WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal mechanical noise

  1. A mechanical-thermal noise analysis of a nonlinear microgyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajimi, S. A. M.; Heppler, G. R.; Abdel-Rahman, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical-thermal noise (MTN) equivalent rotation rate (Ωn) is computed by using the linear approximation of the system response and the nonlinear "slow" system. The slow system, which is obtained using the method of multiple scales, is used to identify the linear single-valued response of the system. The linear estimate of the noise equivalent rate fails as the drive direction stroke increases. It becomes imperative in these conditions to use a more complex nonlinear estimate of the noise equivalent rate developed here for the first time in literature. The proposed design achieves a high performance regarding noise equivalent rotation rate.

  2. Statistical mechanics of influence maximization with thermal noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christopher W.; Lee, Daniel D.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of optimally distributing a budget of influence among individuals in a social network, known as influence maximization, has typically been studied in the context of contagion models and deterministic processes, which fail to capture stochastic interactions inherent in real-world settings. Here, we show that by introducing thermal noise into influence models, the dynamics exactly resemble spins in a heterogeneous Ising system. In this way, influence maximization in the presence of thermal noise has a natural physical interpretation as maximizing the magnetization of an Ising system given a budget of external magnetic field. Using this statistical mechanical formulation, we demonstrate analytically that for small external-field budgets, the optimal influence solutions exhibit a highly non-trivial temperature dependence, focusing on high-degree hub nodes at high temperatures and on easily influenced peripheral nodes at low temperatures. For the general problem, we present a projected gradient ascent algorithm that uses the magnetic susceptibility to calculate locally optimal external-field distributions. We apply our algorithm to synthetic and real-world networks, demonstrating that our analytic results generalize qualitatively. Our work establishes a fruitful connection with statistical mechanics and demonstrates that influence maximization depends crucially on the temperature of the system, a fact that has not been appreciated by existing research.

  3. Thermal and Quantum Mechanical Noise of a Superfluid Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    A potential application of a superfluid gyroscope is for real-time measurements of the small variations in the rotational speed of the Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Such rotational jitter, if not measured and corrected for, will be a limiting factor on the resolution potential of a GPS system. This limitation will prevent many automation concepts in navigation, construction, and biomedical examination from being realized. We present the calculation of thermal and quantum-mechanical phase noise across the Josephson junction of a superfluid gyroscope. This allows us to derive the fundamental limits on the performance of a superfluid gyroscope. We show that the fundamental limit on real-time GPS due to rotational jitter can be reduced to well below 1 millimeter/day. Other limitations and their potential mitigation will also be discussed.

  4. Modified Skvor/Starr approach in the mechanical-thermal noise analysis of condenser microphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Wee; Miao, Jianmin

    2009-11-01

    Simple analytical expressions of mechanical resistance, such as those formulated by Skvor/Starr, are widely used to describe the mechanical-thermal noise performance of a condenser microphone. However, the Skvor/Starr approach does not consider the location effect of acoustic holes in the backplate and overestimates the total equivalent mechanical resistance and mechanical-thermal noise. In this paper, a modified form of the Skvor/Starr approach is proposed to address this hole location dependent effect. A mode shape factor, which consists of the zero order Bessel and modified Bessel functions, is included in Skvor's mechanical resistance formulation to consider the effect of the hole location in the backplate. With reference to two B&K microphones, the theoretical results of the A-weighted mechanical-thermal noise obtained by the modified Skvor/Starr approach are in good agreements with those reported experimental ones.

  5. A study of coating mechanical and optical losses in view of reducing mirror thermal noise in gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaminio, R.; Franc, J.; Michel, C.; Morgado, N.; Pinard, L.; Sassolas, B.

    2010-04-01

    Mirror coatings play a crucial role in the performance of laser interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection such as Virgo and LIGO. Mechanical losses in the coating material limit the sensitivity of the detectors due to the associated mirror thermal noise. The absorption of light in the coating induces a thermal lens in the mirror substrate which reduces the quality of the optical interference and requires sophisticated thermal compensation systems. This paper describes the work ongoing at LMA in order to reduce mechanical losses and optical absorption in the coating. The results obtained by doping Ta2O5 layers and testing different high-index materials are described. Finally the performances of different potential coatings are compared and the results obtained with a 40 kg mirror are reported. Titania doped Ta2O5 shows mechanical losses of 2 × 10-4 and absorption below 0.5 ppm. Nb2O5 appears to be the best competitor from the thermal noise point of view but it has an optical absorption four to five times larger.

  6. Thermal noise estimation in bio-inspired hair flow sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagamseh, A.M.K.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2009-01-01

    In micromachining technology, the reduction in the size of the moving structures has many advantages in different applications. However, these moving structures are subjected to mechanical noise resulting from the molecule agitation. In this abstract, we investigate the thermal-mechanical noise in

  7. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  8. External noise distinguishes attention mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z L; Dosher, B A

    1998-05-01

    We developed and tested a powerful method for identifying and characterizing the effect of attention on performance in visual tasks as due to signal enhancement, distractor exclusion, or internal noise suppression. Based on a noisy Perceptual Template Model (PTM) of a human observer, the method adds increasing amounts of external noise (white gaussian random noise) to the visual stimulus and observes the effect on performance of a perceptual task for attended and unattended stimuli. The three mechanisms of attention yield three "signature" patterns of performance. The general framework for characterizing the mechanisms of attention is used here to investigate the attentional mechanisms in a concurrent location-cued orientation discrimination task. Test stimuli--Gabor patches tilted slightly to the right or left--always appeared on both the left and the right of fixation, and varied independently. Observers were cued on each trial to attend to the left, the right, or evenly to both stimuli, and decide the direction of tilt of both test stimuli. For eight levels of added external noise and three attention conditions (attended, unattended, and equal), subjects' contrast threshold levels were determined. At low levels of external noise, attention affected threshold contrast: threshold contrasts for non-attended stimuli were systematically higher than for equal attention stimuli, which were, in turn, higher than for attended stimuli. Specifically, when the rms contrast of the external noise is below 10%, there is a consistent 17% elevation of contrast threshold from attended to unattended condition across all three subjects. For higher levels of external noise, attention conditions did not affect threshold contrast values at all. These strong results are characteristic of a signal enhancement, or equivalently, an internal additive noise reduction mechanism of attention.

  9. Experimental research on mechanism of phase noise of laser amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Kun; Tang, Xiao-jun; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Coherent combination of multiple laser amplifier is an important technique for high power and high beam quality laser. Laser amplifier uses master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration for narrow bandwidth and high beam quality laser. Then active phase control is used to make multiple laser amplifier phase synchronization for coherent spot in the far field. The center spot is N times brighter than the one of incoherent combination. At present, researchers have used this method to achieve 1.56kW coherent combination of nine fiber lasers and 105kW of seven slab lasers. The phase noise of the laser amplifier is an important factor affecting the coherent combination. There are two key technologies in the coherent combination. The one is fill factor of multiple laser spatial distribution, which determines main lobe energy of coherent spot. And the other is the phase noise of the laser amplifier, which decides stability of the coherent combination. The phase noise of laser amplifier is caused by many factors, mainly thermal disturbance and mechanical vibration. Due to the complexity of the phase noise generation, the research on phase noise is generally concentrated in the qualitative analysis. The phase noise is generally considered the time phase noise. It is phase dithering from variation refractive index by external disturbance. A variety of factors, such as temperature changes, mechanical vibrations, the pump power, affect phase noise. We establish an externally imposed discrete disturbance source on fiber laser amplifier and then analyze above-mentioned factors independently and quantitatively by the method. The experiments demonstrate space phase noise, dithering of beam direction, is simultaneously induced by either mechanical vibration or thermal disturbance. This experiment is significant for understanding mechanism of the phase noise and suppression of phase noise.

  10. Thermal noise reduction and absorption optimization via multimaterial coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Martin, Iain W.; Hough, Jim; Krüger, Christoph; Rowan, Sheila; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Future gravitational wave detectors (GWDs) such as Advanced LIGO upgrades and the Einstein Telescope are planned to operate at cryogenic temperatures using crystalline silicon (cSi) test-mass mirrors at an operation wavelength of 1550 nm. The reduction in temperature in principle provides a direct reduction in coating thermal noise, but the presently used coating stacks which are composed of silica (SiO2) and tantala (Ta2O5) show cryogenic loss peaks which results in less thermal noise improvement than might be expected. Due to low mechanical loss at low temperature amorphous silicon (aSi) is a very promising candidate material for dielectric mirror coatings and could replace Ta2O5. Unfortunately, such an aSi /SiO2 coating is not suitable for use in GWDs due to high optical absorption in aSi coatings. We explore the use of a three material based coating stack. In this multimaterial design the low absorbing Ta2O5 in the outermost coating layers significantly reduces the incident light power, while aSi is used only in the lower bilayers to maintain low optical absorption. Such a coating design would enable a reduction of Brownian thermal noise by 25%. We show experimentally that an optical absorption of only (5.3 ±0.4 ) ppm at 1550 nm should be achievable.

  11. Intrinsic autocorrelation time of picoseconds for thermal noise in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi; Sheng, Nan; Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2014-10-02

    Whether thermal noise is colored or white is of fundamental importance. In conventional theory, thermal noise is usually treated as white noise so that there are no directional transportations in the asymmetrical systems without external inputs, since only the colored fluctuations with appropriate autocorrelation time length can lead to directional transportations in the asymmetrical systems. Here, on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the autocorrelation time length of thermal noise in water is ~10 ps at room temperature, which indicates that thermal noise is not white in the molecular scale while thermal noise can be reasonably assumed as white in macro- and meso-scale systems. The autocorrelation time length of thermal noise is intrinsic, since the value is almost unchanged for different temperature coupling methods. Interestingly, the autocorrelation time of thermal noise is correlated with the lifetime of hydrogen bonds, suggesting that the finite autocorrelation time length of thermal noise mainly comes from the finite lifetime of the interactions between neighboring water molecules.

  12. Thermal Noise Can Facilitate Energy Conversion by Ratchet System?

    OpenAIRE

    Takagi, Fumiko; Hondou, Tsuyoshi

    1999-01-01

    Molecular motors in biological systems are expected to use ambient fluctuation. In a recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 80}, 5251 (1998)], it was showed that the following question was unsolved, ``Can thermal noise facilitate energy conversion by ratchet system?'' We consider it using stochastic energetics, and show that there exist systems where thermal noise helps the energy conversion.

  13. Wideband Low Noise Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Cancellation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2005-01-01

    Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) are commonly used to amplify signals that are too weak for direct processing for example in radio or cable receivers. Traditionally, low noise amplifiers are implemented via tuned amplifiers, exploiting inductors and capacitors in resonating LC-circuits. This can render

  14. Optical Coatings and Thermal Noise in Precision Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Gregory; Bodiya, Timothy P.; DeSalvo, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    1. Theory of thermal noise in optical mirrors Y. Levin; 2. Coating technology S. Chao; 3. Compendium of thermal noises in optical mirrors V. B. Braginsky, M. L. Gorodetsky and S. P. Vyatchanin; 4. Coating thermal noise I. Martin and S. Reid; 5. Direct measurements of coating thermal noise K. Numata; 6. Methods of improving thermal noise S. Ballmer and K. Somiya; 7. Substrate thermal noise S. Rowan and I. Martin; 8. Cryogenics K. Numata and K. Yamamoto; 9. Thermo-optic noise M. Evans and G. Ogin; 10. Absorption and thermal issues P. Willems, D. Ottaway and P. Beyersdorf; 11. Optical scatter J. R. Smith and M. E. Zucker; 12. Reflectivity and thickness optimisation I. M. Pinto, M. Principe and R. DeSalvo; 13. Beam shaping A. Freise; 14. Gravitational wave detection D. Ottaway and S. D. Penn; 15. High-precision laser stabilisation via optical cavities M. J. Martin and J. Ye; 16. Quantum optomechanics G. D. Cole and M. Aspelmeyer; 17. Cavity quantum electrodynamics T. E. Northup.

  15. Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Canceling: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, F.; Stroet, P.M.; Stroet, Peter; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    Wide-band LNAs suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the technique and

  16. Thermal Noise Canceling in LNAs: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Bram; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, F.

    2004-01-01

    Most wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the

  17. Extra phase noise from thermal fluctuations in nonlinear optical crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    César, J. E. S.; Coelho, A.S.; Cassemiro, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    We show theoretically and experimentally that scattered light by thermal phonons inside a second-order nonlinear crystal is the source of additional phase noise observed in optical parametric oscillators. This additional phase noise reduces the quantum correlations and has hitherto hindered the d...

  18. Vibrational and thermal noise reduction for cryogenic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirro, S. E-mail: stefano.pirro@lngs.infn.it; Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Coccia, E.; Fiorini, E.; Fafone, V.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Vanzini, M.; Zanotti, L

    2000-04-07

    In this paper we present the excellent results obtained by mechanical decoupling of our thermal detectors from the cryostat. The starting point of this work is the necessity to improve the performances of thermal detectors and, besides, to eliminate the non-constant noise resulting from the overall cryogenic facility; this second point results to be crucial for rare-events experiments and the fundamental task for Dark Matter search. Tested on our bolometer, consisting of a 750 g tellurium oxide absorber coupled with an NTD thermistor and operated at {approx}9 mK in an Oxford 200 dilution refrigerator, this powerful technique can, moreover, provide advantages for a large variety of thermal detectors. A good energy resolution of 3.9 keV FWHM was obtained for 2.615 MeV {gamma}-rays. The 4.2 keV average FWHM resolution for the 5407 keV {sup 210}Po {alpha} decay line is the best ever obtained for {alpha}-particles with any type of detector.

  19. Vibrational and thermal noise reduction for cryogenic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirro, S.; Alessandrello, A.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Coccia, E.; Fiorini, E.; Fafone, V.; Giuliani, A.; Nucciotti, A.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Previtali, E.; Vanzini, M.; Zanotti, L.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper we present the excellent results obtained by mechanical decoupling of our thermal detectors from the cryostat. The starting point of this work is the necessity to improve the performances of thermal detectors and, besides, to eliminate the non-constant noise resulting from the overall cryogenic facility; this second point results to be crucial for rare-events experiments and the fundamental task for Dark Matter search. Tested on our bolometer, consisting of a 750 g tellurium oxide absorber coupled with an NTD thermistor and operated at ˜9 mK in an Oxford 200 dilution refrigerator, this powerful technique can, moreover, provide advantages for a large variety of thermal detectors. A good energy resolution of 3.9 keV FWHM was obtained for 2.615 MeV γ-rays. The 4.2 keV average FWHM resolution for the 5407 keV 210Po α decay line is the best ever obtained for α-particles with any type of detector.

  20. Period doubling induced by thermal noise amplification in genetic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruocco, G.; Fratalocchi, A.

    2014-11-01

    Rhythms of life are dictated by oscillations, which take place in a wide rage of biological scales. In bacteria, for example, oscillations have been proven to control many fundamental processes, ranging from gene expression to cell divisions. In genetic circuits, oscillations originate from elemental block such as autorepressors and toggle switches, which produce robust and noise-free cycles with well defined frequency. In some circumstances, the oscillation period of biological functions may double, thus generating bistable behaviors whose ultimate origin is at the basis of intense investigations. Motivated by brain studies, we here study an ``elemental'' genetic circuit, where a simple nonlinear process interacts with a noisy environment. In the proposed system, nonlinearity naturally arises from the mechanism of cooperative stability, which regulates the concentration of a protein produced during a transcription process. In this elemental model, bistability results from the coherent amplification of environmental fluctuations due to a stochastic resonance of nonlinear origin. This suggests that the period doubling observed in many biological functions might result from the intrinsic interplay between nonlinearity and thermal noise.

  1. Period doubling induced by thermal noise amplification in genetic circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ruocco, G.

    2014-11-18

    Rhythms of life are dictated by oscillations, which take place in a wide rage of biological scales. In bacteria, for example, oscillations have been proven to control many fundamental processes, ranging from gene expression to cell divisions. In genetic circuits, oscillations originate from elemental block such as autorepressors and toggle switches, which produce robust and noise-free cycles with well defined frequency. In some circumstances, the oscillation period of biological functions may double, thus generating bistable behaviors whose ultimate origin is at the basis of intense investigations. Motivated by brain studies, we here study an “elemental” genetic circuit, where a simple nonlinear process interacts with a noisy environment. In the proposed system, nonlinearity naturally arises from the mechanism of cooperative stability, which regulates the concentration of a protein produced during a transcription process. In this elemental model, bistability results from the coherent amplification of environmental fluctuations due to a stochastic resonance of nonlinear origin. This suggests that the period doubling observed in many biological functions might result from the intrinsic interplay between nonlinearity and thermal noise.

  2. Determination of the Thermal Noise Limit of Graphene Biotransistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosser, Michael S; Brown, Morgan A; McEuen, Paul L; Minot, Ethan D

    2015-08-12

    To determine the thermal noise limit of graphene biotransistors, we have measured the complex impedance between the basal plane of single-layer graphene and an aqueous electrolyte. The impedance is dominated by an imaginary component but has a finite real component. Invoking the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we determine the power spectral density of thermally driven voltage fluctuations at the graphene/electrolyte interface. The fluctuations have 1/f(p) dependence, with p = 0.75-0.85, and the magnitude of fluctuations scales inversely with area. Our results explain noise spectra previously measured in liquid-gated suspended graphene devices and provide realistic targets for future device performance.

  3. Phase-field model of dendritic sidebranching with thermal noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A. [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Rappel, W. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    1999-10-01

    We investigate dendritic sidebranching during crystal growth in an undercooled melt by simulation of a phase-field model which incorporates thermal noise of microscopic origin. As a nontrivial quantitative test of this model, we first show that the simulated fluctuation spectrum of a one-dimensional interface in thermal equilibrium agrees with the exact sharp-interface spectrum up to an irrelevant short-wavelength cutoff comparable to the interface thickness. Simulations of dendritic growth are then carried out in two dimensions to compute sidebranching characteristics (root-mean-square amplitude and sidebranch spacing) as a function of distance behind the tip. These quantities are compared quantitatively to the predictions of the existing linear WKB theory of noise amplification. The extension of this study to three dimensions remains needed to determine the origin of noise in experiments. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Quasi-thermal noise and shot noise spectroscopy on a CubeSat in Earth's ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Ronald; Cairns, Iver H.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the practicality of using quasi-thermal noise (QTN) and shot noise spectroscopy on a CubeSat in the Earth's ionosphere and constrain the satellite antenna length for optimal detection of these signals. The voltage spectra predicted for thermal Langmuir waves (QTN) and particle "shot noise" are modeled, and it is shown that the signals detected can provide two very good, independent, passive, in situ methods of measuring the plasma density and temperature in the ionosphere. The impact of the antenna potential ϕ is also discussed, and we show that the negative potential calculated for the ionosphere due to natural current flows has a significant impact on the voltage power level of the shot noise spectrum. The antenna configuration is also shown to play an important role in the shot noise, with a monopole configuration enhancing the spectrum significantly compared with a dipole. Antenna lengths on the order of 20-40 cm are found to be ideal for ionospheric plasma conditions, nicely matching CubeSat sizes and producing detectable thermal Langmuir waves and shot noise at the microvolt level. Further, with a continuous stream of data points at different latitudes and longitudes an orbiting CubeSat can produce a global picture for the ionospheric plasma density and temperature using QTN and shot noise signals. If implemented, especially in a constellation, these data would be more frequent and cover a much greater domain than current ground-based or single-satellite methods. This could lead to improved ionospheric models, such as the empirically based International Reference Ionosphere.

  5. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  6. Suspension-thermal noise in spring–antispring systems for future gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan; Mow-Lowry, Conor M.

    2018-01-01

    Spring–antispring systems have been investigated in the context of low-frequency seismic isolation in high-precision optical experiments. These systems provide the possibility to tune the fundamental resonance frequency to, in principle, arbitrarily low values, and at the same time maintain a compact design. It was argued though that thermal noise in spring–antispring systems would not be as small as one may naively expect from lowering the fundamental resonance frequency. In this paper, we present calculations of suspension-thermal noise for spring–antispring systems potentially relevant in future gravitational-wave detectors, i.e. the beam-balance tiltmeter, and the Roberts linkage. We find a concise expression of the suspension-thermal noise spectrum, which assumes a form very similar to the well-known expression for a simple pendulum. For systems such as the Roberts linkage foreseen as passive seismic isolation, we find that while they can provide strong seismic isolation due to a very low fundamental resonance frequency, their thermal noise is determined by the dimension of the system and is insensitive to fine-tunings of the geometry that can strongly influence the resonance frequency. By analogy, i.e. formal similarity of the equations of motion, this is true for all horizontal mechanical isolation systems with spring–antispring dynamics. This imposes strict requirements on mechanical spring–antispring systems for seismic isolation in potential future low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors as we discuss for the four main concepts, atom-interferometric, superconducting, torsion-bars, and conventional laser interferometer, and generally suggests that thermal noise needs to be evaluated carefully for high-precision experiments implementing spring–antispring dynamics.

  7. Living Organisms Coupling to Electromagnetic Radiation Below Thermal Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Freund, Friedemann

    2013-04-01

    Ultralow frequency (ULF) and extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic (EM) radiation is part of the natural environment. Prior to major earthquakes the local ULF and global ELF radiation field is often markedly perturbed. This has detrimental effects on living organisms. We are studying the mechanism of these effects on the biochemical, cellular and organismal levels. The transfer of electrons along the Electron Transfer Chain (ETC) controls the universal reduction-oxidation reactions that are essential for fundamental biochemical processes in living cells. In order for these processes to work properly, the ETC has to maintain some form of synchronization, or coherence with all biochemical reactions in the living cells, including energy production, RNA transcription, and DNA replication. As a consequence of this synchronization, harmful chemical conflict between the reductive and the oxidative partial reactions can be minimized or avoided. At the same time we note that the synchronization allows for a transfer of energy, coherent or interfering, via coupling to the natural ambient EM field. Extremely weak high frequency EM fields, well below the thermal noise level, tuned in frequency to the electron spins of certain steps in the ETC, have already been shown to cause aberrant cell growth and disorientation among plants and animals with respect to the magnetic and gravity vectors. We investigate EM fields over a much wider frequency range, including ULF known to be generated deep in the Earth prior to major earthquakes locally, and ELF known to be fed by lightning discharges, traveling around the globe in the cavity formed between the Earth's surface and the ionosphere. This ULF/ELF radiation can control the timing of the biochemical redox cycle and thereby have a universal effect on physiology of organisms. The timing can even have a detrimental influence, via increased oxidative damage, on the DNA replication, which controls heredity.

  8. Modeling of the Simultaneous Influence of the Thermal Noise and the Phase Noise in Space Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Baran

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Our work deals with studies of a noise behavior in space communication systems. Two most important noise types the additive thermal noise and the multiplicative phase noise, respectively, are included. A simple model of the narrowband communication system is created and simulated in the Ansoft Designer system simulator. The additive thermal noise is modeled as AWGN in a communication channel. The phase noise is produced in transmitter and receiver oscillators. The main intention is to investigate the receiver filter bandwidth decrease effect on powers of both noise types. Results proposed in this paper show that for defined system conditions and for a certain filter bandwidth value, the power of the multiplicative phase noise equals to the additive thermal noise power. Another decrease of the filter bandwidth causes the phase noise power exceeding. To demonstrate the noise behavior transparently, input system parameters are properly selected. All simulation results are documented by theoretical calculations. Simulation outcomes express a good coincidence with presumptions and calculations.

  9. Effect of thermal-treatment sequence on sound absorbing and mechanical properties of porous sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chen-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent rapid commercial and industrial development, mechanical equipment is supplemented massively in the factory and thus mechanical operation causes noise which distresses living at home. In livelihood, neighborhood, transportation equipment, jobsite construction noises impact on quality of life not only factory noise. This study aims to preparation technique and property evaluation of porous sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites. Hollow three-dimensional crimp PET fibers blended with low-melting PET fibers were fabricated into hollow PET/low-melting PET nonwoven after opening, blending, carding, lapping and needle-bonding process. Then, hollow PET/low-melting PET nonwovens were laminated into sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites by changing sequence of needle-bonding and thermal-treatment. The optimal thermal-treated sequence was found by tensile strength, tearing strength, sound-absorbing coefficient and thermal conductivity coefficient tests of porous composites.

  10. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  11. Low frequency noise sources and mechanisms in semiconductor nanowire transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delker, Collin James

    Semiconductor nanowires are attractive candidates for use in future high-speed electronics, transparent/flexible devices, and chemical sensors. Among other materials, III-V semiconductors have gained considerable interest for their high bulk mobility and low band gap, making them promising for high-speed nanoscale devices. However, nanowire devices also exhibit high levels of low-frequency noise due to their low band gap and high surface-to-volume ratio. The sources and mechanisms of this noise must be understood and controlled in order to realize practical applications of nanowire electronics. This work seeks to understand the underlying noise mechanisms of nanowire transistors in order discover ways to reduce noise levels. It also demonstrates how noise can provide a spectroscopy for analyzing device quality. Most traditional noise studies tend to apply standard MOSFET models to nanowire noise and transport, which lump together all possible independent noise sources in a nanowire, ignoring effects of the contacts or multiple gates, and could lead to misestimation of the noise figures for a device. This work demonstrates how noise in a nanowire transistor can stem from the channel, ungated access regions, metal- semiconductor contacts, and tunnel barriers, all independently adding to the total noise. Each source of noise can contribute and may dominate the overall noise behavior under certain bias regimes and temperatures, as demonstrated in this work through various device structures and measurements. For example, the contacts can influence noise even below the threshold voltage under certain conditions, emphasizing the need for high-quality metal-semiconductor interface technology.

  12. Quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy: The art and the practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Vernet, N.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.

    2017-08-01

    Quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy is an efficient tool for measuring in situ macroscopic plasma properties in space, using a passive wave receiver at the ports of an electric antenna. This technique was pioneered on spinning spacecraft carrying very long dipole antennas in the interplanetary medium—like ISEE-3 and Ulysses—whose geometry approached a "theoretician's dream." The technique has been extended to other instruments in various types of plasmas on board different spacecraft and will be implemented on several missions in the near future. Such extensions require different theoretical modelizations, involving magnetized, drifting, or dusty plasmas with various particle velocity distributions and antennas being shorter, biased, or made of unequal wires. We give new analytical approximations of the plasma quasi-thermal noise (QTN) and study how the constraints of the real world in space can (or cannot) be compatible with plasma detection by QTN spectroscopy. We consider applications to the missions Wind, Cassini, BepiColombo, Solar Orbiter, and Parker Solar Probe.

  13. Soft Thermal Sensor with Mechanical Adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Qi, Dianpeng; Liu, Zhiyuan; Chandran, Bevita K; Wang, Ting; Yu, Jiancan; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    A soft thermal sensor with mechanical adaptability is fabricated by the combination of single-wall carbon nanotubes with carboxyl groups and self-healing polymers. This study demonstrates that this soft sensor has excellent thermal response and mechanical adaptability. It shows tremendous promise for improving the service life of soft artificial-intelligence robots and protecting thermally sensitive electronics from the risk of damage by high temperature. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Probing quantum and thermal noise in an interacting many-body system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofferberth, S.; Lesanovsky, Igor; Schumm, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    of the shot-to-shot variations of interference-fringe contrast for pairs of independently created one-dimensional Bose condensates. Analysing different system sizes, we observe the crossover from thermal to quantum noise, reflected in a characteristic change in the distribution functions from poissonian......The probabilistic character of the measurement process is one of the most puzzling and fascinating aspects of quantum mechanics. In many-body systems quantum-mechanical noise reveals non-local correlations of the underlying many-body states. Here, we provide a complete experimental analysis...... to Gumbel type, in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions on the basis of the Luttinger-liquid formalism. We present the first experimental observation of quasi-long-range order in one-dimensional atomic condensates, which is a hallmark of quantum fluctuations in one-dimensional systems...

  15. Electrostatic thermal noise in a weakly ionized collisional plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinović, M. M.; Zaslavsky, A.; Maksimović, M.; Å egan, S.

    2017-01-01

    Quasi-thermal noise (QTN) spectroscopy is a plasma diagnostic technique which enables precise measurements of local electron velocity distribution function moments. This technique is based on measurements and analysis of voltage fluctuations at the antenna terminals, induced by thermal motion of charged particles. In this work, we accommodate, for the first time, this technique to weakly ionized collisional plasmas. It turns out that the QTN spectrum is modified both at low frequencies, increasing the level of power spectrum, and around the plasma frequency, where collisions damp the plasma oscillations and therefore broaden and reduce the amplitude of so called "plasma peak," while the spectrum at high frequencies is nearly unmodified compared to the collisionless case. Based on these results, we show that QTN spectroscopy enables independent measurements of the collision frequency, electron density, and temperature, provided the ratio of collision frequency to plasma frequency is ν/ωp˜0.1. The method presented here can be used for precise estimation of plasma parameters in laboratory devices and unmagnetized ionospheres, while application in the ionosphere of Earth is possible but limited to small, low-frequency range due to magnetic field influence.

  16. Numerically modeling Brownian thermal noise in amorphous and crystalline thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey; Demos, Nicholas; Khan, Haroon

    2018-01-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be one of the noise sources limiting the astrophysical reach of Advanced LIGO (once commissioning is complete) and third-generation detectors. Adopting crystalline materials for thin, reflecting mirror coatings, rather than the amorphous coatings used in current-generation detectors, could potentially reduce thermal noise. Understanding and reducing thermal noise requires accurate theoretical models, but modeling thermal noise analytically is especially challenging with crystalline materials. Thermal noise models typically rely on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates the power spectral density of the thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. In this paper, we present results from a new, open-source tool that numerically solves the auxiliary elastic problem to compute the Brownian thermal noise for both amorphous and crystalline coatings. We employ the open-source deal.ii and PETSc frameworks to solve the auxiliary elastic problem using a finite-element method, adaptive mesh refinement, and parallel processing that enables us to use high resolutions capable of resolving the thin reflective coating. We verify numerical convergence, and by running on up to hundreds of compute cores, we resolve the coating elastic energy in the auxiliary problem to approximately 0.1%. We compare with approximate analytic solutions for amorphous materials, and we verify that our solutions scale as expected with changing beam size, mirror dimensions, and coating thickness. Finally, we model the crystalline coating thermal noise in an experiment reported by Cole et al (2013 Nat. Photon. 7 644–50), comparing our results to a simpler numerical calculation that treats the coating as an ‘effectively amorphous’ material. We find that treating the coating as a cubic crystal instead of as an effectively amorphous material increases the thermal noise by about 3%. Our results are a step toward better understanding and reducing thermal noise to

  17. Characterization of thermal transport in one-dimensional microstructures using Johnson noise electro-thermal technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-06-01

    This work reports on the development of a Johnson noise electro-thermal (JET) technique to directly characterize the thermal conductivity of one-dimensional micro-/nanoscale materials. In this technique, the to-be-measured micro-/nanoscale sample is connected between two electrodes and is subjected to steady-state Joule heating. The average temperature rise of the sample is evaluated by simultaneously measuring the Johnson noise over it and its electrical resistance. The system's Johnson noise measurement accuracy is evaluated by measuring the Boltzmann constant ( k B). Our measured k B value (1.375 × 10-23 J/K) agrees very well with the reference value of 1.381 × 10-23 J/K. The temperature measurement accuracy based on Johnson noise is studied against the resistance temperature detector method, and sound agreement (4 %) is obtained. The thermal conductivity of a glass fiber with a diameter of 8.82 μm is measured using the JET technique. The measured value 1.20 W/m K agrees well with the result using a standard technique in our laboratory. The JET technique provides a very compelling way to characterize the thermophysical properties of micro-/nanoscale materials without calibrating the sample's resistance-temperature coefficient, thereby eliminating the effect of resistance drift/change during measurement and calibration. Since JET technique does not require resistance-temperature correlation, it is also applicable to semi-conductive materials which usually have a nonlinear I- V relation.

  18. Ultra-low noise mechanically cooled germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, P., E-mail: pjbarton@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Amman, M.; Martin, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Vetter, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-11

    Low capacitance, large volume, high purity germanium (HPGe) radiation detectors have been successfully employed in low-background physics experiments. However, some physical processes may not be detectable with existing detectors whose energy thresholds are limited by electronic noise. In this paper, methods are presented which can lower the electronic noise of these detectors. Through ultra-low vibration mechanical cooling and wire bonding of a CMOS charge sensitive preamplifier to a sub-pF p-type point contact HPGe detector, we demonstrate electronic noise levels below 40 eV-FWHM.

  19. Waste energy harvesting mechanical and thermal energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ling Bing, Kong; Hng, Huey Hoon; Boey, Freddy; Zhang, Tianshu

    2014-01-01

    Waste Energy Harvesting overviews the latest progress in waste energy harvesting technologies, with specific focusing on waste thermal mechanical energies. Thermal energy harvesting technologies include thermoelectric effect, storage through phase change materials and pyroelectric effect. Waste mechanical energy harvesting technologies include piezoelectric (ferroelectric) effect with ferroelectric materials and nanogenerators. The book aims to strengthen the syllabus in energy, materials and physics and is well suitable for students and professionals in the fields.

  20. Resistance noise spectroscopy across the thermally and electrically driven metal-insulator transitions in VO2 nanobeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaqqa, Ali; Kilcoyne, Colin; Singh, Sujay; Horrocks, Gregory; Marley, Peter; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Sambandamurthy, G.

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a strongly correlated material that exhibits a sharp thermally driven metal-insulator transition at Tc ~ 340 K. The transition can also be triggered by a DC voltage in the insulating phase with a threshold (Vth) behavior. The mechanisms behind these transitions are hotly discussed and resistance noise spectroscopy is a suitable tool to delineate different transport mechanisms in correlated systems. We present results from a systematic study of the low frequency (1 mHz noise behavior in VO2 nanobeams across the thermally and electrically driven transitions. In the thermal transition, the power spectral density (PSD) of the resistance noise is unchanged as we approach Tc from 300 K and an abrupt drop in the magnitude is seen above Tc and it remains unchanged till 400 K. However, the noise behavior in the electrically driven case is distinctly different: as the voltage is ramped from zero, the PSD gradually increases by an order of magnitude before reaching Vth and an abrupt increase is seen at Vth. The noise magnitude decreases above Vth, approaching the V = 0 value. The individual roles of percolation, Joule heating and signatures of correlated behavior will be discussed. This work is supported by NSF DMR 0847324.

  1. Cross-spectrum Measurement of Thermal-noise Limited Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Hati, Archita; Nelson, Craig W.; Howe, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Cross-spectrum analysis is a commonly-used technique for the detection of phase and amplitude noise of a signal in the presence of interfering noise. It extracts the desired correlated noise from two time series in the presence of uncorrelated interfering noise. Recently, we demonstrated that the phase-inversion (anti-correlation) effect due to AM noise leakage can cause complete or partial collapse of the cross-spectral function. In this paper, we discuss the newly discovered effect of anti-...

  2. Shot Noise Thermometry for Thermal Characterization of Templated Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sayer, Robert A; Kim, Sunkook; Franklin, Aaron D; Mohammadi, Saeed; Fisher, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) thermometer that operates on the principles of electrical shot noise is reported. Shot noise thermometry is a self-calibrating measurement technique that relates statistical fluctuations in dc current across a device to temperature. A structure consisting of vertical, top, and bottom-contacted single-walled carbon nanotubes in a porous anodic alumina template was fabricated and used to measure shot noise. Frequencies between 60 and 100 kHz were observed to preclude sig...

  3. Mechanical monolithic sensor for low-frequency seismic noise measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acernese, Fausto; De Rosa, Rosario; Giordano, Gerardo; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2007-04-01

    This paper describes a new low-frequency seismic sensor for geophysical applications. The instrument is basically a monolithic tunable folded pendulum with an interferometric readout system, that can be configured as seismometer or as accelerometer. The monolithic mechanical design and the introduction of a laser interferometric technique for the readout implementation make it a very sensitive and compact instrument with a very good immunity to environmental noises. The theoretical sensitivity curve is calculated considering the brownian noise, the readout noise and the data acquisition noise. Preliminary tests on the mechanical performances of the monolithic structure and on the optical readout have been performed. Interesting result is the measured resonant frequency of the instrument of ~ 150mHz obtained with a rough tuning, demonstrating the feasibility of a resonant frequency of the order of 5mHz with a more refined tuning. The transfer function of the folded pendulum in open loop configuration is calculated measuring the resonant frequency and the quality factor for several step responses. Then a PID controller is added to implement the closed loop configuration. The mechanics of the seismic sensor, the optical scheme of the readout system, the theoretical predictions and the preliminary experimental performances as accelerometer are discussed in detail, together with the foreseen further improvements.

  4. Zero Thermal Noise in Resistors at Zero Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2016-06-01

    The bandwidth of transistors in logic devices approaches the quantum limit, where Johnson noise and associated error rates are supposed to be strongly enhanced. However, the related theory — asserting a temperature-independent quantum zero-point (ZP) contribution to Johnson noise, which dominates the quantum regime — is controversial and resolution of the controversy is essential to determine the real error rate and fundamental energy dissipation limits of logic gates in the quantum limit. The Callen-Welton formula (fluctuation-dissipation theorem) of voltage and current noise for a resistance is the sum of Nyquist’s classical Johnson noise equation and a quantum ZP term with a power density spectrum proportional to frequency and independent of temperature. The classical Johnson-Nyquist formula vanishes at the approach of zero temperature, but the quantum ZP term still predicts non-zero noise voltage and current. Here, we show that this noise cannot be reconciled with the Fermi-Dirac distribution, which defines the thermodynamics of electrons according to quantum-statistical physics. Consequently, Johnson noise must be nil at zero temperature, and non-zero noise found for certain experimental arrangements may be a measurement artifact, such as the one mentioned in Kleen’s uncertainty relation argument.

  5. Mechanism of thermal toluene autoxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Ive; Peeters, Jozef; Vereecken, Luc; Jacobs, Pierre A

    2007-12-21

    Aerobic oxidation of toluene (PhCH3) is investigated by complementary experimental and theoretical methodologies. Whereas the reaction of the chain-carrying benzylperoxyl radicals with the substrate produces predominantly benzyl hydroperoxide, benzyl alcohol and benzaldehyde originate mainly from subsequent propagation of the hydroperoxide product. Nevertheless, a significant fraction of benzaldehyde is also produced in primary PhCH3 propagation, presumably via proton rather than hydrogen transfer. An equimolar amount of benzyl alcohol, together with benzoic acid, is additionally produced in the tertiary propagation of PhCHO with benzylperoxyl radicals. The "hot" oxy radicals generated in this step can also abstract aromatic hydrogen atoms from PhCH3, and this results in production of cresols, known inhibitors of radical-chain reactions. The very fast benzyl peroxyl-initiated co-oxidation of benzyl alcohol generates HO2* radicals, along with benzaldehyde. This reaction also causes a decrease in the overall oxidation rate, due to the fast chain-terminating reaction of HO2*with the benzylperoxyl radicals, which causes a loss of chain carriers. Moreover, due to the fast equilibrium PhCH2OOH+HO2* right harpoon over left harpoonPhCH2OO* + H2O2, and the much lower reactivity of H2O2 compared to PhCH2OOH, the fast co-oxidation of the alcohol means that HO2* gradually takes over the role of benzylperoxyl as principal chain carrier. This drastically changes the autoxidation mechanism and, among other things, causes a sharp decrease in the hydroperoxide yield.

  6. Deployment Mechanism for Thermal Pointing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koski, Kraig

    2014-01-01

    The Deployment Mechanism for the Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor (TSIS) is responsible for bringing the Thermal Pointing System (TPS) from its stowed, launch locked position to the on-orbit deployed, operational position. The Deployment Mechanism also provides structural support for the TSIS optical bench and two-axis gimbal. An engineering model of the Deployment Mechanism has been environmentally qualified and life tested. This paper will give an overview of the TSIS mission and then describe the development, design, and testing of the Deployment Mechanism.

  7. Thermal integrity in mechanics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Shorr, Boris F

    2015-01-01

    The book is targeted at engineers, university lecturers, postgraduates, and final year undergraduate students involved in computational modelling and experimental and theoretical analysis of the high-temperature behavior of engineering structures. It will also be of interest to researchers developing the thermal strength theory as a branch of continuum mechanics. Thermal integrity is a multidisciplinary field combining the expertise of mechanical engineers, material scientists and applied mathematicians, each approaching the problem from their specific viewpoint. This monograph draws on the research of a broad scientific community including the author’s contribution. The scope of thermal strength analysis was considerably extended thanks to modern computers and the implementation of FEM codes. However, the author believes that some material models adopted in the advanced high-performance software, are not sufficiently justificated due to lack of easy-to-follow books on the theoretical and experimental aspec...

  8. Thermalized solutions, statistical mechanics and turbulence: An ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermalized solutions, statistical mechanics and turbulence only for an interval of time O(KG. −2/3). By using arguments of phase mixing, we can see that coherent structures can happen only at spatial points where the fluid velocity differs from the resonance velocity (the velocity of the shock) by an amount v such that v ≲.

  9. Thermalized solutions, statistical mechanics and turbulence: An ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-20

    Feb 20, 2015 ... In this study, we examine the intriguing connection between turbulence and equilibrium statistical mechanics. There are several recent works which emphasize this connection. Thus in the last few years, the first manifestations of the thermalization, predicted by T D Lee in 1952, was seen and a theoretical ...

  10. Efficient thermal noise removal of Sentinel-1 image and its impacts on sea ice applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong-Won; Korosov, Anton; Babiker, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Wide swath SAR observation from several spaceborne SAR missions played an important role in studying sea ice in the polar region. Sentinel 1A and 1B are producing dual-polarization observation data with the highest temporal resolution ever. For a proper use of dense time-series, radiometric properties must be qualified. Thermal noise is often neglected in many sea ice applications, but is impacting seriously the utility of dual-polarization SAR data. Sentinel-1 TOPSAR image intensity is disturbed by additive thermal noise particularly in cross-polarization channel. Although ESA provides calibrated noise vectors for noise power subtraction, residual noise contribution is significant considering relatively narrow backscattering distribution of cross-polarization channel. In this study, we investigate the noise characteristics and propose an efficient method for noise reduction based on three types of correction: azimuth de-scalloping, noise scaling, and inter-swath power balancing. The core idea is to find optimum correction coefficients resulting in the most noise-uncorrelated gentle backscatter profile over homogeneous region and to combine them with scalloping gain for reconstruction of complete two-dimensional noise field. Denoising is accomplished by subtracting the reconstructed noise field from the original image. The resulting correction coefficients determined by extensive experiments showed different noise characteristics for different Instrument Processing Facility (IPF) versions of Level 1 product generation. Even after thermal noise subtraction, the image still suffers from residual noise, which distorts local statistics. Since this residual noise depends on local signal-to-noise ratio, it can be compensated by variance normalization with coefficients determined from an empirical model. Denoising improved not only visual interpretability but also performances in SAR intensity-based sea ice applications. Results from two applications showed the

  11. A new simple method for analysing of thermal noise in switched-capacitor filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtian, Mohammad; Afshin Hemmatyar, Ali Mohammad; Hashemipour, Omid

    2012-12-01

    Thermal noise is one of the most important challenges in analogue integrated circuits design. This problem is more crucial in switched-capacitor (SC) filters due to the aliasing effect of wide-band thermal noise. In this article, a new simple method is proposed for estimating the power spectrum density of output thermal noise in SC filters, which have acceptable accuracy and short running time. In the proposed method, first using HSPICE simulator, accurate value of accumulated sampled noise on sampler capacitors in each clock state is achieved. Next, using difference equations of the SC filter, frequency response of the SC filter is shaped by time domain analysis. Based on the proposed method, a SC low-pass filter and a second-order SC band-pass filter are analysed. The results are validated by comparing to the previously measured data.

  12. Noise-based approximation to thermal spin-injection in Fe/GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, T.; Haigh, J. A.; Olejník, K.; Irvine, A. C.; Novák, V.; Wunderlich, J.

    2017-10-01

    We analyze the prospects for thermal spin-injection from iron into gallium arsenide via the application of electrical noise. By estimating the applied effective temperature-equivalent gradients, we characterize the magnitude of any electrical part of the thermal spin-injection efficiency or the spin-dependent Seebeck effect. The magnitude of the non-local spin signal associated with this effect suggests that temperature differences on the order of ˜100 K would be needed for true thermal spin-injection experiments. The large size of the effective temperature gradients induced by the noise-based method means that even very small thermo-electric effects can be quantified.

  13. Switching fixed skyrmions with electrical field in the presence of thermal noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Dhritiman; Al-Rashid, Md Mamun; Atulasimha, Jayasimha

    Switching deterministically and reliably between core pointing up and core pointing down states of magnetic skyrmions could lead to an energy efficient paradigm for the realization of nanomagnetic memory. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a ferromagnet/oxide interface can be modulated by employing an electric field and thereby cause core reversal of magnetic skyrmions with an electric field without needing a magnetic field or spin current. Furthermore, in devices that are switched with spin current, voltage control of magnetic anisotropy can reduce the critical current density required for such a reversal. However, switching probability (error) in the presence of thermal noise in these reversal mechanisms is key to their performance. Here, we present stochastic magnetization dynamics simulations to establish switching error at room temperature, how it is impacted by intermediate magnetic states visited and interface properties (i.e. PMA and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction). This work is supported by NSF under Career Grant CCF-1253370.

  14. A review of the combined effects of thermal and noise conditions on human performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, Richard A.; Wang, Lily M.; Musser, Amy

    2004-05-01

    Human perception and annoyance due to background noise has been the subject of much research. A great deal of work has also been done to identify conditions that produce an acceptable thermal environment for building occupants. The experience of occupants in indoor environments, however, is much more complex than can be represented by thermal comfort or the acoustic environment in isolation. Occupants normally experience a mix of thermal, auditory, visual, and olfactory stimuli that combines to form an impression of the environment. This paper is specifically interested in how building occupants trade off between acoustic and thermal comfort. Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems in buildings are often adjusted by building users to arrive at a more comfortable temperature, but this change may also produce more noise. Previous studies on the interaction effects between temperature and noise on human performance are reviewed in this presentation, followed by a discussion of the authors' current work in this area.

  15. Quantum mechanical evolution towards thermal equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Linden, Noah; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J.; Winter, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The circumstances under which a system reaches thermal equilibrium, and how to derive this from basic dynamical laws, has been a major question from the very beginning of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Despite considerable progress, it remains an open problem. Motivated by this issue, we address the more general question of equilibration. We prove, with virtually full generality, that reaching equilibrium is a universal property of quantum systems: Almost any subsystem in interacti...

  16. Observational limitations of Bose-Einstein photon statistics and radiation noise in thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.-J.; Talghader, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    For many decades, theory has predicted that Bose-Einstein statistics are a fundamental feature of thermal emission into one or a few optical modes; however, the resulting Bose-Einstein-like photon noise has never been experimentally observed. There are at least two reasons for this: (1) Relationships to describe the thermal radiation noise for an arbitrary mode structure have yet to be set forth, and (2) the mode and detector constraints necessary for the detection of such light is extremely hard to fulfill. Herein, photon statistics and radiation noise relationships are developed for systems with any number of modes and couplings to an observing space. The results are shown to reproduce existing special cases of thermal emission and are then applied to resonator systems to discuss physically realizable conditions under which Bose-Einstein-like thermal statistics might be observed. Examples include a single isolated cavity and an emitter cavity coupled to a small detector space. Low-mode-number noise theory shows major deviations from solely Bose-Einstein or Poisson treatments and has particular significance because of recent advances in perfect absorption and subwavelength structures both in the long-wave infrared and terahertz regimes. These microresonator devices tend to utilize a small volume with few modes, a regime where the current theory of thermal emission fluctuations and background noise, which was developed decades ago for free-space or single-mode cavities, has no derived solutions.

  17. Mechanical and Thermal Characterization of Silica Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Anthony Lamar

    Polymer nanocomposites are a class of materials containing nanoparticles with a large interfacial surface area. Only a small quantity of nanoparticles are needed to provide superior multifunctional properties; such as mechanical, thermal, electrical, and moisture absorption properties in polymers. Nanoparticles tend to agglomerate, so special techniques are required for homogeneous distribution. Nanosilica is now readily available as colloidal sols, for example; Nanopox RTM F400 (supplied by Evonik Nanoresins AG, Germany). The nanoparticles are first synthesized from aqueous sodium silicate solution, and then undergo a surface modification process with organosilane and matrix exchange. F400 contains 40%wt silica nanoparticles colloidally dispersed in a DGEBA epoxy resin. The mean particle diameter is about 20 nm with a narrow distribution range of about 5 to 35 nm. The objectives of this study are to develop a reproducible processing method for nanosilica enhanced resin systems used in the manufacturing of fiber reinforced composites that will be characterized for mechanical and thermal properties. Research has concluded that shows improvements in the properties of the matrix material when processed in loading variations of 0 to 25%wt silica nanoparticles. The loadings were also used to manufacture fiberglass reinforced nanocomposite laminates and also tested for mechanical and thermal properties.

  18. Non-Fourier based thermal-mechanical tissue damage prediction for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-01-02

    Prediction of tissue damage under thermal loads plays important role for thermal ablation planning. A new methodology is presented in this paper by combing non-Fourier bio-heat transfer, constitutive elastic mechanics as well as non-rigid motion of dynamics to predict and analyze thermal distribution, thermal-induced mechanical deformation and thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues under thermal loads. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed methodology based on the non-Fourier bio-heat transfer can account for the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and predict tissue thermal damage more accurately than classical Fourier bio-heat transfer based model.

  19. Wide-band CMOS low-noise amplifier exploiting thermal noise canceling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    Known elementary wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental tradeoff between noise figure (NF) and source impedance matching, which limits the NF to values typically above 3 dB. Global negative feedback can be used to break this tradeoff, however, at the price of potential instability. In

  20. Detecting shapes in noise: tuning characteristics of global shape mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, Gunnar; Gordon, Gael E.; Bennett, David M.; Loffler, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    The proportion of signal elements embedded in noise needed to detect a signal is a standard tool for investigating motion perception. This paradigm was applied to the shape domain to determine how local information is pooled into a global percept. Stimulus arrays consisted of oriented Gabor elements that sampled the circumference of concentric radial frequency (RF) patterns. Individual Gabors were oriented tangentially to the shape (signal) or randomly (noise). In different conditions, signal elements were located randomly within the entire array or constrained to fall along one of the concentric contours. Coherence thresholds were measured for RF patterns with various frequencies (number of corners) and amplitudes (“sharpness” of corners). Coherence thresholds (about 10% = 15 elements) were lowest for circular shapes. Manipulating shape frequency or amplitude showed a range where thresholds remain unaffected (frequency ≤ RF4; amplitude ≤ 0.05). Increasing either parameter caused thresholds to rise. Compared to circles, thresholds increased by approximately four times for RF13 and five times for amplitudes of 0.3. Confining the signals to individual contours significantly reduced the number of elements needed to reach threshold (between 4 and 6), independent of the total number of elements on the contour or contour shape. Finally, adding external noise to the orientation of the elements had a greater effect on detection thresholds than adding noise to their position. These results provide evidence for a series of highly sensitive, shape-specific analysers which sum information globally but only from within specific annuli. These global mechanisms are tuned to position and orientation of local elements from which they pool information. The overall performance for arrays of elements can be explained by the sensitivity of multiple, independent concentric shape detectors rather than a single detector integrating information widely across space (e.g. Glass

  1. Quantum mechanical evolution towards thermal equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Noah; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J; Winter, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    The circumstances under which a system reaches thermal equilibrium, and how to derive this from basic dynamical laws, has been a major question from the very beginning of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Despite considerable progress, it remains an open problem. Motivated by this issue, we address the more general question of equilibration. We prove, with virtually full generality, that reaching equilibrium is a universal property of quantum systems: almost any subsystem in interaction with a large enough bath will reach an equilibrium state and remain close to it for almost all times. We also prove several general results about other aspects of thermalization besides equilibration, for example, that the equilibrium state does not depend on the detailed microstate of the bath.

  2. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Ma, Kun; Jin, Jing; Teng, Fei; Cai, Wei

    2017-10-26

    A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10 -5 deg/√h.

  3. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningfang Song

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10−5 deg/√h.

  4. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  5. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Kovscek

    2003-01-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from October 1 through December 31, 2002 , for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' In this project, a broad spectrum of research is undertaken related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. During this period, experimental data regarding multidimensional imbibition was analyzed to obtain shape factors appropriate for dual-porosity simulation. It is shown that the usual assumption of constant, time-independent shape factors is incorrect. In other work, we continued to study the mechanisms by which oil is produced from fractured media at high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased the apparent wettability and affected water relative permeability of cores used in previous experiments. A phenomenological and mechanistic cause for this behavior is sought. Our work in the area of primary production of heavy oil continues with field cores and crude oil. On the topic of reservoir definition, work continued on developing techniques that integrate production history into reservoir models using streamline-based properties.

  6. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Kovscek

    2002-07-01

    This technical progress report describes work performed from April 1 through June 30, 2002, for the project ''Heavy and Thermal Oil Recovery Production Mechanisms.'' We investigate a broad spectrum of topics related to thermal and heavy-oil recovery. Significant results were obtained in the areas of multiphase flow and rock properties, hot-fluid injection, improved primary heavy oil recovery, and reservoir definition. The research tools and techniques used are varied and span from pore-level imaging of multiphase fluid flow to definition of reservoir-scale features through streamline-based history-matching techniques. Briefly, experiments were conducted to image at the pore level matrix-to-fracture production of oil from a fractured porous medium. This project is ongoing. A simulation studied was completed in the area of recovery processes during steam injection into fractured porous media. We continued to study experimentally heavy-oil production mechanisms from relatively low permeability rocks under conditions of high pressure and high temperature. High temperature significantly increased oil recovery rate and decreased residual oil saturation. Also in the area of imaging production processes in laboratory-scale cores, we use CT to study the process of gas-phase formation during solution gas drive in viscous oils. Results from recent experiments are reported here. Finally, a project was completed that uses the producing water-oil ratio to define reservoir heterogeneity and integrate production history into a reservoir model using streamline properties.

  7. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  8. A transformed analytical model for thermal noise of FinFET based on fringing field approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhulika Sharma, Savitesh; Dasgupta, S.; Kartikeyant, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    This paper delineates the effect of nonplanar structure of FinFETs on noise performance. We demonstrate the thermal noise analytical model that has been inferred by taking into account the presence of an additional inverted region in the extended (underlap) S/D region due to finite gate electrode thickness. Noise investigation includes the effects of source drain resistances which become significant as channel length becomes shorter. In this paper, we evaluate the additional noise caused by three dimensional (3-D) structure of the single fin device and then extended analysis of the multi-fin and multi-fingers structure. The addition of fringe field increases its minimum noise figure and noise resistance of approximately 1 dB and 100 Ω respectively and optimum admittance increases to 5.45 mƱ at 20 GHz for a device operating under saturation region. Hence, our transformed model plays a significant function in evaluation of accurate noise performance at circuit level. Project supported in part by the All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE).

  9. Analysis of the laser noise propagation mechanism on the laser interferometer gravitational wave antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Shuichi [TAMA project, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Arai, Koji [TAMA project, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan); Akutsu, Tomotada [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo 3-7-1 Hongo Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8588 (Japan)

    2006-03-02

    The propagation mechanisms of noise imposed on the light used to illuminate complex optical systems, from the noise source to the signal readout, can be very complicated, such as gravitational wave detectors. It is very important to understand these mechanisms both qualitatively and quantitatively, in order to effectively suppress the noise contribution to the interferometer readout. In this article, a method for the systematic treatment of the noise propagation mechanisms, and a way to analyze a noise contributions in complex optical systems, is described.

  10. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  11. Deformation due to mechanical and thermal sources in generalised ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    dimensional problem of thermoelasticity has been considered to investigate the disturbance due to mechanical (horizontal or verti- cal) and thermal source in a homogeneous, thermally conducting orthorhombic material. Laplace–Fourier ...

  12. Analysis of Electrical Transport and Noise Mechanisms in Amorphous Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-23

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Amorphous silicon, Temperature Coefficient of Resistance , TCR, 1/f Noise , Variable Range...coefficient of resistance (TCR) with low noise is desired at a conductivity dictated by the IC design to minimize NEDT. Selecting a resistance range...associated with low resistivity and large pixel volume i.e., large number of carriers (Hooge’s noise model). To a certain extent, the transport

  13. Aircraft noise effects on sleep: Mechanisms, mitigation and research needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Basner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an ample number of laboratory and field studies which provide sufficient evidence that aircraft noise disturbs sleep and, depending on traffic volume and noise levels, may impair behavior and well-being during the day. Although clinical sleep disorders have been shown to be associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, only little is known about the long-term effects of aircraft noise disturbed sleep on health. National and international laws and guidelines try to limit aircraft noise exposure facilitating active and passive noise control to prevent relevant sleep disturbances and its consequences. Adopting the harmonized indicator of the European Union Directive 2002/49/EC, the WHO Night Noise Guideline for Europe (NNG defines four Lnight , outside ranges associated with different risk levels of sleep disturbance and other health effects ( 55 dBA. Although traffic patterns differing in number and noise levels of events that lead to varying degrees of sleep disturbance may result in the same Lnight , simulations of nights with up to 200 aircraft noise events per night nicely corroborate expert opinion guidelines formulated in WHO′s NNG. In the future, large scale field studies on the effects of nocturnal (aircraft noise on sleep are needed. They should involve representative samples of the population including vulnerable groups like children and chronically ill subjects. Optimally, these studies are prospective in nature and examine the long-term consequences of noise-induced sleep disturbances. Furthermore, epidemiological case-control studies on the association of nocturnal (aircraft noise exposure and cardiovascular disease are needed. Despite the existing gaps in knowledge on long-term health effects, sufficient data are available for defining limit values, guidelines and protection concepts, which should be updated with the availability of new data.

  14. Mechanical properties of thermal protection system materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2005-06-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the mechanical properties of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials used for the Space Shuttle. Three types of TPS materials (LI-900, LI-2200, and FRCI-12) were tested in 'in-plane' and 'out-of-plane' orientations. Four types of quasi-static mechanical tests (uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression, uniaxial strain, and shear) were performed under low (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3}/s) and intermediate (1 to 10/s) strain rate conditions. In addition, split Hopkinson pressure bar tests were conducted to obtain the strength of the materials under a relatively higher strain rate ({approx}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3}/s) condition. In general, TPS materials have higher strength and higher Young's modulus when tested in 'in-plane' than in 'through-the-thickness' orientation under compressive (unconfined and confined) and tensile stress conditions. In both stress conditions, the strength of the material increases as the strain rate increases. The rate of increase in LI-900 is relatively small compared to those for the other two TPS materials tested in this study. But, the Young's modulus appears to be insensitive to the different strain rates applied. The FRCI-12 material, designed to replace the heavier LI-2200, showed higher strengths under tensile and shear stress conditions. But, under a compressive stress condition, LI-2200 showed higher strength than FRCI-12. As far as the modulus is concerned, LI-2200 has higher Young's modulus both in compression and in tension. The shear modulus of FRCI-12 and LI-2200 fell in the same range.

  15. Mechanical, Hygric and Thermal Properties of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tesárek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference measurements of basic mechanical, thermal and hygric parameters of hardened flue gas desulfurization gypsum are carried out. Moisture diffusivity, water vapor diffusion coefficient, thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and linear thermal expansion coefficient are determined with the primary aim of comparison with data obtained for various types of modified gypsum in the future. 

  16. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  17. Pressurizer with a mechanically attached surge nozzle thermal sleeve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepfer, Robert M

    2014-03-25

    A thermal sleeve is mechanically attached to the bore of a surge nozzle of a pressurizer for the primary circuit of a pressurized water reactor steam generating system. The thermal sleeve is attached with a series of keys and slots which maintain the thermal sleeve centered in the nozzle while permitting thermal growth and restricting flow between the sleeve and the interior wall of the nozzle.

  18. Synthesis, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cardanol, an excellent monomer for polymer production, has been isolated from CNSL and allowed to react with formaldehyde in a particular mole ratio in the presence of glutaric acid catalyst to give ... Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) were undertaken for thermal characterization.

  19. Electrically Isolating Thermally Coupled Device for Noise Suppression of Circuits in Deep Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantooth, A.; McNutt, T.; Mojarradi, M.; Li, H.; Blalock, B.

    2001-01-01

    Mixed mode rad hard avionics Systems on a Chip (SoC) designed for deep space applications such as Europa orbiters and Europa Landers will require data isolation circuits to block noise. This paper presents the simulation performance for a novel rad hard SOI CMOS compatible thermal transducer used for on-chip data isolation in SoC. The research presented involves the use of commercially available computer aided design tools to model the transient electrothermal behavior of the transducer. Both one- and two-dimensional analyses of a prototype thermal transducer were performed. Results indicate that thermal-based data isolator technology can pass a data bit in under a microsecond and, as a measurement of feasibility, I(exp 2)C bus specifications can be met.

  20. Modulation of thermal noise and spectral sensitivity in Lake Baikal cottoid fish rhodopsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Hoi Ling; Bhattacharyya, Nihar; Montisci, Fabio; Morrow, James M.; Melaccio, Federico; Wada, Akimori; Sheves, Mudi; Fanelli, Francesca; Chang, Belinda S. W.; Olivucci, Massimo

    2016-12-01

    Lake Baikal is the deepest and one of the most ancient lakes in the world. Its unique ecology has resulted in the colonization of a diversity of depth habitats by a unique fauna that includes a group of teleost fish of the sub-order Cottoidei. This relatively recent radiation of cottoid fishes shows a gradual blue-shift in the wavelength of the absorption maximum of their visual pigments with increasing habitat depth. Here we combine homology modeling and quantum chemical calculations with experimental in vitro measurements of rhodopsins to investigate dim-light adaptation. The calculations, which were able to reproduce the trend of observed absorption maxima in both A1 and A2 rhodopsins, reveal a Barlow-type relationship between the absorption maxima and the thermal isomerization rate suggesting a link between the observed blue-shift and a thermal noise decrease. A Nakanishi point-charge analysis of the electrostatic effects of non-conserved and conserved amino acid residues surrounding the rhodopsin chromophore identified both close and distant sites affecting simultaneously spectral tuning and visual sensitivity. We propose that natural variation at these sites modulate both the thermal noise and spectral shifting in Baikal cottoid visual pigments resulting in adaptations that enable vision in deep water light environments.

  1. Thermal, electrochemical and mechanical properties of shape

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    T. Ahmad

    2017-05-01

    May 1, 2017 ... He also discussed the uses of superelastic NiTi powder for the resistance of SnPdAg solder against failure due to thermal stresses. European has been recently using NiTiNb plug for sealing high-pressure fuel passages in diesel engine injectors made of SMA actuators. This research is aimed to develop ...

  2. Direct correlation between strengthening mechanisms and electrical noise in strained copper wires

    OpenAIRE

    Bellido, Natalia; Pautrat, Alain; Keller, Clement; Hug, Eric

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the resistance noise of copper metallic wires during a tensile stress. The time variation of the main resistance is continuous up to the wire breakdown, but its fluctuations reveal the intermittent and heterogeneous character of plastic flow. We show in particular direct correlations between strengthening mechanisms and noise spectra characteristics.

  3. Memory texture as a mechanism of improvement in preference by adding noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinzhu; Aoki, Naokazu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    2014-02-01

    According to color research, people have memory colors for familiar objects, which correlate with high color preference. As a similar concept to this, we propose memory texture as a mechanism of texture preference by adding image noise (1/f noise or white noise) to photographs of seven familiar objects. Our results showed that (1) memory texture differed from real-life texture; (2) no consistency was found between memory texture and real-life texture; (3) correlation existed between memory texture and preferred texture; and (4) the type of image noise which is more appropriate to texture reproduction differed by object.

  4. Bounding the quantum limits of precision for phase estimation with loss and thermal noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagatsos, Christos N.; Bash, Boulat A.; Guha, Saikat; Datta, Animesh

    2017-12-01

    We consider the problem of estimating an unknown but constant carrier phase modulation θ using a general, possibly entangled, n -mode optical probe through n independent and identical uses of a lossy bosonic channel with additive thermal noise. We find an upper bound to the quantum Fisher information (QFI) of estimating θ as a function of n , the mean and variance of the total number of photons NS in the n -mode probe, the transmissivity η , and mean thermal photon number per mode n¯B of the bosonic channel. Since the inverse of QFI provides a lower bound to the mean-square error (MSE) of an unbiased estimator θ ˜ of θ , our upper bound to the QFI provides a lower bound to the MSE. It already has found use in proving fundamental limits of covert sensing and could find other applications requiring bounding the fundamental limits of sensing an unknown parameter embedded in a correlated field.

  5. Improvements of Real Time First Motion Focal Mechanism and Noise Characteristics of New Sites at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. M.; Lopez, A. M.; Huerfano, V.; Lugo, J.; Cancel, J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic networks need quick and efficient ways to obtain information related to seismic events for the purposes of seismic activity monitoring, risk assessment, and scientific knowledge among others. As part of an IRIS summer internship program, two projects were performed to provide a tool for quick faulting mechanism and improve seismic data at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN). First, a simple routine to obtain a focal mechanisms, the geometry of the fault, based on first motions was developed and implemented for data analysts routine operations at PRSN. The new tool provides the analyst a quick way to assess the probable faulting mechanism that occurred while performing the interactive earthquake location procedure. The focal mechanism is generated on-the-fly when data analysts pick P wave arrivals onsets and motions. Once first motions have been identified, an in-house PRSN utility is employed to obtain the double couple representation and later plotted using GMT's psmeca utility. Second, we addressed the issue of seismic noise related to thermal fluctuations inside seismic vaults. Seismic sites can be extremely noisy due to proximity to cultural activities and unattended thermal fluctuations inside sensor housings, thus resulting in skewed readings. In the past, seismologists have used different insulation techniques to reduce the amount of unwanted noise that a seismometers experience due to these thermal changes with items such as Styrofoam, and fiber glass among others. PRSN traditionally uses Styrofoam boxes to cover their seismic sensors, however, a proper procedure to test how these method compare to other new techniques has never been approached. The deficiency of properly testing these techniques in the Caribbean and especially Puerto Rico is that these thermal fluctuations still happen because of the intense sun and humidity. We conducted a test based on the methods employed by the IRIS Transportable Array, based on insulation by sand burial of

  6. Densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes .2. Thermal and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, T.A C; Derks, R.; van der Vegt, H.A.; Stenekes, R.; Pennings, A.J; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of two densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxane systems were investigated in relation to the molecular structure. The networks were prepared from functional branched prepolymers and crosslinked via a hydrosilylation curing reaction. The prepolymers having only

  7. Noise-free quantum optical frequency shifting driven by mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Linran; Poot, Menno; Cheng, Risheng; Guo, Xiang; Han, Xu; Tang, Hong X

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate single photons is of critical importance for fundamental quantum optics studies and practical implementations of quantum communications. While extraordinary progresses have been made in controlling spatial, temporal, spin and orbit angular momentum degrees of freedom, frequency-domain control of single photons so far relies on nonlinear optical effects, which have faced obstacles such as noise photons, narrow bandwidth and demanding optical filtering. Here we demonstrate the first integrated near-unity efficiency frequency manipulation of single photons, by stretching and compressing a waveguide at 8.3 billion cycles per second. Frequency shift up to 150 GHz at telecom wavelength is realized without measurable added noise and the preservation of quantum coherence is verified through quantum interference between twin photons of different colors. This single photon frequency control approach will be invaluable for increasing the channel capacity of quantum communications and compensati...

  8. Masking of sounds by a background noise--cochlear mechanical correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Spinoso, Alberto; Cooper, Nigel P

    2013-05-15

    In the search for cochlear correlates of auditory masking by noise stimuli, we recorded basilar membrane (BM) vibrations evoked by either tone or click signals in the presence of varying levels of background noise. The BM vibrations were recorded from basal regions in healthy cochleae of anaesthetized chinchilla and gerbil. Non-linear interactions that could underpin various aspects of psychophysical masking data, including both compression and suppression at the BM level, were observed. The suppression effects, whereby the amplitude of the responses to each stimulus component could be reduced, depended on the relative intensities of the noise and the tones or clicks. Only stimulus components whose frequencies fell inside the non-linear region of the recording site, i.e. around its characteristic frequency (CF), were affected by presentation of the 'suppressing' stimulus (which could be either the tone or the noise). Mutual suppression, the simultaneous reduction of the responses to both tones and noise components, was observed under some conditions, but overall reductions of BM vibration were rarely observed. Moderate- to high-intensity tones suppressed BM responses to low-intensity Gaussian stimuli, including both broadband and narrowband noise. Suppression effects were larger for spectral components of the noise response that were closer to the CF. In this regime, the tone and noise stimuli became the suppressor and probe signals, respectively. This study provides the first detailed observations of cochlear mechanical correlates of the masking effects of noise. Mechanical detection thresholds for tone signals, which were arbitrarily defined using three criteria, are shown to increase in almost direct proportion to the noise level for low and moderately high noise levels, in a manner that resembles the findings of numerous psychophysical observations.

  9. In situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites: thermal and mechanical properties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olowojoba, Ganiu B; Eslava, Salvador; Gutierrez, Eduardo S; Kinloch, Anthony J; Mattevi, Cecilia; Rocha, Victoria G; Taylor, Ambrose C

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has excellent mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties and this has made it a prime target for use as a filler material in the development of multifunctional polymeric composites...

  10. Thermal, electrochemical and mechanical properties of shape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... resemblance with structure of casted shape memory alloy obtained from the vacuum induction process. The Vickers hardness test was also performed. Quenched microstructure with improved hardness than pre-quenched structure was observed. Keywords: Shape Memory Alloy, Microstructure, Mechanical Properties ...

  11. Synthesis, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Department of Chemistry, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, Abishekapatti, Tirunelveli 627 012, India. MS received 28 August 2003; ... thanes were characterized with respect to their resistance to chemical reagents and mechanical properties such as tensile strength, ..... Recent advances (ed.) I S. Bhardwajj (New ...

  12. Thermalization and its mechanism for generic isolated quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigol, Marcos; Dunjko, Vanja; Olshanii, Maxim

    2008-04-17

    An understanding of the temporal evolution of isolated many-body quantum systems has long been elusive. Recently, meaningful experimental studies of the problem have become possible, stimulating theoretical interest. In generic isolated systems, non-equilibrium dynamics is expected to result in thermalization: a relaxation to states in which the values of macroscopic quantities are stationary, universal with respect to widely differing initial conditions, and predictable using statistical mechanics. However, it is not obvious what feature of many-body quantum mechanics makes quantum thermalization possible in a sense analogous to that in which dynamical chaos makes classical thermalization possible. For example, dynamical chaos itself cannot occur in an isolated quantum system, in which the time evolution is linear and the spectrum is discrete. Some recent studies even suggest that statistical mechanics may give incorrect predictions for the outcomes of relaxation in such systems. Here we demonstrate that a generic isolated quantum many-body system does relax to a state well described by the standard statistical-mechanical prescription. Moreover, we show that time evolution itself plays a merely auxiliary role in relaxation, and that thermalization instead happens at the level of individual eigenstates, as first proposed by Deutsch and Srednicki. A striking consequence of this eigenstate-thermalization scenario, confirmed for our system, is that knowledge of a single many-body eigenstate is sufficient to compute thermal averages-any eigenstate in the microcanonical energy window will do, because they all give the same result.

  13. Effects of shift work and intermittent noise exposure on hearing: mechanisms and prophylactic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchgrevink, Hans M

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that intermittent noise exposure characteristically produces less hearing loss than equal energy/intensity continuous noise in animal models. Ongoing different shift work regimes open for direct studies on hearing effects of intermittent noise exposure in man without ethical concern. Amazingly, few such studies are reported. In one recent study in the present volume, noise-exposed employees working 12 hours a day for two consecutive days followed by two days off, the cycle then repeated, had significantly lower permanent hearing loss than employees working nine-hour shifts from 8 am to 5 pm Monday to Friday. This commentary refers to the few studies reported, gives a short overview of the mechanisms behind noise-induced hearing loss and the protective effect of intermittent exposure, and concludes that direct studies in man on the effects of different shift work regimes on occupational hearing loss under specified noise conditions represent a prophylactic potential that calls for increased research activity. Such studies might pave the way for direct use of more optimal intermittent noise exposure regimes in future design of the noise exposure workday/-week and make future hearing conservation programs more effective.

  14. Noise as a mechanism of anomalous face processing among persons with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce K. Christensen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence that people with Schizophrenia (SCZ have altered visual perception and cognition, including impaired face processing. However, the mechanism(s underlying this observation are not yet known. Eye movement studies have found that people with SCZ do not direct their gaze to the most informative regions of the face (e.g., the eyes. This suggests that SCZ patients may be less able to extract the most relevant face information and therefore have decreased calculation efficiency. In addition, research with non-face stimuli indicates that SCZ is associated with increased levels of internal noise. Importantly, both calculation efficiency and internal noise have been shown to underpin face perception among healthy observers. Therefore, the current study applies noise masking to upright and inverted faces to determine if face processing deficits among those with SCZ are the result of changes in calculation efficiency, internal noise, or both. Consistent with previous results, SCZ participants exhibited higher contrast thresholds in order to identify masked target faces. However, higher thresholds were associated with increases in internal noise but unrelated to changes in calculation efficiency. These results suggest that SCZ-related face processing deficits are the result of a decreased noise-to-signal ratio. The source of increased processing noise among these patients is unclear, but may emanate from abnormal neural dynamics.

  15. Computational Modeling of a Mechanized Benchtop Apparatus for Leading-Edge Slat Noise Treatment Device Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.; Moore, James B.; Long, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Airframe noise is a growing concern in the vicinity of airports because of population growth and gains in engine noise reduction that have rendered the airframe an equal contributor during the approach and landing phases of flight for many transport aircraft. The leading-edge-slat device of a typical high-lift system for transport aircraft is a prominent source of airframe noise. Two technologies have significant potential for slat noise reduction; the slat-cove filler (SCF) and the slat-gap filler (SGF). Previous work was done on a 2D section of a transport-aircraft wing to demonstrate the implementation feasibility of these concepts. Benchtop hardware was developed in that work for qualitative parametric study. The benchtop models were mechanized for quantitative measurements of performance. Computational models of the mechanized benchtop apparatus for the SCF were developed and the performance of the system for five different SCF assemblies is demonstrated.

  16. Multifunctional Thermal Structures Using Cellular Contact-Aided Complaint Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    structure. Based on a finite element formulation and Solid Isotropic Material with Penalization (SIMP) interpolation for material properties...scheme for seeking specific values of the design variables. The objective function was the global mechanical / thermal compliance of the structure. A...Distribution approved for public release. 23 4.3.5 Topology optimization algorithm This section considers the minimization of the “thermal compliance

  17. Correspondence behavior of classical and quantum dissipative directed transport via thermal noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Ermann, Leonardo; Rivas, Alejandro M F; Spina, María E

    2016-04-01

    We systematically study several classical-quantum correspondence properties of the dissipative modified kicked rotator, a paradigmatic ratchet model. We explore the behavior of the asymptotic currents for finite ℏ_{eff} values in a wide range of the parameter space. We find that the correspondence between the classical currents with thermal noise providing fluctuations of size ℏ_{eff} and the quantum ones without it is very good in general with the exception of specific regions. We systematically consider the spectra of the corresponding classical Perron-Frobenius operators and quantum superoperators. By means of an average distance between the classical and quantum sets of eigenvalues we find that the correspondence is unexpectedly quite uniform. This apparent contradiction is solved with the help of the Weyl-Wigner distributions of the equilibrium eigenvectors, which reveal the key role of quantum effects by showing surviving coherences in the asymptotic states.

  18. Thermal noise and the incessant vibration of the outer hair cells in the cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fritze

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The continual exposure of outer hair cells (OHCs to thermal noise causes vibrations in resonant frequency. As these vibrations are backprojected, they should be recordable as audiofrequencies in the outer ear canal. But even though they are likely to be amplified in some areas by clustering in terms of the chaos theory, they cannot be picked up in the outer ear canal by currently available recording technologies. Conditions change in the presence of pathology, e.g. loss of OHCs and fibrous replacement: Clusters grow in size and amplitudes become larger so that the vibrations can be picked up as spontaneous oto-acoustic emissions (SOAEs in the outer ear canal. Efforts are needed to demonstrate the presence of physiological OHC vibrations (emission by incessant vibration, EIV by processing auditory recordings with statistical methods.

  19. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2002-09-30

    The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

  20. Dependence of Glass Mechanical Properties on Thermal and Pressure History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Bauchy, Mathieu

    Predicting the properties of new glasses prior to manufacturing is a topic attracting great industrial and scientific interest. Mechanical properties are currently of particular interest given the increasing demand for stronger, thinner, and more flexible glasses in recent years. However, as a non......-equilibrium material, the structure and properties of glass depend not only on its composition, but also on its thermal and pressure histories. Here we review our recent findings regarding the thermal and pressure history dependence of indentation-derived mechanical properties of oxide glasses....

  1. Mechanics and thermal management of stretchable inorganic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jizhou; Feng, Xue; Huang, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable electronics enables lots of novel applications ranging from wearable electronics, curvilinear electronics to bio-integrated therapeutic devices that are not possible through conventional electronics that is rigid and flat in nature. One effective strategy to realize stretchable electronics exploits the design of inorganic semiconductor material in a stretchable format on an elastomeric substrate. In this review, we summarize the advances in mechanics and thermal management of stretchable electronics based on inorganic semiconductor materials. The mechanics and thermal models are very helpful in understanding the underlying physics associated with these systems, and they also provide design guidelines for the development of stretchable inorganic electronics. PMID:27547485

  2. In situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites: thermal and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowojoba, Ganiu B.; Eslava, Salvador; Gutierrez, Eduardo S.; Kinloch, Anthony J.; Mattevi, Cecilia; Rocha, Victoria G.; Taylor, Ambrose C.

    2016-10-01

    Graphene has excellent mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties and this has made it a prime target for use as a filler material in the development of multifunctional polymeric composites. However, several challenges need to be overcome to take full advantage of the aforementioned properties of graphene. These include achieving good dispersion and interfacial properties between the graphene filler and the polymeric matrix. In the present work, we report the thermal and mechanical properties of reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites prepared via a facile, scalable and commercially viable method. Electron micrographs of the composites demonstrate that the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is well dispersed throughout the composite. Although no improvements in glass transition temperature, tensile strength and thermal stability in air of the composites were observed, good improvements in thermal conductivity (about 36 %), tensile and storage moduli (more than 13 %) were recorded with the addition of 2 wt% of rGO.

  3. In situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites: thermal and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganiu B. Olowojoba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Graphene has excellent mechanical, thermal, optical and electrical properties and this has made it a prime target for use as a filler material in the development of multifunctional polymeric composites. However, several challenges need to be overcome to take full advantage of the aforementioned properties of graphene. These include achieving good dispersion and interfacial properties between the graphene filler and the polymeric matrix. In the present work, we report the thermal and mechanical properties of reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites prepared via a facile, scalable and commercially viable method. Electron micrographs of the composites demonstrate that the reduced graphene oxide (rGO is well dispersed throughout the composite. Although no improvements in glass transition temperature, tensile strength and thermal stability in air of the composites were observed, good improvements in thermal conductivity (about 36 %, tensile and storage moduli (more than 13 % were recorded with the addition of 2 wt% of rGO.

  4. Enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electric properties of graphene aerogels via supercritical ethanol drying and high-temperature thermal reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Yehong Cheng; Shanbao Zhou; Ping Hu; Guangdong Zhao; Yongxia Li; Xinghong Zhang; Wenbo Han

    2017-01-01

    Graphene aerogels with high surface areas, ultra-low densities and thermal conductivities have been prepared to exploit their wide applications from pollution adsorption to energy storage, supercapacitor, and thermal insulation. However, the low mechanical properties, poor thermal stability and electric conductivity restrict these aerogels? applications. In this paper, we prepared mechanically strong graphene aerogels with large BET surface areas, low thermal conductivities, high thermal stab...

  5. Chemical, thermal and mechanical stabilities of metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Ashlee J.; Liu, Yangyang; Li, Peng; Li, Zhanyong; Wang, Timothy C.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.

    2016-03-01

    The construction of thousands of well-defined, porous, metal-organic framework (MOF) structures, spanning a broad range of topologies and an even broader range of pore sizes and chemical functionalities, has fuelled the exploration of many applications. Accompanying this applied focus has been a recognition of the need to engender MOFs with mechanical, thermal and/or chemical stability. Chemical stability in acidic, basic and neutral aqueous solutions is important. Advances over recent years have made it possible to design MOFs that possess different combinations of mechanical, thermal and chemical stability. Here, we review these advances and the associated design principles and synthesis strategies. We focus on how these advances may render MOFs effective as heterogeneous catalysts, both in chemically harsh condensed phases and in thermally challenging conditions relevant to gas-phase reactions. Finally, we briefly discuss future directions of study for the production of highly stable MOFs.

  6. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high.

  7. Preparation and studies of some thermal, mechanical and optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Preparation and studies of some thermal, mechanical and optical properties of xAl2O3(1 – x)NaPO3 glass system. K V SHAH, V SUDARSAN†, M GOSWAMI, A SARKAR, S MANIKANDAN,. RAKESH KUMAR, B I SHARMA, V K SHRIKHANDE and G P KOTHIYAL*. Technical Physics and Prototype Engineering Division, ...

  8. Statistical mechanics of thermal denaturation of DNA oligomers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Statistical mechanics of thermal denaturation of DNA oligomers. NAVIN SINGH and YASHWANT SINGH. Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005, India. Email: ysingh@bhu.ac.in. Abstract. Double stranded DNA chain is known to have non-trivial elasticity. We study the effect of this elasticity on ...

  9. Thermal and mechanical modelling of convergent plate margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beukel, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis, the thermal and mechanical structure of convergent plate margins will be investigated by means of numerical modelling. In addition, we will discuss the implications of modelling results for geological processes such as metamorphism or the break-up of a plate at a convergent plate

  10. Evaluating the Wind-Induced Mechanical Noise on the InSight Seismometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Naomi; Mimoun, David; Garcia, Raphael F.; Rapin, William; Kawamura, Taichi; Lognonné, Philippe; Banfield, Don; Banerdt, W. Bruce

    2017-10-01

    The SEIS (Seismic Experiment for Interior Structures) instrument onboard the InSight mission to Mars is the critical instrument for determining the interior structure of Mars, the current level of tectonic activity and the meteorite flux. Meeting the performance requirements of the SEIS instrument is vital to successfully achieve these mission objectives. Here we analyse in-situ wind measurements from previous Mars space missions to understand the wind environment that we are likely to encounter on Mars, and then we use an elastic ground deformation model to evaluate the mechanical noise contributions on the SEIS instrument due to the interaction between the Martian winds and the InSight lander. Lander mechanical noise maps that will be used to select the best deployment site for SEIS once the InSight lander arrives on Mars are also presented. We find the lander mechanical noise may be a detectable signal on the InSight seismometers. However, for the baseline SEIS deployment position, the noise is expected to be below the total noise requirement >97 % of the time and is, therefore, not expected to endanger the InSight mission objectives.

  11. Thermal-Mechanical Optimization of Folded Core Sandwich Panels for Thermal Protection Systems of Space Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrated thermal protection system (ITPS is a complicated system that addresses both mechanical and thermal considerations. An M-pattern folded core sandwich panel packed with low-density insulation material provides inherently low mass for a potential ITPS panel. Herein, we identify the most influential geometric parameters and establish a viable, computationally efficient optimization procedure. Variables considered for optimization are geometric dimensions of the ITPS, while temperature and deflection are taken as constraints. A one-dimensional (1D thermal model based on a modified form of the rule of mixtures was established, while a three-dimensional (3D model was adopted for linear static analyses. Parametric models were generated to facilitate a design of experiment (DOE study, and approximate models using radial basis functions were obtained to carry out the optimization process. Sensitivity studies were first conducted to investigate the effect of geometric parameters on the ITPS responses. Then optimizations were performed for both thermal and thermal-mechanical constraints. The results show that the simplified 1D thermal model is able to predict temperature through the ITPS thickness satisfactorily. The combined optimization strategy evidently improves the computational efficiency of the design process showing it can be used for initial design of folded core ITPS.

  12. The Effect of Mechanical Noise and Natural Sound on Visitor Experiences in Units of the National Park System

    OpenAIRE

    Gramann, Dr. James; National Park Service; U.S. Department of the Interior

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews research on the effects of mechanical noise and natural sound on visitor experiences in national parks. Three approaches to studying noise impacts are described. Most noise research to date has addressed the impact of air-tour overflights on visitor experiences. these impacts are localized with significant percentages of visitors in some parks reporting interference with natural sounds from aircraft noise. Research also shows that unthreatening natural environments can ...

  13. Thermal-field emission flicker (1/f) noise and diffusive equilibrium density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesley, Mark; Swanson, Lyn

    1988-06-01

    A model of diffusive equilibrium density fluctuations in a grand-canonical ensemble is constructed for systems of finite size. The particle number autocorrelation is developed from a Langevin-type bounded-diffusion equation. Both probe and sample geometries affect its spectrum, which factors into two terms representing the particle creation rate and diffusion according to a multidimensional Carson's theorem. The spatial decay of the kernel in the spectrum's integral equation is measured by a frequency-dependent correlation length that depends on particle lifetime, diffusivity, and probe resolution. The kernel and its transform, the mutual coherence function, collapse to the Ornstein-Zernike spatial distribution but with the new result that the classical correlation length is given by a ratio of diffusive and thermodynamic variables. For the limiting case of an unbounded system with infinite particle lifetime, Voss and Clarke's spatially correlated spectrum is rederived. However, for this ensemble a finite particle lifetime is a necessary equilibrium condition. Little's theorem is generalized when particle interactions are included. Noise-power integrals converge in all cases. Frequency exponents characterize the spectra and, when a small region is probed in a quasi-two-dimensional system, broadband 1/f noise occurs. A Lorentzian spectrum results in the limit of no diffusion. A lower length limit introduced to avoid the breakdown of the diffusion approximation at small time and space intervals can in some cases be identified with probe resolution and is measurable when a certain crossover in frequency exponents is identified. The analysis is then applied to fluctuations in the electron current, thermal field emitted from a single-crystal tungsten cathode. These are coupled to self-diffusion of surface defect adatoms on the cathode by the Fowler-Nordheim equation. Other frequency crossovers yield surface diffusivities and their activation energies, which for

  14. Noise Spectrum of a Quantum Point Contact Coupled to a Nano-Mechanical Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Nikhilesh A.

    With the advance in nanotechnology, we are more interested in the "smaller worlds". One of the practical applications of this is to measure a very small displacement or the mass of a nano-mechanical object. To measure such properties, one needs a very sensitive detector. A quantum point contact (QPC) is one of the most sensitive detectors. In a QPC, electrons tunnel one by one through a tunnel junction (a "hole"). The tunnel junction in a QPC consists of a narrow constriction (nm-wide) between two conductors. To measure the properties of a nano-mechanical object (which acts as a harmonic oscillator), we couple it to a QPC. This coupling effects the electrons tunneling through the QPC junction. By measuring the transport properties of the tunneling electrons, we can infer the properties of the oscillator (i.e. the nano-mechanical object). However, this coupling introduces noise, which reduces the measurement precision. Thus, it is very important to understand this source of noise and to study how it effects the measurement process. We theoretically study the transport properties of electrons through a QPC junction, weakly coupled to a vibration mode of a nano-mechanical oscillator via both the position and the momentum of the oscillator. We study both the position and momentum based coupling. The transport properties that we study consist of the average flow of current through the junction, given by the one-time correlation of the electron tunneling event, and the current noise given by the two-time correlation of the average current, i.e., the variance. The first comprehensive experimental study of the noise spectrum of a detector coupled to a QPC was performed by the group of Stettenheim et al. Their observed spectral features had two pronounced peaks which depict the noise produced due to the coupling of the QPC with the oscillator and in turn provide evidence of the induced feedback loop (back-action). Benatov and Blencowe theoretically studied these spectral

  15. Channel microstructure and thermal insulation mechanism of sepiolite mineral nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liang, Jinsheng; Tang, Qingguo; Chen, Cong; Chen, Yalei

    2014-05-01

    The longitudinal and cross sectional TEM images of sepiolite mineral nanofibers were prepared by cutting in the direction parallel and perpendicular to nanofibers, and the channel microstructure of sepiolite nanofibers was studied. The thermal insulation mechanism of sepiolite nanofibers was analyzed according to the diagrammatic sketch obtained from the above experimental method. The results showed that many discontinuously connected bending shape channels with about 23-26 nm in diameter existed in the center region of nanofibers, and many discontinuously connected irregular micropores and mesopores with the size of about 1-9 nm existed on the wall of nanofibers. The main reasons for the formation of channel microstructure in sepiolite nanofibers were their minerogenetic conditions and the interaction between acid and high-speed airflow in the process of nanofibers preparation, and bubbles in the hydrotherm played a significant role in the microstructure formation. The thermal insulation performance of sepiolite nanofibers could be attributed to obstructive and infrared radiative thermal insulation.

  16. Nanoporous Carbon Monoliths with Tunable Thermal Insulation and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Fenghua; Luo, Zhenhua; Li, Hao; Zhao, Tong

    2016-01-01

    In this work, nanoscale porous carbon monoliths, with excellent compressive strength and thermal insulation, were obtained with a simple method of carbonizing cured phenol-formaldehyde resin/poly(methyl methacrylate) blends. Apparent density, pore size and morphology of the carbon monoliths were tailored by changing the composition, curing process and carbonization temperature. The continuous nanopores played a key role in enhancing mechanical and thermal performance of the carbon materials. When PMMA concentration was 25%, apparent density and thermal conductivity of the nanoporous carbonaceous monoliths were obtained as low as 1.07 g · cm⁻³ and 0.42 W/(m · K), decreasing by 29.4% and 35.4% than that of carbonaceous monoliths obtained from pure PF; while compressive strength of the nanoporous carbonaceous monoliths was as high as 34 MPa, which was improved over five times than that of pure PF carbon monoliths.

  17. Cluster-cluster aggregation of Ising dipolar particles under thermal noise

    KAUST Repository

    Suzuki, Masaru

    2009-08-14

    The cluster-cluster aggregation processes of Ising dipolar particles under thermal noise are investigated in the dilute condition. As the temperature increases, changes in the typical structures of clusters are observed from chainlike (D1) to crystalline (D2) through fractal structures (D1.45), where D is the fractal dimension. By calculating the bending energy of the chainlike structure, it is found that the transition temperature is associated with the energy gap between the chainlike and crystalline configurations. The aggregation dynamics changes from being dominated by attraction to diffusion involving changes in the dynamic exponent z=0.2 to 0.5. In the region of temperature where the fractal clusters grow, different growth rates are observed between charged and neutral clusters. Using the Smoluchowski equation with a twofold kernel, this hetero-aggregation process is found to result from two types of dynamics: the diffusive motion of neutral clusters and the weak attractive motion between charged clusters. The fact that changes in structures and dynamics take place at the same time suggests that transitions in the structure of clusters involve marked changes in the dynamics of the aggregation processes. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

  18. Thermal noise variance of a receive radiofrequency coil as a respiratory motion sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreychenko, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341697672; Raaijmakers, A. J E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304819662; Sbrizzi, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341735868; Crijns, S. P M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/341021296; Lagendijk, J. J W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/07011868X; Luijten, P. R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304821098; van den Berg, C. A T|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304817422

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Development of a passive respiratory motion sensor based on the noise variance of the receive coil array. Methods: Respiratory motion alters the body resistance. The noise variance of an RF coil depends on the body resistance and, thus, is also modulated by respiration. For the noise

  19. Summary of thermal, shot and flicker noise in detectors and readout circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Seller, P

    1999-01-01

    The techniques for calculating noise in electronic circuits are well known (P. Seller, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 408 (1998) 603). These have been used here to tabulate the output noise variance and the Equivalent input Noise Charge (ENC) for time-invariant filter circuits often used for reading out detector systems. This is followed by some comparisons of the performance of different filters.

  20. Enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electric properties of graphene aerogels via supercritical ethanol drying and high-temperature thermal reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yehong; Zhou, Shanbao; Hu, Ping; Zhao, Guangdong; Li, Yongxia; Zhang, Xinghong; Han, Wenbo

    2017-05-03

    Graphene aerogels with high surface areas, ultra-low densities and thermal conductivities have been prepared to exploit their wide applications from pollution adsorption to energy storage, supercapacitor, and thermal insulation. However, the low mechanical properties, poor thermal stability and electric conductivity restrict these aerogels' applications. In this paper, we prepared mechanically strong graphene aerogels with large BET surface areas, low thermal conductivities, high thermal stability and electric conductivities via hydrothermal reduction and supercritical ethanol drying. Annealing at 1500 °C resulted in slightly increased thermal conductivity and further improvement in mechanical properties, oxidation temperature and electric conductivity of the graphene aerogel. The large BET surface areas, together with strong mechanical properties, low thermal conductivities, high thermal stability and electrical conductivities made these graphene aerogels feasible candidates for use in a number of fields covering from batteries to sensors, electrodes, lightweight conductor and insulation materials.

  1. Majorana Demonstrator Bolted Joint Mechanical and Thermal Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.

    2012-06-01

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is designed to probe for neutrinoless double-beta decay, an extremely rare process with a half-life in the order of 1026 years. The experiment uses an ultra-low background, high-purity germanium detector array. The germanium crystals are both the source and the detector in this experiment. Operating these crystals as ionizing radiation detectors requires having them under cryogenic conditions (below 90 K). A liquid nitrogen thermosyphon is used to extract the heat from the detectors. The detector channels are arranged in strings and thermally coupled to the thermosyphon through a cold plate. The cold plate is joined to the thermosyphon by a bolted joint. This circular plate is housed inside the cryostat can. This document provides a detailed study of the bolted joint that connects the cold plate and the thermosyphon. An analysis of the mechanical and thermal properties of this bolted joint is presented. The force applied to the joint is derived from the torque applied to each one of the six bolts that form the joint. The thermal conductivity of the joint is measured as a function of applied force. The required heat conductivity for a successful experiment is the combination of the thermal conductivity of the detector string and this joint. The thermal behavior of the joint is experimentally implemented and analyzed in this study.

  2. Gate voltage dependent 1/f noise variance model based on physical noise generation mechanisms in n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yukiko; Aoki, Hitoshi; Abe, Fumitaka; Todoroki, Shunichiro; Khatami, Ramin; Kazumi, Masaki; Totsuka, Takuya; Wang, Taifeng; Kobayashi, Haruo

    2015-04-01

    1/f noise is one of the most important characteristics for designing analog/RF circuits including operational amplifiers and oscillators. We have analyzed and developed a novel 1/f noise model in the strong inversion, saturation, and sub-threshold regions based on SPICE2 type model used in any public metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) models developed by the University of California, Berkeley. Our model contains two noise generation mechanisms that are mobility and interface trap number fluctuations. Noise variability dependent on gate voltage is also newly implemented in our model. The proposed model has been implemented in BSIM4 model of a SPICE3 compatible circuit simulator. Parameters of the proposed model are extracted with 1/f noise measurements for simulation verifications. The simulation results show excellent agreements between measurement and simulations.

  3. Mechanical and thermal properties of the Czech marbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čáchová, Monika; Koňáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Keppert, Martin; Černý, Robert

    2016-06-01

    The paper is dealing with selected parameters of four marbles with respect to their utilization as building materials. Stones from four function quarries in the Czech Republic were chosen and scopes of physical properties were determined. Basic physical, mechanical and thermal properties belong among studied characteristics. Bulk density of studied marbles is in average 2750 kg/m3, matrix density 2770 kg/m3, open porosity 0.7%. Pore structure show similar distributions. Mechanical properties show more differences; however minimal value of compressive strength was 66.5 MPa, while maximum was 174 MPa. Thermal conductivity of studied marbles was about 2.955 W/mK. Last measured characteristic was specific heat capacity; its average value was 609 J/kgK.

  4. Thermal and mechanical properties of PVDF/PANI blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Francisco Malmonge

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(vinylidene fluoride/polyaniline blends of different composition were synthesized by chemical polymerization of aniline in a mixture of Poly(vinylidene fluoride and N,N-dimethylformamide and their thermal and mechanical behavior was investigated as a function of the polyaniline doping level and the composition using thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis and tensile tests techniques. The results showed the blend obtained presents a good thermal stability with low weight loss up to 300 ºC, assigned to water and solvents evaporation. The glass transition and melting point is not affected by the PANI content in the blend, showing that polymers are no miscible. The films produced present a good sustainability; however the presence of the conducting polymer in the blend increases the tensile strength and the Young modulus, while diminishes the elongation at break, as compared to pure PVDF.

  5. Thermal/Mechanical Measurement and Modeling of Bicycle Disc Brakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Feier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Brake induced heating has become more difficult to control as bicycle component mass has been reduced. High-power braking with insufficient cooling or thermal capacitance can create excessive temperatures, boiling brake fluid, performance degradation, and damage. To better understand component heating, a disc braking dynamometer has been constructed with a motor driven disc, hydraulic braking, and a miniature wind tunnel. Disc temperatures are studied for various braking scenarios using infrared techniques and thermocouples. A transient, numerical, MATLAB, lumped parameter thermal/mechanical model is created to predict the impact of key design parameters on braking performance and to understand the heat loss mechanisms from the brake system components. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations are used to estimate the disc surface convective cooling coefficients for the model. The final model provides transient temperature predictions based on bicycle velocity and braking power, and successfully matches dynamometer experimental data.

  6. Response of mechanical properties of glasses to their chemical, thermal and mechanical histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    of glass fibers are dependent on the thermal history (measured as fictive temperature), tension, chemical composition and redox state. However, the fictive temperature affects the hardness of bulk glass in a complicated manner, i.e., the effect does not exhibit a clear regularity in the range......Mechanical properties are a key factor to be considered when designing new glass compositions, optimizing glass processing parameters and defining the glass application fields. However, mechanical properties of glasses are complex values since they are influenced by many factors such as structure......, surface, thermal history or excess entropy of the final glass state. Here I review recent progresses in understanding of the responses of mechanical properties of oxide glasses to the compositional variation, thermal history and mechanical deformation. The tensile strength, elastic modulus and hardness...

  7. Computationally efficient thermal-mechanical modelling of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yabin; Ayas, Can

    2017-10-01

    The Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing (AM) method to produce high density metal parts with complex topology. However, part distortions and accompanying residual stresses deteriorates the mechanical reliability of SLM products. Modelling of the SLM process is anticipated to be instrumental for understanding and predicting the development of residual stress field during the build process. However, SLM process modelling requires determination of the heat transients within the part being built which is coupled to a mechanical boundary value problem to calculate displacement and residual stress fields. Thermal models associated with SLM are typically complex and computationally demanding. In this paper, we present a simple semi-analytical thermal-mechanical model, developed for SLM that represents the effect of laser scanning vectors with line heat sources. The temperature field within the part being build is attained by superposition of temperature field associated with line heat sources in a semi-infinite medium and a complimentary temperature field which accounts for the actual boundary conditions. An analytical solution of a line heat source in a semi-infinite medium is first described followed by the numerical procedure used for finding the complimentary temperature field. This analytical description of the line heat sources is able to capture the steep temperature gradients in the vicinity of the laser spot which is typically tens of micrometers. In turn, semi-analytical thermal model allows for having a relatively coarse discretisation of the complimentary temperature field. The temperature history determined is used to calculate the thermal strain induced on the SLM part. Finally, a mechanical model governed by elastic-plastic constitutive rule having isotropic hardening is used to predict the residual stresses.

  8. 4D Printing with Mechanically Robust, Thermally Actuating Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakarich, Shannon E; Gorkin, Robert; in het Panhuis, Marc; Spinks, Geoffrey M

    2015-06-01

    A smart valve is created by 4D printing of hydrogels that are both mechanically robust and thermally actuating. The printed hydrogels are made up of an interpenetrating network of alginate and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). 4D structures are created by printing the "dynamic" hydrogel ink alongside other static materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Thermal noise variance of a receive radiofrequency coil as a respiratory motion sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreychenko, A; Raaijmakers, A J E; Sbrizzi, A; Crijns, S P M; Lagendijk, J J W; Luijten, P R; van den Berg, C A T

    2017-01-01

    Development of a passive respiratory motion sensor based on the noise variance of the receive coil array. Respiratory motion alters the body resistance. The noise variance of an RF coil depends on the body resistance and, thus, is also modulated by respiration. For the noise variance monitoring, the noise samples were acquired without and with MR signal excitation on clinical 1.5/3 T MR scanners. The performance of the noise sensor was compared with the respiratory bellow and with the diaphragm displacement visible on MR images. Several breathing patterns were tested. The noise variance demonstrated a periodic, temporal modulation that was synchronized with the respiratory bellow signal. The modulation depth of the noise variance resulting from the respiration varied between the channels of the array and depended on the channel's location with respect to the body. The noise sensor combined with MR acquisition was able to detect the respiratory motion for every k-space read-out line. Within clinical MR systems, the respiratory motion can be detected by the noise in receive array. The noise sensor does not require careful positioning unlike the bellow, any additional hardware, and/or MR acquisition. Magn Reson Med 77:221-228, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mechanism of the Thermal Decomposition of Ethanethiol and Dimethylsulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhado, William Francis; Whitman, Jared Connor; Kong, Jessica; Anderson, Daniel Easton; Vasiliou, AnGayle (AJ)

    2016-06-01

    Combustion of organosulfur contaminants in petroleum-based fuels and biofuels produces sulfur oxides (SO_x). These pollutants are highly regulated by the EPA because they have been linked to poor respiratory health and negative environmental impacts. Therefore much effort has been made to remove sulfur compounds in petroleum-based fuels and biofuels. Currently desulfurization methods used in the fuel industry are costly and inefficient. Research of the thermal decomposition mechanisms of organosulfur species can be implemented via engineering simulations to modify existing refining technologies to design more efficient sulfur removal processes. We have used a resistively-heated SiC tubular reactor to study the thermal decomposition of ethanethiol (CH_3CH_2SH) and dimethylsulfide (CH_3SCH_3). The decomposition products are identified by two independent techniques: 118.2 nm VUV photoionization mass spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The thermal cracking products for CH_3CH_2SH are CH_2CH_2, SH, and H_2S and the thermal cracking products from CH_3SCH_3 are CH_3S, CH_2S, and CH_3.

  11. Hemp Thermal Insulation Concrete with Alternative Binders, Analysis of their Thermal and Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinka, M.; Sahmenko, G.; Korjakins, A.; Radina, L.; Bajare, D.

    2015-11-01

    One of the main challenges that construction industry faces today is how to address the demands for more sustainable, environmentally friendly and carbon neutral construction materials and building upkeep processes. One of the answers to these demands is lime-hemp concrete (LHC) building materials - carbon negative materials that have sufficient thermal insulation capabilities to be used as thermal insulation materials for new as well as for existing buildings. But one problem needs to be overcome before these materials can be used on a large scale - current manufacturing technology allows these materials to be used only as self-bearing thermal insulation material with large labour intensity in the manufacturing process. In order to lower the labour intensity and allow the material to be used in wider applications, a LHC block and board production is necessary, which in turn calls for the binders different from the classically used ones, as they show insufficient mechanical strength for this new use. The particular study focuses on alternative binders produced using gypsum-cement compositions ensuring they are usable in outdoor applications together with hemp shives. Physical, mechanical, thermal and water absorption properties of hemp concrete with various binders are addressed in the current study.

  12. Resolving Some Paradoxes in the Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Acetaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Raghu; Michael, Joe V.; Harding, Lawrence B.; Klippenstein, Stephen J.

    2015-07-16

    The mechanism for the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde has been revisited with an analysis of literature kinetics experiments using theoretical kinetics. The present modeling study was motivated by recent observations, with very sensitive diagnostics, of some unexpected products in high temperature micro-tubular reactor experiments on the thermal decomposition of CH3CHO and its deuterated analogs, CH3CDO, CD3CHO, and CD3CDO. The observations of these products prompted the authors of these studies to suggest that the enol tautomer, CH2CHOH (vinyl alcohol), is a primary intermediate in the thermal decomposition of acetaldehyde. The present modeling efforts on acetaldehyde decomposition incorporate a master equation re-analysis of the CH3CHO potential energy surface (PES). The lowest energy process on this PES is an isomerization of CH3CHO to CH2CHOH. However, the subsequent product channels for CH2CHOH are substantially higher in energy, and the only unimolecular process that can be thermally accessed is a re-isomerization to CH3CHO. The incorporation of these new theoretical kinetics predictions into models for selected literature experiments on CH3CHO thermal decomposition confirms our earlier experiment and theory based conclusions that the dominant decomposition process in CH3CHO at high temperatures is C-C bond fission with a minor contribution (~10-20%) from the roaming mechanism to form CH4 and CO. The present modeling efforts also incorporate a master-equation analysis of the H + CH2CHOH potential energy surface. This bimolecular reaction is the primary mechanism for removal of CH2CHOH, which can accumulate to minor amounts at high temperatures, T > 1000 K, in most lab-scale experiments that use large initial concentrations of CH3CHO. Our modeling efforts indicate that the observation of ketene, water and acetylene in the recent micro-tubular experiments are primarily due to bimolecular reactions of CH3CHO and CH2CHOH with H-atoms, and have no bearing on

  13. Downstream evolution of unconfined vortices: mechanical and thermal aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Saborid, M.; Herrada, M. A.; Gómez-Barea, A.; Barrero, A.

    2002-11-01

    We present a numerical study of the downstream evolution (mechanical and thermal) of vortex-jet cores whose velocity and temperature fields far from the axis match a family of inviscid and non-conducting vortices. The far-velocity field is rotational, except for a particular case which corresponds to the well-known Long's vortex. The evolution of the vortex core depends on both the conditions at a certain upstream station, characterized by the dimensionless value of the velocity at the axis, and a dimensionless swirling parameter L defined as the ratio of the values of the azimuthal and axial velocities outside the vortex core. This numerical study, based on the quasi-cylindrical approximation (QC) of the Navier Stokes equations, determines the conditions under which the vortex evolution proceeds smoothly, eventually reaching an asymptotic self-similar behaviour as described in the literature (Fernández-Feria, Fernández de la Mora & Barrero 1995; Herrada, Pérez-Saborid & Barrero 1999), or breaks in a non-slender solution (vortex breakdown). In particular, the critical value L = Lb(a) beyond which vortex breakdown occurs downstream is a function of a dimensionless parameter a characterizing the axial momentum of the vortex jet at an initial upstream station. It is found numerically that for very large values of a this vortex breakdown criterion tends to an asymptote which is precisely the value L = L* predicted by the self-similar analysis, and beyond which a self-similar structure of the vortex core does not exist. In addition, the computation of the total temperature field provides useful information on the physical mechanisms responsible for the thermal separation phenomenon observed in Ranque Hilsch tubes and other swirling jet devices. In particular, the mechanical work of viscous forces which gives rise to an intense loss of kinetic energy during the initial stages of the evolution has been identified as the physical mechanism responsible for thermal

  14. Dissociative mechanism for irreversible thermal denaturation of oligomeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebotareva, Natalia A; Roman, Svetlana G; Kurganov, Boris I

    2016-12-01

    Protein stability is a fundamental characteristic essential for understanding conformational transformations of the proteins in the cell. When using protein preparations in biotechnology and biomedicine, the problem of protein stability is of great importance. The kinetics of denaturation of oligomeric proteins may have characteristic properties determined by the quaternary structure. The kinetic schemes of denaturation can include the multiple stages of conformational transitions in the protein oligomer and stages of reversible dissociation of the oligomer. In this case, the shape of the kinetic curve of denaturation or the shape of the melting curve registered by differential scanning calorimetry can vary with varying the protein concentration. The experimental data illustrating dissociative mechanism for irreversible thermal denaturation of oligomeric proteins have been summarized in the present review. The use of test systems based on thermal aggregation of oligomeric proteins for screening of agents possessing anti-aggregation activity is discussed.

  15. Highly thermally conductive and mechanically strong graphene fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Guoqing; Yao, Tiankai; Sun, Hongtao; Scott, Spencer Michael; Shao, Dali; Wang, Gongkai; Lian, Jie

    2015-09-04

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms bonded in a hexagonal lattice, is the thinnest, strongest, and stiffest known material and an excellent conductor of heat and electricity. However, these superior properties have yet to be realized for graphene-derived macroscopic structures such as graphene fibers. We report the fabrication of graphene fibers with high thermal and electrical conductivity and enhanced mechanical strength. The inner fiber structure consists of large-sized graphene sheets forming a highly ordered arrangement intercalated with small-sized graphene sheets filling the space and microvoids. The graphene fibers exhibit a submicrometer crystallite domain size through high-temperature treatment, achieving an enhanced thermal conductivity up to 1290 watts per meter per kelvin. The tensile strength of the graphene fiber reaches 1080 megapascals. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Electrical and noise characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors: ambient effects, noise sources and physical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, S; Liu, G; Stillman, W; Shur, M; Balandin, A A

    2010-10-06

    We fabricated a large number of single and bilayer graphene transistors and carried out a systematic experimental study of their low-frequency noise characteristics. Special attention was given to determining the dominant noise sources in these devices and the effect of aging on the current-voltage and noise characteristics. The analysis of the noise spectral density dependence on the area of graphene channel showed that the dominant contributions to the low-frequency electronic noise come from the graphene layer itself rather than from the contacts. Aging of graphene transistors due to exposure to ambient conditions for over a month resulted in substantially increased noise, attributed to the decreasing mobility of graphene and increasing contact resistance. The noise spectral density in both single and bilayer graphene transistors either increased with deviation from the charge neutrality point or depended weakly on the gate bias. This observation confirms that the low-frequency noise characteristics of graphene transistors are qualitatively different from those of conventional silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  17. Mechanical and Thermal Characterization of Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Daniel R.

    Additive manufacturing is an emerging production technology used to create net shaped 3-D objects from a digital model. Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM) is a relatively new type of additive manufacturing that uses ultrasonic energy to sequentially bond layers of metal foils at temperatures much lower than the melting temperature of the material. Constructing metal structures without melting allows UAM to have distinct advantages over beam based additive manufacturing and other traditional manufacturing processes. This is because solidification defects can be avoided, structures can be composed of dissimilar material and secondary materials (both metallic and non-metallic) can be successfully embedded into the metal matrix. These advantages allow UAM to have tremendous potential to create metal matrix composite structures that cannot be built using any other manufacturing technique. Although UAM has tremendous engineering potential, the effect of interfacial bonding defects on the mechanical and thermal properties have not be characterized. Incomplete interfacial bonding at the laminar surfaces due to insufficient welding energy can result in interfacial voids. Voids create discontinuities in the structure which change the mechanical and thermal properties of the component, resulting in a structure that has different properties than the monolithic material used to create it. In-situ thermal experiments and thermal modeling demonstrates that voids at partially bonded interfaces significantly affected heat generation and thermal conductivity in. UAM parts during consolidation as well as in the final components. Using ultrasonic testing, elastic properties of UAM structures were found to be significantly reduced due to the presence of voids, with the reduction being the most severe in the transverse (foil staking) direction. Elastic constants in all three material directions decreased linearly with a reduction in the interfacial bonded area. The linear trend

  18. Thermalization and its mechanism for generic quantum isolated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshanii, Maxim; Dunjko, Vanja; Rigol, Marcos

    2008-05-01

    Time dynamics of isolated many-body quantum systems has long been an elusive subject, perhaps most urgently needed in the foundations of quantum statistical mechanics. In generic systems, one expects the nonequilibrium dynamics to lead to thermalization: a relaxation to states where the values of macroscopic quantities are stationary, universal with respect to widely differing initial conditions, and predictable through the time-tested recipe of statistical mechanics. The relaxation mechanism is not obvious, however; dynamical chaos cannot play the key role as it does in classical systems since quantum evolution is linear. Here we demonstrateootnotetextM. Rigol, V. Dunjko, and M. Olshanii, to appear in Nature (2008), using the results of an ab initio numerical experiment with 5 hard-core bosons moving in a 5x5 lattice, that in quantum systems thermalization happens not in course of time evolution but instead at the level of individual eigenstates, as first proposed by DeutschootnotetextJ. M. Deutsch, Phys.Rev. A 43, 2046 (1991) and SrednickiootnotetextM. Srednicki, Phys. Rev. E 50, 888 (1994).

  19. The mechanical and thermal setup of the GLORIA spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piesch, C.; Sartorius, C.; Friedl-Vallon, F.; Gulde, T.; Heger, S.; Kretschmer, E.; Maucher, G.; Nordmeyer, H.; Barthel, J.; Ebersoldt, A.; Graf, F.; Hase, F.; Kleinert, A.; Neubert, T.; Schillings, H. J.

    2015-04-01

    The novel airborne Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA) measures infrared emission of atmospheric trace constituents. GLORIA comprises a cooled imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, which is operated in unpressurized aircraft compartments at ambient temperature. The whole spectrometer is pointed by the gimbal towards the atmospheric target. In order to reach the required sensitivity for atmospheric emission measurements, the spectrometer optics needs to operate at a temperature below 220 K. A lightweight and compact design is mandatory due to limited space and high agility requirements. The cooled optical system needs to withstand high pressure and temperature gradients, humidity, and vibrations. A new cooling system based on carbon dioxide and liquid nitrogen combined with high-performance insulation has been developed to meet the mechanical, thermal, and logistical demands. The challenging mechanical and spatial requirements lead to the development of a novel rigid linear slide design in order to achieve the large optical path difference for high spectral resolution. This paper describes the mechanical and thermal setup of GLORIA and presents the performance results on two different research aircrafts.

  20. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Praseodymium Monopnictides: AN Ultrasonic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Vyoma; Kumar, Raj; Tripathy, Chinmayee; Singh, Devraj

    2013-09-01

    We have computed ultrasonic attenuation, acoustic coupling constants and ultrasonic velocities of praseodymium monopnictides PrX(X: N, P, As, Sb and Bi) along the , , in the temperature range 100-500 K using higher order elastic constants. The higher order elastic constants are evaluated using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential with two basic parameters viz. nearest-neighbor distance and hardness parameter in the temperature range of 0-500 K. Several other mechanical and thermal parameters like bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, anisotropic ratio, tetragonal moduli, Breazeale's nonlinearity parameter and Debye temperature are also calculated. In the present study, the fracture/toughness (B/G) ratio is less than 1.75 which implies that PrX compounds are brittle in nature at room temperature. The chosen material fulfilled Born criterion of mechanical stability. We also found the deviation of Cauchy's relation at higher temperatures. PrN is most stable material as it has highest valued higher order elastic constants as well as the ultrasonic velocity. Further, the lattice thermal conductivity using modified approach of Slack and Berman is determined at room temperature. The ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction and thermoelastic relaxation mechanisms have been computed using modified Mason's approach. The results with other well-known physical properties are useful for industrial applications.

  1. Bulk Nanolaminated Nickel: Preparation, Microstructure, Mechanical Property, and Thermal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Yuan, Hao; Goel, Sunkulp; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jing Tao

    2018-02-01

    A bulk nanolaminated (NL) structure with distinctive fractions of low- and high-angle grain boundaries ( f LAGBs and f HAGBs) is produced in pure nickel, through a two-step process of primary grain refinement by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP), followed by a secondary geometrical refinement via liquid nitrogen rolling (LNR). The lamellar boundary spacings of 2N and 4N nickel are refined to 40 and 70 nm, respectively, and the yield strength of the NL structure in 2N nickel reaches 1.5 GPa. The impacts of the deformation path, material purity, grain boundary (GB) misorientation, and energy on the microstructure, refinement ability, mechanical strength, and thermal stability are investigated to understand the inherent governing mechanisms. GB migration is the main restoration mechanism limiting the refinement of an NL structure in 4N nickel, while in 2N nickel, shear banding occurs and mediates one-fifth of the total true normal rolling strain at the mesoscale, restricting further refinement. Three typical structures [ultrafine grained (UFG), NL with low f LAGBs, and NL with high f LAGBs] obtained through three different combinations of ECAP and LNR were studied by isochronal annealing for 1 hour at temperatures ranging from 433 K to 973 K (160 °C to 700 °C). Higher thermal stability in the NL structure with high f LAGBs is shown by a 50 K (50 °C) delay in the initiation temperature of recrystallization. Based on calculations and analyses of the stored energies of deformed structures from strain distribution, as characterized by kernel average misorientation (KAM), and from GB misorientations, higher thermal stability is attributed to high f LAGBs in this type of NL structure. This is confirmed by a slower change in the microstructure, as revealed by characterizing its annealing kinetics using KAM maps.

  2. Bulk Nanolaminated Nickel: Preparation, Microstructure, Mechanical Property, and Thermal Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Yuan, Hao; Goel, Sunkulp; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jing Tao

    2017-11-01

    A bulk nanolaminated (NL) structure with distinctive fractions of low- and high-angle grain boundaries (f LAGBs and f HAGBs) is produced in pure nickel, through a two-step process of primary grain refinement by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP), followed by a secondary geometrical refinement via liquid nitrogen rolling (LNR). The lamellar boundary spacings of 2N and 4N nickel are refined to 40 and 70 nm, respectively, and the yield strength of the NL structure in 2N nickel reaches 1.5 GPa. The impacts of the deformation path, material purity, grain boundary (GB) misorientation, and energy on the microstructure, refinement ability, mechanical strength, and thermal stability are investigated to understand the inherent governing mechanisms. GB migration is the main restoration mechanism limiting the refinement of an NL structure in 4N nickel, while in 2N nickel, shear banding occurs and mediates one-fifth of the total true normal rolling strain at the mesoscale, restricting further refinement. Three typical structures [ultrafine grained (UFG), NL with low f LAGBs, and NL with high f LAGBs] obtained through three different combinations of ECAP and LNR were studied by isochronal annealing for 1 hour at temperatures ranging from 433 K to 973 K (160 °C to 700 °C). Higher thermal stability in the NL structure with high f LAGBs is shown by a 50 K (50 °C) delay in the initiation temperature of recrystallization. Based on calculations and analyses of the stored energies of deformed structures from strain distribution, as characterized by kernel average misorientation (KAM), and from GB misorientations, higher thermal stability is attributed to high f LAGBs in this type of NL structure. This is confirmed by a slower change in the microstructure, as revealed by characterizing its annealing kinetics using KAM maps.

  3. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis of hypromellose 2910 free films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cespi, Marco; Bonacucina, Giulia; Mencarelli, Giovanna; Casettari, Luca; Palmieri, Giovanni Filippo

    2011-10-01

    It is common practice to coat oral solid dosage forms with polymeric materials for controlled release purposes or for practical and aesthetic reasons. Good knowledge of thermo-mechanical film properties or their variation as a function of polymer grade, type and amount of additives or preparation method is of prime importance in developing solid dosage forms. This work focused on the dynamic mechanical thermal characteristics of free films of hypromellose 2910 (also known as HPMC), prepared using three grades of this polymer from two different manufacturers, in order to assess whether polymer chain length or origin affects the mechanical or thermo-mechanical properties of the final films. Hypromellose free films were obtained by casting their aqueous solutions prepared at a specific concentrations in order to obtain the same viscosity for each. The films were stored at room temperature until dried and then examined using a dynamic mechanical analyser. The results of the frequency scans showed no significant differences in the mechanical moduli E' and E″ of the different samples when analysed at room temperature; however, the grade of the polymer affected material transitions during the heating process. Glass transition temperature, apparent activation energy and fragility parameters depended on polymer chain length, while the material brand showed little impact on film performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enabling low-noise null-point scanning thermal microscopy by the optimization of scanning thermal microscope probe through a rigorous theory of quantitative measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwangseok; Chung, Jaehun; Kwon, Ohmyoung

    2014-11-01

    The application of conventional scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is severely limited by three major problems: (i) distortion of the measured signal due to heat transfer through the air, (ii) the unknown and variable value of the tip-sample thermal contact resistance, and (iii) perturbation of the sample temperature due to the heat flux through the tip-sample thermal contact. Recently, we proposed null-point scanning thermal microscopy (NP SThM) as a way of overcoming these problems in principle by tracking the thermal equilibrium between the end of the SThM tip and the sample surface. However, in order to obtain high spatial resolution, which is the primary motivation for SThM, NP SThM requires an extremely sensitive SThM probe that can trace the vanishingly small heat flux through the tip-sample nano-thermal contact. Herein, we derive a relation between the spatial resolution and the design parameters of a SThM probe, optimize the thermal and electrical design, and develop a batch-fabrication process. We also quantitatively demonstrate significantly improved sensitivity, lower measurement noise, and higher spatial resolution of the fabricated SThM probes. By utilizing the exceptional performance of these fabricated probes, we show that NP SThM can be used to obtain a quantitative temperature profile with nanoscale resolution independent of the changing tip-sample thermal contact resistance and without perturbation of the sample temperature or distortion due to the heat transfer through the air.

  5. Basic thermal-mechanical properties and thermal shock, fatigue resistance of swaged + rolled potassium doped tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Yan, Qingzhi; Lang, Shaoting; Xia, Min; Ge, Changchun

    2014-09-01

    The potassium doped tungsten (W-K) grade was achieved via swaging + rolling process. The swaged + rolled W-K alloy exhibited acceptable thermal conductivity of 159.1 W/m K and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 873 K while inferior mechanical properties attributed to the coarse pores and small deformation degree. Then the thermal shock, fatigue resistance of the W-K grade were characterized by an electron beam facility. Thermal shock tests were conducted at absorbed power densities varied from 0.22 to 1.1 GW/m2 in a step of 0.22 GW/m2. The cracking threshold was in the range of 0.44-0.66 GW/m2. Furthermore, recrystallization occurred in the subsurface of the specimens tested at 0.66-1.1 GW/m2 basing on the analysis of microhardness and microstructure. Thermal fatigue tests were performed at 0.44 GW/m2 up to 1000 cycles and no cracks emerged throughout the tests. Moreover, recrystallization occurred after 1000 cycles.

  6. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  7. Assessment of heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system for recycling heavy metals from crushed e-wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-12-01

    Vacuum metallurgy separation (VMS) is a technically feasible method to recover Pb, Cd and other heavy metals from crushed e-wastes. To further determine the environmental impacts and safety of this method, heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system are evaluated in this article. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and PM10 are 0.1503 and 0.0973 mg m(-3) near the facilities. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and Sn in TSP samples are 0.0104, 0.1283 and 0.0961 μg m(-3), respectively. Health risk assessments show that the hazard index of Pb is 3.25 × 10(-1) and that of Cd is 1.09 × 10(-1). Carcinogenic risk of Cd through inhalation is 1.08 × 10(-5). The values of the hazard index and risk indicate that Pb and Cd will not cause non-cancerous effects or carcinogenic risk on workers. The noise sources are mainly the mechanical vacuum pump and the water cooling pump. Both of them have the noise levels below 80 dB (A). The thermal safety assessment shows that the temperatures of the vacuum metallurgy separation system surface are all below 303 K after adopting the circulated water cooling and heat insulation measures. This study provides the environmental information of the vacuum metallurgy separation system, which is of assistance to promote the industrialisation of vacuum metallurgy separation for recovering heavy metals from e-wastes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Distinct promoter activation mechanisms modulate noise-driven HIV gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Arvind K.; Wong, Victor C.; Miller-Jensen, Kathryn

    2015-12-01

    Latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections occur when the virus occupies a transcriptionally silent but reversible state, presenting a major obstacle to cure. There is experimental evidence that random fluctuations in gene expression, when coupled to the strong positive feedback encoded by the HIV genetic circuit, act as a ‘molecular switch’ controlling cell fate, i.e., viral replication versus latency. Here, we implemented a stochastic computational modeling approach to explore how different promoter activation mechanisms in the presence of positive feedback would affect noise-driven activation from latency. We modeled the HIV promoter as existing in one, two, or three states that are representative of increasingly complex mechanisms of promoter repression underlying latency. We demonstrate that two-state and three-state models are associated with greater variability in noisy activation behaviors, and we find that Fano factor (defined as variance over mean) proves to be a useful noise metric to compare variability across model structures and parameter values. Finally, we show how three-state promoter models can be used to qualitatively describe complex reactivation phenotypes in response to therapeutic perturbations that we observe experimentally. Ultimately, our analysis suggests that multi-state models more accurately reflect observed heterogeneous reactivation and may be better suited to evaluate how noise affects viral clearance.

  9. Thermal-mechanical behavior of fuel element in SCWR design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, R.; Yetisir, M.; Hamilton, H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a study on thermal-mechanical behavior of a fuel element proposed for the Canadian Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR). In the Canadian SCWR, the coolant pressure is 25 MPa, and the temperature is 350{sup o}C at the inlet and 625{sup o}C at the outlet of the reactor core. Critical design decisions for fuel design will be the selection of the fuel sheath material and details of the fuel element design options (sheath thickness, pellet-clad gap, internal pressure, etc.). The analysis presented in this paper predicted temperature, stress and strain in the fuel element of the Canadian SCWR with a collapsible sheath using ANSYS. Typical conditions for the evaluation of the fuel behavior, such as linear heat generation rate, coolant temperature and sheath surface heat transfer coefficient, were extracted from core and fuel channel designs. The temperature distribution in the fuel element is predicted by a thermal model and then the thermal model is coupled sequentially with a structural model to predict fuel sheath deformation under the predicted temperature distribution and external (coolant) pressure. Nonlinear thermo-mechanical simulations include nonlinear buckling with elastic-plastic deformation. Three sheath collapse phenomena are considered: (1) elastic collapse by buckling, (2) longitudinal ridging and (3) plastic collapse by yielding. The numerical models are validated against analytical and experimental data. The presented results show the temperature distribution, deformed shape, stress and strain of the fuel element, allowing the designers to select appropriate sheath material and element design options for the SCWR fuel element design. (author)

  10. Flue Gas Desulfurization by Mechanically and Thermally Activated Sodium Bicarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walawska Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of study on structural parameters (particle size, surface area, pore volume and the sorption ability of mechanically and thermally activated sodium bicarbonate. The sorption ability of the modified sorbent was evaluated by: partial and overall SO2 removal efficiency, conversion rate, normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR. Sodium bicarbonate was mechanically activated by various grinding techniques, using three types of mills: fluid bed opposed jet mill, fine impact mill and electromagnetic mill, differing in grinding technology. Grounded sorbent was thermally activated, what caused a significant development of surface area. During the studies of SO2 sorption, a model gas with a temperature of 300°C, of composition: sulfur dioxide at a concentration of 6292 mg/mn3, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen as a carrier gas, was used. The best development of surface area and the highest SO2 removal efficiency was obtained for the sorbent treated by electromagnetic grinding, with simultaneous high conversion rate.

  11. Thermal stability of nafion membranes under mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintilii, M.; Struis, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of adequately modified fluoro-ionomer membranes (NAFION{sup R}) is demonstrated for the selective separation of methanol synthesis products from the raw reactor gas at temperatures around 200{sup o}C. For an economically relevant application of this concept on a technical scale the Nafion membranes should be thin ({approx_equal}10 {mu}m) and thermally stable over a long period of time (1-2 years). In cooperation with industry (Methanol Casale SA, Lugano (CH)), we test the thermal stability of Nafion hollow fibers and supported Nafion thin sheet membranes at temperatures between 160 and 200{sup o}C under mechanical stress by applying a gas pressure difference over the membrane surface ({Delta}P{<=} 40 bar). Tests with the hollow fibers revealed that Nafion has visco-elastic properties. Tests with 50 {mu}m thin Nafion sheets supported by a porous metal carrier at 200{sup o}C and {Delta}P=39 bar showed no mechanical defects over a period of 92 days. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  12. Importance of the Wheel Vertical Dynamics in the Squeal Noise Mechanism on a Scaled Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Collette

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of the wheel vertical dynamics in the mechanism of squeal noise on a scaled test bench. To this purpose, sustained oscillations are first studied on a single degree of freedom oscillator, considering both a decreasing slope of the friction curve and a vertical excitation. Their relative importance to sustain the oscillations is discussed. Then, a mathematical model of a quarter scale test bench is developed in the frequency domain. Using this model, it is shown that the squeal noise resulting from the excitation of the bending modes of the wheel is sustained because these bending modes are associated with variations of the vertical contact force. Results are further confirmed by experiments conducted on a scaled test bench.

  13. Woven glass fabric reinforced laminates based on polyolefin wastes: Thermal, mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Pietro; Acierno, Domenico; Simeoli, Giorgio; Lopresto, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    Potentialities of polyolefin wastes in place of virgin polypropylene to produce composite laminates have been investigated. Plaques reinforced with a woven glass fabric were prepared by film-stacking technique and systematically analyzed in terms of thermal, mechanical and dynamic-mechanical properties. In case of PP matrices, the use of a typical compatibilizer to improve the adhesion at the interface has been considered. Thermal properties emphasized the chemical nature of plastic wastes. About mechanical properties, static tests showed an increase of flexural parameters for compatibilized systems due to the coupling effect between grafted maleic anhydride and silane groups on the surface of the glass fabric. These effects, maximized for composites based on car bumper wastes, is perfectly reflected in terms of storage modulus and damping ability of products as determined by single-cantilever bending dynamic tests.

  14. GIOTTO's antenna de-spin mechanism: Ots lubrication and thermal vacuum performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, M. J.; Parker, K.

    1987-01-01

    Except in the near Earth phase of GIOTTO's mission to Comet Halley, the HGA (high gain antenna) on board GIOTTO was the only designed means of up/down communications. The spacecraft spin stabilization required that the HGA be despun at the same rotational rate of nominally 15 rpm in order to keep the HGA pointing accurately to a Earth. A dual servomotor despin mechanism was designed and built by SEP of France for this purpose. The expected thermal environment suggested that dry lubrication was preferable to wet for the ball bearings but there existed no relevant data on the torque noise spectrum of candidate solid lubricants. Therefore ad hoc torque noise tests were run with two solid lubricants: ion plated lead film plus lead bronze cage (retainer) and a PTFE composite cage only. The lead lubrication showed the better spectrum up to the mission lifetime point so it was selected for continued test over some 20 times the Halley mission life, with periodic torque spectrum monitoring. The spectrum remained well within the pointing error budget over the 100 million revolutions covered.

  15. Mechanisms of thermal interaction of corium with coolants (sodium, water)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuri I Zagorulko; Viktor G Zhmurin; Andrey N Volov; Michail V Kashcheev; Yuri P Kovalev [SSC RF-IPPE named after A.I. Leypunsky, Bondarenko sq. 1, Obninsk, 249033, Kaluga region (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Experimental assessments of corium thermal-energy-to-mechanical-work conversion factors at thermal interaction (TI) with coolants (sodium, water) and the effects of material transport (coolant, its vapor, corium fragments) caused by this interaction provide a basis for testing the physical and computational TI models. It is evident that the physical TI model should provide an adequate description of all parameters to be measured experimentally (pressure history in the system, amplitude-frequency characteristics of vibrational spectra, rate and acceleration of material transport, final corium fragments size distribution and their morphology) in terms of initial conditions of interaction, inertia and geometrical constraints imposed on the system. The paper presents a generalized analysis of experimental results of TI study in systems 'coolant (sodium, water)/corium (melts of thermit mixtures U+MoO{sub 3}, Zr+Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3})' as to possible mechanisms of thermal interaction in these systems. The study was performed with free channels and those encumbered by rod bundles of hexagonal geometry. In all tests, the sodium temperature was {approx} 823 K, that of water {approx} 293 K, at mass ratios M{sub corium}/M{sub coolant} {approx_equal} 0.3-0.6. The corium outflow conditions were set with regard to modeling of fission gas presence (argon in sodium experiments, air in tests with water) at melt temperatures of {approx} 3000 K and gas pressures up to 0.6-1 MPa. The rate of melt outflow amounted to 20 m/s. The kinematic parameters of material transport and impact loads caused by this transport were determined by means of two independent techniques. The first technique was based on measuring residual deformations of bend of calibrated plate elements (copper, steel). The assemblies of these elements were located at a specified distance above the coolant level in the plane perpendicular to the axis of the channel (the interaction

  16. Thermal mechanical analysis of applications with internal heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Srisharan Garg

    control blade, spatial variations in temperature within the control blade occur from the non-uniform heat generation within the BORAL as a result of the non-uniform thermal neutron flux along the longitudinal direction when the control blade is partially withdrawn. There is also variation in the heating profile through the thickness and about the circumferential width of the control blade. Mathematical curve-fits are generated for the non-uniform volumetric heat generation profile caused by the thermal neutron absorption and the functions are applied as heating conditions within a finite element model of the control blade built using the commercial finite element code Abaqus FEA. The finite element model is solved as a fully coupled thermal mechanical problem as in the case of the annular target. The resulting deflection is compared with the channel gap to determine if there is a significant risk of the control blade binding during reactor operation. Hence, this dissertation will consist of two sections. The first section will seek to present the thermal and structural safety analyses of the annular targets for the production of molybdenum-99. Since there hasn't been any detailed, documented, study on these annular targets in the past, the work complied in this dissertation will help to understand the thermal-mechanical behavior and failure margins of the target during in-vessel irradiation. As the work presented in this dissertation provides a general performance analysis envelope for the annular target, the tools developed in the process can also be used as useful references for future analyses that are specific to any reactor. The numerical analysis approach adopted and the analytical models developed, can also be applied to other applications, outside the Mo-99 project domain, where internal heat generation exists such as in electronic components and nuclear reactor control blades. The second section will focus on estimating the thermally induced deflection and hence

  17. Thermal noise due to surface-charge effects within the Debye layer of endogenous structures in dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, Roman R.

    2010-02-01

    An assumption commonly used in cable theory is revised by taking into account electrical amplification due to intracellular capacitive effects in passive dendritic cables. A generalized cable equation for a cylindrical volume representation of a dendritic segment is derived from Maxwell’s equations under assumptions: (i) the electric-field polarization is restricted longitudinally along the cable length; (ii) extracellular isopotentiality; (iii) quasielectrostatic conditions; and (iv) homogeneous medium with constant conductivity and permittivity. The generalized cable equation is identical to Barenblatt’s equation arising in the theory of infiltration in fissured strata with a known analytical solution expressed in terms of a definite integral involving a modified Bessel function and the solution to a linear one-dimensional classical cable equation. Its solution is used to determine the impact of thermal noise on voltage attenuation with distance at any particular time. A regular perturbation expansion for the membrane potential about the linear one-dimensional classical cable equation solution is derived in terms of a Green’s function in order to describe the dynamics of free charge within the Debye layer of endogenous structures in passive dendritic cables. The asymptotic value of the first perturbative term is explicitly evaluated for small values of time to predict how the slowly fluctuating (in submillisecond range) electric field attributed to intracellular capacitive effects alters the amplitude of the membrane potential. It was found that capacitive effects are almost negligible for cables with electrotonic lengths L>0.5 , contributes up to 10% of the signal for cables with electrotonic lengths in the range between 0.25cables (Lcables with both ends sealed are prone to significant neurobiological thermal noise due to intracellular capacitive effects. The presence of significant thermal noise weakens the assumption of intracellular isopotentiality

  18. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  19. Pulsed laser manipulation of an optically trapped bead: Averaging thermal noise and measuring the pulsed force amplitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindballe, Thue Bjerring; Kristensen, Martin V. G.; Keiding, Søren Rud

    2013-01-01

    is analyzed from the direct time-dependent position measurements and from the power spectrum. The results show that the bead is on average displaced 208 nm from the trap center and exposed to a force amplitude of 71 nanoNewton, more than five orders of magnitude larger than the trapping forces. Our......An experimental strategy for post-eliminating thermal noise on position measurements of optically trapped particles is presented. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser, synchronized to the detection system, to exert a periodic driving force on an optically trapped 10 polystyrene bead, the laser pulse...

  20. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Jason R.

    1995-01-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to -184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool. Delayed crack initiation observed in a few cases is attributed to a

  1. Mechanical and Electrical Noise in Sense Channel of MEMS Vibratory Gyroscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xukai; Jia, Jia; Gao, Yang; Li, Hongsheng

    2017-10-11

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of mechanical and electrical noise in the sense channel of micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) vibratory gyroscopes. Closed-form expressions for the power spectral density (PSD) of the noise equivalent rate (NER) of gyroscopes in the open-loop and the force-rebalance operations are derived by using an averaged PSD model and an equivalent transfer function. The obtained expressions are verified through numerical simulations, demonstrating close agreements between the analytic and the numerical models. Based on the derived expressions for the PSD of the NER, the impacts of the modal frequency split, quality factor, and the gain of the feedback forcer, as well as the gain of the signal conditioning circuit, on the gyroscope noise characteristics are theoretically analyzed. In addition, the angle random walk (ARW) and the standard deviation of the NER are also discussed through the PSD models. Finally, the effects of the loop closing, the mode matching, and the gain of the feedback forcer on the PSD of the NER were verified via a MEMS vibratory gyroscope with a tunable modal frequency split.

  2. Mechanical, Thermal and Functional Properties of Green Lightweight Foamcrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, the construction industry has revealed noteworthy attention in the use of lightweight foamcrete as a building material due to its many favourable characteristics such as lighter weight, easy to fabricate, durable and cost effective. Foamcrete is a material consisting of Portland cement paste or cement filler matrix (mortar with a homogeneous pore structure created by introducing air in the form of small bubbles. With a proper control in dosage of foam and methods of production, a wide range of densities (400 – 1600 kg/m 3 of foamcrete can be produced thus providing flexibility for application such as structural elements, partition, insulating materials and filling grades. Foamcrete has so far been applied primarily as a filler material in civil engineering works. However, its good thermal and acoustic performance indicates its strong potential as a material in building construction. The focus of this paper is to classify literature on foamcrete in terms of its mechanical, thermal and functional properties.

  3. Optical, mechanical and thermal behaviors of Nitrilotriacetic acid single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepa, B.; Philominathan, P.

    2017-11-01

    An organic nonlinear single crystal of Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTAA) was grown for the first time by employing a simple slow evaporation technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis reveals that the grown crystal belongs to the monoclinic system with noncentrosymmetric space group CC. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral study ascertains the presence of functional groups in NTAA. The molecular structure of the grown crystal was confirmed by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectral analysis. The optical parameters such as transmittance, absorption coefficient and band gap were calculated from UV-Visible and fluorescence studies. Dielectric measurements were carried out for different frequency and temperature. The mechanical strength of the grown crystal was measured using Vickers microhardness test. The high thermal stability and the melting point of the grown crystal were also estimated using thermogravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal analyses (DTA). The confirmation of the grown crystals belonging to nonlinear optical crystals was performed by Kurtz-Perry technique and found as suitable candidate for optoelectronics applications.

  4. Random telegraphic voltage noise due to thermal bi-stability in a superconducting weak link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sourav; Kumar, Nikhil; Winkelmann, C. B.; Courtois, Herve; Gupta, Anjan K.

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the random telegraphic voltage noise signal in the hysteretic bi-stable state of a superconducting weak link device. Fluctuation induced random switching between zero voltage state and non-zero-voltage state gives rise to a random telegraphic voltage signal in time domain. This telegraphic noise is used to find the mean lifetime of each of the two states. The mean life time in the zero voltage state is found to decrease with increasing bias current while that of resistive state increases and thus the two cross at certain bias current. We qualitatively discuss this observed switching behavior as arising from the bi-stable nature.

  5. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Raghav [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg 412 96 (Sweden); Heinonen, O. G. [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Åkerman, J. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg 412 96 (Sweden); Materials Physics, School of ICT, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, Kista 164 40 (Sweden); Muduli, P. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg 412 96 (Sweden)

    2014-09-29

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  6. Mechanisms of thermal balance in flying Centris pallida (Hymenoptera: Anthophoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S P; Harrison, J F; Hadley, N F

    1998-08-01

    Thermoregulation of the thorax is critical for bees and other endothermic insects to achieve high rates of flight muscle power production. However, the mechanisms allowing insects to regulate thorax temperatures during flight are not well understood. To test whether variations in metabolic heat production, evaporation or heat transfer from the thorax to the abdomen contribute to the maintenance of stable body temperatures during flight in the bee Centris pallida, we measured CO2 production, water vapor loss, wingbeat frequency and body segment temperatures during flight at varying air temperatures (Ta). While hovering in the field and while flying in the respirometer, C. pallida males maintain extremely stable, elevated thorax temperatures (45+/-2 degrees C; mean +/- S.E.M.). Measurements of head, thorax and abdomen temperatures as a function of Ta during hovering flight in the field indicated that C. pallida males were not actively increasing heat transfer from the thorax to the head or abdomen at high Ta values. As Ta increased from 26 to 35 degrees C, increases in evaporative water loss were relatively small compared with the decrease in carbon dioxide emission. As Ta values increased from 26 to 35 degrees C, the factorial decreases in metabolic heat production and the elevation of thorax temperature above Ta were closely matched (35 %), suggesting that variation in metabolic heat production is the major mechanism of thermoregulation in flying C. pallida. The thermal effects on rates of water loss and metabolic water production resulted in a strong positive water balance at cooler Ta values, but a strong negative water balance at Ta values above 31 degrees C. During the first minute of flight in the respirometry chamber, wingbeat frequency was independent of Ta. However, by the fourth minute, there was a significant negative relationship between Ta and wingbeat frequency, which was similar to the thermal relationship observed for wingbeat frequency in the field

  7. Optimization and thermal ASE noise characterization of an all-fibre Sagnac interferometer via LAN for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Calderon, A.; Rodriguez-Novelo, J. C.; Gamez-Aviles, E.; May-Alarcon, M.; Toral-Cruz, H.; Alvarez-Chavez, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    The spectral noise characteristic and relative intensity noise of an all fibre Sagnac interferometer system consisting of a 980nm pump source at 130mW maximum output power, a 980/1550nm wavelength division multiplexer, a 10m-piece of Erbium-doped fibre, a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) centered at 1.548um, an optical circulator at 1550nm and a 50/50 fibre coupler, were measured with an optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) for fine tuning for a range of temperature between 5 and 180 degrees Celsius in step of 1 degree Celsius. At the probing end, a high-bi piece of fibre and a Peltier were employed for temperature variation of the system. Spectral and temperature response of the noise reduction due to temperature variation was performed remotely using and Arduino micro-controller and a DS18B20 digital sensor, into a local area network. Full optical and thermal characterization of the system will be included in the presentation.

  8. Mechanism of crack initiation and crack growth under thermal and mechanical fatigue loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utz, S.; Soppa, E.; Silcher, H.; Kohler, C. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Materials Testing Inst.

    2013-07-01

    The present contribution is focused on the experimental investigations and numerical simulations of the deformation behaviour and crack development in the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal and mechanical cyclic loading in HCF and LCF regimes. The main objective of this research is the understanding of the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage and the development of simulation methods, which can be applied further in safety evaluations of nuclear power plant components. In this context the modelling of crack initiation and crack growth inside the material structure induced by varying thermal or mechanical loads are of particular interest. The mechanisms of crack initiation depend among other things on the type of loading, microstructure, material properties and temperature. The Nb-stabilized austenitic stainless steel in the solution-annealed condition was chosen for the investigations. Experiments with two kinds of cyclic loading - pure thermal and pure mechanical - were carried out and simulated. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal loading was studied within the framework of the joint research project [4]. Interrupted thermal cyclic tests in the temperature range of 150 C to 300 C combined with non-destructive residual stress measurements (XRD) and various microscopic investigations, e.g. in SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), were used to study the effects of thermal cyclic loading on the material. This thermal cyclic loading leads to thermal induced stresses and strains. As a result intrusions and extrusions appear inside the grains (at the surface), at which microcracks arise and evolve to a dominant crack. Finally, these microcracks cause a continuous and significant decrease of residual stresses. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under mechanical loading at room temperature was studied within the framework of the research project [5], [8]. With a combination of interrupted LCF tests and EBSD

  9. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  10. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubon Usca, G., E-mail: gabriela.tubon@fis.unical.it [Surface Nanoscience Group, Department of Physics, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 33C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); DIMES - University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 42C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Hernandez-Ambato, J., E-mail: jhernandez@dimes.unical.it [DIMES - University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 42C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Pace, C., E-mail: calogero.pace@unical.it [DIMES - University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 42C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Caputi, L.S., E-mail: lorenzo.caputi@fis.unical.it [Surface Nanoscience Group, Department of Physics, University of Calabria, Via P. Bucci cubo 33C, 87036, Rende, Cosenza (Italy); Tavolaro, A., E-mail: a.tavolaro@itm.cnr.it [Research Institute on Membrane Technology (ITM-CNR), cubo 17C, 87036 University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, Cosenza (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was exfoliated in liquid phase also in the presence of zeolite 4A. • Films were obtained by drop-casting. • SEM, Raman, low-frequency noise and thermal electric measurements show that the presence of zeolite improves the quality of the FLG films. - Abstract: In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm{sup 2}. The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  11. Noise Robust Feature Scheme for Automatic Speech Recognition Based on Auditory Perceptual Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shang; Xiao, Yeming; Pan, Jielin; Zhao, Qingwei; Yan, Yonghong

    Mel Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC) are the most popular acoustic features used in automatic speech recognition (ASR), mainly because the coefficients capture the most useful information of the speech and fit well with the assumptions used in hidden Markov models. As is well known, MFCCs already employ several principles which have known counterparts in the peripheral properties of human hearing: decoupling across frequency, mel-warping of the frequency axis, log-compression of energy, etc. It is natural to introduce more mechanisms in the auditory periphery to improve the noise robustness of MFCC. In this paper, a k-nearest neighbors based frequency masking filter is proposed to reduce the audibility of spectra valleys which are sensitive to noise. Besides, Moore and Glasberg's critical band equivalent rectangular bandwidth (ERB) expression is utilized to determine the filter bandwidth. Furthermore, a new bandpass infinite impulse response (IIR) filter is proposed to imitate the temporal masking phenomenon of the human auditory system. These three auditory perceptual mechanisms are combined with the standard MFCC algorithm in order to investigate their effects on ASR performance, and a revised MFCC extraction scheme is presented. Recognition performances with the standard MFCC, RASTA perceptual linear prediction (RASTA-PLP) and the proposed feature extraction scheme are evaluated on a medium-vocabulary isolated-word recognition task and a more complex large vocabulary continuous speech recognition (LVCSR) task. Experimental results show that consistent robustness against background noise is achieved on these two tasks, and the proposed method outperforms both the standard MFCC and RASTA-PLP.

  12. Flight and wind tunnel test results of the mechanical jet noise suppressor nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, R. D.; McKinnon, R. A.; Johnson, E. S.; Brooks, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Comprehensive acoustic and propulsion data are presented, based on flight and wind tunnel tests, of a mechanical jet noise suppressor designed to satisfy the requirements of an advanced supersonic transport (AST) under study by the McDonnell Douglas Corporation. The flight program was conducted jointly by MDC, Rolls-Royce Ltd., and the British Aerospace Corporation, using an HS-125 aircraft modified to accept an upgraded RR Viper 601 engine with conical reference and mechanical suppressor nozzles and an acoustically treated ejector. The nacelle, engine and nozzle configurations from the HS-125 were also tested in one of NASA's wind tunnels to obtain thrust performance at forward velocity and acoustic data. The acoustic flight test data, when scaled to an AST engine nozzle size and projected to a typical sideline distance, indicate reduction in effective perceived noise level of 16 EPNdB at the takeoff power setting. It is estimated that the in-flight thrust loss for a typical AST suppressor/ejector nozzle configuration (37.5 inch equivalent diameter) would be 5.4 percent at takeoff power settings and 6.6 percent at cutback power settings.

  13. Analysis of thermal comfort and indoor air quality in a mechanically ventilated theatre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavgic, M.; Mumovic, D.; Young, A. [The Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, England (United Kingdom); Stevanovic, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences - Vinca, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (RS)

    2008-07-01

    Theatres are the most complex of all auditorium structures environmentally. They usually have high heat loads, which are of a transient nature as audiences come and go, and from lighting which changes from scene to scene, and they generally have full or nearly full occupancy. Theatres also need to perform well acoustically, both for the spoken word and for music, and as sound amplification is less used than in other auditoria, background noise control is critically important. All these factors place constraints on the ventilation design, and if this is poor, it can lead to the deterioration of indoor air quality and thermal comfort. To analyse the level of indoor air quality and thermal comfort in a typical medium-sized mechanically ventilated theatre, and to identify where improvements could typically be made, a comprehensive post-occupancy evaluation study was carried out on a theatre in Belgrade. The evaluation, based on the results of monitoring (temperature, relative humidity, CO{sub 2}, air speed and heat flux) and modelling (CFD), as well as the assessment of comfort and health as perceived by occupants, has shown that for most of the monitored period the environmental parameters were within the standard limits of thermal comfort and IAQ. However, two important issues were identified, which should be borne in mind by theatre designers in the future. First, the calculated ventilation rates showed that the theatre was over-ventilated, which will have serious consequences for its energy consumption, and secondly, the displacement ventilation arrangement employed led to higher than expected complaints of cold discomfort, probably due to cold draughts around the occupants' feet. (author)

  14. ATS-6 engineering performance report. Volume:Program and systems summaries: Mechanical and thermal details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, R. O. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The overall mission and spacecraft systems, testing, and operations are summarized. The mechanical subsystems are reviewed, encompassing mechanical design requirements; separation and deployment mechanisms; design and performance evaluation; and the television camera reflector monitor. Thermal control and contamination are discussed in terms of thermal control subsystems, design validation, subsystems performance, the advanced flight experiment, and the quartz-crystal microbalance contamination monitor.

  15. Thermal and mechanical stability of retained austenite surrounded by martensite with different degrees of tempering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidalgo Garcia, J.; Findley, K.O.; Santofimia Navarro, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal stability of austenite in multiphase advanced high strength steels are influenced by the surrounding microstructure. The mechanisms underlying and the relations between thermal and mechanical stability are still dubious due to the difficulty of isolating other factors

  16. Evaluation of thermal protection structure mechanism of LMR reactor vessels and design improvement for thermal stress reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Sang; Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hun; Lee, Jae Han

    2003-03-01

    LMR reactor vessels operated in high temperature have a severe thermal damage due to the significant temperature gradient in the hot pool free surface regions of reactor vessel. The thermal protection mechanism of LMR reactor vessel should be designed for the structural integrity in high temperature condition. In this study, the thermal protection mechanism of foreign LMR reactor vessels is investigated for the power upgrade of KALIMER and the modified reactor baffle design with a Y-piece type structure is proposed for the reduction of thermal damage for KALIMER reactor vessel. The modified reactor baffle design leads to reduce the thermal damage such as creep-fatigue and ratcheting in the transient operation condition.

  17. New numerical model for thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on two-stage thermal stimulation of thermoluminescence model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kadari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal quenching plays an important role in the thermoluminescence (TL of quartz on which many applications of TL are based. The studies of the stability and kinetics of the 325 °C thermoluminescence peak in quartz are described by Wintle (1975, which show the occurrence of thermal quenching, the decrease in luminescence efficiency with rise in temperature. The thermal quenching of thermoluminescence in quartz was studied experimentally by several authors. The simulations work presented in the literature is based on the single-stage thermal stimulation model of thermoluminescence, in spite of that the mechanisms of this effect remain incomplete. This paper presents a new numerical model for thermal quenching in quartz, using the previously published two-stage thermal stimulation of thermoluminescence model.

  18. Effect of atomic noise on optical squeezing via polarization self-rotation in a thermal vapor cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, M.T.L.; Hetet, G.; Peng, A.

    2006-01-01

    The traversal of an elliptically polarized optical field through a thermal vapor cell can give rise to a rotation of its polarization axis. This process, known as polarization self-rotation (PSR), has been suggested as a mechanism for producing squeezed light at atomic transition wavelengths. We...

  19. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  20. Spin-transfer torque magnetization reversal in uniaxial nanomagnets with thermal noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, D.; Kent, A. D.; Stein, D. L.

    2013-07-01

    We consider the general Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) dynamical theory underlying the magnetization switching rates of a thin film uniaxial magnet subject to spin-torque effects and thermal fluctuations. After discussing the various dynamical regimes governing the switching phenomena, we present analytical results for the mean switching time behavior. Our approach, based on explicitly solving the first passage time problem, allows for a straightforward analysis of the thermally assisted, low spin-torque, switching asymptotics of thin film magnets. To verify our theory, we have developed an efficient Graphics Processing Unit (GPU)-based micromagnetic code to simulate the stochastic LLG dynamics out to millisecond timescales. We explore the effects of geometrical tilts between the spin-current and uniaxial anisotropy axes on the thermally assisted dynamics. We find that even in the absence of axial symmetry, the switching times can be functionally described in a form virtually identical to the collinear case.

  1. Corticothalamic Synaptic Noise as a Mechanism for Selective Attention in Thalamic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eBéhuret

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A reason why the thalamus is more than a passive gateway for sensory signals is that two-third of the synapses of thalamocortical neurons are directly or indirectly related to the activity of corticothalamic axons. While the responses of thalamocortical neurons evoked by sensory stimuli are well characterized, with ON- and OFF-center receptive field structures, the prevalence of synaptic noise resulting from neocortical feedback in intracellularly recorded thalamocortical neurons in vivo has attracted little attention. However, in vitro and modeling experiments point to its critical role for the integration of sensory signals. Here we combine our recent findings in a unified framework suggesting the hypothesis that corticothalamic synaptic activity is adapted to modulate the transfer efficiency of thalamocortical neurons during selective attention at three different levels: First, on ionic channels by interacting with intrinsic membrane properties, second at the neuron level by impacting on the input-output gain, and third even more effectively at the cell assembly level by boosting the information transfer of sensory features encoded in thalamic subnetworks. This top-down population control is achieved by tuning the correlations in subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations and is adapted to modulate the transfer of sensory features encoded by assemblies of thalamocortical relay neurons. We thus propose that cortically-controlled (de-correlation of subthreshold noise is an efficient and swift dynamic mechanism for selective attention in the thalamus.

  2. Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Simulation of Lithium-Ion Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Zhang, Chao; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Models capture the force response for single-cell and cell-string levels to within 15%-20% accuracy and predict the location for the origin of failure based on the deformation data from the experiments. At the module level, there is some discrepancy due to poor mechanical characterization of the packaging material between the cells. The thermal response (location and value of maximum temperature) agrees qualitatively with experimental data. In general, the X-plane results agree with model predictions to within 20% (pending faulty thermocouples, etc.); the Z-plane results show a bigger variability both between the models and test-results, as well as among multiple repeats of the tests. The models are able to capture the timing and sequence in voltage drop observed in the multi-cell experiments; the shapes of the current and temperature profiles need more work to better characterize propagation. The cells within packaging experience about 60% less force under identical impact test conditions, so the packaging on the test articles is robust. However, under slow-crush simulations, the maximum deformation of the cell strings with packaging is about twice that of cell strings without packaging.

  3. Mechanical performance experiments on rock and cement, casing residual stress evaluation in the thermal recovery well based on thermal-structure coupling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Yong; Peng, Xu; Yu, Hao

    2017-01-01

    .... In this paper, mechanical performance experiments on rock and cement are carried out first, and then a finite element mechanical model of thermal recovery wellbore based on thermal-structure coupling is established...

  4. Mechanically Stretchable and Electrically Insulating Thermal Elastomer Composite by Liquid Alloy Droplet Embedment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seung Hee; Chen, Si; Huo, Jinxing; Gamstedt, Erik Kristofer; Liu, Johan; Zhang, Shi-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Bin; Hjort, Klas; Wu, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    Stretchable electronics and soft robotics have shown unsurpassed features, inheriting remarkable functions from stretchable and soft materials. Electrically conductive and mechanically stretchable materials based on composites have been widely studied for stretchable electronics as electrical conductors using various combinations of materials. However, thermally tunable and stretchable materials, which have high potential in soft and stretchable thermal devices as interface or packaging materials, have not been sufficiently studied. Here, a mechanically stretchable and electrically insulating thermal elastomer composite is demonstrated, which can be easily processed for device fabrication. A liquid alloy is embedded as liquid droplet fillers in an elastomer matrix to achieve softness and stretchability. This new elastomer composite is expected useful to enhance thermal response or efficiency of soft and stretchable thermal devices or systems. The thermal elastomer composites demonstrate advantages such as thermal interface and packaging layers with thermal shrink films in transient and steady-state cases and a stretchable temperature sensor. PMID:26671673

  5. Excess white noise to probe transport mechanisms in a membrane channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queralt-Martín, María; López, M. Lidón; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Current fluctuation analysis has been successfully used over the years to investigate the physical properties of different systems. Here, we perform single-channel time-resolved current experiments in a protein channel to evaluate the different transport mechanisms governing the channel function. Using different salts of monovalent and divalent cations in a wide range of concentrations and applied potentials, we analyze current fluctuations focusing on the voltage dependence of the additional white noise that appears in the low-frequency range of the spectra. We demonstrate that the channel displays two characteristic transport regimes: at low salt concentrations (10 mM to 1 M) ion permeation is controlled by the protein fixed charges that induce accumulation or exclusion of ions to preserve local electroneutrality. At high salt concentrations (>1 M ) adsorption processes associated to the binding of cations to the channel charges regulate the transport properties.

  6. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Jesper Givskov Sørensen; Mads Fristrup Schou; Torsten Nygaard Kristensen; Volker Loeschcke

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by ...

  7. Geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical factors which influence repository design in the bedded salt environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, J.P.; Nair, O.; Ortman, D.; Rowe, J.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical considerations applicable to repository design. The topics discussed in the report include: tectonic activity; geologic structure; stratigraphy; rock mechanical properties; and hydrologic properties.

  8. Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Analysis of Failure Propagation in Lithium-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-07-28

    This is a presentation given at the 12th World Congress for Computational Mechanics on coupled mechanical-electrochemical-thermal analysis of failure propagation in lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles.

  9. Thermal Explosion in a Mechanically Activated Ti-Ni System: Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, O. V.; Shkoda, O. A.

    2017-01-01

    A mathematical model of a thermal explosion in a mechanically pre-activated Ti-Ni system is constructed in a macroscopic approximation. It is found out that preliminary mechanical activation considerably accelerates the reaction product synthesis. Using the experimental data obtained earlier, the thermal and kinetic constants of the synthesis are determined.

  10. A Rat Model of Full Thickness Thermal Injury Characterized by Thermal Hyperalgesia, Mechanical Allodynia, Pronociceptive Peptide Release and Tramadol Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    4 weeks (n 2 per time point) post injury to visualize burn pathology . A board certified veterinary pathol ogist characterized the degree of burn...an animal model of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia evoked by full thickness thermal injury that shares pathological characteristics with...sections were rinsed in potassium phosphate buffered saline (KPBS) and incubated in primary antibody solution rabbit anti CGRP (1:10,000; Immunostar; Hudson

  11. Terahertz bolometric detection by thermal noise in graphene field effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahjoub, Akram M.; Suzuki, Shinichi; Ouchi, Takahiro; Aoki, Nobuyuki; Miyamoto, Katsuhiko; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Omatsu, Takashige; Ishibashi, Koji; Ochiai, Yuichi

    2015-08-01

    Monolayer (MLG) and bilayer (BLG) graphene devices have been fabricated with integrated antennas and have been investigated for a wideband terahertz (THz) detection at room temperature (RT). The devices show opposite (metallic vs. semiconducting, respectively) temperature coefficients of their resistance, which enable us to achieve a reproducible THz response via bolometric heating. The bolometric nature of this response is inferred by determining the spectral density of the 1/f resistance noise exhibited by the devices, as a function of the incident THz power. With increasing power, the spectral density varies in the two devices in a manner that reflects the opposite signs of their resistance temperature coefficients. The bolometric response is furthermore confirmed for both devices by the variation of their Hooge parameter as a function of the THz power. Overall, these observations confirm the capacity of graphene devices for sensitive broadband THz detection near RT.

  12. Radio-frequency tunnel-junction shot noise thermometry and its application to the study of thermal properties at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Hwan; Ha, Dong-Gwang; Song, Woon; Chong, Yonuk

    2013-03-01

    We developed a radio-frequency broadband measurement setup for shot noise thermometry in the temperature range from 0.1 K to 300 K. The noise power from a metallic tunnel junction was measured at 1 GHz with a bandwidth of 400 MHz. Very small noise signal from the tunnel junction was amplified by a cryogenic HEMT amplifier. The signal was then amplified by a room temperature amplifiers followed by a diode detector that converts the noise power into voltage output. Broadband measurement technique enables a fast measurement of RF signal. The shot noise thermometer directly measures the electron temperature and our measurement uncertainty is less than 3% in the sub-Kelvin range. Because of the small size of the tunnel junction, local measurement of the temperature on a device is possible. Since we measure the electron temperature directly, we can apply this technique to the study of thermal properties at low temperature.We suggest a method of measuring electron temperature before and after a thermal process in a chip at low temperature, which will help understanding of the thermal properties of electron-phonon system at low temperature.

  13. Pathogenesis mechanism by noise induced clinical pictures-lessons from the Spandau health-survey; Pathogenesemechanismen bei laerminduzierten Krankheitsbildern - Schlussfolgerungen aus dem Spandauer Gesundheits-Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maschke, C. [Forschungs- und Beratungsbuero Maschke (FBB-Maschke), Berlin (Germany); Hecht, K. [Interdisziplinaerer Forschungsverbund Laerm und Gesundheit, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Traffic noise (road noise, flight noise, train noise) is the predominant noise source in the living environment, followed by neighbourhood noise. Through the central nervous processes noise can lead, via disturbed sleep as well as via subjective experience, to an inadequate neuro-endocrine reaction with the possibility of finally leading to diseases which are mediated or triggered by stress. Noise induced health disturbances by traffic noise is a large and contrarily discussed problem. In the context of the Spandau health survey, both the noise load (equivalent sound level) and the noise experience (disturbances) were collected and the relationship with medically treated illnesses evaluated. The results suggest that two different ''effect mechanisms'' exist regarding the health effect of traffic noise. Besides the noise disturbed sleep, an insufficient coping with the noise exposures can lead to increased disease risks. The study shows convincing relations between impairments of the heart circulation system (e.g. with hypertension) and the nightly equivalent sound level (22.00-6:00 hours) at the place of residents of the test persons. It has to be assumed that this is the long-term result of sleep which is not restful. On the other hand, psychic disturbances were less connected to the sound level and had more correlation with the noise experience. With psychic disturbances the individual overtaxing of the information-processing processes plays an important role and is classified as an emotional stress situation. (orig.)

  14. Thermal mechanical stress modeling of GCtM seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chambers, Robert [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Finite-element thermal stress modeling at the glass-ceramic to metal (GCtM) interface was conducted assuming heterogeneous glass-ceramic microstructure. The glass-ceramics were treated as composites consisting of high expansion silica crystalline phases dispersed in a uniform residual glass. Interfacial stresses were examined for two types of glass-ceramics. One was designated as SL16 glass -ceramic, owing to its step-like thermal strain curve with an overall coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at 16 ppm/ºC. Clustered Cristobalite is the dominant silica phase in SL16 glass-ceramic. The other, designated as NL16 glass-ceramic, exhibited clusters of mixed Cristobalite and Quartz and showed a near-linear thermal strain curve with a same CTE value.

  15. Improved Standard Electronic Modules, Thermal and Mechanical Analyses and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-01

    center frame. For greater detail on the computer solution to the Comuter -Aided Thermal Modeling, refer to Standard Electronic Modules Exploratory... solutions were obtained for all frame designs and component layout configurations using three metal alloys having different thermal conductivities...as a heat conducting element, was neglected. Concerning this, a separate computer solution was made considering the ISEM fin top as being .270 inch

  16. Enhanced mechanical and thermal properties of regenerated cellulose/graphene composite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Mingwei; Qu, Lijun; Zhang, Xiansheng; Zhang, Kun; Zhu, Shifeng; Guo, Xiaoqing; Han, Guangting; Tang, Xiaoning; Sun, Yaning

    2014-10-13

    In this study, a wet spinning method was applied to fabricate regenerated cellulose fibers filled with low graphene loading which was systematically characterized by SEM, TEM, FTIR and XRD techniques. Subsequently, the mechanical and thermal properties of the resulting fibers were investigated. With only 0.2 wt% loading of graphene, a ∼ 50% improvement of tensile strength and 25% enhancement of Young's modulus were obtained and the modified Halpin-Tsai model was built to predict the mechanical properties of composite fibers. Thermal analysis of the composite fibers showed remarkably enhanced thermal stability and dynamic heat transfer performance of graphene-filled cellulose composite fiber, also, the presence of graphene oxide can significantly enhance the thermal conductivity of the composite fiber. This work provided a facile way to improve mechanical and thermal properties of regenerated cellulose fibers. The resultant composite fibers have potential application in thermal insulation and reinforced fibrous materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Agave nonwovens in polypropylene composites: mechanical and thermal studies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available nonwovens on the mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties of composites were investigated. Composites containing agave-polypropylene (A-PP) nonwovens exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to the other two. Storage modulus of the composites...

  18. Thermal-Mechanical and Thermal Behavior of High-Temperature Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-31

    Physical Constants of Porcelain ," Nagoya Kogyo Gijutsu Shikensko Hokoku, 8 [5] 37-43 (1959); Ceram. Abstracts, 1959, Nov. p. 287a. 6. F. P. Knudsen...engineering materials appropriate for conditions which require high thermal shock resistance in combination with good thermal insulating ability"C. Finally

  19. Analysis Methods of HTLS Conductors in Terms of Mechanical and Thermal Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kubek

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A thermal modernization allows increasing the thermal rating of the existing lines. This especially concerns the older overhead lines designed for the +40°C temperature conductor limit. This paper presents reconductoring as the attractive method of existing line thermal modernization. The article provides an overview of issues related to the selection of the HTLS conductor for thermal uprating of existing overhead transmission lines. Some aspects related to the extension of the thermal, electrical and mechanical models used so far for analysis of HTLS conductors are presented in the paper.

  20. Mechanical spectroscopy of thermal stress relaxation in aluminium alloys reinforced with short alumina fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreno-Morelli, E.; Schaller, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Genie Atomique; Urreta, S.E.

    1998-05-01

    The mechanical behaviour under low temperature thermal cycling of aluminium-based composites reinforced with short Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} SAFFIL fibres has been investigated by mechanical spectroscopy (mechanical loss and elastic shear modulus measurements). A mechanical loss maximum has been observed during cooling which originates in the relaxation of thermal stresses at the interfaces due to the differential thermal expansion between matrix and reinforcement. The maximum height increases with the volumetric fibre content. In addition, if the matrix strength is increased by the appropriated choice of alloy and thermal treatment, the maximum diminishes and shifts to lower temperatures. No damage accumulation at the interfaces has been detected during long period thermal cycling in the range 100 to 500 K. A description of the damping behaviour is made in terms of the development of microplastic zones which surround the fibres. (orig.) 9 refs.

  1. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polymethyl Methacrylate-BN Nanotube Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Zhi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA-BN nanotube (BNNT composites were fabricated and their mechanical and thermal properties were analyzed. Using a 1 wt.% BNNTs fraction in a polymer, the elastic modulus of PMMA was increased up to 19%. In addition, thermal stability and glass transition temperature of PMMA were also positively affected. The thermal conductivity of PMMA with BNNT additions increased three times. The resultant BNNT-PMMA composites possess the high electrical breakover voltages. Thus our studies clearly indicate that BNNTs are promising nanofillers for improvement of mechanical and thermal conductivity of dielectric polymers under preservation of their electrical insulation.

  2. Nano-Kelvin thermometry and temperature control: beyond the thermal noise limit

    CERN Document Server

    Weng, Wenle; Stace, Thomas M; Campbell, Geoff; Baynes, Fred N; Luiten, Andre N

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate thermometry with a resolution of 80 $\\mathrm{nK} / \\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$ using an isotropic crystalline whispering-gallery mode resonator based on a dichroic dual-mode technique. We simultaneously excite two modes that have a mode frequency ratio very close to two ($\\pm0.3$ppm). The wavelength- and temperature-dependence of the refractive index means that the frequency difference between these modes is an ultra-sensitive proxy of the resonator temperature. This approach to temperature sensing automatically suppresses sensitivity to thermal expansion and vibrationally induced changes of the resonator. We also demonstrate active suppression of temperature fluctuations in the resonator by controlling the intensity of the driving laser. The residual temperature fluctuations are shown to be below the limits set by fundamental thermodynamic fluctuations of the resonator material.

  3. Detecting impact signal in mechanical fault diagnosis under chaotic and Gaussian background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinfeng; Duan, Jie; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Huiyong; Xie, Julan; Chen, Hanwen

    2018-01-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. Traditional methods, such like stochastic resonance (SR), which using noise to enhance weak signals instead of suppressing noise, failed in chaotic background. Neural network, which use reference sequence to estimate and reconstruct the background noise, failed in white Gaussian noise. To solve these problems, a novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting impact signal buried under heavy chaotic and Gaussian background noise is proposed. First, the proposed method obtains the virtual reference sequence by constructing the Hankel data matrix. Then an M-order optimal FIR filter is designed, which can minimize the output power of background noise and pass the weak periodic signal undistorted. Finally, detection and reconstruction of the weak periodic signal are achieved from the output SBNR (signal to background noise ratio). The simulation shows, compared with the stochastic resonance (SR) method, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in chaotic noise background while stochastic resonance (SR) method cannot. Compared with the neural network method, (a) the proposed method does not need a reference sequence while neural network method needs one; (b) the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in white Gaussian noise background while the neural network method fails, in chaotic noise background, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal under a lower SBNR (about 8-17 dB lower) than the neural network method; (c) the proposed method can reconstruct the weak periodic signal precisely.

  4. Proposed mechanism for learning and memory erasure in a white-noise-driven sleeping cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L.; Steyn-Ross, D. A.; Sleigh, J. W.; Wilson, M. T.; Wilcocks, Lara C.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the structure and purpose of sleep remains one of the grand challenges of neurobiology. Here we use a mean-field linearized theory of the sleeping cortex to derive statistics for synaptic learning and memory erasure. The growth in correlated low-frequency high-amplitude voltage fluctuations during slow-wave sleep (SWS) is characterized by a probability density function that becomes broader and shallower as the transition into rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep is approached. At transition, the Shannon information entropy of the fluctuations is maximized. If we assume Hebbian-learning rules apply to the cortex, then its correlated response to white-noise stimulation during SWS provides a natural mechanism for a synaptic weight change that will tend to shut down reverberant neural activity. In contrast, during REM sleep the weights will evolve in a direction that encourages excitatory activity. These entropy and weight-change predictions lead us to identify the final portion of deep SWS that occurs immediately prior to transition into REM sleep as a time of enhanced erasure of labile memory. We draw a link between the sleeping cortex and Landauer’s dissipation theorem for irreversible computing [R. Landauer, IBM J. Res. Devel. 5, 183 (1961)], arguing that because information erasure is an irreversible computation, there is an inherent entropy cost as the cortex transits from SWS into REM sleep.

  5. Investigation of casing connection failure mechanisms in thermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, J. [C-FER Technologies, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Thermal well technologies use casing strings that consist of casing joints linked by threaded connections that are cemented over the wellbore's length in order to provide structural support and hydraulic isolation to the wellbore. Studies have demonstrated that over 80 per cent of uphole casing failures occur at the casing joint connections, and are caused by thread rupture or structural damage. This study discussed thermal well failures related to casing connection damage. Finite element analyses (FEA) were then conducted to consider various critical load conditions with a generic premium casing connection. The study considered structural integrity losses, fatigue, and leakage during connection installation. Results of the study were then used to optimize casing connection designs. The study showed that thermal cycle and curvature loading can have an impact on the structural and sealing performance of premium connections. Connection structural performance should be evaluated in order to determine appropriate designs for thermal well applications. It was concluded that the connection shoulder region is a critical area for material fatigue failure. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Influence of mechanical milling and thermal annealing on electrical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    the cation distribution. The dielectric constant is smaller by an order of magnitude and the dielectric loss is three orders of magnitude smaller for the milled sample compared to that of the bulk. In the case of cobalt ferrite, the observed decrease in conductivity, when the grain size is increased from 8–92 nm upon thermal.

  7. Mechanism studies on thermal dissociation of tri-n-octylamine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHUNHUA DONG

    2017-09-02

    Sep 2, 2017 ... Abstract. The thermal dissociation of tri-n-octylamine hydrochloride (TOAHCl) was investigated using both the quantum chemical simulation and experimental methods. The pathway through which a mixture of tri- n-octylamine (TOA) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), rather than di-n-octylamine (DOA) and ...

  8. Parametric fuselage design : Integration of mechanics and acoustic & thermal insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krakers, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Designing a fuselage is a very complex process, which involves many different aspects like strength and stability, fatigue, damage tolerance, fire resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation but also inspection, maintenance, production and repair aspects. It is difficult to include all design

  9. Thermal dynamics-based mechanism for intense laser-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser material processing involving welding, ablation and cutting involves interaction of intense laser pulses of .... nological processes like keyhole generation during laser welding, cutting and laser material ablation. 2. Thermal ..... The simulations also show that the motion of the melt from the centre of the interaction zone ...

  10. Thermal dynamics-based mechanism for intense laser-induced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Laser material processing involving welding, ablation and cutting involves interaction of intense laser pulses of nanosecond duration with a condensed phase. ... the vaporization process and consequent non-linear multiple thermal phase transitions under the action of laser plasma is the subject matter of the present work.

  11. Molecular mechanisms underlying thermal adaptation of xeric animals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu Sudhan

    2007-03-15

    Mar 15, 2007 ... The thermal threshold of induction of heat shock proteins in desert thermophylic species is, as a rule, higher than in the species from less extreme .... dry Central Asian deserts. The results of our studies ... (L) (lane 6) receiving no heat shock treatment (c); lanes 2, 3 and 4,. P. interscapularis heat shocked (h) ...

  12. Analysis of seismic noise to check the mechanical isolation of a medical device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rombetto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the mechanical response of a magnetically shielded room that hosts a magnetoencephalography system that is subject to external vibrations. This is a superconducting quantum interference device, which are the most sensitive sensors for magnetic flux variations. When the magnetoencephalography operates with people inside the room, the spectrum of the flux of the magnetic field shows anomalous peaks at several frequencies between 1 Hz and 20 Hz, independent of the experiment that is being run. As the variations in the flux of the magnetic field through the sensors might not only be related to the electrical currents circulating inside the brain, but also to non-damped mechanical oscillations of the room, we installed seismic instrumentation to measure the effective motion inside the room and to compare it to the external motion. For this analysis, we recorded the ambient seismic noise at two very close stations, one inside the magnetically shielded room, the other one outside in the room in which the magnetically shielded room is itself located. Data were collected over four days, including a week-end, to study the response of the magnetically shielded room subjected to different energy levels of external vibrations. The root mean square, Fourier spectra and power spectral density show significant differences between the signal recorded inside and outside the magnetically shielded room, with several anomalous peaks in the frequency band of 1 Hz to 20 Hz. The normalized spectral quantities (horizontal to vertical spectral ratio, and ratio between the internal and external spectra show large amplification at several frequencies, reaching in some cases one order of magnitude. We concluded that the magnetically shielded room does not dampen the external vibrations, but it instead appears to amplify these across a broad frequency range.

  13. Aging Effects and Estimating Degradation Mechanisms of Thermally Upgraded Paper in Mineral Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Katsunori; Oe, Etsuo; Yamagata, Naoki

    The life of a transformer is limited to the deterioration of its solid insulation. Winding conductors and other solid insulation materials in oil-immersed transformers have been insulated using cellulose products. For many years, manufacturers have met the needs of special applications by designing transformers using thermally upgraded materials to achieve lighter weight, higher power density and increased life. Recently, the effect of thermally upgraded insulation on diagnostic techniques such as gas-in oil analysis, and their indication of insulation degradation have been reviewed. This paper describes evaluations of the thermal degradation characteristics and decomposition reactions in mineral transformer oil of amine-impregnated thermally upgraded paper insulation. The thermal resistance of the thermally upgraded paper is evaluated by comparison with Kraft paper insulation. Further, aging degradation mechanisms of decompositional degradation of the thermally upgraded paper due to aging in mineral transformer oil are proposed.

  14. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity and Conduction Mechanism of Ge2Sb2Te5 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kuwahara, Masashi; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has drawn much attention due to its application in phase-change random-access memory and potential as a thermoelectric material. Electrical and thermal conductivity are important material properties in both applications. The aim of this work is to investigate the temperature dependence of the electrical and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy and discuss the thermal conduction mechanism. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy were measured from room temperature to 823 K by four-terminal and hot-strip method, respectively. With increasing temperature, the electrical resistivity increased while the thermal conductivity first decreased up to about 600 K then increased. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity was calculated from the Wiedemann-Franz law using the resistivity results. At room temperature, Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has large electronic thermal conductivity and low lattice thermal conductivity. Bipolar diffusion contributes more to the thermal conductivity with increasing temperature. The special crystallographic structure of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy accounts for the thermal conduction mechanism.

  15. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L. S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-09-01

    In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al2O3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm2. The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  16. Thermal capacitator design rationale. Part 1: Thermal and mechanical property data for selected materials potentially useful in thermal capacitor design and construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. A.; Liao, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal properties of paraffin hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon mixtures which may be used as the phase change material (PCM) in thermal capacitors are discussed. The paraffin hydrocarbons selected for consideration are those in the range from C11H24 (n-Undecane) to C20H42 (n-Eicosane). A limited amount of data is included concerning other properties of paraffin hydrocarbons and the thermal and mechanical properties of several aluminum alloys which may find application as constructional materials. Data concerning the melting temperature, transition temperature, latent heat of fusion, heat of transition, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of pure and commercial grades of paraffin hydrocarbons are given. An index of companies capable of producing paraffin hydrocarbons and information concerning the availability of various grades (purity levels) is provided.

  17. Curing mechanism of furan resin modified with different agents and their thermal strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Renhe

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The curing mechanism of furfuryl alcohol and urea-formaldehyde furan resins was investigated using infrared spectroscopy (IR technique. The curing productions of urea-formaldehyde furan resins modified with different agents (i.e. sorbitol, polyester polyol, phenol and acetone and the productions of incomplete curing were characterized by differential thermal analysis (DTA and thermal gravity analysis (TG. The results indicate that except for polyester polyol, the other modifiers have little effect on the thermal strength of urea-formaldehyde furan resin. Furthermore, the thermal strength can be improved at a temperature of higher than 550℃.

  18. Effects of thermal aging on mechanical performance of paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.T. Hotle; J.M. Considine; M.J. Wald; R.E. Rowlands; K.T. Turner

    2008-01-01

    A missing element of paper aging research is a description of mechanical performance with aging. Tensile strength cannot be predicted directly from DP measurements, and existing models do not represent the effects of aging on strength and stiffness. The primary aim of the present work is to characterize changes of mechanical properties, such as tensile response and...

  19. Measures against mechanical noise from large wind turbines: A design guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljunggren, Sten; Johansson, Melker

    1991-06-01

    The noise generated by the machinery of the two Swedish prototypes contains pure tones which are very important with respect to the environmental impact. A discussion of the results of noise measurements carried out at these turbines, that are meant to be used as a guide as to how to predict and control the noise around a large wind turbine during the design stage, is presented. The design targets are discussed, stressing the importance of the audibility of pure tones and not only the annoyance; a simple criterion is cited. The main noise source is the gearbox and a simple empirical expression for the sound power level is shown to give good agreement with the measurement results. The influence of the noise of the gearbox design is discussed in some detail. Formulas for the prediction of the airborne sound transmission to the ground outside the nacelle are presented, together with a number of empirical data on the sound reduction indices for single and double constructions. The structure-borne noise transmission is discussed.

  20. Mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Alves Silvério

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from soy hulls (WSH30 on the mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose (MC nanocomposites were evaluated. MC/WSH30 nanocomposite films with different filler levels (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10% were prepared by casting. Compared to neat MC film, improvements in the mechanical and barrier properties were observed, while thermal stability was retained. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared may be attributed to mechanical percolation of WSH30, formation of a continuous network of WSH30 linked by hydrogen interactions and a close association between filler and matrix.

  1. Mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverio, Hudson Alves; Flauzino Neto, Wilson Pires; Silva, Ingrid Souza Vieira da; Rosa, Joyce Rover; Pasquini, Daniel, E-mail: pasquini@iqufu.ufu.br, E-mail: danielpasquini2005@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Uberlandia (USU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Assuncao, Rosana Maria Nascimento de [Universidade de Uberlandia (USU), Ituiutaba, MG (brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Integradas do Pontal; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney Jose Lima [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-11-15

    In this work, the effects of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from soy hulls (WSH{sub 30}) on the mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose (MC) nanocomposites were evaluated. MC/WSH{sub 30} nanocomposite films with different filler levels (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10%) were prepared by casting. Compared to neat MC film, improvements in the mechanical and barrier properties were observed, while thermal stability was retained. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared may be attributed to mechanical percolation of WSH{sub 30}, formation of a continuous network of WSH{sub 30} linked by hydrogen interactions and a close association between filler and matrix. (author)

  2. Thermal-mechanical coupled analysis of a brake disk rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhocine, Ali; Bouchetara, Mostefa

    2013-08-01

    The main purpose of this study is to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of the dry contact between the brake disk and pads during the braking phase. The simulation strategy is based on computer code ANSYS11. The modeling of transient temperature in the disk is actually used to identify the factor of geometric design of the disk to install the ventilation system in vehicles The thermal-structural analysis is then used with coupling to determine the deformation and the Von Mises stress established in the disk, the contact pressure distribution in pads. The results are satisfactory when compared to those of the specialized literature.

  3. Mechanical and thermal properties of tungsten carbide – graphite nanoparticles nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornaus Kamil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies concerning pure tungsten carbide polycrystalline materials revealed that nanolayers of graphite located between WC grains improve its thermal properties. What is more, pressure-induced orientation of graphene nano platelets (GNP in hot pressed silicon nitride-graphene composites results in anisotropy of thermal conductivity. Aim of this study was to investigate if addition of GNP to WC will improve its thermal properties. For this purpose, tungsten carbide with 0.5–6 wt.% of GNP(12-additive underwent hot pressing. The microstructure observations performed by SEM microscopy. The anisotropy was determined via ultrasonic measurements. The following mechanical properties were evaluated: Vickers hardness, bending strength, fracture toughness KIc. The influence of GNP(12 addition on oxidation resistance and thermal conductivity was examined. It was possible to manufacture hot-pressed WC-graphene composites with oriented GNP(12 particles, however, the addition of graphene decreased both thermal and mechanical properties of the material.

  4. Thermal and Mechanical Characteristics of Polymer Composites Based on Epoxy Resin, Aluminium Nanopowders and Boric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, O. B.; Melnikova, T. V.; Visakh, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The epoxy polymers are characterized by low thermal stability and high flammability. Nanoparticles are considered to be effective fillers of polymer composites for improving their thermal and functional properties. In this work, the epoxy composites were prepared using epoxy resin ED-20, polyethylene polyamine as a hardener, aluminum nanopowder and boric acid fine powder as flame-retardant filler. The thermal characteristics of the obtained samples were studied using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The mechanical characteristics of epoxy composites were also studied. It was found that an addition of all fillers enhances the thermal stability and mechanical characteristics of the epoxy composites. The best thermal stability showed the epoxy composite filled with boric acid. The highest flexural properties showed the epoxy composite based on the combination of boric acid and aluminum nanopowder.

  5. Thermal-hydraulics/thermal-mechanics temporal coupling for unprotected loss of flow accidents simulations on a SFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricot Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the frame of ASTRID designing, unprotected loss of flow (ULOF accidents are considered. As the reactor is not scrammed, power evolution is driven by neutronic feedbacks, among which Doppler effect, linked to fuel temperature, is prominent. Fuel temperature is calculated using thermal properties of fuel pins (we will focus on heat transfer coefficient between fuel pellet and cladding, Hgap, and on fuel thermal conductivity, λfuel which vary with irradiation conditions (neutronic flux, mass flow and history for instance and during transient (mainly because of dilatation of materials with temperature. In this paper, we propose an analysis of the impact of spatial variation and temporal evolution of thermal properties of fuel pins on a CFV-like core [M.S. Chenaud et al., Status of the ASTRID core at the end of the pre-conceptual design phase 1, in Proceedings of ICAPP 2013, Jeju Island, Korea (2013] behavior during an ULOF accident. These effects are usually neglected under some a priori conservative assumptions. The vocation of our work is not to provide a best-estimate calculation of ULOF transient, but to discuss some of its physical aspects. To achieve this goal, we used TETAR, a thermal-hydraulics system code developed by our team to calculate ULOF transients, GERMINAL V1.5, a CEA code dedicated to SFR pin thermal-mechanics calculations and APOLLO3®, a neutronic code in development at CEA.

  6. Interior and exterior ballistics coupled optimization with constraints of attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xin-xin; Zhang, Nai-min; Zhang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    For solid launch vehicle performance promotion, a modeling method of interior and exterior ballistics associated optimization with constraints of attitude control and mechanical-thermal condition is proposed. Firstly, the interior and external ballistic models of the solid launch vehicle are established, and the attitude control model of the high wind area and the stage of the separation is presented, and the load calculation model of the drag reduction device is presented, and thermal condition calculation model of flight is presented. Secondly, the optimization model is established to optimize the range, which has internal and external ballistic design parameters as variables selected by sensitivity analysis, and has attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions as constraints. Finally, the method is applied to the optimal design of a three stage solid launch vehicle simulation with differential evolution algorithm. Simulation results are shown that range capability is improved by 10.8%, and both attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions are satisfied.

  7. Interpretation of Simultaneous Mechanical-Electrical-Thermal Failure in a Lithium-Ion Battery Module: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Stock, Mark J.; Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Gruchalla, Kenny

    2016-12-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are currently the state-of- the-art power sources for electric vehicles, and their safety behavior when subjected to abuse, such as a mechanical impact, is of critical concern. A coupled mechanical-electrical-thermal model for simulating the behavior of a lithium-ion battery under a mechanical crush has been developed. We present a series of production-quality visualizations to illustrate the complex mechanical and electrical interactions in this model.

  8. The radio waves and thermal electrostatic noise spectroscopy (SORBET) experiment on BEPICOLOMBO/MMO/PWI: Scientific objectives and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncuquet, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Blomberg, L. G.; Issautier, K.; Kasaba, Y.; Kojima, H.; Maksimovic, M.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Zarka, P.

    2006-01-01

    SORBET ( Spectroscopie des Ondes Radio and du Bruit Electrostatique Thermique) is a radio HF spectrometer designed for the radio and Plasma Waves Instrument onboard BepiColombo/Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which performs remote and in situ measurements of waves (electromagnetic and electrostatic). Technically, SORBET includes a plasma wave spectrometer, with two E-field inputs from the two perpendicular electric antennas and one B-field input from a search coil, in the range 2.5-640 kHz. This frequency band includes the local gyrofrequency and plasma frequency expected on most part of the MMO orbits. SORBET also includes a higher frequency radio receiver for remote sensing in the range 500 kHz-10.2 MHz. Owing to its capabilities, SORBET will be able to address the following scientific objectives: High resolution mapping (˜30 km) of electron density and temperature in the solar wind and in the Hermean magnetosphere and exo-ionosphere, via the technique of Quasi-Thermal Noise (QTN) spectroscopy. These QTN measurements will be determinant for the dynamic modeling of the magnetosphere and will provide a fundamental input for the chemistry of cold ionized species (Na, K, O, …) in Mercury's environment. Detection and study of Hermean radio emissions, including possible cyclotron emissions (up to ˜10-20 kHz) from mildly energetic electrons in most highly magnetized (polar?) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Monitoring of solar radio emissions up to ˜10 MHz in order to create a solar activity index from the view point of Mercury, allowing to correlate it with the Hermean magnetospheric response. We especially discuss the capabilities of SORBET for performing the QTN spectroscopy in Mercury's magnetosphere, using the two electric dipole antennas equipping MMO, called MEFISTO and WPT.

  9. Experimental study of thermal effects on the mechanical behaviour of a clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekerevac, Cane; Laloui, Lyesse

    2004-03-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of thermal effects on the mechanical behaviour of a saturated clay. The study was performed on CM clay (Kaolin) using a temperature-controlled triaxial apparatus. Applied temperatures were between 22 and 90°C. A comprehensive experimental program was carried out, including: (i) triaxial shear tests at ambient and high temperatures for different initial overconsolidation ratios; (ii) consolidation tests at ambient and high temperatures; and (iii) drained thermal heating for different initial overconsolidation ratios. The obtained results provide observations concerning a wide scope of the thermo-mechanical behaviour of clays. Test results obtained at 90°C were compared with tests performed at ambient temperature. Based on these comparisons, thermal effects on a variety of features of behaviour are presented and discussed. Focus is made on: (i) induced thermal volume change during drained heating; (ii) experimental evidence of temperature influence on preconsolidation pressure and on compressibility index; (iii) thermal effects on shear strength and critical state; and (iv) thermal effects on elastic modulus. Thermal yielding is discussed and yield limit evolution with temperature is presented. The directions of the induced plastic strains are also discussed. Several remarks on the difference in the mechanical behaviour at ambient and high temperatures conclude the paper. Copyright

  10. Hydrogen-dependent low frequency noise and its physical mechanism of HfO2 resistance change random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Peng, C.; Fang, W. X.; En, Y. F.; Huang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of hydrogen on low frequency noise characteristics of HfO2 resistance change random access memories (RRAMs) was investigated in this paper. The experimental results show that HfO2 RRAMs after hydrogen treatment take on the better uniformity of switch characteristics and the conduction enhancement behavior. Furthermore, it was found that the low frequency noise characteristics of the HfO2 RRAMs was significantly impacted by the hydrogen treatment, and at three kinds of typical resistance states, the low frequency noises of the HfO2 RRAMs after hydrogen treatment are larger than those of the fresh HfO2 RRAMs. The mechanism could be attributed to H induced oxygen vacancies, which serve as the additional traps for conduction due to the trap-assisted tunneling process. This will result in more random trap/detrap processes in the conducting filament, which gives rise to the larger low frequency noise in the HfO2 RRAMs. The results of this study may be useful in the design and application of HfO2 RRAMs.

  11. [Effects of noise exposure on event-related potential P300 and mechanism in hippocampus of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Bo; Wu, Ming-quan; She, Xiao-jun; Liu, Hong-tao

    2009-08-01

    To study the effects of noise on event-related potential(ERP) and its mechanism in hippocampus in rats. Male SD rats were divided into 2 groups: control group (CG) and noise exposure group(NG). The rats in NG were exposed to white noise 105 dB SPL for 2.5 h/d x 20 d. P300 were recorded at parietal bone in rats. The Nissl body, NMDAR2B and [Ca2+]i of neurons in hippocampus were analyzed. The peak latency (PL) of ERP P3a, P3 and P3b in NG were significantly longer than that in CG in the 14th and 20th exposure day. The amount of Nissl body in dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1 region and NMDAR2B in DG, CA1 and CA3 region of hippocampus of NG were significantly decreased than those of CG as well, while the concentration of Ca2+ in neurons increased markedly in NG. Decreased Nissl body and NMDAR2B and increased [Ca2+]i in hippocampus in long-term noise exposed rats might cause the change of ERP P300.

  12. Cavity optomechanics with micromirrors: Measuring and reducing radiation pressure noise with bright squeezed light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cripe, Jonathan; Singh, Robinjeet; Yap, Min Jet; Cole, Garrett; Corbitt, Thomas; LIGO Collaboration

    On September 14, 2015, LIGO made the first direct detection of gravitational waves. Advanced LIGO is predicted to be limited by quantum noise at intermediate and high frequencies when it reaches design sensitivity in the next couple years. The quantum noise, including radiation pressure noise at intermediate frequencies, will need to be reduced in order to increase the sensitivity of future gravitational wave interferometers. We report recent progress towards measuring quantum radiation pressure noise in an optomechanical cavity and the reduction of radiation pressure noise using bright squeezed light. The low noise, microfabricated mechanical oscillator also allows for direct broadband thermal noise measurements which test thermal noise models and damping mechanisms and serves as a test bed for the application of crystalline coatings in future gravitational wave detectors. These techniques may be applicable to an upgrade of Advanced LIGO or the next generation of gravitational wave detectors. NSF Grant PHY-1150531.

  13. Multifunctional Thermal Structures Using Cellular Contract-Aided Complaint Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-26

    20   4.3.3  Thermo-­‐mechanical  governing   equations ...component of Air Force satellites . These modules are designed to operate near room temperature (say 273 K – 293 K) and they can generate significant...proved to be unreliable in processing the relatively large 316L particulates with low edge resolution because of large grains (~100 microns grain

  14. Design and Development of a Solar Thermal Collector with Single Axis Solar Tracking Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theebhan Mogana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar energy is a source of energy that is abundant in Malaysia and can be easily harvested. However, because of the rotation of the Earth about its axis, it is impossible to harvest the solar energy to the maximum capacity if the solar thermal collector is placed fix to a certain angle. In this research, a solar thermal dish with single axis solar tracking mechanism that will rotate the dish according to the position of the sun in the sky is designed and developed, so that more solar rays can be reflected to a focal point and solar thermal energy can be harvested from the focal point. Data were collected for different weather conditions and performance of the solar thermal collector with a solar tracker were studied and compared with stationary solar thermal collector.

  15. Effect of thermal ageing on mechanical properties of a high-strength ODS alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Jang, Chang Heui [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Kyu [Nuclear Materials DivisionKorea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A new high-strength ODS alloy, ARROS, was recently developed for the application as the cladding material of a Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). To assess the long-term integrity under thermal ageing, ARROS was thermally aged in air at 650°C for 1000 h. The degree of thermal ageing was assessed by mechanical tests such as uniaxial tensile, hardness, and small punch tests at from room temperature to 650°C. Tensile strength was slightly decreased but elongation, hardness, and small punch energy were hardly changed at all test temperatures for the specimen aged at 650°C for 1000 h. However, the variation in mechanical properties such as hardness and small punch energy increased after thermal ageing. Using the test results, the correlation between tensile strength and maximum small punch load was established.

  16. Evaluation of thermal insulation and mechanical properties of waste rubber/natural rubber composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Abdel Kader

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The influences of waste rubber loading on mechanical and thermal conductivity properties were investigated for NR composite. An experimental investigation was carried out to obtain low cost construction material with desirable mechanical and thermal insulation properties. Natural rubber was loaded with different concentrations of waste rubber (200, 400, 600, 800, and 1000 phr. The addition of waste rubber leads to a slight increase in thermal conductivity values of composites but it still lies around range of thermal insulating materials. Also addition of waste rubber leads to improvement of mechanical properties of composites. The crosslink density of NR composite increases with the increase of waste rubber loading until 600 phr and after that it decreases due to the stronger the rubber–filler interaction. This leads to the decrease of the swelling index that has the opposite trend of crosslink density. So, the sample with 600 phr waste rubber is considered the optimum concentration from the swelling measurement. Filler loading results in pronounced increase in the tensile modulus and decease in the elongation at fracture which reflects the reinforcement effect of the filler. The yield stress increases with waste rubber loading increment. This delays the permanent disruption of matrix morphology. So, the optimum concentration which is 600 phr waste rubber loading agrees with the swelling and mechanical measurements which has desirable thermal insulation and high mechanical properties and decreases the cost of materials to 82% of the NR cost.

  17. Simultaneously Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Simulation of Lithium-Ion Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the combined electrochemical-thermal and mechanical response of a system has a variety of applications, for example, structural failure from electrochemical fatigue and the potential induced changes of material properties. For lithium-ion batteries, there is an added concern over the safety of the system in the event of mechanical failure of the cell components. In this work, we present a generic multi-scale simultaneously coupled mechanical-electrochemical-thermal model to examine the interaction between mechanical failure and electrochemical-thermal responses. We treat the battery cell as a homogeneous material while locally we explicitly solve for the mechanical response of individual components using a homogenization model and the electrochemical-thermal responses using an electrochemical model for the battery. A benchmark problem is established to demonstrate the proposed modeling framework. The model shows the capability to capture the gradual evolution of cell electrochemical-thermal responses, and predicts the variation of those responses under different short-circuit conditions.

  18. Thermal and thermo-mechanical simulation of laser assisted machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, G.; Dal Santo, P.; Lebrun, J. L.; Bellett, D.; Robert, P.

    2007-04-01

    Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) improves the machinability of materials by locally heating the workpiece just prior to cutting. The heat input is provided by a high power laser focused several millimeters in front of the cutting tool. Experimental investigations have confirmed that the cutting force can be decreased, by as much as 40%, for various materials (tool steel, titanium alloys and nickel alloys). The laser heat input is essentially superficial and results in non-uniform temperature profiles within the depth of the workpiece. The temperature field in the cutting zone is therefore influenced by many parameters. In order to understand the effect of the laser on chip formation and on the temperature fields in the different deformation zones, thermo-mechanical simulation were undertaken. A thermo-mechanical model for chip formation with and without the laser was also undertaken for different cutting parameters. Experimental tests for the orthogonal cutting of 42CrMo4 steel were used to validate the simulation via the prediction of the cutting force with and without the laser. The thermo-mechanical model then allowed us to highlight the differences in the temperature fields in the cutting zone with and without the laser. In particular, it was shown that for LAM the auto-heating of the material in the primary shear zone is less important and that the friction between the tool and chip also generates less heat. The temperature fields allow us to explain the reduction in the cutting force and the resulting residual stress fields in the workpiece.

  19. A Comprehensive Study on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Nanoclay Reinforced Polymers at Various Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    A Comprehensive Study on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Nanoclay Reinforced Polymers at Various Temperatures*† Selen Bayar, Ph.D...thermal properties of nanoclay reinforced polymer resins are investigated at various temperatures. The effect of nanoclay reinforcement was elicited by...The results indicate that the addition of nanoclay to PP leads to a stronger and stiffer nanocomposite. It was also found that the strength and

  20. Fundamental Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Boride Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    1600°C and a two-color pyrometer above 1500°C. Heating rates as high as 500°C/min have been achieved. To date, four point bend tests as described by...a two-color optical pyrometer and a programmable PID controller. Water cooled graphite pushrods and a fully articulated graphite 4-point bend...Mechanical Stress Evaluation by Neutrons and Synchrotron Radiation , November 10-12, 2009, Mito, Japan. 20. J. Watts, G.E. Hilmas, and W.G. Fahrenholtz

  1. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-08-04

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates.

  2. Influence of temporal noise on the skin blood flow measurements performed by cooled thermal imaging camera: limit possibilities within each physiological frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaidachnyi, A. A.; Volkov, I. U.; Fomin, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes limit possibilities of modern cooled thermal imaging cameras as a tool for estimation of blood flow oscillations at the surface of living body. Skin temperature oscillations, as we assumed, are a consequence of the blood flow oscillations. We considered the temperature sensitivity 0.01-0.02 °C as a typical for the most of modern cooled long wave thermal imaging cameras. Fourier filter used to investigate the temperature signal separately within endothelial, neurogenic, myogenic, respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges. The level of temporal noise has been estimated during measurements of no living body with stabilized temperature ~ 24°C. The level of temperature oscillations has been calculated for the group of healthy subjects within each frequency range. Thus, we were able to determine signal-to-noise ratio within frequency band [0.001, 1] Hz. As a result, we determine that skin temperature oscillations measured by thermal imaging camera with sensitivity 0.02°C have the upper frequency limit ~ 0.2 Hz. In other words, within the respiratory and cardiac frequency ranges of blood flow oscillations the noise level exceeds signal one, and temperature measurements at the skin surface are practically useless. The endothelial, neurogenic and myogenic components of the temperature oscillations contain ~98% of the total spectral power of the signal. We have plot the empirical extrapolated curve of sensitivity of thermal imaging camera vs. frequency of the temperature oscillations. The data analysis shows that measurements of skin temperature oscillations within respiratory and cardiac ranges require the temperature sensitivity at least ~ 0.01°C and 0.001°C, respectively.

  3. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of Inconel 718 after thermal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Z.S., E-mail: yuzaisong@tpri.com.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Xi' an Thermal Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., No. 136, Xingqing Road, Xi’an 710032 (China); Zhang, J.X. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Yuan, Y.; Zhou, R.C.; Zhang, H.J.; Wang, H.Z. [Xi' an Thermal Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., No. 136, Xingqing Road, Xi’an 710032 (China)

    2015-05-14

    Inconel 718 was subjected to various heat treatments, i.e., solution heat treatment, standard ageing treatment and standard ageing plus 700 °C thermal exposure. The mechanical properties of the alloys were determined using tensile tests and Charpy pendulum impact tests at 650 °C and room temperature, respectively. The highest yield strength of 988 MPa was attained in the standard aged specimen, whereas a maximum impact toughness of 217 J cm{sup −2} was attained in the solution-treated specimen. After thermal exposure, the mechanical properties of the specimens degrade. Both the yield strength and impact toughness decreased monotonically with increasing thermal exposure time. Subjected to a 10000-h long-term thermal exposure, the yield strength dramatically decreased to 475 MPa (almost 50% of the maximum strength), and the impact toughness reduced to only 18 J cm{sup −2}. The microstructures of the specimens were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Coarsening of γ′ and γ″ and the transformation of γ″ to δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb was observed after thermal exposure. However, a complete transformation from metastable γ″ to δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb was never accomplished, even after the 10000-h long-term thermal exposure. Based on the obtained experimental results, the effects of the microstructural evolution on the mechanical properties are discussed.

  4. Thermal and mechanical analysis of the Faraday shield for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesey, R.A.

    1988-02-01

    The antenna for the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is protected from the plasma environment by a Faraday shield, an array of gas-cooled metallic tubes. The plasma side of the tubes is armored with graphite tiles, which can be either brazed or mechanically attached to the tube. The Faraday shield has been analyzed using finite element codes to model thermal and mechanical responses to typical CIT heating and disruption loads. Four representative materials (Inconel 718, tantalum-10 tungsten, copper alloy C17510, and molybdenum alloy TZM) and several combinations of tube and armor thicknesses were used in the thermal analysis, which revealed that maximum allowable temperatures were not exceeded for any of the four materials considered. The two-dimensional thermal stress analysis indicated Von Mises stresses greater than twice the yield stress for a tube constructed of Inconel 718 (the original design material) for the brazed-graphite design. Analysis of stresses caused by plasma disruption ()rvec J) )times) )rvec B)) loads eliminated the copper and molybdenum alloys as candidate tube materials. Of the four materials considered, tantalum-10 tungsten performed the best for a brazed graphite design, showing acceptable thermal stresses (69% of yield) and disruption stresses (42% of yield). A preliminary thermal analysis of the mechanically attached graphite scheme predicts minimal thermal stresses in the tube. The survivability of the graphite tubes in this scheme is yet to be analyzed. 8 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Thermal and mechanical properties of bio-based plasticizers mixtures on poly (vinyl chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussaha Bouchoul

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of mixtures of nontoxic and biodegradable plasticizers coming from natural resources is a good way to replace conventional phthalates plasticizers. In this study, two secondary plasticizers of epoxidized sunflower oil (ESO and epoxidized sunflower oil methyl ester (ESOME were synthesized and have been used with two commercially available biobased plasticizers; isosorbide diesters (ISB and acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC in order to produce flexible PVC. Different mixtures of these plasticizers have been introduced in PVC formulations. Thermal, mechanical and morphological properties have been studied by using discoloration, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA, tensile - strain and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Studies have shown that PVC plasticization and stabilization were improved by addition of plasticizers blends containing ISB, ATBC, ESO and ESOME. An increase in the content of ESO or ESOME improved thermal and mechanical properties, whereas ESOME/ATBC formulations exhibited the best properties.

  6. A Phenomenological Thermal-Mechanical Viscoelastic Constitutive Modeling for Polypropylene Wood Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiongqi Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a phenomenological thermal-mechanical viscoelastic constitutive modeling for polypropylene wood composites. Polypropylene (PP wood composite specimens are compressed at strain rates from 10−4 to 10−2 s−1 and at temperature of , , and , respectively. The mechanical responses are shown to be sensitive both to strain rate and to temperature. Based on the Maxwell viscoelastic model, a nonlinear thermal-mechanical viscoelastic constitutive model is developed for the PP wood composite by decoupling the effect of temperature with that of the strain rate. Corresponding viscoelastic parameters are obtained through curve fitting with experimental data. Then the model is used to simulate thermal compression of the PP wood composite. The predicted theoretical results coincide quite well with experimental data. The proposed constitutive model is then applied to the thermoforming simulation of an automobile interior part with the PP wood composites.

  7. Dynamics of a mechanical system with multiple degrees of freedom out of thermal equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigel, A.

    2017-05-01

    Out of thermal equilibrium, an environment imposes effective mechanical forces on nanofabricated devices as well as on microscopic chemical or biological systems. Here we address the question of how to calculate these forces together with the response of the system from first principles. We show that an ideal gaslike environment, even near thermal equilibrium, can enforce a specific steady state on the system by creating effective potentials in otherwise homogeneous space. An example of stable and unstable rectifications of thermal fluctuations is presented using a modified Feynman-Smoluchowski ratchet with two degrees of freedom. Moreover, the stability of a steady configuration depends on its chiral symmetry. The transition rate probabilities and the corresponding kinetic equations are derived for a complex mechanical system with arbitrary degrees of freedom. This work, therefore, extends the applicability of mechanical systems as a toy model playground of statistical physics for active and living matter with multiple degrees of freedom.

  8. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Epoxy Composites Containing Zirconium Oxide Impregnated Halloysite Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon il Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Liquid epoxy resins have received much attention from both academia and the chemical industry as eco-friendly volatile organic compound (VOC-free alternatives for applications in coatings and adhesives, especially in those used in households. Epoxy resins show high chemical resistance and high creep resistance. However, due to their brittleness and lack of thermal stability, additional fillers are needed for improving the mechanical and thermal properties. Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs are naturally abundant, inexpensive, and eco-friendly clay minerals that are known to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy composites after suitable surface modification. Zirconium is well known for its high resistance to heat and wear. In this work, zirconium oxide-impregnated HNTs (Zr/HNTs were added to epoxy resins to obtain epoxy composites with improved mechanical and thermal properties. Zr/HNTs were characterized by field-emission transmission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Changes in the thermal properties of the epoxy composites were characterized by thermo mechanical analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Furthermore, flexural properties of the composites were analyzed using a universal testing machine.

  9. The Ageing Effect of Mechanical Joints on the Tyre/Joint Noises Monitored by a Control Vehicle Method without Traffic Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the ageing effect of mechanical joints reflecting from the tyre/joint impacting noise by measuring the vehicle structure-borne noise change. Field data is collected applying two measurement methods suitable for newly installed and existing old expansion joints. The measurement methodology is improved by designing and applying a trailer for equipment installation. The main advantage of this method is not to disturb existing traffic by lane closure for measurement. Field measurements were conducted regularly for a study period up to 16 months after new joint replacement to monitor the variation of the structure-borne noise change inside a test vehicle while passing through mechanical joints. Empirical relationship is developed based on the field data of the roadside airborne noise change and the vehicle structure-borne noise change. The roadside tyre/joint noises could be converted using calibrated empirical formula. Key result findings include the following. (1 The vehicle structure-borne noise change is found smallest during the 3rd–6th months even lower than that measured when a new joint is installed. The structure-borne noise change then keeps increasing afterwards till the end of the study period. (2 Similar observations are found in all study cases incorporating various mechanical joint types and test vehicle types.

  10. Wind seismic noise introduced by external infrastructure: field data and transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martysevich, Pavel; Starovoyt, Yuri

    2017-04-01

    Background seismic noise generated by wind was analyzed at six co-located seismic and infrasound arrays with the use of the wind speed data. The main factors affecting the noise level were identified as (a) external structures as antenna towers for intrasite communication, vegetation and heavy solar panels fixtures, (b) borehole casing and (c) local lithology. The wind-induced seismic noise peaks in the spectra can be predicted by combination of inverted pendulum model for antenna towers and structures used to support solar panels, free- or clamped-tube resonance of the borehole casing and is dependent on the type of sedimentary upper layer. Observed resonance frequencies are in agreement with calculated clamped / free tube modes for towers and borehole casings. Improvement of the seismic data quality can be achieved by minimizing the impact of surrounding structures close to seismic boreholes. The need and the advantage of the borehole installation may vanish and appear to be even not necessary at locations with non-consolidated sediments because the impact of surrounding structures on seismic background may significantly deteriorate the installation quality and therefore the detection capability of the array. Several IMS arrays where the radio telemetry antennas are used for data delivery to the central site may benefit from the redesign of the intrasite communication system by its substitute with the fiber-optic net as less harmful engineering solution.

  11. MWCNTs/Resin Nanocomposites: Structural, Thermal, Mechanical and Dielectric Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Alexopoulos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were manufactured, characterized and added to a typical aeronautical resin matrix at different concentrations as nano-reinforcement. The carbon content of produced MWCNTs was determined to be around 98.5% while they consisted of 13-20 wall-layers and their external diameter had an average size in between 20 and 50 nm. MWCNTs were dispersed in an epoxy resin system and tensile specimens for different MWCNTs concentrations were prepared in an open mould. Electrical wiring was attached to the specimens’ surface and surface electrical resistance change was in-situ monitored during monotonic tension till fracture. Performed tensile tests showed that the MWCNTs addition increased both modulus of elasticity and ultimate tensile strength on the nano-composites with a simultaneously dramatic ductility decrease. The MWCNTs addition enhanced the investigated resin matrix with monitoring ability; electrical resistance change of the investigated tensile tests was correlated in the elastic regime with axial nominal strain and the gauge factor of the different MWCNTs concentration specimens were calculated. It was found that lowest MWCNTs concentration gave the best results in terms of piezo-resistivity and simultaneously the least enhancement in the mechanical properties.

  12. Thermal, dielectric and mechanical study of poly(vinyl chloride/olive pomace composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Composites from PVC and chemically treated olive pomace have been prepared. The effect of the incorporation of virgin and benzylated olive pomace in the poly(vinyl chloride matrix on dielectric, mechanical and thermal stability properties, of /olive pomace composites was studied. The mechanical properties of the benzylated composites were improved. Furthermore, the thermal characterization of the different samples carried out by thermogravimetric analysis revealed an increase in the onset temperatures of decomposition for the treated composites. The dielectric investigation indicated that the samples containing olive pomace treated with the benzyl chloride can be used in electrical applications as insulators.

  13. Microstructural banding in thermally and mechanically processed titanium 6242

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, U.; Kassner, M. E.; Hiatt, D. R.; Bristow, B. M.

    1992-06-01

    Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si coupons were shaped by repeated cycles of heating (to 954 °) and hammer or press forging followed by a solution anneal that varied from 968 to 998 °. The coupons were originally extracted from billets forged below the beta transus (1009 °) and slow cooled to ambient temperatures. Macroscopic and microstructural banding is observed in some forged and solution annealed coupons. The microstructure consists of elongated “platelets” of primary alpha. More significant banding is observed subsequent to annealing at lower temperatures (968 °), whereas subsequent to higher annealing temperatures (998 °) much less microstructural banding is present. About the same level of banding is observed in hammer forged coupons and press forged coupons. The observation of these bands is significant, because these may lead to inhomogeneous mechanical properties. Specifically, some types of banding are reported to affect the high-temperature creep properties of this alloy. Classically, banding in Ti6242-0.1Si has been regarded as a result of adiabatic shear, chill zone formation, or compositional in homogeneity. High- and low-magnification metallography, electron microprobe analysis, and micro-hardness tests were performed on forged and annealed specimens in this investigation. The bands of this study appear to originate from the microstructure that consists of the forged billet of elongated primary alpha. The deformation of the extracted coupon is neither fully homogeneous nor sufficiently substantial, and the coupon is only partly statically restored after a solution anneal. Areas not fully restored appear as “bands” with elongated primary alpha that are remnant of the starting billet microstructure. Therefore, a source of banding in Ti- 6242- O.1Si alloy additional to the classic sources is evident. This type of banding is likely removed by relatively high solution treatment temperatures and perhaps greater plastic deformation during forging.

  14. Thermal and mechanical properties of 3D printed boron nitride - ABS composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quill, Tyler J.; Smith, Matthew K.; Zhou, Tony; Baioumy, Mohamed Gamal Shafik; Berenguer, Joao Paulo; Cola, Baratunde A.; Kalaitzidou, Kyriaki; Bougher, Thomas L.

    2017-11-01

    The current work investigates the thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of Boron Nitride (BN)-Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) composites prepared using both 3D printing and injection molding. The thermally conductive, yet electrically insulating composite material provides a unique combination of properties that make it desirable for heat dissipation and packaging applications in electronics. Materials were fabricated via melt mixing on a twin-screw compounder, then injection molded or extruded into filament for fused deposition modeling (FDM) 3D printing. Compositions of up to 35 wt.% BN in ABS were prepared, and the infill orientation of the 3D printed composites was varied to investigate the effect on properties. Injection molding produced a maximum in-plane conductivity of 1.45 W/m-K at 35 wt.% BN, whereas 3D printed samples of 35 wt.% BN showed a value of 0.93 W/m-K, over 5 times the conductivity of pure ABS. The resulting thermal conductivity is anisotropic; with the through-plane thermal conductivity lower by a factor of 3 for injection molding and 4 for 3D printing. Adding BN flakes caused a modest increase in the flexural modulus, but resulted in a large decrease in the flexural strength and impact toughness. It is shown that although injection molding produces parts with superior thermal and mechanical properties, BN shows much potential as a filler material for rapid prototyping of thermally conductive composites.

  15. Thermalization via collisional and non-collisional mechanisms in ultracold neutral plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Craig; Roberts, Jacob

    2016-10-01

    Many ultracold neutral plasmas (UCPs) are formed with non-uniform electron and ion densities. They are also formed in a way that the initial electron velocity distribution is not in thermal equilibrium. We present the results of a numerical simulation that compares the electron velocity distribution evolution after UCP formation between uniform and non-uniform density UCPs. We find three distinct thermalization time periods for the electron velocity: a rapid thermalization on the order of the electron plasma frequency timescale where position variations lead to velocity randomization; a slower second phase where non-collisional effects play a role in thermalization as evidenced by differences between thermalization rates in uniform density and non-uniform density plasmas; and an even slower third phase where the highest velocity portion of the electron thermal distribution equilibrates primarily via collisional mechanisms. These mechanisms are relevant for understanding the establishment of equilibrium in the electron component of UCPs in experimentally relevant conditions. This work supported by the AFOSR.

  16. Effect of Functionalization of Graphene Nanoplatelets on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Silicone Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwu Zhang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of silane and surfactant treatments of graphene nanoplatelets (GnPs on the mechanical and thermal properties of silicone rubber (SR composites. GnPs were modified with aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES, vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMS, and Triton X-100, and then the pristine GnPs and functionalized GnPs were individually incorporated into the SR. Compared with the pristine GnP/SR composite, the composites reinforced with modified GnP showed better tensile strength, elongation at break, and thermal conductivity properties due to better dispersion of modified GnPs and stronger interfacial interactions between the modified GnPs and matrix. The mechanical properties and thermal conductivity of the VTMS-GnP/SR composite were comparable to the properties of the Triton-GnP counterpart, but better than that of the APTES-GnP/SR composite. In addition, the VTMS-GnP/SR composite demonstrated the highest thermal stability and crystallization temperature among the four types of composites. The remarkable improvement of mechanical and thermal properties of the VTMS-GnP/SR composite was mainly due to the covalent linkage of VTMS-GnP with SR. The VTMS treatment was a more appropriate modification of GnP particles to improve the multifunctional properties of SR.

  17. Thermal modal analysis of novel non-pneumatic mechanical elastic wheel based on FEM and EMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youqun Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of Finite Element Method (FEM and Experiment Modal Analysis (EMA have been employed here to characterize the structural dynamic response of mechanical elastic wheel (ME-Wheel operating under a specific thermal environment. The influence of high thermal condition on the structural dynamic response of ME-Wheel is investigated. The obtained results indicate that the EMA results are in accordance with those obtained using the proposed Finite Element (FE model, indicting the high reliability of this FE model applied in analyzing the modal of ME-Wheel working under practical thermal environment. It demonstrates that the structural dynamic response of ME-Wheel operating under a specific thermal condition can be predicted and evaluated using the proposed analysis method, which is beneficial for the dynamic optimization design of the wheel structure to avoid tire temperature related vibration failure and improve safety of tire.

  18. Study of Dust Suppression Mechanism in Kalisindh Super Thermal Power Plant Jhalawar, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Shringi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Coal emission from thermal power plants has become a major cause of environmental pollution which has many adverse effects on living beings and non living things. Now a days there is a great lead in the requirement of the electricity, to full fill the requirement of electricity we need to establish thermal power plant which emit coal and dust. To handle the coal in thermal power plant, they are equipped with coal handling plant. To handle the emitted coal particles we use several techniques. In its simplest form, dust control may involve nothing more than attention to the enclosure of the transfer point chutework or the Use Of Water Sprays To Suppress The Emitted Coal Particles. In This Paper We Study The Dust Supression Mechanism Used In The Kalisindh Super Thermal Power Plant Jhalawar, India.

  19. Thermal modal analysis of novel non-pneumatic mechanical elastic wheel based on FEM and EMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youqun; Zhu, Mingmin; Lin, Fen; Xiao, Zhen; Li, Haiqing; Deng, Yaoji

    2018-01-01

    A combination of Finite Element Method (FEM) and Experiment Modal Analysis (EMA) have been employed here to characterize the structural dynamic response of mechanical elastic wheel (ME-Wheel) operating under a specific thermal environment. The influence of high thermal condition on the structural dynamic response of ME-Wheel is investigated. The obtained results indicate that the EMA results are in accordance with those obtained using the proposed Finite Element (FE) model, indicting the high reliability of this FE model applied in analyzing the modal of ME-Wheel working under practical thermal environment. It demonstrates that the structural dynamic response of ME-Wheel operating under a specific thermal condition can be predicted and evaluated using the proposed analysis method, which is beneficial for the dynamic optimization design of the wheel structure to avoid tire temperature related vibration failure and improve safety of tire.

  20. Mechanical and thermal properties of HSC with fine natural pozzolana as SCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    KoÅ¥átková, Jaroslava; Čáchová, Monika; KoÅáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Reiterman, Pavel

    2017-07-01

    The paper is dealing with an influence of fine pozzolanic admixture supplementing a part of cement on various properties of high-strength concrete. The measured characteristics were basic physical properties, compressive strength and thermal properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity). Replacing the cement by the natural pozzolana in higher dosages leads to the higher porosity and thus to the lower compressive strength of the developed material. Conversely, in case of lower amounts of pozzolana (up to 10% of weight) such replacement has an opposite consequence, the open porosity decreases which results in the higher compressive strength. Taking into account thermal properties which are enhanced by an increase of amount of pores, it is evident that it is necessary to optimize the amount of pozzolana (pozzolanic) admixture in order to obtain reasonable mechanical and thermal properties.

  1. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  2. Low frequency noise from wind turbines mechanisms of generation and its modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2010-01-01

    competitive designs compared with the upwind threebladed rotor. The simulation package comprises an aeroelastic time simulation code HAWC2 and an acoustic low frequency noise (LFN) prediction model. Computed time traces of rotor thrust and rotor torque from the aeroelastic model are input to the acoustic....... For an upwind rotor the LFN levels are so low that it should not cause annoyance of neighbouring people. Important turbine design parameters with strong influence on LFN are the blade tip speed and the distance between rotor and tower....

  3. Hybrid Composites from Wheat Straw, Inorganic Filler, and Recycled Polypropylene: Morphology and Mechanical and Thermal Expansion Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Min; Huang, Runzhou; He, Chunxia; Wu, Qinglin; Zhao, Xueni

    2016-01-01

    .... The effects of individual filler (WS) and combined fillers (WS and inorganic filler) on morphological, mechanical, and thermal expansion and water absorption properties of hybrid composites were investigated...

  4. MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITES FROM UNSATURATED POLYESTER FILLED WITH OIL PALM ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Ibrahim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm ash (OPA is available in abundance, is renewable, can be obtained at no cost and shows good performance at high thermal conditions. Combinations of the unsaturated polyester with natural fillers have been reported to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of composites. Utilisation of oil palm ash as a filler in the manufacture of polymer composites can significantly reduce the requirement for other binders or matrixes of composite materials. This research uses oil palm ash as a filler to form composites through the investigation of the effect of different contents of filler on the properties of OPA-filled unsaturated polyester (UP/OPA composites. The effect of different volume fractions, i.e., 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% of oil palm ash introduced into 100, 90, 80 and 70 vol.% of an unsaturated polyester matrix on the composite mechanical properties, i.e., tensile and flexural, has been studied, together with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC. Specimens were prepared using compression moulding techniques based on the ASTM D790 and D5083 standards for flexural and tensile tests, respectively. The tensile and flexural mechanical properties of UP/OPA composites were improved in modulus by increasing the filler content. Thermal stability of the composites increased as the OPA filler content was increased, which was a logical consequence because of the high thermal stability of the silica compound of the OPA filler compared with that of the UP matrix. The results from the surface electron microscope (SEM analysis were the extension of mechanical and thermal tests.

  5. Preparation, Characterization, and Enhanced Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Epoxy-Titania Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubab, Zakya; Siddiqi, Humaira M.; Saeed, Shaukat

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy-titania composites. First, submicron titania particles are prepared via surfactant-free sol-gel method using TiCl4 as precursor. These particles are subsequently used as inorganic fillers (or reinforcement) for thermally cured epoxy polymers. Epoxy-titania composites are prepared via mechanical mixing of titania particles with liquid epoxy resin and subsequently curing the mixture with an aliphatic diamine. The amount of titania particles integrated into epoxy matrix is varied between 2.5 and 10.0 wt.% to investigate the effect of sub-micron titania particles on thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy-titania composites. These composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric (TG), and mechanical analyses. It is found that sub-micron titania particles significantly enhance the glass transition temperature (>6.7%), thermal oxidative stability (>12.0%), tensile strength (>21.8%), and Young's modulus (>16.8%) of epoxy polymers. Epoxy-titania composites with 5.0 wt.% sub-micron titania particles perform best at elevated temperatures as well as under high stress. PMID:24578638

  6. Humidity Effects on Soluble Core Mechanical and Thermal Properties (Polyvinyl Alcohol/Microballoon Composite)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report for the study of humidity effects and loading rate on soluble core (PVA/MB composite material) mechanical and thermal properties. This report describes test results, procedures employed, and any unusual occurrences or specific observations associated with this test program.

  7. Mechanical and thermal cycling effects on the flexural strength of glass ceramics fused to titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasquez, Vanessa; Ozcan, Mutlu; Nishioka, Renato; Souza, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Alfredo; Pavanelli, Carlos

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical and thermal cycling on the flexural strength (ISO 9693) of three brands of ceramics fused to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Metallic frameworks of 25 x 3 x 0.5 mm dimensions (N = 84) were cast in cpTi, followed by 150-mu m aluminum oxide airborne

  8. Mechanical and thermal properties of waterborne epoxy composites containing cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanhong Xu; Natalie Girouard; Gregory Schueneman; Meisha L. Shofner; J. Carson Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are reinforcing fillers of emerging interest for polymers due to their high modulus and potential for sustainable production. In this study, CNC-based composites with a waterborne epoxy resin matrix were prepared and characterized to determine morphology, water content, and thermal and mechanical properties. While some CNC aggregation was...

  9. Effect of pMDI isocyanate additive on mechanical and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI) on mechanical and thermal properties of Kenaf fibre (KF) reinforced thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) composites was studied. Various percentages viz. 2%, 4% and 6%, were studied. The composites were characterized by using tensile testing, ...

  10. Effective thermal/mechanical properties of honeycomb core panels for hot structure applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fatemi, J.; Lemmen, M.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The present work addresses the computation of the effective thermal and mechanical properties of a honeycombcore sandwich panel. The panel considered has a hexagon-cell honeycomb core. An alternative method, based on the Gebhart factors within a hexagonal cell, is presented in addition to the

  11. FORMING OF MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SLUGS OF TITANIC ALLOY BT23 AT THERMAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Fedulov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Тhе changings of the initial plate structure of alloy BT23 at running of high-temperature thermal treatment of large-sized slugs with heating up to 650- 950 eC and cooling on air and in water and their influence on forming of complex of mechanical characteristics are examined.

  12. Mechanical, thermal, and moisture properties of plastics with bean as filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments on polymers using beans as fillers are reported herein. We are looking for desirable mechanical, thermal and moisture properties at economical costs. Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) is studied as the polymeric matrix because it is available and biodegradable. Although the physical properties are...

  13. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(butylene succinate Films Reinforced with Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangviroon Nanthaporn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent year, bioplastics have become more popular resulting from the growing concerns on environmental issues and the rising fossil fuel price. However, their applications were limited by its mechanical and thermal properties. The aim of this research is thus to improve mechanical and thermal properties of PBS bioplastic films by reinforcing with silica. Due to the poor interfacial interaction between the PBS matrix and silica, glycidyl methacrylate grafted poly(butylene succinate (PBS-g-GMA was used as a compatibilizer in order to improve the interaction between bioplastic films and filler. PBS-g-GMA was prepared in a twin-screw extruder and analyzed by the FTIR spectrometer. PBS and silica were then mixed in a twin-screw extruder and processed into films by a chill-roll cast extruder. The effects of silica loading on thermal and mechanical properties of the prepared bioplastic films were investigated. It was found that the mechanical properties of PBS/silica composite films were improved when 1%wt of silica was added. However, the mechanical properties decreased with increasing silica loading due to the agglomeration of silica particles. The results also show that the silica/PBS films with PBS-g-GMA possessed improved mechanical properties over the films without the compatibilizer.

  14. Improving environmental sustainability of concrete products: Investigation on MWC thermal and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becchio, Cristina; Corgnati, Stefano Paolo; Kindinis, Andrea [Department of Energetics (DENER), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Pagliolico, Simonetta [Department of Materials Science and Engineering Chemistry (DISMIC), Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2009-11-15

    This research focuses on the possibility of constituting a more sustainable lightweight concrete, Mineralized Wood Concrete (MWC), substituting natural aggregates with wastes from woodworking activities. Exploiting this type of aggregates, a triple purpose has been achieved: preservation of natural raw materials, reuse of wastes and energy saving. Furthermore, the use of wood aggregates is a way to try to develop a sustainable concrete characterized by high thermal inertia, high thermal resistance and low weight. In this paper, effects of the addition of wood aggregates on mechanical and thermal properties of concrete are studied. Mechanical performances have been investigated with compressive strength tests, while a one-dimensional heat flow model has been used to predict the thermal conductivity of MWC. The use of MWC can be associated with the idea of a different typology of relatively heavy building envelope: this union could competitively answer to the demand of well-insulated building envelope and concurrently characterized by high thermal mass. From this union, a series of other values can be derived: low weight, environmentally friendly, easily industrialized and easy on-site casting. Consequently, applications of wood concrete in building constructions may be an interesting solution in order to improve sustainability and building energy efficiency. (author)

  15. Assessment of VCSEL thermal rollover mechanisms from measurements and empirical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baveja, Prashant P; Kögel, Benjamin; Westbergh, Petter; Gustavsson, Johan S; Haglund, Åsa; Maywar, Drew N; Agrawal, Govind P; Larsson, Anders

    2011-08-01

    We use an empirical model together with experimental measurements for studying mechanisms contributing to thermal rollover in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). The model is based on extraction of the temperature dependence of threshold current, internal quantum efficiency, internal optical loss, series resistance and thermal impedance from measurements of output power, voltage and lasing wavelength as a function of bias current over an ambient temperature range of 15-100 °C. We apply the model to an oxide-confined, 850-nm VCSEL, fabricated with a 9-μm inner-aperture diameter and optimized for high-speed operation, and show for this specific device that power dissipation due to linear power dissipation (sum total of optical absorption, carrier thermalization, carrier leakage and spontaneous carrier recombination) exceeds power dissipation across the series resistance (quadratic power dissipation) at any ambient temperature and bias current. We further show that the dominant contributors to self-heating for this particular VCSEL are quadratic power dissipation, internal optical loss, and carrier leakage. A rapid reduction of the internal quantum efficiency at high bias currents (resulting in high temperatures) is identified as being the major cause of thermal rollover. Our method is applicable to any VCSEL and is useful for identifying the mechanisms limiting the thermal performance of the device and to formulate design strategies to ameliorate them.

  16. Physico-mechanical and thermal performances of newly developed rubber-added bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut, Paki [Harran University, Civil Engineering Department, 63300 Sanliurfa (Turkey); Yesilata, Bulent [Harran University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 63300 Sanliurfa (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    The new European energy regulation now considers a high standard of thermal protection in buildings with reasonable energy consumption, satisfactory thermal comfort conditions and low operational costs. A series of significant restrictions on the disposal of used tires in landfills, stockpiles, or illegal dumping grounds are also imposed in recent European Union directives. The potential use of crumb rubber-concrete combination, in favor of these arrangements, for producing a low cost and lightweight composite brick with improved thermal resistance is examined here. The physico-mechanical and thermal insulation performances of these rubber-added bricks are investigated. The obtained compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting strength, freezing-thawing resistance, unit weight and water absorption values satisfy with the relevant international standards. The experimental observations reveal that high level replacement of crumb rubber with conventional sand aggregate does not exhibit a sudden brittle fracture even beyond the failure loads, indicates high energy absorption capacity, reduces the unit weight dramatically and introduces smoother surface compared to the current concrete bricks in the market. Thermal insulation performance is improved by introducing various amount of crumb rubber into the ordinary cementitious mixes. The percentage-wise improvements in thermal insulation performance have varied nearly between 5 and 11%, depending on the amount of crumb rubber used. (author)

  17. Aircraft engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennepohl, F.

    An overview of the main aircraft engine noise sources is given. Special emphasis is devoted to turbomachinery/rotor noise, which plays an important role in all engine concepts appropriate to regional aircraft, such as turbofans, propellers, or new propfan engine concepts. The noise generating mechanisms, including propagation within the engine, and calculation methods used are described. Noise reduction methods are considered, with emphasis on cutoff design of turbomachines. Some noise features of counter rotating propellers and swept rotor blades are mentioned.

  18. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Unsaturated Polyester/Vinyl Ester Blends Cured at Room Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardhyananta, H.; Puspadewa, F. D.; Wicaksono, S. T.; Widyastuti; Wibisono, A. T.; Kurniawan, B. A.; Ismail, H.; Salsac, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    Unsaturated polyester (UP) resin containing aromatic ring was blended with vinyl ester (VE) at wide range composition (10, 20, 30, 40,and 80 wt.%) using mechanical blending method. The blends were cured at room temperature using methyl ethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP) (4 wt.%) as catalyst initiator without the presence of catalystaccelerator. The effect of vinyl ester composition on theenhancement of mechanical and thermal properties of unsaturated polyester/vinyl ester blends was investigated. The polymer blends were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR)spectroscopy, tensile testing, hardness testing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). IR spectra showed UP and VE peaks. The curing copolymerization reactionoccurred at vinyl (C=C) bonds. The addition of vinyl esters enhanced mechanical and thermal properties. The UP/VE blends showed homogeneous morphology, transparent and copolymer thermoset blend.

  19. Mechanical and thermal properties of irradiated films based on Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabato, S.F. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508 900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.br; Nakamurakare, N.; Sobral, P.J.A. [Food Engineering Department, ZEA/FZEA/USP, Av. Duque de Caxias Norte 225, 13635 900 Pirassununga, SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    Proteins are considered potential material in natural films as alternative to traditional packaging. When gamma radiation is applied to protein film forming solution it resulted in an improvement in mechanical properties of whey protein films. The objective of this work was the characterization of mechanical and thermal properties of irradiated films based on muscle proteins from Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The films were prepared according to a casting technique with two levels of plasticizer: 25% and 45% glycerol and irradiated in electron accelerator type Radiation Dynamics, 0.550 MeV at dose range from 0 to 200 kGy. Thermal properties and mechanical properties were determined using a differential scanning calorimeter and a texture analyzer, respectively. Radiation from electron beam caused a slightly increase on its tensile strength characteristic at 100 kGy, while elongation value at this dose had no reduction.

  20. Mechanical, thermal and swelling properties of phosphorylated nanocellulose fibrils/PVA nanocomposite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad Bilal Khan; Jahan, Zaib; Berg, Sigrun Sofie; Gregersen, Øyvind Weiby

    2017-12-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) have strong reinforcing properties when incorporated in a compatible polymer matrix. This work reports the effect of the addition of phosphorylated nanocellulose (PCNF) on the mechanical, thermal and swelling properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite membranes. The incorporation of nanocellulose in PVA reduced the crystallinity at 0%RH. However, when the films were exposed to higher humidities the crystallinity increased. No apparent trend is observed for mechanical properties for dry membranes (0% RH). However, at 93% RH the elastic modulus increased strongly from 0.12MPa to 0.82MPa when adding 6% PCNF. At higher humidities, the moisture uptake has large influence on storage modulus, tan δ and tensile properties. Membranes containing 1% PCNF absorbed most moisture. Swelling, thermal and mechanical properties indicate a good potential for applying of PVA/phosphorylated nanocellulose composite membranes for CO2 separation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sustainability of Recycled ABS and PA6 by Banana Fiber Reinforcement: Thermal, Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder; Kumar, Ranvijay; Ranjan, Nishant

    2018-01-01

    In the present study efforts have been made to prepare functional prototypes with improved thermal, mechanical and morphological properties from polymeric waste for sustainability. The primary recycled acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polyamide 6 (PA6) has been selected as matrix material with bio-degradable and bio-compatible banana fibers (BF) as reinforcement. The blend (in form of feed stock filament wire) of ABS/PA6 and BF was prepared in house by conventional twin screw extrusion (TSE) process. Finally feed stock filament of ABS/PA6 reinforced with BF was put to run on open source fused deposition modelling based three dimensional printer (without any change in hardware/software of the system) for printing of functional prototypes with improved thermal/mechanical/morphological properties. The results are supported by photomicrographs, thermographs and mechanical testing.

  2. Experimental analysis on physical and mechanical properties of thermal shock damage of granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the changes of mechanical and physical properties of granite under different thermal loading effects. Uniaxial compression experiments studying the rules of the influence of temperature load on mechanical properties of granite were carried out. After high-temperature heating at above 600 °C, granite tended to have stronger ductility and plasticity as well as declined peak stress and compressive strength. Thermogravimetry - differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC analysis results showed that, thermal load at different temperatures induced reactions such as water loss, oxidation and crystallization in the microstructure of granite, which led to physical changes of granite. Hence it is concluded that, heating can significantly weaken the mechanical performance of granite, which provides an important support for the optimization of heating assisted processing of granite. It also reveals that, heating assisted cutting technique can effectively lower energy consumption and improve processing efficiency.

  3. Mechanical properties and microstructure of long term thermal aged WWER 440 RPV steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolluri, M.; Kryukov, A.; Magielsen, A. J.; Hähner, P.; Petrosyan, V.; Sevikyan, G.; Szaraz, Z.

    2017-04-01

    The integrity assessment of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is essential for the safe and Long Term Operation (LTO) of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Hardening and embrittlement of RPV caused by neutron irradiation and thermal ageing are main reasons for mechanical properties degradation during the operation of an NPP. The thermal ageing-induced degradation of RPV steels becomes more significant with extended operational lives of NPPs. Consequently, the evaluation of thermal ageing effects is important for the structural integrity assessments required for the lifetime extension of NPPs. As a part of NRG's research programme on Structural Materials for safe-LTO of Light Water Reactor (LWR) RPVs, WWER-440 surveillance specimens, which have been thermal aged for 27 years (∼200,000 h) at 290 °C in a surveillance channel of Armenian-NPP, are investigated. Results from the mechanical and microstructural examination of these thermal aged specimens are presented in this article. The results indicate the absence of significant long term thermal ageing effect of 15Cr2MoV-A steel. No age hardening was detected in aged tensile specimens compared with the as-received condition. There is no difference between the impact properties of as-received and thermal aged weld metals. The upper shelf energy of the aged steel remains the same as for the as-received material at a rather high level of about 120 J. The T41 value did not change and was found to be about 10 °C. The microstructure of thermal aged weld, consisting carbides, carbonitrides and manganese-silicon inclusions, did not change significantly compared to as-received state. Grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus in long term aged weld is not significant either which has been confirmed by the absence of intergranular fracture increase in the weld. Negligible hardening and embrittlement observed after such long term thermal ageing is attributed to the optimum chemical composition of 15Cr2MoV-A for high thermal stability.

  4. Thermal and mechanical improvement of aluminum open-cells foams through electrodeposition of copper and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoncini Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to its planar structure, graphene is characterized by unique properties, such as excellent chemical inactivity, high electrical and thermal conductivity, high optical transparency, extraordinary flexibility and high mechanical resistance, which make it suitable in a very wide range of applications. This paper details the state of the art in graphene coating applied to aluminum open-cells foams for the improvement of their mechanical and thermal behavior. Metallic foams are highly porous materials with extremely high convective heat transfer coefficients, thanks to their complex structure of three-dimensional open-cells. Graphene nanoplatelets have been used to improve thermal conductivity of aluminum foams, to make them better suitable during heat transfer in transient state. Also, an improvement of mechanical resistance has been observed. Before electrodeposition, all the samples have been subjected to sandblasting process, to eliminate the oxide layer on the surface, enabling a better adhesion of the coating. Different nanoparticles of graphene have been used. The experimental findings revealed a higher thermal conductivity for aluminum open cells foams electroplated with graphene. Considered the relatively low process costs and the improvements obtainable, these materials are very promising in many technological fields. The topics covered include surface modification, electrochemical plating, thermo-graphic analysis.

  5. Coupled thermal-fluid-mechanics analysis of twin roll casting of A7075 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun-Soo; Kim, Hyoung-Wook; Cho, Jae-Hyung; Chun, Se-Hwan

    2017-09-01

    Better understanding of temperature distribution and roll separation force during twin roll casting of aluminum alloys is critical to successfully fabricate good quality of aluminum strips. Therefore, the simulation techniques are widely applied to understand the twin roll casting process in a comprehensive way and to reduce the experimental time and cost of trial and error. However, most of the conventional approaches are considered thermally coupled flow, or thermally coupled mechanical behaviors. In this study, a fully coupled thermal-fluid-mechanical analysis of twin roll casting of A7075 aluminum strips was carried out using the finite element method. Temperature profile, liquid fraction and metal flow of aluminum strips with different thickness were predicted. Roll separation force and roll temperatures were experimentally obtained from a pilot-scale twin roll caster, and those results were compared with model predictions. Coupling the fluid of the liquid melt to the thermal and mechanical modeling reasonably predicted roll temperature distribution and roll separation force during twin roll casting.

  6. Transportation R and D included in thermal and mechanical sciences program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is a multiprogram research and development laboratory operated by The University of Chicago for the US Department of Energy. At Argonne, applied research in thermal and mechanical sciences is performed within the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section of the Energy Technology Division. Current program areas include compact evaporators and condensers for the process and transportation industries, ice slurries for district cooling, advanced fluids for improved heat transfer and reduced pressure drop, flow-induced vibration and flow distribution in shell-and-tube heat exchangers, and dynamics and control of maglev systems. In general, the objective of the research is to extend the technology base in each of these areas and to facilitate its application in solving problems of importance to US industries and utilities. This is accomplished by developing validated design correlations and predictive methods. The staff of the Thermal and Mechanical Sciences Section have extensive experimental and analytical experience in heat transfer, multiphase flow, structural dynamics and control, fluid-structure interaction, transient flow and mixing, thermally driven flows, and flow visualization using ultra-high-speed video. Large, general-purpose test facilities and smaller, single-purpose test apparatuses are available for experiments and component design evaluation. A world-class capability in the study of flow-induced vibrations exists within the Section. Individual fact sheets, describing currently active research program areas, related facilities, and listing, as a contact, the principal investigator, are included.

  7. Characterisation of Ground Thermal and Thermo-Mechanical Behaviour for Shallow Geothermal Energy Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Ana; Alberdi-Pagola, Maria; Christodoulides, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Increasing use of the ground as a thermal reservoir is expected in the near future. Shallow geothermal energy (SGE) systems have proved to be sustainable alternative solutions for buildings and infrastructure conditioning in many areas across the globe in the past decades. Recently novel solutions......-hydro-mechanical behaviour of soil is introduced and discussed. These coupled processes are important for confirming the structural integrity of energy geostructures, but routine methods for parameter determination are still lacking (Energies). Keywords: shallow geothermal systems; soil thermal behaviour; laboratory testing...

  8. A study on the fracture mechanism of smart composite under thermal shock cycles using AE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.K.; Lee, S.P. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Dongeui Univ., Busan (Korea); Park, Y.C. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Donga Univ., Busan (Korea)

    2005-07-01

    A smart material is used as spectacle frames and brassiere frames, and partly in medical supplies because of its shape memory effect. The smart composite can be used on the wing of an airplane instead of the existing aluminium to control crack propagation. In this study, the smart composite was fabricated by a hot press method. TiNi alloy as reinforcement and Al6061 as matrix were used, respectively. The mechanical properties of the smart composite under thermal shock cycles were evaluated. In addition, acoustic emission techniques were also used to clarify the damage behavior of the smart composite under thermal shock cycles nondestructively. (orig.)

  9. Mechanical and Thermal Characterisation of a TT Half-Module Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, F; Pangilinan, M; Siegler, M

    2005-01-01

    This note describes the mechanical effects of thermal cycles on a TT half-module, to demonstrate that the detectors can withstand the expected thermal gradients without damage. The stress transferred by the carbon fiber rails and the ceramic to the silicon sensors was investigated, and the deformation that occurred during these tests was measured by strain gauges that were attached to sensors on a test half-module. In addition, heat transfer through the carbon fiber rails was studied. Furthermore, we present a comparison of different materials proposed to build the carbon fiber rails of the modules.

  10. Modelling the thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, V.; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new numerical model for thermal quenching in quartz, based on the previously suggested Mott–Seitz mechanism. In the model electrons from a dosimetric trap are raised by optical or thermal stimulation into the conduction band, followed by an electronic transition from...... simulations are carried out of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) experiments, in which the temperature dependence of luminescence lifetimes in quartz is studied as a function of the stimulation temperature. Good quantitative agreement is found between the simulation results and new...... experimental data obtained using a single-aliquot procedure on a sedimentary quartz sample....

  11. Research on Thermal-Mechanical Coupling Modeling and Simulation of the Spindle Feed System of Machine Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of spindle feed system affects the accuracy of machine tools directly. Aiming at the problem that most research works focused on mechanical characteristics or thermal characteristics of the feed system so far, the thermal-mechanical coupling characteristic is studied in this paper. The coupling mechanism and theoretical model are established for a machine tool feed system, its coupling modal and harmonic response are simulated and analyzed by the FEM software. By comparing with the mechanical characteristics, thermal-mechanical coupling characteristics has directly influence on the dynamic performance of spindle feed system, its displacement amplitude is significantly weakened.

  12. Thermal and mechanical effect during rapid heating of astroloy for improving structural integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popoolaa, A.P.I., E-mail: popoolaapi@tut.ac.za [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Oluwasegun, K.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Olorunniwo, O.E., E-mail: segun_nniwo@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Atanda, P.O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Aigbodion, V.S. [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria)

    2016-05-05

    The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astroloy(Turbine Disc alloy) a Powder metallurgy (PM) nickel base superalloy has been investigated. The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of an inertia friction welded Astroloy were simulated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulation system. Detailed microstructural examination of the simulated TMAZ and HAZ and those present in actual inertial friction welded specimens showed that γ′ particles persisted during rapid heating up to a temperature where the formation of liquid is thermodynamically favoured, and subsequently re-solidified eutectically. The result obtained showed that forging during the thermo-mechanical simulation significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. This is attributable to strain-induced rapid isothermal dissolution of the constitutional liquation products within 150 μm from the centre of the forged sample. This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens. - Highlights: • The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astrology • The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). • significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. • This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. • The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens.

  13. Effect of resin infiltration on the thermal and mechanical properties of nano-sized silica-based thermal insulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Chun; Kim, Yun-Il; Lee, Dong-Hun; Kim, Won-Jun; Park, Sung; Lee, Dong Bok

    2011-08-01

    Several kinds of nano-sized silica-based thermal insulation were prepared by dry processing of mixtures consisting of fumed silica, ceramic fiber, and a SiC opacifier. Infiltration of phenolic resin solution into the insulation, followed by hot-pressing, was attempted to improve the mechanical strength of the insulation. More than 22% resin content was necessary to increase the strength of the insulation by a factor of two or more. The structural integrity of the resin-infiltrated samples could be maintained, even after resin burn-out, presumably due to reinforcement from ceramic fibers. For all temperature ranges and similar sample bulk density values, the thermal conductivities of the samples after resin burn-out were consistently higher than those of the samples obtained from the dry process. Mercury intrusion curves indicated that the median size of the nanopores formed by primary silica aggregates in the samples after resin burn-out is consistently larger than that of the sample without resin infiltration.

  14. Effect of Surfactants on Mechanical, Thermal, and Photostability of a Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarkhed, Meera; O'Dell, Courtney; Hsieh, Ming-Ching; Zhang, Jingming; Goldstein, Joel; Srivastava, Arvind

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of commonly used surfactants (at 0.01% w/v concentration) on mechanical, thermal, and photostability of a monoclonal antibody (MAb1) of IgG1 sub-class and to evaluate the minimum concentration of surfactant (Polysorbate 80) required in protecting MAb1 from mechanical stress. Surfactants evaluated were non-ionic surfactants, Polysorbate 80, Polysorbate 20, Pluronic F-68 (polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block polymer), Brij 35 (polyoxyethylene lauryl ether), Triton X-100, and an anionic surfactant, Caprylic acid (1-Heptanecarboxylic acid). After evaluating effect of surfactants and determining stabilizing effect of Polysorbate 80 against mechanical stress without compromising thermal and photostability of MAb1, the minimum concentration of Polysorbate 80 required for mechanical stability was further examined. Polysorbate 80 concentration was varied from 0 to 0.02%. Mechanical stability was evaluated by agitation of MAb1 at 300 rotations per minute at room temperature for 72 h. Samples were analyzed for purity by SEC-HPLC, turbidity by absorbance at 350 nm, visible particles by visual inspection, and sub-visible particles by light obscuration technique on a particle analyzer. All non-ionic surfactants tested showed a similar effect in protecting against mechanical stress and did not exhibit any significant negative effect on thermal and photostability. However, Caprylic acid had a slightly negative effect on mechanical and photostability when compared to the non-ionic surfactants or sample without surfactant. This work demonstrated that polysorbate 80 is better than other surfactants tested and that a concentration of at least 0.005% (w/v) Polysorbate 80 is needed to protect MAb1 against mechanical stress.

  15. Detection and location of mechanical system degradation by using detector signal noise data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiano, B.; Blakeman, E.D.; Phillips, L.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the investigation of a diagnostic method for detecting and locating the source of structural degradation in mechanical systems. The goal of this investigation was to determine whether the diagnostic method would be practically and successfully applied to detect and locate structural changes in a mechanical system. The diagnostic method uses a mathematical model of the mechanical system to define relationships between system parameters, such as spring rates and damping rates, and measurable spectral features, such as natural frequencies and mode shapes. These model-defined relationships are incorporated into a neural network, which is used to relate measured spectral features to system parameters. The diagnosis of the system`s condition is performed by presenting the neural network with measured spectral features and comparing the system parameters estimated by the neural network to previously estimated values. Changes in the estimated system parameters indicate the location and severity of degradation in the mechanical system. The investigation involved applying the method by using computer-simulated data and data collected from a bench-top mechanical system. The effects of neural network training set size and composition on the accuracy of the model parameter estimates were investigated by using computer-simulated data. The measured data were used to demonstrate that the method can be applied to estimate the parameters of a {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} mechanical system. The results show that this diagnostic method can be applied to successfully locate and estimate the magnitude of structural changes in a mechanical system. The average error in the estimated spring rate values of the bench-top mechanical system was approximately 5 to 10%. This degree of accuracy is sufficient to permit the use of this method for detecting and locating structural degradation in mechanical systems.

  16. Morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of poly(lactic acid) toughened by precipitated barium sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinian; Wang, Chuang; Shao, Kaiyun; Ding, Guoxin; Tao, Yulun; Zhu, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA)-based composites were prepared by blending PLA with precipitated barium sulfate (BaSO4) modified with stearic acid. The morphologies, mechanical properties and thermal stability of samples with increased mass fraction of BaSO4 were investigated. Results showed that PLA was toughened and reinforced simultaneously by incorporation of precipitated BaSO4 particles. The highest impact toughness and elongation at break were both achieved at 15% BaSO4, while the elastic modulus increased monotonically with increasing BaSO4 loading. Little effect of BaSO4 on the thermal behavior of PLA was observed in the present case. However, the thermal stability of PLA/BaSO4 composites at high temperature was enhanced.

  17. Vacuum thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of two iron-base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, K. D.

    1976-01-01

    The present study extends the concept of in-phase grain boundary ratcheting to two iron-base alloys (Type 304 stainless steel and A286 alloy) and provides a clearer interpretation of out-of-phase grain boundary ratcheting effects observed in the A286 alloy which does not exhibit geometric instability. Elevated-temperature low-cycle thermal-mechanical fatigue tests in an ion-pumped ultrahigh vacuum chamber revealed significant effects of frequency and combined temperature-strain cycling on fatigue life. In-phase thermal cycling (tension at high temperature and compression at low temperature) caused large life reductions in both materials due to grain boundary cavitation caused by unreversed grain boundary sliding (grain boundary ratcheting). Out-of-phase thermal cycling (tension at low temperature and compression at high temperature) also caused large cyclic life reductions in both materials. In the A286 alloy, out-of-phase life reductions are attributed to compressive ratcheting.

  18. Mechanical and thermal properties of melt processed PLA/organoclay nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Norazura; Jollands, Margaret; Parthasarathy, Rajarathinam

    2017-04-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) and organically modified layered silicates (organoclay) with concentrations of 2-10 wt% were prepared by melt intercalation technique. The effects of organoclay on the mechanical and thermal properties of PLA were studied. Tensile properties were evaluated using an Instron Universal Tester. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) and Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were performed to study the thermal behaviour of the prepared composites. The nanocomposites exhibited superior improvement of practical materials properties such as Young’s modulus and thermal stability, as compared to the neat PLA. The Young’s modulus drastically increased, whereas tensile strength and elongation at break decreased. The maximum degradation temperature of the hybrid increased linearly with an increasing amount of organoclay. However, MDSC has determined that the glass transition, cold crystallisation, and melting point temperatures were not significantly influenced by the presence of organoclay.

  19. Sodium alginate/graphene oxide composite films with enhanced thermal and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionita, Mariana; Pandele, Madalina Andreea; Iovu, Horia

    2013-04-15

    Sodium alginate/graphene oxide (Al/GO) nanocomposite films with different loading levels of graphene oxide were prepared by casting from a suspension of the two components. The structure, morphologies and properties of Al/GO films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermal gravimetric (TG) analysis, and tensile tests. The results revealed that hydrogen bonding and high interfacial adhesion between GO filler and Al matrix significantly changed thermal stability and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite films. The tensile strength (σ) and Young's modulus (E) of Al films containing 6 wt% GO increased from 71 MPa and 0.85 GPa to 113 MPa and 4.18 GPa, respectively. In addition, TG analysis showed that the thermal stability of Al/GO composite films was better than that of neat Al film. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal, Electrical and Mechanical Response to a Quench in Nb3SnSuperconducting Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferracin, F.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia,R.R.; Imbasciati, L.; Lietzke, A.F.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2003-11-10

    During a quench, significant temperatures can arise as a magnet's stored energy is dissipated in the normal zone. Temperature gradients during this process give rise to localized strains within the coil. Reactive forces in the magnet structure balance the electromagnetic and thermal forces and maintain on equilibrium. In this paper we present a complete 3D finite element analysis of a racetrack coil. Specifically, the analysis focuses on thermal, electrical and mechanical conditions in a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn coil built and tested as part of LBNL's Subscale Magnet Program. The study attempts to simulate time history of the temperature and voltage rise during quench propagation. The transient thermal stress after the quench is then evaluated and discussed.

  1. Thermal, Electrical and Mechanical Response to a Quench in Nb3Sn Superconducting Coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.r.; Imbasciati, L.; Lietzke, A.F.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2003-10-01

    During a quench, significant temperatures can arise as a magnet's stored energy is dissipated in the normal zone. Temperature gradients during this process give rise to localized strains within the coil. Reactive forces in the magnet structure balance the electromagnetic and thermal forces and maintain on equilibrium. In this paper we present a complete 3D finite element analysis of a racetrack coil. Specifically, the analysis focuses on thermal, electrical and mechanical conditions in a 10T Nb{sub 3}Sn coil built and tested as part of LBNL's Subscale Magnet Program. The study attempts to simulate time history of the temperature and voltage rise during quench propagation. The transient thermal stress after the quench is then evaluated and discussed.

  2. Mechanism for thermal relic dark matter of strongly interacting massive particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2014-10-24

    We present a new paradigm for achieving thermal relic dark matter. The mechanism arises when a nearly secluded dark sector is thermalized with the standard model after reheating. The freeze-out process is a number-changing 3→2 annihilation of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) in the dark sector, and points to sub-GeV dark matter. The couplings to the visible sector, necessary for maintaining thermal equilibrium with the standard model, imply measurable signals that will allow coverage of a significant part of the parameter space with future indirect- and direct-detection experiments and via direct production of dark matter at colliders. Moreover, 3→2 annihilations typically predict sizable 2→2 self-interactions which naturally address the "core versus cusp" and "too-big-to-fail" small-scale structure formation problems.

  3. Study of the effect of gamma irradiation on a commercial polycyclooctene I. Thermal and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Huete, N.; Laza, J. M.; Cuevas, J. M.; Vilas, J. L.; Bilbao, E.; León, L. M.

    2014-09-01

    A gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical, chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals able to induce chain scission or recombination of radicals, which induces annihilation, branching or crosslinking processes. The aim of this work is to research the structural, thermal and mechanical changes induced on a commercial polycyclooctene (PCO) when it is irradiated with a gamma source of 60Co at different doses (25-200 kGy). After gamma irradiation, gel content was determined by Soxhlet extraction in cyclohexane. Furthermore, thermal properties were evaluated before and after Soxhlet extraction by means of Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), as well as mechanical properties were measured by Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA). The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the irradiation dose. Finally, a first approach to evaluate qualitatively the shape memory behaviour of all irradiated PCO samples was performed by a visually monitoring shape recovery process.

  4. Effects of Thermal Treatment on the Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Coal Measures Sandstone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Mao, Xianbiao; Cao, Lili; Pu, Hai; Mao, Rongrong; Lu, Aihong

    2016-09-01

    Many projects such as the underground gasification of coal seams and coal-bed methane mining (exploitation) widely involve the dynamic problems of coal measures sandstone achieved via thermal treatment. This study examines the dynamic mechanical properties of coal measures sandstone after thermal treatment by means of an MTS653 high-temperature furnace and Split Hopkinson pressure bar test system. Experimental results indicate that 500 °C is a transition point for the dynamic mechanical parameters of coal measures sandstone. The dynamic elastic modulus and peak strength increase linearly from 25 to 500 °C while the dynamic peak strain decreases linearly over the same temperature range. The dynamic elastic modulus and peak strength drop quickly from 500 to 800 °C, with a significant increase in the dynamic peak strain over the same temperature range. The rock mechanics are closely linked to material composition and mesoscopic structure. Analysis by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy indicate that the molecules inside the sandstone increase in density due to the thermal expansion of the material particles, which effectively improves the deformation resistance and carrying capacity of the sandstone and reduces the likelihood of axial deformation. With heat treatment that exceeds 500 °C, the dynamic mechanical properties rapidly weaken due to the decomposition of kaolinite; additionally, hot cracking of the mineral particles within the materials arises from coal sandstone internal porosity, and other defects gradually appear.

  5. 3D Thermal and Mechanical Analysis of a Single Event Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, Gabriela; Demarco, Gustavo; Romero, Eduardo; Tais, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a study related to thermal and mechanical behavior of power DMOS transistors during a Single Event Burnout (SEB) process. We use a cylindrical heat generation region for emulating the thermal and mechanical phenomena related to the SEB. In this way, it is avoided the complexity of the mathematical treatment of the ion-device interaction. This work considers locating the heat generation region in positions that are more realistic than the ones used in previous work. For performing the study, we formulate and validate a new 3D model for the transistor that maintains the computational cost at reasonable level. The resulting mathematical models are solved by means of the Finite Element Method. The simulations results show that the failure dynamics is dominated by the mechanical stress in the metal layer. Additionally, the time to failure depends on the heat source position, for a given power and dimension of the generation region. The results suggest that 3D modeling should be considered for a detailed study of thermal and mechanical effects induced by SEBs.

  6. Mechanisms of interaction of non-thermal plasma with living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalghatgi, Sameer Ulhas

    Thermal plasmas and lasers have been widely used in medicine to cut, ablate and cauterize tissues through heating; in contrast, non-thermal plasma produces various highly active molecules and atoms without heat. As a result, its effects on living cells and tissues could be selective and tunable. This makes non-thermal plasma very attractive for medical applications. However, despite several interesting demonstrations of non-thermal plasma in blood coagulation and tissue sterilization, the biological and physical mechanisms of its interaction with living cells are still poorly understood impeding further development of non-thermal plasma as a clinical tool. Although several possible mechanisms of interaction have been suggested, no systematic experimental work has been performed to verify these hypotheses. Using cells in culture, it is shown in this work that non-thermal plasma created by dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) has dose-dependent effects ranging from increasing cell proliferation to inducing apoptosis which are consistent with the effects of oxidative stress. DNA damage is chosen as a marker to assess the effects of oxidative stress in a quantitative manner. It is demonstrated here that plasma induced DNA damage as well as other effects ranging from cell proliferation to apoptosis are indeed due to production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that DNA damage is initiated primarily by plasma generated active neutral species which cannot be attributed to ozone alone. Moreover, it is found that extracellular media and its components play a critical role in the transfer of the non-thermal plasma initiated oxidative stress into cells. Specifically, it is found that the peroxidation efficiency of amino acids is the sole predictor of the ability of the medium to transfer the oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma. Phosphorylation of H2AX, a DNA damage marker, following plasma treatment is found to be ATR dependent and ATM

  7. Vulcanization Kinetics and Mechanical Properties of Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer Thermal Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Irfan Fathurrohman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The vulcanization kinetics of Ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM rubber thermal insulation was studied by using rheometer under isothermal condition at different temperatures. The rheometry analysis was used to determining the cure kinetic parameters and predicting the cure time of EPDM thermal insulation. The experimental results revealed that the curing curves of EPDM thermal insulation were marching and the optimum curing time decreased with increasing the temperature. The kinetic parameters were determined from the autocatalytic model showed close fitting with the experimental results, indicating suitability of autocatalytic model in characterizing the cure kinetics. The activation energy was determined from the autocatalytic model is 46.3661 kJ mol-1. The cure time were predicted from autocatalytic model and the obtained kinetic parameter by using the relationship among degree of conversion, cure temperature, and cure time. The predictions of cure time provide information for the actual curing characteristic of EPDM thermal insulation. The mechanical properties of EPDM thermal insulation with different vulcanization temperatures showed the same hardness, tensile strength and modulus at 300%, except at temperature 70 °C, while the elongation at breaking point decreased with increasing temperature of vulcanization. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 8th April 2014; Revised: 7th January 2015; Accepted: 16th January 2015How to Cite: Fathurrohman, M.I., Maspanger, D.R., Sutrisno, S. (2015. Vulcanization Kinetics and Mechanical Properties of Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer Thermal Insulation. Bulletin of Chemi-cal Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2, 104-110. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.6682.104-110Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.6682.104-110 

  8. Examination of cadmium safety rod thermal test specimens and failure mechanism evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.K.; Peacock, H.B.; Iyer, N.C.

    1992-01-01

    The reactor safety rods may be subjected to high temperatures due to gamma heating after the core coolant level has dropped during the ECS phase of a hypothetical LOCA event. Accordingly, an experimental cadmium safety rod testing subtask was established as part of a task to address the response of reactor core components to this accident. Companion reports describe the experiments and a structural evaluation (finite element analysis) of the safety rod. This report deals primarily with the examination of the test specimens, evaluation of possible failure mechanisms, and confirmatory separate effects experiments. It is concluded that the failures observed in the cadmium safety rod thermal tests which occurred at low temperature (T < 600{degrees}C) with slow thermal ramp rates (slow cladding strain rates) resulted from localized dissolution of the stainless steel cladding by the cadmium/aluminum solution and subsequent ductility exhaustion and rupture. The slow thermal ramp rate is believed to be the root cause for the failures; specifically, the slow ramp rate led to localized cladding shear deformation which ruptured the protective oxide film on the cladding inner surface and allowed dissolution to initiate. The test results and proposed failure mechanism support the conclusion that the rods would not fail below 500{degrees}C even at slow ramp rates. The safety rod thermal test specimen failures which occurred at high temperature (T > 800{degrees}C) with fast thermal ramp rates are concluded to be mechanical in nature without significant environmental degradation. Based on these tests, tasks were initiated to design and manufacture B{sub 4}C safety rods to replace the cadmium safety rods. The B{sub 4}C safety rods have been manufactured at this time and it is currently planned to charge them to the reactor in the near future. 60 refs.

  9. Evolution and use of combined mechanical and thermal codes for cryogenic turbopump bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Joe C.; Marty, David E.; Moore, James D.

    1988-01-01

    Shaft bearing system analysis codes were developed, improved, and used to investigate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Liquid Oxygen (LOX) turbopump bearing problems, and to support the Marshall Space Flight Center Bearing and Seal Materials Test (BSMT) program. Thermal network modeling uses the SINDA thermal code, and the modeling of bearing quasi-dynamic characteristics uses the SHABERTH bearing/shaft code. These codes are solved concurrently for a bearing/shaft system using software developed for this purpose. Simulation of the SSME LOX turbopump turbine and pump end bearings and the MSFC BSMT operating in liquid nitrogen (LN sub 2) and LOX was done. The thermal network models include the bearing components, bearing carriers, shaft, housing, frictional heat, and viscous fluid energy. A cage model was included to account for heat generation between the cage and rolling elements. Since most bearing surfaces operate at temperatures well above the coolant saturation temperature, and move at high speed relative to the coolant, forced convection boiling is the dominant mechanism for heat removal. Improved modeling of forced convection film boiling was incorporated to take into account the local vapor generation at the high temperature surfaces. Rearing preloads in the pump and tester are provided by preload springs. As bearing operating clearances and contact angles change due to thermal effects and loading, the bearing preload changes with these varying conditions. These characteristics were modeled and are included in the overall system models. Results from these models indicate an operational limit which, if exceeded, predicts a thermal excursion.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Thermally Aged Austenitic Stainless Steel Welds and Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Seo, Myeong-Gyu; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung Soo [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Conventional test methods for tensile and J-R properties of such weld require large size specimens. Meanwhile, small punch (SP) test has advantages of using small size samples at specific location. In this study, the mechanical property changes caused by the thermal aging were evaluated for the stainless steel welds and CASSs using tensile, J-R, and SP test. Based on the results, correlations were developed to estimate the fracture toughness using the load-displacement curve of SP tests. Finally, the fracture surfaces of compact tension (CT) and SP test specimens are compared and discussed in view of the effect of thermal aging on microstructure. Stainless steel welds of ER316L and ER347 as well as CASS (CF8M) were thermally aged at 400 .deg. C for 5,000 h. So far, tensile properties and fracture toughness of un-aged materials were carried out at room temperature and 320 .deg. C as a reference data. In order to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on mechanical properties, aged specimens are being tested and the changes in these properties will be discussed. In addition, correlations will be developed to estimate the fracture toughness in between J-R curve and SP curve.

  11. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polypropylene Reinforced by Calcined and Uncalcined Zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdin Bukit

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to compare mechanical and thermal properties of polypropylene (PP reinforced with uncalcined and calcined zeolites. The PP samples were reinforced with zeolites at various quantities of 2, 4, and 6 (wt %. The comparison of the two types of zeolite was based  on mechanical properties, including tensile strength, elongation at break, and Young’s modulus, and thermal characteristics analyzed using DSC, and DTA/TGA technique. The results obtained clearly revealed that both zeolites were able to significantly increase tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the samples, with calcined zeolite was found to work better. Addition of calcined zeolite was found to result in increased fracture elongation of the samples reinforced with up to 4 wt% zeolite but decreased sharply for the sample reinforced with 6 wt% zeolite, while for the samples reinforced with uncalcined zeolite, no consistent trend was observed. Thermal analyses demonstrated that the samples reinforced with calcined zeolite are more resistant to thermal treatment than those reinforced with uncalcined zeolite, as indicated by their higher decomposition temperature. DSC analysis revealed that there  was no significant difference  of the melting points of the samples was observed, but the effect of the quantity of zeolite on enthalphy was quite evident, in which the enthalpies of the samples reinforced with calcined zeolites were relatively lower than those of the samples reinforced with uncalcined zeolites. 

  12. Studies on Mechanical, Thermal, and Morphological Properties of Glass Fibre Reinforced Polyoxymethylene Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohan Babu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyoxymethylene is a material which has excellent mechanical properties similar to Nylon-6 filled with 30% GF. 75% POM and 25% glass fibre (POMGF were blended with nanoclay to increase the tensile and flexural properties. Samples were extruded in twin screw extruder to blend POMGF and (1%, 3%, and 5% Cloisite 25A nanoclay and specimens were prepared by injection moulding process. The tensile properties, flexural properties, impact strength, and hardness were investigated for the nanocomposites. The fibre pull-outs, fibre matrix adhesion, and cracks in composites were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy. 1% POMGF nanocomposite has low water absorption property. Addition of nanoclay improves the mechanical properties and thermal properties marginally. Improper blending of glass fibre and nanoclay gives low tensile strength and impact strength. SEM image shows the mixing of glass fibre and nanoclay among which 1% POMGF nanocomposite shows better properties compared to others. The thermal stability decreased marginally only with the addition of nanoclay.

  13. Mechanical, thermal and microstructural characteristics of cellulose fibre reinforced epoxy/organoclay nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, H.

    2012-10-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites reinforced with recycled cellulose fibres (RCFs) and organoclay platelets (30B) have been fabricated and investigated in terms of WAXS, TEM, mechanical properties and TGA. Results indicated that mechanical properties generally increased as a result of the addition of nanoclay into the epoxy matrix. The presence of RCF significantly enhanced flexural strength, fracture toughness, impact strength and impact toughness of the composites. However, the inclusion of 1 wt.% clay into RCF/epoxy composites considerably increased the impact strength and toughness. The presence of either nanoclay or RCF accelerated the thermal degradation of neat epoxy, but at high temperature, thermal stability was enhanced with increased char residue over neat resin. The failure micromechanisms and energy dissipative processes in these nanocomposites were discussed in terms of microstructural observations. © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of drying method on mechanical, thermal and water absorption properties of enzymatically crosslinked gelatin hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAYSSA C. SIMONI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Enzymatically crossliked gelatin hydrogel was submitted to two different drying methods: air drying and freeze drying. The resulting polymeric tridimensional arrangement (compact or porous, respectively led to different thermal and swelling properties. Significant differences (p < 0.05 on thermal and mechanical characteristics as well as swelling in non-enzymatic gastric and intestinal simulated fluids (37 ºC were detected. Water absorption data in such media was modelled according to Higuchi, Korsmeyer-Peppas, and Peppas-Sahlin equations. Freeze dried hydrogel showed Fickian diffusion behavior while air dried hydrogels presented poor adjustment to Higuchi model suggesting the importance of the relaxation mechanism at the beginning of swelling process. It was possible to conclude that the same gelatin hydrogel may be suitable to different applications depending on the drying process used.

  15. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  16. Reducing Residential Peak Electricity Demand with Mechanical Pre-Cooling of Building Thermal Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Will [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Roux, Jordan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This study uses an advanced airflow, energy and humidity modelling tool to evaluate the potential for residential mechanical pre-cooling of building thermal mass to shift electricity loads away from the peak electricity demand period. The focus of this study is residential buildings with low thermal mass, such as timber-frame houses typical to the US. Simulations were performed for homes in 12 US DOE climate zones. The results show that the effectiveness of mechanical pre-cooling is highly dependent on climate zone and the selected pre-cooling strategy. The expected energy trade-off between cooling peak energy savings and increased off-peak energy use is also shown.

  17. Flexible hybrid energy cell for simultaneously harvesting thermal, mechanical, and solar energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Hulin; Zhu, Guang; Lee, Sangmin; Lin, Zong-Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-01-22

    We report the first flexible hybrid energy cell that is capable of simultaneously or individually harvesting thermal, mechanical, and solar energies to power some electronic devices. For having both the pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties, a polarized poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) film-based nanogenerator (NG) was used to harvest thermal and mechanical energies. Using aligned ZnO nanowire arrays grown on the flexible polyester (PET) substrate, a ZnO-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) heterojunction solar cell was designed for harvesting solar energy. By integrating the NGs and the solar cells, a hybrid energy cell was fabricated to simultaneously harvest three different types of energies. With the use of a Li-ion battery as the energy storage, the harvested energy can drive four red light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

  18. Analytical Study on Thermal and Mechanical Design of Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su-Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kim, Eung-Soo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The analytical methodologies for the thermal design, mechanical design and cost estimation of printed circuit heat exchanger are presented in this study. In this study, three flow arrangements of parallel flow, countercurrent flow and crossflow are taken into account. For each flow arrangement, the analytical solution of temperature profile of heat exchanger is introduced. The size and cost of printed circuit heat exchangers for advanced small modular reactors, which employ various coolants such as sodium, molten salts, helium, and water, are also presented.

  19. Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fibre-reinforced polypropylene composite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phiri, G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ?C). Figure 1 shows the processing steps followed to produce composite samples. Up to 15% fibre loading could be achieved and the sisal fibres were coated with water glass to improve fire resistance. In order to improve the adhesion between sisal... preparation process: (A) WG coated fibre, (B) High speed granulator, (C) Composite granules, (D) Single screw extruder, (E) Injection moulder and (F) Composite samples (dumbbells) Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fi bre...

  20. Handbook of the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of six polycrystalline dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, D. P.

    1972-01-01

    The design data for six polycrystalline dielectric materials are presented to describe the optical, thermal, and mechanical properties. The materials are aluminum oxide, calcium fluoride, magnesium fluoride, magnesium oxide, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide. The primary interest is in the polycrystalline state, although single crystal data are included when appropriate. The temperature range is room temperature to melting point. The wavelength range is from near ultraviolet to near infrared.

  1. Effects of voids on thermal-mechanical reliability of lead-free solder joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benabou Lahouari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reliability of electronic packages has become a major issue, particularly in systems used in electrical or hybrid cars where severe operating conditions must be met. Many studies have shown that solder interconnects are critical elements since many failure mechanisms originate from their typical response under thermal cycles. In this study, effects of voids in solder interconnects on the electronic assembly lifetime are estimated based on finite element simulations.

  2. Mechanical and thermal properties of composite material for anti-hail rockets

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Dimeski, Dimko; Basoski, Gorgi; Smileski, Rose

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the technological treatment for production of a molding compound based on short carbon fibers and ablative phenol- formaldehyde resin for high temperature application is optimized. The characterization of the starting raw materials is performed and molding compounds with different fiber/matrix ratio and different fiber length are obtained. From the different lab-samples molded parts are made by thermocompression. All physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the composi...

  3. A LiBr-H2O Absorption Refrigerator Incorporating a Thermally Activated Solution Pumping Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Ian W. Eames

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an illustrated description of a proposed LiBr-H2O vapour absorption refrigerator which uses a thermally activated solution pumping mechanism that combines controlled variations in generator vapour pressure with changes it produces in static-head pressure difference to circulate the absorbent solution between the generator and absorber vessels. The proposed system is different and potentially more efficient than a bubble pump system previously proposed and avoids the need f...

  4. Mechanical and thermal analysis of the internal combustion engine piston using Ansys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioată, V. G.; Kiss, I.; Alexa, V.; Raţiu, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The piston is one of the most important components of the internal combustion engine. Piston fail mainly due to mechanical stresses and thermal stresses. In this paper is determined by using the finite element method, stress and displacement distribution due the flue gas pressure and temperature, separately and combined. The FEA is performed by CAD and CAE software. The results are compared with those obtained by the analytical method and conclusions have been drawn.

  5. Synthesis and mechanism of formation of oxadeazaflavines by microwave thermal cyclization of ortho-halobenzylidene barbiturates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa-Villar, J. Daniel; Oliveira, Sandra C.G. de, E-mail: figueroa@ime.eb.br [Grupo de Quimica Medicinal, Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    The thermal cyclization reaction of o-halobenzylidene barbiturates was developed as an efficient and simple method for the preparation of oxadeazaflavines. The use of solid state reaction conditions with microwave irradiation afforded the products in 5 min with 47 to 98% yield. Experimental synthetic results and thermogravimetric reaction analyses agree with the molecular modeling mechanism simulation, indicating that this reaction occurs through an intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder cyclization followed by fast re-aromatization. (author)

  6. Equilibrium and shot noise in mesoscopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, T.

    1994-10-01

    Within the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the study of noise in Mesoscopic devices, both experimentally and theoretically. Noise in solid state devices can have different origins: there is 1/f noise, which is believed to arise from fluctuations in the resistance of the sample due to the motion of impurities. On top of this contribution is a frequency independent component associated with the stochastic nature of electron transport, which will be the focus of this paper. If the sample considered is small enough that dephasing and inelastic effects can be neglected, equilibrium (thermal) and excess noise can be completely described in terms of the elastic scattering properties of the sample. As mentioned above, noise arises as a consequence of random processes governing the transport of electrons. Here, there are two sources of randomness: first, electrons incident on the sample occupy a given energy state with a probability given by the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Secondly, electrons can be transmitted across the sample or reflected in the same reservoir where they came from with a probability given by the quantum mechanical transmission/reflection coefficients. Equilibrium noise refers to the case where no bias voltage is applied between the leads connected to the sample, where thermal agitation alone allows the electrons close to the Fermi level to tunnel through the sample. In general, equilibrium noise is related to the conductance of the sample via the Johnson-Nyquist formula. In the presence of a bias, in the classical regime, one expects to recover the full shot noise < {Delta}{sup 2}I >= 2I{Delta}{mu} as was observed a long time ago in vacuum diodes. In the Mesoscopic regime, however, excess noise is reduced below the shot noise level. The author introduces a more intuitive picture, where the current passing through the device is a superposition of pulses, or electron wave packets, which can be transmitted or reflected.

  7. Mechanical and thermal properties of Posidonia oceanica cellulose nanocrystal reinforced polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettaieb, Fedia; Khiari, Ramzi; Dufresne, Alain; Mhenni, Mohamed Farouk; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2015-06-05

    In the present study, cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) were isolated from Posidonia oceanica balls and leaves. CNC was prepared from this marine biomass by sulfuric acid hydrolysis (H2SO4) treatment. The raw fibers were firstly isolated by a delignification-bleaching process then the acid hydrolysis treatment was performed at 55°C during 40min under mechanical stirring. The ensuing CNCs were characterized by their morphological and thermal properties using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. Nanocomposite materials using the CNC extracted from marine biomass were obtained by casting and evaporating a mixture of this suspension with poly(styrene-co-butyl acrylate). The effect of CNC loading on mechanical and thermal properties was studied. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results showed a strong reinforcing effect of CNC that depends on their origin (balls or leaves). The difference was attributed not only to differences in the aspect ratio of CNC but also to the stiffness of the percolating network of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermal-Hydrologic-Mechanical Behavior of Single Fractures in EGS Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyvoloski, G.; Kelkar, S.; Yoshioka, K.; Rapaka, S.

    2010-12-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) rely on the creation a connected fracture system or the enhancement of existing (natural) fractures by hydraulic and chemical treatments. EGS studies at Fenton Hill (New Mexico, USA) and Hijiori (Japan) have revealed that only a limited number of fractures contribute to the effective heat transfer surface area. Thus, the economic viability of EGS depends strongly on the creation and spacing of single fractures in order to efficiently mine heat from given volume of rock. Though there are many similarities between EGS and natural geothermal reservoirs, a major difference between the reservoir types is the (typically) high pumping pressures and induced thermal stresses at the injection wells of an EGS reservoir. These factors can be responsible for fracture dilation/extension and thermal short circuiting and depend strongly on the surrounding state of stress in the reservoir and mechanical properties. We will present results from our study of the thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) behavior of a single fracture in a realistic subsurface stress field. We will show that fracture orientation, the stress environment, fracture permeability structure, and the relationship between permeability changes in a fracture resulting from mechanical displacement are all important when designing and managing an EGS reservoir. Lastly, we present a sensitivity analysis of the important parameters that govern fracture behavior with respect to field measurements. Temperature in high permeability fracture in an EGS reservoir

  9. Degradation mechanism and thermal stability of urea nitrate below the melting point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desilets, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.desilets@drdc-rddc.gc.ca [Defence R and D Canada, Valcartier, 2459 Pie-XI Blvd North, Val-Belair, Quebec, Canada G3J 1X5 (Canada); Brousseau, Patrick; Chamberland, Daniel [Defence R and D Canada, Valcartier, 2459 Pie-XI Blvd North, Val-Belair, Quebec, Canada G3J 1X5 (Canada); Singh, Shanti; Feng, Hongtu; Turcotte, Richard [Canadian Explosives Research Laboratory, 1 Haanel Dr. Ottawa, Quebec, Canada K1A 1M1 (Canada); Anderson, John [Defence R and D Canada, Suffield, Box 4000, stn Main, Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada T1A 8K6 (Canada)

    2011-07-10

    Highlights: {yields} Decomposition mechanism of urea nitrate. {yields} Spectral characterization of the decomposition mechanism. {yields} Thermal stability of urea nitrate at 50, 70 and 100 {sup o}C. {yields} Chemical balance of decomposed products released. - Abstract: Aging and degradation of urea nitrate below the melting point, at 100 {sup o}C, was studied by using thermal analysis and spectroscopic methods including IR, Raman, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR techniques. It was found that urea nitrate was completely degraded after 72 h at 100 {sup o}C into a mixture of solids (69%) and released gaseous species (31%). The degradation mechanism below the melting point was clearly identified. The remaining solid mixture was composed of ammonium nitrate, urea and biuret while unreacted residual nitric and isocyanic acids as well as traces of ammonia were released as gaseous species at 100 {sup o}C. The thermal stability of urea nitrate, under extreme storage conditions (50 {sup o}C), was also examined by isothermal nano-calorimetry.

  10. Effects of gamma irradiation on the mechanical and thermal properties of cyanate ester/benzoxazine resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegaoui, Abdeldjalil; Wang, An-ran; Qadeer Dayo, Abdul; Tian, Bo; Liu, Wen-bin; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yu-guang

    2017-12-01

    In this study, thermosetting resin blends composed of cyanate ester (CE) and benzoxazine (BOZ) were prepared and then subjected to gamma-ray irradiation with doses up to 1000 kGy from a cobalt-60 gamma irradiator. The objective of this present study was to experimentally assess the effect of γ-ray irradiation on the mechanical behaviour, chemical structure and thermal properties of the CE/BOZ resin blends by the bending test, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results showed that at a low radiation dose (250 kGy), the flexural strength and modulus, thermal stability, storage modulus and glass transition temperature of the CE/BOZ resin gradually declined first, then sharply increased when the radiation dose increased to 500 kGy and finally slightly dropped at the end with a dose of 1000 kGy. The decrease in the aforementioned properties could be ascribed to the degradation process including the rupture of chemical bonds and scission of molecular chains of the CE/BOZ resin blends, which were confirmed by the FTIR and SEM. However, a significant improvement in the thermal and mechanical properties of the blend was found when the radiation dose increased to 500 kGy.

  11. Significant Enhancement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Thermoplastic Polyester Elastomer by Polymer Blending and Nanoinclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manwar Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic elastomer composites and nanocomposites were fabricated via melt processing technique by blending thermoplastic elastomer (TPEE with poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT thermoplastic and also by adding small amount of organo modified nanoclay and/or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. We study the effect of polymer blending on the mechanical and thermal properties of TPEE blends with and without nanoparticle additions. Significant improvement was observed by blending only TPEE and virgin PBT polymers. With a small amount (0.5 wt.% of nanoclay or PTFE particles added to the TPEE composite, there was further improvement in both the mechanical and thermal properties. To study mechanical properties, flexural strength (FS, flexural modulus (FM, tensile strength (TS, and tensile elongation (TE were all investigated. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were used to analyze the thermal properties, including the heat distortion temperature (HDT, of the composites. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to observe the polymer fracture surface morphology. The dispersion of the clay and PTFE nanoparticles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis. This material is proposed for use as a baffle plate in the automotive industry, where both high HDT and high modulus are essential.

  12. Microstructural, mechanical, and thermal characteristics of recycled cellulose fiber-halloysite-epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, H.

    2012-02-26

    Epoxy hybrid-nanocomposites reinforced with recycled cellulose fibers (RCF) and halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) have been fabricated and investigated. The dispersion of HNTs was studied by synchrotron radiation diffraction (SRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The influences of RCF/HNTs dispersion on the mechanical properties and thermal properties of these composites have been characterized in terms of flexural strength, flexural modulus, fracture toughness, impact toughness, impact strength, and thermogravimetric analysis. The fracture surface morphology and toughness mechanisms were investigated by SEM. Results indicated that mechanical properties increased because of the addition of HNTs into the epoxy matrix. Flexural strength, flexural modulus, fracture toughness, and impact toughness increased by 20.8, 72.8, 56.5, and 25.0%, respectively, at 1 wt% HNTs load. The presence of RCF dramatically enhanced flexural strength, fracture toughness, impact strength, and impact toughness of the composites by 160%, 350%, 444%, and 263%, respectively. However, adding HNTs to RCF/epoxy showed only slight enhancements in flexural strength and fracture toughness. The inclusion of 5 wt% HNTs into RCF/epoxy ecocomposites increased the impact toughness by 27.6%. The presence of either HNTs or RCF accelerated the thermal degradation of neat epoxy. However, at high temperature, samples reinforced with RCF and HNTs displayed better thermal stability with increased char residue than neat resin. © 2012 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  13. Efficient Simulation and Abuse Modeling of Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Phenomena in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Graf, Peter A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pesaran, Ahmad A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Chao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lamb, Joshua [Sandia National Laboratories; Abraham, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory; Dees, Dennis [Argonne National Laboratory; Yao, Pierre [Argonne National Laboratory

    2017-08-08

    NREL's Energy Storage team is exploring the effect of mechanical crush of lithium ion cells on their thermal and electrical safety. PHEV cells, fresh as well as ones aged over 8 months under different temperatures, voltage windows, and charging rates, were subjected to destructive physical analysis. Constitutive relationship and failure criteria were developed for the electrodes, separator as well as packaging material. The mechanical models capture well, the various modes of failure across different cell components. Cell level validation is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories.

  14. The Effects of Mechanical and Thermal Stimuli on Local Field Potentials and Single Unit Activity in Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belasen, Abigail; Youn, Youngwon; Gee, Lucy; Prusik, Julia; Lai, Brant; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Rizvi, Khizer; Yeung, Philip; Shin, Damian S; Argoff, Charles; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pain is a major, debilitating symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although, deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been shown to improve pain outcomes, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are unclear. Microelectrode recording allows us to measure both local field potentials (LFPs) and single neuronal unit activity (SUA). In this study, we examined how single unit and LFP oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia are impacted by mechanical and thermal sensory stimuli and explored their role in pain modulation. We assessed changes in LFPs and SUAs in the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus interna (Gpi), and globus pallidus externa (Gpe) following exposure with mechanical or thermal stimuli. Sensory thresholds were determined pre-operatively using quantitative sensory testing. Based on these data, patients were exposed to innocuous and noxious mechanical, pressure, and thermal stimuli at individualized thresholds. In the STN, LFP alpha oscillatory activity and SUA increased in response to innocuous mechanical stimuli; SUA further increased in response to noxious mechanical, noxious pressure, and noxious thermal stimuli (p < 0.05). In the Gpe, LFP low betaactivity and SUA increased with noxious thermal stimuli; SUA also increased in response to innocuous thermal stimuli (p < 0.05). In the Gpi, innocuous thermal stimuli increased LFP gammaactivity; noxious pressure stimuli decreased low betaactivity; SUA increased in response to noxious thermal stimuli (p < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate that mechanical and thermal stimuli alter basal ganglia LFPs and SUAs in PD. While STN SUA increases nearly uniformly to all sensory stimuli, SUA in the pallidal nuclei respond solely to thermal stimuli. Similarly, thermal stimuli yield increases in pallidal LFP activity, but not STN activity. We speculate that DBS may provide analgesia through suppression of stimuli-specific changes in basal ganglia activity, supporting a role for these nuclei

  15. Numerical analysis of thermal impact on hydro-mechanical properties of clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuerui Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As is known, high-level radioactive waste (HLW is commonly heat-emitting. Heat output from HLW will dissipate through the surrounding rocks and induce complex thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC processes. In highly consolidated clayey rocks, thermal effects are particularly significant because of their very low permeability and water-saturated state. Thermal impact on the integrity of the geological barriers is of most importance with regard to the long-term safety of repositories. This study focuses on numerical analysis of thermal effects on hydro-mechanical properties of clayey rock using a coupled thermo-mechanical multiphase flow (TH2M model which is implemented in the finite element programme OpenGeoSys (OGS. The material properties of the numerical model are characterised by a transversal isotropic elastic model based on Hooke's law, a non-isothermal multiphase flow model based on van Genuchten function and Darcy's law, and a transversal isotropic heat transport model based on Fourier's law. In the numerical approaches, special attention has been paid to the thermal expansion of three different phases: gas, fluid and solid, which could induce changes in pore pressure and porosity. Furthermore, the strong swelling and shrinkage behaviours of clayey material are also considered in the present model. The model has been applied to simulate a laboratory heating experiment on claystone. The numerical model gives a satisfactory representation of the observed material behaviour in the laboratory experiment. The comparison of the calculated results with the laboratory findings verifies that the simulation with the present numerical model could provide a deeper understanding of the observed effects.

  16. Thermal Stability, Combustion Behavior, and Mechanical Property in a Flame-Retardant Polypropylene System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively improve the strength, toughness, flame retardancy, smoke suppression, and thermal stability of polypropylene (PP, layered double hydroxide (LDH Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH was synthesized by a coprecipitation method coupled with the microwave-hydrothermal treatment. The X-ray diffraction (XRD, morphology, mechanical, thermal, and fire properties for PP composites containing 1 wt %–20 wt % Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH were investigated. The cone calorimeter tests confirm that the peak heat release rate (pk–HRR of PP–20%LDH was decreased to 500 kW/m2 from the 1057 kW/m2 of PP. The pk–HRR, average mass loss rate (AMLR and effective heat of combustion (EHC analysis indicates that the condensed phase fire retardant mechanism of Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH in the composites. The production rate and mean release yield of CO for composites gradually decrease as Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH increases in the PP matrix. Thermal analysis indicates that the decomposition temperature for PP–5%LDH and PP–10%LDH is 34 °C higher than that of the pure PP. The mechanical tests reveal that the tensile strength of PP–1%LDH is 7.9 MPa higher than that of the pure PP. Furthermore, the elongation at break of PP–10%LDH is 361% higher than PP. In this work, the synthetic LDH Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH can be used as a flame retardant, smoke suppressant, thermal stabilizer, reinforcing, and toughening agent of PP products.

  17. Effects of acepromazine, butorphanol and buprenorphine on thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, E J; Taylor, P M; Murrell, J; Whay, H R

    2012-03-01

    To investigate the antinociceptive effects of buprenorphine administered in combination with acepromazine in horses and to establish an effective dose for use in a clinical environment. To evaluate the responses to thermal and mechanical stimulation following administration of 3 doses of buprenorphine compared to positive (butorphanol) and negative (glucose) controls. Observer blinded, randomised, crossover design using 6 Thoroughbred geldings (3-10 years, 500-560 kg). Thermal and mechanical nociceptive thresholds were measured 3 times at 15 min intervals. Horses then received acepromazine 0.05 mg/kg bwt with one of 5 treatments i.v.: 5% glucose (Glu), butorphanol 100 µg/kg bwt (But) buprenorphine 5 µg/kg bwt (Bup5), buprenorphine 7.5 µg/kg bwt (Bup7.5) and buprenorphine 10 µg/kg bwt (Bup10). Thresholds were measured 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 230 min, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 24 h post treatment administration. The 95% confidence intervals for threshold temperature (ΔT) for each horse were calculated and an antinociceptive effect defined as ΔT, which was higher than the upper limit of the confidence interval. Duration of thermal antinociception was analysed using a within-subjects ANOVA and peak mechanical thresholds with a general linear model with post hoc Tukey tests. Significance was set at Pbuprenorphine produced antinociception to a thermal stimulus for significantly longer than acepromazine and either butorphanol or glucose. This study suggests that buprenorphine has considerable potential as an analgesic in horses and should be examined further under clinical conditions and by investigation of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile. © 2011 EVJ Ltd.

  18. Reduced silanized graphene oxide/epoxy-polyurethane composites with enhanced thermal and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jing, E-mail: linjin00112043@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Peipei [Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA 01605 (United States); Zheng, Cheng; Wu, Xu; Mao, Taoyan; Zhu, Mingning; Wang, Huaquan; Feng, Danyan; Qian, Shuxuan; Cai, Xianfang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Graphical abstract: The synthesis route for EPUAs/R-Si-GEO composites. - Highlights: • Reduced silanized graphene oxide as fillers. • The graphene layers were well distributed in the epoxy-polyurethane composites. • The thermal stabilities of composites were greatly improved by incorporation of the graphene. • Mechanical properties of composites were greatly enhanced by the incorporation of the graphene. - Abstract: This paper describes the synthesis of reduced silanized graphene oxide/epoxy-polyurethane (EPUAs/R-Si-GEO) composites with enhanced thermal and mechanical properties. Graphene oxide (GEO), prepared from natural graphite flakes, was modified with methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane to prepare silanized GEO (Si-GEO), and was then reduced by NaHSO{sub 3} to prepare R-Si-GEO (partially reduced Si-GEO). EPAc/R-Si-GEO (R-Si-GEO/epoxy acrylate copolymers) was synthesized via an in situ polymerization of R-Si-GEO and epoxy acrylic monomers. EPUAs/R-Si-GEO was obtained by curing reaction between EPAc/R-Si-GEO and an isocyanate curing agent. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface and crystal structure of the modified graphene and EPUAs/R-Si-GEO. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to characterize their morphology. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile strength, elongation at break, and cross-linking density measurements showed that the thermal stability and mechanical properties of EPUAs/R-Si-GEO were greatly enhanced by the addition of R-Si-GEO.

  19. Hot-spot detection and calibration of a scanning thermal probe with a noise thermometry gold wire sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitas, A.; Wolgast, S.; Covington, E.; Kurdak, C.

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the temperature profile of a nanoscale sample using scanning thermal microscopy is challenging due to a scanning probe's non-uniform heating. In order to address this challenge, we have developed a calibration sample consisting of a 1-?m wide gold wire, which can be heated electrically by

  20. Experimental measurements and noise analysis of a cryogenic radiometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S. M.; Woods, S. I.; Jung, T. M.; Carter, A. C.; Datla, R. U. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    A cryogenic radiometer device, intended for use as part of an electrical-substitution radiometer, was measured at low temperature. The device consists of a receiver cavity mechanically and thermally connected to a temperature-controlled stage through a thin-walled polyimide tube which serves as a weak thermal link. With the temperature difference between the receiver and the stage measured in millikelvin and the electrical power measured in picowatts, the measured responsivity was 4700 K/mW and the measured thermal time constant was 14 s at a stage temperature of 1.885 K. Noise analysis in terms of Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) was used to quantify the various fundamental and technical noise contributions, including phonon noise and Johnson-Nyquist noise. The noise analysis clarifies the path toward a cryogenic radiometer with a noise floor limited by fundamental phonon noise, where the magnitude of the phonon NEP is 6.5 fW/√(Hz) for the measured experimental parameters.

  1. Is phenotypic plasticity a key mechanism for responding to thermal stress in ants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oms, Cristela Sánchez; Cerdá, Xim; Boulay, Raphaël

    2017-06-01

    Unlike natural selection, phenotypic plasticity allows organisms to respond quickly to changing environmental conditions. However, plasticity may not always be adaptive. In insects, body size and other morphological measurements have been shown to decrease as temperature increases. This relationship may lead to a physiological conflict in ants, where larger body size and longer legs often confer better thermal resistance. Here, we tested the effect of developmental temperature (20, 24, 28 or 32 °C) on adult thermal resistance in the thermophilic ant species Aphaenogaster senilis. We found that no larval development occurred at 20 °C. However, at higher temperatures, developmental speed increased as expected and smaller adults were produced. In thermal resistance tests, we found that ants reared at 28 and 32 °C had half-lethal temperatures that were 2 °C higher than those of ants reared at 24 °C. Thus, although ants reared at higher temperatures were smaller in size, they were nonetheless more thermoresistant. These results show that A. senilis can exploit phenotypic plasticity to quickly adjust its thermal resistance to local conditions and that this process is independent of morphological adaptations. This mechanism may be particularly relevant given current rapid climate warming.

  2. Failure Mechanisms of SAC/Fe-Ni Solder Joints During Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Yin; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Li, Cai-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Thermal cycling tests have been conducted on Sn-Ag-Cu/Fe- xNi ( x = 73 wt.% or 45 wt.%) and Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu solder joints according to the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council industrial standard to study their interfacial reliability under thermal stress. The interfacial intermetallic compounds formed for solder joints on Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni were 4.5 μm, 1.7 μm, and 1.4 μm thick, respectively, after 3000 cycles, demonstrating excellent diffusion barrier effect of Fe-Ni under bump metallization (UBM). Also, two deformation modes, viz. solder extrusion and fatigue crack formation, were observed by scanning electron microscopy and three-dimensional x-ray microscopy. Solder extrusion dominated for solder joints on Cu, while fatigue cracks dominated for solder joints on Fe-45Ni and both modes were detected for those on Fe-73Ni. Solder joints on Fe-Ni presented inferior reliability during thermal cycling compared with those on Cu, with characteristic lifetime of 3441 h, 3190 h, and 1247 h for Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni UBM, respectively. This degradation of the interfacial reliability for solder joints on Fe-Ni is attributed to the mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at interconnection level. The CTE mismatch at microstructure level was also analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction for clearer identification of recrystallization-related deformation mechanisms.

  3. Effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical, thermal and rheological behavior of HDPE filled with seaweed residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataño, L.; Albano, C.; Karam, A.; Domínguez, N.; Sánchez, Y.; González, J.

    2005-07-01

    The present work shows the results obtained during the investigation of the influence of gamma irradiation on mechanical, thermal and rheological properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) filled with seaweed residues (SR). The SR used was located on Venezuelan coastlines and they are composed mainly by CaCO3 in aragonite phase. The HDPE was extruded along with the filler at different compositions (20, 30 and 40 wt.%). The composites were exposed to a 60Co source irradiated at 25 and 100 kGy. From the obtained results, it was noticed that Young modulus remained constant with filler content. Moreover, the influence of filler content was found to be more prominent on properties like tensile stress and elongation at break. On the other hand, thermal analysis showed that filler content had no significant influence on thermal stability. Still, it is necessary to point out that low radiation doses improved thermal stability of the composites. From rheological studies it was observed a decreasing of melt flow index (MFI) by increasing the SR amount and radiation. Therefore, was determinate that high filler content composites are the best choice to be considered for biomedical and industrial applications.

  4. Extracting signal from noise: kinetic mechanisms from a Michaelis-Menten-like expression for enzymatic fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Bustamante, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-catalyzed reactions are naturally stochastic, and precision measurements of these fluctuations, made possible by single-molecule methods, promise to provide fundamentally new constraints on the possible mechanisms underlying these reactions. We review some aspects of statistical kinetics: a new field with the goal of extracting mechanistic information from statistical measures of fluctuations in chemical reactions. We focus on a widespread and important statistical measure known as the randomness parameter. This parameter is remarkably simple in that it is the squared coefficient of variation of the cycle completion times, although it places significant limits on the minimal complexity of possible enzymatic mechanisms. Recently, a general expression has been introduced for the substrate dependence of the randomness parameter that is for rate fluctuations what the Michaelis-Menten expression is for the mean rate of product generation. We discuss the information provided by the new kinetic parameters introduced by this expression and demonstrate that this expression can simplify the vast majority of published models. © 2013 FEBS.

  5. Activation of parallel fiber feedback by spatially diffuse stimuli reduces signal and noise correlations via independent mechanisms in a cerebellum-like structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Simmonds

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Correlations between the activities of neighboring neurons are observed ubiquitously across systems and species and are dynamically regulated by several factors such as the stimulus' spatiotemporal extent as well as by the brain's internal state. Using the electrosensory system of gymnotiform weakly electric fish, we recorded the activities of pyramidal cell pairs within the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL under spatially localized and diffuse stimulation. We found that both signal and noise correlations were markedly reduced (>40% under the latter stimulation. Through a network model incorporating key anatomical features of the ELL, we reveal how activation of diffuse parallel fiber feedback from granule cells by spatially diffuse stimulation can explain both the reduction in signal as well as the reduction in noise correlations seen experimentally through independent mechanisms. First, we show that burst-timing dependent plasticity, which leads to a negative image of the stimulus and thereby reduces single neuron responses, decreases signal but not noise correlations. Second, we show trial-to-trial variability in the responses of single granule cells to sensory input reduces noise but not signal correlations. Thus, our model predicts that the same feedback pathway can simultaneously reduce both signal and noise correlations through independent mechanisms. To test this prediction experimentally, we pharmacologically inactivated parallel fiber feedback onto ELL pyramidal cells. In agreement with modeling predictions, we found that inactivation increased both signal and noise correlations but that there was no significant relationship between magnitude of the increase in signal correlations and the magnitude of the increase in noise correlations. The mechanisms reported in this study are expected to be generally applicable to the cerebellum as well as other cerebellum-like structures. We further discuss the implications of such

  6. Activation of parallel fiber feedback by spatially diffuse stimuli reduces signal and noise correlations via independent mechanisms in a cerebellum-like structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds, Benjamin; Chacron, Maurice J

    2015-01-01

    Correlations between the activities of neighboring neurons are observed ubiquitously across systems and species and are dynamically regulated by several factors such as the stimulus' spatiotemporal extent as well as by the brain's internal state. Using the electrosensory system of gymnotiform weakly electric fish, we recorded the activities of pyramidal cell pairs within the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL) under spatially localized and diffuse stimulation. We found that both signal and noise correlations were markedly reduced (>40%) under the latter stimulation. Through a network model incorporating key anatomical features of the ELL, we reveal how activation of diffuse parallel fiber feedback from granule cells by spatially diffuse stimulation can explain both the reduction in signal as well as the reduction in noise correlations seen experimentally through independent mechanisms. First, we show that burst-timing dependent plasticity, which leads to a negative image of the stimulus and thereby reduces single neuron responses, decreases signal but not noise correlations. Second, we show trial-to-trial variability in the responses of single granule cells to sensory input reduces noise but not signal correlations. Thus, our model predicts that the same feedback pathway can simultaneously reduce both signal and noise correlations through independent mechanisms. To test this prediction experimentally, we pharmacologically inactivated parallel fiber feedback onto ELL pyramidal cells. In agreement with modeling predictions, we found that inactivation increased both signal and noise correlations but that there was no significant relationship between magnitude of the increase in signal correlations and the magnitude of the increase in noise correlations. The mechanisms reported in this study are expected to be generally applicable to the cerebellum as well as other cerebellum-like structures. We further discuss the implications of such decorrelation on the neural

  7. Realization of the thermal equilibrium in inhomogeneous magnetic systems by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with stochastic noise, and its dynamical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Masamichi; Miyashita, Seiji

    2015-04-01

    It is crucially important to investigate the effects of temperature on magnetic properties such as critical phenomena, nucleation, pinning, domain wall motion, and coercivity. The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation has been applied extensively to study dynamics of magnetic properties. Approaches of Langevin noises have been developed to introduce the temperature effect into the LLG equation. To have the thermal equilibrium state (canonical distribution) as the steady state, the system parameters must satisfy some condition known as the fluctuation-dissipation relation. In inhomogeneous magnetic systems in which spin magnitudes are different at sites, the condition requires that the ratio between the amplitude of the random noise and the damping parameter depend on the magnitude of the magnetic moment at each site. Focused on inhomogeneous magnetic systems, we systematically showed agreement between the stationary state of the stochastic LLG equation and the corresponding equilibrium state obtained by Monte Carlo simulations in various magnetic systems including dipole-dipole interactions. We demonstrated how violations of the condition result in deviations from the true equilibrium state. We also studied the characteristic features of the dynamics depending on the choice of the parameter set. All the parameter sets satisfying the condition realize the same stationary state (equilibrium state). In contrast, different choices of parameter set cause seriously different relaxation processes. We show two relaxation types, i.e., magnetization reversals with uniform rotation and with nucleation.

  8. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscope (SEM, instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA.

  9. The absence of a dense potential core in supercritical injection: A thermal break-up mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banuti, Daniel T.; Hannemann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Certain experiments in quasi-isobaric supercritical injection remain unexplained by the current state of theory: Without developing a constant value potential core as expected from the mechanical view of break-up, density is observed to drop immediately upon entering the chamber. Furthermore, this phenomenon has never been captured in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) despite having become a de facto standard case for real fluid CFD validation. In this paper, we present strong evidence for a thermal jet disintegration mechanism (in addition to classical mechanical break-up) which resolves both the theoretical and the computational discrepancies. A new interpretation of supercritical jet disintegration is introduced, based on pseudo-boiling, a nonlinear supercritical transition from gas-like to liquid-like states. We show that thermal disintegration may dominate classical mechanical break-up when heat transfer takes place in the injector and when the fluid state is sufficiently close to the pseudo-boiling point. A procedure which allows to capture subsided cores with standard CFD is provided and demonstrated.

  10. An Investigation on the Coupled Thermal-Mechanical-Electrical Response of Automobile Thermoelectric Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Mu, Yu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Li, Guodong; Zhang, Qingjie

    2013-07-01

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials, which can directly convert heat to electrical energy, possess wide application potential for power generation from waste heat. As TE devices in vehicle exhaust power generation systems work in the long term in a service environment with coupled thermal-mechanical-electrical conditions, the reliability of their mechanical strength and conversion efficiency is an important issue for their commercial application. Based on semiconductor TE devices wih multiple p- n couples and the working environment of a vehicle exhaust power generation system, the service conditions of the TE devices are simulated by using the finite-element method. The working temperature on the hot side is set according to experimental measurements, and two cooling methods, i.e., an independent and shared water tank, are adopted on the cold side. The conversion efficiency and thermal stresses of the TE devices are calculated and discussed. Numerical results are obtained, and the mechanism of the influence on the conversion efficiency and mechanical properties of the TE materials is revealed, aiming to provide theoretical guidance for optimization of the design and commercial application of vehicle TE devices.

  11. Theoretical studies on thermal degradation reaction mechanism of model compound of bisphenol A polycarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbao; He, Chao; Li, Xinsheng; Pan, Guiying; Tong, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Density functional theory methods (DFT) M062X have been used to investigate the thermal degradation processes of model compound of bisphenol A polycarbonate (MPC) and to identify the optimal reaction paths in the thermal decomposition of bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC). The bond dissociation energies of main bonds in MPC were calculated, and it is found that the weakest bond in MPC is the single bond between the methylic carbon and carbon atom and the second weakest bond in MPC is the single bond between oxygen atom and the carbonyl carbon. On the basis of computational results of kinetic parameters, a mechanism is proposed where the hydrolysis (or alcoholysis) reaction is the main degradation pathways for the formation of the evolved products, and the homolytic cleavage and rearrangement reactions are the competitive reaction pathways in the thermal degradation of PC. The proposed mechanism is consistent with experimental observations of CO2, bisphenol A and 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethane as the main degradation products, together with a small amount of CO, alkyl phenol and diphenyl carbonate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of poly(lactic acid)/ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacharawichanant, S.; Hoysang, P.; Ratchawong, S.

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports a melt blend of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer (EBAC) with organoclay content at 3 phr. The mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of PLA/EBAC blends and nanocomposites were investigated. The morphological analysis revealed EBAC phase dispersed as a spherical domain in PLA matrix and the domain size of EBAC dispersed phase increased with increasing EBAC content. The addition of organoclay could improve the miscibility of PLA/EBAC blends due to the decrease of domain size of EBAC dispersed phase. The mechanical properties indicated that the strain at break and impact strength of PLA increased when added EBAC, but Young’s modulus and tensile strength decreased. Storage modulus increased with the addition of organoclay to the PLA/EBAC blends. The thermal properties found that the incorporation of organoclay in the PLA/EBAC blends did not effect on the glass transition temperature and melting temperature values relative to PLA. The degradation temperature of PLA improved with the addition of EBAC. This indicated that EBAC has more thermal stability and degradation temperature than PLA. From X-ray diffraction patterns displayed the characteristic peak in PLA/EBAC/organoclay nanocomposites appeared at the lower angle, which indicated the dispersed clay is intercalated in the polymer matrix. However, second-order diffraction peak appeared at the higher angle indicated that there was partially the conventional composite.

  13. Mechanism of antioxidant interaction on polymer oxidation by thermal and radiation ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Tamura, Kiyotoshi; Shimada, Akihiko; Sugimoto, Masaki; Kudoh, Hisaaki

    2012-11-01

    The mechanism of polymer oxidation by radiation and thermal ageing was investigated for the life evaluation of cables installed in radiation environments. The antioxidant as a stabilizer was very effective for thermal oxidation with a small content in polymers, but was not effective for radiation oxidation. The ionizing radiation induced the oxidation to result in chain scission even at low temperature, because the free radicals were produced and the antioxidant could not stop the oxidation of radicals with the chain scission. A new mechanism of antioxidant effect for polymer oxidation was proposed. The effect of antioxidant was not the termination of free radicals in polymer chains such as peroxy radicals, but was the depression of initial radical formation in polymer chains by thermal activation. The antioxidant molecule was assumed to delocalize the activated energy in polymer chains by the Boltzmann statics (distribution) to result in decrease in the probability of radical formation at a given temperature. The interaction distance (delocalization volume) by one antioxidant molecule was estimated to be 5-10 nm by the radius of sphere in polymer matrix, though the value would depend on the chemical structure of antioxidant.

  14. Improving the Model Fidelity for the Mechanical Response in a Thermal Cookoff of HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Albert

    2011-06-01

    Understanding the response of energetic materials to adverse thermal environments is necessary to have confidence in the safety those systems. In the past few years we have been improving our thermal-mechanical-chemical modeling of HMX-VitonA based systems. Time to event predictions are very good, to within a degree of the experimental result. However, the chemical network/reaction rates are under constrained, and many networks can achieve the same level of accuracy. Recently, we have significantly improved the mechanical response modeling by the inclusion of porosity and surface tension in the solid species in the reaction network. We discuss the addition of the reversible sublimation/vaporization reactions to the reaction network. This reaction provides a non-reactive pathway yielding mass loss in the lower temperature region in TGA experiments. This implies that a lower decomposition rate can achieve the same overall level of mass loss, thus reducing the gas pressurization in the models of experiments like the Scaled Thermal Explosion eXperiemt. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work was partially funded by the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Technology Development Program.

  15. Numerical modelling of levee stability based on coupled mechanical, thermal and hydrogeological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwornik Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical modelling of coupled mechanical, thermal and hydrogeological processes for a soil levee is presented in the paper. The modelling was performed for a real levee that was built in Poland as a part of the ISMOP project. Only four parameters were changed to build different flood waves: the water level, period of water increase, period of water decrease, and period of low water level after the experiment. Results of numerical modelling shows that it is possible and advisable to calculate simultaneously changes of thermal and hydro-mechanical fields. The presented results show that it is also possible to use thermal sensors in place of more expensive pore pressure sensors, with some limitations. The results of stability analysis show that the levee is less stable when the water level decreases, after which factor of safety decreases significantly. For all flooding wave parameters described in the paper, the levee is very stable and factor of safety variations for any particular stage were not very large.

  16. Effect of synthesized ZnO nanoparticles on thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of natural rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntako, R.

    2018-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is widely used in rubber industry as a cure activator for rubber vulcanization. In this work, comparison of cure characteristic, mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and volume swell testing in oil no.1 and oil no.3 between natural rubber (NR) filled synthesized ZnO nanoparticles (sZnO) by precipitation method and NR filled conventional ZnO (cZnO). The particle size of sZnO is 41.50 nm and specific area of 27.92 m2/g, the particle size of cZnO is 312.92 nm and specific surface area of 1.35 m2/g. It has been found that NR filled sZnO not only improves rubber mechanical properties, volume swell testing but also improves thermal conductivity and better than NR filled cZnO. Thermal conductivity of NR filled sZnO increases by 10.34%, 12.90% and 20.00%, respectively when compared with NR filled cZnO in same loading content (various concentrations of ZnO at 5, 8 and 10 parts per hundred parts of rubber). This is due to small particle size and large specific surface area of sZnO which lead to an increase in crosslinking in rubber chain and enhance heat transfer performance.

  17. Mechanical behaviour and thermal stability of multi-axially compressed copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padap, Aditya Kumar; Dwivedi, Ankit; Kumar, Narendra

    2018-01-01

    In the present study coarse grained (CG) annealed copper is subjected to multi-axial compression (MAC) process up to 9 passes to analyse its mechanical behaviour and thermal stability. The samples are characterized by optical microscopy to analyse microstructure evolution and grain size during MAC process. Mechanical properties like hardness and tensile strength have been evaluated by conducting the hardness and tensile test at ambient temperature. Microstructural examinations reveal the reduction in grain size with increase in number of passes which contributes to enhanced hardness and strength of copper. Tensile fractured specimens are examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) to analyse the mode of failure with increasing number of MAC passes. Fractured micrographs reveal the ductile mode of failure in annealed and lower pass sample which is further converted to mixed mode (ductile and brittle) as the number of passes increased. Thermal stability of processed copper is also analysed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis and results reveal reduction in thermal stability with increase in number of MAC passes. The evaluated properties of processed copper are correlated with microstructures.

  18. Thermal hydraulic-Mechanic Integrated Simulation for Advanced Cladding Thermal Shock Fracture Analysis during Reflood Phase in LBLOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seong Min; Lee, You Ho; Cho, Jae Wan; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study suggested thermal hydraulic-mechanical integrated stress based methodology for analyzing the behavior of ATF type claddings by SiC-Duplex cladding LBLOCA simulation. Also, this paper showed that this methodology could predict real experimental result well. That concept for enhanced safety of LWR called Advanced Accident-Tolerance Fuel Cladding (ATF cladding, ATF) is researched actively. However, current nuclear fuel cladding design criteria for zircaloy cannot be apply to ATF directly because those criteria are mainly based on limiting their oxidation. So, the new methodology for ATF design criteria is necessary. In this study, stress based analysis methodology for ATF cladding design criteria is suggested. By simulating LBLOCA scenario of SiC cladding which is the one of the most promising candidate of ATF. Also we'll confirm our result briefly through comparing some facts from other experiments. This result is validating now. Some of results show good performance with 1-D failure analysis code for SiC fuel cladding that already developed and validated by Lee et al,. It will present in meeting. Furthermore, this simulation presented the possibility of understanding the behavior of cladding deeper. If designer can predict the dangerous region and the time precisely, it may be helpful for designing nuclear fuel cladding geometry and set safety criteria.

  19. Poly (trimethylene) terephthalate/m-LLDPE blend nanocomposites: Evaluation of mechanical, thermal and morphological behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, Sanjay K., E-mail: drsknayak@yahoo.com [Laboratory for Advanced Research in Polymeric Materials (LARPM), Central Institute of Plastic Engineering and Technology (CIPET), B-25, CNI Complex, Patia, Bhubaneswar 751024, Orissa (India); Mohanty, Smita [Laboratory for Advanced Research in Polymeric Materials (LARPM), Central Institute of Plastic Engineering and Technology (CIPET), B-25, CNI Complex, Patia, Bhubaneswar 751024, Orissa (India)

    2010-01-15

    PTT/m-LLDPE blends and its nanocomposites were prepared using melt blending technique in a batch mixer. Organically modified nanoclays have been used as nanoscale reinforcement to prepare blend nanocomposites. Mechanical tests revealed optimum performance characteristics at PTT/m-LLDPE ratio of 70:30. Further, incorporation of nanoclays showed higher tensile strength and modulus in the blend nanocomposites as compared to optimized blend. The nanocomposites formation has been established through X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The thermal measurements have been carried out using DSC and TGA. DSC thermograms revealed a maximum increase in the crystallization temperature in the presence of clays in the blend system containing Cloisite 30B. TGA thermograms indicated that the thermal stability of the blend increases with the incorporation of nanoclays. DMA measurements reveal that the Cloisite 30B nanocomposite has maximum modulus as compared to other nanocomposites.

  20. Mechanical, Thermal and Acoustic Properties of Open-pore Phenolic Multi-structured Cryogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rui; Yao, Zhengjun; Zhou, Jintang; Liu, Peijiang; Lei, Yiming

    2017-09-01

    Open-pore phenolic cryogel acoustic multi-structured plates (OCMPs) were prepared via modified sol gel polymerization and freeze-dried methods. The pore morphology, mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties of the cryogels were investigated. From the experimental results, the cryogels exhibited a porous sandwich microstructure: A nano-micron double-pore structure was observed in the core layer of the plates, and nanosized pores were observed in the inner part of the micron pores. In addtion, compared with cryogel plates with uniform-pore (OCPs), the OCMPs had lower thermal conductivities. What’s more, the compressive and tensile strength of the OCMPs were much higher than those of OCPs. Finally, the OCMPs exhibited superior acoustic performances (20% solid content OCMPs performed the best) as compared with those of OCPs. Moreover, the sound insulation value and sound absorption bandwidth of OCMPs exhibited an improvement of approximately 3 and 2 times as compared with those of OCPs, respectively.

  1. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan/Agar Blended Films: Part 2. Thermal, Mechanical, and Surface Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam A. Elhefian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan/agar (CS/AG films were prepared by blending different proportions of chitosan and agar (considering chitosan as the major component in solution forms. The thermal stability of the blended films was studied using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. It was revealed that chitosan and agar form a compatible blend. Studying the mechanical properties of the films showed a decrease in the tensile strength and elongation at break with increasing agar content. Blending of agar with chitosan at all proportions was found to form hydrogel films with enhanced swelling compared to the pure chitosan one. Static water contact angle measurements confirmed the increasing affinity of the blended films towards water suggesting that blending of agar with chitosan improves the wettability of the obtained films.

  2. Non-destructive assay of mechanical components using gamma-rays and thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Erica Silvani; de Almeida, Gevaldo L.; Souza, Maria Ines S.; Avelino, Mila R.

    2013-05-01

    This work presents the results obtained in the inspection of several mechanical components through neutron and gamma-ray transmission radiography. The 4.46 × 105 n.cm-2.s-1 thermal neutron flux available at the main port of the Argonauta research reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear has been used as source for the neutron radiographic imaging. The 412 keV γ-ray emitted by 198Au, also produced in that reactor, has been used as interrogation agent for the gamma radiography. Imaging Plates - IP specifically designed to operate with thermal neutrons or with X-rays have been employed as detectors and storage devices for each of these radiations.

  3. A Coupled Model of Multiphase Flow, Reactive Biogeochemical Transport, Thermal Transport and Geo-Mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C. H.; Yeh, G. T.

    2015-12-01

    In this investigation, a coupled model of multiphase flow, reactive biogeochemical transport, thermal transport and geo-mechanics in subsurface media is presented. It iteratively solves the mass conservation equation for fluid flow, thermal transport equation for temperature, reactive biogeochemical transport equations for concentration distributions, and solid momentum equation for displacement with successive linearization algorithm. With species-based equations of state, density of a phase in the system is obtained by summing up concentrations of all species. This circumvents the problem of having to use empirical functions. Moreover, reaction rates of all species are incorporated in mass conservation equation for fluid flow. Formation enthalpy of all species is included in the law of energy conservation as a source-sink term. Finite element methods are used to discretize the governing equations. Numerical experiments are presented to examine the accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. The results demonstrate the feasibility and capability of present model in subsurface media.

  4. Uniaxial Negative Thermal Expansion and Mechanical Properties of a Zinc-Formate Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqiang Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermal expansion behavior of a metal-formate framework, Zn(HCOO2·2(H2O (1, has been systematically studied via variable temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Our results demonstrate that this formate exhibits significant negative thermal expansion (NTE, −26(2 MK−1 along its c-axis. Detailed structural analyses reveal that the large NTE response is attributed to the ‘hinge-strut’ like framework motion. In addition, the fundamental mechanical properties of framework 1 have been explored via nanoindentation experiments. The measured elastic modulus and hardness properties on the (00-2/(100/(110 facets are 35.5/35.0/27.1 and 2.04/1.83/0.47 GPa, respectively. The stiffness and hardness anisotropy can be correlated well with the underlying framework structure, like its thermoelastic behavior.

  5. RESOLUTION STRATEGY FOR GEOMECHANICALLY-RELATED REPOSITORY DESIGN FOR THERMAL-MECHANICAL EFFECTS (RDTME)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Board

    2003-04-01

    In September of 2000, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2000). The Key Technical Issue (KTI) agreements on Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) were jointly developed at the Technical Exchange and Management Meeting held on February 6-8, 2001 in Las Vegas, Nevada. In that report, a number of geomechanically-related issues were raised regarding the determination of rock properties, the estimation of the impacts of geologic variability, the use of numerical models, and the examination of drift degradation and design approach to the ground support system for the emplacement drifts. Ultimately, the primary end products of the KTI agreement resolution processes are an assessment of the preclosure stability of emplacement drifts and the associated ground support requirements. There is also an assessment of the postclosure degradation of the excavations when subjected to thermal and seismic-related stresses as well as in situ loading over time.

  6. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  7. Thermal, mechanical and morphological properties of polypropylene/clay/wood flour nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposites with polypropylene/clay/wood flour were prepared by melt compounding. Thermal, mechanical and morphological properties were characterized. The addition of clay, compatibilizer and wood flour considerably improved the thermal stability (i.e., decomposition and melting temperatures of the hybrids. The tensile modulus and strength of most hybrids were highly increased with the increased loading of clay, MAPP and wood flour, compared to the hybrids without wood flour. The wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD patterns showed the increased d-spacing of clay layers, indicating enhanced compatibility between PP and clay with the addition of maleated polypropylene (MAPP. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM photomicrographs illustrated the intercalated and partially exfoliated structures of the hybrids with clay, MAPP and wood flour.

  8. Fatigue behaviour of coke drum materials under thermal-mechanical cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coke drums are vertical pressure vessels used in the delayed coking process in petroleum refineries. Significant temperature variation during the delayed coking process causes damage in coke drums in the form of bulging and cracking. There were some studies on the fatigue life estimation for the coke drums, but most of them were based on strain-fatigue life curves at constant temperatures, which do not consider simultaneous cyclic temperature and mechanical loading conditions. In this study, a fatigue testing system is successfully developed to allow performing thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF test similar to the coke drum loading condition. Two commonly used base and one clad materials of coke drums are then experimentally investigated. In addition, a comparative study between isothermal and TMF lives of these materials is conducted. The experimental findings lead to better understanding of the damage mechanisms occurring in coke drums and more accurate prediction of fatigue life of coke drum materials.

  9. Ab initio kinetics and thermal decomposition mechanism of mononitrobiuret and 1,5-dinitrobiuret

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongyan; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.

    2015-05-01

    Mononitrobiuret (MNB) and 1,5-dinitrobiuret (DNB) are tetrazole-free, nitrogen-rich, energetic compounds. For the first time, a comprehensive ab initio kinetics study on the thermal decomposition mechanisms of MNB and DNB is reported here. In particular, the intramolecular interactions of amine H-atom with electronegative nitro O-atom and carbonyl O-atom have been analyzed for biuret, MNB, and DNB at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the MNB and DNB molecules are stabilized through six-member-ring moieties via intramolecular H-bonding with interatomic distances between 1.8 and 2.0 Å, due to electrostatic as well as polarization and dispersion interactions. Furthermore, it was found that the stable molecules in the solid state have the smallest dipole moment amongst all the conformers in the nitrobiuret series of compounds, thus revealing a simple way for evaluating reactivity of fuel conformers. The potential energy surface for thermal decomposition of MNB was characterized by spin restricted coupled cluster theory at the RCCSD(T)/cc-pV∞ Z//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level. It was found that the thermal decomposition of MNB is initiated by the elimination of HNCO and HNN(O)OH intermediates. Intramolecular transfer of a H-atom, respectively, from the terminal NH2 group to the adjacent carbonyl O-atom via a six-member-ring transition state eliminates HNCO with an energy barrier of 35 kcal/mol and from the central NH group to the adjacent nitro O-atom eliminates HNN(O)OH with an energy barrier of 34 kcal/mol. Elimination of HNN(O)OH is also the primary process involved in the thermal decomposition of DNB, which processes C2v symmetry. The rate coefficients for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure. In addition, the thermal decomposition of HNN(O)OH was analyzed via Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus/multi-well master equation simulations, the results of which reveal the formation

  10. Ab Initio Kinetics and Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Mononitrobiuret and 1,5- Dinitrobiuret

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hongyan; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam G.

    2015-05-26

    Mononitrobiuret (MNB) and 1,5-dinitrobiuret (DNB) are tetrazole-free, nitrogen-rich, energetic compounds. For the first time, a comprehensive ab initio kinetics study on the thermal decomposition mechanisms of MNB and DNB is reported here. In particular, the intramolecular interactions of amine H-atom with electronegative nitro O-atom and carbonyl O-atom have been analyzed for biuret, MNB, and DNB at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the MNB and DNB molecules are stabilized through six-member-ring moieties via intramolecular H-bonding with interatomic distances between 1.8 and 2.0 Å, due to electrostatic as well as polarization and dispersion interactions. Furthermore, it was found that the stable molecules in the solid state have the smallest dipole moment amongst all the conformers in the nitrobiuret series of compounds, thus revealing a simple way for evaluating reactivity of fuel conformers. The potential energy surface for thermal decomposition of MNB was characterized by spin restricted coupled cluster theory at the RCCSD(T)/cc-pV∞ Z//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level. It was found that the thermal decomposition of MNB is initiated by the elimination of HNCO and HNN(O)OH intermediates. Intramolecular transfer of a H-atom, respectively, from the terminal NH2 group to the adjacent carbonyl O-atom via a six-member-ring transition state eliminates HNCO with an energy barrier of 35 kcal/mol and from the central NH group to the adjacent nitro O-atom eliminates HNN(O)OH with an energy barrier of 34 kcal/mol. Elimination of HNN(O)OH is also the primary process involved in the thermal decomposition of DNB, which processes C2v symmetry. The rate coefficients for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure. In addition, the thermal decomposition of HNN(O)OH was analyzed via Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus/multi-well master equation simulations, the results of which reveal the

  11. Effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformation and mechanical strengthening of stainless steels – A phase-field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Shaw, Brian A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D elastoplastic phase-field model is used to study the effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformationas well as on mechanical strengthening of both austenite and martensite in stainless steel. The results show that with an increasing number of thermal cycles, martensite becomes more...

  12. Comparison of indoor air distribution and thermal environment for different combinations of radiant heating systems with mechanical ventilation systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaozhou; Fang, Lei; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    2018-01-01

    air distribution and the thermal environment for all combinations of radiant heating systems with mechanical ventilation systems. Therefore, in this article, the indoor air distribution and the thermal environment were comparatively analyzed in a room with floor heating (FH) or ceiling heating (CH...

  13. Transient thermal sympathectomy as a possible mechanism for hypotension after kyphoplasty: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Eliezer; Galperin, Mark; Portenoy, Russell K

    2013-12-01

    Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are minimally invasive treatments for vertebral compression fractures. Although infrequent, both transitory and persistent adverse effects have been reported. They range from asymptomatic to severe neurological deficits that are caused directly by polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) leakage or may be related to local or general reactions not due to PMMA leakage. Transitory hypotension after the procedure has been observed, but the characteristics and etiology of this phenomenon are not defined. To describe a case of prolonged hypotension after kyphoplasty and suggest a possible mechanism. Six months after L2 kyphoplasty, a 63-year-old woman with severe osteoporosis developed a new back pain due to compression fracture of L1 and compression deformity of the superior L3 endplate. The patient underwent bilateral kyphoplasty at the L1 and L3 levels. She developed persistent hypotension for approximately 46 hours immediately after the procedure. Common causes of hypotension were ruled out and the event resolved spontaneously. On the basis of needle placement, the temporal relationship between the procedure and blood pressure change, and the lack of other identifiable causes, thermal sympathectomy from heating of the PMMA adjacent to the paravertebral sympathetic chain is proposed as a potential mechanism. Single case report based on clinical observation. Prolonged hypotension can complicate kyphoplasty at upper lumbar levels. Two days of severe hypotension has not been described as a complication of kyphoplasty. Although the mechanism is unknown, a transient thermal sympathectomy may be the cause.

  14. Quantum Corrected Non-Thermal Radiation Spectrum from the Tunnelling Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subenoy Chakraborty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The tunnelling mechanism is today considered a popular and widely used method in describing Hawking radiation. However, in relation to black hole (BH emission, this mechanism is mostly used to obtain the Hawking temperature by comparing the probability of emission of an outgoing particle with the Boltzmann factor. On the other hand, Banerjee and Majhi reformulated the tunnelling framework deriving a black body spectrum through the density matrix for the outgoing modes for both the Bose-Einstein distribution and the Fermi-Dirac distribution. In contrast, Parikh and Wilczek introduced a correction term performing an exact calculation of the action for a tunnelling spherically symmetric particle and, as a result, the probability of emission of an outgoing particle corresponds to a non-strictly thermal radiation spectrum. Recently, one of us (C. Corda introduced a BH effective state and was able to obtain a non-strictly black body spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism corresponding to the probability of emission of an outgoing particle found by Parikh and Wilczek. The present work introduces the quantum corrected effective temperature and the corresponding quantum corrected effective metric is written using Hawking’s periodicity arguments. Thus, we obtain further corrections to the non-strictly thermal BH radiation spectrum as the final distributions take into account both the BH dynamical geometry during the emission of the particle and the quantum corrections to the semiclassical Hawking temperature.

  15. Mechanical and Thermal Stability Properties of Modified Rice Straw Fiber Blend with Polycaprolactone Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshanak Khandanlou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of modified rice straw (ORS on the mechanical and thermal properties of modified rice straw/polycaprolactone composites (ORS/PCL-Cs. The composites (Cs of polycaprolactone (PCL with ORS were successfully synthesized using the solution-casting method. The RS modified with octadecylamine (ODA as an organic modifier. The prepared composites were characterized by using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, and mechanical properties were investigated. Composites of ORS/PCL showed superior mechanical properties due to greater compatibility of ORS with PCL. The XRD results showed that the intensity of the peaks decreased with the increase of ORS content from 1.0 to 7.0 wt.% in comparison with PCL peaks. Tensile measurement showed an increase in tensile modulus but a decrease in tensile strength and elongation at break as the ORS contents are increased from 1.0 to 7.0 wt.%; on the other hand, tensile strength was improved with the addition of 5.0 wt.% of ORS. Thermal stability was decreased with the increase of ORS contents. SEM micrograph indicated good dispersion of ORS into the matrix, and FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the interaction between PCL and ORS is physical interaction.

  16. Mechanical properties and shape memory effect of thermal-responsive polymer based on PVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liulan; Zhang, Lingfeng; Guo, Yanwei

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the effect of content of glutaraldehyde (GA) on the shape memory behavior of a shape memory polymer based on polyvinyl alcohol chemically cross-linked with GA was investigated. Thermal-responsive shape memory composites with three different GA levels, GA-PVA (3 wt%, 5 wt%, 7 wt%), were prepared by particle melting, mold forming and freeze–drying technique. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and shape memory behavior were measured by differential scanning calorimeter, physical bending test and cyclic thermo-mechanical test. The addition of GA to PVA led to a steady shape memory transition temperature and an improved mechanical compressive strength. The composite with 5 wt% of GA exhibited the best shape recoverability. Further increase in the crosslinking agent content of GA would reduce the recovery force and prolong the recovery time due to restriction in the movement of the soft PVA chain segments. These results provide important information for the study on materials in 4D printing.

  17. Change Spectroscopic, thermal and mechanical studies of PU/PVC blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hezma, A.M. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Center, Giza (Egypt); Elashmawi, I.S. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Center, Giza (Egypt); Physic Department, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, Al-Ula (Saudi Arabia); Rajeh, A., E-mail: a.rajeh88@yahoo.com [Physic Department, Faculty of Science, Amran University, Sa' dah (Yemen); Physics Department, Faculty of science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Kamal, Mustafa [Physics Department, Faculty of science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Blends of polyurethane (PU) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with different concentrations were prepared by casting method. The effects of PU on PVC blends was examined by Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR), Ultra-violet visible studies (UV/VIS.), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetric (TGA), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and mechanical properties (stress–strain curve). The interaction between PU and PVC was examined by FT-IR through the absorbance of the N–H groups and was correlated to mechanical/thermal properties. Ultra-violet visible said that optical energy gap decrease with increasing concentration of PU. Differential scanning calorimetry results was observed a single glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) for blends this confirming existence miscibility within the blends. The causes for best thermal stability of some blends may be described by measurements of interactions between C=O groups of PU and the α-hydrogen of PVC or a dipole–dipole –C=O..Cl–C– interactions. Significant alterations in FTIR, X-ray and DSC examination shows an interactions between blends had good miscibility. X-ray shows some alterations in the intensity with additional PU. PU change the mechanical behavior of PVC through of the blends. When polyurethane content increase causes polyvinyl chloride tensile strength decreases and elongation at break increase.

  18. Date palm biochar-polymer composites: An investigation of electrical, mechanical, thermal and rheological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Anesh Manjaly; Elnour, Ahmed Yagoub; Anis, Arfat; Shaikh, Hamid; Al-Zahrani, S M; George, Justin; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Usman, Adel R; Ok, Yong Sik; Tsang, Daniel C W; Sarmah, Ajit K

    2018-04-01

    The application of biochar (BC) as a filler in polymers can be viewed as a sustainable approach that incorporates pyrolysed waste based value-added material and simultaneously mitigate bio-waste in a smart way. The overarching aim of this work was to investigate the electrical, mechanical, thermal and rheological properties of biocomposite developed by utilizing date palm waste-derived BC for the reinforcing of polypropylene (PP) matrix. Date palm waste derived BC prepared at (700 and 900°C) were blended at different proportions with polypropylene and the resultant composites (BC/PP) were characterized using an array of techniques (scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy). Additionally the thermal, mechanical, electrical and rheological properties of the BC/PP composites were evaluated at different loading of BC content (from 0 to15% w/w). The mechanical properties of BC/PP composites showed an improvement in the tensile modulus while that of electrical characterization revealed an enhanced electrical conductivity with increased BC loading. Although the BC incorporation into the PP matrix has significantly reduced the total crystallinity of the resulted composites, however; a positive effect on the crystallization temperature (T c ) was observed. The rheological characterization of BC/PP composites revealed that the addition of BC had minimal effect on the storage modulus (G') compared to the neat (PP). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Influence of test parameters on the thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of a superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpertu, J. L.; Rémy, L.

    1990-01-01

    The thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) behavior of IN-100, a cast nickel-base superalloy, was investigated with a basic mechanical strain-temperature loop applied in a temperature range from 600 °C to 1050 °C (873 to 1323 K). Peak strains were applied at intermediate temperatures, giving a faithful simulation of real component parts. Tests with or without a mean strain were used; other tests involved a longer period or a tensile hold time, and they were compared with conventional “in-phase” TMF cycles. An interrupted test procedure was used with a plastic replication technique to define a conventional TMF life to 0.3-mm crack depth, as well as a life to 50-µm, crack depth, to characterize the crack initiation period. Some stress-strain hysteresis loops were reported. Thermal-mechanical fatigue life was found to be dependent upon test parameters, while the life to crack initiation was not. Oxidation of specimens and micro-cracks was found to be important in all the tests. These results were then discussed and compared with those under low cycle fatigue at high temperature.

  20. Effect of MWCNT on Thermal, Mechanical, and Morphological Properties of Polybutylene Terephthalate/Polycarbonate Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. Rejisha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluated the effect of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT on the properties of PBT/PC blends. The nanocomposites were obtained by melt blending MWCNT in the weight percentages 0.15, 0.3, and 0.45 wt% with PBT/PC blends in a high performance corotating twin screw extruder. Samples were characterized by tensile testing, dynamic mechanical analysis, thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Concentrations of PBT and PC are optimized as 80 : 20 based on mechanical properties. A small amount of MWCNT shows better increase in the thermal and mechanical properties of the blends of PBT/PC nanocomposite when compared to nanoclays or inorganic fillers. The ultimate tensile strength of the nanocomposites increased from 54 MPa to 85 MPa with addition of MWCNT up to 0.3% and then decreased.The tensile modulus values were increased to about 60% and the flexural modulus was more than about 80%. The impact strength was also improved with 20% PC to about 60% and with 0.15% MWCNT to about 50%. The HDT also improved from 127°C to 205°C. It can be seen from XRD result that the crystallinity of PBT is less affected by incorporating MWCNT. The crystallizing temperature was increased and the MWCNT may act as a strong nucleating agent.

  1. Effect of space exposure of some epoxy matrix composites on their thermal expansion and mechanical properties (A0138-8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabs, Heinrich

    1992-01-01

    Assessments of the behavior of the carbon/epoxy composites in space conditions are described. After an exposure of five years, the mechanical characteristics and the coefficient of thermal expansion are measured and compared to reference values.

  2. The influence of blend ratio on the morphology, mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties of PP/LDPE blends

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mofokeng, TG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on how the blend ratio and morphology influence the mechanical, thermal, thermomechanical, and rheological properties of poly(propylene) (PP)/low density polyethylene (LDPE) blends. The blend morphology is composed of the major...

  3. Influence of boehmite nanoparticle loading on the mechanical, thermal, and rheological properties of biodegradable polylactide/ poly(e-caprolactone) blends

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Agwuncha, SC

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available -1 Macromolecular Materials and Engineering Vol. 300(1), 31-47 Influence of Boehmite Nanoparticle Loading on the Mechanical, Thermal, and Rheological Properties of Biodegradable Polylactide/Poly(e-caprolactone) Blendsa Stephen C. Agwuncha, Suprakas Sinha...

  4. A case study of interior low-frequency noise from box-shaped bridge girders induced by running trains: Its mechanism, prediction and countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Li, Xiaozhen; Hao, Hong; Wang, Dangxiong; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-01

    A side effect of high-speed railway and urban rail transit systems is the associated vibration and noise. Since the use of concrete viaducts is predominant in railway construction due to scarce land resources, low-frequency (20-200 Hz) structure-radiated noise from concrete bridges is a principal concern. Although it is the most commonly used bridge type, the mechanism of noise emission from box-shaped bridge girders when subjected to impact forces from moving trains, which sounds like beating a drum, has not been well studied. In this study, a field measurement was first made on a simply-supported box-shaped bridge to record the acceleration of the slabs and the associated sound pressures induced by running trains. These data indicated that a significant beat-wave noise occurred in the box-shaped cavity when the train speed was around 340 km/h, which arose from the interference between two sound waves of 75.0 Hz and 78.8 Hz. The noise leakage from the bridge expansion joint was serious and resulted in obvious noise pollution near the bridge once the beat-wave noise was generated in the cavity. The dominant frequency of the interior noise at 75.0 Hz was confirmed from the spectrum of the data and the modal analysis results, and originated from the peak vibration of the top slab due to resonance and the first-order vertical acoustic mode, which led to cavity resonance, amplifying the corresponding noise. The three-dimensional acoustic modes and local vibration modes of the slab were calculated by using the finite element method. A simplified vehicle-track-bridge coupling vibration model was then developed to calculate the wheel-rail interaction force in a frequency range of 20-200 Hz. Numerical simulations using the boundary element method confirmed the cavity resonance effect and the numerical results agreed well with the data. Based on the calibrated numerical model, three noise reduction measures, i.e., adding a horizontal baffle in the interior cavity, narrowing

  5. MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF MALEIC ANHYDRIDE MODIFIED RICE HUSK FILLED PVC COMPOSITES

    OpenAIRE

    Navin Chand; Bhajan Das Jhod

    2008-01-01

    Unmodified and modified rice husk powder filled PVC composites were prepared having different amounts of rice husk powder. Mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of these composites were determined. The tensile strength of rice husk powder PVC composites having 0, 10, 20, 30, and 40 weight percent of rice husk powder was found to be 33.9, 19.4, 18.1, 14.6, and 9.5 MPa, respectively. Adding of maleic anhydride- modified rice husk powder improved the tensile strength of rice husk powder...

  6. Mechanical, thermal, and fire properties of biodegradable polylactide/boehmite alumina composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Das, K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research May 2013/ Vol. 52(18), pp 6083-6091 Mechanical, Thermal, and Fire Properties of Biodegradable Polylactide/Boehmite Alumina Composites Kunal Das,*,† Suprakas Sinha Ray,†,‡ Steve Chapple,§ and James Wesley...-Smith‡ †Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Doornforntein 2028, Johannesburg, South Africa ‡DST/CSIR National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria 0001, South Africa §Polymer...

  7. The mechanism of foaming and thermal conductivity of glasses foamed with MnO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    bubbles and subsequent growth. We discuss evolution of pore morphology in terms of pore number density, pore size and closed porosity. The thermal conductivity of the foam glasses is linearly dependent on density. The heat transfer mechanism is revealed by comparing the experimental data with structural...... reduce, causing further formation of O2 gas and foaming of the glass melt. Increasing the treatment temperature and time enhances foam expansion, Mn2O3 dissolution, and lowers the closed porosity. Once the foam reaches a percolated stage, the foam continues to grow. This is caused by nucleation of new...

  8. NON-LINEAR MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL AND THERMAL PHENOMENA IN PIEZOELECTRIC CRYSTALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.Warkusz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical, electrical and thermal phenomena occurring in piezoelectric crystals were examined by non-linear approximation. For this purpose, use was made of the thermodynamic function of state, which describes an anisotropic body. Considered was the Gibbs function. The calculations included strain tensor εij=f(σkl,En,T, induction vector Dm=f(σkl,En,T and entropy S=f(σkl,En,T as function of stress σkl, field strength En and temperature difference T. The equations obtained apply to anisotropic piezoelectric bodies provided that the "forces" σkl, En, T acting on the crystal are known.

  9. Carbon nanofiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites and syntactic foams - mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Ronald Leonel

    The tailorability of composite materials is crucial for use in a wide array of real-world applications, which range from heat-sensitive computer components to fuselage reinforcement on commercial aircraft. The mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of composites are highly dependent on their material composition, method of fabrication, inclusion orientation, and constituent percentages. The focus of this work is to explore carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as potential nanoscale reinforcement for hollow particle filled polymer composites referred to as syntactic foams. In the present study, polymer composites with high weight fractions of CNFs, ranging from 1-10 wt.%, are used for quasi-static and high strain rate compression analysis, as well as for evaluation and characterization of thermal and electrical properties. It is shown that during compressive characterization of vapor grown carbon nanofiber (CNF)/epoxy composites in the strain rate range of 10-4-2800 s-1, a difference in the fiber failure mechanism is identified based on the strain rate. Results from compression analyses show that the addition of fractions of CNFs and glass microballoons varies the compressive strength and elastic modulus of epoxy composites by as much as 53.6% and 39.9%. The compressive strength and modulus of the syntactic foams is also shown to generally increase by a factor of 3.41 and 2.96, respectively, with increasing strain rate when quasi-static and high strain rate testing data are compared, proving strain rate sensitivity of these reinforced composites. Exposure to moisture over a 6 month period of time is found to reduce the quasi-static and high strain rate strength and modulus, with a maximum of 7% weight gain with select grades of CNF/syntactic foam. The degradation of glass microballoons due to dealkalization is found to be the primary mechanism for reduced mechanical properties, as well as moisture diffusion and weight gain. In terms of thermal analysis results, the

  10. The Effect of Thermal Cycling Treatments on the Thermal Stability and Mechanical Properties of a Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal cycling treatments on the thermal stability and mechanical properties of a Ti48Zr20Nb12Cu5Be15 bulk metallic glass composite (BMGC has been investigated. Results show that moderate thermal cycles in a temperature range of −196 °C (cryogenic temperature, CT to 25 °C (room temperature, RT or annealing time at CT has not induced obvious changes of thermal stability and then it decreases slightly over critical thermal parameters. In addition, the dendritic second phases with a bcc structure are homogeneously embedded in the amorphous matrix; no visible changes are detected, which shows structural stability. Excellent mechanical properties as high as 1599 MPa yield strength and 34% plastic strain are obtained, and the yield strength and elastic modulus also increase gradually. The effect on the stability is analyzed quantitatively by crystallization kinetics and plastic-flow models, and indicates that the reduction of structural relaxation enthalpy, which is related to the degradation of spatial heterogeneity, reduces thermal stability but does not imperatively deteriorate the plasticity.

  11. Cellulose-Templated Graphene Monoliths with Anisotropic Mechanical, Thermal, and Electrical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rujing; Chen, Qiao; Zhen, Zhen; Jiang, Xin; Zhong, Minlin; Zhu, Hongwei

    2015-09-02

    Assembling particular building blocks into composites with diverse targeted structures has attracted considerable interest for understanding its new properties and expanding the potential applications. Anisotropic organization is considered as a frequently used targeted architecture and possesses many peculiar properties because of its unusual shapes. Here, we show that anisotropic graphene monoliths (AGMs), three-dimensional architectures of well-aligned graphene sheets obtained by a dip-coating method using cellulose acetate fibers as templates show thermal-insulating, fire-retardant, and anisotropic properties. They exhibit a feature of higher mechanical strength and thermal/electrical conductivities in the axial direction than in the radial direction. Elastic polymer resins are then introduced into the pores of the AGMs to form conductive and flexible composites. The composites, as AGMs, retain the unique anisotropic properties, revealing opposite resistance change under compressions in different directions. The outstanding anisotropic properties of AGMs make them possible to be applied in the fields of thermal insulation, integrated circuits, and electromechanical devices.

  12. Effects of mechanical and thermal cycling on composite and hybrid laminates with residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of tensile load cycling and thermal cycling on residual stiffness and strength properties of the following composite and hybrid angle-ply laminates were studied: boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low-modulus epoxy, graphite/high-modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide, S-glass/epoxy, graphite/Kevlar 49/epoxy, and graphite/S-glass/epoxy. Specimens of the first six types were mechanically cycled up to 90% of static strength. Those that survived 10 million cycles were tested statically to failure, and no significant changes in residual strength and modulus were noted. Specimens of all types were subjected to thermal cycling between room temperature and 411 K for the epoxy-matrix composites and 533 K for the polyimide-matrix composites. The residual strength and stiffness remained largely unchanged, except for the graphite/low-modulus epoxy, which showed reductions in both of approximately 35%. When low-temperature thermal cycling under tensile load was applied, there was a noticeable reduction in modulus and strength in the graphite/low-modulus epoxy and some strength reduction in the S-glass/epoxy.

  13. Thermal and mechanical stability of retained austenite in aluminum-containing multiphase TRIP steels

    CERN Document Server

    Zwaag, S; Kruijver, S O; Sietsma, J

    2002-01-01

    Stability of retained austenite is the key issue to understand transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) effect. In this work, both thermal stability and mechanical stability are investigated by thermo-magnetic as well as in situ conventional X-ray diffraction and micro synchrotron radiation diffraction measurements. The thermal stability in a 0.20C-1.52Mn-0.25Si-0.96Al (wt%) TRIP steel is studied in the temperature range between 5 and 300 K under a constant magnetic field of 5T. It is found that almost all austenite transforms thermally to martensite upon cooling to 5K and M sub s and M sub f temperatures are analyzed to be 355 and 115 K. Transformation kinetics on the fraction versus temperature relation are well described by a model based on thermodynamics. From the in situ conventional X-ray and synchrotron diffraction measurements in a 0.17C-1.46Mn-0.26Si-1.81Al (wt%) steel, the volume fraction of retained austenite is found to decrease as the strain increases according to Ludwigson and Berger relation. T...

  14. Thermal, mechanical and chemical control of ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia in different habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sölter, Ulrike

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A small plot field experiment with transplanted ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia into gravel and grassland and a large scale field experiment on a roadside banquette in Brandenburg with a natural ragweed infestation were carried out. Thermal control treatments were hot air (gravel and grassland and hot water (roadside and flaming, the mechanical treatment was mowing and the chemical treatment was the application of the herbicide combination MCPA and Dicamba. The gravel and grassland experiment was conducted at two growth stages of ragweed (BBCH 16-18 and 22-29, at the roadside ragweed was at BBCH 50-65. Dry matter yield of ragweed was assessed 9 weeks after the treatments were conducted in gravel and grassland and 4 weeks after the treatment at the roadside. In gravel and grassland the best eradication at both growth stages by thermal control was achieved by hot air in comparison to the untreated plots (significant at P <0.05. And at the roadside significant lower dry matter was determined by hot water and flaming in comparison to the untreated plots (significant at P <0.05. The results of these experiments demonstrated the efficiency of thermal control methods based on hot air and hot water as an alternative to herbicide control and mowing in habitats where herbicide application is not allowed or mowing gives no sufficient eradication results, like on roadside banquettes.

  15. Mechanical and thermal properties of NpO2 using LSDA+U approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The elastic constants, bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young׳s modulus, Debye temperature, isobaric heat capacity and minimum thermal conductivity are estimated for NpO2 using plane-wave pseudopotential method within the local spin density approximation plus Hubbard U (LSDA+U theory. The computed lattice constants are in good agreement with the available experimental results and then three independent elastic constants were computed by means of the stress–strain method. From the knowledge of the elastic constants, the values of Young׳s modulus, Poisson, Debye temperature and minimum thermal conductivity are obtained and they are 218 GPa, 0.288, 453.5 K and 0.99 Wm−1 K−1, respectively. The obtained mechanical and thermal properties of NpO2 are in agreement with the previous experimental and theoretical data. Our investigations which are unobtainable from previous report can provide valuable reference in the future.

  16. Study on the kinetics and mechanism of grain growth during the thermal decomposition of magnesite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Daxue; Feng, Naixiang; Wang, Yaowu [Northeastern Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2012-04-15

    The X-ray line broadening technique was used to calculate the grain size of MgO at 1023, 1123, 1223 K respectively either in CO{sub 2} or during the thermal decomposition of magnesites in air as well as in vacuum. By referring to the conventional grain growth equation, D{sup n} = kt, the activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the process in air are gained as 125.8 kJ/mol and 1.56 X 10{sup 8} nm{sup 4}/s, respectively. Raman spectroscopy was employed to study the surface structure of MgO obtained during calcination of magnesite, by which the mechanism of grain growth was analyzed and discussed. It is suggested that a kind of highly reactive MgO is produced during the thermal decomposition of magnesites, which is exactly the reason why the activation energy of the grain growth during the thermal decomposition of magnesite is lower than that of bulk diffusion or surface diffusion.

  17. Study on the kinetics and mechanism of grain growth during the thermal decomposition of magnesite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Daxue; Feng, Naixiang; Wang, Yaowu [Northeastern Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2012-04-15

    The X-ray line broadening technique was used to calculate the grain size of MgO at 1023, 1123, 1223 K respectively either in CO{sub 2} or during the thermal decomposition of magnesites in air as well as in vacuum. By referring to the conventional grain growth equation, D{sup n} = kt, the activation energy and pre-exponential factor for the process in air are gained as 125.8 kJ/mol and 1.56 X 10{sup 8} nm{sup 4}/s, respectively. Ran man spectroscopy was employed to study the surface structure of MgO obtained during calcination of magnesite, by which the mechanism of grain growth was analyzed and discussed. It is suggested that a kind of highly reactive MgO is produced during the thermal decomposition of magnesites, which is exactly the reason why the activation energy of the grain growth during the thermal decomposition of magnesite is lower than that of bulk diffusion or surface diffusion.

  18. Thermal degradation mechanism of addition-cure liquid silicone rubber with urea-containing silane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Weizhen; Zeng, Xingrong, E-mail: psxrzeng@gmail.com; Lai, Xuejun; Li, Hongqiang; Chen, Wanjuan; Zhang, Yajun

    2015-04-10

    Highlights: • The urea-containing silane was incorporated into addition-cure liquid silicone rubber (ALSR) via hydrosilylation reaction. • The thermal stability of the ALSR was improved by DEUPAS both in nitrogen and air • The TG–FTIR of evolved gases during degradation was performed. • The possible degradation mechanism of the ALSR samples was proposed. - Abstract: The reactive urea-containing silane, (γ-diethylureidopropyl) allyloxyethoxysilane (DEUPAS), was synthesized by the trans-etherification reaction. The chemical structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry ({sup 1}H NMR). Subsequently, DEUPAS was incorporated into addition-cure liquid silicone rubber (ALSR) via hydrosilylation reaction. The thermal stability of the ALSR samples was investigated by thermogravimetry (TG) and thermogravimetry–Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (TG–FTIR). When DEUPAS was incorporated, the temperature of 10% weight loss and 20% weight loss under air atmosphere were respectively increased by 31 °C and 60 °C compared with those of the ALSR without DEUPAS. Meanwhile, the residual weight at 800 °C increased from 33.5% to 58.7%. It was found that the striking enhancement in thermal stability of the ALSR samples was likely attributed to the decomposition of the urea groups to isocyanic acid, which reacted with hydroxyl groups to inhibit the unzipping depolymerization.

  19. MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF WASTE BIO-POLYMER COMPOUND BY HOT COMPRESSION MOLDING TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khairul Zaimy A. G.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The demand for bio-polymer compound (BPC has attracted attention in various applications from industrial to medical. Therefore, the mechanical and thermal stability properties of recycling industrial waste BPC are very important to investigate. The waste BPC for this study is based on a mixture of hydroxylated waste cooking oil with hardeners to produce waste bio-polymer foam (WBF. The granulate of WBF was cast into the mold until all spaces were evenly filled and compacted into a homogeneous shape and thickness at 30–45 bar for 2 hours using hot compression molding. This method of BPC fabrication results in a tensile and flexural strength of 4.89 MPa and 18.08 MPa respectively. Meanwhile, the thermal stability of laminated BPC was conducted using a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA, and the first degradation of the soft segment occurred at 263°C, then subsequently the second degradation occurred at 351°C and the last at 416°C.

  20. Influence of solder joint length to the mechanical aspect during the thermal stress analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. S.; Khor, C. Y.; Rahim, Wan Mohd Faizal Wan Abd; Ishak, Muhammad Ikman; Rosli, M. U.; Jamalludin, Mohd Riduan; Zakaria, M. S.; Nawi, M. A. M.; Aziz, M. S. Abdul; Ani, F. Che

    2017-09-01

    Solder joint is an important interconnector in surface mount technology (SMT) assembly process. The real time stress, strain and displacement of the solder joint is difficult to observe and assess the experiment. To tackle these problems, simulation analysis was employed to study the von Mises stress, strain and displacement in the thermal stress analysis by using Finite element based software. In this study, a model of leadless electronic package was considered. The thermal stress analysis was performed to investigate the effect of the solder length to those mechanical aspects. The simulation results revealed that solder length gives significant effect to the maximum von Mises stress to the solder joint. Besides, changes in solder length also influence the displacement of the solder joint in the thermal environment. The increment of the solder length significantly reduces the von Mises stress and strain on the solder joint. Thus, the understanding of the physical parameter for solder joint is important for engineer prior to designing the solder joint of the electronic component.

  1. Mechanical, thermal and laser damage threshold analyses of II group metal complexes of thiourea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanuskodi, S., E-mail: dhanus2k3@yahoo.com [School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Sabari Girisun, T.C. [School of Physics, Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli 620 024, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Physics, Bishop Heber College, Tiruchirappalli 620 017, Tamil Nadu (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [Material Characterization Division, National Physical laboratory, New Delhi 110 012 (India); Uma, S.; Phillip, J. [Sophisticated Test and Instrumentation Center, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682 022 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: {yields} The role of the Group II metal ions in improving the stability is discussed. {yields} BTCC has a higher heat capacity than BTZC. {yields} Elastic stiffness is found to be higher for BTCC than BTZC. {yields} Microscopy studies confirm the damage is due to thermo-chemical ablation. {yields} BTCC has a higher laser damage threshold than BTZC. - Abstract: Single crystals of thiourea metal complexes with selected Group II metal ions, Zinc and Cadmium, have been grown by solvent evaporation technique. The crystals grown are bisthiourea zinc chloride (BTZC) and bisthiourea cadmium chloride (BTCC). Following an improved photopyroelectric technique, the thermal transport properties have been determined. It is found that BTCC has a higher heat capacity (304.09 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}) than BTZC (255.24 J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}), and hence BTCC has better thermal stability. Vicker's microhardness measurements reveal that these materials have reverse indentation size effect and belong to the category of soft materials. Elastic stiffness is found to be higher for BTCC (1.57 GPa) than BTZC (0.76 GPa). The roles of the Group II metal ions in improving the mechanical and thermal stability of the metal complexes are discussed. Multi-shot laser damage studies on these materials reveal that BTCC has a higher laser damage threshold (15 GW cm{sup -2}) than BTZC (6 GW cm{sup -2}).

  2. Preparation, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Cement Board with Expanded Perlite Based Composite Phase Change Material for Improving Buildings Thermal Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rongda; Fang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhengguo; Gao, Xuenong

    2015-11-13

    Here we demonstrate the mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of construction elements made of cement and form-stable PCM-Rubitherm® RT 28 HC (RT28)/expanded perlite (EP) composite phase change materials (PCMs). The composite PCMs were prepared by adsorbing RT28 into the pores of EP, in which the mass fraction of RT28 should be limited to be no more than 40 wt %. The adsorbed RT28 is observed to be uniformly confined into the pores of EP. The phase change temperatures of the RT28/EP composite PCMs are very close to that of the pure RT28. The apparent density and compression strength of the composite cubes increase linearly with the mass fraction of RT28. Compared with the thermal conductivity of the boards composed of cement and EP, the thermal conductivities of the composite boards containing RT28 increase by 15%-35% with the mass fraction increasing of RT28. The cubic test rooms that consist of six boards were built to evaluate the thermal energy storage performance, it is found that the maximum temperature different between the outside surface of the top board with the indoor temperature using the composite boards is 13.3 °C higher than that of the boards containing no RT28. The thermal mass increase of the built environment due to the application of composite boards can contribute to improving the indoor thermal comfort and reducing the energy consumption in the buildings.

  3. Preparation, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Cement Board with Expanded Perlite Based Composite Phase Change Material for Improving Buildings Thermal Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongda Ye

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we demonstrate the mechanical properties, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of construction elements made of cement and form-stable PCM-Rubitherm® RT 28 HC (RT28/expanded perlite (EP composite phase change materials (PCMs. The composite PCMs were prepared by adsorbing RT28 into the pores of EP, in which the mass fraction of RT28 should be limited to be no more than 40 wt %. The adsorbed RT28 is observed to be uniformly confined into the pores of EP. The phase change temperatures of the RT28/EP composite PCMs are very close to that of the pure RT28. The apparent density and compression strength of the composite cubes increase linearly with the mass fraction of RT28. Compared with the thermal conductivity of the boards composed of cement and EP, the thermal conductivities of the composite boards containing RT28 increase by 15%–35% with the mass fraction increasing of RT28. The cubic test rooms that consist of six boards were built to evaluate the thermal energy storage performance, it is found that the maximum temperature different between the outside surface of the top board with the indoor temperature using the composite boards is 13.3 °C higher than that of the boards containing no RT28. The thermal mass increase of the built environment due to the application of composite boards can contribute to improving the indoor thermal comfort and reducing the energy consumption in the buildings.

  4. Subjectively homogeneous noise over written text as a tool to investigate the perceptual mechanisms involved in reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Frédéric J A M; Gosselin, Frédéric; Arguin, Martin

    2013-09-24

    In an effort to understand the factors influencing text legibility in natural reading, we adapted the visual spread method (Poirier, Gosselin, & Arguin, 2008) to natural text. Stimuli were sentences conforming to MNREAD standards (Legge, Ross, Luebker, & LaMay 1989) mixed with dynamic probabilistic noise-i.e., each pixel in the image is associated with a probability that its polarity is inverted on a given refresh cycle of the display screen. Noise level varied continuously over the image as initially determined by Gaussian-filtered noise. Participants adjusted noise levels in the text using the mouse until the text appeared homogenously noisy. We assume that participants increased (or decreased) noise at locations where stimulus features were easy (or difficult) to encode and thus that local noise settings correlate with legibility. Data from 11 participants and 30 sentences revealed interesting effects, demonstrating the validity of the method for assessing the impact of various factors on noise resistance in natural text. For example, participants increased noise over (a) spaces and adjacent letters, (b) the second half of words, (c) words with more orthographic neighbors but fewer phonological neighbors, (d) less useful word types, (e) less complex letters, and (f) diagnostic letters (a novel metric). Our observations also offer significant insights on constraints acting upon letter identification as well as on higher-level processes that are involved in reading.

  5. Thermal and mechanical properties of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene-based polyurethane/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposites plasticized with DOA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kwon, Younghwan; Kim, Chang Kee

    2013-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical properties of PU/POSS nanocomposites plasticized with DOA were investigated. These hybrid materials were prepared using one-step method through the incorporation of flexible HTPB prepolymer, reactive or non-reactive POSS nanoparticle, and DOA plasticizer under IPDI curative system. The plasticizer added into PU/POSS composites decreased glass transition temperature, mechanical strength and modulus, while the change of thermal stability was modest. Thermal stability of these hybrid composites was found to depend preferably on characteristics of POSS molecules incorporated.

  6. Coupling of Mechanical Behavior of Lithium Ion Cells to Electrochemical-Thermal (ECT) Models for Battery Crush

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Pesaran, Ahmad; Sahraei, Elham; Wierzbicki, Tom

    2016-06-14

    Vehicle crashes can lead to crushing of the battery, damaging lithium ion battery cells and causing local shorts, heat generation, and thermal runaway. Simulating all the physics and geometries at the same time is challenging and takes a lot of effort; thus, simplifications are needed. We developed a material model for simultaneously modeling the mechanical-electrochemical-thermal behavior, which predicted the electrical short, voltage drop, and thermal runaway behaviors followed by a mechanical abuse-induced short. The effect of short resistance on the battery cell performance was studied.

  7. The impact of human perception of simultaneous exposure to thermal load, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Ole; Witterseh, Thomas; Clausen, Geo

    1999-01-01

    Human perception of simultaneous exposure to combinations of three different levels of operative temperature, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution (27 combinations) was studied in climate chambers. The operative temperatures studied were: 26.0 deg.C, 27.6 deg.C and 29.6 deg...... conditions as a change of 3.8 dB(A) in sound pressure level or a change of 7 dp in air pollution (at 26 deg.C). The percentage of dissatisfied with the perceived air quality increased with increasing temperature. An elevated temperature had a dominant impact on the human perception of the indoor environment.......C, and the sound pressure levels were: 45 dB(A), 48 dB(A) and 51 dB(A). The air pollution corresponding to these three levels of perceived air quality (at 26 deg.C) was: 1.1 decipol (dp), 2.4 dp and 4.5 dp. A 1 deg.C change in operative temperature had the same impact on the human perception of the overall...

  8. Thermal-Conductivity Characterization of Gas Diffusion Layer in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells and Electrolyzers Under Mechanical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamour, M.; Garnier, J. P.; Grandidier, J. C.; Ouibrahim, A.; Martemianov, S.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate information on the temperature field and associated heat transfer rates is particularly important for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) and PEM electrolyzers. An important parameter in fuel cell and electrolyzer performance analysis is the effective thermal conductivity of the gas diffusion layer (GDL) which is a solid porous medium. Usually, this parameter is introduced in modeling and performance analysis without taking into account the dependence of the GDL thermal conductivity λ (in W · m-1 · K-1) on mechanical compression. Nevertheless, mechanical stresses arising in an operating system can change significantly the thermal conductivity and heat exchange. Metrology allowing the characterization of the GDL thermal conductivity as a function of the applied mechanical compression has been developed in this study using the transient hot-wire technique (THW). This method is the best for obtaining standard reference data in fluids, but it is rarely used for thermal-conductivity measurements in solids. The experiments provided with Quintech carbon cloth indicate a strong dependence (up to 300%) of the thermal conductivity λ on the applied mechanical load. The experiments have been provided in the pressure range 0 cloth layers have been provided. The conducted experiments indicate the independence of the measured thermal conductivity on the number of GDL layers and, thus, justify the robustness of the developed method and apparatus for this type of application.

  9. Dynamic Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Bagasse/Glass Fiber/Polypropylene Hybrid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Roohani

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to evaluate the thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of bagasse/glass fiber/polypropylene hybrid composites. Composites were prepared by the melt compounding method and their properties were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. DSC results found that with incorporation of bagasse and glass fiber the melting temperature (Tm and the crystallisation temperature (Tc shift to higher temperatures and the degree of crystallinity (Xc increase. These findings suggest that the fibers played the role of a nucleating agent in composites. Dynamic mechanical analysis indicated that by the incorporation of bagasse and glass fiber into polypropylene, the storage modulus ( and the loss modulus ( increase whereas the mechanical loss factor (tanδ decrease. To assess the effect of reinforcement with increasing temperature, the effectiveness coefficient C was calculated at different temperature ranges and revealed that, at the elevated temperatures, improvement of mechanical properties due to the presence of fibers was more noticeable. The fiber-matrix adhesion efficiency determined by calculating of adhesion factor A in terms of the relative damping of the composite (tan δc and the polymer (tan δpand volume fraction of the fibers (Фf. Calculated adhesion factor A values indicated that by adding glass fiber to bagasse/polypropylene system, the fiber-matrix adhesion improve. Hybrid composite containing 25% bagasse and 15% glass fiber showed better fiber-matrix adhesion.

  10. Computational study of the self-initiation mechanism in thermal polymerization of methyl acrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sriraj; Lee, Myung Won; Grady, Michael C; Soroush, Masoud; Rappe, Andrew M

    2009-10-08

    This computational study deals with the mechanism of spontaneous initiation in thermal polymerization of alkyl acrylates (e.g., methyl, ethyl, and n-butyl acrylate). The mechanism is presently still unknown. Density-functional theory (DFT) and Møller-Plesset (MP2) calculations are used to explore the Flory and Mayo mechanisms of self-initiation in methyl acrylate. On the singlet surface, a low-barrier, concerted [4 + 2] Diels-Alder mechanism for the formation of a dihydropyran adduct (DA) and a high-barrier nonconcerted [2 + 2] diradical ((*)M(2s)(*)) mechanism for the formation of dimethyl cyclobutane-1,2-dicarboxylate (DCD) were found using B3LYP/6-31G*. Several levels of theory were used to validate the transition states, and the pathways for the DA and DCD formations on the singlet surface were determined using intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) calculations. On the triplet surface, a triplet diradical intermediate ((*)M(2t)(*)) was identified that is structurally similar to (*)M(2s)(*) but lower in energy. The spin-orbit coupling constant for crossover of the diradical from singlet to triplet surface was calculated. Monoradical generation from the two intermediates, DA and (*)M(2t)(*) via hydrogen transfer to or from a third methyl acrylate was studied. It was found that generation of two monoradical species was possible from (*)M(2t)(*) and is proposed as a likely explanation for experimentally observed spontaneous-initiation.

  11. Bone ablation without thermal or acoustic mechanical injury via a novel picosecond infrared laser (PIRL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowett, Nathan; Wöllmer, Wolfgang; Reimer, Rudolph; Zustin, Jozef; Schumacher, Udo; Wiseman, Paul W; Mlynarek, Alex M; Böttcher, Arne; Dalchow, Carsten V; Lörincz, Balazs B; Knecht, Rainald; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2014-03-01

    A precise means to cut bone without significant thermal or mechanical injury has thus far remained elusive. A novel non-ionizing ultrafast pulsed picosecond infrared laser (PIRL) may provide the solution. Tissue ablation with the PIRL occurs via a photothermal process with thermal and stress confinement, resulting in efficient material ejection greatly enhanced through front surface spallation photomechanical effects. By comparison, the Er:YAG laser (EYL) ablates via photothermal and cavitation-induced photomechanical effects without thermal or acoustic confinement, leading to significant collateral tissue injury. This study compared PIRL and EYL bone ablation by infrared thermography (IRT), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and histology. Prospective, comparative, ex vivo animal model. Optics laboratory. Ten circular area defects were ablated in ex vivo chicken humeral cortex using PIRL and EYL at similar average power (~70 mW) under IRT. Following fixation, ESEM and undecalcified light microscopy images were obtained and examined for signs of cellular injury. Peak rise in surface temperature was negligible and lower for PIRL (1.56 °C; 95% CI, 0.762-2.366) compared to EYL ablation (12.99 °C; 95% CI, 12.189-13.792) (P < .001). ESEM and light microscopy demonstrated preserved cortical microstructure following PIRL ablation in contrast to diffuse thermal injury seen with EYL ablation. Microfractures were not observed. Ablation of cortical bone using the PIRL generates negligible and significantly less heat than EYL ablation while preserving cortical microstructure. This novel laser has great potential in advancing surgical techniques where precision osseous manipulation is required.

  12. The influence of mechanical vibrations on microstructure of Ni-based thermally sprayed-fused coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena ŠKAMAT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of mechanical vibrations on microstructure and properties of Ni-based thermally sprayed and fused coatings deposited on a steel substrate has been studied. Self-fluxing powder with about 73% Ni was used as a sprayed material. As-sprayed coatings were refused using conventional flame technique and with introducing of mechanical vibrations. In result coatings with quite complicated microstructure were obtained. During investigation of coatings by different methods it was found that vibratory treatment really influences the solidified microstructure. It was found that vibrations promote densimetric movement of hard particles up - towards a surface with forming of thicker so-called “hard-inclusions-free” layer near interface. Some tendency was noted that coatings, remelted under vibrations, showed better corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistance in comparison with coatings created without vibrational treatment during solidification.

  13. Mechanical and thermal properties of electron beam-irradiated polypropylene reinforced with Kraft lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano-Segura, A. T. R.; Tavares, L. B.; Rizzi, J. G. F.; Rosa, D. S.; Salvadori, M. C.; dos Santos, D. J.

    2017-10-01

    Polypropylene reinforced with Kraft lignin composites (0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 wt% lignin) were submitted to electron beam (EB) irradiation at doses of 0, 50, 100 and 250 kGy. Kraft lignin incorporation maintained Young´s modulus values, even at electron beam doses up to 100 kGy (10 wt% lignin). The yield stress losses were also reduced by the addition of lignin to polypropylene. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed low formation of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups for composites containing lignin. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) curves indicated a synergistic effect between Kraft lignin and electron beam irradiation on the storage modulus (E´). Several properties evolved as a function of the Kraft lignin content. Synergistic effects between Kraft lignin incorporation and electron beam radiation contribute to applications that require the mechanical and thermal properties of iPP to be maintained, even after high doses of electron beam radiation.

  14. Mechanical, Thermal, and Electrical Properties of Graphene-Epoxy Nanocomposites—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasheed Atif

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Monolithic epoxy, because of its brittleness, cannot prevent crack propagation and is vulnerable to fracture. However, it is well established that when reinforced—especially by nano-fillers, such as metallic oxides, clays, carbon nanotubes, and other carbonaceous materials—its ability to withstand crack propagation is propitiously improved. Among various nano-fillers, graphene has recently been employed as reinforcement in epoxy to enhance the fracture related properties of the produced epoxy–graphene nanocomposites. In this review, mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of graphene reinforced epoxy nanocomposites will be correlated with the topographical features, morphology, weight fraction, dispersion state, and surface functionalization of graphene. The factors in which contrasting results were reported in the literature are highlighted, such as the influence of graphene on the mechanical properties of epoxy nanocomposites. Furthermore, the challenges to achieving the desired performance of polymer nanocomposites are also suggested throughout the article.

  15. A 1,470 nm diode laser in stapedotomy: Mechanical, thermal, and acoustic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenraads, Simone P C; de Boorder, Tjeerd; Grolman, Wilko; Kamalski, Digna M A

    2017-08-01

    Multiple laser systems have been investigated for their use in stapes surgery in patients with otosclerosis. The diode 1,470 nm laser used in this study is an attractive laser system because it is easily transported and relatively inexpensive in use. This wavelength has relative high absorption in water. This study aimed to investigate the mechanical, thermal, and acoustic effects of the diode 1,470 nm laser on a stapes in an inner ear model. Experiments were performed in an inner ear model including fresh frozen human stapes. High-speed imaging with frame rates up to 2,000 frames per second (f/s) was used to visualize the effects in the vestibule during fenestration of the footplate. A special high-speed color Schlieren technique was used to study thermal effects. The sound produced by perforation was recorded by a hydrophone. Single pulse settings of the diode 1,470 nm laser were 100 ms, 3 W. Diode 1,470 nm laser fenestration showed mechanical effects with small vapor bubbles and pressure waves pushed into the vestibule. Thermal imaging visualized an increase temperature underneath the stapes footplate. Acoustic effects were limited, but larger sounds levels were reached when vaporization bubbles arise and explode in the vestibule. The diode 1,470 nm laser highly absorbs in perilymph and is capable of forming a clear fenestration in the stapes. An overlapping laser pulse will increase the risk of vapor bubbles, pressure waves, and heating the vestibule. As long as we do not know the possible damage of these effects to the inner ear function, it seems advisable to use the laser with less potential harm. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:619-624, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Geochronologic and Isotropic Constraints on Thermal and Mechanical Models of Lunar Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Gregory A.; Taylor, Lawrence A.

    1998-01-01

    Both short-lived and long-lived geochronometers are key to our understanding of the thermal and mechanical evolution of planets and satellites. These isotopic studies not only allow us to set time constraints on various processes (core formation, melting, crystallization, impact), but also allow us to determine the chemical and mineralogic characteristics of plausible sources. Thermal and mechanical models derived from remote spectroscopy and geophysical data must be tempered by such studies. We present three case studies where the ground truth afforded by radiogenic isotopic studies and geochronology have drastically changed (or should change) prevailing models determined from remote sensing and geophysics: (1) ferroan anorthosites (FANs) and the magma ocean hypothesis, (2) highlands plutonic-suite rocks and late KREEP formation from a magma ocean, and (3) high-Ti basalt sources and ilmenite-sinking in the lunar mantle In addition, we will mention several other outstanding problems in lunar petrology and geochemistry where remote sensing and geophysics could prove useful in cutting the Gordian knot.

  17. Effect of epoxidised soybean oil loading as plasticiser on physical, mechanical and thermal properties of polyvinylchloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmah, M.; Nurazzi, N. Mohd; Farah Nordyana, A. R.; Syed Anas, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effect of epoxidised soybean oil (ESO) as an alternative plasticizer on physical, mechanical and thermal properties of plasticised polyvinyl chloride (PPVC). Samples were prepared using 10, 20, 30 and 40% by weight percent of ESO. The samples were characterized for density, water absorption, tensile, hardness and thermal properties. The addition of ESO as plasticizer in PVC had caused significant effect on the physical and mechanical properties of PPVC. Increasing of ESO loading had resulted in decreased density, tensile strength, tensile modulus but increased in elongation at break and shore hardness. From water absorption study, it was observed that the all the samples reached the plateau absorption at days 8 to 10 with absorption percentages of between 1.8 to 2%. In general the crystallinity of PPVC maintained between 10 to 13% with increase in ESO loading while the melting point ( Tm) is slightly decreased about 3 to 6°C. In this study, ESO which acts as plasticiser were found to result in lower glass transition temperature (Tg). The enhancements of super cooling with higher ESO loading were found to increase the crystallization temperature, promoting crystallisation and act as nucleating agent.

  18. Delamination onset in polymeric composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1991-01-01

    A fracture mechanics damage methodology to predict edge delamination is described. The methodology accounts for residual thermal stresses, cyclic thermal stresses, and cyclic mechanical stresses. The modeling is based on the classical lamination theory and a sublaminate theory. The prediction methodology determines the strain energy release rate, G, at the edge of a laminate and compares it with the fatigue and fracture toughness of the composite. To verify the methodology, isothermal static tests at 23, 125, and 175 C and tension-tension fatigue tests at 23 and 175 C were conducted on laminates. The material system used was a carbon/bismaleimide, IM7/5260. Two quasi-isotropic layups were used. Also, 24 ply unidirectional double cantilever beam specimens were tested to determine the fatigue and fracture toughness of the composite at different temperatures. Raising the temperature had the effect of increasing the value of G at the edge for these layups and also to lower the fatigue and fracture toughness of the composite. The static stress to edge delamination was not affected by temperature but the number of cycles to edge delamination decreased.

  19. Analysis of clinically relevant mechanical and thermal characteristics of titanium foam spinal implants during drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Murata, Takahiro; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-09-01

    Although high biocompatibility promotes the use of titanium (Ti) alloy in spinal implants, this material shows high stiffness, which is an issue for removal by drilling. The recently developed, porous Ti foam implants, which have shown enhanced osteoformation, may overcome this flaw. Thus, this study aimed to compare the mechanical and thermal characteristics of Ti-foam (80 % porosity) and conventional Ti alloy (0 % porosity) implants drilled in clinically relevant conditions. Mechanical properties were analyzed by measuring axial and torque forces using a pressure sensor with a drill of 2.5-mm diameter at a rotation frequency of 20 Hz. Thermography was used to evaluate the heat generated by a diamond burr attached to a high-speed (80,000 rpm) drill. The torque and axial strengths of Ti foam (13.63 ± 1.43 and 82.60 ± 7.78 N, respectively) were significantly lower (P = 0.001) than those of Ti alloy (73.58 ± 13.60 and 850.72 ± 146.99 N, respectively). Furthermore, irrigation reduced the area of local heating for Ti foam to 56-82 % of that for Ti alloy, indicating lower thermal conductivity. These data suggest that the use of Ti foam implants may be advantageous in cases with a probability of implant drilling in the future.

  20. Thermal-mechanical modeling and experimental validation of weld solidification cracking in 6061-T6 aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dike, J.J.; Brooks, J.A.; Bammann, D.J.; Li, M.

    1997-12-31

    Finite element simulation using an internal state variable constitutive model coupled with a void growth and damage model are used to study weld solidification cracking of 6061-T6 aluminum. Calculated results are compared with data from an experimental program determining the locations of failure as a function of weld process parameters and specimen geometry. Two types of weld solidification cracking specimen were studied. One specimen, in which cracking did not occur, was used to evaluate finite element simulations of the thermal response and calculations of average strain across the weld. The other specimen type was used to determine the location of crack initiation as a function of weld process parameters. This information was used to evaluate the finite element simulations of weld solidification cracking. A solidification model which includes dendrite tip and eutectic undercooling was used in both thermal and mechanical finite element analyses. A strain rate and temperature history dependent constitutive model is coupled with a ductile void growth damage model in the mechanical analyses. Stresses near the weld pool are examined to explain results obtained in the finite element analyses and correlated with experimental observations. Good agreement is obtained between simulation and experiment for locations of crack initiation and extent of cracking. Some effects of uncertainties in material parameters are discussed.

  1. Effect of nano-clay on mechanical and thermal properties of geopolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Assaedi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of nano-clay platelets (Cloisite 30B on the mechanical and thermal properties of fly ash geopolymer has been investigated in this paper. The nano-clay platelets are added to reinforce the geopolymer at loadings of 1.0%, 2.0%, and 3.0% by weight. The phase composition and microstructure of geopolymer nano-composites are also investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and scanning electron microscope (SEM techniques. Results show that the mechanical properties of geopolymer nano-composites are improved due to addition of nano-clay. It is found that the addition of 2.0 wt% nano-clay decreases the porosity and increases the nano-composite's resistance to water absorption significantly. The optimum 2.0 wt% nano-clay addition exhibited the highest flexural and compressive strengths, flexural modulus and hardness. The microstructural analysis results indicate that the nano-clay behaves not only as a filler to improve the microstructure, but also as an activator to facilitate the geopolymeric reaction. The geopolymer nano-composite also exhibited better thermal stability than its counterpart pure geopolymer.

  2. Reactive Extrusion of Polyethylene Terephthalate Waste and Investigation of Its Thermal and Mechanical Properties after Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Mohsin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates treating polyethylene terephthalate (PET waste water bottles with different mass of ethylene glycol (EG using reactive extrusion technique at a temperature of 260°C. The study puts emphases on evaluating the thermal, mechanical, and chemical characteristics of the treated polyethylene terephthalate. The properties of the treated PET from the extruder were analyzed using FT-IR, TGA, DSC, and nanoindentation. The melt flow indexes (MFI of both treated and untreated PET were also measured and compared. Thermal properties such as melting temperature (Tm for treating PET showed an inversely proportional behavior with the EG concentrations. The FT-IR analysis was used to investigate the formation of new linkages like hydrogen bonds between PET and EG due to the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups. Nanoindentation results revealed that both the mechanical characteristics, elastic modulus and hardness, decrease with increasing EG concentration. On the other hand, the melt flow index of treated PET exhibited an increase with increasing EG concentration in the PET matrix.

  3. Morphology, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Thermoplastic Polyurethane Containing Reduced Graphene Oxide and Graphene Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Strankowski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane/graphene nanocomposites were synthesized using commercial thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU, Apilon 52DE55, and two types of graphene derivatives: graphene nanoplatelets (GNP and reduced graphene oxide (RGO. Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR spectroscopy, TEM, and SEM microscopy and XRD techniques were used to chemically and structurally characterize GNP and RGO nanofillers. The properties of the new TPU nanocomposite materials were studied using thermal analysis techniques (Dynamical Mechanical Analysis (DMA, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TG to describe the influence of graphene nanofillers on polyurethane matrix. Our investigation describes the comparison of two types of graphene derivatives, commercial one (GNP and synthesized (RGO on thermoplastic polyurethanes. These nanofillers provides opportunities to achieve compatibility with the TPU matrix. The property enhancements are attributed commonly to high aspect ratio of graphene nanoplatelets and filler–polymer interactions at the interface. The obtained nanocomposites exhibit higher thermal and mechanical properties due to the good dispersion of both nanofillers into TPU matrix. It was found that the addition of 2 wt % of the nanofiller could lead to a significant reinforcement effect on the TPU matrix. Also, with high content of nanofiller (GNP and RGO, the Payne effect was observed.

  4. Physical, thermal, and mechanical properties of polypropylene composites filled with rattan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nikmatin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural fillers are recognized as the materials that feature a poor fiber/matrix interaction. As a result, their composites behaviors are directly compromised. Existing evidence has exhibited that nanoparticle fillers can be employed as an alternative size to overcome this problem. We thus examined in this study the effects of rattan filler of nanoparticle size on the physical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the composite. Neat polypropylene (PP, PP with 5% rattan nanoparticle (PP/R5, and PP with 5% glass fiber (PP/FG5 were considered. For performance assessment, particle size analysis, morphology, X-ray diffraction, thermal inspection, and mechanical tests were carried out. The highest degree of crystallinity was discovered in PP/R5. Tensile properties of both PP/FG5 and PP/R5 were comparable although the former demonstrated higher moduli of elasticity and rupture. Well-distributed constituents were displayed in PP/R5 by means of morphological study, which offered insight into its highest average hardness, maximum strain, and therefore its advantageous ductile behavior compared to the other considered materials.

  5. Thermal/mechanical Development of an LEU-Foil Based Target for Production of Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Kyler; Makarewicz, Philip; Govindarajan, Srisharan; Solbrekken, Gary L. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, E2411 Lafferre Hall, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Allen, Charlie [University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), University of Missouri, 1513 Research Park Dr., Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Thermal-mechanical studies of LEU foil targets with annular and plate geometries are currently underway. The primary goal of the studies is to establish that such targets can be irradiated safely. The two geometries are based on current low volume production targets developed by Argonne National Lab and the current high volume production dispersion targets. In both cases, it is assumed that the targets will be disassembled and the LEU foil removed after irradiation to be dissolved. This strategy reduces the amount of liquid waste generated. Analytic and numeric models for both geometry types are developed. The rationale for using analytic models is that they clearly show the parameters that govern physical behavior. Unfortunately, analytic models can be obtained for only simple shapes and boundary conditions. Numeric models developed using the finite element code Abaqus allow more complicated conditions to be explored. In this paper, we show that the annular target design has a relatively low risk to thermal-mechanical failure. At the same time, we provide target design trends for a flat plate geometry. (author)

  6. Effect of radiation sickness on the progress and treatment of mechanical and thermal injuries. [In German

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, K.

    1964-04-01

    It has been estimated that 70 or 75% of persons exposed to atomic weapons would suffer mechanical and thermal injuries, and that 30% receive radiation injuries. Of the total persons injured, 75% would suffer combinations of these injuries. As a result the various injurious agents, complexes of injury conditions, would be observed. These include leukopenia and impaired resistance to infection, shortened delay in appearance o irradiation symptoms, intensified evidence of shock, and an increased tendency toward hemorrhage, with increased sensitivity to blood loss. The author discusses a wide range of general and specific medical procedures and drugs that can be used to treat and support recovery of persons with combined radiation and mechanical or thermal injuries. Some general treatment procedures include absolute isolation and rest, special dietetic supplementation, strict medical supervision to prevent acute hemorrhage or circulatory failure, and parenteral administration of fluids. Other special measures include treatment of the primary reactions to injury by antihistamines, sedatives, antibiotics, hormones, support of circulation, blood transfusions, etc.

  7. Structure, thermal and fracture mechanical properties of benzoxazine-modified amine-cured DGEBA epoxy resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available First, traditional diamine hardeners of epoxy resins (EP were checked as potential accelerators for the benzoxazine (BOX homopolymerization. It was established that the acceleration effect depends on both the type and amount of the diamine compounds. In the follow-up work amine-curable diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA type EP was modified with BOX keeping the EP/BOX ratio constant (75/25 wt.%. The amine hardeners, added in the EP in stoichiometric amounts, were of aliphatic and aromatic nature, viz. diethylenetriamine (DETA, 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (DDM, and their 1/1 mixture. The thermal, viscoelastic, flexural and fracture mechanical properties of the EP/BOX hybrids were determined and compared to those of the reference EPs. Based on dynamic-mechanical thermal analysis and atomic force microscopy the formation of co-network between EP and BOX was concluded. Homopolymerized BOX was built in the network in nanoscaled inclusions and it was associated with internal antiplasticization. Incorporation of BOX improved the charring, enhanced the flexural modulus and strength, and reduced the glass transition of the parent EP. The fracture toughness and energy were not improved by hybridization with BOX.

  8. Mechanical and thermal properties of crab chitin reinforced carboxylated SBR composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Santulli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The addition of small amounts (up to 9 wt% of chitin microsized particles, originating from shellfish waste, to carboxylated styrene-butadiene rubber (XSBR matrix (as received and annealed to 100°C has been studied. In particular, this study concentrated on their mechanical (creep investigation by nanoindentation and dynamical-mechanical analysis, thermal (differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry and swelling behaviour (toluene absorption and was completed by morphological characterisation by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results show that annealing has a limited effect on materials properties, effects which are further reduced by the addition of growing amounts of crab chitin. It should be noted that the limited filler content used in the study does not substantially modify the linear creep behaviour of XSBR for sufficiently long loading times. The thermal stability of the system does also appear to be preserved even with the maximum chitin content added, while it serves sufficiently as an effective barrier against aromatic solvent absorption.

  9. Numerical investigation of damage protective oxide mechanisms in thermal barrier system for aeronautical turbine blade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khelifa hocine

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a material for a given application requires insuring a good durability in its conditions of employment, in particular environmental. It is especially true for the systems destined to work in corrosive hot atmospheres. For it, the knowledge and the understanding of the corrosion phenomena, oxidization, ageing and damage are indispensable in order to anticipate the life period of the structures and to propose the adapted protective solutions. The study of the corrosion in high temperature is therefore a greatly interdisciplinary topic, into the interface of the physico-chemistry, metallic and ceramic materials and mechanics. We propose in this work a finite element method for the simulation of EBPVD TBCs spallation. Our studies concern one of several systems that we call thermal barrier coatings, which are a Composite materials deposited in layers on the hot components to isolate them chemically and thermally at high temperatures. This is the last operational technology adapted on aircraft engines but it is still studied and not fully exploited.This comprehensive article describes the systems currently used and the problem of interaction between mechanical and environment in the turbine.

  10. Diffusion Mechanisms and Lattice Locations of Thermal-Equilibrium Defects in Si-Ge Alloys

    CERN Multimedia

    Lyutovich, K; Touboltsev, V; Laitinen, P O; Strohm, A

    2002-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Ge and Si differ considerably with respect to intrinsic-point-defect-mediated diffusion. In Ge, the native point defects dominating under thermal-equilibium conditions at all solid-state temperatures accessible in diffusion experiments are vacancies, and therefore Ge self-diffusion is vacancy-controlled. In Si, by contrast, self-interstitials and vacancies co-exist in thermal equilibrium. Whereas in the most thoroughly investigated temperature regime above about 1000$^\\circ$C Si self-diffusion is self-interstitial-controlled, it is vacancy-controlled at lower temperatures. According to the scenario displayed above, self-diffusion in Si-Ge alloys is expected to change from an interstitialcy mechanism on the Si side to a vacancy mechanism on the Ge side. Therefore, $^{71}$Ge self-diffusion experiments in Si$_{1- \\it y}$Ge$_{\\it y}$ as a function of composition Y are highly interesting. In a first series of experiments the diffusion of Ge in 0.4 to 10 $\\mu$m thick, relaxed, low-disl...

  11. Polyacrylonitrile nanofibers with added zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIF-7) to enhance mechanical and thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Wook [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 842 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60607-7022 (United States); An, Seongpil; Song, Kyo Yong; Joshi, Bhavana N.; Jo, Hong Seok; Yoon, Sam S., E-mail: skyoon@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: ayarin@uic.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Al-Deyab, Salem S. [Department of Chemistry, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Yarin, Alexander L., E-mail: skyoon@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: ayarin@uic.edu [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, 842 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60607-7022 (United States); School of Mechanical Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-28

    Zeolitic imidazolate framework 7/polyacrylonitrile (ZIF-7/PAN) nanofiber mat of high porosity and surface area can be used as a flexible fibrous filtration membrane that is subjected to various modes of mechanical loading resulting in stresses and strains. Therefore, the stress-strain relation of ZIF-7/PAN nanofiber mats in the elastic and plastic regimes of deformation is of significant importance for numerous practical applications, including hydrogen storage, carbon dioxide capture, and molecular sensing. Here, we demonstrated the fabrication of ZIF-7/PAN nanofiber mats via electrospinning and report their mechanical properties measured in tensile tests covering the elastic and plastic domains. The effect of the mat fabrication temperature on the mechanical properties is elucidated. We showed the superior mechanical strength and thermal stability of the compound ZIF-7/PAN nanofiber mats in comparison with that of pure PAN nanofiber mats. Material characterization including scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, tensile tests, differential scanning calorimetry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the enhanced chemical bonds of the ZIF-7/PAN complex.

  12. Processing, thermal and mechanical behaviour of PEI/MWCNT/carbon fiber nanostructured laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, L. F. P.; Ribeiro, B.; Hein, L. R. O.; Botelho, E. C.; Costa, M. L.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, nanostructured composites of polyetherimide (PEI) with addition of functionalized multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) were processed via solution mixing. After processing, these nanocomposites were evaluated by thermogravimetry (TGA), dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Subsequently, the nanocomposite was processed with carbon fibers by using hot compression molding. In order to evaluate interlaminar fracture strength, the processed laminates were mechanically evaluated by interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and compression shear test (CST). Also, the Weibull distribution was employed to help in the statistical treatment of the data obtained from the mechanical tests. With regards to the fracture of the specimens, optical microscopy was used for the evaluation of the material. The addition of 1 wt% of MWCNT in the polymer matrix increased both thermal stability and viscoelastic behavior of the material. These improvements positively impacted the mechanical properties, generating a 16% and 58% increase in the short-beam strength and apparent interlaminar shear, respectively. In addition, it can be verified from morphological analysis of the fracture a change in the failure mode of the laminate by the incorporation of MWCNT. This behavior can be proven from CST test where there was no presence of the shear force by compression.

  13. Physical, thermal and mechanical study of MPC formulated with LG-MgO incorporating Phase Change Materials as admixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Alameda, A.; Lacasta, A. M.; Giro-Paloma, J.; Chimenos, J. M.; Formosa, J.

    2017-10-01

    The high environmental impact generated by using of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) has lead to the search for alternative materials in the field of civil and building engineering. In addition, there is a tendency to develop cements from industrial by-products, thus reducing pollution and emissions generated by their production. One of the best positioned cements to compete with OPC is Magnesium Phosphate Cement (MPC). The present work studies different dosages of MPC mortars formulated with low-grade MgO by-product (sustainable MPC) incorporating Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials (MPCM) and air entraining additive (AEA) as admixtures (Thermal Sustainable MPC) to improve the thermal behaviour of the material. The aim is developed a new eco-friendly material that leads to reducing energy consumption in buildings. The study is focused on the physical, thermal, and mechanical characterization of TS-MPC mortars to assess their potential use as a thermal prefabricated panel. The results allow to relate the amount of the MPCM and the additive percentage with the thermal and mechanical properties of the TS- MPC. Furthermore, is important to highlight the influence of MPCM not only in the thermal behaviour but also on the increase of the porosity. The experimental results show that the addition of both additives contributes substantially to the improvement of the thermal behaviour of the mortars and converts them on a suitable material to reduce thermal oscillations in buildings.

  14. Effect of Ionizing Beta Radiation on the Mechanical Properties of Poly(ethylene under Thermal Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bednarik Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It was found in this study, that ionizing beta radiation has a positive effect on the mechanical properties of poly(ethylene. In recent years, there have been increasing requirements for quality and cost effectiveness of manufactured products in all areas of industrial production. These requirements are best met with the polymeric materials, which have many advantages in comparison to traditional materials. The main advantages of polymer materials are especially in their ease of processability, availability, and price of the raw materials. Radiation crosslinking is one of the ways to give the conventional plastics mechanical, thermal, and chemical properties of expensive and highly resistant construction polymers. Several types of ionizing radiation are used for crosslinking of polymers. Each of them has special characteristics. Electron beta and photon gamma radiation are used the most frequently. The great advantage is that the crosslinking occurs after the manufacturing process at normal temperature and pressure. The main purpose of this paper has been to determine the effect of ionizing beta radiation on the tensile modulus, strength and elongation of low and high density polyethylene (LDPE and HDPE. These properties were examined in dependence on the dosage of the ionizing beta radiation (non-irradiated samples and those irradiated by dosage 99 kGy were compared and on the test temperature. Radiation cross-linking of LDPE and HDPE results in increased tensile strength and modulus, and decreased of elongation. The measured results indicate that ionizing beta radiation treatment is effective tool for improvement of mechanical properties of LDPE and HDPE under thermal stress.

  15. High fidelity computational characterization of the mechanical response of thermally aged polycarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zesheng; Zhang, Lili; Jasa, John; Li, Wenlong; Gazonas, George; Negahban, Mehrdad

    2017-07-01

    A representative all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) system of polycarbonate (PC) is built and conditioned to capture and predict the behaviours of PC in response to a broad range of thermo-mechanical loadings for various thermal aging. The PC system is constructed to have a distribution of molecular weights comparable to a widely used commercial PC (LEXAN 9034), and thermally conditioned to produce models for aged and unaged PC. The MD responses of these models are evaluated through comparisons to existing experimental results carried out at much lower loading rates, but done over a broad range of temperatures and loading modes. These experiments include monotonic extension/compression/shear, unilaterally and bilaterally confined compression, and load-reversal during shear. It is shown that the MD simulations show both qualitative and quantitative similarity with the experimental response. The quantitative similarity is evaluated by comparing the dilatational response under bilaterally confined compression, the shear flow viscosity and the equivalent yield stress. The consistency of the in silico response to real laboratory experiments strongly suggests that the current PC models are physically and mechanically relevant and potentially can be used to investigate thermo-mechanical response to loading conditions that would not easily be possible. These MD models may provide valuable insight into the molecular sources of certain observations, and could possibly offer new perspectives on how to develop constitutive models that are based on better understanding the response of PC under complex loadings. To this latter end, the models are used to predict the response of PC to complex loading modes that would normally be difficult to do or that include characteristics that would be difficult to measure. These include the responses of unaged and aged PC to unilaterally confined extension/compression, cyclic uniaxial/shear loadings, and saw-tooth extension/compression/shear.

  16. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from Shippingport reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-04-01

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approximately}13 y at {approximately}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approximately}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approximately} 15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approximately} 8 y of service.

  17. Mechanical properties of thermally aged cast stainless steels from shippingport reactor components.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

    1995-06-07

    Thermal embrittlement of static-cast CF-8 stainless steel components from the decommissioned Shippingport reactor has been characterized. Cast stainless steel materials were obtained from four cold-leg check valves, three hot-leg main shutoff valves, and two pump volutes. The actual time-at-temperature for the materials was {approx}13 y at {approx}281 C (538 F) for the hot-leg components and {approx}264 C (507 F) for the cold-leg components. Baseline mechanical properties for as-cast material were determined from tests on either recovery-annealed material, i.e., annealed for 1 h at 550 C and then water quenched, or material from the cooler region of the component. The Shippingport materials show modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength because of relatively low service temperatures and ferrite content of the steel. The procedure and correlations developed at Argonne National Laboratory for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly lower values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and JIC of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predicted the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y and the KRB reactor pump cover plate (CF-8) after {approx}8 y of service.

  18. An In-Depth Study on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Nanoclay Reinforced Polymers at Various Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    Unclassified Distribution A Approved An In-Depth Study on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Nanoclay Reinforced Polymers at Various...Warren, Michigan 48397-5000 Abstract In this study, the mechanical properties of nanoclay reinforced polymeric resins are investigated at various...temperatures. In recent years there has been heightened interest to develop nanoclay reinforced composites due to their superior performance

  19. Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of Computer Disk Drive Components with Emphasis on Electro-Mechanical Noise Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Ran

    Vibro-acoustic characteristics of compact electro -mechanical devices are not well understood. This study examines fundamental research issues in this area through the example case of a 3.5" personal computer hard disk drive. In particular, a narrow band mathematical model of the drive has been developed to predict prominent pure tones over the high frequency range (1-6.5 KHz). Through detailed analytical studies, it has been found that the motor torque pulsation of the brushless d.c. motor is the source for this noise problem. Accordingly, a simplified disk drive model consisting of motor driving a single disk is used to investigate key components, with emphasis on the development of new mathematical models to describe the source, path and radiator characteristics. Two different mathematical models have been developed for brushless d.c. motor to predict the torque spectrum associated with invertor switching logic, pulse width modulation control scheme, eccentricity, and magnetic saturation. Frequency contents of predicted variables are identified and matched with measured sound data. Additionally, the Galerkin's method (or modified harmonic balance) is also employed successfully to develop an efficient computational scheme which predicts the Fourier coefficients of torque pulsations directly including various effects associated with inductance harmonics and the fluctuation of rotor angular velocity. For the radiator (annular disk), modal base formulations of sound radiation have been developed by approximating disk eigen-functions. Specifically, the effects of modal coupling and source rotation on radiated sound are investigated. Analytical predictions match well with numerical results obtained by using a boundary element program. New mobility transfer functions (path) are derived to couple the source and radiator formulations in order to construct an overall vibro-acoustic model. Potential areas of further research including experimental validation are discussed.

  20. Ab initio kinetics and thermal decomposition mechanism of mononitrobiuret and 1,5-dinitrobiuret

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Hongyan, E-mail: hongyan.sun1@gmail.com, E-mail: ghanshyam.vaghjiani@us.af.mil; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L., E-mail: hongyan.sun1@gmail.com, E-mail: ghanshyam.vaghjiani@us.af.mil [Propellants Branch, Rocket Propulsion Division, Aerospace Systems Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RQRP, 10 E. Saturn Blvd., Edwards AFB, California 93524 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    Mononitrobiuret (MNB) and 1,5-dinitrobiuret (DNB) are tetrazole-free, nitrogen-rich, energetic compounds. For the first time, a comprehensive ab initio kinetics study on the thermal decomposition mechanisms of MNB and DNB is reported here. In particular, the intramolecular interactions of amine H-atom with electronegative nitro O-atom and carbonyl O-atom have been analyzed for biuret, MNB, and DNB at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The results show that the MNB and DNB molecules are stabilized through six-member-ring moieties via intramolecular H-bonding with interatomic distances between 1.8 and 2.0 Å, due to electrostatic as well as polarization and dispersion interactions. Furthermore, it was found that the stable molecules in the solid state have the smallest dipole moment amongst all the conformers in the nitrobiuret series of compounds, thus revealing a simple way for evaluating reactivity of fuel conformers. The potential energy surface for thermal decomposition of MNB was characterized by spin restricted coupled cluster theory at the RCCSD(T)/cc-pV∞ Z//M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level. It was found that the thermal decomposition of MNB is initiated by the elimination of HNCO and HNN(O)OH intermediates. Intramolecular transfer of a H-atom, respectively, from the terminal NH{sub 2} group to the adjacent carbonyl O-atom via a six-member-ring transition state eliminates HNCO with an energy barrier of 35 kcal/mol and from the central NH group to the adjacent nitro O-atom eliminates HNN(O)OH with an energy barrier of 34 kcal/mol. Elimination of HNN(O)OH is also the primary process involved in the thermal decomposition of DNB, which processes C{sub 2v} symmetry. The rate coefficients for the primary decomposition channels for MNB and DNB were quantified as functions of temperature and pressure. In addition, the thermal decomposition of HNN(O)OH was analyzed via Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus/multi-well master equation simulations, the results of which

  1. Mechanisms for Extracting a Signal from Noise as Revealed through the Specificity and Generality of Task Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dorita H. F.; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2013-01-01

    Visual judgments critically depend on (1) the detection of meaningful items from cluttered backgrounds and (2) the discrimination of an item from highly similar alternatives. Learning and experience are known to facilitate these processes, but the specificity with which these processes operate is poorly understood. Here we use psychophysical measures of human participants to test learning in two types of commonly used tasks that target segmentation (signal-in-noise, or “coarse” tasks) versus the discrimination of highly similar items (feature difference, or “fine” tasks). First, we consider the processing of binocular disparity signals, examining performance on signal-in-noise and feature difference tasks after a period of training on one of these tasks. Second, we consider the generality of learning between different visual features, testing performance on both task types for displays defined by disparity, motion, or orientation. We show that training on a feature difference task also improves performance on signal-in-noise tasks, but only for the same visual feature. By contrast, training on a signal-in-noise task has limited benefits for fine judgments of the same feature but supports learning that generalizes to signal-in-noise tasks for other features. These findings indicate that commonly used signal-in-noise tasks require at least three distinct components: feature representations, signal-specific selection, and a generalized process that enhances segmentation. As such, there is clear potential to harness areas of commonality (both within and between cues) to improve impaired perceptual functions. PMID:23825402

  2. A hydro-thermo-mechanics analyze of the thermal fatigue in the mixing tee junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourdin, C.; Chapuliot, S. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire, (DEN/DM2S/SEMT/LISN), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Magnaud, J.P. [CEA Saclay, Dir. de l' Energie Nucleaire (DEN/DM2S/SFME/LTMF), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Payen, T. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN/DES/SAMS), 92 - 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2003-07-01

    Work presented here, has been achieved at Cea, and is related to the comprehension of the mechanisms leading to cracking under thermal loading in the zones of mixing. The main objective of this work is to analyze, by computation, the thermal loading induced by the turbulent mixing following a tee junction and to explain how it can create cracking, from the internal skin of the component to a leakage, as it was observed in Civaux Power Plant in 1998. The phenomenon is still today not completely understood. One of the principal reasons to this partial incomprehension undoubtedly resides in the multi-field aspect of the loading and of the associated damage, utilizing three different and complementary scientific disciplines: thermohydraulics, thermomechanics and material science. The presentation proposed here, consists in connecting the analyses resulting from these various fields. The first part concentrates on thermohydraulics simulations. The choice of an adequate modeling is discussed on the basis of observed cracking in order to highlight phenomena of large scale beats, which are supposed one of the major causes leading to the failure of the structures. The second part deals with the use of the temperature fields obtained in the first part in order to carry out thermomechanical simulations. All these simulations are 3-dimensional and represent the complex geometry of Civaux RRA piping line, including a tee junction and elbows, water flow velocity. Mean and temperatures variations, mean and stresses variations are also presented. As final results make it possible to determine a map of the damage associated with these complex thermal loading. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of thermal hydrolysis efficiency of mechanically dewatered sewage sludge via rheological measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingsi; Xue, Yonggang; Eshtiaghi, Nicky; Dai, Xiaohu; Tao, Wenquan; Li, Zhuo

    2017-06-01

    In this study, laboratory tests of both low temperature (60-90 °C) and high temperature (120-180 °C) thermal hydrolysis (LTHP and HTHP) were performed on mechanically dewatered high-solid sludges (at total solid of 14.2 wt% and 18.2 wt%) to evaluate the extent of organic solubilization through rheological measurements. The effects of treatment temperature and duration on organic solubilization and viscoelastic behavior of the sludge were comprehensively investigated. The results indicated that the organic solubilization contents including soluble chemical oxygen demand, soluble protein, and soluble polysaccharides increased logarithmically with the treatment time. Protein solubilized considerably faster than polysaccharides during thermal hydrolysis. The rheological curves exhibited the Payne effect in the amplitude sweep oscillation test. The elastic modulus in linear viscoelastic regime decreased logarithmically with treatment time. The viscoelastic behavior of sludge was well modeled by the Kaye-Bernstein-Kearsly-Zapas (KBKZ) model with paralleled Maxwell elements to describe the frequency dependence of elastic modulus and viscous modulus. With respect to the relaxation spectrum, the relaxation modulus first decreased with relaxation time and then increased. The relaxation modulus in each Maxwell element decreased with the treatment temperature and duration. Furthermore, in the HTHP, the influence of treatment temperature on enhancing organic solubilization and decreasing viscoelasticity exceeded the influence of treatment duration. In contrast, the treatment duration played a more important role than temperature in the LTHP. The content of organic matters was linearly related and logarithmically related to the elastic modulus in the LTHP and in the HTHP, respectively. The rheology analyses demonstrated that viscoelastic properties could be used as indicators to estimate the extent of organic matter solubilization in thermal hydrolysis process. The

  4. Possibility of pure thermal sensitization in the pre-dose mechanism of the 110 deg. C TL peak of quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koul, D.K., E-mail: dkkoul@barc.gov.i [Astrophysical Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Polymeris, G.S.; Tsirliganis, N.C. [R.C. ' Athena' , Cultural and Educational Technology Institute, Archaeometry Laboratory, Tsimiski 58, 67100 Xanthi (Greece); Kitis, G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2010-03-01

    The role of thermal activation in the pre-dose sensitization of the 110 deg. C TL glow peak of quartz has been hypothesized to transfer holes from reservoir centre, R, to luminescence centre, L. But, the thermal treatment has been reported to sensitize this peak, also, in an independent mode. So, a comparative analysis of the impact of thermal and pre-dose treatment on the TL properties of the 110 deg. C signal, observed by various workers, has been undertaken in this paper. Also experiments were carried out to observe thermal sensitization component at the temperatures which are used in the pre-dose sensitization measurements. The study seems to support the existence of an inherent pure thermal sensitization component in the pre-dose sensitization mechanism.

  5. High Thermal Dissipation of Al Heat Sink When Inserting Ceramic Powders by Ultrasonic Mechanical Coating and Armoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Yu; Huang, Guan-Rong; Wang, Kuang-Kuo; Chen, Chin-Fu; Huang, J C

    2017-04-26

    Aluminum alloys, which serve as heat sink in light-emitting diode (LED) lighting, are often inherent with a high thermal conductivity, but poor thermal total emissivity. Thus, high emissive coatings on the Al substrate can enhance the thermal dissipation efficiency of radiation. In this study, the ultrasonic mechanical coating and armoring (UMCA) technique was used to insert various ceramic combinations, such as Al₂O₃, SiO₂, or graphite, to enhance thermal dissipation. Analytic models have been established to couple the thermal radiation and convection on the sample surface through heat flow equations. A promising match has been reached between the theoretical predictions and experimental measurements. With the adequate insertion of ceramic powders, the temperature of the Al heat sinks can be lowered by 5-11 °C, which is highly favorable for applications requiring cooling components.

  6. Influence of creep damage on the low cycle thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of two tantalum base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Doble, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests have been performed on the tantalum base alloys T-111 and ASTAR 811C with synchronized, independently programmed temperature and strain cycling. The thermal-mechanical cycles applied fell into three basic categories: these were isothermal cycling, in-phase thermal cycling, and out-of-phase thermal cycling. In-phase cycling was defined as tensile deformation associated with high temperature and compressive deformation with low temperature, while out-of-phase thermal cycling was defined as the reverse case. The in-phase thermal cycling had a pronounced detrimental influence on the fatigue life of both alloys, with the life reduction being greater in the solid solution strengthened T-111 alloy than in the carbide strengthened ASTAR 811C alloy. The out-of-phase tests also showed pronounced effects on the fatigue life of both alloys, although not as dramatic.

  7. Study on mechanical and ablative properties of EPDM/OMMT thermal insulating nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guoxin; Zhang, Zhicheng; Li, Xuefei; Meng, Qingjie; Zheng, Yuansuo; Jin, Zhihao

    2010-11-01

    In order to enhance the elongation at break, the ablation resistant properties as well as the tensile strength of the thermal insulating materials, organo-montmorillonite (OMMT) was introduced into the short aramid fibers reinforced Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM) based nanocomposites. The effects of OMMT content on the mechanical and ablative properties of the nanocomposites were investigated systematically. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirm that EPDM-matrix has been intercalated into OMMT interlayers after a mixing process on a two-roll mill. The brittle fracture of nanocomposites also indicates that OMMT can lubricate aramid fiber to weaken the interfacial adhesive strength between the fibers and the matrix. As a result, the tensile strength and elongation at break are both improved sharply with OMMT content increasing from 1 phr to 7 phr. However, thanks to the inevitable agglomeration of OMMT with high loading inside the nanocomposites, the tensile strength and elongation at break reduce gently once OMMT is over 7 phr. Furthermore, the ablation resistant properties are improved greatly by increasing OMMT from 1 phr to 11 phr. Therefore, the optimal content of OMMT is 7-11 phr for the thermal insulating nanocomposites with big elongation and excellent ablation resistant properties.

  8. Significant enhancement of metal heat dissipation from mechanically exfoliated graphene nanosheets through thermal radiation effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiong Hu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a facile approach to significantly enhance the heat dissipation potential of conventional aluminum (Al heat sinks by mechanically coating graphene nanosheets. For Al and graphene-coated Al heat sinks, the change in temperature with change in coating coverage, coating thickness and heat flux are studied. It is found that with the increase in coating coverage from 0 to 100%, the steady-state temperature is decreased by 5 °C at a heat flux of 1.8 W cm-1. By increasing the average thickness of graphene coating from 480 nm to 1900 nm, a remarkable temperature reduction up to 7 °C can be observed. Moreover, with the increase in heat flux from 1.2 W cm-1 to 2.4 W cm-1, the temperature difference between uncoated and graphene-coated samples increases from 1 °C to 6 °C. The thermal analysis and finite element simulation reveal that the thermal radiation plays a key role in enhancing the heat dissipation performance. The effect of heat convection remains weak owing to the low air velocity at surface-air boundary. This work provides a technological innovation in improving metal heat dissipation using graphene nanosheets.

  9. Rheology, Mechanical Properties, and Thermal Stability of Maleated Polyethylene Filled with Nanoclays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhadi A. Al-Juhani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Maleated polyethylene (MAPE was used in this study as a model matrix for hosting hydrophobic nanoclay (C15A and hydrophilic nanoclay (C30B, to investigate the effect of nanoclay loading on the bulk properties of the composites. Composites were prepared by melt-blending technique, with varying the loading from 0 to 9 wt.%. Tensile, oxidative TGA, and FE-SEM tests were employed for both C15A-filled polymer and C30B-filled polymer, which confirmed that C15A had better dispersion and was much superior to C30B for enhancing the mechanical properties and thermal stability of MAPE. Consequently, XRD and melt rheology tests were performed for C15A-filled polymer only. XRD confirmed the formation of nanocomposite structure, which could be the main reason for the significant increase in the thermal stability and viscosity. For example, compared to the neat polymer, the degradation temperature at the 20% mass loss was increased by 72°C after the addition of 5 wt.% C15A. Based on rheological analysis, the percolation threshold was around 3 wt.% loading of C15A. Fitting the viscosity data to the Cross model suggested that increasing C15A loading had a strong effect for increasing the shear thinning index and relaxation time of the nanocomposites.

  10. Micro and nanocomposites of polybutadienebased polyurethane liners with mineral fillers and nanoclay: thermal and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Pablo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro and nanocomposites of hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB-based polyurethanes (NPU were obtained using five mineral fillers and Cloisite 20A nanoclay, respectively. Samples were prepared by the reaction of HTPB polyol and toluene diisocyanate (TDI, and the chain was further extended with glyceryl monoricinoleate to produce the final elastomeric polyurethanes. Mechanical and thermal properties were studied, showing that mineral fillers (20%w/w significantly increased tensile strength, in particular nanoclay (at 5% w/w. When nanoclay-polymer dispersion was modified with a silane and hydantoin-bond promoter, elongation at break was significantly increased with respect to NPU with C20A. Thermal properties measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were not significantly affected in any case. The molecular structure of prepared micro and nanocomposites was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Interaction of fillers with polymer chains is discussed, considering the role of silanes in compatibilization of hydrophilic mineral fillers and hydrophobic polymer. The functionalization of nanoclay with HMDS silane was confirmed using FTIR. Microstructure of NPU with C20A nanoclay was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM.

  11. Mechanisms of nonequilibrium electron-phonon coupling and thermal conductance at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Donovan, Brian F.; Szwejkowski, Chester; Warzoha, Ronald J.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Ihlefeld, Jon; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-03-01

    We study the electron and phonon thermal coupling mechanisms at interfaces between gold films with and without Ti adhesion layers on various substrates via pump-probe time-domain thermoreflectance. The coupling between the electronic and the vibrational states is increased by more than a factor of five with the inclusion of an ˜3 nm Ti adhesion layer between the Au film and the non-metal substrate. Furthermore, we show an increase in the rate of relaxation of the electron system with increasing electron and lattice temperatures induced by the laser power and attribute this to enhanced electron-electron scattering, a transport channel that becomes more pronounced with increased electron temperatures. The inclusion of the Ti layer also results in a linear dependence of the electron-phonon relaxation rate with temperature, which we attribute to the coupling of electrons at and near the Ti/substrate interface. This enhanced electron-phonon coupling due to electron-interface scattering is shown to have negligible influence on the Kapitza conductances between the Au/Ti and the substrates at longer time scales when the electrons and phonons in the metal have equilibrated. These results suggest that only during highly nonequilibrium conditions between the electrons and phonons (Te ≫ Tp) does electron-phonon scattering at an interface contribute to thermal boundary conductance.

  12. Mechanisms of nonequilibrium electron-phonon coupling and thermal conductance at interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giri, Ashutosh; Gaskins, John T.; Donovan, Brian F.; Szwejkowski, Chester; Hopkins, Patrick E., E-mail: phopkins@virginia.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Warzoha, Ronald J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland 21401 (United States); Rodriguez, Mark A.; Ihlefeld, Jon [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)

    2015-03-14

    We study the electron and phonon thermal coupling mechanisms at interfaces between gold films with and without Ti adhesion layers on various substrates via pump-probe time-domain thermoreflectance. The coupling between the electronic and the vibrational states is increased by more than a factor of five with the inclusion of an ∼3 nm Ti adhesion layer between the Au film and the non-metal substrate. Furthermore, we show an increase in the rate of relaxation of the electron system with increasing electron and lattice temperatures induced by the laser power and attribute this to enhanced electron-electron scattering, a transport channel that becomes more pronounced with increased electron temperatures. The inclusion of the Ti layer also results in a linear dependence of the electron-phonon relaxation rate with temperature, which we attribute to the coupling of electrons at and near the Ti/substrate interface. This enhanced electron-phonon coupling due to electron-interface scattering is shown to have negligible influence on the Kapitza conductances between the Au/Ti and the substrates at longer time scales when the electrons and phonons in the metal have equilibrated. These results suggest that only during highly nonequilibrium conditions between the electrons and phonons (T{sub e} ≫ T{sub p}) does electron-phonon scattering at an interface contribute to thermal boundary conductance.

  13. Mechanical, Thermal Degradation, and Flammability Studies on Surface Modified Sisal Fiber Reinforced Recycled Polypropylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of surface treated sisal fiber on the mechanical, thermal, flammability, and morphological properties of sisal fiber (SF reinforced recycled polypropylene (RPP composites was investigated. The surface of sisal fiber was modified with different chemical reagent such as silane, glycidyl methacrylate (GMA, and O-hydroxybenzene diazonium chloride (OBDC to improve the compatibility with the matrix polymer. The experimental results revealed an improvement in the tensile strength to 11%, 20%, and 31.36% and impact strength to 78.72%, 77%, and 81% for silane, GMA, and OBDC treated sisal fiber reinforced recycled Polypropylene (RPP/SF composites, respectively, as compared to RPP. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, and heat deflection temperature (HDT results revealed improved thermal stability as compared with RPP. The flammability behaviour of silane, GMA, and OBDC treated SF/RPP composites was studied by the horizontal burning rate by UL-94. The morphological analysis through scanning electron micrograph (SEM supports improves surface interaction between fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  14. Structure, mechanical and thermal behaviour of mixtures of polyester resin and dental ceramic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Rodríguez, G.; Martínez Maldonado, L.; Dulce Moreno, H. J.

    2016-02-01

    The tensile strength and bending strength, structure and thermal behaviour of mixtures of polyester resin (P-2000) and powders (ASTM sieve 200, dental ceramic wastes (dentals impressions, alginate and gypsum) was reported. The samples consisted of mixtures with percentage weights of 50-50%, 60-40%, 70-30%, 80-20%, 90-10%, where the resin was the majority phase, the Mekc (4% wt) was used as catalyst. The structure was studied using SEM and XRD, the thermal behaviour using DSC, TGA and DMA, while the mechanical strength was tested using standards ASTM D790 and D638. Irregular morphology and presence of small agglomerations was observed, with particle sizes between 29.63 and 38.67μm, the presence of different phases of calcium sulphate was found, and that to the increasing the concentration of the powder, the materials becomes more crystalline, increasing its density. An average service temperature of 69.15±4.60°C was found. Vickers hardness values are reported in ranges from 18.65 to 27.96. Considering the elastic modules was established that the materials become more rigid by having more powder concentration.

  15. Thermal and mechanical denaturation properties of a DNA model with three sites per nucleotide

    CERN Document Server

    Florescu, Ana-Maria; 10.1063/1.3626870

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we show that the coarse grain model for DNA, which has been proposed recently by Knotts, Rathore, Schwartz and de Pablo (J. Chem. Phys. 126, 084901 (2007)), can be adapted to describe the thermal and mechanical denaturation of long DNA sequences by adjusting slightly the base pairing contribution. The adjusted model leads to (i) critical temperatures for long homogeneous sequences that are in good agreement with both experimental ones and those obtained from statistical models, (ii) a realistic step-like denaturation behaviour for long inhomogeneous sequences, and (iii) critical forces at ambient temperature of the order of 10 pN, close to measured values. The adjusted model furthermore supports the conclusion that the thermal denaturation of long homogeneous sequences corresponds to a first-order phase transition and yields a critical exponent for the critical force equal to sigma=0.70. This model is both geometrically and energetically realistic, in the sense that the helical structure and th...

  16. Three-Dimensional Graphene Foam-Filled Elastomer Composites with High Thermal and Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Haoming; Zhao, Yunhong; Zhang, Yafei; Ren, Yanjuan; Bai, Shu-Lin

    2017-08-09

    To meet the increasing demands for effective heat management of electronic devices, a graphene-based polymeric composite is considered to be one of the candidate materials owing to the ultrahigh thermal conductivity (TC) of graphene. However, poor graphene dispersion, low quality of exfoliated graphene, and strong phonon scattering at the graphene/matrix interface restrict the heat dissipation ability of graphene-filled composites. Here, a facile and versatile approach to bond graphene foam (GF) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is proposed, and the corresponding composite with considerable improvement in TC and insulativity is fabricated. First, three-dimensional GF was coated with polydopamine (PDA) via π-π stack and functional groups from PDA reacted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS). Then, the modified GF was compressed (c-GF) to enhance density and infiltrated with PDMS to get the c-GF/PDA/APTS/PDMS composite. As a result, these processes endow the composite with high TC of in-plane 28.77 W m-1 K-1 and out-of-plane 1.62 W m-1 K-1 at 11.62 wt % GF loading. Besides, the composite manifests obvious improvement in mechanical properties, thermal stability, and insulativity compared to neat PDMS and GF/PDMS composite. An attempt to use the composite for cooling a ceramic heater is found to be successful. Above results open a way for such composites to be applied for the heat management of electronic devices.

  17. Research on the Thermal Decomposition Reaction Kinetics and Mechanism of Pyridinol-Blocked Isophorone Diisocyanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Guo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of pyridinol-blocked isophorone isocyanates, based on pyridinol including 2-hydroxypyridine, 3-hydroxypyridine, and 4-hydroxypyridine, was synthesized and characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and FTIR spectra. The deblocking temperature of blocked isocyanates was established by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and the CO2 evaluation method. The deblocking studies revealed that the deblocking temperature was increased with pyridinol nucleophilicity in this order: 3-hydroxypyridine > 4-hydroxypyridine > 2-hydroxypyridine. The thermal decomposition reaction of 4-hydroxypyridine blocked isophorone diisocyanate was studied by thermo-gravimetric analysis. The Friedman–Reich–Levi (FRL equation, Flynn–Wall–Ozawa (FWO equation, and Crane equation were utilized to analyze the thermal decomposition reaction kinetics. The activation energy calculated by FRL method and FWO method was 134.6 kJ·mol−1 and 126.2 kJ·mol−1, respectively. The most probable mechanism function calculated by the FWO method was the Jander equation. The reaction order was not an integer because of the complicated reactions of isocyanate.

  18. Final Report: Improving the understanding of the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic behavior of consolidating granular salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stormont, John [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lampe, Brandon [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mills, Melissa [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paneru, Laxmi [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lynn, Timothy [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Piya, Aayush [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-09

    The goal of this project is to improve the understanding of key aspects of the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic response of granular (or crushed) salt used as a seal material for shafts, drifts, and boreholes in mined repositories in salt. The project is organized into three tasks to accomplish this goal: laboratory measurements of granular salt consolidation (Task 1), microstructural observations on consolidated samples (Task 2), and constitutive model development and evaluation (Task 3). Task 1 involves laboratory measurements of salt consolidation along with thermal properties and permeability measurements conducted under a range of temperatures and stresses expected for potential mined repositories in salt. Testing focused on the role of moisture, temperature and stress state on the hydrologic (permeability) and thermal properties of consolidating granular salt at high fractional densities. Task 2 consists of microstructural observations made on samples after they have been consolidated to interpret deformation mechanisms and evaluate the ability of the constitutive model to predict operative mechanisms under different conditions. Task 3 concerns the development of the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrologic constitutive model for granular salt consolidation. The measurements and observations in Tasks 1 and 2 were used to develop a thermal-mechanical constitutive model. Accomplishments and status from each of these efforts is reported in subsequent sections of this report

  19. Technique for reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils due to thermal expansion properties of various FRP bobbins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, N.; Tada, S.; Higuchi, T.; Furumura, Y.; Takao, T.; Yamanaka, A.

    2005-10-01

    We reported about reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils. The method is the use of FRP bobbins fabricated with special fibers. Since their FRPs have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, the FRP bobbins expand to the circumferential direction during cooling down. In case of the superconducting coils with such FRP bobbins, the winding tensions do not decrease during cooling down. Therefore, the mechanical losses are reduced by the suppression of wire's vibration. Their special FRPs are a Dyneema® fiber reinforced plastic (DFRP), a Dyneema and glass fiber reinforced plastic (DGFRP), and a Zylon® fiber reinforced plastic (ZFRP). These materials have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, however, the amplitudes of thermal expansion are various by the quantity or quality of the fiber. In this paper, the values of thermal expansion were actually measured, and it was discussed about the influence on the mechanical losses. At the experimental results, the mechanical loss was small, so that the thermal strain to the circumferential direction on the coil was large. Moreover, in case of the coils with sufficiently strong winding tensions at coil-operating temperature, the mechanical losses vanished.

  20. Technique for reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils due to thermal expansion properties of various FRP bobbins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, N. [Tsukamoto Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, 79-5, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)]. E-mail: n-sekine@tsukalab.dnj.ynu.ac.jp; Tada, S. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Higuchi, T. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Furumura, Y. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Takao, T. [Sophia University, 7-1, Kioicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Yamanaka, A. [Research Center, Toyobo, Co., Ltd, 2-1-1, Katata, Otsu, Shiga 520-0292 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    We reported about reduction of mechanical losses in AC superconducting coils. The method is the use of FRP bobbins fabricated with special fibers. Since their FRPs have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, the FRP bobbins expand to the circumferential direction during cooling down. In case of the superconducting coils with such FRP bobbins, the winding tensions do not decrease during cooling down. Therefore, the mechanical losses are reduced by the suppression of wire's vibration. Their special FRPs are a Dyneema[reg] fiber reinforced plastic (DFRP), a Dyneema and glass fiber reinforced plastic (DGFRP), and a Zylon[reg] fiber reinforced plastic (ZFRP). These materials have negative thermal expansion coefficient to the fiber direction, however, the amplitudes of thermal expansion are various by the quantity or quality of the fiber. In this paper, the values of thermal expansion were actually measured, and it was discussed about the influence on the mechanical losses. At the experimental results, the mechanical loss was small, so that the thermal strain to the circumferential direction on the coil was large. Moreover, in case of the coils with sufficiently strong winding tensions at coil-operating temperature, the mechanical losses vanished.

  1. Thermo-Mechanical and Thermal behavior of High-Temperature Structural Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-31

    reached a value at which in many candidate materials, such as tar-bonded magnesite refractories , substantial soften- L. ing and creep may occur. If so...number) Thermal shock, thermal stress, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity; refractories , composites, radiation heat transfer, cyclic heating...Bentsen and D. P. H. Hasselman, "The Measurement of the Thermal Conductivity of Refractories by the Laser-Flash Method." IV J. R. Thomas, J. I

  2. Enhancement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Polylactic Acid/Polycaprolactone Blends by Hydrophilic Nanoclay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chern Chiet Eng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hydrophilic nanoclay, Nanomer PGV, on mechanical properties of Polylactic Acid (PLA/Polycaprolactone (PCL blends were investigated and compared with hydrophobic clay, Montmorillonite K10. The PLA/PCL/clay composites were prepared by melt intercalation technique and the composites were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM. FTIR spectra indicated that formation of hydrogen bond between hydrophilic clay with the matrix. XRD results show that shifting of basal spacing when clay incorporated into polymer matrix. TEM micrographs reveal the formation of agglomerate in the composites. Based on mechanical properties results, addition of clay Nanomer PGV significantly enhances the flexibility of PLA/PCL blends about 136.26%. TGA showed that the presence of clay improve thermal stability of blends. DMA show the addition of clay increase storage modulus and the presence of clay Nanomer PGV slightly shift two Tg of blends become closer suggest that the presence of clay slightly compatibilizer the PLA/PCL blends. SEM micrographs revealed that presence of Nanomer PGV in blends influence the miscibility of the blends. The PLA/PCL blends become more homogeneous and consist of single phase morphology.

  3. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of glutaraldehyde crosslinked bovine pericardium followed by glutamic acid treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Goissis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Major problems with valve bioprostheses are associated with progressive structural deterioration and calcification, directly associated with the use of glutaraldehyde (GA. This work describes the effects of GA processing and borate/glutamic acid buffer treatment on the mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of 0.5% GA crosslinked bovine pericardium (BP. The results showed that while the treatment of 0.5% GA crosslinked BP with borate/glutamic acid significantly improves the mechanical properties, it had no visible effect on surface morphology. Better surface preservation was only achieved for BP pre-treated with a lower GA concentration followed by the conventional treatment (0.5% GA. Improvements in mechanical properties probably arises from structural changes probably involving the depolymerization of polymeric GA crosslinks and an increase electrostatic interaction due to covalent binding of glutamic acid to free carbonyl groups (Schiff base.The results indicate that the treatment GA crosslinked BP with borate/glutamic acid buffer may be an attractive procedure for the manufacture of heart valve bioprostheses.

  4. Thermal and Mechanical Behavior of Hybrid Polymer Nanocomposite Reinforced with Graphene Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Tai Le

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we successfully fabricate a hybrid polymer nanocomposite containing epoxy/polyester blend resin and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs by a novel technique. A high intensity ultrasonicator is used to obtain a homogeneous mixture of epoxy/polyester resin and graphene nanoplatelets. This mixture is then mixed with a hardener using a high-speed mechanical stirrer. The trapped air and reaction volatiles are removed from the mixture using high vacuum. The hot press casting method is used to make the nanocomposite specimens. Tensile tests, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA are performed on neat, 0.2 wt %, 0.5 wt %, 1 wt %, 1.5 wt % and 2 wt % GNP-reinforced epoxy/polyester blend resin to investigate the reinforcement effect on the thermal and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. The results of this research indicate that the tensile strength of the novel nanocomposite material increases to 86.8% with the addition of a ratio of graphene nanoplatelets as low as 0.2 wt %. DMA results indicate that the 1 wt % GNP-reinforced epoxy/polyester nanocomposite possesses the highest storage modulus and glass transition temperature (Tg, as compared to neat epoxy/polyester or the other nanocomposite specimens. In addition, TGA results verify thethermal stability of the experimental specimens, regardless of the weight percentage of GNPs.

  5. Optimization of Mechanical, Dynamical and Thermal Properties of a High Performance Tread Compound for Radial Tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Hamid Reza Ghoreishy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A high performance passenger tire tread compound was optimized for its mechanical, dynamical and thermal properties. A reference compound was based on a blend of SBR and BR, sulfur and other ingredients without accelerator, carbon black and aromatic oil. The effects of CBS/TMTD and TBBS/TMTD as accelerator systems were studied with different quantities and the best accelerator system was chosen. Then, the blends of N330 and N550 carbon blacks were added in different quantities and the properties of these samples were studied to determine the best carbon black blend. Finally, the effect of different quantities of aromatic oil was investigated and the optimized quantity of aromatic oil and the final properties of tire tread compound were defined. The mechanical and dynamical tests were carried out on appropriate samples to determine tensile strength, elongation-at-break, fatigue-to-failure, abrasion resistance, hardness, resilience, dynamical-mechanical properties and temperature rise due to the heat build-up. The results showed that the compound containing 0.8 phr CBS, 0.7 phr TMTD, 40 phr N330,20 phr N550 and 15 phr aromatic oils demonstrated the best properties.

  6. Phase evolution and thermal stability of 2 Mg–Cu alloys processed by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, C., E-mail: carola.martinezu@usach.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile); Ordoñez, S., E-mail: stella.ordonez@usach.cl [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile); Guzmán, D. [Departamento de Ingeniería en Metalurgia, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Atacama y CRIDESAT, Av. Copayapu 485, Casilla de Correo 240, Copiapó (Chile); Serafini, D. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 307, Santiago (Chile); Iturriza, I. [CEIT, Manuel de Lardizábal 15, 20018 San Sebastián, España (Spain); Bustos, O. [Departamento de Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O’Higgins 3363, Casilla de correo 10233, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •Study of phase evolution of elemental powders Mg and Cu by mechanical alloying. •The presence of an amorphous precursor which crystallizes to Mg{sub 2}Cu can be observed. •Establishing the sequence of phase transformations leading to the formation of Mg{sub 2}Cu. •The feasibility to obtain Mg{sub 2}Cu by means two possible routes has been established. -- Abstract: Phase evolution during mechanical alloying (MA) of elemental Mg and Cu powders and their subsequent heat treatment is studied. Elemental Mg and Cu powders in a 2:1 atomic ratio were mechanically alloyed in a SPEX 8000D mill using a 10:1 ball-to-powder ratio. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the formation of the intermetallic Mg{sub 2}Cu takes place between 3 and 4 h of milling, although traces of elemental Cu are still present after 10 h of milling. The thermal behavior of different powder mixtures was evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The combination of DSC, heat treatment and XRD has shown a sequence of phase transformations that results in the intermetallic Mg{sub 2}Cu from an amorphous precursor. This amorphous phase is converted into Mg{sub 2}Cu by heating at low temperature (407 K). Short MA times and the formation of the amorphous precursor, together with its subsequent transformation into Mg{sub 2}Cu at low temperatures; represent an advantageous alternative route for its preparation.

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a microalloyed steel after thermal treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Barros Cota

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The properties of a microalloyed steel, with Nb and V in its composition, were studied, after different intercritical thermal treatments and at different austenitizing and tempering temperatures. The mechanical properties of the specimens were measured in a Vickers hardness tester, and their microstructures were analyzed by optical microscopy, with the aid of a digital image processor. After austenitizing at 1100 °C and tempering at 625 °C, the samples showed significantly higher tempering resistance, reflected by their retention of high hardness, which may be associated with a secondary hardening precipitation of Nb carbon nitrides. In the sample with dual-phase microstructure, the martensite volume fraction varied from 18.2 to 26.3% and the ferrite grain size remained unchanged, upon the variation of the time length of the intercritical treatments. Tempered samples showed Vickers hardness (HVN varying from 327 to 399, and dual-phase samples showed HVN from 362 to 429.

  8. Mechanical, Rheological and Thermal Properties of Polystyrene/1-Octadecanol Modified Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Amr, Issam Thaher

    2014-09-04

    The results of the studies on the functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with 1-octadecanol and its usage as reinforcing filler in the bulk polymerization of styrene are reported in this article. Both unmodified and modified CNTs were utilized in different loadings, however, without any initiator. The resulting composites were characterized by using mechanical testing, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis and melt rheology. The tensile tests show the addition of 0.5wt% of CNT-C18 results in 19.5% increment of Young\\'s modulus. The DSC study shows a decrease in T-g values of prepared PS/CNT nanocomposite. The rheological study was conducted at 190 degrees C and shows that addition of pure CNT increased the viscoelastic behavior of the PS matrices, while the CNT-C18 act as plasticizer. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the incorporation of CNT into PS enhanced the thermal properties significantly.

  9. ELECTRO-THERMAL AND MECHANICAL VALIDATION EXPERIMENT ON THE LHC MAIN BUSBAR SPLICE CONSOLIDATION

    CERN Document Server

    Willering, GP; Bourcey, N; Bottura, L; Charrondiere, M; Cerqueira Bastos, M; Deferne, G; Dib, G; Giloux, Chr; Grand-Clement, L; Heck, S; Hudson, G; Kudryavtsev, D; Perret, P; Pozzobon, M; Prin, H; Scheuerlein, Chr; Rijllart, A; Triquet, S; Verweij, AP

    2012-01-01

    To eliminate the risk of thermal runaways in LHC interconnections a consolidation by placing shunts on the main bus bar interconnections is proposed by the Task Force Splices Consolidation. To validate the design two special SSS magnet spares are placed on a test bench in SM-18 to measure the interconnection in between with conditions as close as possible to the LHC conditions. Two dipole interconnections are instrumented and prepared with worst-case-conditions to study the thermo-electric stability limits. Two quadrupole interconnections are instrumented and prepared for studying the effect of current cycling on the mechanical stability of the consolidation design. All 4 shunted interconnections showed very stable behaviour, well beyond the LHC design current cycle.

  10. Mechanical and thermal behaviour of U–Mo and U–Nb–Zr Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Denise Adorno [LABMAT, Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo, Rod. Sorocaba-Iperó km 12.5, 18560-000 Iperó, SP (Brazil); Guisard Restivo, Thomaz Augusto, E-mail: guisard@dglnet.com.br [UNISO, Universidade de Sorocaba, Rod. Raposo Tavares km 92.5, 18023-000 Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Escola Politécnica USP, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 05508-030 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Padilha, Angelo Fernando [Escola Politécnica USP, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 05508-030 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Nuclear fuels composed of uranium alloys in monolithic and dispersed forms are being considered for research and compact power reactors due to their density properties (greater than 15 g-U/cm{sup 3}) and fast heat transfer. U–Nb–Zr and U–Mo alloys are the most promising systems for plate fuel elements owing to their broad γ-phase stability field, which shows higher ductility and isotropic behaviour, allowing extensive fabrication capability. In the present work, γ-phase stabilized U–7.5Nb–2.5Zr and U–10Mo alloys were characterized by mechanical and thermal analyses for comparison of their behaviour under deformation and heat-treatment. The results demonstrate that the alloys have substantially different properties regarding deformation, kinetics phase transformation and recovery/recrystallization. The main results show that U–Nb–Zr is superior regarding fabrication capabilities although the γ-phase is less stable than U–Mo alloys.

  11. Mechanical and thermal properties of polylactic acid composites reinforced with cellulose nanoparticles extracted from kenaf fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketabchi, Mohammad Reza; Khalid, Mohammad; Thevy Ratnam, Chantara; Walvekar, Rashmi

    2016-12-01

    Different approaches have been attempted to use biomass as filler for production of biodegradable polymer composites. In this study, cellulose nanoparticles (CNP) extracted from kenaf fibres were used to produce polylactic acid (PLA) based biodegradable nanocomposites. CNP concentration was varied from 1-5 wt. % and blended with PLA using Brabender twin-screw compounder. Effects of CNP loading on the mechanical, thermal and dynamic properties of PLA were investigated. Studies on the morphological properties and influence of CNP loading on the properties of CNP/PLA nanocomposite were also conducted. The results show an adequate compatibility between CNP and PLA matrix. Moreover, addition of 3 wt. % of CNP improved the PLA tensile strength by 25%.

  12. Compressive mechanical response of graphene foams and their thermal resistance with copper interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonjun Park

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report compressive mechanical response of graphene foams (GFs and the thermal resistance (RTIM between copper (Cu and GFs, where GFs were prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method. We observe that Young’s modulus (EGF and compressive strength (σGF of GFs have a power law dependence on increasing density (ρGF of GFs. The maximum efficiency of absorbed energy (ηmax for all GFs during the compression is larger than ∼0.39. We also find that a GF with a higher ρGF shows a larger ηmax. In addition, we observe that the measured RTIM of Cu/GFs at room temperature with a contact pressure of 0.25 MP applied increases from ∼50 to ∼90 mm2 K/W when ρGF increases from 4.7 to 31.9 mg/cm3.

  13. Rapid thermal annealing and crystallization mechanisms study of silicon nanocrystal in silicon carbide matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, a positive effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA technique has been researched and compared with conventional furnace annealing for Si nanocrystalline in silicon carbide (SiC matrix system. Amorphous Si-rich SiC layer has been deposited by co-sputtering in different Si concentrations (50 to approximately 80 v%. Si nanocrystals (Si-NC containing different grain sizes have been fabricated within the SiC matrix under two different annealing conditions: furnace annealing and RTA both at 1,100°C. HRTEM image clearly reveals both Si and SiC-NC formed in the films. Much better "degree of crystallization" of Si-NC can be achieved in RTA than furnace annealing from the research of GIXRD and Raman analysis, especially in high-Si-concentration situation. Differences from the two annealing procedures and the crystallization mechanism have been discussed based on the experimental results.

  14. The effect of thermal treatment on the mechanical properties of PLLA tubular specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbeiter Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Conventional permanent stent systems for vascular applications are associated with long-term risks, such as restenosis and thrombosis. To overcome these limitations, novel approaches using various biodegradable materials for stent construction have been investigated. In this context, thermal treatment of polymer materials is investigated to adjust the mechanical properties of biodegradable stents. In this work polymeric tubular specimens of biodegradable poly(L-lactide (PLLA were extruded and subjected to a molding process using different temperatures above glass transition temperature TG. Physicochemical properties of the molded samples were analyzed using DSC measurements and uniaxial tensile tests. The molding process resulted in a weakening of the PLLA tubular specimens with a simultaneous increase in the degree of crystallinity (χ.

  15. ALD Functionalized Nanoporous Gold: Thermal Stability, Mechanical Properties, and Catalytic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Wichmann, A; Wittstock, A; Baumann, T F; Baeumer, M; Hamza, A V

    2011-03-24

    Nanoporous metals have many technologically promising applications but their tendency to coarsen limits their long-term stability and excludes high temperature applications. Here, we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) can be used to stabilize and functionalize nanoporous metals. Specifically, we studied the effect of nanometer-thick alumina and titania ALD films on thermal stability, mechanical properties, and catalytic activity of nanoporous gold (np-Au). Our results demonstrate that even only one-nm-thick oxide films can stabilize the nanoscale morphology of np-Au up to 1000 C, while simultaneously making the material stronger and stiffer. The catalytic activity of np-Au can be drastically increased by TiO{sub 2} ALD coatings. Our results open the door to high temperature sensor, actuator, and catalysis applications and functionalized electrodes for energy storage and harvesting applications.

  16. Effect of post-curing on thermal and mechanical behavior of GFRP composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D. S.; Shukla, M. J.; Mahato, K. K.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2015-02-01

    Curing cycle has a strong impact on the thermal and mechanical behavior of thermosetting polymers. The extent of cross-linking which is a strong function of curing temperature and time is directly linked to the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the thermosetting polymer. This transition temperature speaks about the transformation of the polymer from glassy state to rubbery state, hence decides the applicability of the material at certain temperature with certain degree of safety and reliability. Hence assessment of Tg and its possible improvement is quite essential from material point of view. The present study is emphasized on the impact of post curing parameters on thermal as well as mechanical behavior of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite. Post curing was carried out at 3 different temperatures (80°C, 110°C and 140°C) for different time periods (2h, 4h, 6h, 8h and 12h). Short beam Shear (SBS) test was performed on each of the post cured samples to determine the apparent Interlaminar Shear Strength (ILSS) and the corresponding Tg was also evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. The results revealed that the ILSS and Tg are significantly affected with post curing parameters. No significant change in ILSS was obtained at 80°C over the entire curing time. In case of 110°C a smooth increment in ILSS was observed with time (even till 12 hrs). For samples post cured at 140°C a rapid improvement in ILSS takes place with time followed by saturation. With all the possible combinations of curing temperature and time, optimum values are noticed at 140°C for 6 hrs.

  17. Marginal adaptation of class V composite restorations submitted to thermal and mechanical cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Sa Maia CASSELLI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the effect of the margin location and an adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. Material and Methods Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with the gingival margin on the dentin and the incisal margin on the enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid composite resin using an etch-and-rinse [Single Bond 2 (SB] or a self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE Bond (CL]. After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, 500 x magnification. The higher gap width in each margin was recorded (T0. After the first evaluation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycling (2,000 cycles of 5°C±2°C followed by 55°C±2°C – T1 and mechanical cycling (100,000 cycles of 50 kN and 2 Hz – T2. Replicas of samples were rebuilt after each cycling and analyzed under SEM. The data were submitted to Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and Friedman testing (α=0.05. Results The SB presented higher gaps in the dentin than the enamel, while there was no difference between the substrate for the CL. In the dentin, the CL showed better marginal sealing than the SB. The opposite occurred in the enamel. There were no significant differences between the baseline, thermal and mechanical cycling for any experimental condition. Conclusions The outcomes of the present study showed that the adhesive system and margin location have an important effect on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations.

  18. Mechanisms of thermal stability during flight in the honeybee apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts; Harrison

    1999-06-01

    Thermoregulation of the thorax allows honeybees (Apis mellifera) to maintain the flight muscle temperatures necessary to meet the power requirements for flight and to remain active outside the hive across a wide range of air temperatures (Ta). To determine the heat-exchange pathways through which flying honeybees achieve thermal stability, we measured body temperatures and rates of carbon dioxide production and water vapor loss between Ta values of 21 and 45 degrees C for honeybees flying in a respirometry chamber. Body temperatures were not significantly affected by continuous flight duration in the respirometer, indicating that flying bees were at thermal equilibrium. Thorax temperatures (Tth) during flight were relatively stable, with a slope of Tth on Ta of 0.39. Metabolic heat production, calculated from rates of carbon dioxide production, decreased linearly by 43 % as Ta rose from 21 to 45 degrees C. Evaporative heat loss increased nonlinearly by over sevenfold, with evaporation rising rapidly at Ta values above 33 degrees C. At Ta values above 43 degrees C, head temperature dropped below Ta by approximately 1-2 degrees C, indicating that substantial evaporation from the head was occurring at very high Ta values. The water flux of flying honeybees was positive at Ta values below 31 degrees C, but increasingly negative at higher Ta values. At all Ta values, flying honeybees experienced a net radiative heat loss. Since the honeybees were in thermal equilibrium, convective heat loss was calculated as the amount of heat necessary to balance metabolic heat gain against evaporative and radiative heat loss. Convective heat loss decreased strongly as Ta rose because of the decrease in the elevation of body temperature above Ta rather than the variation in the convection coefficient. In conclusion, variation in metabolic heat production is the dominant mechanism of maintaining thermal stability during flight between Ta values of 21 and 33 degrees C, but variations in

  19. Mechanical stability of the LHC dipole-dipole 50-75K thermal shield interconnect "floating" expansion joint concept

    CERN Document Server

    Skoczen, Blazej

    1998-01-01

    The LHC dipole cryostats are equipped with thermal shields carrying super-insulation. A cold helium transfer line equipped with expansion joints is integrated into the shield carrying trays (aluminium profiles supported on three composite feet). The stainless steel (316 L) expansion joints compensate for thermal contraction/expansion of the aluminium panels as well as for their misalignment. Design of the LHC thermal shield interconnect is based on the "floating" expansion joint concept (distance between the supports is of around 5 m). The present paper is dedicated to the analysis of mechanical stability of this large span system working at room and at cryogenic temperatures.

  20. Evaluation of mechanical and thermal properties of insulation materials for HTS power devices at liquid nitrogen temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hyung Seop; Diaz, Mark Angelo [Dept. of Mechanical Design Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In superconducting power devices including power cables in which high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes are utilized, a reliable electrical insulation should be achieved for its maximum performance. For an efficient design of HTS superconducting devices, a comparative evaluation of the mechanical and thermal propperties for various insulation materials at cryogenic temperatures is required. Especially, in the process of the property evaluation of the sheet-shaped insulation materials, anisotropy according to the machining direction should be considered because the mechanical and thermal properties are significantly influenced by the sample orientation. In this study, the cryogenic thermal and mechanical properties of various insulation material sheets such as PPLP, Cryoflex, Teflon, and Kapton were determined considering sample orientation. All samples tested at cryogenic temperature showed significantly higher tensile strength as compared with that of room temperature. The ultimate tensile strength at both temperature conditions significantly depended upon the sample orientation. The thermal properties of the insulation materials exhibited a slight difference among samples depending on the orientation: for the PPLP and Cryoflex, the CD orientation showed larger thermal contraction up to 77 K as compared to the MD one. MD samples in PPLP and Cryoflex showed a lower CTE and thermal contraction which made it more promising as an insulation material due to its comparable CTE with HTS CC tapes.

  1. Resistive Switching Assisted by Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, G. A.; Fierens, P. I.; Grosz, D. F.

    2013-01-01

    We extend results by Stotland and Di Ventra on the phenomenon of resistive switching aided by noise. We further the analysis of the mechanism underlying the beneficial role of noise and study the EPIR (Electrical Pulse Induced Resistance) ratio dependence with noise power. In the case of internal noise we find an optimal range where the EPIR ratio is both maximized and independent of the preceding resistive state. However, when external noise is considered no beneficial effect is observed.

  2. Uncovering new thermal and mechanical behavior at the nanoscale using coherent extreme ultraviolet light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeboom-Pot, Kathleen Marie

    Tremendous recent progress in nanofabrication capabilities has made high-quality single-atomic layers and nanostructures with dimensions well below 50 nm commonplace, enabling unprecedented access to materials at the nanoscale. However, tools and techniques capable of characterizing the properties and function of nanosystems are still quite limited, leaving much of the fundamental physics that dominates material behavior in the deep nano-regime still unknown. Further understanding gained by studying nanoscale materials is critical both to fundamental science and to continued technological development. This thesis applies coherent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light from tabletop high harmonic generation to study nanoscale systems on their intrinsic length and time scales (nanometers and femtoseconds, and above), specifically following thermal transport and acoustic dynamics. These studies have shown where and how nanostructured material properties can be quite different from their bulk counterparts. This has in turn allowed us to develop new theoretical descriptions to guide further work. By observing heat dissipation from the smallest nanostructure heat sources measured to date (at 20 nm in lateral size), this work uncovers a previously unobserved and unpredicted nanoscale thermal transport regime where both size and spacing of heat sources play a role in determining the heat dissipation effciency. Surprisingly, this shows that nanoscale heat sources can cool more quickly when spaced close together than when far apart. This discovery is significant to the engineering of thermal management in nanoscale systems and devices while also revealing new insight into the fundamental nature of thermal transport. Furthermore, we harness this new regime to demonstrate the first experimental measurement of the differential contributions of phonons with different mean free paths to thermal conductivity, down to mean free paths as short as 14 nm for the first time. The same

  3. Effect of interfaces on the thermal, mechanical and chemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guo An

    The primary focus of this work is to explore the effect of interface on thermal, mechanical, and chemical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the methods to modify the interface between CNTs and CNTs based composites. CNTs are potentially promising fibers for ultra-high-strength composites. The load transfer between the inner and outer tubes in multiwall nanotubes (MWNTs) has to be clearly understood to realize the potential of MWNTs in composites and other applications such as nano-springs, and nano-bearings. This dissertation studies the load transfer between the walls of MWNTs in both tension and compression using molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that only the minimal load is transferred to the inner nanotube in tension. The load transfer of capped nanotubes in compression is much higher than in tension. In the case of uncapped nanotubes, the inner nanotube is deformed in bending only after the outer nanotube is extensively deformed by buckling. The presence of a few interstitial atoms between the walls of MWNTs can significantly improve the stiffness and enhance the load transfer to the inner nanotubes in both tension and compression. The modification of the interface of CNTs is a key factor for effectively using CNTs in many applications. Many potential applications of CNTs, including high strength composites, nano-sensors, and molecular electronics, can be created by chemical surface modification. The use of molecular statics and dynamics helps exploring ion irradiation as a method for functionalization of CNTs. It is found that ion bombardment of single and Multiwall carbon nanotubes creates vacancies and defects, which can act as high-energy sites for further chemical reactions; furthermore, ion irradiation of CNTs embedded in polymer matrix creates chemical attachments between CNTs and polymer matrix, enhancing the compositing process. Mechanical property simulations based on tension and pullout tests indicate that the chemical links

  4. Research on the Mechanical and Thermal Properties of MWCNTs/CF Reinforced Epoxy Resin Matrix Composite Patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Li, C. Q.; Lin, L.; Chen, Y.

    The mechanical and thermal properties of multi-walled carbon nano-tubes and carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite patch were tested, which was prepared by the hand lay-up method. The results indicated that the imagination observed by SEM presented good resin-impregnation for both of the two kinds of composite patches, and the mechanical and thermal properties of composite patch could be effectively increased by improvement of the interface combination after adding MWCNTs. For the mechanical properties of composite patch reinforced with MWCNTs, the interlaminar shear strength, bend strength and impact-tolerance were separately increased by 3.1%, 51.66% and 60.7%; and heat-resistance obtained by DMA were shown better thermal stability.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of polyurethane/bentonite nanoclay based nanocomposites using different diisocyanates: relation between mechanical and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Javier; Wittemberg, Víctor; Quagliano, Javier

    2017-05-01

    Polyurethanes (PUs) and polyurethane nanocomposites (PUNC) with bentonite nanoclay were prepared by the reaction of toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI), dimeryl diisocyanate (DDI) and isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) with two different polymers: hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and polytetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG), and the chains were further extended with 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BDO) to get final PUs and PUNCs. PUNCs were prepared by dispersing within the polymers a commercial and a synthesized bentonite nanoclay by mechanical dispersion. Mechanical properties showed that the addition of a small amount of nanoclay resulted in a significant increase in tensile strength and reduction in elongation at break (maximum increase of 2.3 and 5-times reduction, respectively, for a HTPB-TDI-BDO PUNCs). Thermal analysis revealed that the addition of nanoclays improved the thermal stability and increased decomposition temperature of PUNCs. We concluded that there is a positive correlation between mechanical and thermal properties as a result of nanoclay addition.

  6. Understanding Nanoscale Thermal Conduction an Mechanical Strength Correlation in High Temperature Ceramics with Improved Thermal Shock Resistance for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    Equation (BTE). In the instances where an interface is being analyzed, variants of either acoustic mismatch model ( AMM ) or of diffusive mismatch model...DMM) are employed for the description of conductive heat transport. The AMM makes the assumption of thermal equilibrium achieved immediately on...either side of a single abrupt junction. Calculations of the AMM only consider the materials on either side of the interfacial bond and not the

  7. The Effect of Nanoclay on Physicochemical, Mechanical and Thermal Properties of New Urea- Glyoxal Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hamed yonesi korekhili

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to eliminate the harm of formaldehyde from panels bonded with UF resin to environment and human health at the source, the low volatile and nontoxic aldehyde of glyoxyal (G was chosen to react with urea (U to prepare the wood adhesive of urea-glyoxal (UG resin a substitute for urea-formaldehyde (UF resin. The urea-glyoxal (UG resin was synthesized under weak acid conditions, and its different properties were measured. Also, the effect of nanoclay on physico-chemical, thermal and mechanical properties of UG resin was investigated. For this purpose, the prepared UG resin was mixed with 1, 2 and 3 wt% nanoclay by mechanically stirring for 5 min at room temperature. The physico-chemical properties (such as SPG, viscosity, solid content and gelation time and dry shear strength of the prepared resin were measured according to standard methods. Also, the effect of nanoclay on curing temperature of UG resin was analyzed by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC device. The physico-chemical test results indicated that addition of nanoclay increased SPG, viscosity and solid content of UG resin and decreased gelation time in the prepared resin. Dry shear strength test results showed that increasing nanoclay content from 1 to 3 wt% increased shear strength of UG resin; as the panels containing 3% nanoclay exhibited the highest shear strength value and wood failure percentage. Based on DSC test results, hardening rate as well as enthalpy value of the prepared UG resin was decreased by addition of nanoclay.

  8. Thermal Degradation, Mechanical Properties and Morphology of Wheat Straw Flour Filled Recycled Thermoplastic Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengeloglu, Fatih; Karakus, Kadir

    2008-01-24

    Thermal behaviors of wheat straw flour (WF) filled thermoplastic compositeswere measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanningcalorimetry. Morphology and mechanical properties were also studied using scanningelectron microscope and universal testing machine, respectively. Presence of WF inthermoplastic matrix reduced the degradation temperature of the composites. One for WFand one for thermoplastics, two main decomposition peaks were observed. Morphologicalstudy showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between WFs andthermoplastic. WFs were embedded into the thermoplastic matrix indicating improvedadhesion. However, the bonding was not perfect because some debonding can also be seenon the interface of WFs and thermoplastic matrix. In the case of mechanical properties ofWF filled recycled thermoplastic, HDPE and PP based composites provided similar tensileand flexural properties. The addition of coupling agents improved the properties ofthermoplastic composites. MAPE coupling agents performed better in HDPE while MAPPcoupling agents were superior in PP based composites. The composites produced with thecombination of 50-percent mixture of recycled HDPE and PP performed similar with theuse of both coupling agents. All produced composites provided flexural properties requiredby the ASTM standard for polyolefin-based plastic lumber decking boards.

  9. Thermal Degradation, Mechanical Properties and Morphology of Wheat Straw Flour Filled Recycled Thermoplastic Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadir Karakus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal behaviors of wheat straw flour (WF filled thermoplastic compositeswere measured applying the thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanningcalorimetry. Morphology and mechanical properties were also studied using scanningelectron microscope and universal testing machine, respectively. Presence of WF inthermoplastic matrix reduced the degradation temperature of the composites. One for WFand one for thermoplastics, two main decomposition peaks were observed. Morphologicalstudy showed that addition of coupling agent improved the compatibility between WFs andthermoplastic. WFs were embedded into the thermoplastic matrix indicating improvedadhesion. However, the bonding was not perfect because some debonding can also be seenon the interface of WFs and thermoplastic matrix. In the case of mechanical properties ofWF filled recycled thermoplastic, HDPE and PP based composites provided similar tensileand flexural properties. The addition of coupling agents improved the properties ofthermoplastic composites. MAPE coupling agents performed better in HDPE while MAPPcoupling agents were superior in PP based composites. The composites produced with thecombination of 50-percent mixture of recycled HDPE and PP performed similar with theuse of both coupling agents. All produced composites provided flexural properties requiredby the ASTM standard for polyolefin-based plastic lumber decking boards.

  10. Thermal, Mechanical, and Electrical Properties of Graphene Nanoplatelet/Graphene Oxide/ Polyurethane Hybrid Nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Pashupati; Lee, Sang Hyub; Lee, Dai Soo

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid nanocomposites of polyurethane (PU) were prepared by in-situ polymerization of 4,4'- diphenyl methane diisocyanate (MDI) with mixture of graphene oxide (GO) and graphene nanoplatelet (GNP) dispersed in a poly(tetramethylene ether glycol) (PTMEG). Effects of the fillers, GO and GNP, on the thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties of the nanocomposites of PU were investigated. Sonication of the hybrid of GNP and GO with PTMEG enabled effective dispersion of the fillers in the solution than the sonication of GNP alone. The addition of PTMEG in the solution prevented the GNPs from the restacking during the drying process. It was observed that the electrical conductivity and mechanical property of the nanocomposites based on the hybrid of GO and GNP were superior to the nanocomposite based on GNP alone at the same loading of the filler. At the loading of the 3 wt% hybrid filler in PU, we observed the improvement of Young's modulus -200% and the surface resistivity of 10(9.5) ohm/sq without sacrificing the elongation at break.

  11. Mechanism-based modeling of solute strengthening: application to thermal creep in Zr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wen, Wei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Capolungo, Laurent [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report focuses on the development of a physics-based thermal creep model aiming to predict the behavior of Zr alloy under reactor accident condition. The current models used for this kind of simulations are mostly empirical in nature, based generally on fits to the experimental steady-state creep rates under different temperature and stress conditions, which has the following limitations. First, reactor accident conditions, such as RIA and LOCA, usually take place in short times and involve only the primary, not the steady-state creep behavior stage. Moreover, the empirical models cannot cover the conditions from normal operation to accident environments. For example, Kombaiah and Murty [1,2] recently reported a transition between the low (n~4) and high (n~9) power law creep regimes in Zr alloys depending on the applied stress. Capturing such a behavior requires an accurate description of the mechanisms involved in the process. Therefore, a mechanism-based model that accounts for the evolution with time of microstructure is more appropriate and reliable for this kind of simulation.

  12. Mechanical, Thermal and Surface Investigations of Chitosan/Agar/PVA Ternary Blended Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam A. El-Hefian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and thermal properties of chitosan/agar/poly vinyl alcohol (CS/AG/PVA ternary blended films having various proportions considering chitosan as the main component were investigated. The various variables static water contact angle such as contact angle, drop base area, drop volume and drop height was also studied in correlation with the variation of time. Results obtained from mechanical measurements showed a noticeable increase in the tensile strength (TS coincided with a sharp decrease in elongation percent at break (E% of blended films with increasing agar and PVA contents. The DSC results prevailed the development of an interaction between chitosan individual components: agar and PVA. Moreover, an enhancement of the wettability of the blends was obtained with increasing agar and PVA contents. It was also found that the pure CS film and the blended films with 90/05/05 and 80/10/10 compositions were more affected by time than blended films with other compositions when the contact angle, the drop height and the drop length were studied as a function of time. In addition, when the drop is initially placed on the substrate, the drop area and the drop volume of all films remained almost constant up to a certain time after which they showed a slight difference with the elapse of time.

  13. Influence of electron beam irradiation on mechanical and thermal properties of polypropylene/polyamide blend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shigeya, E-mail: shi-nakamura@hitachi-chem.co.jp [Hitachi Chemical Co., Ltd., 1150 Goshomiya, Chikusei, Ibaraki 308-8524, Japan and Department of Materials Science, School of Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka-cho, Hikone, 522-8533, Shiga (Japan); Tokumitsu, Katsuhisa [Department of Materials Science, School of Engineering, The University of Shiga Prefecture, 2500 Hassaka-cho, Hikone, 522-8533, Shiga (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    The effects of electron beam irradiation on the mechanical and thermal properties of polypropylene (PP) and polyamide6 (PA6) blends-with talc 20 wt% as filler, SEBS-g-MAH as compatibilizer, and triallyl isocyanurate as crosslinking agent-were investigated. Although the tensile and flexural moduli and strengths of the PP/PA6 blends with talc, SEBS-g-MAH, and TAIC could be increased by the application of electron beam irradiation, the impact strength was decreased. Ddifferential scanning calorimetryer measurements showed that the melting temperatures of all PP/PA6 blends were decreased with increases in the electron beam irradiationdose. From dynamic mechanical analyzer results, a storage modulus curve in the plateau region was observed only in the PP/PA6 blends with talc, SEBS-g-MAH, and TAIC; the storage modulus increased with increasing electron beam irradiation dose, indicating that the three-dimensional network developed gradually in the more amorphous PA6. As a result, the most significant improvement observed in heat distortion tests under high load (1.8 MPa) occurred at 200 kGy.

  14. Melatonin Alters the Mechanical and Thermal Hyperalgesia Induced by Orofacial Pain Model in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; de Oliveira, Carla; Adachi, Lauren Naomi Spezia; de Macedo, Isabel Cristina; Cioato, Stefania Giotti; de Freitas, Joice S; de Souza, Andressa; Quevedo, Alexandre; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci Lucena da Silva

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is a neuroendocrine hormone that presents a wide range of physiological functions including regulating circadian rhythms and sleep, enhancing immune function, sleep improvement, and antioxidant effects. In addition, melatonin has received special attention in pain treatment since it is effective and presents few adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effect of acute dose of melatonin upon hyperalgesia induced by complete Freund's adjuvant in a chronic orofacial pain model in Sprague-Dawley rats. Nociceptive behavior was assessed by facial Von Frey and the hot plate tests at baseline and thereafter 30, 60, and 120 min, 24 h, and 7 days after melatonin treatment. We demonstrated that acute melatonin administration alters mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by an orofacial pain model (TMD), highlighting that the melatonin effect upon mechanical hyperalgesia remained until 7 days after its administration. Besides, we observed specific tissue profiles of neuroimmunomodulators linked to pain conditions and/or melatonin effect (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and interleukins 6 and 10) in the brainstem levels, and its effects were state-dependent of the baseline of these animals.

  15. Thermal, mechanical and fluid flow aspects of the high power beam dump for FRIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avilov, Mikhail; Aaron, Adam; Amroussia, Aida; Bergez, Wladimir; Boehlert, Carl; Burgess, Thomas; Carroll, Adam; Colin, Catherine; Durantel, Florent; Ferrante, Paride; Fourmeau, Tiffany; Graves, Van; Grygiel, Clara; Kramer, Jacob; Mittig, Wolfgang; Monnet, Isabelle; Patel, Harsh; Pellemoine, Frederique; Ronningen, Reginald; Schein, Mike

    2016-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) under construction at Michigan State University is based on a 400 kW heavy ion accelerator and uses in-flight production and separation to generate rare isotope beams. The first section of the fragment separator houses the rare isotope production target, and the primary beam dump to stop the unreacted primary beam. The experimental program will use 400 kW ion beams from 16O to 238U. After interaction with the production target, over 300 kW in remaining beam power must be absorbed by the beam dump. A rotating water-cooled thin-shell metal drum was chosen as the basic concept for the beam dump. Extensive thermal, mechanical and fluid flow analyses were performed to evaluate the effects of the high power density in the beam dump shell and in the water. Many properties were optimized simultaneously, such as shell temperature, mechanical strength, fatigue strength, and radiation resistance. Results of the analyses of the beam dump performance with different design options will be discussed. For example, it was found that a design modification to the initial water flow pattern resulted in a substantial increase in the wall heat transfer coefficient. A detailed evaluation of materials for the shell is in progress. The widely used titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V (wt%), is presently considered as the best candidate, and is the subject of specific tests, such as studies of performance under heavy ion irradiation.

  16. Mechanical and Thermal Properties and Morphology of Thermoplastic Polyurethane (TPU/Clay Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pizzatto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU composites were prepared with different nanoclay contents (1, 3 and 10 wt%. The nanoclay Cloisite ®30B (C30B was dispersed in the TPU matrix by melt processing using a twin-screw extruder. The synthesis method of TPU involved the two-step bulk polymerization of polyesterpolyol and 4,4’ diphenylmethanediisocyanate with butane-1,4-diol as the chain extender. The dispersion of the nanoclay particles and its effect on the mechanical and thermal properties of the composites was investigated. The characterization of TPU/nanoclay composites was carried out by means of scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion microanalysis and X ray diffraction. The mechanical characterization was performed through determination of the tensile strength. The TPU 3 wt% composite showed the best improvement with increases in stress and tensile at break (28% and 35%, respectively, compared to the neat TPU (sample without nanoclay. The differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry analyses for composites indicated that the nanoclay did not affect significantly the glass transition, melt, and degradation temperatures of the polymeric matrix, but reduces the molecular mobility.

  17. Mechanisms of thermal induced gallium removal (TIGR) from plutonium dioxide. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeMuth, S.F.

    1998-08-07

    This study was initiated in order to determine the advantages of using a mixed-bed rather than a fixed-bed reactor (i.e. furnace) for separation of gallium from PuO{sub 2} by the Thermal Induced Gallium Removal (TIGR) process. The TIGR process is based upon vaporization of gallium suboxide (Ga{sub 2}O). from essentially nonvolatile PuO{sub 2}. The gallium suboxide is formed by passing a reducing gas (i.e. hydrogen) over the PuO{sub 2} particles. Several mechanisms are involved in the reduction and convective vaporization of the gallium suboxide. If the mass transfer of the gallium suboxide across the solid to gas interface significantly affects the processing time, it may be advantageous to use a mixed-bed reactor rather than a fixed-bed reactor. However, due to the difficulty of handling PuO{sub 2} powder, a mixed-bed reactor should be used only if significant advantages can be demonstrated. Based on available data, the results of this study provide strong evidence that a mixed-bed reactor (i.e. furnace) would provide little advantage over a fixed-bed reactor. This is due to the conclusion that the mechanism of internal gallium diffusion within the particle has the predominant affect on the processing time. This is an important conclusion since the use of a mixed-bed would require development of more complex hardware than for a fixed-bed.

  18. A LiBr-H2O Absorption Refrigerator Incorporating a Thermally Activated Solution Pumping Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian W. Eames

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an illustrated description of a proposed LiBr-H2O vapour absorption refrigerator which uses a thermally activated solution pumping mechanism that combines controlled variations in generator vapour pressure with changes it produces in static-head pressure difference to circulate the absorbent solution between the generator and absorber vessels. The proposed system is different and potentially more efficient than a bubble pump system previously proposed and avoids the need for an electrically powered circulation pump found in most conventional LiBr absorption refrigerators. The paper goes on to provide a sample set of calculations that show that the coefficient of performance values of the proposed cycle are similar to those found for conventional cycles. The theoretical results compare favourably with some preliminary experimental results, which are also presented for the first time in this paper. The paper ends by proposing an outline design for an innovative steam valve, which is a key component needed to control the solution pumping mechanism.

  19. Thermal, mechanical and fluid flow aspects of the high power beam dump for FRIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avilov, Mikhail [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Aaron, Adam [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Amroussia, Aida [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Bergez, Wladimir [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Toulouse University, CNRS, Allée Camille Soula, 31400 Toulouse (France); Boehlert, Carl [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Burgess, Thomas; Carroll, Adam [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Colin, Catherine [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Toulouse University, CNRS, Allée Camille Soula, 31400 Toulouse (France); Durantel, Florent [Centre des recherches sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CIMAP) CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN, BP 5133, 14070 CAEN CEDEX 5 (France); Ferrante, Paride; Fourmeau, Tiffany [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Graves, Van [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Grygiel, Clara [Centre des recherches sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CIMAP) CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN, BP 5133, 14070 CAEN CEDEX 5 (France); Kramer, Jacob [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Mittig, Wolfgang [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Monnet, Isabelle [Centre des recherches sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CIMAP) CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-UCN, BP 5133, 14070 CAEN CEDEX 5 (France); Patel, Harsh [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); and others

    2016-06-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) under construction at Michigan State University is based on a 400 kW heavy ion accelerator and uses in-flight production and separation to generate rare isotope beams. The first section of the fragment separator houses the rare isotope production target, and the primary beam dump to stop the unreacted primary beam. The experimental program will use 400 kW ion beams from {sup 16}O to {sup 238}U. After interaction with the production target, over 300 kW in remaining beam power must be absorbed by the beam dump. A rotating water-cooled thin-shell metal drum was chosen as the basic concept for the beam dump. Extensive thermal, mechanical and fluid flow analyses were performed to evaluate the effects of the high power density in the beam dump shell and in the water. Many properties were optimized simultaneously, such as shell temperature, mechanical strength, fatigue strength, and radiation resistance. Results of the analyses of the beam dump performance with different design options will be discussed. For example, it was found that a design modification to the initial water flow pattern resulted in a substantial increase in the wall heat transfer coefficient. A detailed evaluation of materials for the shell is in progress. The widely used titanium alloy, Ti–6Al–4V (wt%), is presently considered as the best candidate, and is the subject of specific tests, such as studies of performance under heavy ion irradiation.

  20. Electrospun PHBV/PEO co-solution blends: microstructure, thermal and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Alessandra; Calderone, Manuela; Cacciotti, Ilaria

    2013-04-01

    Blending allows to tailor and modulate the properties of selected polymers. Blends of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) were fabricated by electrospinning in different weight ratios i.e. 100:0, 80:20, 70:30, 50:50, 0:100. In order to evaluate the influence of PEO addition on the final properties of PHBV, a complete microstructural, thermal and mechanical characterization of PHBV/PEO blends has been performed. The two neat polymeric membranes were also considered for the sake of comparison. The following characterization techniques were employed: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential analyses (TG-DTA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and uniaxial tensile tests. All electrospun mats consisted of randomly oriented and uniform fibers. It has been observed that the microstructure of PHBV/PEO was remarkably affected by blend composition. The average fiber size ranged between 0.5 μm and 2.6 μm. It resulted that the electrospun polymeric blends consisted of separate crystalline domains associated to an amorphous interdisperse phase. PHBV/PEO blends presented intermediate mechanical properties, in terms of tensile modulus and ultimate tensile stress, with respect to the two neat components. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.