WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal mechanical noise

  1. Thermal and Quantum Mechanical Noise of a Superfluid Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Talso; Penanen, Konstantin

    2004-01-01

    A potential application of a superfluid gyroscope is for real-time measurements of the small variations in the rotational speed of the Earth, the Moon, and Mars. Such rotational jitter, if not measured and corrected for, will be a limiting factor on the resolution potential of a GPS system. This limitation will prevent many automation concepts in navigation, construction, and biomedical examination from being realized. We present the calculation of thermal and quantum-mechanical phase noise across the Josephson junction of a superfluid gyroscope. This allows us to derive the fundamental limits on the performance of a superfluid gyroscope. We show that the fundamental limit on real-time GPS due to rotational jitter can be reduced to well below 1 millimeter/day. Other limitations and their potential mitigation will also be discussed.

  2. Case study. Health hazards of automotive repair mechanics: thermal and lighting comfort, particulate matter and noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupa, G

    2013-01-01

    An indoor environmental quality survey was conducted in a small private automotive repair shop during May 2009 (hot season) and February 2010 (cold season). It was established that the detached building, which is naturally ventilated and lit, had all the advantages of the temperate local climate. It provided a satisfactory microclimatic working environment, concerning the thermal and the lighting comfort, without excessive energy consumption for air-conditioning or lighting. Indoor number concentrations of particulate matter (PM) were monitored during both seasons. Their size distributions were strongly affected by the indoor activities and the air exchange rate of the building. During working hours, the average indoor/outdoor (I/O) number concentration ratio was 31 for PM0.3-1 in the hot season and 69 for the cold season. However I/O PM1-10 number concentration ratios were similar, 33 and 32 respectively, between the two seasons. The estimated indoor mass concentration of PM10 for the two seasons was on average 0.68 mg m(-3) and 1.19 mg m(-3), i.e., 22 and 36 times higher than outdoors, during the hot and the cold seasons, respectively. This is indicative that indoor air pollution may adversely affect mechanics' health. Noise levels were highly variable and the average LEX, 8 h of 69.3 dB(A) was below the European Union exposure limit value 87db (A). Noise originated from the use of manual hammers, the revving up of engines, and the closing of car doors or hoods. Octave band analysis indicated that the prevailing noise frequencies were in the area of the maximum ear sensitivity.

  3. Thermal background noise limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  4. Thermal noise engines

    OpenAIRE

    Kish, Laszlo B.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical heat engines driven by the Johnson-Nyquist noise of resistors are introduced. They utilize Coulomb's law and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem of statistical physics that is the reverse phenomenon of heat dissipation in a resistor. No steams, gases, liquids, photons, combustion, phase transition, or exhaust/pollution are present here. In these engines, instead of heat reservoirs, cylinders, pistons and valves, resistors, capacitors and switches are the building elements. For the ...

  5. External noise distinguishes attention mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z L; Dosher, B A

    1998-05-01

    We developed and tested a powerful method for identifying and characterizing the effect of attention on performance in visual tasks as due to signal enhancement, distractor exclusion, or internal noise suppression. Based on a noisy Perceptual Template Model (PTM) of a human observer, the method adds increasing amounts of external noise (white gaussian random noise) to the visual stimulus and observes the effect on performance of a perceptual task for attended and unattended stimuli. The three mechanisms of attention yield three "signature" patterns of performance. The general framework for characterizing the mechanisms of attention is used here to investigate the attentional mechanisms in a concurrent location-cued orientation discrimination task. Test stimuli--Gabor patches tilted slightly to the right or left--always appeared on both the left and the right of fixation, and varied independently. Observers were cued on each trial to attend to the left, the right, or evenly to both stimuli, and decide the direction of tilt of both test stimuli. For eight levels of added external noise and three attention conditions (attended, unattended, and equal), subjects' contrast threshold levels were determined. At low levels of external noise, attention affected threshold contrast: threshold contrasts for non-attended stimuli were systematically higher than for equal attention stimuli, which were, in turn, higher than for attended stimuli. Specifically, when the rms contrast of the external noise is below 10%, there is a consistent 17% elevation of contrast threshold from attended to unattended condition across all three subjects. For higher levels of external noise, attention conditions did not affect threshold contrast values at all. These strong results are characteristic of a signal enhancement, or equivalently, an internal additive noise reduction mechanism of attention.

  6. Manipulating the Flow of Thermal Noise in Quantum Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzanjeh, Shabir; Aquilina, Matteo; Xuereb, André

    2018-02-01

    There has been significant interest recently in using complex quantum systems to create effective nonreciprocal dynamics. Proposals have been put forward for the realization of artificial magnetic fields for photons and phonons; experimental progress is fast making these proposals a reality. Much work has concentrated on the use of such systems for controlling the flow of signals, e.g., to create isolators or directional amplifiers for optical signals. In this Letter, we build on this work but move in a different direction. We develop the theory of and discuss a potential realization for the controllable flow of thermal noise in quantum systems. We demonstrate theoretically that the unidirectional flow of thermal noise is possible within quantum cascaded systems. Viewing an optomechanical platform as a cascaded system we show here that one can ultimately control the direction of the flow of thermal noise. By appropriately engineering the mechanical resonator, which acts as an artificial reservoir, the flow of thermal noise can be constrained to a desired direction, yielding a thermal rectifier. The proposed quantum thermal noise rectifier could potentially be used to develop devices such as a thermal modulator, a thermal router, and a thermal amplifier for nanoelectronic devices and superconducting circuits.

  7. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  8. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than ∼2 x 10 -13 cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors

  9. Thermal noise from optical coatings in gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Gregory M; Armandula, Helena; Black, Eric; Crooks, D R M; Cagnoli, Gianpietro; Hough, Jim; Murray, Peter; Reid, Stuart; Rowan, Sheila; Sneddon, Peter; Fejer, Martin M; Route, Roger; Penn, Steven D

    2006-03-01

    Gravitational waves are a prediction of Einstein's general theory of relativity. These waves are created by massive objects, like neutron stars or black holes, oscillating at speeds appreciable to the speed of light. The detectable effect on the Earth of these waves is extremely small, however, creating strains of the order of 10(-21). There are a number of basic physics experiments around the world designed to detect these waves by using interferometers with very long arms, up to 4 km in length. The next-generation interferometers are currently being designed, and the thermal noise in the mirrors will set the sensitivity over much of the usable bandwidth. Thermal noise arising from mechanical loss in the optical coatings put on the mirrors will be a significant source of noise. Achieving higher sensitivity through lower mechanical loss coatings, while preserving the crucial optical and thermal properties, is an area of active research right now.

  10. Possible mechanism of solar noise storm generation in meter wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genkin, L.G.; Erukhimov, L.M.; Levin, B.N.

    1989-01-01

    Fluctuation plasma mechanism of noise storm generation is proposed. The sporadic formation of density irregularities in plasma (Langmuir) turbulence region is shown to be the result of thermal stratification of plasma. The noise storm type 1 bursts in their typical parameters are like radio emission due to plasma turbulence conversion on this structures

  11. Study of the thermal noise caused by inhomogeneously distributed loss

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, K; Ando, M; Kawabe, K; Tsubono, K

    2002-01-01

    The normal modal expansion is the most frequently used method to estimate the thermal noise of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. However, the method does not agree with new estimation methods, direct approaches, when the loss is distributed inhomogeneously. We have checked the modal expansion and direct approaches experimentally using a mechanical oscillator, such as a mirror. The experiments showed that the modal expansion is invalid. On the other hand, the measured spectra are consistent with the direct approaches. We calculated the thermal noise of a real mirror with inhomogeneous loss using the direct approaches. This calculation showed that the thermal motions caused by loss in the reflective coating and at coil-magnet actuators are comparable with the sensitivity goals of future gravitational wave detector projects. In addition, according to our calculation, a mechanical loss may cause much larger or much smaller thermal motion than is expected in modal expansion, depending on the loss distr...

  12. Thermal voltage noise in layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkenazy, V.D.; Jung, G.; Shapiro, B.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal voltage noise in the mixed state of type-II superconductors has been calculated taking into account fluctuation modes of nonrigid vortices. It has been shown that bending of vortices leads to new effects in thermal-voltage-noise spectra at high frequencies. The power spectrum reflecting fluctuations of rigid vortices is suppressed at very low frequencies and saturates into a white spectrum at a characteristic frequency depending on the strip width. At high frequencies tilt modes of flexible vortices start to contribute to the fluctuating voltages and the power spectrum undergoes three subsequent magnitude increases, following ω 1/2 -, ω 2 -, and again ω 1/2 -like behavior before becoming white again. It has been shown that for layered superconductors of a moderate anisotropy the second ω 1/2 -like increase disappears at magnetic fields exceeding a certain threshold field corresponding to the crossover field between two-dimensional and three-dimensional vortex-lattice melting. Field dependencies of characteristic frequencies separating different regimes of spectral behavior have been evaluated and shown to be qualitatively different for low and high magnetic fields

  13. Wideband Low Noise Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Cancellation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2005-01-01

    Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) are commonly used to amplify signals that are too weak for direct processing for example in radio or cable receivers. Traditionally, low noise amplifiers are implemented via tuned amplifiers, exploiting inductors and capacitors in resonating LC-circuits. This can render

  14. Thermal Noise Canceling in LNAs : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Bram; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, Frederico

    2004-01-01

    Most wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the

  15. Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Canceling: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, F.; Stroet, P.M.; Stroet, Peter; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    Wide-band LNAs suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the technique and

  16. General mechanism for the 1 /f noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Avinash Chand; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna; Dhar, Deepak

    2017-08-01

    We consider the response of a memoryless nonlinear device that acts instantaneously, converting an input signal ξ (t ) into an output η (t ) at the same time t . For input Gaussian noise with power-spectrum 1 /fα , the nonlinearity can modify the spectral index of the output to give a spectrum that varies as 1 /fα ' with α'≠α . We show that the value of α' depends on the nonlinear transformation and can be tuned continuously. This provides a general mechanism for the ubiquitous 1 /f noise found in nature.

  17. Extra phase noise from thermal fluctuations in nonlinear optical crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    César, J. E. S.; Coelho, A.S.; Cassemiro, K.N.

    2009-01-01

    We show theoretically and experimentally that scattered light by thermal phonons inside a second-order nonlinear crystal is the source of additional phase noise observed in optical parametric oscillators. This additional phase noise reduces the quantum correlations and has hitherto hindered the d...

  18. Thermal noise reduction for present and future gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amico, P.; Bosi, L.; Gammaitoni, L.; Losurdo, G.; Marchesoni, F.; Mazzoni, M.; Punturo, M. E-mail: michele.punturo@pg.infn.it; Stanga, R.; Toncelli, A.; Tonelli, M.; Travasso, F.; Vetrano, F.; Vocca, H

    2004-02-01

    Thermal noise in mirror suspension is and will be the most severe fundamental limit to the low-frequency sensitivity of interferometric gravitational wave detectors currently under construction. The technical solutions, adopted in the Virgo detector, optimize the current suspension scheme, but new materials and new designs are needed to further reduce the suspension thermal noise. Silicon fibers are promising candidates both for room temperature advanced detectors and for future cryogenic interferometric detectors.

  19. Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Canceling: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, Federico; Stroet, Peter; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    Wide-band LNAs suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the technique and its key properties. Although the technique has been applied to wideband CMOS LNAs, it can just as well be implemented exploiting transconductance elements realized with oth...

  20. Thermal Noise Canceling in LNAs: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, Bram; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Bruccoleri, Frederico

    2004-01-01

    Most wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise figure NF and source impedance matching, which limits NF to values typically above 3dB. Recently, a feed-forward noise canceling technique has been proposed to break this trade-off. This paper reviews the principle of the technique and its key properties. Although the technique has been applied to wideband CMOS LNAs, it can just as well be implemented exploiting transconductance elements realized with other types of t...

  1. Period doubling induced by thermal noise amplification in genetic circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ruocco, G.

    2014-11-18

    Rhythms of life are dictated by oscillations, which take place in a wide rage of biological scales. In bacteria, for example, oscillations have been proven to control many fundamental processes, ranging from gene expression to cell divisions. In genetic circuits, oscillations originate from elemental block such as autorepressors and toggle switches, which produce robust and noise-free cycles with well defined frequency. In some circumstances, the oscillation period of biological functions may double, thus generating bistable behaviors whose ultimate origin is at the basis of intense investigations. Motivated by brain studies, we here study an “elemental” genetic circuit, where a simple nonlinear process interacts with a noisy environment. In the proposed system, nonlinearity naturally arises from the mechanism of cooperative stability, which regulates the concentration of a protein produced during a transcription process. In this elemental model, bistability results from the coherent amplification of environmental fluctuations due to a stochastic resonance of nonlinear origin. This suggests that the period doubling observed in many biological functions might result from the intrinsic interplay between nonlinearity and thermal noise.

  2. Johnson noise and the thermal Casimir effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bimonte, Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    We study the thermal interaction between two nearby thin metallic wires, at finite temperature. It is shown that the Johnson currents in the wires give rise, via inductive coupling, to a repulsive force between them. This thermal interaction exhibits all the puzzling features found recently in the thermal Casimir effect for lossy metallic plates, suggesting that the physical origin of the difficulties encountered in the Casimir problem resides in the inductive coupling between the Johnson currents inside the plates. We show that in our simple model all puzzles are resolved if account is taken of capacitive effects associated with the end points of the wires. Our findings suggest that capacitive finite-size effects may play an important role in the resolution of the analogous problems met in the thermal Casimir effect

  3. On the thermal noise limit of cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, Gy; Szasz, N; Szasz, A

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of thermal noise limits and the effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LFEMF) on the cellular membrane have important implications for the study of bioelectro-magnetism in this regime. Over a decade ago, Weaver and Astumian developed a model to show that thermal noise can limit the efficacy of LFEMF. A recent report by Kaune [Kaune (2002) Bioelectromagnetics 23:622-628], however, contradicted their findings. Kaune assumes that the conductance noise current of cell membrane can be decomposed into two components, where one of them is identical regarding all segments (coherent), while the other is different (incoherent). Besides, this decomposition is not unequivocal and contradicts to the statistical independence of the segment noise currents, and therefore to the second law of thermodynamics as well. We suggest the procedure based on the method of symmetrical components, by the means of which we can re-interpret the result of Kaune in a correct way. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Operation of transition-edge sensors with excess thermal noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maasilta, I J; Kinnunen, K M; Nuottajaervi, A K; Leppaeniemi, J; Luukanen, A

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) is currently one of the most attractive choices for ultra-high resolution calorimetry in the keV x-ray band, and is being considered for future ESA and NASA missions. We have performed a study on the noise characteristics of Au/Ti bilayer TESs, at operating temperatures around ∼100 mK, with the SQUID readout at 1.5 K. Experimental results indicate that without modifications the back-action noise from the SQUID chip degrades the noise characteristics significantly. We present a simple and effective solution to the problem: by installing an extra shunt resistor which absorbs the excess radiation from the SQUID input, we have reduced the excess thermal (photon) noise power down by approximately a factor of five, allowing high resolution operation of the sensors

  5. Thermal mixtures in stochastic mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, F [Rome Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Matematica; Loffredo, M I [Salerno Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica

    1981-01-17

    Stochastic mechanics is extended to systems in thermal equilibrium. The resulting stochastic processes are mixtures of Nelson processes. Their Markov property is investigated in some simple cases. It is found that in order to inforce Markov property the algebra of observable associated to the present must be suitably enlarged.

  6. Active noise canceling system for mechanically cooled germanium radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl Einar; Burks, Morgan T

    2014-04-22

    A microphonics noise cancellation system and method for improving the energy resolution for mechanically cooled high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector systems. A classical adaptive noise canceling digital processing system using an adaptive predictor is used in an MCA to attenuate the microphonics noise source making the system more deployable.

  7. Thermal noise in mid-infrared broadband upconversion detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barh, Ajanta; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Low noise detection with state-of-the-art mid-infrared (MIR) detectors (e.g., PbS, PbSe, InSb, HgCdTe) is a primary challenge owing to the intrinsic thermal background radiation of the low bandgap detector material itself. However, researchers have employed frequency upconversion based detectors...... of the noise-equivalent power of an UCD system. In this article, we rigorously analyze the optical power generated by frequency upconversion of the intrinsic black-body radiation in the nonlinear material itself due to the crystals residual emissivity, i.e. absorption. The thermal radiation is particularly...... prominent at the optical absorption edge of the nonlinear material even at room temperature. We consider a conventional periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) based MIR-UCD for the investigation. The UCD is designed to cover a broad spectral range, overlapping with the entire absorption edge of the PPLN...

  8. Suspension-thermal noise in spring–antispring systems for future gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Jan; Mow-Lowry, Conor M.

    2018-01-01

    Spring–antispring systems have been investigated in the context of low-frequency seismic isolation in high-precision optical experiments. These systems provide the possibility to tune the fundamental resonance frequency to, in principle, arbitrarily low values, and at the same time maintain a compact design. It was argued though that thermal noise in spring–antispring systems would not be as small as one may naively expect from lowering the fundamental resonance frequency. In this paper, we present calculations of suspension-thermal noise for spring–antispring systems potentially relevant in future gravitational-wave detectors, i.e. the beam-balance tiltmeter, and the Roberts linkage. We find a concise expression of the suspension-thermal noise spectrum, which assumes a form very similar to the well-known expression for a simple pendulum. For systems such as the Roberts linkage foreseen as passive seismic isolation, we find that while they can provide strong seismic isolation due to a very low fundamental resonance frequency, their thermal noise is determined by the dimension of the system and is insensitive to fine-tunings of the geometry that can strongly influence the resonance frequency. By analogy, i.e. formal similarity of the equations of motion, this is true for all horizontal mechanical isolation systems with spring–antispring dynamics. This imposes strict requirements on mechanical spring–antispring systems for seismic isolation in potential future low-frequency gravitational-wave detectors as we discuss for the four main concepts, atom-interferometric, superconducting, torsion-bars, and conventional laser interferometer, and generally suggests that thermal noise needs to be evaluated carefully for high-precision experiments implementing spring–antispring dynamics.

  9. Suppression of thermal noise in a non-Markovian random velocity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We study the diffusion of Brownian particles in a Gaussian random velocity field with short memory. By extending the derivation of an effective Fokker–Planck equation for the Lanvegin equation with weakly colored noise to a random velocity-field problem, we find that the effect of thermal noise on particles is suppressed by the existence of memory. We also find that the renormalization effect for the relative diffusion of two particles is stronger than that for single-particle diffusion. The results are compared with those of molecular dynamics simulations. (paper: classical statistical mechanics, equilibrium and non-equilibrium)

  10. Probing quantum and thermal noise in an interacting many-body system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofferberth, S.; Lesanovsky, Igor; Schumm, Thorsten

    2008-01-01

    of the shot-to-shot variations of interference-fringe contrast for pairs of independently created one-dimensional Bose condensates. Analysing different system sizes, we observe the crossover from thermal to quantum noise, reflected in a characteristic change in the distribution functions from poissonian......The probabilistic character of the measurement process is one of the most puzzling and fascinating aspects of quantum mechanics. In many-body systems quantum-mechanical noise reveals non-local correlations of the underlying many-body states. Here, we provide a complete experimental analysis....... Furthermore, our experiments constitute the first analysis of the full distribution of quantum noise in an interacting many-body system....

  11. Methods and tools to detect thermal noise in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, M.; Giovannini, R.

    1985-07-01

    The Specialists' Meeting on ''Methods and Tools to Detect Thermal Noise in Fast Reactors'' was held in Bologna on 8-10 October 1984. The meeting was hosted by the ENEA and was sponsored by the IAEA on the recommendation of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors. 17 participants attended the meeting from France, the Federal Republic of Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, Joint Research Centre of CEC and from IAEA. The meeting was presided over by Prof. Mario Motta of Italy. The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss methods and tools for temperature noise detection and related analysis as a potential means for detecting local blockages in fuel and blanket subassemblies and other faults in LMFBR. The meeting was divided into four technical sessions as follows: 1. National review presentations on application purposes and research activities for thermal noise detection. (5 papers); 2. Detection instruments and electronic equipment for temperature measurements in fast reactors. (5 papers); 3. Physical models. (2 papers); 4. Signal processing techniques. (3 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  12. Cortical Mechanisms of Speech Perception in Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Patrick C. M.; Uppunda, Ajith K.; Parrish, Todd B.; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The present study examines the brain basis of listening to spoken words in noise, which is a ubiquitous characteristic of communication, with the focus on the dorsal auditory pathway. Method: English-speaking young adults identified single words in 3 listening conditions while their hemodynamic response was measured using fMRI: speech in…

  13. High Resolution Viscosity Measurement by Thermal Noise Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Aguilar Sandoval

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An interferometric method is implemented in order to accurately assess the thermal fluctuations of a micro-cantilever sensor in liquid environments. The power spectrum density (PSD of thermal fluctuations together with Sader’s model of the cantilever allow for the indirect measurement of the liquid viscosity with good accuracy. The good quality of the deflection signal and the characteristic low noise of the instrument allow for the detection and corrections of drawbacks due to both the cantilever shape irregularities and the uncertainties on the position of the laser spot at the fluctuating end of the cantilever. Variation of viscosity below 0.03 mPa·s was detected with the alternative to achieve measurements with a volume as low as 50 µL.

  14. Noise Characterization and Performance of MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sriharsha; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Wu, Aisheng; Wenny, Brian; Chiang, Kwofu; Chen, Na; Wang, Zhipeng; Li, Yonghong

    2016-01-01

    The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is a premier Earth-observing sensor of the early 21st century, flying onboard the Terra (T) and Aqua (A) spacecraft. Both instruments far exceeded their six-year design life and continue to operate satisfactorily for more than 15 and 13 years, respectively. The MODIS instrument is designed to make observations at nearly a 100% duty cycle covering the entire Earth in less than two days. The MODIS sensor characteristics include a spectral coverage from 0.41micrometers to 14.4 micrometers, of which those wavelengths ranging from 3.7 micrometers to 14.4 micrometers cover the thermal infrared region which is interspaced in 16 thermal emissive bands (TEBs). Each of the TEB contains ten detectors which record samples at a spatial resolution of 1 km. In order to ensure a high level of accuracy for the TEB-measured top-of-atmosphere radiances, an onboard blackbody (BB) is used as the calibration source. This paper reports the noise characterization and performance of the TEB on various counts. First, the stability of the onboard BB is evaluated to understand the effectiveness of the calibration source. Next, key noise metrics such as the noise equivalent temperature difference and the noise equivalent dn difference (NEdN) for the various TEBs are determined from multiple temperature sources. These sources include the nominally controlled BB temperature of 290 K for T-MODIS and 285 K for A-MODIS, as well as a BB warm up-cool down cycle that is performed over a temperature range from roughly 270 to 315 K. The space-view port that measures the background signal serves as a viable cold temperature source for measuring noise. In addition, a well characterized Earth-view target, the Dome Concordia site located in the Antarctic plateau, is used for characterizing the stability of the sensor, indirectly providing a measure of the NEdN. Based on this rigorous characterization, a list of the noisy and inoperable detectors for

  15. Quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy: The art and the practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Vernet, N.; Issautier, K.; Moncuquet, M.

    2017-08-01

    Quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy is an efficient tool for measuring in situ macroscopic plasma properties in space, using a passive wave receiver at the ports of an electric antenna. This technique was pioneered on spinning spacecraft carrying very long dipole antennas in the interplanetary medium—like ISEE-3 and Ulysses—whose geometry approached a "theoretician's dream." The technique has been extended to other instruments in various types of plasmas on board different spacecraft and will be implemented on several missions in the near future. Such extensions require different theoretical modelizations, involving magnetized, drifting, or dusty plasmas with various particle velocity distributions and antennas being shorter, biased, or made of unequal wires. We give new analytical approximations of the plasma quasi-thermal noise (QTN) and study how the constraints of the real world in space can (or cannot) be compatible with plasma detection by QTN spectroscopy. We consider applications to the missions Wind, Cassini, BepiColombo, Solar Orbiter, and Parker Solar Probe.

  16. Effect of thermal-treatment sequence on sound absorbing and mechanical properties of porous sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chen-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to recent rapid commercial and industrial development, mechanical equipment is supplemented massively in the factory and thus mechanical operation causes noise which distresses living at home. In livelihood, neighborhood, transportation equipment, jobsite construction noises impact on quality of life not only factory noise. This study aims to preparation technique and property evaluation of porous sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites. Hollow three-dimensional crimp PET fibers blended with low-melting PET fibers were fabricated into hollow PET/low-melting PET nonwoven after opening, blending, carding, lapping and needle-bonding process. Then, hollow PET/low-melting PET nonwovens were laminated into sound-absorbing/thermal-insulating composites by changing sequence of needle-bonding and thermal-treatment. The optimal thermal-treated sequence was found by tensile strength, tearing strength, sound-absorbing coefficient and thermal conductivity coefficient tests of porous composites.

  17. Quantum noise of a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer with a translucent mechanical oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Friedrich, Daniel; Westphal, Tobias; Gossler, Stefan; Danzmann, Karsten; Schnabel, Roman; Somiya, Kentaro; Danilishin, Stefan L.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations in the radiation pressure of light can excite stochastic motions of mechanical oscillators thereby realizing a linear quantum opto-mechanical coupling. When performing a precise measurement of the position of an oscillator, this coupling results in quantum radiation pressure noise. Up to now this effect has not been observed yet. Generally speaking, the strength of radiation pressure noise increases when the effective mass of the oscillator is decreased or when the power of the reflected light is increased. Recently, extremely light SiN membranes (≅100 ng) with high mechanical Q values at room temperature (≥10 6 ) have attracted attention as low thermal noise mechanical oscillators. However, the power reflectance of these membranes is much lower than unity (<0.4 at a wavelength of 1064 nm) which makes the use of advanced interferometer recycling techniques to amplify the radiation pressure noise in a standard Michelson interferometer inefficient. Here, we propose and theoretically analyze a Michelson-Sagnac interferometer that includes the membrane as a common end mirror for the Michelson interferometer part. In this topology, both power and signal recycling can be used even if the reflectance of the membrane is much lower than unity. In particular, signal recycling is a useful tool because it does not involve a power increase at the membrane. We derive the formulas for the quantum radiation pressure noise and the shot noise of an oscillator position measurement and compare them with theoretical models of the thermal noise of a SiN membrane with a fundamental resonant frequency of 75 kHz and an effective mass of125 ng. We find that quantum radiation pressure noise should be observable with a power of 1 W at the central beam splitter of the interferometer and a membrane temperature of 1 K.

  18. Overcoming thermal noise in non-volatile spin wave logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Nikonov, Dmitri; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian; Naeemi, Azad

    Spin waves are propagating disturbances in magnetically ordered materials. To compete as a promising candidate for beyond-CMOS application, the all-magnon based computing system must undergo the essential steps of careful selection of materials and demonstrate robustness with respect to thermal noise/variability. Here, we identify suitable materials and investigate two viable options for translating the theoretical idea of phase-dependent switching of the spin wave detector to a practical realization of a thermally reliable magnonic device by - (a) using the built-in strain in the ME cell, arising from the lattice mismatch and/or thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the film and the substrate, for compensation of the demagnetization, and (b) using an exchange-spring structure that exhibits a strong exchange-coupling between the ME cell and PMA SWB and provides a modification of the energy landscape of the ME cell magnet. A high switching success and error-free logic functionality can be ensured if the amplitude of the detected spin wave () remains higher than a threshold value of around 6°C and the detected phase falls within the window from 280°C through 0 to 20°C or from 100°C to 200°C with a maximum allowable ϕ range of around 100°C.

  19. Training to Improve Hearing Speech in Noise: Biological Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Judy H.; Skoe, Erika; Banai, Karen

    2012-01-01

    We investigated training-related improvements in listening in noise and the biological mechanisms mediating these improvements. Training-related malleability was examined using a program that incorporates cognitively based listening exercises to improve speech-in-noise perception. Before and after training, auditory brainstem responses to a speech syllable were recorded in quiet and multitalker noise from adults who ranged in their speech-in-noise perceptual ability. Controls did not undergo training but were tested at intervals equivalent to the trained subjects. Trained subjects exhibited significant improvements in speech-in-noise perception that were retained 6 months later. Subcortical responses in noise demonstrated training-related enhancements in the encoding of pitch-related cues (the fundamental frequency and the second harmonic), particularly for the time-varying portion of the syllable that is most vulnerable to perceptual disruption (the formant transition region). Subjects with the largest strength of pitch encoding at pretest showed the greatest perceptual improvement. Controls exhibited neither neurophysiological nor perceptual changes. We provide the first demonstration that short-term training can improve the neural representation of cues important for speech-in-noise perception. These results implicate and delineate biological mechanisms contributing to learning success, and they provide a conceptual advance to our understanding of the kind of training experiences that can influence sensory processing in adulthood. PMID:21799207

  20. Soft Thermal Sensor with Mechanical Adaptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Qi, Dianpeng; Liu, Zhiyuan; Chandran, Bevita K; Wang, Ting; Yu, Jiancan; Chen, Xiaodong

    2016-11-01

    A soft thermal sensor with mechanical adaptability is fabricated by the combination of single-wall carbon nanotubes with carboxyl groups and self-healing polymers. This study demonstrates that this soft sensor has excellent thermal response and mechanical adaptability. It shows tremendous promise for improving the service life of soft artificial-intelligence robots and protecting thermally sensitive electronics from the risk of damage by high temperature. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Chaos and thermal noise in the rf-biased Josephson junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kautz, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of thermal noise on chaotic behavior in the rf-biased Josephson junction is studied through digital simulations. In instances for which chaotic behavior occurs in the noise-free system, it is found that the dynamics of the system are almost unchanged by the addition of thermal noise unless the level of thermal noise exceeds that of the chaotic state. In instances for which the only stable states of the noise-free system are periodic solutions, small amounts of thermal noise can induce the junction to hop between two different dynamical states, producing a low-frequency noise level much higher than that of the thermal noise. Such noise-induced hopping can occur either between two periodic solutions or between a periodic solution and a metastable chaotic solution. When a metastable chaotic state is involved, temperatures somewhat higher than those which produce hopping can destablize the periodic solution to the point where the system spends virtually all of its time in the metastable chaotic state, creating noise-induced chaos. The similarities between chaotic behavior at zero temperature and noise-induced chaos are sufficiently strong that it may be difficult to distinguish the two cases experimentally

  2. Numerically modeling Brownian thermal noise in amorphous and crystalline thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey; Demos, Nicholas; Khan, Haroon

    2018-01-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be one of the noise sources limiting the astrophysical reach of Advanced LIGO (once commissioning is complete) and third-generation detectors. Adopting crystalline materials for thin, reflecting mirror coatings, rather than the amorphous coatings used in current-generation detectors, could potentially reduce thermal noise. Understanding and reducing thermal noise requires accurate theoretical models, but modeling thermal noise analytically is especially challenging with crystalline materials. Thermal noise models typically rely on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates the power spectral density of the thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. In this paper, we present results from a new, open-source tool that numerically solves the auxiliary elastic problem to compute the Brownian thermal noise for both amorphous and crystalline coatings. We employ the open-source deal.ii and PETSc frameworks to solve the auxiliary elastic problem using a finite-element method, adaptive mesh refinement, and parallel processing that enables us to use high resolutions capable of resolving the thin reflective coating. We verify numerical convergence, and by running on up to hundreds of compute cores, we resolve the coating elastic energy in the auxiliary problem to approximately 0.1%. We compare with approximate analytic solutions for amorphous materials, and we verify that our solutions scale as expected with changing beam size, mirror dimensions, and coating thickness. Finally, we model the crystalline coating thermal noise in an experiment reported by Cole et al (2013 Nat. Photon. 7 644–50), comparing our results to a simpler numerical calculation that treats the coating as an ‘effectively amorphous’ material. We find that treating the coating as a cubic crystal instead of as an effectively amorphous material increases the thermal noise by about 3%. Our results are a step toward better understanding and reducing thermal noise to

  3. Statistical mechanics of microscopically thin thermalized shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej

    Recent explosion in fabrication of microscopically thin free standing structures made from graphene and other two-dimensional materials has led to a renewed interest in the mechanics of such structures in presence of thermal fluctuations. Since late 1980s it has been known that for flat solid sheets thermal fluctuations effectively increase the bending rigidity and reduce the bulk and shear moduli in a scale-dependent fashion. However, much is still unknown about the mechanics of thermalized flat sheets of complex geometries and about the mechanics of thermalized shells with non-zero background curvature. In this talk I will present recent development in the mechanics of thermalized ribbons, spherical shells and cylindrical tubes. Long ribbons are found to behave like hybrids between flat sheets with renormalized elastic constants and semi-flexible polymers, and these results can be used to predict the mechanics of graphene kirigami structures. Contrary to the anticipated behavior for ribbons, the non-zero background curvature of shells leads to remarkable novel phenomena. In shells, thermal fluctuations effectively generate negative surface tension, which can significantly reduce the critical buckling pressure for spherical shells and the critical axial load for cylindrical tubes. For large shells this thermally generated load becomes big enough to spontaneously crush spherical shells and cylindrical tubes even in the absence of external loads. I will comment on the relevance for crushing of microscopic shells (viral capsids, bacteria, microcapsules) due to osmotic shocks and for crushing of nanotubes.

  4. Waste energy harvesting mechanical and thermal energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ling Bing, Kong; Hng, Huey Hoon; Boey, Freddy; Zhang, Tianshu

    2014-01-01

    Waste Energy Harvesting overviews the latest progress in waste energy harvesting technologies, with specific focusing on waste thermal mechanical energies. Thermal energy harvesting technologies include thermoelectric effect, storage through phase change materials and pyroelectric effect. Waste mechanical energy harvesting technologies include piezoelectric (ferroelectric) effect with ferroelectric materials and nanogenerators. The book aims to strengthen the syllabus in energy, materials and physics and is well suitable for students and professionals in the fields.

  5. Failure mechanism for thermal fatigue of thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giolli, C.; Scrivani, A.; Rizzi, G. [Turbocoating S.p.A., Rubbiano di Solignano (Italy); Borgioli, F. [Firenze Univ., Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Bolelli, G.; Lusvarghi, L. [Univ. di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2008-07-01

    High temperature thermal fatigue causes the failure of Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) systems. Due to the difference in thickness and microstructure between thick TBCs and traditional thin TBCs, they cannot be assumed a-priori to possess the same failure mechanisms. Thick TBCs, consisting of a CoNiCrAlY bond coat and Yttria Partially Stabilised Zirconia top coat with different values of porosity, were produced by Air Plasma Spray. Thermal fatigue resistance limit of TBCs was tested by Furnace Cycling Tests (FCT) according to the specifications of an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM). TBC systems were analyzed before and after FCT. The morphological and chemical evolution of CoNiCrAlY/TGO microstructure was studied. Sintering effect, residual stress, phase transformation and fracture toughness were evaluated in the ceramic Top Coat. All the tested samples passed FCT according to the specification of an important OEM. Thermal fatigue resistance increases with the amount of porosity in the top coat. The compressive in-plane stresses increase in the TBC systems after thermal cycling, nevertheless the increasing rate has a trend contrary to the porosity level of top coat. The data suggest that the spallation happens at the TGO/Top Coat interface. The failure mechanism of thick TBCs subjected to thermal fatigue was eventually found to be similar to the failure mechanism of thin TBC systems made by APS. (orig.)

  6. Wide-band CMOS low-noise amplifier exploiting thermal noise canceling

    OpenAIRE

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2004-01-01

    Known elementary wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental tradeoff between noise figure (NF) and source impedance matching, which limits the NF to values typically above 3 dB. Global negative feedback can be used to break this tradeoff, however, at the price of potential instability. In contrast, this paper presents a feedforward noise-canceling technique, which allows for simultaneous noise and impedance matching, while canceling the noise and distortion contributions of the matching d...

  7. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of thermal noise in open cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Cao Hui; Taflove, Allen; Kumar, Prem; Cao Changqi

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is developed to simulate thermal noise in open cavities owing to output coupling. The absorbing boundary of the FDTD grid is treated as a blackbody, whose thermal radiation penetrates the cavity in the grid. The calculated amount of thermal noise in a one-dimensional dielectric cavity recovers the standard result of the quantum Langevin equation in the Markovian regime. Our FDTD simulation also demonstrates that in the non-Markovian regime the buildup of the intracavity noise field depends on the ratio of the cavity photon lifetime to the coherence time of thermal radiation. The advantage of our numerical method is that the thermal noise is introduced in the time domain without prior knowledge of cavity modes

  8. Partial removal of correlated noise in thermal imagery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borel, C.C.; Cooke, B.J.; Laubscher, B.E.

    1996-01-01

    Correlated noise occurs in many imaging systems such as scanners and push-broom imagers. The sources of correlated noise can be from the detectors, pre-amplifiers and sampling circuits. Correlated noise appears as streaking along the scan direction of a scanner or in the along track direction of a push-broom imager. We have developed algorithms to simulate correlated noise and pre-filter to reduce the amount of streaking while not destroying the scene content. The pre- filter in the Fourier domain consists of the product of two filters. One filter models the correlated noise spectrum, the other is a windowing function e.g. Gaussian or Hanning window with variable width to block high frequency noise away from the origin of the Fourier Transform of the image data. We have optimized the filter parameters for various scenes and find improvements of the RMS error of the original minus the pre-filtered noisy image

  9. Relationship of core exit-temperature noise to thermal-hydraulic conditions in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1983-01-01

    Core exit thermocouple temperature noise and neutron detector noise measurements were performed at the Loss of Fluid Test Facility (LOFT) reactor and a Westinghouse, 1148 MW(e) PWR to relate temperature noise to core thermal-hydraulic conditions. The noise analysis results show that the RMS of the temperature noise increases linearly with increasing core δT at LOFT and the commercial PWR. Out-of-core test loop temperature noise has shown similar behavior. The phase angle between core exit temperature noise and in-core or ex-core neutron noise is directly related to the core coolant flow velocity. However, if the thermocouple response time is slow, compared to the coolant transit time between the sensors, velocities inferred from the phase angle are lower than measured coolant flow velocities

  10. Zero Thermal Noise in Resistors at Zero Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.; Granqvist, Claes-Göran

    2016-06-01

    The bandwidth of transistors in logic devices approaches the quantum limit, where Johnson noise and associated error rates are supposed to be strongly enhanced. However, the related theory — asserting a temperature-independent quantum zero-point (ZP) contribution to Johnson noise, which dominates the quantum regime — is controversial and resolution of the controversy is essential to determine the real error rate and fundamental energy dissipation limits of logic gates in the quantum limit. The Callen-Welton formula (fluctuation-dissipation theorem) of voltage and current noise for a resistance is the sum of Nyquist’s classical Johnson noise equation and a quantum ZP term with a power density spectrum proportional to frequency and independent of temperature. The classical Johnson-Nyquist formula vanishes at the approach of zero temperature, but the quantum ZP term still predicts non-zero noise voltage and current. Here, we show that this noise cannot be reconciled with the Fermi-Dirac distribution, which defines the thermodynamics of electrons according to quantum-statistical physics. Consequently, Johnson noise must be nil at zero temperature, and non-zero noise found for certain experimental arrangements may be a measurement artifact, such as the one mentioned in Kleen’s uncertainty relation argument.

  11. Analysis of Noise Mechanisms in Cell-Size Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Saurabh; Vargas-Garcia, Cesar Augusto; Ghusinga, Khem Raj; Singh, Abhyudai

    2017-06-06

    At the single-cell level, noise arises from multiple sources, such as inherent stochasticity of biomolecular processes, random partitioning of resources at division, and fluctuations in cellular growth rates. How these diverse noise mechanisms combine to drive variations in cell size within an isoclonal population is not well understood. Here, we investigate the contributions of different noise sources in well-known paradigms of cell-size control, such as adder (division occurs after adding a fixed size from birth), sizer (division occurs after reaching a size threshold), and timer (division occurs after a fixed time from birth). Analysis reveals that variation in cell size is most sensitive to errors in partitioning of volume among daughter cells, and not surprisingly, this process is well regulated among microbes. Moreover, depending on the dominant noise mechanism, different size-control strategies (or a combination of them) provide efficient buffering of size variations. We further explore mixer models of size control, where a timer phase precedes/follows an adder, as has been proposed in Caulobacter crescentus. Although mixing a timer and an adder can sometimes attenuate size variations, it invariably leads to higher-order moments growing unboundedly over time. This results in a power-law distribution for the cell size, with an exponent that depends inversely on the noise in the timer phase. Consistent with theory, we find evidence of power-law statistics in the tail of C. crescentus cell-size distribution, although there is a discrepancy between the observed power-law exponent and that predicted from the noise parameters. The discrepancy, however, is removed after data reveal that the size added by individual newborns in the adder phase itself exhibits power-law statistics. Taken together, this study provides key insights into the role of noise mechanisms in size homeostasis, and suggests an inextricable link between timer-based models of size control and

  12. Preparation, mechanical strengths, and thermal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, A.; Furukawa, S.; Hagiwara, M.; Masumoto, T.

    1987-05-01

    Ni-based amorphous wires with good bending ductility have been prepared for Ni75Si8B17 and Ni78P12B10 alloys containing 1 to 2 at. pct Al or Zr by melt spinning in rotating water. The enhancement of the wire-formation tendency by the addition of Al has been clarified to be due to the increase in the stability of the melt jet through the formation of a thin A12O3 film on the outer surface. The maximum wire diameter is about 190 to 200 μm for the Ni-Si (or P)-B-Al alloys and increases to about 250 μm for the Ni-Si-B-Al-Cr alloys containing 4 to 6 at. pct Cr. The tensile fracture strength and fracture elongation are 2730 MPa and 2.9 pct for (Ni0.75Si0.08B0.17 99Al1) wire and 2170 MPa and 2.4 pct for (Ni0.78P0.12B0.1)99Al1 wire. These wires exhibit a fatigue limit under dynamic bending strain in air with a relative humidity of 65 pct; this limit is 0.50 pct for a Ni-Si-B-Al wire, which is higher by 0.15 pct than that of a Fe75Si10B15 amorphous wire. Furthermore, the Ni-base wires do not fracture during a 180-deg bending even for a sample annealed at temperatures just below the crystallization temperature, in sharp contrast to high embrittlement tendency for Fe-base amorphous alloys. Thus, the Ni-based amorphous wires have been shown to be an attractive material similar to Fe- and Co-based amorphous wires because of its high static and dynamic strength, high ductility, high stability to thermal embrittlement, and good corrosion resistance.

  13. Cluster-cluster aggregation of Ising dipolar particles under thermal noise

    KAUST Repository

    Suzuki, Masaru; Kun, Ferenc; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2009-01-01

    The cluster-cluster aggregation processes of Ising dipolar particles under thermal noise are investigated in the dilute condition. As the temperature increases, changes in the typical structures of clusters are observed from chainlike (D1

  14. Monocrystalline fibres for low thermal noise suspension in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amico, P; Bosi, L; Gammaitoni, L; Losurdo, G; Marchesoni, F; Mazzoni, M; Parisi, D; Punturo, M; Stanga, R; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Travasso, F; Vetrano, F; Vocca, H

    2004-01-01

    Thermal noise in mirror suspension will be the most severe fundamental limit to the low-frequency sensitivity of future interferometric gravitational wave detectors. We propose a new type of materials to realize low thermal noise suspension in such detectors. Monocrystalline suspension fibres are good candidates both for cryogenic and for ambient temperature interferometers. Material characteristics and a production facility are described in this paper

  15. Monocrystalline fibres for low thermal noise suspension in advanced gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amico, P [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Bosi, L [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Gammaitoni, L [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Losurdo, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze/Urbino, Florence (Italy); Marchesoni, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Mazzoni, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze/Urbino, Florence (Italy); Parisi, D [NEST-Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Punturo, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Stanga, R [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze/Urbino, Florence (Italy); Toncelli, A [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Tonelli, M [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Travasso, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy); Vetrano, F [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Firenze/Urbino, Florence (Italy); Vocca, H [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Virgo Project, I-06100 Perugia (Italy)

    2004-03-07

    Thermal noise in mirror suspension will be the most severe fundamental limit to the low-frequency sensitivity of future interferometric gravitational wave detectors. We propose a new type of materials to realize low thermal noise suspension in such detectors. Monocrystalline suspension fibres are good candidates both for cryogenic and for ambient temperature interferometers. Material characteristics and a production facility are described in this paper.

  16. Towards measuring the off-resonant thermal noise of a pendulum mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Leonhardt, V; Kloevekorn, P; Willke, B; Lück, H B; Danzmann, K

    2002-01-01

    Thermal noise is one of the dominant noise sources in interferometric length measurements and can limit the sensitivity of gravitational wave detectors. Our goal is to analyse the off-resonant thermal noise of a high Q pendulum. Therefore we interferometrically detect the length changes of a 2.3 cm long optical resonator, which for good seismic isolation consists of two multiple stage pendulums. We are able to lock the length of this optical resonator to a frequency-stabilized laser beam and as a result get the spectral density of the differential mirror movement.

  17. Thermal integrity in mechanics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Shorr, Boris F

    2015-01-01

    The book is targeted at engineers, university lecturers, postgraduates, and final year undergraduate students involved in computational modelling and experimental and theoretical analysis of the high-temperature behavior of engineering structures. It will also be of interest to researchers developing the thermal strength theory as a branch of continuum mechanics. Thermal integrity is a multidisciplinary field combining the expertise of mechanical engineers, material scientists and applied mathematicians, each approaching the problem from their specific viewpoint. This monograph draws on the research of a broad scientific community including the author’s contribution. The scope of thermal strength analysis was considerably extended thanks to modern computers and the implementation of FEM codes. However, the author believes that some material models adopted in the advanced high-performance software, are not sufficiently justificated due to lack of easy-to-follow books on the theoretical and experimental aspec...

  18. Thermal hydraulics and mechanics core design programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinecke, J.

    1992-10-01

    The report documents the work performed within the Research and Development Task T hermal hydraulics and mechanics core design programs , funded by the German government. It contains the development of new codes, the extension of existing codes, the qualification and verification of codes and the development of a code library. The overall goal of this work was to adapt the system of thermal hydraulics and mechanics codes to the permanently growing requirements of the status of science and technology

  19. Comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Boyd, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging. We first calculate the signal-to-noise ratio of each process in terms of its controllable experimental conditions. We show that a key distinction is that a thermal ghost image always resides on top of a large background; the fluctuations in this background constitutes an intrinsic noise source for thermal ghost imaging. In contrast, there is a negligible intrinsic background to a quantum ghost image. However, for practical reasons involving achievable illumination levels, acquisition times for thermal ghost images are often much shorter than those for quantum ghost images. We provide quantitative predictions for the conditions under which each process provides superior performance. Our conclusion is that each process can provide useful functionality, although under complementary conditions.

  20. Cellular mechanisms of noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabi, Arwa; Keithley, Elizabeth M; Housley, Gary D; Ryan, Allen F; Wong, Ann C-Y

    2017-06-01

    Exposure to intense sound or noise can result in purely temporary threshold shift (TTS), or leave a residual permanent threshold shift (PTS) along with alterations in growth functions of auditory nerve output. Recent research has revealed a number of mechanisms that contribute to noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The principle cause of NIHL is damage to cochlear hair cells and associated synaptopathy. Contributions to TTS include reversible damage to hair cell (HC) stereocilia or synapses, while moderate TTS reflects protective purinergic hearing adaptation. PTS represents permanent damage to or loss of HCs and synapses. While the substrates of HC damage are complex, they include the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and the active stimulation of intracellular stress pathways, leading to programmed and/or necrotic cell death. Permanent damage to cochlear neurons can also contribute to the effects of NIHL, in addition to HC damage. These mechanisms have translational potential for pharmacological intervention and provide multiple opportunities to prevent HC damage or to rescue HCs and spiral ganglion neurons that have suffered injury. This paper reviews advances in our understanding of cellular mechanisms that contribute to NIHL and their potential for therapeutic manipulation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Wide-band CMOS low-noise amplifier exploiting thermal noise canceling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    Known elementary wide-band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental tradeoff between noise figure (NF) and source impedance matching, which limits the NF to values typically above 3 dB. Global negative feedback can be used to break this tradeoff, however, at the price of potential instability. In

  2. Thermal integrity in mechanics and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shorr, Boris F.

    2015-01-01

    The book is targeted at engineers, university lecturers, postgraduates, and final year undergraduate students involved in computational modelling and experimental and theoretical analysis of the high-temperature behavior of engineering structures. It will also be of interest to researchers developing the thermal strength theory as a branch of continuum mechanics. Thermal integrity is a multidisciplinary field combining the expertise of mechanical engineers, material scientists and applied mathematicians, each approaching the problem from their specific viewpoint. This monograph draws on the research of a broad scientific community including the author's contribution. The scope of thermal strength analysis was considerably extended thanks to modern computers and the implementation of FEM codes. However, the author believes that some material models adopted in the advanced high-performance software, are not sufficiently justificated due to lack of easy-to-follow books on the theoretical and experimental aspects of thermal integrity. The author endeavors to provide a thorough yet sufficiently simple presentation of the underlying concepts, making the book compelling to a wide audience.

  3. Thermal integrity in mechanics and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shorr, Boris F. [Central Institute of Aviation Motors (CIAM), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    The book is targeted at engineers, university lecturers, postgraduates, and final year undergraduate students involved in computational modelling and experimental and theoretical analysis of the high-temperature behavior of engineering structures. It will also be of interest to researchers developing the thermal strength theory as a branch of continuum mechanics. Thermal integrity is a multidisciplinary field combining the expertise of mechanical engineers, material scientists and applied mathematicians, each approaching the problem from their specific viewpoint. This monograph draws on the research of a broad scientific community including the author's contribution. The scope of thermal strength analysis was considerably extended thanks to modern computers and the implementation of FEM codes. However, the author believes that some material models adopted in the advanced high-performance software, are not sufficiently justificated due to lack of easy-to-follow books on the theoretical and experimental aspects of thermal integrity. The author endeavors to provide a thorough yet sufficiently simple presentation of the underlying concepts, making the book compelling to a wide audience.

  4. Measuring proton beam thermal noises on the NAP-M storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dement'ev, E.N.; Dikanskij, N.S.; Medvedko, A.S.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Pestrikov, D.V.

    1980-01-01

    The data on experimental investigation of thermal noises of an asimuthally homogeneous proton beam on the NAP-M storage ring are given. The noise spectra are measured at the 5th and 8th harmonics of the ciculation frequency using pick-up electrodes. The dependencies of the noise power on the proton current for noncooled and cooled beams are presented. It is shown that as a result of electron cooling the noise power decreases by two orders and in the 0.5-10 μA current range the noise power of the cooled beam does not depend on the proton current. The noise power of the noncooled beam linearly increases with the proton current. It is also shown that with the modulation growth the noise power increases. The conclusions are made that while analyzing noises of the continuous beam in the storage ring the changes of the noise spectra due to particle interaction in the beam should be taken into account

  5. The colour of thermal noise in classical Brownian motion: a feasibility study of direct experimental observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg-Soerensen, Kirstine; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    One hundred years after Einstein modelled Brownian motion, a central aspect of this motion in incompressible fluids has not been verified experimentally: the thermal noise that drives the Brownian particle, is not white, as in Einstein's simple theory. It is slightly coloured, due to hydrodynamics and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. This theoretical result from the 1970s was prompted by computer simulation results in apparent violation of Einstein's theory. We discuss how a direct experimental observation of this colour might be carried out by using optical tweezers to separate the thermal noise from the particle's dynamic response to it. Since the thermal noise is almost white, very good statistics is necessary to resolve its colour. That requires stable equipment and long recording times, possibly making this experiment one for the future only. We give results for experimental requirements and for stochastic errors as functions of experimental window and measurement time, and discuss some potential sources of systematic errors

  6. Mechanical and Thermal Characterization of Silica Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Anthony Lamar

    Polymer nanocomposites are a class of materials containing nanoparticles with a large interfacial surface area. Only a small quantity of nanoparticles are needed to provide superior multifunctional properties; such as mechanical, thermal, electrical, and moisture absorption properties in polymers. Nanoparticles tend to agglomerate, so special techniques are required for homogeneous distribution. Nanosilica is now readily available as colloidal sols, for example; Nanopox RTM F400 (supplied by Evonik Nanoresins AG, Germany). The nanoparticles are first synthesized from aqueous sodium silicate solution, and then undergo a surface modification process with organosilane and matrix exchange. F400 contains 40%wt silica nanoparticles colloidally dispersed in a DGEBA epoxy resin. The mean particle diameter is about 20 nm with a narrow distribution range of about 5 to 35 nm. The objectives of this study are to develop a reproducible processing method for nanosilica enhanced resin systems used in the manufacturing of fiber reinforced composites that will be characterized for mechanical and thermal properties. Research has concluded that shows improvements in the properties of the matrix material when processed in loading variations of 0 to 25%wt silica nanoparticles. The loadings were also used to manufacture fiberglass reinforced nanocomposite laminates and also tested for mechanical and thermal properties.

  7. Micromagnetic simulations with thermal noise: Physical and numerical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, E. [Dept. de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Universidad de Burgos, Plaza Misael Banuelos, s/n, E-09001, Burgos (Spain)]. E-mail: emvecino@ubu.es; Lopez-Diaz, L. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, Salamanca E-37008 (Spain); Torres, L. [Dept. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, Salamanca E-37008 (Spain); Garcia-Cervera, C.J. [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Langevin dynamics treats finite temperature effects in micromagnetics framework by adding a thermal fluctuation field to the local effective field. Several works have addressed that the numerical results depend on the cell size used to split the ferromagnetic samples on the nanoscale regime. In this short paper, we analyze a thermally perturbed micromagnetic problem by using an implicit unconditionally stable numerical scheme to integrate the Langevin equation at room temperature. The obtained micromagnetic results for several cell sizes inside the validity range of the micromagnetic formalism, indicate that the addressed cell size dependence could be associated to numerical limitations of the commonly used numerical schemes.

  8. Micromagnetic simulations with thermal noise: Physical and numerical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, E.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Torres, L.; Garcia-Cervera, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    Langevin dynamics treats finite temperature effects in micromagnetics framework by adding a thermal fluctuation field to the local effective field. Several works have addressed that the numerical results depend on the cell size used to split the ferromagnetic samples on the nanoscale regime. In this short paper, we analyze a thermally perturbed micromagnetic problem by using an implicit unconditionally stable numerical scheme to integrate the Langevin equation at room temperature. The obtained micromagnetic results for several cell sizes inside the validity range of the micromagnetic formalism, indicate that the addressed cell size dependence could be associated to numerical limitations of the commonly used numerical schemes

  9. Modeling of Thermal Phase Noise in a Solid Core Photonic Crystal Fiber-Optic Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ningfang; Ma, Kun; Jin, Jing; Teng, Fei; Cai, Wei

    2017-10-26

    A theoretical model of the thermal phase noise in a square-wave modulated solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope has been established, and then verified by measurements. The results demonstrate a good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of the thermal phase noise to the random walk coefficient of the gyroscope is derived. A fiber coil with 2.8 km length is used in the experimental solid core photonic crystal fiber-optic gyroscope, showing a random walk coefficient of 9.25 × 10 -5 deg/√h.

  10. Non-Fourier based thermal-mechanical tissue damage prediction for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-01-02

    Prediction of tissue damage under thermal loads plays important role for thermal ablation planning. A new methodology is presented in this paper by combing non-Fourier bio-heat transfer, constitutive elastic mechanics as well as non-rigid motion of dynamics to predict and analyze thermal distribution, thermal-induced mechanical deformation and thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues under thermal loads. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed methodology based on the non-Fourier bio-heat transfer can account for the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and predict tissue thermal damage more accurately than classical Fourier bio-heat transfer based model.

  11. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  12. Rotary Compressor Noise Analysis Using Mechanisms and Electromagnetics Coupled Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Jinah; Lee, Uiyoon; Lee, Jeongbae; Lee, Unseop; Han, Eunsil; Yoon, Jinhwan

    2016-01-01

    This research is conducted to investigate noise source and design low noise compressors. For improving energy efficiency, the rotary compressor with variable speed brushless DC motor is increasingly adopted for appliances. However brushless DC motor makes more compressor vibration than constant speed motor compressor at high speed operating condition. Therefore it is necessary to reduce noise and vibration for improving air conditioner quality. In this study, compressor’s noise and vibrat...

  13. Mechanical and thermal design of hybrid blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, K.R.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design considerations are discussed. This paper is intended as a companion to that of J. D. Lee of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory on the nuclear aspects of hybrid reactor blanket design. The major design characteristics of hybrid reactor blankets are discussed with emphasis on the areas of difference between hybrid reactors and standard fusion or fission reactors. Specific examples are used to illustrate the design tradeoffs and choices that must be made in hybrid reactor design. These examples are drawn from the work on the Mirror Hybrid Reactor

  14. Investigation of ferroelectric materials by the thermal noise method: advantages and limitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednyakov, Petr; Shnaidshtein, I. V.; Strukov, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 500, č. 1 (2016), 203-217 ISSN 0015-0193 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15110S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thermal noise * ferroelectricity * thin films * dielectric permittivity * equivalent circuit Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.551, year: 2016

  15. Period doubling induced by thermal noise amplification in genetic circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ruocco, G.; Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    . In the proposed system, nonlinearity naturally arises from the mechanism of cooperative stability, which regulates the concentration of a protein produced during a transcription process. In this elemental model, bistability results from the coherent amplification

  16. Thermal and athermal crackling noise in ferroelastic nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Z; Salje, E K H; Ding, X; Sun, J

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of ferroelastic microstructures under external shear is determined by large-scale molecular dynamics simulations in two and three dimensions. Ferroelastic pattern formation was found to be almost identical in two and three dimensions, with only the ferroelastic transition temperature changing. The twin patterns generated by shear deformation depend strongly on temperature, with high wall densities nucleating under optimized temperature conditions. The dynamical tweed and mobile kink movement inside the twin walls is continuous and thermally activated at high temperatures, and becomes jerky and athermal at low temperatures. With decreasing temperature, the statistical distributions of dynamical tweed and kinks vary from a Vogel–Fulcher law P(E)   -tilde  exp−(E/(T−T VF )) to an athermal power-law distribution P(E)   -tilde  E −ϵ . During the yield event, the nucleation of needles and kinks is always jerky, and the energy of the jerks is power-law distributed. Low-temperature yield proceeds via one large avalanche. With increasing temperature, the large avalanche is thermally broken up into a multitude of small segments. The power-law exponents reflect the changes in temperature, even in the athermal regime. (fast track communications)

  17. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  18. Minimizing cell size dependence in micromagnetics simulations with thermal noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MartInez, E [Departamento de Ingenieria Electromecanica, Universidad de Burgos, Plaza Misael Banuelos, s/n, E-09001, Burgos (Spain); Lopez-DIaz, L [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. Universidad Salamanca. Plaza de la Merced s/n. Salamanca E-37008 (Spain); Torres, L [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada. Universidad Salamanca. Plaza de la Merced s/n. Salamanca E-37008 (Spain); GarcIa-Cervera, C J [Department of Mathematics. University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2007-02-21

    Langevin dynamics treats finite temperature effects in a micromagnetics framework by adding a thermal fluctuation field to the effective field. Several works have addressed the dependence of numerical results on the cell size used to split the ferromagnetic samples on the nanoscale regime. In this paper, some former problems dealing with the dependence on the spatial discretization at finite temperature have been revised. We have focused our attention on the stability of the numerical schemes used to integrate the Langevin equation. In particular, a detailed analysis of results was carried out as a function of the time step. It was confirmed that the mentioned dependence can be minimized if an unconditional stable integration method is used to numerically solve the Langevin equation.

  19. Minimizing cell size dependence in micromagnetics simulations with thermal noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MartInez, E; Lopez-DIaz, L; Torres, L; GarcIa-Cervera, C J

    2007-01-01

    Langevin dynamics treats finite temperature effects in a micromagnetics framework by adding a thermal fluctuation field to the effective field. Several works have addressed the dependence of numerical results on the cell size used to split the ferromagnetic samples on the nanoscale regime. In this paper, some former problems dealing with the dependence on the spatial discretization at finite temperature have been revised. We have focused our attention on the stability of the numerical schemes used to integrate the Langevin equation. In particular, a detailed analysis of results was carried out as a function of the time step. It was confirmed that the mentioned dependence can be minimized if an unconditional stable integration method is used to numerically solve the Langevin equation

  20. Turbulence, chaos and thermal noise in globally coupled Josephson junction arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.

    1995-03-01

    We discuss the effects of thermal noise in underdamped Josephson junction series arrays that are globally coupled through a resistive load and driven by an rf current. We study the breakdown of the law of large numbers in the turbulent phase of the Josephson arrays. This corresponds to a saturation of the broad band noise S 0 for a large number N of junctions. We find that this phenomenon is stable against thermal fluctuations below a critical temperature T cl . The behaviour of S 0 vs. T, for large N, shows three different regimes. For 0 cl , S 0 decreases when increasing T, and there is turbulence and the breakdown of the law of large numbers. For T cl c2 , S 0 is constant and the dynamics is dominated by the chaos of the individual junctions. Finally for T > T c2 , S 0 in mainly due to thermal fluctuations, since it increases linearly with T. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs

  1. Investigation of power oscillation mechanisms based on noise analysis at Forsmark-1 BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguma, Ritsuo

    1996-01-01

    Noise analysis has been performed for stability test data collected during reactor start-up in January 1989 at the boiling water reactor (BWR) Forsmark unit 1. A unique instrumentation to measure local coolant flow in this reactor allowed investigation of dynamic interactions between neutron flux and coolant flow noise signals at different radial positions in the core. The causal relationship for these signals was evaluated based on a method called signal transmission path (STP) analysis with the aim of identifying the principal mechanism of power oscillations in this reactor. The results of the present study indicated that large amplitude power oscillations were induced by two instability mechanisms concurrent in the core. The first is the global void reactivity feedback effect which played the most significant role to power oscillations at a resonant frequency of about 0.53 Hz. The second is the thermal-hydraulics coupling with neutron kinetics, inducing resonant oscillations at about 0.45 Hz. The latter was found to be active only in a certain core region. A peculiar phenomenon of amplitude modulations observed in some local power range monitor (LPRM) signals was also examined. It was interpreted to occur as the consequence of these two resonant power oscillations, the frequencies of which lie close to each other. The noise analysis technique applied in the present study is expected to be useful to get a deeper understanding of the power oscillation mechanism which is active in the reactor under evaluation. The technique may be applicable to BWRs with instruments to measure local channel flow together with in-core neutron detectors. (Author)

  2. Proposed Use of Zero Bias Diode Arrays as Thermal Electric Noise Rectifiers and Non-Thermal Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valone, Thomas F.

    2009-03-01

    The well known built-in voltage potential for some select semiconductor p-n junctions and various rectifying devices is proposed to be favorable for generating DC electricity at "zero bias" (with no DC bias voltage applied) in the presence of Johnson noise or 1/f noise which originates from the quantum vacuum (Koch et al., 1982). The 1982 Koch discovery that certain solid state devices exhibit measurable quantum noise has also recently been labeled a finding of dark energy in the lab (Beck and Mackey, 2004). Tunnel diodes are a class of rectifiers that are qualified and some have been credited with conducting only because of quantum fluctuations. Microwave diodes are also good choices since many are designed for zero bias operation. A completely passive, unamplified zero bias diode converter/detector for millimeter (GHz) waves was developed by HRL Labs in 2006 under a DARPA contract, utilizing a Sb-based "backward tunnel diode" (BTD). It is reported to be a "true zero-bias diode." It was developed for a "field radiometer" to "collect thermally radiated power" (in other words, 'night vision'). The diode array mounting allows a feed from horn antenna, which functions as a passive concentrating amplifier. An important clue is the "noise equivalent power" of 1.1 pW per root hertz and the "noise equivalent temperature difference" of 10° K, which indicate sensitivity to Johnson noise (Lynch, et al., 2006). There also have been other inventions such as "single electron transistors" that also have "the highest signal to noise ratio" near zero bias. Furthermore, "ultrasensitive" devices that convert radio frequencies have been invented that operate at outer space temperatures (3 degrees above zero point: 3° K). These devices are tiny nanotech devices which are suitable for assembly in parallel circuits (such as a 2-D array) to possibly produce zero point energy direct current electricity with significant power density (Brenning et al., 2006). Photovoltaic p-n junction

  3. Estimations of Kappa parameter using quasi-thermal noise spectroscopy: Applications on Wind spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinović, M.

    2017-12-01

    Quasi-thermal noise (QTN) spectroscopy is an accurate technique for in situ measurements of electron density and temperature in space plasmas. The QTN spectrum has a characteristic noise peak just above the plasma frequency produced by electron quasi-thermal fluctuations, which allows a very accurate measurement of the electron density. The size and shape of the peak are determined by suprathermal electrons. Since this nonthermal electron population is well described by a generalized Lorentzian - Kappa velocity distribution, it is possible to determinate the distribution properties in the solar wind from a measured spectrum. In this work, we discuss some basic properties of the QTN spectrum dependence of the Kappa distribution parameters - total electron density, temperature and the Kappa index, giving an overview on how instrument characteristics and environment conditions affect quality of the measurements. Further on, we aim to apply the method to Wind Thermal Noise Receiver (TNR) measurements. However, the spectra observed by this instrument usually contain contributions from nonthermal phenomena, like ion acoustic waves below, or galactic noise above the plasma frequency. This is why, besides comparison of the theory with observations, work with Wind data requires development of a sophisticated algorithm that distinguish parts of the spectra that are dominated by the QTN, and therefore can be used in our study. Postulates of this algorithm, as well as major results of its implementation, are also presented.

  4. ACCESS: Thermal Mechanical Design, Performance, and Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Morris, M. J.; McCandliss, S. R.; Rauscher, B. J.; Kimble, R. A.; Kruk, J. W.; Wright, E. L.; Bohlin, R.; Kurucz, R. L.; Riess, A. G.; Pelton, R.; Deustua, S. E.; Dixon, W. V.; Sahnow, D. J.; Benford, D. J.; Gardner, J. P.; Feldman, P. D.; Moos, H. W.; Lampton, M.; Perlmutter, S.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2014-01-01

    Systematic errors associated with astrophysical data used to probe fundamental astrophysical questions, such as SNeIa observations used to constrain dark energy theories, are now rivaling and exceeding the statistical errors associated with these measurements. ACCESS: Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars is a series of rocket-borne sub-orbital missions and ground-based experiments designed to enable improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale through the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of 500 across the 0.35 - 1.7μm bandpass. Achieving this level of accuracy requires characterization and stability of the instrument and detector including a thermal background that contributes less than 1% to the flux per resolution element in the NIR. We will present the instrument and calibration status with a focus on the thermal mechanical design and associated performance data. The detector control and performance will be presented in a companion poster (Morris, et al). NASA APRA sounding rocket grant NNX08AI65G supports this work.

  5. CW 316 mechanical properties during thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauvin, R.; Boutard, J.L.; Allegraud, G.

    1984-06-01

    During in pile incidents, the cladding can experience higher temperatures than the nominal one; it is necessary to know the mechanical properties of the cladding material during such thermal transients to predict the time and location of rupture. Two types of tests have been developed: first tensile (constant strain rate) tests after a heating at a constant rate and secondly constant load tests where heating is performed until rupture occurs. The tensile tests clearly show the role of the heating rate: the higher is the heating rate, the lower is the cold work recovery. Constant load tests were conducted with either uniaxial or biaxial (burst tests) loading. The same stress/failure temperature relation is found in both types of loading using the Von Mises equivalent stress. To predict failure, the Larson Miller parameter is not adequate, as well as all parameters based on a time/temperature equivalence. The yield stress measured in the two types of tests are very different probably due to a strain rate effect. Indeed the tensile tests are dynamic ones to avoid thermal recovery during the test duration, while the strain rate measured in constant load tests ranges only from 10 -5 s -1 to 10 -3 s -1 , being an increasing function of heating rate (ranging from 1 0 c/s to 100 0 c/s)

  6. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  7. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Crack assessment of pipe under combined thermal and mechanical load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Tae Kwang; Kim, Yun Jae

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, J-integral and transient C(t)-integral, which were key parameters in low temperature and high temperature fracture mechanics, under combined thermal and mechanical load were estimated via 3-dimensional finite element analyses. Various type of thermal and mechanical load, material hardening were considered to decrease conservatism in existing solutions. As a results, V-factor and redistribution time for combined thermal and mechanical load were proposed to calculate J-integral and C(t)-integral, respectively.

  9. Spatio-temporal chaos and thermal noise in Josephson junction series arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, D.; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    We study underdamped Josephson junction series arrays that are globally coupled through a resistive shunting load and driven by an rf bias current. We find that they can be an experimental realization of many phenomena currently studied in globally coupled logistic map. Depending on the bias current the array can show Shapiro steps but also spatio-temporal chaos or ''turbulence'' in the IV characteristics. In the turbulent phase there is a saturation of the broad band noise for a large number of junctions. This corresponds to a break down of the law of large numbers as seen in globally coupled maps. We study this phenomenon as a function of thermal noise. We find that when increasing the temperature the broad band noise decreases. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  10. Noise measurements during high-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, R J; Weigle, C G

    1995-10-01

    To evaluate the noise levels with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation. An observational, prospective study. Pediatric intensive care unit. The caretakers and environment of the pediatric intensive care unit. High-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation. Caretakers evaluated noise using a visual analog scale. Noise was measured with a decibel meter and an octave band frequency filter. There was twice as much noise perceived by the caretakers and as measured on the decibel A scale. All measures showed significantly greater noise, especially at low frequencies, with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation exposes the patient to twice as much noise as does the use of conventional mechanical ventilation.

  11. Improvement of the chemical, thermal, mechanical and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-05-16

    May 16, 2018 ... mal stability and thermal conductivity, it has limitation due its poor thermal .... graphene composites can help determine the percent of carbonyl .... between the glass transition temperature Tg and the amounts of graphene ...

  12. A noise level prediction method based on electro-mechanical frequency response function for capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lingyu; Ji, Shengchang; Shen, Qi; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jinyu; Liu, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The capacitors in high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) converter stations radiate a lot of audible noise which can reach higher than 100 dB. The existing noise level prediction methods are not satisfying enough. In this paper, a new noise level prediction method is proposed based on a frequency response function considering both electrical and mechanical characteristics of capacitors. The electro-mechanical frequency response function (EMFRF) is defined as the frequency domain quotient of the vibration response and the squared capacitor voltage, and it is obtained from impulse current experiment. Under given excitations, the vibration response of the capacitor tank is the product of EMFRF and the square of the given capacitor voltage in frequency domain, and the radiated audible noise is calculated by structure acoustic coupling formulas. The noise level under the same excitations is also measured in laboratory, and the results are compared with the prediction. The comparison proves that the noise prediction method is effective.

  13. Pharmaceutical applications of dynamic mechanical thermal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David S; Tian, Yiwei; Abu-Diak, Osama; Andrews, Gavin P

    2012-04-01

    The successful development of polymeric drug delivery and biomedical devices requires a comprehensive understanding of the viscoleastic properties of polymers as these have been shown to directly affect clinical efficacy. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) is an accessible and versatile analytical technique in which an oscillating stress or strain is applied to a sample as a function of oscillatory frequency and temperature. Through cyclic application of a non-destructive stress or strain, a comprehensive understanding of the viscoelastic properties of polymers may be obtained. In this review, we provide a concise overview of the theory of DMTA and the basic instrumental/operating principles. Moreover, the application of DMTA for the characterization of solid pharmaceutical and biomedical systems has been discussed in detail. In particular we have described the potential of DMTA to measure and understand relaxation transitions and miscibility in binary and higher-order systems and describe the more recent applications of the technique for this purpose. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Noise and correlations in a microwave-mechanical-optical transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Andrew P.; Burns, Peter S.; Peterson, Robert W.; Urmey, Maxwell D.; Kampel, Nir S.; Menke, Timothy; Cicak, Katarina; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Regal, Cindy A.; Lehnert, Konrad W.

    Viewed as resources for quantum information processing, microwave and optical fields offer complementary strengths. We simultaneously couple one mode of a micromechanical oscillator to a resonant microwave circuit and a high-finesse optical cavity. In previous work, this system was operated as a classical converter between microwave and optical signals at 4 K, operating with 10% efficiency and 1500 photons of added noise. To improve noise performance, we now operate the converter at 0.1 K. We have observed order-of-magnitude improvement in noise performance, and quantified effects from undesired interactions between the laser and superconducting circuit. Correlations between the microwave and optical fields have also been investigated, serving as a precursor to upcoming quantum operation. We acknowledge support from AFOSR MURI Grant FA9550-15-1-0015 and PFC National Science Foundation Grant 1125844.

  15. Mechanical, Hygric and Thermal Properties of Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tesárek

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference measurements of basic mechanical, thermal and hygric parameters of hardened flue gas desulfurization gypsum are carried out. Moisture diffusivity, water vapor diffusion coefficient, thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity and linear thermal expansion coefficient are determined with the primary aim of comparison with data obtained for various types of modified gypsum in the future. 

  16. Multispectral linear array (MLA) focal plane mechanical and thermal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A. S.; Kaminski, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanical and thermal design of an integrated focal plane subsystem of a Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) instrument is discussed in terms of focal-plane alignment, thermoelastic performance, and thermal requirements. The modular construction and thermal control of the focal plane array are discussed.

  17. Quantum Mechanical Noise in a Michelson Interferometer with Nonclassical Inputs: Nonperturbative Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sun-Kun

    1996-01-01

    The variances of the quantum-mechanical noise in a two-input-port Michelson interferometer within the framework of the Loudon-Ni model were solved exactly in two general cases: (1) one coherent state input and one squeezed state input, and (2) two photon number states inputs. Low intensity limit, exponential decaying signal and the noise due to mixing were discussed briefly.

  18. Molecular thermal transistor: Dimension analysis and mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnia, S.; Panahinia, R.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, large challenge has been spent to realize high efficient thermal transistors. Outstanding properties of DNA make it as an excellent nano material in future technologies. In this paper, we introduced a high efficient DNA based thermal transistor. The thermal transistor operates when the system shows an increase in the thermal flux despite of decreasing temperature gradient. This is what called as negative differential thermal resistance (NDTR). Based on multifractal analysis, we could distinguish regions with NDTR state from non-NDTR state. Moreover, Based on dimension spectrum of the system, it is detected that NDTR state is accompanied by ballistic transport regime. The generalized correlation sum (analogous to specific heat) shows that an irregular decrease in the specific heat induces an increase in the mean free path (mfp) of phonons. This leads to the occurrence of NDTR.

  19. Mechanical-thermal synthesis of chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki; Favilla, Eliane Aparecida Peixoto; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the synthesis of chromium carbides (Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 ), starting from metallic chromium (obtained from the reduction of Cr 2 O 3 with Al) and carbon (graphite). The synthesis was carried out via high energy milling, followed by heat-treating of pellets made of different milled mixtures at 800 o C, for 2 h, under an atmosphere of argon. A SPEX CertPrep 8000 Mixer/Mill was used for milling under argon atmosphere. A tool steel vat and two 12.7 mm diameter chromium steel balls were used. The raw materials used and the products were characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, electronic microscopy and X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis. The following variables were investigated: the quantity of carbon in the mixture, the milling time and the milling power. Mechanical activation of the reactant mixture depends upon the milling power ratio used for processing. The energy liberated by the reduction of the chromium oxide with aluminium exhibits a maximum for milling power ratio between 5:1 and 7.5:1. Self-propagating reaction occurred for all heat-treated samples whatever the carbon content of the sample and the milling power ratio used. Bearing carbon samples exhibited hollow shell structures after the reaction. The level of iron contamination of the milled samples was kept below 0.3% Fe. The self-propagated reaction caused high temperatures inside the samples as it may be seen by the occurrence of spherules, dendrites and whiskers. The carbon content determines the type of chromium carbide formed

  20. Mechanical relaxations and 1/f noise in Bi, Nb, and Fe films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alers, G.B.; Weissman, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    Anelastic piezoresistance and 1/f noise were measured in the same samples to compare mechanical relaxations with 1/f noise. In bismuth below 200 K, both effects could be fitted to a model invoking one class of mobile defects. In niobium, both the anelastic piezoresistance and the noise scaled with the concentration of dissolved hydrogen. A well-defined peak in noise versus temperature was observed without any peak in the anelastic response. In iron, noise apparently from a carbon Snoek relaxation was observed at 220 K in a sample with high impurity concentration and at 300 K with low impurity concentration. No anelastic feature was found at 220 K in the high-impurity-concentration sample. The broad nature of 1/f noise appears to arise not from a fundamental source but from the generally poor quality of thin films

  1. Developmental Mechanisms Underlying Improved Contrast Thresholds for Discriminations of Orientation Signals Embedded in Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Taek eJeon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We combined an external noise paradigm with an efficient procedure for obtaining contrast thresholds (Lesmes et al., 2006 in order to model developmental changes during childhood. Specifically, we measured the contrast thresholds of 5-, 7-, 9-year-olds and adults (n = 20/age in a two alternative forced-choice orientation discrimination task over a wide range of external noise levels and at three levels of accuracy. Overall, as age increased, contrast thresholds decreased over the entire range of external noise levels tested. The decrease was greatest between 5 and 7 years of age. The reduction in threshold after age 5 was greater in the high than the low external noise region, a pattern implying greater tolerance to the irrelevant background noise as children became older. To model the mechanisms underlying these developmental changes in terms of internal noise components, we adapted the original perceptual template model (Lu and Dosher, 1998 and normalized the magnitude of performance changes against the performance of 5-year-olds. The resulting model provided an excellent fit (r2 = 0.985 to the contrast thresholds at multiple levels of accuracy (60, 75, and 90% across a wide range of external noise levels. The improvements in contrast thresholds with age were best modelled by a combination of reductions in internal additive noise, reductions in internal multiplicative noise, and improvements in excluding external noise by template retuning. In line with the data, the improvement was greatest between 5 and 7 years of age, accompanied by a 39% reduction in additive noise, 71% reduction in multiplicative noise, and 45% improvement in external noise exclusion. The modelled improvements likely reflect developmental changes at the cortical level, rather than changes in front-end structural properties (Kiorpes et al., 2003.

  2. Improvements of Real Time First Motion Focal Mechanism and Noise Characteristics of New Sites at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. M.; Lopez, A. M.; Huerfano, V.; Lugo, J.; Cancel, J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismic networks need quick and efficient ways to obtain information related to seismic events for the purposes of seismic activity monitoring, risk assessment, and scientific knowledge among others. As part of an IRIS summer internship program, two projects were performed to provide a tool for quick faulting mechanism and improve seismic data at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN). First, a simple routine to obtain a focal mechanisms, the geometry of the fault, based on first motions was developed and implemented for data analysts routine operations at PRSN. The new tool provides the analyst a quick way to assess the probable faulting mechanism that occurred while performing the interactive earthquake location procedure. The focal mechanism is generated on-the-fly when data analysts pick P wave arrivals onsets and motions. Once first motions have been identified, an in-house PRSN utility is employed to obtain the double couple representation and later plotted using GMT's psmeca utility. Second, we addressed the issue of seismic noise related to thermal fluctuations inside seismic vaults. Seismic sites can be extremely noisy due to proximity to cultural activities and unattended thermal fluctuations inside sensor housings, thus resulting in skewed readings. In the past, seismologists have used different insulation techniques to reduce the amount of unwanted noise that a seismometers experience due to these thermal changes with items such as Styrofoam, and fiber glass among others. PRSN traditionally uses Styrofoam boxes to cover their seismic sensors, however, a proper procedure to test how these method compare to other new techniques has never been approached. The deficiency of properly testing these techniques in the Caribbean and especially Puerto Rico is that these thermal fluctuations still happen because of the intense sun and humidity. We conducted a test based on the methods employed by the IRIS Transportable Array, based on insulation by sand burial of

  3. Stochastic IMT (Insulator-Metal-Transition Neurons: An Interplay of Thermal and Threshold Noise at Bifurcation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Parihar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks can harness stochasticity in multiple ways to enable a vast class of computationally powerful models. Boltzmann machines and other stochastic neural networks have been shown to outperform their deterministic counterparts by allowing dynamical systems to escape local energy minima. Electronic implementation of such stochastic networks is currently limited to addition of algorithmic noise to digital machines which is inherently inefficient; albeit recent efforts to harness physical noise in devices for stochasticity have shown promise. To succeed in fabricating electronic neuromorphic networks we need experimental evidence of devices with measurable and controllable stochasticity which is complemented with the development of reliable statistical models of such observed stochasticity. Current research literature has sparse evidence of the former and a complete lack of the latter. This motivates the current article where we demonstrate a stochastic neuron using an insulator-metal-transition (IMT device, based on electrically induced phase-transition, in series with a tunable resistance. We show that an IMT neuron has dynamics similar to a piecewise linear FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN neuron and incorporates all characteristics of a spiking neuron in the device phenomena. We experimentally demonstrate spontaneous stochastic spiking along with electrically controllable firing probabilities using Vanadium Dioxide (VO2 based IMT neurons which show a sigmoid-like transfer function. The stochastic spiking is explained by two noise sources - thermal noise and threshold fluctuations, which act as precursors of bifurcation. As such, the IMT neuron is modeled as an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU process with a fluctuating boundary resulting in transfer curves that closely match experiments. The moments of interspike intervals are calculated analytically by extending the first-passage-time (FPT models for Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU process to include a

  4. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Born, M; Danzmann, K; Diepholz, I; Auger, G; Binetruy, P; Baird, J; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Fitzsimons, E; Bursi, A; Caleno, M; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Dolesi, R; Ferroni, V; Cruise, M; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations. (paper)

  5. Calculation of wind turbine mechanical noise transmitted through the wings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinther, S.; Kristensen, E.; Johansen, S.; Dam Madsen, K.

    2001-10-01

    A method for calculation of transmission noise radiated from the wind turbine blades has been established. The method is based on a numerical model describing the transmission of vibrations from the gear through the main shaft to the blades. In this project 1 MW and 2 MW wind turbines from BONUS Energy A/S are used as test cases. The numerical model offers the possibility of optimising the transmission system to avoid coincidence between gear excitation frequencies and natural frequencies of the blades. The optimisation can be reached by altering stiffness, mass and damping values for the different elements of the model. The numerical model needs experimental validation and supplementary determination of sound radiation factors for the blades. Therefore, a series of test methods have been developed and tried out. In a test rig for wind turbine, blades dynamic characteristicts and sound radiation factors for the blades were determined. On a 2 MW turbine tests were carried out during normal operation of the turbine. The shaft between the generator and the gearbox was excited in torsion by a hydraulic torsion exciter, and simultaneous response measurements of vibrations on one of the blades were made to estimate frequency response functions between gear and discrete points on the blade. The individual parts of the method have been tested, and the method showed out to supply valuable information about the different means for minimising radiation of transmission noise from the wind turbine blades. In future optimisation of the method, emphasis will be concentrated on the experimental validation provided by measurements on the operating wind turbine to provide a more certain validation of the numerical model. (au)

  6. Densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxanes .2. Thermal and mechanical properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipsen, T.A C; Derks, R.; van der Vegt, H.A.; Stenekes, R.; Pennings, A.J; Hadziioannou, G

    1997-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of two densely crosslinked polycarbosiloxane systems were investigated in relation to the molecular structure. The networks were prepared from functional branched prepolymers and crosslinked via a hydrosilylation curing reaction. The prepolymers having only

  7. Analysis and reduction of thermal magnetic noise in liquid-He dewar for sensitive low-field nuclear magnetic resonance measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S. M.; Yu, K. K.; Lee, Y. H.; Kang, C. S.; Kim, K.; Lee, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    For sensitive measurements of micro-Tesla nuclear magnetic resonance (μT-NMR) signal, a low-noise superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) system is needed. We have fabricated a liquid He dewar for an SQUID having a large diameter for the pickup coil. The initial test of the SQUID system showed much higher low-frequency magnetic noise caused by the thermal magnetic noise of the aluminum plates used for the vapor-cooled thermal shield material. The frequency dependence of the noise spectrum showed that the noise increases with the decrease of frequency. This behavior could be explained from a two-layer model; one generating the thermal noise and the other one shielding the thermal noise by eddy-current shielding. And the eddy-current shielding effect is strongly dependent on the frequency through the skin-depth. To minimize the loop size for the fluctuating thermal noise current, we changed the thermal shield material into insulated thin Cu mesh. The magnetic noise of the SQUID system became flat down to 0.1 Hz with a white noise of 0.3 fT√ Hz, including the other noise contributions such as SQUID electronics and magnetically shielded room, etc, which is acceptable for low-noise μT-NMR experiments.

  8. Thermalized solutions, statistical mechanics and turbulence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-20

    Feb 20, 2015 ... In this study, we examine the intriguing connection between turbulence and equilibrium statistical mechanics. There are several recent works which emphasize this connection. Thus in the last ... Current Issue : Vol. 90, Issue 6.

  9. Mechanical properties and thermal behaviour of LLDPE/MWNTs nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Jin-hua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs were incorporated into a linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE matrix through using screw extrusion and injection technique. The effect of different weight percent loadings of MWNTs on the morphology, mechanical, and thermal of LLDPE/MWNTs nanocomposite had been investigated. It was found that, at low concentration of MWNTs, it could uniformly disperse into a linear low-density polyethylene matrix and provide LLDPE/MWNTs nanocomposites much improved mechanical properties. Thermal analysis showed that a clear improvement of thermal stability for LLDPE/MWNTs nanocomposites increased with increasing MWNTs content.

  10. Apoptotic mechanisms after repeated noise trauma in the mouse medial geniculate body and primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Felix; Ernst, Arne; Strübing, Ira; Basta, Dietmar; Gröschel, Moritz

    2017-12-01

    A correlation between noise-induced apoptosis and cell loss has previously been shown after a single noise exposure in the cochlear nucleus, inferior colliculus, medial geniculate body (MGB) and primary auditory cortex (AI). However, repeated noise exposure is the most common situation in humans and a major risk factor for the induction of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). The present investigation measured cell death pathways using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) in the dorsal, medial and ventral MGB (dMGB, mMGB and vMGB) and six layers of the AI (AI-1 to AI-6) in mice (NMRI strain) after a second noise exposure (double-exposure group). Therefore, a single noise exposure group has been investigated 7 (7-day-group-single) or 14 days (14-day-group-single) after noise exposure (3 h, 5-20 kHz, 115 dB SPL peak-to-peak). The double-exposure group received the same noise trauma for a second time 7 days after the initial exposure and was either TUNEL-stained immediately (7-day-group-double) or 1 week later (14-day-group-double) and data were compared to the corresponding single-trauma group as well as to an unexposed control group. It was shown that TUNEL increased immediately after the second noise exposure in AI-3 and stayed upregulated in the 14-day-group-double. A significant increase in TUNEL was also seen in the 14-day-group-double in vMGB, mMGB and AI-1. The present results show for the first time the influence of a repeated noise trauma on cell death mechanisms in thalamic and cortical structures and might contribute to the understanding of pathophysiological findings and psychoacoustic phenomena accompanying NIHL.

  11. Mechanical Chevrons and Fluidics for Advanced Military Aircraft Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    when viewed as an animation (movie). Representative still-frames from the movies are shown in Figs. 12 and 13. Apart from the features of the flow...Martens, Far-Field Acoustic Investigation into Chevron Nozzle Mechanisms and Trends, AIAA Journal, Vol.43, no.1, pp.87-95, 2004. 10. Panda , J

  12. Measurements of the Young's modulus of hydroxide catalysis bonds, and the effect on thermal noise in ground-based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Margot; van Veggel, Anna-Maria; Hough, James; Messenger, Chris; Hughes, David; Cunningham, William; Haughian, Karen; Rowan, Sheila

    2018-05-01

    With the outstanding results from the detection and observation of gravitational waves from coalescing black holes and neutron star inspirals, it is essential that pathways to further improve the sensitivities of the LIGO and VIRGO detectors are explored. There are a number of factors that potentially limit the sensitivities of the detectors. One such factor is thermal noise, a component of which results from the mechanical loss in the bond material between the silica fibre suspensions and the test mass mirrors. To calculate its magnitude, the Young's modulus of the bond material has to be known with reasonable accuracy. In this paper we present a new combination of ultrasonic technology and Bayesian analysis to measure the Young's modulus of hydroxide catalysis bonds between fused silica substrates. Using this novel technique, we measure the bond Young's modulus to be 18.5 ±2.32.0 GPa . We show that by applying this value to thermal noise models of bonded test masses with suitable attachment geometries, a reduction in suspension thermal noise consistent with an overall design sensitivity improvement allows a factor of 5 increase in event rate to be achieved.

  13. Thermal noise and the incessant vibration of the outer hair cells in the cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Fritze

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The continual exposure of outer hair cells (OHCs to thermal noise causes vibrations in resonant frequency. As these vibrations are backprojected, they should be recordable as audiofrequencies in the outer ear canal. But even though they are likely to be amplified in some areas by clustering in terms of the chaos theory, they cannot be picked up in the outer ear canal by currently available recording technologies. Conditions change in the presence of pathology, e.g. loss of OHCs and fibrous replacement: Clusters grow in size and amplitudes become larger so that the vibrations can be picked up as spontaneous oto-acoustic emissions (SOAEs in the outer ear canal. Efforts are needed to demonstrate the presence of physiological OHC vibrations (emission by incessant vibration, EIV by processing auditory recordings with statistical methods.

  14. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of the AH of FRW Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi-Huan, Wei

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the work made out by the apparent horizon (AH) of the Friedmann–Robertson–Walker (FRW) universe and the heat flux through the AH from the first law of thermodynamics. We discuss the mechanical properties of the AH and analyze the universe model for which the mechanical properties can change. Finally, the thermal properties of the AH of FRW universe are discussed

  15. Comparison of vibrational noise, between thermal power station (T.P.S.) Jamshoro and thermal power plant (T.P.P.) Pakistan Steel Bin Qasim Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaheer-ud-Din Memon

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Noise is one of the major environmental problems in Industrial Plants. The Noise study has been under taken in (Japanese Unit) Thermal Power Station (TPS) Jamshoro, which generates 250 MW since Jan: 1990 and Russian Unit Thermal Power Plant (TPP) Pak Steel Bin Qasim Karachi, generates 165 MW since 1984. The prevailing Noise has been recorded in detail; at Basement area feed pumps, Turbines, Boilers F.D.F, I.D.F and Compressor houses. Comparing these two Plants, the Noise Level found more Intensive i.e. 97- 114 dB(A) at TPP Pak Steel Bin Qasim as against 91.4 -96.3 dB(A) at TPS Jamshoro, which was even higher one in the light of ISO and other National Standards. In the light of permissible Occupational Noise exposure limits, as allowed by the ISO and other National Standards, some recommendations have been made to provide safety measures for workers against high level noise health hazards like head ache, hearing problem, irritation, accidents at work, tension, disturbance to work and so many psychological effects, along with guidelines to improve the efficiency of the plants. (author)

  16. HEAVY AND THERMAL OIL RECOVERY PRODUCTION MECHANISMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony R. Kovscek; Louis M. Castanier

    2002-09-30

    The Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute (SUPRI-A) conducts a broad spectrum of research intended to help improve the recovery efficiency from difficult to produce reservoirs including heavy oil and fractured low permeability systems. Our scope of work is relevant across near-, mid-, and long-term time frames. The primary functions of the group are to conduct direction-setting research, transfer research results to industry, and educate and train students for careers in industry. Presently, research in SUPRI-A is divided into 5 main project areas. These projects and their goals include: (1) Multiphase flow and rock properties--to develop better understanding of the physics of displacement in porous media through experiment and theory. This category includes work on imbibition, flow in fractured media, and the effect of temperature on relative permeability and capillary pressure. (2) Hot fluid injection--to improve the application of nonconventional wells for enhanced oil recovery and elucidate the mechanisms of steamdrive in low permeability, fractured porous media. (3) Mechanisms of primary heavy oil recovery--to develop a mechanistic understanding of so-called ''foamy oil'' and its associated physical chemistry. (4) In-situ combustion--to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the insitu combustion process. (5) Reservoir definition--to develop and improve techniques for evaluating formation properties from production information. What follows is a report on activities for the past year. Significant progress was made in all areas.

  17. The use of skewness, kurtosis and neural networks for determining corrosion mechanism from electrochemical noise data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, S.; Bell, G.E.C.; Edgemon, G.L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the work undertaken to de-skill the complex procedure of determining corrosion mechanisms derived from electrochemical noise data. The use of neural networks is discussed and applied to the real time generated electrochemical noise data files with the purpose of determining characteristics particular to individual types of corrosion mechanisms. The electrochemical noise signals can have a wide dynamic range and various methods of raw data pre-processing prior to neural network analysis were investigated. Normalized data were ultimately used as input to the final network analysis. Various network schemes were designed, trained and tested. Factors such as the network learning schedule and network design were considered before a final network was implemented to achieve a solution. Neural networks trained using general and localized corrosion data from various material environment systems were used to analyze data from simulated nuclear waste tank environments with favorable results

  18. Thermal and mechanical stresses in a functionally graded thick sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslami, M.R.; Babaei, M.H.; Poultangari, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a general solution for the one-dimensional steady-state thermal and mechanical stresses in a hollow thick sphere made of functionally graded material is presented. The temperature distribution is assumed to be a function of radius, with general thermal and mechanical boundary conditions on the inside and outside surfaces of the sphere. The material properties, except Poisson's ratio, are assumed to vary along the radius r according to a power law function. The analytical solution of the heat conduction equation and the Navier equation lead to the temperature profile, radial displacement, radial stress, and hoop stress as a function of radial direction

  19. Mechanics and thermal management of stretchable inorganic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jizhou; Feng, Xue; Huang, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    Stretchable electronics enables lots of novel applications ranging from wearable electronics, curvilinear electronics to bio-integrated therapeutic devices that are not possible through conventional electronics that is rigid and flat in nature. One effective strategy to realize stretchable electronics exploits the design of inorganic semiconductor material in a stretchable format on an elastomeric substrate. In this review, we summarize the advances in mechanics and thermal management of stretchable electronics based on inorganic semiconductor materials. The mechanics and thermal models are very helpful in understanding the underlying physics associated with these systems, and they also provide design guidelines for the development of stretchable inorganic electronics.

  20. Mechanics and thermal management of stretchable inorganic electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jizhou; Feng, Xue; Huang, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    Stretchable electronics enables lots of novel applications ranging from wearable electronics, curvilinear electronics to bio-integrated therapeutic devices that are not possible through conventional electronics that is rigid and flat in nature. One effective strategy to realize stretchable electronics exploits the design of inorganic semiconductor material in a stretchable format on an elastomeric substrate. In this review, we summarize the advances in mechanics and thermal management of stretchable electronics based on inorganic semiconductor materials. The mechanics and thermal models are very helpful in understanding the underlying physics associated with these systems, and they also provide design guidelines for the development of stretchable inorganic electronics. PMID:27547485

  1. Dependence of Glass Mechanical Properties on Thermal and Pressure History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Bauchy, Mathieu

    Predicting the properties of new glasses prior to manufacturing is a topic attracting great industrial and scientific interest. Mechanical properties are currently of particular interest given the increasing demand for stronger, thinner, and more flexible glasses in recent years. However, as a non......-equilibrium material, the structure and properties of glass depend not only on its composition, but also on its thermal and pressure histories. Here we review our recent findings regarding the thermal and pressure history dependence of indentation-derived mechanical properties of oxide glasses....

  2. A non-contact, thermal noise based method for the calibration of lateral deflection sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullin, Nic; Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-01-01

    Calibration of lateral forces and displacements has been a long standing problem in lateral force microscopies. Recently, it was shown by Wagner et al. that the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode may be used to calibrate the deflection sensitivity of the detector. This method is quick, non-destructive and may be performed in situ in air or liquid. Here we make a full quantitative comparison of the lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity obtained by the lateral thermal noise method and the shape independent method developed by Anderson et al. We find that the thermal method provides accurate results for a wide variety of rectangular cantilevers, provided that the geometry of the cantilever is suitable for torsional stiffness calibration by the torsional Sader method, in-plane bending of the cantilever may be eliminated or accounted for and that any scaling of the lateral deflection signal between the measurement of the lateral thermal noise and the measurement of the lateral deflection is eliminated or corrected for. We also demonstrate that the thermal method may be used to characterize the linearity of the detector signal as a function of position, and find a deviation of less than 8% for the instrument used

  3. Thermal and mechanical cutting of concrete and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloj, G.; Tittel, G.

    1984-01-01

    Various thermal and mechanical processes for dismantling radioactive large components and concrete structures were investigated in order to determine the optimal handling conditions and their respective efficiency. For the thermal processes, the separation of heavy concrete and steel components by means of oxygen lances, powder cutting, ocyacetylene cutting, and plasma cutting processes were tested. In order to gain the necessary data for designing filtering equipment with regard to use in nuclear power stations, the amount of dust deposition and particle size distribution for these thermal processes were measured. The largest particle size proportion occurs for a particle size of ca. 0.3 μm. For the mechanical processes, stationary saws were used. Due to the large dimensions of the components which are to be found in a nuclear installation, it is not possible to use such saws for the initial dismantling. These saws can be used for both low-alloy and austenitic types of steel, and for separating materials not containing iron. In order to compare the efficiency of the saws with that of the thermal processes, to some extent the same test pieces were used that were used for the thermal tests. The advantage of the saw technique in comparison to the thermal separation processes lies in that next to no gas or dust contamination can become released. Also, the amount of shavings produced (secondary waste) is low. Furthermore, some of the saws can be used under remote control

  4. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics study of thermal shock cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Nakazawa, H.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes thermal shock experiments conducted on a nuclear pressure vessel steel (A533 Grade B Class 1), an AISI304 steel and a tool steel (JIS SKD62) using both a new thermal shock test facility and method. Analysis of their quasi-static thermal stress intensity factors is performed on the basis of linear-elastic fracture mechanics; and a thermal shock fracture toughness value, Ksub(tsc) is evaluated. Then elastic-plastic fracture toughness tests are carried out in the same high temperature range of the thermal shock experiment, and a relation between the stretched zone width, SZW, formed as a result of the fatigue precrack tip plastic blunting and the J-integral is clarified. An elastic-plastic thermal shock fracture toughness value, Jsub(tsc), is evaluated from a critical value of the stretched zone width, SZWsub(tsc), at the initiation of the thermal shock cracking by using the relation between SZW and J. The Jsub(tsc) value is compared with an elastic-plastic fracture toughness value, Jsub(Ic), and the difference between these Jsub(tsc) and Jsub(Ic) values is discussed on the basis of fractography. (author)

  5. Regulatory requirements to the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical computer codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitkova, M.; Kalchev, B.; Stefanova, S.

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the regulatory requirements to the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical computer codes, which are used for safety assessment of the fuel design and the fuel utilization. Some requirements to the model development, verification and validation of the codes and analysis of code uncertainties are also define. Questions concerning Quality Assurance during development and implementation of the codes as well as preparation of a detailed verification and validation plan are briefly discussed

  6. Characterization of Thermal and Mechanical Impact on Aluminum Honeycomb Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study supports NASA Kennedy Space Center's research in the area of intelligent thermal management systems and multifunctional thermal systems. This project addresses the evaluation of the mechanical and thermal properties of metallic cellular solid (MCS) materials; those that are lightweight; high strength, tunable, multifunctional and affordable. A portion of the work includes understanding the mechanical properties of honeycomb structured cellular solids upon impact testing under ambient, water-immersed, liquid nitrogen-cooled, and liquid nitrogen-immersed conditions. Additionally, this study will address characterization techniques of the aluminum honeycomb's ability to resist multiple high-rate loadings or impacts in varying environmental conditions, using various techniques for the quantitative and qualitative determination for commercial applicability.

  7. Flue Gas Desulfurization by Mechanically and Thermally Activated Sodium Bicarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Walawska Barbara; Szymanek Arkadiusz; Pajdak Anna; Nowak Marzena

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of study on structural parameters (particle size, surface area, pore volume) and the sorption ability of mechanically and thermally activated sodium bicarbonate. The sorption ability of the modified sorbent was evaluated by: partial and overall SO2 removal efficiency, conversion rate, normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR). Sodium bicarbonate was mechanically activated by various grinding techniques, using three types of mills: fluid bed opposed jet mill, fine i...

  8. Thermal and mechanical modelling of convergent plate margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beukel, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis, the thermal and mechanical structure of convergent plate margins will be investigated by means of numerical modelling. In addition, we will discuss the implications of modelling results for geological processes such as metamorphism or the break-up of a plate at a convergent plate

  9. Effect of high thermal expansion glass infiltration on mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work studies the effect on the mechanical properties of alumina-10 wt% zirconia (3 mol% yttria stabilized) composite by infiltrating glass of a higher thermal expansion (soda lime glass) on the surface at high temperature. The glass improved the strength of composite at room temperature as well as at high temperature.

  10. Mechanical properties of clayey soils and thermal solicitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boisson, J.Y.

    1992-01-01

    Changes in permeability and mechanical properties of three clayey soils with temperature have been studied by using a special oedometric cell. The action of a thermal solicitation on the fabric and the behavior of the samples is highlighted. 3 figs., 1 tab

  11. Thermal behaviors of mechanically activated pyrites by thermogravimetry (TG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Huiping; Chen Qiyuan; Yin Zhoulan; Zhang Pingmin

    2003-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of mechanically activated and non-activated pyrites were studied by thermogravimetry (TG) at the heating rate of 10 K min -1 in argon. Results indicate that the initial temperature of thermal decomposition (T di ) in TG curves for mechanically activated pyrites decreases gradually with increasing the grinding time. The specific granulometric surface area (S G ), the structural disorder of mechanically activated pyrites were analyzed by X-ray diffraction laser particle size analyzer, and X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), respectively. The results show that the S G of mechanically activated pyrites remains almost constant after a certain grinding time, and lattice distortions (ε) rise but the crystallite sizes (D) decrease with increasing the grinding time. All these results imply that the decrease of T di in TG curves of mechanically activated pyrites is mainly caused by the increase of lattice distortions ε and the decrease of the crystallite sizes D of mechanically activated pyrite with increasing the grinding time. The differences in the reactivity between non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites were observed using characterization of the products obtained from 1 h treatment of non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites at 713 K under inert atmosphere and characterization of non-activated and mechanically activated pyrites exposed to ambient air for a certain period

  12. Integrating Thermal Tools Into the Mechanical Design Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Siebes, Georg; Novak, Keith S.; Kinsella, Gary M.

    1999-01-01

    The intent of mechanical design is to deliver a hardware product that meets or exceeds customer expectations, while reducing cycle time and cost. To this end, an integrated mechanical design process enables the idea of parallel development (concurrent engineering). This represents a shift from the traditional mechanical design process. With such a concurrent process, there are significant issues that have to be identified and addressed before re-engineering the mechanical design process to facilitate concurrent engineering. These issues also assist in the integration and re-engineering of the thermal design sub-process since it resides within the entire mechanical design process. With these issues in mind, a thermal design sub-process can be re-defined in a manner that has a higher probability of acceptance, thus enabling an integrated mechanical design process. However, the actual implementation is not always problem-free. Experience in applying the thermal design sub-process to actual situations provides the evidence for improvement, but more importantly, for judging the viability and feasibility of the sub-process.

  13. Response of mechanical properties of glasses to their chemical, thermal and mechanical histories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng

    , surface, thermal history or excess entropy of the final glass state. Here I review recent progresses in understanding of the responses of mechanical properties of oxide glasses to the compositional variation, thermal history and mechanical deformation. The tensile strength, elastic modulus and hardness...... of glass fibers are dependent on the thermal history (measured as fictive temperature), tension, chemical composition and redox state. However, the fictive temperature affects the hardness of bulk glass in a complicated manner, i.e., the effect does not exhibit a clear regularity in the range...... and micro-cracks occurring during indentation of a glass is discussed briefly. Finally I describe the future perspectives and challenges in understanding responses of mechanical properties of oxide glasses to compositional variation, thermal history and mechanical deformation....

  14. Zebrafish hair cell mechanics and physiology through the lens of noise-induced hair cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Allison B.; Xu, Jie; Uribe, Phillip M.

    2018-05-01

    Hair cells are exquisitely sensitive to auditory stimuli, but also to damage from a variety of sources including noise trauma and ototoxic drugs. Mammals cannot regenerate cochlear hair cells, while non-mammalian vertebrates exhibit robust regenerative capacity. Our research group uses the lateral line system of larval zebrafish to explore the mechanisms underlying hair cell damage, identify protective therapies, and determine molecular drivers of innate regeneration. The lateral line system contains externally located sensory organs called neuromasts, each composed of ˜8-20 hair cells. Lateral line hair cells are homologous to vertebrate inner ear hair cells and share similar susceptibility to ototoxic damage. In the last decade, the lateral line has emerged as a powerful model system for understanding hair cell death mechanisms and for identifying novel protective compounds. Here we demonstrate that the lateral line is a tractable model for noise-induced hair cell death. We have developed a novel noise damage system capable of inducing over 50% loss of lateral line hair cells, with hair cell death occurring in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Cell death is greatest 72 hours post-exposure. However, early signs of hair cell damage, including changes in membrane integrity and reduced mechanotransduction, are apparent within hours of noise exposure. These features, early signs of damage followed by delayed hair cell death, are consistent with mammalian data, suggesting that noise acts similarly on zebrafish and mammalian hair cells. In our future work we will use our new model system to investigate noise damage events in real time, and to develop protective therapies for future translational research.

  15. Cluster-cluster aggregation of Ising dipolar particles under thermal noise

    KAUST Repository

    Suzuki, Masaru

    2009-08-14

    The cluster-cluster aggregation processes of Ising dipolar particles under thermal noise are investigated in the dilute condition. As the temperature increases, changes in the typical structures of clusters are observed from chainlike (D1) to crystalline (D2) through fractal structures (D1.45), where D is the fractal dimension. By calculating the bending energy of the chainlike structure, it is found that the transition temperature is associated with the energy gap between the chainlike and crystalline configurations. The aggregation dynamics changes from being dominated by attraction to diffusion involving changes in the dynamic exponent z=0.2 to 0.5. In the region of temperature where the fractal clusters grow, different growth rates are observed between charged and neutral clusters. Using the Smoluchowski equation with a twofold kernel, this hetero-aggregation process is found to result from two types of dynamics: the diffusive motion of neutral clusters and the weak attractive motion between charged clusters. The fact that changes in structures and dynamics take place at the same time suggests that transitions in the structure of clusters involve marked changes in the dynamics of the aggregation processes. © 2009 The American Physical Society.

  16. The thermal and mechanical deformation study of up-stream pumping mechanical seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H L; Xu, C; Zuo, M Z; Wu, Q B

    2015-01-01

    Taking the viscosity-temperature relationship of the fluid film into consideration, a 3-D numerical model was established by ANSYS software which can simulate the heat transfer between the upstream pumping mechanical seal stationary and rotational rings and the fluid film between them as well as simulate the thermal deformation, structure deformation and the coupling deformation of them. According to the calculation result, thermal deformation causes the seal face expansion and the maximum thermal deformation appears at the inside of the seal ring. Pressure results in a mechanical deformation, the maximum deformation occurs at the top of the spiral groove and the overall trend is inward the mating face, opposite to the thermal deformation. The coupling deformation indicate that the thermal deformation can be partly counteracted by pressure deformation. Using this model, the relationship between deformation and shaft speed and the sealing liquid pressure was studied. It's found that the shaft speed will both enhance the thermal and structure deformation and the fluid pressure will enhance the structure deformation but has little to do with the thermal deformation. By changing the sealing material, it's found that material with low thermal expansion coefficient and low elastic modulus will suffer less thermal-pressure deformation

  17. The thermal and mechanical deformation study of up-stream pumping mechanical seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. L.; Xu, C.; Zuo, M. Z.; Wu, Q. B.

    2015-01-01

    Taking the viscosity-temperature relationship of the fluid film into consideration, a 3-D numerical model was established by ANSYS software which can simulate the heat transfer between the upstream pumping mechanical seal stationary and rotational rings and the fluid film between them as well as simulate the thermal deformation, structure deformation and the coupling deformation of them. According to the calculation result, thermal deformation causes the seal face expansion and the maximum thermal deformation appears at the inside of the seal ring. Pressure results in a mechanical deformation, the maximum deformation occurs at the top of the spiral groove and the overall trend is inward the mating face, opposite to the thermal deformation. The coupling deformation indicate that the thermal deformation can be partly counteracted by pressure deformation. Using this model, the relationship between deformation and shaft speed and the sealing liquid pressure was studied. It's found that the shaft speed will both enhance the thermal and structure deformation and the fluid pressure will enhance the structure deformation but has little to do with the thermal deformation. By changing the sealing material, it's found that material with low thermal expansion coefficient and low elastic modulus will suffer less thermal-pressure deformation.

  18. Implementation of heaters on thermally actuated spacecraft mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, John D.; Bokaie, Michael D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents general insight into the design and implementation of heaters as used in actuating mechanisms for spacecraft. Problems and considerations that were encountered during development of the Deep Space Probe and Science Experiment (DSPSE) solar array release mechanism are discussed. Obstacles included large expected fluctuations in ambient temperature, variations in voltage supply levels outgassing concerns, heater circuit design, materials selection, and power control options. Successful resolution of these issues helped to establish a methodology which can be applied to many of the heater design challenges found in thermally actuated mechanisms.

  19. Relationship between mechanical characteristics and thermal shock stability of refractories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov-Husovic, T.; Raic, K.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stability of the refractory material with the content of 60 % Al 2 O 3 was investigated. Water quench test (JUS.B.D8.319) was applied as experimental method for thermal stability testing. Damage of porous materials is commonly related to a modification of strength that is mostly a reduction. This is linked with characteristics related to pore space. Mechanical characteristics are considered such as compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity and resistance parameters resulting from resonance frequency measurements, as well as ultrasonic velocity. (Original)

  20. Material recognition based on thermal cues: Mechanisms and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Ni

    2018-01-01

    Some materials feel colder to the touch than others, and we can use this difference in perceived coldness for material recognition. This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying material recognition based on thermal cues. It provides an overview of the physical, perceptual, and cognitive processes involved in material recognition. It also describes engineering domains in which material recognition based on thermal cues have been applied. This includes haptic interfaces that seek to reproduce the sensations associated with contact in virtual environments and tactile sensors aim for automatic material recognition. The review concludes by considering the contributions of this line of research in both science and engineering.

  1. Transient thermal-mechanical coupling behavior analysis of mechanical seals during start-up operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B. C.; Meng, X. K.; Shen, M. X.; Peng, X. D.

    2016-05-01

    A transient thermal-mechanical coupling model for a contacting mechanical seal during start-up has been developed. It takes into consideration the coupling relationship among thermal-mechanical deformation, film thickness, temperature and heat generation. The finite element method and multi-iteration technology are applied to solve the temperature distribution and thermal-mechanical deformation as well as their evolution behavior. Results show that the seal gap transforms from negative coning to positive coning and the contact area of the mechanical seal gradually decreases during start-up. The location of the maximum temperature and maximum contact pressure move from the outer diameter to inside diameter. The heat generation and the friction torque increase sharply at first and then decrease. Meanwhile, the contact force decreases and the fluid film force and leakage rate increase.

  2. Mechanism of the thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Due to their intrinsically low thermal conductivity, intermetallic type-I clathrates are promising candidates for thermoelectric energy conversion, most notably for waste-heat recovery above room temperature. Combining their low thermal conductivity with the enhanced electrical power factor of strongly correlated materials can be considered as one of the most promising routes to a next generation thermoelectric material. However, although much investigated, the physical origin of the low thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates is still debated. Therefore, the main goal of this thesis was to gain deeper insight into the mechanism of the low thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates. On the basis of recent inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering studies on type-I clathrates and skutterudites, an analytical model for describing the phonon thermal conductivity of such filled cage compounds was developed within this thesis. This model is based on the phononic filter effect and on strongly enhanced Umklapp scattering. Data on several Ge-based single crystalline type-I clathrates are discussed in the context of this model, revealing the influence of host framework vacancies, charge carriers, and large defects such as grain boundaries on the low-temperature thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates. Since for waste heat recovery the thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures is of interest, a sophisticated 3w-experiment for accurate measurements of bulk and thin film materials at elevated temperatures was developed. With the help of this experiment, a universal dependence of the intrinsic phonon thermal conductivity of type-I clathrates on the sound velocity and the lowest-lying guest Einstein mode was demonstrated for the first time. Further investigations on thermoelectric materials including the first Ce-containing type-I clathrate, skutterudites, and thin films complete this doctoral work. (author)

  3. Electro-Thermal-Mechanical Simulation Capability Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, D

    2008-01-01

    This is the Final Report for LDRD 04-ERD-086, 'Electro-Thermal-Mechanical Simulation Capability'. The accomplishments are well documented in five peer-reviewed publications and six conference presentations and hence will not be detailed here. The purpose of this LDRD was to research and develop numerical algorithms for three-dimensional (3D) Electro-Thermal-Mechanical simulations. LLNL has long been a world leader in the area of computational mechanics, and recently several mechanics codes have become 'multiphysics' codes with the addition of fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and chemistry. However, these multiphysics codes do not incorporate the electromagnetics that is required for a coupled Electro-Thermal-Mechanical (ETM) simulation. There are numerous applications for an ETM simulation capability, such as explosively-driven magnetic flux compressors, electromagnetic launchers, inductive heating and mixing of metals, and MEMS. A robust ETM simulation capability will enable LLNL physicists and engineers to better support current DOE programs, and will prepare LLNL for some very exciting long-term DoD opportunities. We define a coupled Electro-Thermal-Mechanical (ETM) simulation as a simulation that solves, in a self-consistent manner, the equations of electromagnetics (primarily statics and diffusion), heat transfer (primarily conduction), and non-linear mechanics (elastic-plastic deformation, and contact with friction). There is no existing parallel 3D code for simulating ETM systems at LLNL or elsewhere. While there are numerous magnetohydrodynamic codes, these codes are designed for astrophysics, magnetic fusion energy, laser-plasma interaction, etc. and do not attempt to accurately model electromagnetically driven solid mechanics. This project responds to the Engineering R and D Focus Areas of Simulation and Energy Manipulation, and addresses the specific problem of Electro-Thermal-Mechanical simulation for design and analysis of energy manipulation systems

  4. Thermal and mechanical stability of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks polymorphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lila Bouëssel du Bourg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical studies on the experimental feasibility of hypothetical Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs have focused so far on relative energy of various polymorphs by energy minimization at the quantum chemical level. We present here a systematic study of stability of 18 ZIFs as a function of temperature and pressure by molecular dynamics simulations. This approach allows us to better understand the limited stability of some experimental structures upon solvent or guest removal. We also find that many of the hypothetical ZIFs proposed in the literature are not stable at room temperature. Mechanical and thermal stability criteria thus need to be considered for the prediction of new MOF structures. Finally, we predict a variety of thermal expansion behavior for ZIFs as a function of framework topology, with some materials showing large negative volume thermal expansion.

  5. Pulsed laser manipulation of an optically trapped bead: Averaging thermal noise and measuring the pulsed force amplitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindballe, Thue Bjerring; Kristensen, Martin V. G.; Keiding, Søren Rud

    2013-01-01

    An experimental strategy for post-eliminating thermal noise on position measurements of optically trapped particles is presented. Using a nanosecond pulsed laser, synchronized to the detection system, to exert a periodic driving force on an optically trapped 10 polystyrene bead, the laser pulse-bead...... interaction is repeated hundreds of times. Traces with the bead position following the prompt displacement from equilibrium, induced by each laser pulse, are averaged and reveal the underlying deterministic motion of the bead, which is not visible in a single trace due to thermal noise. The motion of the bead...... is analyzed from the direct time-dependent position measurements and from the power spectrum. The results show that the bead is on average displaced 208 nm from the trap center and exposed to a force amplitude of 71 nanoNewton, more than five orders of magnitude larger than the trapping forces. Our...

  6. Thermal assault and polyurethane foam-evaluating protective mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, C.L.; Iams, Z.L.

    2004-01-01

    Rigid polyurethane foam utilizes a variety of mechanisms to mitigate the thermal assault of a ''regulatory burn''. Polymer specific heat and foam k-factor are of limited usefulness in predicting payload protection. Properly formulated rigid polyurethane foam provides additional safeguards by employing ablative mechanisms which are effective even when the foam has been crushed or fractured as a result of trauma. The dissociative transitions from polymer to gas and char, and the gas transport of heat from inside the package out into the environment are also thermal mitigators. Additionally, the in-situ production of an intumescent, insulative, carbonaceous char, confers thermal protection even when a package's outer steel skin has been breached. In this test program, 19 liter, ''Five gallon'' steel pails are exposed on one end to the flame of an ''Oil Burner'' as described in the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ''Aircraft Materials Fire Test Handbook''. When burning 2 diesel at a nominal rate of 8.39 kg (18.5 pounds)/hr, the burner generates a high emissivity flame that impinges on the pail face with the thermal intensity of a full scale pool-fire environment. Results of these tests, TGA and MDSC analysis on the subject foams are reported, and their relevance to full size packages and pool fires are discussed

  7. Nociceptive responses to thermal and mechanical stimulations in awake pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Herskin, Mette S.

    2013-01-01

    body sizes (30 and 60 kg) were exposed to thermal (CO(2) laser) and mechanical (pressure application measurement device) stimulations to the flank and the hind legs in a balanced order. The median response latency and the type of behavioural response were recorded. RESULTS: Small pigs exhibited...... animal studies in a large species require further examination. This manuscript describes the initial development of a porcine model of cutaneous nociception and focuses on interactions between the sensory modality, body size and the anatomical location of the stimulation site. METHODS: Pigs of different...... significantly lower pain thresholds (shorter latency to response) than large pigs to thermal and mechanical stimulations. Stimulations at the two anatomical locations elicited very distinct sets of behavioural responses, with different levels of sensitivity between the flank and the hind legs. Furthermore...

  8. Computationally efficient thermal-mechanical modelling of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yabin; Ayas, Can

    2017-10-01

    The Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing (AM) method to produce high density metal parts with complex topology. However, part distortions and accompanying residual stresses deteriorates the mechanical reliability of SLM products. Modelling of the SLM process is anticipated to be instrumental for understanding and predicting the development of residual stress field during the build process. However, SLM process modelling requires determination of the heat transients within the part being built which is coupled to a mechanical boundary value problem to calculate displacement and residual stress fields. Thermal models associated with SLM are typically complex and computationally demanding. In this paper, we present a simple semi-analytical thermal-mechanical model, developed for SLM that represents the effect of laser scanning vectors with line heat sources. The temperature field within the part being build is attained by superposition of temperature field associated with line heat sources in a semi-infinite medium and a complimentary temperature field which accounts for the actual boundary conditions. An analytical solution of a line heat source in a semi-infinite medium is first described followed by the numerical procedure used for finding the complimentary temperature field. This analytical description of the line heat sources is able to capture the steep temperature gradients in the vicinity of the laser spot which is typically tens of micrometers. In turn, semi-analytical thermal model allows for having a relatively coarse discretisation of the complimentary temperature field. The temperature history determined is used to calculate the thermal strain induced on the SLM part. Finally, a mechanical model governed by elastic-plastic constitutive rule having isotropic hardening is used to predict the residual stresses.

  9. Radiation Improved Mechanical and Thermal Property of PP/HDPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaisupaditsin, M.; Thammit, C.; Techakiatkul, C.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical properties, thermal properties and gel contents of PP-irradiated HDPE blends were studied. HDPE was gamma irradiated in the dose range of 10-30 kGy. The ratios of polymer blends of 30PP:70HDPE was mixed by a twin screw extruder at speed of 50 rpm. Irradiated HDPE with 30 kGy showed the highest gel contents. The blends ratio of 30PP:70HDPE (30 kGy) shows better heat resistance than the blends with non-irradiated HDPE. With increasing the radiation doses, the mechanical properties of the blends were improved

  10. Thermal and mechanical properties of fatty acid starch esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, H; Vorwerg, W; Rihm, R

    2014-02-15

    The current study examined thermal and mechanical properties of fatty acid starch esters (FASEs). All highly soluble esters were obtained by the sustainable, homogeneous transesterification of fatty acid vinyl esters in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Casted films of products with a degree of substitution (DS) of 1.40-1.73 were compared with highly substituted ones (DS 2.20-2.63). All films were free of any plasticizer additives. Hydrophobic surfaces were characterized by contact angle measurements. Dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) revealed thermal transitions (T(g), T(m)) which were influenced by the internal plasticizing effect of the ester groups. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) measurements showed the increased thermal stability toward native starch. Tensile tests revealed the decreasing strength and stiffness of the products with increasing ester-group chain length while the elongation increased up to the ester group laurate and after that decreased. Esters of the longest fatty acids, palmitate and stearate turned out to be brittle materials due to super molecular structures of the ester chains such as confirmed by X-ray. Summarized products with a DS 1.40-1.73 featured more "starch-like" properties with tensile strength up to outstanding 43 MPa, while products with a DS >2 behaved more "oil-like". Both classes of esters should be tested as a serious alternative to commercial starch blends and petrol-based plastics. The term Cnumber is attributed to the number of total C-Atoms of the fatty acid (e.g. C6=Hexanoate). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. COMTA - a computer code for fuel mechanical and thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, S.; Sawhney, S.S.; Anand, A.K.; Anantharaman, K.; Mehta, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    COMTA is a generalized computer code for integrity analysis of the free standing fuel cladding, with natural UO 2 or mixed oxide fuel pellets. Thermal and Mechanical analysis is done simultaneously for any power history of the fuel pin. For analysis, the fuel cladding is assumed to be axisymmetric and is subjected to axisymmetric load due to contact pressure, gas pressure, coolant pressure and thermal loads. Axial variation of load is neglected and creep and plasticity are assumed to occur at constant volume. The pellet is assumed to be made of concentric annuli. The fission gas release integral is dependent on the temperature and the power produced in each annulus. To calculate the temperature distribution in the fuel pin, the variation of bulk coolant temperature is given as an input to the code. Gap conductance is calculated at every time step, considering fuel densification, fuel relocation and gap closure, filler gas dilution by released fission gas, gap closure by expansion and irradiation swelling. Overall gap conductance is contributed by heat transfer due to the three modes; conduction convection and radiation as per modified Ross and Stoute model. Equilibrium equations, compatibility equations, stress strain relationships (including thermal strains and permanent strains due to creep and plasticity) are used to obtain triaxial stresses and strains. Thermal strain is assumed to be zero at hot zero power conditions. The boundary conditions are obtained for radial stresses at outside and inside surfaces by making these equal to coolant pressure and internal pressure respectively. A multi-mechanism creep model which accounts for thermal and irradiation creep is used to calculate the overall creep rate. Effective plastic strain is a function of effective stress and material constants. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of macroscopic plasma parameters with a radio experiment: Interpretation of the quasi-thermal noise spectrum observed in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, P.; Hoang, S.; Meyer-Vernet, N.; Steinberg, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The ISEE-3 SBH radio receiver has provided the first systematic observations of the quasi-thermal (plasma waves) noise in the solar wind plasma. The theoretical interpretation of that noise involves the particle distribution function so that electric noise measurements with long antennas provide a fast and independent method of measuring plasma parameters: densities and temperatures of a two component (core and halo) electron distribution function have been obtained in that way. The polarization of that noise is frequency dependent and sensitive to the drift velocity of the electron population. Below the plasma frequency, there is evidence of a weak noise spectrum with spectral index -1 which is not yet accounted for by the theory. The theoretical treatment of the noise associated with the low energy (thermal) proton population shows that the moving electrical antenna radiates in the surrounding plasma by Carenkov emission which becomes predominant at the low frequencies, below about 0.1 F sub P.

  13. Thin circular cylinder under axisymmetrical thermal and mechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaudeau, F.; Zarka, J.; Gerij, J.

    1977-01-01

    To assess structural integrity of components subjected to cyclic thermal loadings one must look at thermal ratchetting as a possible failure mode. Considering a thin circular cylinder subjected to constant internal pressure and cyclically varying thermal gradient through the thickness Bree, J. Strain Analysis 2 (1967) No.3, obtained a diagram that serves as a foundation for many design rules (e.g.: ASME code). The upper part of the french LMFBR main vessel is subjected to an axisymmetrical axial thermal loading and an axial load (own weight). Operation of the reactor leads to cyclic variations of the axial thermal loading. The question that arises is whether or not the Bree diagram is realistic for such loading conditions. A special purpose computer code (Ratch) was developed to analyse a thin circular cylinder subjected to axisymmetrical mechanical and thermal loadings. The Mendelson's approach of this problem is followed. Classical Kirchoff-Love hypothesis of thin shells is used and a state of plane stress is assumed. Space integrations are performed by Gaussian quadrature in the axial direction and by Simpson's one third rule throughout the thickness. Thermoelastic-plastic constitutive equations are solved with an implicit scheme (Nguyen). Thermovisco-plastic constitutive equations are solved with an explicit time integration scheme (Treanor's algorithm especially fitted). A Bree type diagram is obtained for an axial step of temperature which varies cyclically and a sustained constant axial load. The material behavior is assumed perfectly plastic and creep effect is not considered. Results show that the domain where no ratchetting occurs is reduced when compared with the domain predicted by the Bree diagram

  14. Nanobioceramic Composites: A Study of Mechanical, Morphological, and Thermal Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivabalan Sasthiryar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the incorporation of biomass carbon nanofillers (CNF into advanced ceramic. Biomass from bamboo, bagasse (remains of sugarcane after pressing, and oil palm ash was used as the predecessor for producing carbon black nanofillers. Furnace pyrolysis was carried out at 1000 °C and was followed by ball-mill processing to obtain carbon nanofillers in the range of 50 nm to 100 nm. CNFs were added to alumina in varying weight fractions and the resulting mixture was subjected to vacuum sintering at 1400 °C to produce nanobioceramic composites. The ceramic composites were characterized for mechanical, thermal, and morphological properties. A high-resolution Charge-coupled device (CCD camera was used to study the fracture impact and the failure mechanism. An increase in the loading percentage of CNFs in the alumna decreased the specific gravity, vickers hardness (HV, and fracture toughness values of the composite materials. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity and the thermal stability of the ceramic composite increased as compared to the pristine alumina.

  15. Understanding the thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of epoxy nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarathi, R.; Sahu, R.K.; Rajeshkumar, P.

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the electrical, mechanical and thermal properties of epoxy nanocomposite materials were studied. The electrical insulation characteristics were analyzed through short time breakdown voltage test, accelerated electrical ageing test, and by tracking test. The breakdown voltage increases with increase in nano-clay content up to 5 wt%, under AC and DC voltages. The volume resistivity, permittivity and tan(δ) of the epoxy nanocomposites were measured. The Weibull studies indicate that addition of nanoclay upto 5 wt% enhances the characteristic life of epoxy nanocomposite insulation material. The tracking test results indicate that the tracking time is high with epoxy nanocomposites as compared to pure epoxy. Ageing studies were carried out to understand the surface characteristic variation through contact angle measurement. The hydrophobicity of the insulating material was analysed through contact angle measurement. The diffusion coefficients of the material with different percentage of clay in epoxy nanocomposites were calculated. The exfoliation characteristics in epoxy nanocomposites were analyzed through wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) studies. The thermal behaviour of the epoxy nanocomposites was analyzed by carrying out thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) studies. Heat deflection temperature of the material was measured to understand the stability of the material for intermittent temperature variation. The dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results indicated that storage modulus of the material increases with small amount of clay in epoxy resin. The activation energy of the material was calculated from the DMA results

  16. Modelling of thermal and mechanical behaviour of pebble beds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boccaccini, L.V.; Buehler, L.; Hermsmeyer, S.; Wolf, F.

    2001-01-01

    FZK (Forshungzentrum Karlsruhe) is developing a Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket Concept for fusion power reactors based on the use of ceramic breeder materials and beryllium multiplier in the form of pebble beds. The design of such a blanket requires models and computer codes describing the thermal-mechanical behavior of pebble beds to evaluate the temperatures, stresses, deformations and mechanical interactions between pebble beds and the structure with required accuracy and reliability. The objective to describe the beginning of life condition for the HCPB blanket seems near to be reached. Mechanical models that describe the thermo-mechanical behavior of granular materials used in form of pebble beds are implemented in a commercial structure code. These models have been calibrated using the results of a large series of dedicated experiments. The modeling work is practically concluded for ceramic breeder; it will be carried on in the next year for beryllium to obtain the required correlations for creep and the thermal conductivity. The difficulties for application in large components (such as the HCPB blanket) are the limitations of the present commercial codes to manage such a set of constitutive equations under complex load conditions and large mesh number. The further objective is to model the thermal cycles during operation; the present correlations have to be adapted for the release phase. A complete description of the blanket behavior during irradiation is at the present out of our capability; this objective requires an extensive R and D program that at the present is only at the beginning. (Y.Tanaka)

  17. Epitaxial Growth and Cracking Mechanisms of Thermally Sprayed Ceramic Splats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Guan-jun

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, the epitaxial growth and cracking mechanisms of thermally sprayed ceramic splats were explored. We report, for the first time, the epitaxial growth of various splat/substrate combinations at low substrate temperatures (100 °C) and large lattice mismatch (- 11.26%). Our results suggest that thermal spray deposition was essentially a liquid-phase epitaxy, readily forming chemical bonding. The interface temperature was also estimated. The results convincingly demonstrated that atoms only need to diffuse and rearrange over a sufficiently short range during extremely rapid solidification. Concurrently, severe cracking occurred in the epitaxial splat/substrate systems, which indicated high tensile stress was produced during splat deposition. The origin of the tensile stress was attributed to the strong constraint of the locally heated substrate by its cold surroundings.

  18. The Usability of Noise Level from Rock Cutting for the Prediction of Physico-Mechanical Properties of Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delibalta, M. S.; Kahraman, S.; Comakli, R.

    2015-11-01

    Because the indirect tests are easier and cheaper than the direct tests, the prediction of rock properties from the indirect testing methods is important especially for the preliminary investigations. In this study, the predictability of the physico-mechanical rock properties from the noise level measured during cutting rock with diamond saw was investigated. Noise measurement test, uniaxial compressive strength (UCS) test, Brazilian tensile strength (BTS) test, point load strength (Is) test, density test, and porosity test were carried out on 54 different rock types in the laboratory. The results were statistically analyzed to derive estimation equations. Strong correlations between the noise level and the mechanical rock properties were found. The relations follow power functions. Increasing rock strength increases the noise level. Density and porosity also correlated strongly with the noise level. The relations follow linear functions. Increasing density increases the noise level while increasing porosity decreases the noise level. The developed equations are valid for the rocks with a compressive strength below 150 MPa. Concluding remark is that the physico-mechanical rock properties can reliably be estimated from the noise level measured during cutting the rock with diamond saw.

  19. Time Delay Mechanical-noise Cancellation (TDMC) to Provide Order of Magnitude Improvements in Radio Science Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, D. H.; Babuscia, A.; Lazio, J.; Asmar, S.

    2017-12-01

    Many Radio Science investigations, including the determinations of planetary masses, measurements of planetary atmospheres, studies of the solar wind, and solar system tests of relativistic gravity, rely heavily on precision Doppler tracking. Recent and currently proposed missions such as VERITAS, Bepi Colombo, Juno have shown that the largest error source in the precision Doppler tracking data is noise in the Doppler system. This noise is attributed to un-modeled motions of the ground antenna's phase center and is commonly referred to as "antenna mechanical noise." Attempting to reduce this mechanical noise has proven difficult since the deep space communications antennas utilize large steel structures that are already optimized for mechanical stability. Armstrong et al. (2008) have demonstrated the Time Delay Mechanical-noise Cancellation (TDMC) concept using Goldstone DSN antennas (70 m & 34 m) and the Cassinispacecraft to show that the mechanical noise of the 70 m antenna could be suppressed when two-way Doppler tracking from the 70 m antenna and the receive-only Doppler data from the smaller, stiffer 34 m antenna were combined with suitable delays. The proof-of-concept confirmed that the mechanical noise in the final Doppler observable was reduced to that of the stiffer, more stable antenna. Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) near Bishop, CA now has six 10.4 m diameter antennas, a consequence of the closure of Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA). In principle, a 10 m antenna can lead to an order-of-magnitude improvement for the mechanical noise correction, as the smaller dish offers better mechanical stability compared to a DSN 34-m antenna. These antennas also have existing Ka-band receiving systems, and preliminary discussions with the OVRO staff suggest that much of the existing signal path could be used for Radio Science observations.

  20. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Praseodymium Monopnictides: AN Ultrasonic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Vyoma; Kumar, Raj; Tripathy, Chinmayee; Singh, Devraj

    2013-09-01

    We have computed ultrasonic attenuation, acoustic coupling constants and ultrasonic velocities of praseodymium monopnictides PrX(X: N, P, As, Sb and Bi) along the , , in the temperature range 100-500 K using higher order elastic constants. The higher order elastic constants are evaluated using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential with two basic parameters viz. nearest-neighbor distance and hardness parameter in the temperature range of 0-500 K. Several other mechanical and thermal parameters like bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, Poisson ratio, anisotropic ratio, tetragonal moduli, Breazeale's nonlinearity parameter and Debye temperature are also calculated. In the present study, the fracture/toughness (B/G) ratio is less than 1.75 which implies that PrX compounds are brittle in nature at room temperature. The chosen material fulfilled Born criterion of mechanical stability. We also found the deviation of Cauchy's relation at higher temperatures. PrN is most stable material as it has highest valued higher order elastic constants as well as the ultrasonic velocity. Further, the lattice thermal conductivity using modified approach of Slack and Berman is determined at room temperature. The ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction and thermoelastic relaxation mechanisms have been computed using modified Mason's approach. The results with other well-known physical properties are useful for industrial applications.

  1. Effect of thermal stresses on the mechanism of tooth pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskui, Iman Z; Ashtiani, Mohammed N; Hashemi, Ata; Jafarzadeh, Hamid

    2014-11-01

    Daily hot and cold thermal loadings on teeth may result in structural deformation, mechanical stress, and pain signaling. The aim of this study was to compare the adverse effects of hot and cold beverages on an intact tooth and, then, to provide physical evidence to support the hydrodynamic theory of tooth pain sensation mechanism. Three-dimensional finite element analysis was performed on a premolar model subjected to hot and cold thermal loadings. Elapsed times for heat diffusion and stress detection at the pulp-dentin junction were calculated as measures of the pain sensation. Extreme tensile stress within the enamel resulted in damage in cold loadings. Also, extreme values of stress at the pulpal wall occurred 21.6 seconds earlier than extreme temperatures in hot and cold loadings. The intact tooth was remarkably vulnerable to cold loading. Earlier changes in mechanical stress rather than temperature at the pulp-dentin junction indicate that the dental pain caused by hot or cold beverages may be based on the hydrodynamic theory. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system for recycling heavy metals from crushed e-wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lu; Xu, Zhenming

    2014-12-01

    Vacuum metallurgy separation (VMS) is a technically feasible method to recover Pb, Cd and other heavy metals from crushed e-wastes. To further determine the environmental impacts and safety of this method, heavy metals exposure, noise and thermal safety in the ambiance of a vacuum metallurgy separation system are evaluated in this article. The mass concentrations of total suspended particulate (TSP) and PM10 are 0.1503 and 0.0973 mg m(-3) near the facilities. The concentrations of Pb, Cd and Sn in TSP samples are 0.0104, 0.1283 and 0.0961 μg m(-3), respectively. Health risk assessments show that the hazard index of Pb is 3.25 × 10(-1) and that of Cd is 1.09 × 10(-1). Carcinogenic risk of Cd through inhalation is 1.08 × 10(-5). The values of the hazard index and risk indicate that Pb and Cd will not cause non-cancerous effects or carcinogenic risk on workers. The noise sources are mainly the mechanical vacuum pump and the water cooling pump. Both of them have the noise levels below 80 dB (A). The thermal safety assessment shows that the temperatures of the vacuum metallurgy separation system surface are all below 303 K after adopting the circulated water cooling and heat insulation measures. This study provides the environmental information of the vacuum metallurgy separation system, which is of assistance to promote the industrialisation of vacuum metallurgy separation for recovering heavy metals from e-wastes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. The effects of MWNT on thermal conductivity and thermal mechanical properties of epoxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismadi, A. I.; Othman, R. N.

    2017-12-01

    Multiwall nanotube (MWNT) was used as filler in various studies to improve thermal conductivity and mechanical properties of epoxy. Present study varied different weight loading (0, 0.1 %, 0.5 %, 1 %, 1.5 %, 3 % and 5 %) of MWNT in order to observe the effects on the epoxy. Nanocomposite was analyzed by dynamic-mechanical thermal analyser (DMTA) and KD2 pro analyzer. DMTA measured storage modulus (E') and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the nanocomposite. Result showed that Tg value of neat epoxy is higher than all MWNT epoxy nanocomposite. Tg values drop from 81.55 °C (neat epoxy) to 65.03 °C (at 0.1 wt%). This may happen due to the agglomeration of MWNT in the epoxy. However, Tg values increases with the increase of MWNT wt%. Tg values increased from 65.03 °C to 78.53 °C at 1 wt%. Increment of storage modulus (E') at 3 °C (glassy region) was observed as the MWNT loading increases. Maximum value of E' during glassy region was observed to be at 5 wt% with (7.26±0.7) E+08 Pa compared to neat epoxy. On the contrary, there is slight increased and slight decreased with E' values at 100 °C (rubbery region) for all nanocomposite. Since epoxy exhibits low thermal conductivity properties, addition of MWNT has enhanced the properties. Optimum value of thermal conductivity was observed at 3 wt%. The values increased up to 9.03 % compared to neat epoxy. As expected, the result showed decrease value in thermal conductivity at 5 wt% as a result of agglomeration of MWNT in the epoxy.

  4. Mechanical and thermal modeling of the SCALPEL mask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C. J.; Semke, W. H.; Dicks, G. A.; Engelstad, R. L.; Lovell, E. G.; Liddle, J. A.; Novembre, A. E.

    1999-01-01

    Scattering with angular limitation projection electron-beam lithography (SCALPEL) is being developed by Lucent Technologies for sub-130 nm lithography. The mask fabrication and exposure processes produce mask distortions that result in pattern placement errors. In order to understand these distortions, and determine how to reduce them to levels consistent with the error budget, structural and heat transfer finite element models have been generated to simulate the mechanical and thermal response of the mask. In addition, sensitivity studies of the distortions due to key design parameters that may be used to refine the SCALPEL mask configuration have been conducted. (c) 1999 American Vacuum Society

  5. Quantum chemical aided prediction of the thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures of ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroon, Maaike C.; Buijs, Wim; Peters, Cor J.; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2007-01-01

    The long-term thermal stability of ionic liquids is of utmost importance for their industrial application. Although the thermal decomposition temperatures of various ionic liquids have been measured previously, experimental data on the thermal decomposition mechanisms and kinetics are scarce. It is desirable to develop quantitative chemical tools that can predict thermal decomposition mechanisms and temperatures (kinetics) of ionic liquids. In this work ab initio quantum chemical calculations (DFT-B3LYP) have been used to predict thermal decomposition mechanisms, temperatures and the activation energies of the thermal breakdown reactions. These quantum chemical calculations proved to be an excellent method to predict the thermal stability of various ionic liquids

  6. Basic thermal-mechanical properties and thermal shock, fatigue resistance of swaged + rolled potassium doped tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Yan, Qingzhi; Lang, Shaoting; Xia, Min; Ge, Changchun

    2014-09-01

    The potassium doped tungsten (W-K) grade was achieved via swaging + rolling process. The swaged + rolled W-K alloy exhibited acceptable thermal conductivity of 159.1 W/m K and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 873 K while inferior mechanical properties attributed to the coarse pores and small deformation degree. Then the thermal shock, fatigue resistance of the W-K grade were characterized by an electron beam facility. Thermal shock tests were conducted at absorbed power densities varied from 0.22 to 1.1 GW/m2 in a step of 0.22 GW/m2. The cracking threshold was in the range of 0.44-0.66 GW/m2. Furthermore, recrystallization occurred in the subsurface of the specimens tested at 0.66-1.1 GW/m2 basing on the analysis of microhardness and microstructure. Thermal fatigue tests were performed at 0.44 GW/m2 up to 1000 cycles and no cracks emerged throughout the tests. Moreover, recrystallization occurred after 1000 cycles.

  7. Mode-hopping mechanism generating colored noise in a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Raghav; Dürrenfeld, P.; Iacocca, E.; Heinonen, O. G.; Åkerman, J.; Muduli, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    The frequency noise spectrum of a magnetic tunnel junction based spin torque oscillator is examined where multiple modes and mode-hopping events are observed. The frequency noise spectrum is found to consist of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise. We find a systematic and similar dependence of both white noise and 1/f frequency noise on bias current and the relative angle between the reference and free layers, which changes the effective damping and hence the mode-hopping behavior in this system. The frequency at which the 1/f frequency noise changes to white noise increases as the free layer is aligned away from the anti-parallel orientation w.r.t the reference layer. These results indicate that the origin of 1/f frequency noise is related to mode-hopping, which produces both white noise as well as 1/f frequency noise similar to the case of ring lasers.

  8. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  9. Thermal noise due to surface-charge effects within the Debye layer of endogenous structures in dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poznanski, Roman R

    2010-02-01

    An assumption commonly used in cable theory is revised by taking into account electrical amplification due to intracellular capacitive effects in passive dendritic cables. A generalized cable equation for a cylindrical volume representation of a dendritic segment is derived from Maxwell's equations under assumptions: (i) the electric-field polarization is restricted longitudinally along the cable length; (ii) extracellular isopotentiality; (iii) quasielectrostatic conditions; and (iv) homogeneous medium with constant conductivity and permittivity. The generalized cable equation is identical to Barenblatt's equation arising in the theory of infiltration in fissured strata with a known analytical solution expressed in terms of a definite integral involving a modified Bessel function and the solution to a linear one-dimensional classical cable equation. Its solution is used to determine the impact of thermal noise on voltage attenuation with distance at any particular time. A regular perturbation expansion for the membrane potential about the linear one-dimensional classical cable equation solution is derived in terms of a Green's function in order to describe the dynamics of free charge within the Debye layer of endogenous structures in passive dendritic cables. The asymptotic value of the first perturbative term is explicitly evaluated for small values of time to predict how the slowly fluctuating (in submillisecond range) electric field attributed to intracellular capacitive effects alters the amplitude of the membrane potential. It was found that capacitive effects are almost negligible for cables with electrotonic lengths L>0.5 , contributes up to 10% of the signal for cables with electrotonic lengths in the range between 0.25thermal noise due to

  10. Knudsen torque: A rotational mechanism driven by thermal force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Liang, Tengfei; Ye, Wenjing

    2014-09-01

    Thermally induced mechanical loading has been shown to have significant effects on micro- and nano-objects immersed in a gas with a nonuniform temperature field. While the majority of existing studies and related applications focus on forces, we investigate the torque, and thus the rotational motion, produced by such a mechanism. Our study has found that a torque can be induced if the configuration of the system is asymmetric. In addition, both the magnitude and the direction of the torque depend highly on the system configuration, indicating the possibility of manipulating the rotational motion via geometrical design. Based on this feature, two types of rotational micromotor that are of practical importance, namely pendulum motor and unidirectional motor, are designed. The magnitude of the torque at Kn =0.5 can reach to around 2nN×μm for a rectangular microbeam with a length of 100μm.

  11. A numerical study of fundamental shock noise mechanisms. Ph.D. Thesis - Cornell Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Kristine R.

    1995-01-01

    The results of this thesis demonstrate that direct numerical simulation can predict sound generation in unsteady aerodynamic flows containing shock waves. Shock waves can be significant sources of sound in high speed jet flows, on helicopter blades, and in supersonic combustion inlets. Direct computation of sound permits the prediction of noise levels in the preliminary design stage and can be used as a tool to focus experimental studies, thereby reducing cost and increasing the probability of a successfully quiet product in less time. This thesis reveals and investigates two mechanisms fundamental to sound generation by shocked flows: shock motion and shock deformation. Shock motion is modeled by the interaction of a sound wave with a shock. During the interaction, the shock wave begins to move and the sound pressure is amplified as the wave passes through the shock. The numerical approach presented in this thesis is validated by the comparison of results obtained in a quasi-one dimensional simulation with linear theory. Analysis of the perturbation energy demonstrated for the first time that acoustic energy is generated by the interaction. Shock deformation is investigated by the numerical simulation of a ring vortex interacting with a shock. This interaction models the passage of turbulent structures through the shock wave. The simulation demonstrates that both acoustic waves and contact surfaces are generated downstream during the interaction. Analysis demonstrates that the acoustic wave spreads cylindrically, that the sound intensity is highly directional, and that the sound pressure level increases significantly with increasing shock strength. The effect of shock strength on sound pressure level is consistent with experimental observations of shock noise, indicating that the interaction of a ring vortex with a shock wave correctly models a dominant mechanism of shock noise generation.

  12. Systematic comparison of mechanical and thermal sludge disintegration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wett, B; Phothilangka, P; Eladawy, A

    2010-06-01

    This study presents a systematic comparison and evaluation of sewage sludge pre-treatment by mechanical and thermal techniques. Waste activated sludge (WAS) was pre-treated by separate full scale Thermo-Pressure-Hydrolysis (TDH) and ball milling facilities. Then the sludge was processed in pilot-scale digestion experiments. The results indicated that a significant increase in soluble organic matter could be achieved. TDH and ball milling pre-treatment could offer a feasible treatment method to efficiently disintegrate sludge and enhance biogas yield of digestion. The TDH increased biogas production by ca. 75% whereas ball milling allowed for an approximately 41% increase. The mechanisms of pre-treatment were investigated by numerical modeling based on Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) in the MatLab/SIMBA environment. TDH process induced advanced COD-solubilisation (COD(soluble)/COD(total)=43%) and specifically complete destruction of cell mass which is hardly degradable in conventional digestion. While the ball mill technique achieved a lower solubilisation rate (COD(soluble)/COD(total)=28%) and only a partial destruction of microbial decay products. From a whole-plant prospective relevant release of ammonia and formation of soluble inerts have been observed especially from thermal hydrolysis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal mechanism of prepeak formation in Pulsed Glow Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, Maxim; Hoffmann, Volker; Steingrobe, Tobias; Buscher, Wolfgang; Engelhard, Carsten; Storey, Andrew; Ray, Steven; Hieftje, Gary

    2012-10-01

    A microsecond Pulsed Glow Discharge (μs PGD) in a Grimm-type source is characterized by the so-called ``prepeak,'' which is a spike in both electrical current and emission intensity at the leading edge of the discharge pulse. The prepeak is followed by synchronized vibrations of the current and the emission. To understand the nature of these phenomena, a microphone was inserted into the discharge chamber. Acoustical waves were detected and found to be in correlation with the measured vibrations. This points to a thermal mechanism for prepeak formation: the gas is heated in the leading edge of the discharge pulse and then expanded. To prove this suggestion, a Monte-Carlo based model was developed to simulate the evolution of Ar concentration, temperature, and flow in time and space. Potentially, the model could be used for gas simulations in a wide range of different applications. Here, the model is incorporated into an existing but modified model of the μs PGD in a Grimm-type plasma excitation source. Results of the simulations confirm that the thermal mechanism is responsible for the formation of the electrical prepeak and the pressure waves.

  14. Thermal mechanical analysis of a solid breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aquaro, Donato

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with a theoretical model of thermal mechanical behaviour of pebble beds, used as neutron multiplier or tritium breeder in the breeding blanket of a fusion nuclear reactor. The model tries to sum up the advantages of the two approaches ('discrete' method and macroscopic method), presently used for analysing the pebble bed behaviour, without their intrinsic disadvantages. The developed method has the capability to describe the microscopic behaviour of the single sphere (as the discrete approach does), and the capability to model complex structures under variable loads, typical of the macroscopic approach, without doing the unrealistic assumption of continuum homogeneous and isotropic material. The model describes the thermal mechanical behaviour of a single sphere compressed in elastic plastic conditions. The obtained relations have been extrapolated to regular lattices of spheres and subsequently to pebble beds (characterised by a macroscopic parameter called 'packing factor') of simple geometric shapes using statistical considerations. The results of the model have been assessed by comparison with results obtained by means of numerical simulations and experimental tests. The ongoing activity is the implementation in a FEM code of a new finite element, which represents one or several regular lattices of spheres, the non linear stiffness of which is obtained from the mono dimensional compression model of one sphere. The results of the numerical simulation permits to construct and display the strain and stress distribution of the single spheres by means of an implemented graphical interface

  15. Mechanical and thermal design of the Cascade reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    We present an improved Cascade fusion reaction chamber that is optimized with respect to chamber radius, wall thickness, and pebble blanket outlet temperature. We show results of a parameter study where we varied chamber radius from 3 to 6 m, wall thickness from 15 to 80 mm, and blanket outlet temperature from 900 to 1400 K. Based on these studies, we achieved an optimized chamber with 50% the volume of the original design and 60% of its blanket. Chamber radius is only 4.4 m and its half length is only 5.9 m, decreased from the original 5-m radius and 8-m half-length. In our optimization method, we calculate both thermal and mechanical stresses resulting from x-ray, fusion-pellet-debris, and neutron-generated momentum, pressure from ablated material, centrifugal action, vacuum inside the chamber, and gravity. We add the mechanical stresses to thermal stresses and keep the total less than the yield stress. Further, we require that fluctuations in these stresses be less than that which would produce creep-fatigue failure within the chamber 30-year lifetime

  16. Thermal stability of nafion membranes under mechanical stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintilii, M; Struis, R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The feasibility of adequately modified fluoro-ionomer membranes (NAFION{sup R}) is demonstrated for the selective separation of methanol synthesis products from the raw reactor gas at temperatures around 200{sup o}C. For an economically relevant application of this concept on a technical scale the Nafion membranes should be thin ({approx_equal}10 {mu}m) and thermally stable over a long period of time (1-2 years). In cooperation with industry (Methanol Casale SA, Lugano (CH)), we test the thermal stability of Nafion hollow fibers and supported Nafion thin sheet membranes at temperatures between 160 and 200{sup o}C under mechanical stress by applying a gas pressure difference over the membrane surface ({Delta}P{<=} 40 bar). Tests with the hollow fibers revealed that Nafion has visco-elastic properties. Tests with 50 {mu}m thin Nafion sheets supported by a porous metal carrier at 200{sup o}C and {Delta}P=39 bar showed no mechanical defects over a period of 92 days. (author) 5 figs., 4 refs.

  17. Choking flow modeling with mechanical and thermal non-equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, H.J.; Ishii, M.; Revankar, S.T. [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2006-01-15

    The mechanistic model, which considers the mechanical and thermal non-equilibrium, is described for two-phase choking flow. The choking mass flux is obtained from the momentum equation with the definition of choking. The key parameter for the mechanical non-equilibrium is a slip ratio. The dependent parameters for the slip ratio are identified. In this research, the slip ratio which is defined in the drift flux model is used to identify the impact parameters on the slip ratio. Because the slip ratio in the drift flux model is related to the distribution parameter and drift velocity, the adequate correlations depending on the flow regime are introduced in this study. For the thermal non-equilibrium, the model is developed with bubble conduction time and Bernoulli choking model. In case of highly subcooled water compared to the inlet pressure, the Bernoulli choking model using the pressure undershoot is used because there is no bubble generation in the test section. When the phase change happens inside the test section, two-phase choking model with relaxation time calculates the choking mass flux. According to the comparison of model prediction with experimental data shows good agreement. The developed model shows good prediction in both low and high pressure ranges. (author)

  18. Flue Gas Desulfurization by Mechanically and Thermally Activated Sodium Bicarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walawska Barbara

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of study on structural parameters (particle size, surface area, pore volume and the sorption ability of mechanically and thermally activated sodium bicarbonate. The sorption ability of the modified sorbent was evaluated by: partial and overall SO2 removal efficiency, conversion rate, normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR. Sodium bicarbonate was mechanically activated by various grinding techniques, using three types of mills: fluid bed opposed jet mill, fine impact mill and electromagnetic mill, differing in grinding technology. Grounded sorbent was thermally activated, what caused a significant development of surface area. During the studies of SO2 sorption, a model gas with a temperature of 300°C, of composition: sulfur dioxide at a concentration of 6292 mg/mn3, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen as a carrier gas, was used. The best development of surface area and the highest SO2 removal efficiency was obtained for the sorbent treated by electromagnetic grinding, with simultaneous high conversion rate.

  19. Application of a thermally assisted mechanical dewatering process to biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, A.; Arlabosse, P. [Universite de Toulouse, Mines Albi, CNRS, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi cedex 09 (France); Ecole des Mines Albi, Centre RAPSODEE, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi (France); Fernandez, A. [Universite de Toulouse, INSA, UPS, INP, LISBP, 135 Avenue de Rangueil, F-31400 Toulouse (France); INRA, UMR792 Ingenierie des Systemes Biologiques et des Procedes, CNRS, UMR5504, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-01-15

    Thermally assisted mechanical dewatering (TAMD) is a new process for energy-efficient liquid/solids separation which enhances conventional-device efficiency. The main idea of this process is to supply a flow of heat in mechanical dewatering processes to favour the reduction of the liquid content. This is not a new idea but the proposed combination, especially the chosen operating conditions (T < 100 C and P < 3000 kPa) constitutes an original approach and a significant energy saving since the liquid is kept in liquid state. Response surface methodology was used to evaluate the effects of the processing parameters of TAMD on the final dry solids content, which is a fundamental dewatering parameter and an excellent indicator of the extent of TAMD. In this study, a two-factor central composite design was used to establish the optimum conditions for the TAMD of alfalfa biomass. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory compression cell. Experiments showed that the dewatering enhancement results only from thermal effects. With a moderate heat supply (T{sub piston} = 80 C), the dry solid content of the press cake can reach 66%, compared to 36% at ambient temperature. A significant regression model, describing changes on final dry solids content with respect to independent variables, was established with determination coefficient, R{sup 2}, greater than 88%. With an energy consumption of less than 150 kWh/m{sup 3}, the use of the TAMD process before a thermal drying process leads to an energy saving of at least 30% on the overall separation chain. (author)

  20. Phonon mechanism of mobility equilibrium fluctuation and properties of 1/f-noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melkonyan, S.V.; Aroutiounian, V.M.; Gasparyan, F.V.; Asriyan, H.V.

    2006-01-01

    The main mechanisms of the generation of the equilibrium fluctuations of the electron mobility in homogeneous and non-degenerate semiconductors are studied. It is proven that the mobility fluctuations are related to energy fluctuations and are conditioned by random non-elastic scattering and generation-recombination processes. In particular, it is shown that the mobility fluctuations come into existence as a result of random electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scattering processes. The case of acoustic phonon-phonon scattering is considered in detail. The spectral density of the electron lattice mobility fluctuations is calculated on the base of a new phonon mechanism. It is shown that the noise spectrum over a broad frequency range has a 1/f form. The theoretical results for many samples agree with experimental data

  1. Thermal mechanical analysis of applications with internal heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Srisharan Garg

    control blade, spatial variations in temperature within the control blade occur from the non-uniform heat generation within the BORAL as a result of the non-uniform thermal neutron flux along the longitudinal direction when the control blade is partially withdrawn. There is also variation in the heating profile through the thickness and about the circumferential width of the control blade. Mathematical curve-fits are generated for the non-uniform volumetric heat generation profile caused by the thermal neutron absorption and the functions are applied as heating conditions within a finite element model of the control blade built using the commercial finite element code Abaqus FEA. The finite element model is solved as a fully coupled thermal mechanical problem as in the case of the annular target. The resulting deflection is compared with the channel gap to determine if there is a significant risk of the control blade binding during reactor operation. Hence, this dissertation will consist of two sections. The first section will seek to present the thermal and structural safety analyses of the annular targets for the production of molybdenum-99. Since there hasn't been any detailed, documented, study on these annular targets in the past, the work complied in this dissertation will help to understand the thermal-mechanical behavior and failure margins of the target during in-vessel irradiation. As the work presented in this dissertation provides a general performance analysis envelope for the annular target, the tools developed in the process can also be used as useful references for future analyses that are specific to any reactor. The numerical analysis approach adopted and the analytical models developed, can also be applied to other applications, outside the Mo-99 project domain, where internal heat generation exists such as in electronic components and nuclear reactor control blades. The second section will focus on estimating the thermally induced deflection and hence

  2. Computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics for geosystems management.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davison, Scott; Alger, Nicholas; Turner, Daniel Zack; Subia, Samuel Ramirez; Carnes, Brian; Martinez, Mario J.; Notz, Patrick K.; Klise, Katherine A.; Stone, Charles Michael; Field, Richard V., Jr.; Newell, Pania; Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Red-Horse, John Robert; Bishop, Joseph E.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Hopkins, Polly L.; Mesh, Mikhail; Bean, James E.; Moffat, Harry K.; Yoon, Hongkyu

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes research performed under the SNL LDRD entitled - Computational Mechanics for Geosystems Management to Support the Energy and Natural Resources Mission. The main accomplishment was development of a foundational SNL capability for computational thermal, chemical, fluid, and solid mechanics analysis of geosystems. The code was developed within the SNL Sierra software system. This report summarizes the capabilities of the simulation code and the supporting research and development conducted under this LDRD. The main goal of this project was the development of a foundational capability for coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) simulation of heterogeneous geosystems utilizing massively parallel processing. To solve these complex issues, this project integrated research in numerical mathematics and algorithms for chemically reactive multiphase systems with computer science research in adaptive coupled solution control and framework architecture. This report summarizes and demonstrates the capabilities that were developed together with the supporting research underlying the models. Key accomplishments are: (1) General capability for modeling nonisothermal, multiphase, multicomponent flow in heterogeneous porous geologic materials; (2) General capability to model multiphase reactive transport of species in heterogeneous porous media; (3) Constitutive models for describing real, general geomaterials under multiphase conditions utilizing laboratory data; (4) General capability to couple nonisothermal reactive flow with geomechanics (THMC); (5) Phase behavior thermodynamics for the CO2-H2O-NaCl system. General implementation enables modeling of other fluid mixtures. Adaptive look-up tables enable thermodynamic capability to other simulators; (6) Capability for statistical modeling of heterogeneity in geologic materials; and (7) Simulator utilizes unstructured grids on parallel processing computers.

  3. Microcracking in composite laminates under thermal and mechanical loading. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddocks, Jason R.

    1995-01-01

    Composites used in space structures are exposed to both extremes in temperature and applied mechanical loads. Cracks in the matrix form, changing the laminate thermoelastic properties. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a predictive methodology to quantify microcracking in general composite laminates under both thermal and mechanical loading. This objective is successfully met through a combination of analytical modeling and experimental investigation. In the analysis, the stress and displacement distributions in the vicinity of a crack are determined using a shear lag model. These are incorporated into an energy based cracking criterion to determine the favorability of crack formation. A progressive damage algorithm allows the inclusion of material softening effects and temperature-dependent material properties. The analysis is implemented by a computer code which gives predicted crack density and degraded laminate properties as functions of any thermomechanical load history. Extensive experimentation provides verification of the analysis. AS4/3501-6 graphite/epoxy laminates are manufactured with three different layups to investigate ply thickness and orientation effects. Thermal specimens are cooled to progressively lower temperatures down to -184 C. After conditioning the specimens to each temperature, cracks are counted on their edges using optical microscopy and in their interiors by sanding to incremental depths. Tensile coupons are loaded monotonically to progressively higher loads until failure. Cracks are counted on the coupon edges after each loading. A data fit to all available results provides input parameters for the analysis and shows them to be material properties, independent of geometry and loading. Correlation between experiment and analysis is generally very good under both thermal and mechanical loading, showing the methodology to be a powerful, unified tool. Delayed crack initiation observed in a few cases is attributed to a

  4. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  5. Liquid-phase exfoliated graphene self-assembled films: Low-frequency noise and thermal-electric characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubon Usca, G.; Hernandez-Ambato, J.; Pace, C.; Caputi, L.S.; Tavolaro, A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphene was exfoliated in liquid phase also in the presence of zeolite 4A. • Films were obtained by drop-casting. • SEM, Raman, low-frequency noise and thermal electric measurements show that the presence of zeolite improves the quality of the FLG films. - Abstract: In few years, graphene has become a revolutionary material, leading not only to applications in various fields such as electronics, medicine and environment, but also to the production of new types of 2D materials. In this work, Liquid Phase Exfoliation (LPE) was applied to natural graphite by brief sonication or mixer treatment in suitable solvents, in order to produce Few Layers Graphene (FLG) suspensions. Additionally, zeolite 4A (Z4A) was added during the production of FLG flakes-based inks, with the aim of aiding the exfoliation process. Conductive films were obtained by drop casting three types of suspensions over Al 2 O 3 substrates with interdigitated electrodes, with total channel surface of 1.39 mm 2 . The morphology characterization resulted in the verification of the presence of thin self-assembled flakes. Raman studies gave evidence of 4 to 10 layers graphene flakes. Electrical measurements were performed to state the Low-Frequency Noise and Thermal-Electric characteristics of the samples. We observe interesting relations between sample preparation procedures and electrical properties.

  6. Schrödinger problem, Lévy processes, and noise in relativistic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbaczewski, Piotr; Klauder, John R.; Olkiewicz, Robert

    1995-05-01

    The main purpose of the paper is an essentially probabilistic analysis of relativistic quantum mechanics. It is based on the assumption that whenever probability distributions arise, there exists a stochastic process that is either responsible for the temporal evolution of a given measure or preserves the measure in the stationary case. Our departure point is the so-called Schrödinger problem of probabilistic evolution, which provides for a unique Markov stochastic interpolation between any given pair of boundary probability densities for a process covering a fixed, finite duration of time, provided we have decided a priori what kind of primordial dynamical semigroup transition mechanism is involved. In the nonrelativistic theory, including quantum mechanics, Feynman-Kac-like kernels are the building blocks for suitable transition probability densities of the process. In the standard ``free'' case (Feynman-Kac potential equal to zero) the familiar Wiener noise is recovered. In the framework of the Schrödinger problem, the ``free noise'' can also be extended to any infinitely divisible probability law, as covered by the Lévy-Khintchine formula. Since the relativistic Hamiltonians ||∇|| and √-Δ+m2 -m are known to generate such laws, we focus on them for the analysis of probabilistic phenomena, which are shown to be associated with the relativistic wave (D'Alembert) and matter-wave (Klein-Gordon) equations, respectively. We show that such stochastic processes exist and are spatial jump processes. In general, in the presence of external potentials, they do not share the Markov property, except for stationary situations. A concrete example of the pseudodifferential Cauchy-Schrödinger evolution is analyzed in detail. The relativistic covariance of related wave equations is exploited to demonstrate how the associated stochastic jump processes comply with the principles of special relativity.

  7. Thermal-mechanical and isothermal fatigue of IN 792 CC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.; Pitz, G.; Lang, K.-H.; Loehe, D.

    1997-01-01

    The cyclic deformation and lifetime behaviour of the cast Ni-base superalloy IN 792 CC was investigated both under thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) and isothermal fatigue (IF) conditions. During TMF the phase relations between temperature and mechanical strain were in-phase and out-of-phase, respectively. For both phase relations a similar cyclic deformation behaviour is observed. In all cases out-of-phase TMF causes tensile mean stresses, whereas in-phase TMF leads to compressive mean stresses. At T max below 800 C out-of-phase cycling results in smaller lifetimes than in-phase loading. In spite of the rather high compressive mean stresses developing at T max above 800 C, at these temperatures in-phase loading causes shorter lifetimes than out-of-phase TMF. This effect is due to the different damage mechanisms caused by in-phase and out-of-phase loadings: at higher T max considerable intergranular damage caused by in-phase loading reduces the lifetime below the respective values measured during out-of-phase TMF, after which no intergranular damage could be detected. A comparison of the TMF data with the cyclic deformation and lifetime behaviour under IF conditions shows that the material's reactions under TMF cannot be assessed satisfactorily by the results obtained from isothermal fatigue tests. (orig.)

  8. Novel toughened polylactic acid nanocomposite: Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, Harintharavimal; Hassan, Azman; Wahit, Mat Uzir; Yussuf, A.A.; Razak, Shamsul Bahri Abdul

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study is to develop a novel toughened polylactic acid (PLA) nanocomposite. The effects of linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE) and organophilic modified montmorillonite (MMT) on mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of PLA were investigated. LLDPE toughened PLA nanocomposites consisting of PLA/LLDPE blends, of composition 100/0 and 90/10 with MMT content of 2 phr and 4 phr were prepared. The Young's and flexural modulus improved with increasing content of MMT indicating that MMT is effective in increasing stiffness of LLDPE toughened PLA nanocomposite even at low content. LLDPE improved the impact strength of PLA nanocomposites with a sacrifice of tensile and flexural strength. The tensile and flexural strength also decreased with increasing content of MMT in PLA/LLDPE nanocomposites. The impact strength and elongation at break of LLDPE toughened PLA nanocomposites also declined steadily with increasing loadings of MMT. The crystallization temperature and glass transition temperature dropped gradually while the thermal stability of PLA improved with addition of MMT in PLA/LLDPE nanocomposites. The storage modulus of PLA/LLDPE nanocomposites below glass transition temperature increased with increasing content of MMT. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope studies revealed that an intercalated LLDPE toughened PLA nanocomposite was successfully prepared at 2 phr MMT content.

  9. Mechanical, Thermal and Functional Properties of Green Lightweight Foamcrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, the construction industry has revealed noteworthy attention in the use of lightweight foamcrete as a building material due to its many favourable characteristics such as lighter weight, easy to fabricate, durable and cost effective. Foamcrete is a material consisting of Portland cement paste or cement filler matrix (mortar with a homogeneous pore structure created by introducing air in the form of small bubbles. With a proper control in dosage of foam and methods of production, a wide range of densities (400 – 1600 kg/m 3 of foamcrete can be produced thus providing flexibility for application such as structural elements, partition, insulating materials and filling grades. Foamcrete has so far been applied primarily as a filler material in civil engineering works. However, its good thermal and acoustic performance indicates its strong potential as a material in building construction. The focus of this paper is to classify literature on foamcrete in terms of its mechanical, thermal and functional properties.

  10. A novel phase-change cement composite for thermal energy storage: Fabrication, thermal and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, He; Xing, Feng; Cui, Hong-Zhi; Chen, Da-Zhu; Ouyang, Xing; Xu, Su-Zhen; Wang, Jia-Xin; Huang, Yi-Tian; Zuo, Jian-Dong; Tang, Jiao-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel flaky graphite-doped phase-change microcapsule (FGD-MPCM) was prepared. • FGD-MPCM has substantial latent heat storage capacity (135.8 J/g). • FGD-MPCMs/cement composite is capable of reducing indoor temperature fluctuation. • Compressive strength of cement composite with 30% FGD-MPCMs can reach to 14.2 MPa. - Abstract: Facing upon the increasingly severe energy crisis, one of the key issues for reducing the building energy consumption is to pursue high-performance thermal energy storage technologies based on phase-change materials. In this study, a novel cement composite incorporated with flaky graphite-doped microencapsulated phase-change materials (FGD-MPCMs) was developed. Various techniques, such as field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to analyse the composite structure and thermal performances. The results indicate that the spherical microcapsules are well dispersed in the cement matrix. When combined within the cement, the thermal stability of the microcapsules was highly improved, and the inclusion of greater amounts of FGD-MPCMs further increased the latent heat of the composite. The mechanical properties of the cement composites were affected with the increase of FGD-MPCMs dosage and the porosity of the composites. In spite of this, the compressive strength and flexural strength of the cement composite with 30% FGD-MPCM could still reach to as high as 14.2 MPa and 4.1 MPa, respectively. Results from the infrared thermography and the model room test suggested that the composite filled with FGD-MPCMs is capable of reducing indoor temperature fluctuation and exhibits good potential for application in buildings to enhance energy savings and thermal comfort.

  11. Mechanical and thermal properties of physically-blended-plastic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Issa, M. S.

    1983-10-01

    Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and isotactic polypropylene (PP) blend were produced in film form and were characterized by a number of techniques such as wide-angle x-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and instron tensile testing. Results of WAXD and DTA showed conclusively that the two components in the blend are incompatible. SEM micrographs indicated that the 60/40 and 40/60 PP/PE blends show approximately fine homogeneous dispersion of the minor component into the matrix of the major component. The mechanical properties of the blend films improved with respect to the PE homo polymer. The improvement was more remarkable with the increase of the PP component in the blend. Results obtained in this work were explained in terms of crystallinity and the crystallite orientation. 28 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (A.M.H.)

  12. Corticothalamic Synaptic Noise as a Mechanism for Selective Attention in Thalamic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhuret, Sébastien; Deleuze, Charlotte; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    A reason why the thalamus is more than a passive gateway for sensory signals is that two-third of the synapses of thalamocortical neurons are directly or indirectly related to the activity of corticothalamic axons. While the responses of thalamocortical neurons evoked by sensory stimuli are well characterized, with ON- and OFF-center receptive field structures, the prevalence of synaptic noise resulting from neocortical feedback in intracellularly recorded thalamocortical neurons in vivo has attracted little attention. However, in vitro and modeling experiments point to its critical role for the integration of sensory signals. Here we combine our recent findings in a unified framework suggesting the hypothesis that corticothalamic synaptic activity is adapted to modulate the transfer efficiency of thalamocortical neurons during selective attention at three different levels: First, on ionic channels by interacting with intrinsic membrane properties, second at the neuron level by impacting on the input-output gain, and third even more effectively at the cell assembly level by boosting the information transfer of sensory features encoded in thalamic subnetworks. This top-down population control is achieved by tuning the correlations in subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations and is adapted to modulate the transfer of sensory features encoded by assemblies of thalamocortical relay neurons. We thus propose that cortically-controlled (de-)correlation of subthreshold noise is an efficient and swift dynamic mechanism for selective attention in the thalamus. PMID:26733818

  13. Corticothalamic Synaptic Noise as a Mechanism for Selective Attention in Thalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhuret, Sébastien; Deleuze, Charlotte; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    A reason why the thalamus is more than a passive gateway for sensory signals is that two-third of the synapses of thalamocortical neurons are directly or indirectly related to the activity of corticothalamic axons. While the responses of thalamocortical neurons evoked by sensory stimuli are well characterized, with ON- and OFF-center receptive field structures, the prevalence of synaptic noise resulting from neocortical feedback in intracellularly recorded thalamocortical neurons in vivo has attracted little attention. However, in vitro and modeling experiments point to its critical role for the integration of sensory signals. Here we combine our recent findings in a unified framework suggesting the hypothesis that corticothalamic synaptic activity is adapted to modulate the transfer efficiency of thalamocortical neurons during selective attention at three different levels: First, on ionic channels by interacting with intrinsic membrane properties, second at the neuron level by impacting on the input-output gain, and third even more effectively at the cell assembly level by boosting the information transfer of sensory features encoded in thalamic subnetworks. This top-down population control is achieved by tuning the correlations in subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations and is adapted to modulate the transfer of sensory features encoded by assemblies of thalamocortical relay neurons. We thus propose that cortically-controlled (de-)correlation of subthreshold noise is an efficient and swift dynamic mechanism for selective attention in the thalamus.

  14. Corticothalamic Synaptic Noise as a Mechanism for Selective Attention in Thalamic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eBéhuret

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A reason why the thalamus is more than a passive gateway for sensory signals is that two-third of the synapses of thalamocortical neurons are directly or indirectly related to the activity of corticothalamic axons. While the responses of thalamocortical neurons evoked by sensory stimuli are well characterized, with ON- and OFF-center receptive field structures, the prevalence of synaptic noise resulting from neocortical feedback in intracellularly recorded thalamocortical neurons in vivo has attracted little attention. However, in vitro and modeling experiments point to its critical role for the integration of sensory signals. Here we combine our recent findings in a unified framework suggesting the hypothesis that corticothalamic synaptic activity is adapted to modulate the transfer efficiency of thalamocortical neurons during selective attention at three different levels: First, on ionic channels by interacting with intrinsic membrane properties, second at the neuron level by impacting on the input-output gain, and third even more effectively at the cell assembly level by boosting the information transfer of sensory features encoded in thalamic subnetworks. This top-down population control is achieved by tuning the correlations in subthreshold membrane potential fluctuations and is adapted to modulate the transfer of sensory features encoded by assemblies of thalamocortical relay neurons. We thus propose that cortically-controlled (de-correlation of subthreshold noise is an efficient and swift dynamic mechanism for selective attention in the thalamus.

  15. Mechanism of crack initiation and crack growth under thermal and mechanical fatigue loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utz, S.; Soppa, E.; Silcher, H.; Kohler, C.

    2013-01-01

    The present contribution is focused on the experimental investigations and numerical simulations of the deformation behaviour and crack development in the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal and mechanical cyclic loading in HCF and LCF regimes. The main objective of this research is the understanding of the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage and the development of simulation methods, which can be applied further in safety evaluations of nuclear power plant components. In this context the modelling of crack initiation and crack growth inside the material structure induced by varying thermal or mechanical loads are of particular interest. The mechanisms of crack initiation depend among other things on the type of loading, microstructure, material properties and temperature. The Nb-stabilized austenitic stainless steel in the solution-annealed condition was chosen for the investigations. Experiments with two kinds of cyclic loading - pure thermal and pure mechanical - were carried out and simulated. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal loading was studied within the framework of the joint research project [4]. Interrupted thermal cyclic tests in the temperature range of 150 C to 300 C combined with non-destructive residual stress measurements (XRD) and various microscopic investigations, e.g. in SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), were used to study the effects of thermal cyclic loading on the material. This thermal cyclic loading leads to thermal induced stresses and strains. As a result intrusions and extrusions appear inside the grains (at the surface), at which microcracks arise and evolve to a dominant crack. Finally, these microcracks cause a continuous and significant decrease of residual stresses. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under mechanical loading at room temperature was studied within the framework of the research project [5], [8]. With a combination of interrupted LCF tests and EBSD

  16. Mechanism of crack initiation and crack growth under thermal and mechanical fatigue loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Utz, S.; Soppa, E.; Silcher, H.; Kohler, C. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Materials Testing Inst.

    2013-07-01

    The present contribution is focused on the experimental investigations and numerical simulations of the deformation behaviour and crack development in the austenitic stainless steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal and mechanical cyclic loading in HCF and LCF regimes. The main objective of this research is the understanding of the basic mechanisms of fatigue damage and the development of simulation methods, which can be applied further in safety evaluations of nuclear power plant components. In this context the modelling of crack initiation and crack growth inside the material structure induced by varying thermal or mechanical loads are of particular interest. The mechanisms of crack initiation depend among other things on the type of loading, microstructure, material properties and temperature. The Nb-stabilized austenitic stainless steel in the solution-annealed condition was chosen for the investigations. Experiments with two kinds of cyclic loading - pure thermal and pure mechanical - were carried out and simulated. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under thermal loading was studied within the framework of the joint research project [4]. Interrupted thermal cyclic tests in the temperature range of 150 C to 300 C combined with non-destructive residual stress measurements (XRD) and various microscopic investigations, e.g. in SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), were used to study the effects of thermal cyclic loading on the material. This thermal cyclic loading leads to thermal induced stresses and strains. As a result intrusions and extrusions appear inside the grains (at the surface), at which microcracks arise and evolve to a dominant crack. Finally, these microcracks cause a continuous and significant decrease of residual stresses. The fatigue behaviour of the steel X6CrNiNb18-10 under mechanical loading at room temperature was studied within the framework of the research project [5], [8]. With a combination of interrupted LCF tests and EBSD

  17. High level white noise generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, C.J.; Blalock, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application

  18. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  19. Studies of chaos and thermal noise in a driven Josephson junction using an electronic analog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegrum, C.M.; Gurney, W.S.C.; Nisbet, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Using an electronic analog of a resistively shunted driven Josephson junction, the authors have demonstrated a number of effects, including the appearance of a devil's staircase in the current-voltage characteristic, the onset of chaos, and the effect of noise on these phenomena. The authors stress that the analog is simple, but models the junction behavior with a high degree of accuracy and detail

  20. Quantum mechanical noise in coherent-state and squeezed-state Michelson interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assaf, Ohad; Ben-Aryeh, Yacob

    2002-01-01

    In the present study we extend and generalize previous results for coherent-state and squeezed-state Michelson interferometer quantum mechanical uncertainties (or fluctuations), which are commonly referred to as 'quantum noise'. The calculation of photon counting (PC) fluctuations in the squeezed-state interferometer is extended to fourth-order correlation functions used as the measured signal. We also generalize a 'unified model' for treating both PC and radiation pressure fluctuations in the coherent-state interferometer, by using mathematical methods which apply to Kerr-type interactions. The results are more general than those reported previously in two ways. First, we obtain exact expressions, which lead to previous results under certain approximations. Second, we deal with cases in which the responses of the two mirrors to radiation pressure are not equal

  1. The thermal and mechanical properties of electron beam-irradiated polylactide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, In Seol; Jung, Chan Hee; Hwang, In Tae; Choi, Jae Hak; Nho, Young Chang

    2010-01-01

    The effect of electron beam irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties of polylactide (PLA) was investigated in this research. PLA films were irradiated by electron beams at different absorption doses ranging from 20 to 200 kGy. The thermal and mechanical properties of the irradiated PLA films were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimeter, thermogravimetric analyzer, universal testing machine, dynamic mechanical analyzer, and thermal mechanical analyzer. The results revealed that the chain scission of the PLA predominated over the crosslinking during the irradiation, which considerably deteriorated the thermal and mechanical properties of the PLA

  2. Mechanical and Thermal Analysis of Classical Functionally Graded Coated Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toudehdehghan Abdolreza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The governing equation of a classical rectangular coated beam made of two layers subjected to thermal and uniformly distributed mechanical loads are derived by using the principle of virtual displacements and based on Euler-Bernoulli deformation beam theory (EBT. The aim of this paper was to analyze the static behavior of clamped-clamped thin coated beam under thermo-mechanical load using MATLAB. Two models were considered for composite coated. The first model was consisting of ceramic layer as a coated and substrate which was metal (HC model. The second model was consisting of Functionally Graded Material (FGM as a coated layer and metal substrate (FGC model. From the result it was apparent that the superiority of the FGC composite against conventional coated composite has been demonstrated. From the analysis, the stress level throughout the thickness at the interface of the coated beam for the FGC was reduced. Yet, the deflection in return was observed to increase. Therefore, this could cater to various new engineering applications where warrant the utilization of material that has properties that are well-beyond the capabilities of the conventional or yesteryears materials.

  3. Effect of atomic noise on optical squeezing via polarization self-rotation in a thermal vapor cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, M.T.L.; Hetet, G.; Peng, A.

    2006-01-01

    The traversal of an elliptically polarized optical field through a thermal vapor cell can give rise to a rotation of its polarization axis. This process, known as polarization self-rotation (PSR), has been suggested as a mechanism for producing squeezed light at atomic transition wavelengths. We ...

  4. Integrated ensemble noise-reconstructed empirical mode decomposition for mechanical fault detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Ji, Feng; Gao, Yuan; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Chenjun; Zhou, Yu

    2018-05-01

    A new branch of fault detection is utilizing the noise such as enhancing, adding or estimating the noise so as to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and extract the fault signatures. Hereinto, ensemble noise-reconstructed empirical mode decomposition (ENEMD) is a novel noise utilization method to ameliorate the mode mixing and denoised the intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). Despite the possibility of superior performance in detecting weak and multiple faults, the method still suffers from the major problems of the user-defined parameter and the powerless capability for a high SNR case. Hence, integrated ensemble noise-reconstructed empirical mode decomposition is proposed to overcome the drawbacks, improved by two noise estimation techniques for different SNRs as well as the noise estimation strategy. Independent from the artificial setup, the noise estimation by the minimax thresholding is improved for a low SNR case, which especially shows an outstanding interpretation for signature enhancement. For approximating the weak noise precisely, the noise estimation by the local reconfiguration using singular value decomposition (SVD) is proposed for a high SNR case, which is particularly powerful for reducing the mode mixing. Thereinto, the sliding window for projecting the phase space is optimally designed by the correlation minimization. Meanwhile, the reasonable singular order for the local reconfiguration to estimate the noise is determined by the inflection point of the increment trend of normalized singular entropy. Furthermore, the noise estimation strategy, i.e. the selection approaches of the two estimation techniques along with the critical case, is developed and discussed for different SNRs by means of the possible noise-only IMF family. The method is validated by the repeatable simulations to demonstrate the synthetical performance and especially confirm the capability of noise estimation. Finally, the method is applied to detect the local wear fault

  5. Analysis of thermal comfort and indoor air quality in a mechanically ventilated theatre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavgic, M.; Mumovic, D.; Young, A. [The Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, England (United Kingdom); Stevanovic, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences - Vinca, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (RS)

    2008-07-01

    Theatres are the most complex of all auditorium structures environmentally. They usually have high heat loads, which are of a transient nature as audiences come and go, and from lighting which changes from scene to scene, and they generally have full or nearly full occupancy. Theatres also need to perform well acoustically, both for the spoken word and for music, and as sound amplification is less used than in other auditoria, background noise control is critically important. All these factors place constraints on the ventilation design, and if this is poor, it can lead to the deterioration of indoor air quality and thermal comfort. To analyse the level of indoor air quality and thermal comfort in a typical medium-sized mechanically ventilated theatre, and to identify where improvements could typically be made, a comprehensive post-occupancy evaluation study was carried out on a theatre in Belgrade. The evaluation, based on the results of monitoring (temperature, relative humidity, CO{sub 2}, air speed and heat flux) and modelling (CFD), as well as the assessment of comfort and health as perceived by occupants, has shown that for most of the monitored period the environmental parameters were within the standard limits of thermal comfort and IAQ. However, two important issues were identified, which should be borne in mind by theatre designers in the future. First, the calculated ventilation rates showed that the theatre was over-ventilated, which will have serious consequences for its energy consumption, and secondly, the displacement ventilation arrangement employed led to higher than expected complaints of cold discomfort, probably due to cold draughts around the occupants' feet. (author)

  6. A study on thermal and mechanical properties of mechanically milled HDPE and PP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Can, S.; Tan, S.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, mechanical mixing of HDPE and PP was performed via ball milling. Prepared compositions were 75/25 , 50/50 , 25/75 w/w HDPE/PP. Milling time and ball to powder ratio (B/P) were kept constant and system was cooled by adding solid CO 2 to improve the milling efficiency. To compare these systems with traditional methods, mixtures were also melt mixed by Brabender Plasti-Corder. Both milled and melt mixed systems were examined with DSC for thermal properties and tensile testing for mechanical properties Results are discussed by comparing milled , melt mixed and as-received polymers. It is observed that, unlike ball milled systems' in melt mixed systems mechanical properties are composition dependent. In addition , ball milling results in amorphization of both polymers and very high amounts of PP (75wt %) creates very amorphous HDPE structure. (Original)

  7. Pathogenesis mechanism by noise induced clinical pictures-lessons from the Spandau health-survey; Pathogenesemechanismen bei laerminduzierten Krankheitsbildern - Schlussfolgerungen aus dem Spandauer Gesundheits-Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maschke, C. [Forschungs- und Beratungsbuero Maschke (FBB-Maschke), Berlin (Germany); Hecht, K. [Interdisziplinaerer Forschungsverbund Laerm und Gesundheit, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Traffic noise (road noise, flight noise, train noise) is the predominant noise source in the living environment, followed by neighbourhood noise. Through the central nervous processes noise can lead, via disturbed sleep as well as via subjective experience, to an inadequate neuro-endocrine reaction with the possibility of finally leading to diseases which are mediated or triggered by stress. Noise induced health disturbances by traffic noise is a large and contrarily discussed problem. In the context of the Spandau health survey, both the noise load (equivalent sound level) and the noise experience (disturbances) were collected and the relationship with medically treated illnesses evaluated. The results suggest that two different ''effect mechanisms'' exist regarding the health effect of traffic noise. Besides the noise disturbed sleep, an insufficient coping with the noise exposures can lead to increased disease risks. The study shows convincing relations between impairments of the heart circulation system (e.g. with hypertension) and the nightly equivalent sound level (22.00-6:00 hours) at the place of residents of the test persons. It has to be assumed that this is the long-term result of sleep which is not restful. On the other hand, psychic disturbances were less connected to the sound level and had more correlation with the noise experience. With psychic disturbances the individual overtaxing of the information-processing processes plays an important role and is classified as an emotional stress situation. (orig.)

  8. Phase-dependent deterministic switching of magnetoelectric spin wave detector in the presence of thermal noise via compensation of demagnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Sourav, E-mail: sdutta38@gatech.edu; Naeemi, Azad [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Manipatruni, Sasikanth; Young, Ian A. [Components Research, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    The possibility of achieving phase-dependent deterministic switching of the magnetoelectric spin wave detector in the presence of thermal noise has been discussed. The proposed idea relies on the modification of the energy landscape by partially canceling the out-of-plane demagnetizing field and the resultant change in the intrinsic magnetization dynamics to drive the nanomagnet towards a preferential final magnetization state. The remarkable increase in the probability of successful switching can be accounted for by the shift in the location of the saddle point in the energy landscape and a resultant change in the nature of the relaxation dynamics of the magnetization from a highly precessional to a fairly damped one and an increased dependence on the initial magnetization values, a crucial requirement for phase-dependent spin wave detection.

  9. Thermal-mechanical fatigue of high temperature structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renauld, Mark Leo

    Experimental and analytical methods were developed to address the effect of thermal-mechanical strain cycling on high temperature structural materials under uniaxial and biaxial stress states. Two materials were used in the investigation, a nickel-base superalloy of low ductility, IN-738LC and a high ductility material, 316 stainless steel. A uniaxial life prediction model for the IN-738LC material was based on tensile hysteresis energy measured in stabilized, mid-life hysteresis loops. Hold-time effects and temperature cycling were incorporated in the hysteresis energy approach. Crack growth analysis was also included in the model to predict the number of TMF cycles to initiate and grow a fatigue crack through the coating. The nickel-base superalloy, IN-738LC, was primarily tested in out-of-phase (OP) TMF with a temperature range from 482-871sp°C (900-1600sp°F) under continuous and compressive hold-time cycling. IN-738LC fatigue specimens were coated either with an aluminide, NiCoCrAlHfSi overlay or CoNiCrAlY overlay coating on the outer surface of the specimen. Metallurgical failure analysis via optical and scanning electron microscopy, was used to characterize failure behavior of both substrate and coating materials. Type 316 SS was subjected to continuous biaxial strain cycling with an in-phase (IP) TMF loading and a temperature range from 399-621sp°C (750-1150sp°F). As a result, a biaxial TMF life prediction model was proposed on the basis of an extended isothermal fatigue model. The model incorporates a frequency effect and phase factors to assess the different damage mechanisms observed during TMF loading. The model was also applied to biaxial TMF data generated on uncoated IN-738LC.

  10. Noise spectroscopy of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB magnetic tunnel junctions in the presence of thermal gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebing, N. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, d-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Serrano-Guisan, S., E-mail: santiago.serrano-guisan@inl.int [International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre Jose Veiga, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Rott, K.; Reiss, G. [University of Bielefeld, Department of Physics, Univesitätesstr. 25, d-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Schumacher, H.W., E-mail: hans.w.schumacher@ptb.de [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, d-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    We present experimental data of the precessional dynamics of the free layer of CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB based magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) in the presence of thermal gradients across the MTJ. The free layer precession is investigated by noise spectroscopy. Thermal gradients of the order of tens of mK/nm across the MTJ are generated by electrical heating. Without applied thermal gradients we find spin transfer torque modified magnetization precession. With increasing thermal gradients we generally observe a decrease of the precession frequency which could be related to an increasing overall free layer temperature. However an asymmetry of the line width behavior for parallel and antiparallel orientation points towards additional effects beyond thermal activation. This could be a hint for the modification of the precessional dynamics in magnetic tunnel junctions by thermal spin torques. - Highlights: • Thermal gradients induced magnetization dynamics on MTJ structures are explored. • Magnetic noise spectroscopy is carried out to study the efficiency of such effects. • A decrease of resonance frequency is observed at both MTJ states for large ∇T. • An asymmetric linewidth behavior is observed for both MTJ states under ∇T. • Additional thermal effects beyond thermal activation must be considered.

  11. Thin circular cylinder under axisymmetrical thermal and mechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaudeau, F.; Zarka, J.; Gerij, J.

    1977-01-01

    A special purpose computer code (Ratch) was developed to analyse a thin circular cylinder subjected to axisymmetrical mechanical and thermal loadings. The Mendelson's approach of this problem is followed. Classical Kirchoff-Love hypothesis of thin shells is used and a state of plane stress is assumed. Space integrations are performed by Gaussian quadrature in the axial direction and by Simpson's one third rule throughout the thickness. Thermoelastic-plastic constitutive equations are solved with an implicit scheme (Nguyen). Thermovisco-plastic constitutive equations are solved with an explicit time integration scheme (Treanor's algorithm especially fitted). A Bree type diagram is obtained for an axial step of temperature which varies cyclically and a sustained constant axial load. The material behavior is assumed perfectly plastic and creep effect is not considered. Results show that the domain where ratchetting occurs is reduced when compared with the domain predicted by the Bree diagram. To investigate the effect of material hardening the authors verify Halphen's Theorem which states that a structure made of material with kinematic hardening behavior and constant properties with temperature will always shake down to a periodic behavior. (Auth.)

  12. Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Simulation of Lithium-Ion Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Zhang, Chao; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Models capture the force response for single-cell and cell-string levels to within 15%-20% accuracy and predict the location for the origin of failure based on the deformation data from the experiments. At the module level, there is some discrepancy due to poor mechanical characterization of the packaging material between the cells. The thermal response (location and value of maximum temperature) agrees qualitatively with experimental data. In general, the X-plane results agree with model predictions to within 20% (pending faulty thermocouples, etc.); the Z-plane results show a bigger variability both between the models and test-results, as well as among multiple repeats of the tests. The models are able to capture the timing and sequence in voltage drop observed in the multi-cell experiments; the shapes of the current and temperature profiles need more work to better characterize propagation. The cells within packaging experience about 60% less force under identical impact test conditions, so the packaging on the test articles is robust. However, under slow-crush simulations, the maximum deformation of the cell strings with packaging is about twice that of cell strings without packaging.

  13. Detecting impact signal in mechanical fault diagnosis under chaotic and Gaussian background noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinfeng; Duan, Jie; Chen, Zhuo; Li, Huiyong; Xie, Julan; Chen, Hanwen

    2018-01-01

    In actual fault diagnosis, useful information is often submerged in heavy noise, and the feature information is difficult to extract. Traditional methods, such like stochastic resonance (SR), which using noise to enhance weak signals instead of suppressing noise, failed in chaotic background. Neural network, which use reference sequence to estimate and reconstruct the background noise, failed in white Gaussian noise. To solve these problems, a novel weak signal detection method aimed at the problem of detecting impact signal buried under heavy chaotic and Gaussian background noise is proposed. First, the proposed method obtains the virtual reference sequence by constructing the Hankel data matrix. Then an M-order optimal FIR filter is designed, which can minimize the output power of background noise and pass the weak periodic signal undistorted. Finally, detection and reconstruction of the weak periodic signal are achieved from the output SBNR (signal to background noise ratio). The simulation shows, compared with the stochastic resonance (SR) method, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in chaotic noise background while stochastic resonance (SR) method cannot. Compared with the neural network method, (a) the proposed method does not need a reference sequence while neural network method needs one; (b) the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal in white Gaussian noise background while the neural network method fails, in chaotic noise background, the proposed method can detect the weak periodic signal under a lower SBNR (about 8-17 dB lower) than the neural network method; (c) the proposed method can reconstruct the weak periodic signal precisely.

  14. Geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical factors which influence repository design in the bedded salt environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, J.P.; Nair, O.; Ortman, D.; Rowe, J.

    1979-12-01

    This report describes the geologic, stratigraphic, thermal, and mechanical considerations applicable to repository design. The topics discussed in the report include: tectonic activity; geologic structure; stratigraphy; rock mechanical properties; and hydrologic properties

  15. Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Analysis of Failure Propagation in Lithium-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-07-28

    This is a presentation given at the 12th World Congress for Computational Mechanics on coupled mechanical-electrochemical-thermal analysis of failure propagation in lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles.

  16. Mechanical effects of strong measurement: back-action noise and cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Keith

    2007-03-01

    Our recent experiments show that it is now possible to prepare and measure mechanical systems with thermal occupation factors of N˜25 and perform continuous position measurements close to the limits required by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle (1). I will discuss our back-action measurements with nanomechanical structures strongly coupled to single electron transistors. We have been able to observe the stochastic back-action forces exerted by the SET as well as a cooling effect which has analogies to cooling in optical cavities. Furthermore, I will discuss progress using optical fields coupled to mechanical modes which show substantial cooling using the pondermotive effects of the photons impacting a flexible dielectric mirror (2). Both of these techniques pave the way to demonstrating the true quantum properties of a mechanical device: squeezed states, superposition states, and entangled states. (1) ``Quantum Measurement Backaction and Cooling Observed with a Nanomechanical Resonator,'' A. Naik, O. Buu, M.D. LaHaye, M.P. Blencowe, A.D. Armour, A.A. Clerk, K.C. Schwab, Nature 443, 193 (2006). (2) ``Self-cooling of a micro-mirror by radiation pressure,'' S. Gigan, H.R. Boehm, M. Patemostro, F. Blaser, G. Langer, J. Hertzberg, K. Schwab, D. Baeuerle, M. Aspelmeyer, A. Zeilinger, Nature 444, 67 (2006).

  17. A Study on the Interaction Mechanism between Thermal Radiation and Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dehong XIA; Tao YU; Chuangu WU; Qingqing CHANG; Honglei JIAO

    2005-01-01

    From the viewpoint of field synergy principle and dipole radiation theory, the interaction between the incident thermal radiation wave and materials is analyzed to reveal the mechanism of selective absorption of incident thermal radiation. It is shown that the frequency of the incident thermal radiation and the damping constant of damping oscillators in materials are of vital importance for the thermal radiation properties (reflectivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, etc.) of materials.

  18. Study of mechanical and thermal properties of soy flour elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kendra Alicia

    Bio-based plastics are becoming viable alternatives to petroleum-based plastics because they decrease dependence on petroleum derivatives and are more environmentally friendly. Raw materials such as soy flour are widely available, low cost, lightweight, stiffness and have high strength characteristics, but weak interfacial adhesion between the soy flour and the polymer poses a challenge. In this study, soy flour was utilized as a filler in thermoplastic elastomer composites. A surface modification called acetylation was investigated at soy flour concentrations of 10 wt%, 15 wt% and 20 wt%. The mechanical properties of the composites were then compared to that of elastomers without a filler. Chemical characterization of the acetylated soy flour was attempted in order to understand what occurs during the reaction and after completion. In the range of tests, soy flour loadings were observed to be inversely proportional to tensile strength for both the untreated and treated soy flour. However, the acetylated soy flour at 10 wt% concentration performed comparable to that of the neat rubber and resulted in an increase in tensile strength. Unexpectedly, the acetylation reaction increased elongation, which reduced stress within the composite and is believed to increase the adhesion of the soy flour to that of the elastomer. In the nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR), the intensity for the treated soy flour was larger than that of the untreated soy flour for the acetyl groups that were attached to the soy flour, particularly, the carbonyl function group next to the deprotonated oxygen and the methyl group next to the carbonyl. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the acetylated soy flour is slightly more thermally stable than the untreated soy flour. The treated soy flour also increased the decomposition temperature of the composite.

  19. A new feature detection mechanism and its application in secured ECG transmission with noise masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufi, Fahim; Khalil, Ibrahim

    2009-04-01

    With cardiovascular disease as the number one killer of modern era, Electrocardiogram (ECG) is collected, stored and transmitted in greater frequency than ever before. However, in reality, ECG is rarely transmitted and stored in a secured manner. Recent research shows that eavesdropper can reveal the identity and cardiovascular condition from an intercepted ECG. Therefore, ECG data must be anonymized before transmission over the network and also stored as such in medical repositories. To achieve this, first of all, this paper presents a new ECG feature detection mechanism, which was compared against existing cross correlation (CC) based template matching algorithms. Two types of CC methods were used for comparison. Compared to the CC based approaches, which had 40% and 53% misclassification rates, the proposed detection algorithm did not perform any single misclassification. Secondly, a new ECG obfuscation method was designed and implemented on 15 subjects using added noises corresponding to each of the ECG features. This obfuscated ECG can be freely distributed over the internet without the necessity of encryption, since the original features needed to identify personal information of the patient remain concealed. Only authorized personnel possessing a secret key will be able to reconstruct the original ECG from the obfuscated ECG. Distribution of the would appear as regular ECG without encryption. Therefore, traditional decryption techniques including powerful brute force attack are useless against this obfuscation.

  20. Analysis of seismic noise to check the mechanical isolation of a medical device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rombetto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the mechanical response of a magnetically shielded room that hosts a magnetoencephalography system that is subject to external vibrations. This is a superconducting quantum interference device, which are the most sensitive sensors for magnetic flux variations. When the magnetoencephalography operates with people inside the room, the spectrum of the flux of the magnetic field shows anomalous peaks at several frequencies between 1 Hz and 20 Hz, independent of the experiment that is being run. As the variations in the flux of the magnetic field through the sensors might not only be related to the electrical currents circulating inside the brain, but also to non-damped mechanical oscillations of the room, we installed seismic instrumentation to measure the effective motion inside the room and to compare it to the external motion. For this analysis, we recorded the ambient seismic noise at two very close stations, one inside the magnetically shielded room, the other one outside in the room in which the magnetically shielded room is itself located. Data were collected over four days, including a week-end, to study the response of the magnetically shielded room subjected to different energy levels of external vibrations. The root mean square, Fourier spectra and power spectral density show significant differences between the signal recorded inside and outside the magnetically shielded room, with several anomalous peaks in the frequency band of 1 Hz to 20 Hz. The normalized spectral quantities (horizontal to vertical spectral ratio, and ratio between the internal and external spectra show large amplification at several frequencies, reaching in some cases one order of magnitude. We concluded that the magnetically shielded room does not dampen the external vibrations, but it instead appears to amplify these across a broad frequency range.

  1. The impact of musicianship on the cortical mechanisms related to separating speech from background noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendel, Benjamin Rich; Tremblay, Charles-David; Belleville, Sylvie; Peretz, Isabelle

    2015-05-01

    Musicians have enhanced auditory processing abilities. In some studies, these abilities are paralleled by an improved understanding of speech in noisy environments, partially due to more robust encoding of speech signals in noise at the level of the brainstem. Little is known about the impact of musicianship on attention-dependent cortical activity related to lexical access during a speech-in-noise task. To address this issue, we presented musicians and nonmusicians with single words mixed with three levels of background noise, across two conditions, while monitoring electrical brain activity. In the active condition, listeners repeated the words aloud, and in the passive condition, they ignored the words and watched a silent film. When background noise was most intense, musicians repeated more words correctly compared with nonmusicians. Auditory evoked responses were attenuated and delayed with the addition of background noise. In musicians, P1 amplitude was marginally enhanced during active listening and was related to task performance in the most difficult listening condition. By comparing ERPs from the active and passive conditions, we isolated an N400 related to lexical access. The amplitude of the N400 was not influenced by the level of background noise in musicians, whereas N400 amplitude increased with the level of background noise in nonmusicians. In nonmusicians, the increase in N400 amplitude was related to a reduction in task performance. In musicians only, there was a rightward shift of the sources contributing to the N400 as the level of background noise increased. This pattern of results supports the hypothesis that encoding of speech in noise is more robust in musicians and suggests that this facilitates lexical access. Moreover, the shift in sources suggests that musicians, to a greater extent than nonmusicians, may increasingly rely on acoustic cues to understand speech in noise.

  2. Monitoring the mechanical vibration of in-core detector tubes and fuel channels via ICFD noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glockler, O.; Cooke, D.F.; Czuppon, G.J.; Kapoor, K.K.

    2000-01-01

    Vibrations of core internals are regularly monitored in the CANDU nuclear generating stations of Ontario Power Generation (OPG) via the noise analysis of in-core flux detectors (ICFDs). Voltage signals of standard station instrumentation are recorded by portable multi-channel high-speed high-resolution data acquisition systems, then statistical parameters are derived from the multi-channel time series measurements. Reactor noise analysis is a non-intrusive statistical technique regularly used in system surveillance, diagnostics and in actual operational I and C problems. It utilizes the dynamic information carried by the small fluctuations (noise) of station signals measured around their mean values during steady-state operation. The present paper discusses specific results related to the flow-induced mechanical vibrations of detector tubes and fuel channels. (author)

  3. Software development of the mechanical vibration monitoring system of the CNA I reactor internals by neutron noise technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wentzeis, Luis M.; Calvo, Maria D.

    2009-01-01

    The neutron noise analysis technique is an important predictive maintenance tool for early detection of failures such as sensor malfunctions and incipient mechanical problems located in the reactor internals. This technique was applied successfully in Argentina since 1987. The FER-GAEN group dependent of the CNEA developed the measuring system to detect anomalies as early as possible. The magnitude of interest in this analysis is the fluctuating component of the neutron flux known as 'neutron noise'. In order to improve and facilitate the analysis, a new software code was developed for the data acquisition of the neutron noise signals and neutron spectra estimation in the frequency domain. The RMS values related with the internals vibrations are calculated from these spectra and are chronologically displayed, in order to detect any anomalous vibration or incipient detector malfunction as early as possible. (author)

  4. Thermal mechanical stress modeling of GCtM seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chambers, Robert [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Finite-element thermal stress modeling at the glass-ceramic to metal (GCtM) interface was conducted assuming heterogeneous glass-ceramic microstructure. The glass-ceramics were treated as composites consisting of high expansion silica crystalline phases dispersed in a uniform residual glass. Interfacial stresses were examined for two types of glass-ceramics. One was designated as SL16 glass -ceramic, owing to its step-like thermal strain curve with an overall coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at 16 ppm/ºC. Clustered Cristobalite is the dominant silica phase in SL16 glass-ceramic. The other, designated as NL16 glass-ceramic, exhibited clusters of mixed Cristobalite and Quartz and showed a near-linear thermal strain curve with a same CTE value.

  5. Multifunctional Thermal Structures Using Cellular Contact-Aided Complaint Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-31

    that it transfers heat away from (or insulates) the electronics modules in order to ensure that the electronics do not overheat (or become too cold...conventional active thermal control systems whenever possible. The basic aim of a passive thermal control system is to control heat transfer from...electronic devices to a radiating exterior surface. Heat may need to be retained when the devices generate little heat , and high heat transfer

  6. Multifunctional Thermal Structures Using Cellular Contract-Aided Complaint Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-26

    that it transfers heat away from (or insulates) the electronics modules in order to ensure that the electronics do not overheat (or become too cold...conventional active thermal control systems whenever possible. The basic aim of a passive thermal control system is to control heat transfer from...electronic devices to a radiating exterior surface. Heat may need to be retained when the devices generate little heat , and high heat transfer

  7. Noise reduction and estimation in multiple micro-electro-mechanical inertial systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waegli, Adrian; Skaloud, Jan; Guerrier, Stéphane; Parés, Maria Eulàlia; Colomina, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    This research studies the reduction and the estimation of the noise level within a redundant configuration of low-cost (MEMS-type) inertial measurement units (IMUs). Firstly, independent observations between units and sensors are assumed and the theoretical decrease in the system noise level is analyzed in an experiment with four MEMS-IMU triads. Then, more complex scenarios are presented in which the noise level can vary in time and for each sensor. A statistical method employed for studying the volatility of financial markets (GARCH) is adapted and tested for the usage with inertial data. This paper demonstrates experimentally and through simulations the benefit of direct noise estimation in redundant IMU setups

  8. Mechanical spectroscopy of thermal stress relaxation in aluminium alloys reinforced with short alumina fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreno-Morelli, E.; Schaller, R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Inst. de Genie Atomique; Urreta, S.E.

    1998-05-01

    The mechanical behaviour under low temperature thermal cycling of aluminium-based composites reinforced with short Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} SAFFIL fibres has been investigated by mechanical spectroscopy (mechanical loss and elastic shear modulus measurements). A mechanical loss maximum has been observed during cooling which originates in the relaxation of thermal stresses at the interfaces due to the differential thermal expansion between matrix and reinforcement. The maximum height increases with the volumetric fibre content. In addition, if the matrix strength is increased by the appropriated choice of alloy and thermal treatment, the maximum diminishes and shifts to lower temperatures. No damage accumulation at the interfaces has been detected during long period thermal cycling in the range 100 to 500 K. A description of the damping behaviour is made in terms of the development of microplastic zones which surround the fibres. (orig.) 9 refs.

  9. Influence of ammonium nitrate on kinetics and mechanism of thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karelin, A.I.; Lobas, O.P.; Zhiganov, A.N.; Vasil'ev, K.F.; Zhiganova, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of ammonium nitrate on the mechanism and kinetics of dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates was studied. An appreciable influence of the nitrate ion content in the samples of ammonium polyuranates on the development of thermal stability has been noted. The kinetic parameters of the thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates have been evaluated. A mechanism of the dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates in the presence of ammonium nitrate has been proposed. It was shown that increase in the content of ammonium nitrate in the precipitate of ammonium polyuranates leads to a decrease in the specific surface of uranoso-uranic oxide

  10. Investigation of ammonium nitrate effect on kinetics and mechanism of thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karelin, A.I.; Lobas, O.P.; Zhiganov, A.N.; Vasil'ev, K.F.; Zhiganova, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made on ammonium nitrate effect on the mechanism and kinetics of dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates. Sufficient effect of nitrate ion content in ammonium polyuranate samples on their thermal stability was noted. Kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates were evaluated. Mechanism of dehydration and thermal decomposition of ammonium polyuranates in the presence of ammonium nitrate was suggested. It was shown that increase of ammonium nitrate content in ammonium polyuranate precipitate resulted to reduction of the specific surface of prepared uranium mixed oxide

  11. Study of thermal and mechanical properties of PCL films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, A.R. de; Vieira, A.B. da Silva; Leite, I.F.

    2016-01-01

    In the current situation of the market, it is remarkable the concern for the development of materials that offer better properties and biodegradable behavior. The scientific researches seeks development and improvement of materials for applications in products increasingly biodegradable. To do so, this research aims at obtaining films composed of polymer poly(ε-caprolactone)(PCL), aliphatic polyester synthetic and biodegradable, and silicates in layers, specifically in the State of Paraiba, prepared by the method of solution. This mixture makes it possible to form different nanostructures intercalated morphology and/or exfoliated, which therefore provides improvement in the thermal properties of the final product. After analyzing the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) was observed predominantly exfoliated morphologies to PCL films containing different silicate content and an increase in thermal stability when there was a lower concentration of clay as thermal analysis (TGA). (author)

  12. The application of fracture mechanics in thermally stressed structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, F.; Maitan, A.; Hellen, T.K.

    1981-03-01

    There is considerable interest in calculating stress intensity factors at crack tips in thermally stressed structures, particularly in the power generation industry where the safe operation of both conventional and nuclear plant is founded on rigorous safety cases. Analytical methods to study such problems are of limited scope, although they can be extended by introducing numerical techniques. Purpose built numerical methods, however, offer a much greater and more accurate solution capability and in particular the finite element method is well advanced. Such methods are described, including how stress intensity factors can be obtained from the finite element results. They are then applied to a range of thermally stressed problems including plates with central cracks and cylinders with axial and circumferential cracks. Both steady state and transient temperature distributions arising from typical thermal shocks are considered. (author)

  13. Thermal and Mechanical Design Aspects of the LIFE Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, R P; Gerhard, M A; Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Morris, K R; Peterson, P F; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-25

    The Laser Inertial confinement fusion - Fission Energy (LIFE) engine encompasses the components of a LIFE power plant responsible for converting the thermal energy of fusion and fission reactions into electricity. The design and integration of these components must satisfy a challenging set of requirements driven by nuclear, thermal, geometric, structural, and materials considerations. This paper details a self-consistent configuration for the LIFE engine along with the methods and technologies selected to meet these stringent requirements. Included is discussion of plant layout, coolant flow dynamics, fuel temperatures, expected structural stresses, power cycle efficiencies, and first wall survival threats. Further research and to understand and resolve outstanding issues is also outlined.

  14. Parametric fuselage design : Integration of mechanics and acoustic & thermal insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krakers, L.A.

    2009-01-01

    Designing a fuselage is a very complex process, which involves many different aspects like strength and stability, fatigue, damage tolerance, fire resistance, thermal and acoustic insulation but also inspection, maintenance, production and repair aspects. It is difficult to include all design

  15. On the establishment of thermal equilibrium in simplest mechanical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsinyan, Ar.M.

    1987-01-01

    The process of the establishment of thermal equilibrium of the damping oscillators and a ''free'' particle in interaction with the blackbody radiation field is considered. A special attention is payed to the principal role of non-closedness of real systems as well as to the irreversibility of the microscopic equations of motion in the question of grounding of the statistical physics

  16. Enhancement in thermal and mechanical properties of bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibib Khalid S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new type of porous brick is proposed. Sawdust is initially well mixed with wet clay in order to create voids inside the brick during the firing process. The voids will enhance the total performance of the brick due to the reduction of its density and thermal conductivity and a minor reduction of its compressive stress. All these properties have been measured experimentally and good performance has been obtained. Although a minor reduction in compressive stress has been observed with increased porosity, this property has still been larger than that of the common used hollow brick. Data obtained by this work lead to a new type of effective brick having a good performance with no possibility that mortar enters inside the holes which is the case with the common used hollow bricks. The mortar has a determent effect on thermal properties of the wall since it has some higher thermal conductivity and density than that of brick which increases the wall overall density and thermal conductivity of the wall.

  17. Characterization and modeling of the thermal mechanics of lithium-ion battery cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Ki-Yong; Epureanu, Bogdan I.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal swelling shape is different than Li-ion intercalation swelling shape. • Nonuniform temperature and gap creation leads to a convex shape at free conditions. • Important parameters of thermal mechanics are estimated through experiments. • A coupled thermal-structural analysis accurately predicts thermal swelling shape. • Nonuniform temperature still plays a critical role at pack conditions. - Abstract: The thermal mechanics of Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries is explored with a focus on thermal swelling. Experiments show for the first time that the swelling shape of prismatic battery cells due to temperature variations is significantly different from that due to Li-ion intercalation in unconstrained conditions. In contrast to uniform and orthotropic Li-ion intercalation swelling in a direction perpendicular to electrodes, the nonuniform temperature distribution in the jellyroll and the gaps/voids between electrodes result in distinguishable different swelling shapes. A unique coupled thermal-structural analysis with a simple, but efficient 3-D finite numerical model is proposed to investigate the impact of temperature variations on the thermal behaviors of battery cells. Anisotropic heat conduction and temperature dependency of the coefficient of thermal expansion are taken into account and found to have an impact on temperature distribution and thermal expansion. Experimental validation of the proposed model clearly demonstrates that the coupled thermal-structural analysis with the proposed model can predict accurately the thermal swelling at unconstrained conditions. The solution at pack (constrained) conditions shows that the nonuniform temperature distribution of the jellyroll still plays a critical role for the thermal swelling shape, although the gaps/voids do not occur because of the constraints from spacers in the pack, suggesting that the estimation of core temperature is important. Such an accurate model, able to estimate cell

  18. Evaluation of thermal cooling mechanisms for laser application to teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miserendino, L J; Abt, E; Wigdor, H; Miserendino, C A

    1993-01-01

    Experimental cooling methods for the prevention of thermal damage to dental pulp during laser application to teeth were compared to conventional treatment in vitro. Pulp temperature measurements were made via electrical thermistors implanted within the pulp chambers of extracted human third molar teeth. Experimental treatments consisted of lasing without cooling, lasing with cooling, laser pulsing, and high-speed dental rotary drilling. Comparisons of pulp temperature elevation measurements for each group demonstrated that cooling by an air and water spray during lasing significantly reduced heat transfer to dental pulp. Laser exposures followed by an air and water spray resulted in pulp temperature changes comparable to conventional treatment by drilling. Cooling by an air water spray with evacuation appears to be an effective method for the prevention of thermal damage to vital teeth following laser exposure.

  19. Ionic liquid thermal stabilities: decomposition mechanisms and analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maton, Cedric; De Vos, Nils; Stevens, Christian V

    2013-07-07

    The increasing amount of papers published on ionic liquids generates an extensive quantity of data. The thermal stability data of divergent ionic liquids are collected in this paper with attention to the experimental set-up. The influence and importance of the latter parameters are broadly addressed. Both ramped temperature and isothermal thermogravimetric analysis are discussed, along with state-of-the-art methods, such as TGA-MS and pyrolysis-GC. The strengths and weaknesses of the different methodologies known to date demonstrate that analysis methods should be in line with the application. The combination of data from advanced analysis methods allows us to obtain in-depth information on the degradation processes. Aided with computational methods, the kinetics and thermodynamics of thermal degradation are revealed piece by piece. The better understanding of the behaviour of ionic liquids at high temperature allows selective and application driven design, as well as mathematical prediction for engineering purposes.

  20. Thermal-mechanical properties of cracked UO2 pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williford, R.E.; Mohr, C.L.; Lanning, D.D.

    1980-11-01

    A series of experiments (IFA-431, 432, 513, and 527) sponsored by the Fuel Behavior Research Branch of the USNRC are being irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor to better define LWR fuel behavior over the normal operating range of power reactor fuel rods. One fuel behavior variable of interest is the thermally induced cracking of UO 2 fuel pellets. The effects of pellet cracking on the effective thermal conductivity and elastic moduli for the fragmented fuel were found to be primarily dependent on the free area in the r, theta plane of the fuel rod. The free area is defined as the area within the cladding inner surface that is not occupied by the fuel fragments themselves

  1. Dielectric, thermal and mechanical properties of ADP doped PVA composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Jagadish; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ravindrachary, V.; Rathod, Sunil G.; Sheela, T.; Naik, Ishwar

    2015-06-01

    Polymer composites of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), doped with different concentrations of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) has been prepared by solution casting. The formation of complexation between ADP and PVA was confirmed with the help of Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows thermal stability of the prepared composites. Impedance analyzer study revealed the increase in dielectric constant and loss with increase the ADP concentration and the strain rate of the prepared composites decreases with ADP concentration.

  2. Thermal studies on a mechanical prototype of A BIS MDT chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Petridou, C; Wotschack, J; Zisis, A

    1998-01-01

    The deformations of a BIS MDT chamber owing to temperature gradients between the two multilayers and between the two Faraday cages were studied on a mechanical prototype. The influence of thermal insulation on the thermal behaviour of the chamber is also reported.

  3. Neutralization of Aerosolized Bio-Agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Bio -agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation Mechanisms Distribution Statement A. Approved for public...of Cincinnati Project Title: Neutralization of Aerosolized Bio -agents by Filled Nanocomposite Materials through Thermal and Chemical Inactivation...fire ball, where they will not effectively interact with any viable bio -aerosol. 1.1.4. Conclusions Cryo-milling is necessary to achieve a

  4. The effect of mechanical cleaning and thermal disinfection on light intensity provided by fibrelight Macintosh laryngoscopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucx, M. J. L.; de Gast, H. M.; Veldhuis, J.; Hassing, L. H.; Meulemans, A.; Kammeyer, A.

    2003-01-01

    The increased use of thermal decontamination procedures for fibrelight laryngoscope blades, to comply with international guidelines, will have considerable economical effects. We evaluated the effect of mechanical cleaning plus thermal disinfection at 90degreesC, with or without subsequent steam

  5. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity and Conduction Mechanism of Ge2Sb2Te5 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kuwahara, Masashi; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has drawn much attention due to its application in phase-change random-access memory and potential as a thermoelectric material. Electrical and thermal conductivity are important material properties in both applications. The aim of this work is to investigate the temperature dependence of the electrical and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy and discuss the thermal conduction mechanism. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy were measured from room temperature to 823 K by four-terminal and hot-strip method, respectively. With increasing temperature, the electrical resistivity increased while the thermal conductivity first decreased up to about 600 K then increased. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity was calculated from the Wiedemann-Franz law using the resistivity results. At room temperature, Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has large electronic thermal conductivity and low lattice thermal conductivity. Bipolar diffusion contributes more to the thermal conductivity with increasing temperature. The special crystallographic structure of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy accounts for the thermal conduction mechanism.

  6. Electrical and Thermal Conductivity and Conduction Mechanism of Ge2Sb2Te5 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Rui; Endo, Rie; Kuwahara, Masashi; Kobayashi, Yoshinao; Susa, Masahiro

    2018-06-01

    Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has drawn much attention due to its application in phase-change random-access memory and potential as a thermoelectric material. Electrical and thermal conductivity are important material properties in both applications. The aim of this work is to investigate the temperature dependence of the electrical and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy and discuss the thermal conduction mechanism. The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy were measured from room temperature to 823 K by four-terminal and hot-strip method, respectively. With increasing temperature, the electrical resistivity increased while the thermal conductivity first decreased up to about 600 K then increased. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity was calculated from the Wiedemann-Franz law using the resistivity results. At room temperature, Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy has large electronic thermal conductivity and low lattice thermal conductivity. Bipolar diffusion contributes more to the thermal conductivity with increasing temperature. The special crystallographic structure of Ge2Sb2Te5 alloy accounts for the thermal conduction mechanism.

  7. Parameters affecting mechanical and thermal responses in bone drilling: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuEun; Chavez, Craig L; Park, Joorok

    2018-04-11

    Surgical bone drilling is performed variously to correct bone fractures, install prosthetics, or for therapeutic treatment. The primary concern in bone drilling is to extract donor bone sections and create receiving holes without damaging the bone tissue either mechanically or thermally. We review current results from experimental and theoretical studies to investigate the parameters related to such effects. This leads to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanical and thermal aspects of bone drilling to reduce their unwanted complications. This review examines the important bone-drilling parameters of bone structure, drill-bit geometry, operating conditions, and material evacuation, and considers the current techniques used in bone drilling. We then analyze the associated mechanical and thermal effects and their contributions to bone-drilling performance. In this review, we identify a favorable range for each parameter to reduce unwanted complications due to mechanical or thermal effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Styrene Butadiene Rubber - Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Laoui, Tahar

    2013-01-01

    The effect of reinforcing styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) with functionalized carbon nanotubes on the mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposite was investigated. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were functionalized with phenol

  9. Two Methods of Mechanical Noise Reduction of Recorded Speech During Phonation in an MRI devic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Přibil, J.; Horáček, Jaromír; Horák, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2011), s. 92-98 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/09/0989 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514; CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : speech processing * noise reduction * NMR imaging Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2011

  10. Low frequency noise from wind turbines mechanisms of generation and its modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2010-01-01

    competitive designs compared with the upwind threebladed rotor. The simulation package comprises an aeroelastic time simulation code HAWC2 and an acoustic low frequency noise (LFN) prediction model. Computed time traces of rotor thrust and rotor torque from the aeroelastic model are input to the acoustic...

  11. Mechanical surveillance of the internal structures on the French PWRs by noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puyal, C.

    1983-01-01

    In service observation of structures, materials and systems in PWRs is one of the major preoccupations of EDF. Methods and means have been developed and put into service in order to achieve this goal. This paper deals with the surveillance of primary systems, using the technique of noise analysis [fr

  12. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Cu-Fe-X Alloys with Excellent Thermal Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Školáková, Andrea; Novák, Pavel; Mejzlíková, Lucie; Průša, Filip; Salvetr, Pavel; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the structure and mechanical properties of innovative Al-Cu-Fe based alloys were studied. We focused on preparation and characterization of rapidly solidified and hot extruded Al-Cu-Fe, Al-Cu-Fe-Ni and Al-Cu-Fe-Cr alloys. The content of transition metals affects mechanical properties and structure. For this reason, microstructure, phase composition, hardness and thermal stability have been investigated in this study. The results showed exceptional thermal stability of these allo...

  13. Molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwei; Han, Mingkun; Lu, Yan; Chen, Daishi; Sun, Xuejun; Yang, Shiming; Sun, Wei; Yu, Ning; Zhai, Suoqiang

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the molecular mechanism of the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on NIHL. Guinea pigs were divided into three groups: hydrogen-saturated saline; normal saline; and control. For saline administration, the guinea pigs were given daily abdominal injections 3 d before and 1 h before noise exposure. ABR were tested to examine cochlear physiology changes. The changes of 8-hydroxy-desoxyguanosine (8-HOdG), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) in the cochlea were also examined. The results showed that pre-treatment with hydrogen-saturated saline could significantly attenuate noise-induced hearing loss. The concentration of 8-HOdG was also significantly decreased in the hydrogen-saturated saline group compared with the normal saline group. After noise exposure, the concentrations of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 in the cochlea of guinea pigs in the hydrogen-saturated saline group were dramatically reduced compared to those in the normal saline group. The concentrations of HMGB-1 and IL-10 in the hydrogen-saturated saline group were significantly higher than in those in the normal saline group immediately and at 7 d after noise exposure. This study revealed for the first time the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) are related to both the anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity.

  14. Thermal capacitator design rationale. Part 1: Thermal and mechanical property data for selected materials potentially useful in thermal capacitor design and construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. A.; Liao, C. K.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal properties of paraffin hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon mixtures which may be used as the phase change material (PCM) in thermal capacitors are discussed. The paraffin hydrocarbons selected for consideration are those in the range from C11H24 (n-Undecane) to C20H42 (n-Eicosane). A limited amount of data is included concerning other properties of paraffin hydrocarbons and the thermal and mechanical properties of several aluminum alloys which may find application as constructional materials. Data concerning the melting temperature, transition temperature, latent heat of fusion, heat of transition, specific heat, and thermal conductivity of pure and commercial grades of paraffin hydrocarbons are given. An index of companies capable of producing paraffin hydrocarbons and information concerning the availability of various grades (purity levels) is provided.

  15. Fundamental Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Boride Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-28

    Zr ,Y)B2 ( Zr ,Hf)B2 ( Zr ,Ti)B2 ZrB2 El ec tri ca l R es is tiv ity (µ Ω -c m ) Temperature (°C) Figure 17. Electrical resistivity as a function...family as Zr , namely Ti and Hf, had minimal effect on thermal conductivity, while others such as Nb , Ta, and W had an increasing impact based on their...diffusivity (α), heat capacity (Cp) from the NIST-JANAF tables, and bulk density (ρ) using Equation 6. (5) (6) Electrical resistivity

  16. A study on the thermal and mechanical properties of inconel for steam generator U-tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seong; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Choo, Kee Nam; Kim, Sung Soo; Maeng, Wan Young; Park, Se Jin

    1993-12-01

    A series of laboratory tests was conducted to obtain the thermal and mechanical properties of Inconel 600 and 690 for the design document of steam generator U-tube. The following properties were measured as a function of temperature, and treated statistically to establish a database: 1) heat capacity, RT ∼ 500 deg C, 2) thermal expansion, RT ∼ 500 deg C, 3) thermal diffusivity, RT ∼ 500 deg C, 4) thermal conductivity, RT ∼ 500 deg C, 5) tensile property, RT ∼ 700 deg C 6) ductility, RT ∼ 700 deg C, 7) Elastic modulii and Poission's ratio, RT, 8) Microhardness, 9) Oxidation rate. (Author)

  17. Thermal and mechanical modelling of a mig-type electron gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patire Junior, H.; Castro, J.J.B. de

    1995-01-01

    A thermal and mechanical modelling of a magnetron injection electron gun has been made to minimize the temperature distribution in the gun elements while keeping the required operating temperature at 1000 0 C of the emitter. Appropriate materials were selected to reduce thermal losses and to improve the gun design from a constructional point of view aiming at extending the capabilities of the gun. A software has been used to simulate a thermal model considering the three processes of thermal transfer and the influence of the physical properties of the materials used. (author). 8 refs., 2 figs, 2 tabs

  18. Mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Alves Silvério

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from soy hulls (WSH30 on the mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose (MC nanocomposites were evaluated. MC/WSH30 nanocomposite films with different filler levels (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10% were prepared by casting. Compared to neat MC film, improvements in the mechanical and barrier properties were observed, while thermal stability was retained. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared may be attributed to mechanical percolation of WSH30, formation of a continuous network of WSH30 linked by hydrogen interactions and a close association between filler and matrix.

  19. Mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverio, Hudson Alves; Flauzino Neto, Wilson Pires; Silva, Ingrid Souza Vieira da; Rosa, Joyce Rover; Pasquini, Daniel, E-mail: pasquini@iqufu.ufu.br, E-mail: danielpasquini2005@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Uberlandia (USU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Assuncao, Rosana Maria Nascimento de [Universidade de Uberlandia (USU), Ituiutaba, MG (brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Integradas do Pontal; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney Jose Lima [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-11-15

    In this work, the effects of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from soy hulls (WSH{sub 30}) on the mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose (MC) nanocomposites were evaluated. MC/WSH{sub 30} nanocomposite films with different filler levels (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10%) were prepared by casting. Compared to neat MC film, improvements in the mechanical and barrier properties were observed, while thermal stability was retained. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared may be attributed to mechanical percolation of WSH{sub 30}, formation of a continuous network of WSH{sub 30} linked by hydrogen interactions and a close association between filler and matrix. (author)

  20. Thermal, electrical, mechanical and fluidity properties of polyester ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bariş Şimşek

    2018-04-13

    Apr 13, 2018 ... of POREC simultaneously is necessary for real-world applications. ... analysis approach containing a design of experiment (DoE) methodology ...... C–S–H gel and mechanical properties: case of ternary Port- land cements ...

  1. Transient thermal-mechanical behavior of cracked glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Y.; Ueda, S.

    1997-01-01

    We consider the transient thermal-mechanical response of cracked G-10CR glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates with temperature-dependent properties. The glass-cloth-reinforced epoxy laminates are suddenly cooled on the surfaces. A generalized plane strain finite element model is used to study the influence of warp angle and crack formation on the thermal shock behavior of two-layer woven laminates at low temperatures. Numerical calculations are carried out, and the transient temperature distribution and the thermal-mechanical stresses are shown graphically

  2. A comparative study of the mechanical behaviour of thermally oxidised commercially pure titanium and zirconium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansari, A; Sun, Y

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the mechanical behaviour of thermally oxidised commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) and commercially pure zirconium (CP-Zr). For this purpose, these two bio-metals were thermally oxidised under the same condition (650°C for 6h) and the oxidised specimens were characterised using various analytical and experimental techniques, including oxygen uptake analysis, layer thickness and hardness measurements, scratch tests, dry sliding friction and wear tests and tribocorrosion tests in Ringer's solution. The results show that under the present thermal oxidation condition, 4 times more oxygen is introduced into CP-Zr than into CP-Ti and the oxide layer produced on CP-Zr is nearly 6 times thicker than that on CP-Ti. Thermally oxidised CP-Zr possesses a higher hardness, a deeper hardening depth and better scratch resistance than thermally oxidised CP-Ti. Under dry sliding and tribocorrosion conditions, thermally oxidised CP-Zr also possesses much better resistance to material removal and a higher load bearing capacity than thermally oxidised CP-Ti. Thus, thermally oxidised Zr possesses much better mechanical behaviour than thermally oxidised Ti. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal stresses in hexagonal materials - heat treatment influence on their mechanical behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloaguen, D.; Freour, S.; Guillen, R.; Royer, J.; Francois, M.

    2004-01-01

    Internal stresses due to anisotropic thermal and plastic properties were investigated in rolled zirconium and titanium. The thermal stresses induced by a cooling process were predicted using a self-consistent model and compared with experimental results obtained by X-ray diffraction. The study of the elastoplastic response during uniaxial loading was performed along the rolling and the transverse direction of the sheet, considering the influence of the texture and the thermal stresses on the mechanical behaviour. An approach in order to determine the thermal behaviour of phases embedded in two-phase materials is also presented. For zirconium, the residual stresses due to thermal anisotropy are rather important (equivalent to 35% of the yield stress) and consequently they play an important role on the elastoplastic transition contrary to titanium. The study of two-phase material shows the influence and the interaction of the second phase on the thermal behaviour in the studied phase

  4. Effect of mechanical activation on structure and thermal decomposition of aluminum sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasri-Khouzani, M.; Meratian, M.; Panjepour, M.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal decompositions of both non-activated and mechanically activated aluminum sulfates were studied by thermogravimetry (TG). The structural disorder, the specific surface area (SSA) and the morphology of mechanically activated aluminum sulfates were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser particle-size analyzer, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Thermal analyses results indicated that the initial temperature of thermal decomposition (T i ) in TG curves for mechanically activated aluminum sulfates decreased gradually with increasing the milling time. It was also found that the SSA of mechanically activated aluminum sulfates remained almost constant after a certain milling time, and lattice strains (ε) rose but the crystallite sizes (D) decreased with increasing the milling time. These results showed that the decrease of T i in TG curves of mechanically activated aluminum sulfates was mainly caused by the increase of lattice distortions and decrease of the crystallite sizes with increasing the milling time

  5. Interpretation of Simultaneous Mechanical-Electrical-Thermal Failure in a Lithium-Ion Battery Module: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Stock, Mark J.; Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Gruchalla, Kenny

    2016-12-01

    Lithium-ion batteries are currently the state-of- the-art power sources for electric vehicles, and their safety behavior when subjected to abuse, such as a mechanical impact, is of critical concern. A coupled mechanical-electrical-thermal model for simulating the behavior of a lithium-ion battery under a mechanical crush has been developed. We present a series of production-quality visualizations to illustrate the complex mechanical and electrical interactions in this model.

  6. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Characteristics of Thermally Aged Alloy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebak, R B; Crook, P

    2002-01-01

    Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) is a candidate material for the external wall of the high level nuclear waste containers for the potential repository site at Yucca Mountain. In the mill-annealed (MA) condition, Alloy 22 is a single face centered cubic phase. When exposed to temperatures on the order of 600 C and above for times higher than 1 h, this alloy may develop secondary phases that reduce its mechanical toughness and corrosion resistance. The objective of this work was to age Alloy 22 at temperatures between 482 C and 760 C for times between 0.25 h and 6,000 h and to study the mechanical and corrosion performance of the resulting material. Aging was carried out using wrought specimens as well as gas tungsten arc welded (GTAW) specimens. Mechanical and corrosion testing was carried out using ASTM standards. Results show-that the higher the aging temperature and the longer the aging time, the lower the impact toughness of the aged material and the lower its corrosion resistance. However, extrapolating both mechanical and corrosion laboratory data predicts that Alloy 22 will remain corrosion resistant and mechanically robust for the projected lifetime of the waste container

  7. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Cu-Fe-X Alloys with Excellent Thermal Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Školáková

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the structure and mechanical properties of innovative Al-Cu-Fe based alloys were studied. We focused on preparation and characterization of rapidly solidified and hot extruded Al-Cu-Fe, Al-Cu-Fe-Ni and Al-Cu-Fe-Cr alloys. The content of transition metals affects mechanical properties and structure. For this reason, microstructure, phase composition, hardness and thermal stability have been investigated in this study. The results showed exceptional thermal stability of these alloys and very good values of mechanical properties. Alloying by chromium ensured the highest thermal stability, while nickel addition refined the structure of the consolidated alloy. High thermal stability of all tested alloys was described in context with the transformation of the quasicrystalline phases to other types of intermetallics.

  8. Structure and Mechanical Properties of Al-Cu-Fe-X Alloys with Excellent Thermal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Školáková, Andrea; Novák, Pavel; Mejzlíková, Lucie; Průša, Filip; Salvetr, Pavel; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2017-11-05

    In this work, the structure and mechanical properties of innovative Al-Cu-Fe based alloys were studied. We focused on preparation and characterization of rapidly solidified and hot extruded Al-Cu-Fe, Al-Cu-Fe-Ni and Al-Cu-Fe-Cr alloys. The content of transition metals affects mechanical properties and structure. For this reason, microstructure, phase composition, hardness and thermal stability have been investigated in this study. The results showed exceptional thermal stability of these alloys and very good values of mechanical properties. Alloying by chromium ensured the highest thermal stability, while nickel addition refined the structure of the consolidated alloy. High thermal stability of all tested alloys was described in context with the transformation of the quasicrystalline phases to other types of intermetallics.

  9. Biomass pyrolysis: Thermal decomposition mechanisms of furfural and benzaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliou, AnGayle K.; Kim, Jong Hyun; Ormond, Thomas K.; Piech, Krzysztof M.; Urness, Kimberly N.; Scheer, Adam M.; Robichaud, David J.; Mukarakate, Calvin; Nimlos, Mark R.; Daily, John W.; Guan, Qi; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Ellison, G. Barney

    2013-09-01

    The thermal decompositions of furfural and benzaldehyde have been studied in a heated microtubular flow reactor. The pyrolysis experiments were carried out by passing a dilute mixture of the aromatic aldehydes (roughly 0.1%-1%) entrained in a stream of buffer gas (either He or Ar) through a pulsed, heated SiC reactor that is 2-3 cm long and 1 mm in diameter. Typical pressures in the reactor are 75-150 Torr with the SiC tube wall temperature in the range of 1200-1800 K. Characteristic residence times in the reactor are 100-200 μsec after which the gas mixture emerges as a skimmed molecular beam at a pressure of approximately 10 μTorr. Products were detected using matrix infrared absorption spectroscopy, 118.2 nm (10.487 eV) photoionization mass spectroscopy and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization. The initial steps in the thermal decomposition of furfural and benzaldehyde have been identified. Furfural undergoes unimolecular decomposition to furan + CO: C4H3O-CHO (+ M) → CO + C4H4O. Sequential decomposition of furan leads to the production of HC≡CH, CH2CO, CH3C≡CH, CO, HCCCH2, and H atoms. In contrast, benzaldehyde resists decomposition until higher temperatures when it fragments to phenyl radical plus H atoms and CO: C6H5CHO (+ M) → C6H5CO + H → C6H5 + CO + H. The H atoms trigger a chain reaction by attacking C6H5CHO: H + C6H5CHO → [C6H6CHO]* → C6H6 + CO + H. The net result is the decomposition of benzaldehyde to produce benzene and CO.

  10. Models for thermal and mechanical monitoring of power transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilaithong, Rummiya

    2011-07-01

    At present, for economic reasons, there is an increasing emphasis on keeping transformers in service for longer than in the past. A condition-based maintenance using an online monitoring and diagnostic system is one option to ensure reliability of the transformer operation. The key parameters for effectively monitoring equipment can be selected by failure statistics and estimated failure consequences. In this work, two key aspects of transformer condition monitoring are addressed in depth: thermal behaviour and behaviour of on-load tap changers. In the first part of the work, transformer thermal behaviour is studied, focussing on top-oil temperatures. Through online comparison of a measured value of the top-oil temperature and its calculated value, some rapidly developing failures in power transformers such as malfunction of the cooling unit may be detected. Predictions of top-oil temperature can be obtained by means of a mathematical model. Long-term investigations on some dynamic top-oil temperature models are presented for three different types of transformer units. The last-state top-oil temperature, load current, ambient temperature and the operating state of pumps and fans are applied as inputs of the top-oil temperature models. In the fundamental physical models presented, some constant parameters are required and can be estimated using a least-squares optimization technique. Multilayer Feed-forward and Recurrent neural network models are also proposed and investigated. The neural network models are trained with three different Backpropagation training algorithms: Levenberg-Marquardt, Scaled Conjugate Gradient and Automated Bayesian Regularization. The effect of varying operating conditions of the cooling units and the non-steady-state behaviour of loading conditions, as well as ambient temperature are noted. Results show sophisticated temperature prediction is possible using the neural network models that is generally more accurate than with the physical

  11. The Ageing Effect of Mechanical Joints on the Tyre/Joint Noises Monitored by a Control Vehicle Method without Traffic Disturbance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the ageing effect of mechanical joints reflecting from the tyre/joint impacting noise by measuring the vehicle structure-borne noise change. Field data is collected applying two measurement methods suitable for newly installed and existing old expansion joints. The measurement methodology is improved by designing and applying a trailer for equipment installation. The main advantage of this method is not to disturb existing traffic by lane closure for measurement. Field measurements were conducted regularly for a study period up to 16 months after new joint replacement to monitor the variation of the structure-borne noise change inside a test vehicle while passing through mechanical joints. Empirical relationship is developed based on the field data of the roadside airborne noise change and the vehicle structure-borne noise change. The roadside tyre/joint noises could be converted using calibrated empirical formula. Key result findings include the following. (1 The vehicle structure-borne noise change is found smallest during the 3rd–6th months even lower than that measured when a new joint is installed. The structure-borne noise change then keeps increasing afterwards till the end of the study period. (2 Similar observations are found in all study cases incorporating various mechanical joint types and test vehicle types.

  12. Mechanization of coal storage bins at thermal electric stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushuev, V P; Dyunze, V M; Sidorenko, I A; Dombrovskii, A N; Orlov, S V

    1987-07-01

    Soviet and foreign methods of mechanizing materials handling at storage depots are discussed. Describes a new method of mechanizing coal storage using a bucket wheel reclaimer and mobile conveyor. Sketches and specifications of the PG-1250.32/21 mobile conveyor and the PRK-1250 bucke wheel reclaimer as well as a flow chart and technical and economic indicators of loading operations are given. Savings realized annually from using the combined PRK-1250 bucke wheel reclaimer and the PG-1250.32/21 mobile conveyor were 280 thousand rubles.

  13. Wind seismic noise introduced by external infrastructure: field data and transfer mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martysevich, Pavel; Starovoyt, Yuri

    2017-04-01

    Background seismic noise generated by wind was analyzed at six co-located seismic and infrasound arrays with the use of the wind speed data. The main factors affecting the noise level were identified as (a) external structures as antenna towers for intrasite communication, vegetation and heavy solar panels fixtures, (b) borehole casing and (c) local lithology. The wind-induced seismic noise peaks in the spectra can be predicted by combination of inverted pendulum model for antenna towers and structures used to support solar panels, free- or clamped-tube resonance of the borehole casing and is dependent on the type of sedimentary upper layer. Observed resonance frequencies are in agreement with calculated clamped / free tube modes for towers and borehole casings. Improvement of the seismic data quality can be achieved by minimizing the impact of surrounding structures close to seismic boreholes. The need and the advantage of the borehole installation may vanish and appear to be even not necessary at locations with non-consolidated sediments because the impact of surrounding structures on seismic background may significantly deteriorate the installation quality and therefore the detection capability of the array. Several IMS arrays where the radio telemetry antennas are used for data delivery to the central site may benefit from the redesign of the intrasite communication system by its substitute with the fiber-optic net as less harmful engineering solution.

  14. Computationally efficient thermal-mechanical modelling of selective laser melting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Y.; Ayas, C.; Brabazon, Dermot; Naher, Sumsun; Ul Ahad, Inam

    2017-01-01

    The Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing (AM) method to produce high density metal parts with complex topology. However, part distortions and accompanying residual stresses deteriorates the mechanical reliability of SLM products. Modelling of the SLM process is

  15. Numerical Study on the Thermal Stress and its Formation Mechanism of a Thermoelectric Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tao; Gong, Tingrui; Yang, Wei; Wu, Yongjia

    2018-06-01

    The strong thermo-mechanical stress is one of the most critical failure mechanisms that affect the durability of thermoelectric devices. In this study, numerical simulations on the formation mechanism of the maximum thermal stress inside the thermoelectric device have been performed by using finite element method. The influences of the material properties and the thermal radiation on the thermal stress have been examined. The results indicate that the maximum thermal stress was located at the contact position between the two materials and occurred due to differential thermal expansions and displacement constraints of the materials. The difference in the calculated thermal stress value between the constant and the variable material properties was between 3% and 4%. At a heat flux of 1 W·cm-2 and an emissivity of 0.5, the influence of the radiation heat transfer on the thermal stress was only about 5%; however, when the heat flux was 20 W·cm-2 and the emissivity was 0.7, the influence of the radiation heat transfer was more than 30%.

  16. Thermal Mechanisms for High Amplitude Aerodynamic Flow Control (YIP 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    transport aircraft , much less cruise. The search for a perfect actuator continues, but progress has been limited by the often proprietary nature these...wave generation as a mechanism for high amplitude, high bandwidth actuation has been demonstrated, but the fundamental physics of how this...moving forward with such a definition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS active flow control, energy deposition, plasma actuation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  17. Conversion of thermall energy to mechanical work in the oscillations with steam condensation in pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aya, Izuo; Nariai, Hideki.

    1988-01-01

    Pressure and fluid oscillations with steam injection into pool water were discussed from the view point of the conversion of thermal energy into mechanical work. When the change of fluid state moves clockwise in the p-V diagram, the oscillation sustains since the thermal energy changes into positive work. The equations difining the mechanical work at the condensation oscillations were presented. The oscillation threshold determined by the condition that mechanical work became zero, coincided with the values derived by the linear oscillation theory. The changes of pressure and specific volume during chugging were also shown with one dimensional simulation analysis. The p-V diagrams at various chugging modes were presented with the movement of steam water interface, and the conversion efficiency of thermal energy to mechanical work was also discussed. (author)

  18. In situ tests for investigating thermal and mechanical rock behaviors at an underground research tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Sangki; Cho, Won-Jin

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the thermal and mechanical behaviors expected to be happened around an underground high-level radioactive waste (HLW) repository is important for a successful site selection, construction, operation, and closure of the repository. In this study, the thermal and mechanical behaviors of rock and rock mass were investigated from in situ borehole heater test and the studies for characterizing an excavation damaged zone (EDZ), which had been carried out at an underground research tunnel, KURT, constructed in granite for the validation of a HLW disposal concept. Thermal, mechanical, and hydraulic properties in EDZ could be predicted from various in situ and laboratory tests as well as numerical simulations. The complex thermo-mechanical coupling behavior of rock could be modeled using the rock properties. (author)

  19. Analysis and development of deterministic and stochastic neutron noise computing techniques with applications to thermal and fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouchon, Amelie

    2016-01-01

    Neutron noise analysis addresses the description of small time-dependent flux fluctuations induced by small global or local perturbations of the macroscopic cross-sections. These fluctuations may occur in nuclear reactors due to density fluctuations of the coolant, to vibrations of fuel elements, control rods, or any other structures in the core. In power reactors, ex-core and in-core detectors can be used to monitor neutron noise with the aim of detecting possible anomalies and taking the necessary measures for continuous safe power production. The objective of this thesis is to develop techniques for neutron noise analysis and especially to implement a neutron noise solver in the deterministic transport code APOLLO3 developed at CEA. A new Monte Carlo algorithm that solves the transport equations for the neutron noise has been also developed. In addition, a new vibration model has been developed. Moreover, a method based on the determination of a new steady state has been proposed for the linear and the nonlinear full theory so as to improve the traditional neutron noise theory. In order to test these new developments we have performed neutron noise simulations in one-dimensional systems and in a large pressurized water reactor with heavy baffle in two and three dimensions with APOLLO3 in diffusion and transport theories. (author) [fr

  20. Thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical design of plasma facing components for SST-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Santra, P.; Chenna Reddy, D.; Parashar, S.K.S.

    2014-01-01

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) are one of the major sub-systems of ssT-1 tokamak. PFC of ssT-1 consisting of divertors, passive stabilizers, baffles and limiters are designed to be compatible for steady state operation. The main consideration in the design of the PFC cooling is the steady state heat removal of up to 1 MW/m 2 . The PFC has been designed to withstand the peak heat fluxes and also without significant erosion such that frequent replacement of the armor is not necessary. Design considerations included 2-D steady state and transient tile temperature distribution and resulting thermal loads in PFC during baking, and cooling, coolant parameters necessary to maintain optimum thermal-hydraulic design, and tile fitting mechanism. Finite Element (FE) models using ANSYS have been developed to carry out the heat transfer and stress analyses of the PFC to understand its thermal and mechanical behaviors. The results of the calculation led to a good understanding of the coolant flow behavior and the temperature distribution in the tube wall and the different parts of the PFC. Thermal analysis of the PFC is carried out with the purpose of evaluating the thermal mechanical behavior of PFCs. The detailed thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical designs of PFCs of ssT-1 are discussed in this paper. (authors)

  1. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G. (José M. G.), 1972-; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  2. Low- and high-frequency cortical brain oscillations reflect dissociable mechanisms of concurrent speech segregation in noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellamsetty, Anusha; Bidelman, Gavin M

    2018-04-01

    Parsing simultaneous speech requires listeners use pitch-guided segregation which can be affected by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the auditory scene. The interaction of these two cues may occur at multiple levels within the cortex. The aims of the current study were to assess the correspondence between oscillatory brain rhythms and determine how listeners exploit pitch and SNR cues to successfully segregate concurrent speech. We recorded electrical brain activity while participants heard double-vowel stimuli whose fundamental frequencies (F0s) differed by zero or four semitones (STs) presented in either clean or noise-degraded (+5 dB SNR) conditions. We found that behavioral identification was more accurate for vowel mixtures with larger pitch separations but F0 benefit interacted with noise. Time-frequency analysis decomposed the EEG into different spectrotemporal frequency bands. Low-frequency (θ, β) responses were elevated when speech did not contain pitch cues (0ST > 4ST) or was noisy, suggesting a correlate of increased listening effort and/or memory demands. Contrastively, γ power increments were observed for changes in both pitch (0ST > 4ST) and SNR (clean > noise), suggesting high-frequency bands carry information related to acoustic features and the quality of speech representations. Brain-behavior associations corroborated these effects; modulations in low-frequency rhythms predicted the speed of listeners' perceptual decisions with higher bands predicting identification accuracy. Results are consistent with the notion that neural oscillations reflect both automatic (pre-perceptual) and controlled (post-perceptual) mechanisms of speech processing that are largely divisible into high- and low-frequency bands of human brain rhythms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal and thermo-mechanical simulation of laser assisted machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, G.; Dal Santo, P.; Lebrun, J. L.; Bellett, D.; Robert, P.

    2007-01-01

    Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) improves the machinability of materials by locally heating the workpiece just prior to cutting. The heat input is provided by a high power laser focused several millimeters in front of the cutting tool. Experimental investigations have confirmed that the cutting force can be decreased, by as much as 40%, for various materials (tool steel, titanium alloys and nickel alloys). The laser heat input is essentially superficial and results in non-uniform temperature profiles within the depth of the workpiece. The temperature field in the cutting zone is therefore influenced by many parameters. In order to understand the effect of the laser on chip formation and on the temperature fields in the different deformation zones, thermo-mechanical simulation were undertaken. A thermo-mechanical model for chip formation with and without the laser was also undertaken for different cutting parameters. Experimental tests for the orthogonal cutting of 42CrMo4 steel were used to validate the simulation via the prediction of the cutting force with and without the laser. The thermo-mechanical model then allowed us to highlight the differences in the temperature fields in the cutting zone with and without the laser. In particular, it was shown that for LAM the auto-heating of the material in the primary shear zone is less important and that the friction between the tool and chip also generates less heat. The temperature fields allow us to explain the reduction in the cutting force and the resulting residual stress fields in the workpiece

  4. Simultaneously Coupled Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Simulation of Lithium-Ion Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Sprague, Michael A.; Pesaran, Ahmad A.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the combined electrochemical-thermal and mechanical response of a system has a variety of applications, for example, structural failure from electrochemical fatigue and the potential induced changes of material properties. For lithium-ion batteries, there is an added concern over the safety of the system in the event of mechanical failure of the cell components. In this work, we present a generic multi-scale simultaneously coupled mechanical-electrochemical-thermal model to examine the interaction between mechanical failure and electrochemical-thermal responses. We treat the battery cell as a homogeneous material while locally we explicitly solve for the mechanical response of individual components using a homogenization model and the electrochemical-thermal responses using an electrochemical model for the battery. A benchmark problem is established to demonstrate the proposed modeling framework. The model shows the capability to capture the gradual evolution of cell electrochemical-thermal responses, and predicts the variation of those responses under different short-circuit conditions.

  5. Thermal depolymerization mechanisms of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hengxue Xiang; Xiaoshuang Wen; Xiaohui Miu; Yan Li; Zhe Zhou; Meifang Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Thermal degradation processes and decomposition mechanisms of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) were investigated by using thermal gravity analysis(TGA), Gel permeation chromatography (GPC), elemental analyzer, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (PyGC-MS) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). The degradation activation energy was calculated via the dependence of residual mass on isothermal temperature. 1H NMR and PyGC-MS were used to investigate the chemical structure and component proportion of volatile gases and degradation residues which were produced by thermal decomposition, and to infer the process of macromolecular chain scission. Besides, the influence of the factors, such as outfield atmosphere, residual metal ions, on the degradation behaviors of PHBV was also studied. Finally, the PHBV thermal decomposition mechanisms were speculated on the basis of the degradation behaviors of molecular and chemical structure.

  6. Effect of thermal ageing on mechanical properties of a high-strength ODS alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Hoon; Kim, Sung Hwan; Jang, Chang Heui [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Kyu [Nuclear Materials DivisionKorea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    A new high-strength ODS alloy, ARROS, was recently developed for the application as the cladding material of a Sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). To assess the long-term integrity under thermal ageing, ARROS was thermally aged in air at 650°C for 1000 h. The degree of thermal ageing was assessed by mechanical tests such as uniaxial tensile, hardness, and small punch tests at from room temperature to 650°C. Tensile strength was slightly decreased but elongation, hardness, and small punch energy were hardly changed at all test temperatures for the specimen aged at 650°C for 1000 h. However, the variation in mechanical properties such as hardness and small punch energy increased after thermal ageing. Using the test results, the correlation between tensile strength and maximum small punch load was established.

  7. Design and Development of a Solar Thermal Collector with Single Axis Solar Tracking Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theebhan Mogana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The solar energy is a source of energy that is abundant in Malaysia and can be easily harvested. However, because of the rotation of the Earth about its axis, it is impossible to harvest the solar energy to the maximum capacity if the solar thermal collector is placed fix to a certain angle. In this research, a solar thermal dish with single axis solar tracking mechanism that will rotate the dish according to the position of the sun in the sky is designed and developed, so that more solar rays can be reflected to a focal point and solar thermal energy can be harvested from the focal point. Data were collected for different weather conditions and performance of the solar thermal collector with a solar tracker were studied and compared with stationary solar thermal collector.

  8. Mechanical Properties and Thermal Shock Resistance Analysis of BNNT/Si3N4 Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouren; Wang, Gaoqi; Wen, Daosheng; Yang, Xuefeng; Yang, Liying; Guo, Peiquan

    2018-04-01

    BNNT/Si3N4 ceramic composites with different weight amount of BNNT fabricated by hot isostatic pressing were introduced. The mechanical properties and thermal shock resistance of the composites were investigated. The results showed that BNNT-added ceramic composites have a finer and more uniform microstructure than that of BNNT-free Si3N4 ceramic because of the retarding effect of BNNT on Si3N4 grain growth. The addition of 1.5 wt.% BNNT results in simultaneous increase in flexural strength, fracture toughness, and thermal shock resistance. The analysis of the results indicates that BNNT brings many thermal transport channels in the microstructure, increasing the efficiency of thermal transport, therefore results in increase of thermal shock resistance. In addition, BNNT improves the residual flexural strength of composites by crack deflection, bridging, branching and pinning, which increase the crack propagation resistance.

  9. Mechanical and thermal properties of castor oil polyurethane bone cement after gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, E.C.; Chierice, G.O.; Claro Neto, S.; Lepiesnki, C.M.; Nascimento, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Polyurethanes from castor oil are being employed as bone cement in medical applications. In this work the thermal and mechanical properties of gamma irradiated polyurethanes derivative from castor oil were investigated by instrumented indentation, thermogravimetry and scanning electron microscopy. A slightly increase in hardness is observed only for doses as high as 100 kGy. Thermal analysis indicates stability at human body temperature. The glass transition temperature has small changes after gamma irradiation. (author)

  10. The mechanism of foaming and thermal conductivity of glasses foamed with MnO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Rosenlund; König, Jakob; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2015-01-01

    bubbles and subsequent growth. We discuss evolution of pore morphology in terms of pore number density, pore size and closed porosity. The thermal conductivity of the foam glasses is linearly dependent on density. The heat transfer mechanism is revealed by comparing the experimental data with structural...... data and analytical models.We show that the effect of pore size, presence of crystal inclusions and degree of closed porosity do not affect the overall thermal conductivity....

  11. Thermal Degradation Mechanism of a Thermostable Polyester Stabilized with an Open-Cage Oligomeric Silsesquioxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Bautista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A polyester composite was prepared through the polymerization of an unsaturated ester resin with styrene and an open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane with methacrylate groups. The effect of the open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane on the thermal stability of the thermostable polyester was studied using both thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The results showed that the methacryl oligomeric silsesquioxane improved the thermal stability of the polyester. The decomposition mechanism of the polyester/oligomer silsesquioxane composite was proposed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis of the volatiles.

  12. Mechanical properties and microstructure of long term thermal aged WWER 440 RPV steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolluri, M., E-mail: kolluri@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Kryukov, A. [Scientific and Engineering Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, 107140 Moscow (Russian Federation); Magielsen, A.J. [Nuclear Research & Consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Hähner, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Petrosyan, V. [Armenian Scientific Research Institute for Nuclear Plant Operation (ARMATOM), 0027 Yerevan (Armenia); Sevikyan, G. [Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP), 0911, Metsamor, Armavir Marz (Armenia); Szaraz, Z. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Directorate G – Nuclear Safety and Security, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-04-01

    The integrity assessment of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) is essential for the safe and Long Term Operation (LTO) of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Hardening and embrittlement of RPV caused by neutron irradiation and thermal ageing are main reasons for mechanical properties degradation during the operation of an NPP. The thermal ageing-induced degradation of RPV steels becomes more significant with extended operational lives of NPPs. Consequently, the evaluation of thermal ageing effects is important for the structural integrity assessments required for the lifetime extension of NPPs. As a part of NRG's research programme on Structural Materials for safe-LTO of Light Water Reactor (LWR) RPVs, WWER-440 surveillance specimens, which have been thermal aged for 27 years (∼200,000 h) at 290 °C in a surveillance channel of Armenian-NPP, are investigated. Results from the mechanical and microstructural examination of these thermal aged specimens are presented in this article. The results indicate the absence of significant long term thermal ageing effect of 15Cr2MoV-A steel. No age hardening was detected in aged tensile specimens compared with the as-received condition. There is no difference between the impact properties of as-received and thermal aged weld metals. The upper shelf energy of the aged steel remains the same as for the as-received material at a rather high level of about 120 J. The T{sub 41} value did not change and was found to be about 10 °C. The microstructure of thermal aged weld, consisting carbides, carbonitrides and manganese-silicon inclusions, did not change significantly compared to as-received state. Grain-boundary segregation of phosphorus in long term aged weld is not significant either which has been confirmed by the absence of intergranular fracture increase in the weld. Negligible hardening and embrittlement observed after such long term thermal ageing is attributed to the optimum chemical composition of 15Cr2MoV-A for high

  13. Thermal and mechanical analysis of the Faraday shield for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesey, R.A.

    1988-02-01

    The antenna for the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is protected from the plasma environment by a Faraday shield, an array of gas-cooled metallic tubes. The plasma side of the tubes is armored with graphite tiles, which can be either brazed or mechanically attached to the tube. The Faraday shield has been analyzed using finite element codes to model thermal and mechanical responses to typical CIT heating and disruption loads. Four representative materials (Inconel 718, tantalum-10 tungsten, copper alloy C17510, and molybdenum alloy TZM) and several combinations of tube and armor thicknesses were used in the thermal analysis, which revealed that maximum allowable temperatures were not exceeded for any of the four materials considered. The two-dimensional thermal stress analysis indicated Von Mises stresses greater than twice the yield stress for a tube constructed of Inconel 718 (the original design material) for the brazed-graphite design. Analysis of stresses caused by plasma disruption (/rvec J/ /times/ /rvec B/) loads eliminated the copper and molybdenum alloys as candidate tube materials. Of the four materials considered, tantalum-10 tungsten performed the best for a brazed graphite design, showing acceptable thermal stresses (69% of yield) and disruption stresses (42% of yield). A preliminary thermal analysis of the mechanically attached graphite scheme predicts minimal thermal stresses in the tube. The survivability of the graphite tubes in this scheme is yet to be analyzed. 8 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of Inconel 718 after thermal exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Z.S., E-mail: yuzaisong@tpri.com.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Xi' an Thermal Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., No. 136, Xingqing Road, Xi’an 710032 (China); Zhang, J.X. [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi’an 710049 (China); Yuan, Y.; Zhou, R.C.; Zhang, H.J.; Wang, H.Z. [Xi' an Thermal Power Research Institute Co. Ltd., No. 136, Xingqing Road, Xi’an 710032 (China)

    2015-05-14

    Inconel 718 was subjected to various heat treatments, i.e., solution heat treatment, standard ageing treatment and standard ageing plus 700 °C thermal exposure. The mechanical properties of the alloys were determined using tensile tests and Charpy pendulum impact tests at 650 °C and room temperature, respectively. The highest yield strength of 988 MPa was attained in the standard aged specimen, whereas a maximum impact toughness of 217 J cm{sup −2} was attained in the solution-treated specimen. After thermal exposure, the mechanical properties of the specimens degrade. Both the yield strength and impact toughness decreased monotonically with increasing thermal exposure time. Subjected to a 10000-h long-term thermal exposure, the yield strength dramatically decreased to 475 MPa (almost 50% of the maximum strength), and the impact toughness reduced to only 18 J cm{sup −2}. The microstructures of the specimens were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Coarsening of γ′ and γ″ and the transformation of γ″ to δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb was observed after thermal exposure. However, a complete transformation from metastable γ″ to δ-Ni{sub 3}Nb was never accomplished, even after the 10000-h long-term thermal exposure. Based on the obtained experimental results, the effects of the microstructural evolution on the mechanical properties are discussed.

  15. Thermal and mechanical properties of bio-based plasticizers mixtures on poly (vinyl chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boussaha Bouchoul

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of mixtures of nontoxic and biodegradable plasticizers coming from natural resources is a good way to replace conventional phthalates plasticizers. In this study, two secondary plasticizers of epoxidized sunflower oil (ESO and epoxidized sunflower oil methyl ester (ESOME were synthesized and have been used with two commercially available biobased plasticizers; isosorbide diesters (ISB and acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC in order to produce flexible PVC. Different mixtures of these plasticizers have been introduced in PVC formulations. Thermal, mechanical and morphological properties have been studied by using discoloration, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA, tensile - strain and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Studies have shown that PVC plasticization and stabilization were improved by addition of plasticizers blends containing ISB, ATBC, ESO and ESOME. An increase in the content of ESO or ESOME improved thermal and mechanical properties, whereas ESOME/ATBC formulations exhibited the best properties.

  16. Degradation mechanism and thermal stability of urea nitrate below the melting point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desilets, Sylvain; Brousseau, Patrick; Chamberland, Daniel; Singh, Shanti; Feng, Hongtu; Turcotte, Richard; Anderson, John

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Decomposition mechanism of urea nitrate. → Spectral characterization of the decomposition mechanism. → Thermal stability of urea nitrate at 50, 70 and 100 o C. → Chemical balance of decomposed products released. - Abstract: Aging and degradation of urea nitrate below the melting point, at 100 o C, was studied by using thermal analysis and spectroscopic methods including IR, Raman, 1 H and 13 C NMR techniques. It was found that urea nitrate was completely degraded after 72 h at 100 o C into a mixture of solids (69%) and released gaseous species (31%). The degradation mechanism below the melting point was clearly identified. The remaining solid mixture was composed of ammonium nitrate, urea and biuret while unreacted residual nitric and isocyanic acids as well as traces of ammonia were released as gaseous species at 100 o C. The thermal stability of urea nitrate, under extreme storage conditions (50 o C), was also examined by isothermal nano-calorimetry.

  17. MWCNTs/Resin Nanocomposites: Structural, Thermal, Mechanical and Dielectric Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Alexopoulos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs were manufactured, characterized and added to a typical aeronautical resin matrix at different concentrations as nano-reinforcement. The carbon content of produced MWCNTs was determined to be around 98.5% while they consisted of 13-20 wall-layers and their external diameter had an average size in between 20 and 50 nm. MWCNTs were dispersed in an epoxy resin system and tensile specimens for different MWCNTs concentrations were prepared in an open mould. Electrical wiring was attached to the specimens’ surface and surface electrical resistance change was in-situ monitored during monotonic tension till fracture. Performed tensile tests showed that the MWCNTs addition increased both modulus of elasticity and ultimate tensile strength on the nano-composites with a simultaneously dramatic ductility decrease. The MWCNTs addition enhanced the investigated resin matrix with monitoring ability; electrical resistance change of the investigated tensile tests was correlated in the elastic regime with axial nominal strain and the gauge factor of the different MWCNTs concentration specimens were calculated. It was found that lowest MWCNTs concentration gave the best results in terms of piezo-resistivity and simultaneously the least enhancement in the mechanical properties.

  18. Thermal shock effect on Mechanical and Physical properties of pre-moisture treated GRE composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraverty, A. P.; Panda, A. B.; Mohanty, U. K.; Mishra, S. C.; Biswal, B. B.

    2018-03-01

    Many practical situations may be encountered under which a GFRP (Glass fibre reinforced polymer) composite, during its service life, is exposed to the severities of sudden temperature fluctuations. Moisture absorption of GRE (Glass fibre reinforced epoxy) composites followed by various gradients of temperature fluctuations may cause thermo- mechanical degradation. It is on this context, the hand layed GRE composite samples are exposed to up-thermal shock (-40°C to +50°C) and down-thermal shock (+50°C to -40°C) for various time interval after several periods of moisture (hydrothermal/hygrothermal) conditioning. The thermally shocked GRE specimens are put to 3-point bend test to divulge inter laminar shear strength (ILSS). Least ILSS values are recorded for the samples with maximum period of moisture treatments under with both up-thermal and down-thermal shock conditions. Lower glass transition temperature (Tg) values, as revealed through the low temperature DSC test, are exhibited at maximum durations of both up-thermal and down-thermal shock for the samples with higher periods of hygrothermal/hydrothermal treatments. SEM fractographs of representative GRE specimens after optimum period of moisture treatments and thermal shock show the various modes of failures.

  19. Effect of Thermal Environment on the Mechanical Behaviors of Building Marble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haijian Su

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High temperature and thermal environment can influence the mechanical properties of building materials worked in the civil engineering, for example, concrete, building rock, and steel. This paper examines standard cylindrical building marble specimens (Φ50 × 100 mm that were treated with high temperatures in two different thermal environments: vacuum (VE and airiness (AE. Uniaxial compression tests were also carried out on those specimens after heat treatment to study the effect that the thermal environment has on mechanical behaviors. With an increase in temperature, the mechanical behavior of marble in this study indicates a critical temperature of 600°C. Both the peak stress and elasticity modulus were larger for the VE than they were for the AE. The thermal environment has an obvious influence on the mechanical properties, especially at temperatures of 450∼750°C. The failure mode of marble specimens under uniaxial compression is mainly affected by the thermal environment at 600°C.

  20. Mechanism of tonal noise generation from circular cylinder with spiral fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Ryo; Hayashi, Hidechito; Okumura, Tetsuya; Hamakawa, Hiromitsu

    2014-12-01

    The pitch of the spiral finned tube influences seriously to the acoustic resonance in the heat exchanger. In this research, the flow characteristics in relating to the aeolian tone from the finned cylinder are studied by the numerical simulation. It is observed that the tonal noise generated from the finned tube at two pitch spaces. The ratio of the fin pitch to the cylinder diameter is changed at 0.11 and 0.27. The tone level increases and the frequency decreases with the pitch shorter. The separation flow from the cylinder generates the span-wise vortices, Karman vortices, and the separation flow from the fin generates the stream-wise vortices. When the fin pitch ratio is small, the stream-wise vortices line up to span-wise and become weak rapidly. Only the Karman vortices are remained and integrate in span. So the Karman vortex became large. This causes the low frequency and the large aeolian tone.

  1. Mechanical behavior of mullite green disks prepared by thermal consolidation with different starches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talou, M.H.; Tomba Martinez, A.G.; Camerucci, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical behavior of porous green disks obtained by thermal consolidation of mullite suspensions with cassava and potato starches was studied by diametral compression testing. Disks (thickness/diameter ≤ 0.25) were prepared by thermal treatment (70-80 °C, 2h) of mullite (75 vol%)/starch (25 vol%) of suspensions (40 vol%) pre-gelled at 55-60 °C, and dried (40 °C, 24 h). Samples were characterized by porosity measurements (50-55%) and microstructural analysis (SEM). Several mechanical parameters were determined: mechanical strength, Young's modulus, strain to fracture and yield stress. Typical crack patterns were analyzed and the fractographic analysis was performed by SEM. Mechanical results were related to the developed microstructures, the behavior of the starches in aqueous suspension, and the properties of the formed gels. For comparative purposes, mullite green disks obtained by burning out the starch (650 °C, 2h) were also mechanically evaluated. (author)

  2. Modeling of two-phase flow with thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houdayer, G.; Pinet, B.; Le Coq, G.; Reocreux, M.; Rousseau, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    To improve two-phase flow modeling by taking into account thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium a joint effort on analytical experiment and physical modeling has been undertaken. A model describing thermal non-equilibrium effects is first presented. A correlation of mass transfer has been developed using steam water critical flow tests. This model has been used to predict in a satisfactory manner blowdown tests. It has been incorporated in CLYSTERE system code. To take into account mechanical non-equilibrium, a six equations model is written. To get information on the momentum transfers special nitrogen-water tests have been undertaken. The first results of these studies are presented

  3. Local thermal property analysis by scanning thermal microscopy of an ultrafine-grained copper surface layer produced by surface mechanical attrition treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, F.A. [Suzhou Institute for Nonferrous Metals Processing Technology, No. 200 Shenxu Road, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215021 (China) and Unite de Thermique et d' Analyse Physique, Laboratoire d' Energetique et d' Optique, Universite de Reims, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France)]. E-mail: guofuan@yahoo.com; JI, Y.L. [Suzhou Institute for Nonferrous Metals Processing Technology, No. 200 Shenxu Road, Suzhou Industrial Park, Suzhou 215021 (China); Trannoy, N. [Unite de Thermique et d' Analyse Physique, Laboratoire d' Energetique et d' Optique, Universite de Reims, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Lu, J. [LASMIS, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 Rue Marie Curie, Troyes 10010 (France)

    2006-06-15

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) was used to map thermal conductivity images in an ultrafine-grained copper surface layer produced by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). It is found that the deformed surface layer shows different thermal conductivities that strongly depend on the grain size of the microstructure: the thermal conductivity of the nanostructured surface layer decreases obviously when compared with that of the coarse-grained matrix of the sample. The role of the grain boundaries in thermal conduction is analyzed in correlation with the heat conduction mechanism in pure metal. A theoretical approach, based on this investigation, was used to calculate the heat flow from the probe tip to the sample and then estimate the thermal conductivities at different scanning positions. Experimental results and theoretical calculation demonstrate that SThM can be used as a tool for the thermal property and microstructural analysis of ultrafine-grained microstructures.

  4. Evaluation of Thermal and Thermo-mechanical Behavior of Full-scale Energy Foundations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kyle D.

    This study focuses on the thermo-mechanical and thermal behavior of full-scale energy foundations installed as part of two buildings recently constructed in Colorado. The soil stratigraphy at each of the sites differed, but both foundations were expected to function as primarily end-bearing elements with a tip socketed into rock. The heat exchanger configurations were also different amongst the foundations at both sites, permitting evaluation of the role of heat exchange. A common thread for both energy foundation case histories was the monitoring of the temperature and axial strain within the foundations during heat exchange operations. The first case study involves an evaluation of the long-term thermo-mechanical response of two full-scale energy foundations installed at the new Denver Housing Authority (DHA) Senior Living Facility at 1099 Osage St. in Denver, Colorado. Due to the construction schedule for this project, the thermal properties of the foundations and surrounding subsurface could not be assessed using thermal response tests. However, instrumentation was incorporated into the foundations to assess their long-term heat exchange response as well as the thermo-mechanical strains, stresses, and displacements that occurred during construction and operation of the ground-source heat pump system. The temperature changes within the foundations during heating and cooling operations over a period of approximately 600 days ranged from 9 to 32 °C, respectively. The thermal axial stresses in the foundations were calculated from the measured strains, and ranged from 3.1 MPa during heating to --1.0 MPa during cooling. These values are within reasonable limits for reinforced concrete structures. The maximum thermal axial stress was observed near the toe of both foundations, which is consistent with trends expected for end-bearing toe boundary conditions. The greatest thermal axial strains were observed near the top of the foundations (upward expansion during

  5. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Epoxy Composites Containing Zirconia-Impregnated Halloysite Nanotubes with Different Loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Moon Il; Shon, Minyoung; Seo, Bongkuk; Lim, Choongsun

    2018-09-01

    Epoxy resins are widely used in various industrial fields due to their low cost, good workability, heat resistance, and good mechanical strength. However, they suffer from brittleness, an issue that must be addressed for further applications. To solve this problem, additional fillers are needed to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of the resins; zirconia is one such filler. However, it has been reported that aggregation may occur in the epoxy composites as the amount of zirconia increases, preventing enhancement of the mechanical strength of the epoxy composites. Herein, to reduce the aggregation, zirconia was well dispersed on halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), which have high thermal and mechanical strength, by a conventional wet impregnation method. The HNTs were impregnated with zirconia at different loadings using zirconyl chloride octahydrate as a precursor. The mechanical and thermal strengths of the epoxy composites with these fillers were investigated. The zirconia-impregnated HNTs (Zr/HNT) were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and tunneling electron microscopy (TEM). The hardening conditions of the epoxy composites were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The thermal strength of the epoxy composites was studied by thermomechanical analysis (TMA) and micro-calorimetry and the mechanical strength of the epoxy composites (flexural strength and tensile strength) was studied by using a universal testing machine (UTM). The mechanical and thermal strengths of the epoxy composites with Zr/HNT were improved compared to those of the epoxy composite with HNT, and also increased as the zirconia loading on HNT increased.

  6. Effect of Isomorphous Substitution on the Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Hydrotalcites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Crosby

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrotalcites have many important applications in catalysis, wastewater treatment, gene delivery and polymer stabilization, all depending on preparation history and treatment scenarios. In catalysis and polymer stabilization, thermal decomposition is of great importance. Hydrotalcites form easily with atmospheric carbon dioxide and often interfere with the study of other anion containing systems, particularly if formed at room temperature. The dehydroxylation and decomposition of carbonate occurs simultaneously, making it difficult to distinguish the dehydroxylation mechanisms directly. To date, the majority of work on understanding the decomposition mechanism has utilized hydrotalcite precipitated at room temperature. In this study, evolved gas analysis combined with thermal analysis has been used to show that CO2 contamination is problematic in materials being formed at RT that are poorly crystalline. This has led to some dispute as to the nature of the dehydroxylation mechanism. In this paper, data for the thermal decomposition of the chloride form of hydrotalcite are reported. In addition, carbonate-free hydrotalcites have been synthesized with different charge densities and at different growth temperatures. This combination of parameters has allowed a better understanding of the mechanism of dehydroxylation and the role that isomorphous substitution plays in these mechanisms to be delineated. In addition, the effect of anion type on thermal stability is also reported. A stepwise dehydroxylation model is proposed that is mediated by the level of aluminum substitution.

  7. Fatigue behaviour of the austenitic steel 1.4550 under mechanical and thermal cyclic loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegele, D.; Fingerhuth, J.; Varfolomeev, I.; Moroz, S. [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials (IWM), Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Fatigue behaviour of the austenitic steel 1.4550 (X6CrNiNb18-10) under low-cycle fatigue and high-cycle thermal fatigue was investigated with in two research projects supported by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy and the Ministry of Education and Research. The objectives of the projects were the gain of deep understanding of the damage mechanisms under mechanical and thermal cyclic loading and the development of material models and simulation procedures for an improved lifetime assessment. In comparison to the advanced mechanism based material models engineering computational procedures were proven with respect to their applicability and conservatisms. For thermal cyclic loading, test equipment and technique were developed which allow for cyclic thermal loading with temperature ranges between 1 00 C and 300 C and frequencies between 0.1 and 1 Hz. As a result, tests with a temperature range of 150 C and lower showed no crack formation up to 300,000 cycles. For temperature ranges of 200 C and higher multiple crack patterns were observed with the deepest crack of about 1.3 mm after 1,000,000 cycles, whereas the difference in crack depth between 300,000 and 1,000,000 cycles was negligibly small. To model the fatigue lifetime, the D{sub TMF} damage parameter was applied to the low-cycle fatigue and the thermal, high frequent fatigue tests. For thermal fatigue, the analyses predicted in agreement with the tests crack initiation followed by crack propagation, subsequent retardation and arrest. This behaviour can be explained qualitatively and quantitatively using the methods of linear-elastic fracture mechanics, whereas the consideration of the interaction of multiple cracks is essential to describe the experimentally observed crack retardation. The results for thermal fatigue are in the scatterband of the mechanical p and thermo-mechanical fatigue results and the cycles to failure are 10 times higher than those estimated according to the KTA fatigue

  8. Assessment of structural, thermal, and mechanical properties of portlandite through molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajilar, Shahin, E-mail: shajilar@iastate.edu [Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1066 (United States); Shafei, Behrouz, E-mail: shafei@iastate.edu [Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011-1066 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The structural, thermal, and mechanical properties of portlandite, the primary solid phase of ordinary hydrated cement paste, are investigated using the molecular dynamics method. To understand the effects of temperature on the structural properties of portlandite, the coefficients of thermal expansion of portlandite are determined in the current study and validated with what reported from the experimental tests. The atomic structure of portlandite equilibrated at various temperatures is then subjected to uniaxial tensile strains in the three orthogonal directions and the stress-strain curves are developed. Based on the obtained results, the effect of the direction of straining on the mechanical properties of portlandite is investigated in detail. Structural damage analysis is performed to reveal the failure mechanisms in different directions. The energies of the fractured surfaces are calculated in different directions and compared to those of the ideal surfaces available in the literature. The key mechanical properties, including tensile strength, Young's modulus, and fracture strain, are extracted from the stress-strain curves. The sensitivity of the obtained mechanical properties to temperature and strain rate is then explored in a systematic way. This leads to valuable information on how the structural and mechanical properties of portlandite are affected under various exposure conditions and loading rates. - Graphical abstract: Fracture mechanism of portlandite under uniaxial strain in the z-direction. - Highlights: • The structural, thermal, and mechanical properties of portlandite are investigated. • The coefficients of thermal expansion are determined. • The stress-strain relationships are studied in three orthogonal directions. • The effects of temperature and strain rate on mechanical properties are examined. • The plastic energy required for fracture in the crystalline structure is reported.

  9. Effect of Mo content on thermal and mechanical properties of Mo–Ru–Rh–Pd alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masahira, Yusuke; Ohishi, Yuji; Kurosaki, Ken; Muta, Hiroaki; Yamanaka, Shinsuke; Komamine, Satoshi; Fukui, Toshiki; Ochi, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Metallic inclusions are precipitated in irradiated oxide fuels. The composition of the phases varies with the burnup and the conditions such as temperature gradients and oxygen potential of the fuel. In the present work, Mo x/(0.7+x) (Ru 0.5 Rh 0.1 Pd 0.1 ) (0.7)/(0.7+x) (x = 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, and 0.25) alloys were prepared by arc melting, followed by annealing in a high vacuum. The thermal and mechanical properties of the alloys such as elastic moduli, Debye temperature, micro-Vickers hardness, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity have been evaluated to elucidate the effect of Mo content on these physical properties of the alloys. The alloys with lower Mo contents show higher thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of the alloy with x = 0 is almost twice of that of the alloy with x = 0.25. The thermal conductivities of the alloys are dominated by electronic contribution, which has been evaluated using the Wiedemann–Franz–Lorenz relation from the electrical resistivity data. It is confirmed that the variation of the Mo contents of the alloys considerably affects the mechanical and thermal properties of the alloys

  10. Instability and noise-induced thermalization of Fermi–Pasta–Ulam recurrence in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wabnitz, Stefan; Wetzel, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the spontaneous growth of noise that accompanies the nonlinear evolution of seeded modulation instability into Fermi–Pasta–Ulam recurrence. Results from the Floquet linear stability analysis of periodic solutions of the three-wave truncation are compared with full numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The predicted initial stage of noise growth is in a good agreement with simulations, and is expected to provide further insight into the subsequent dynamics of the field evolution after recurrence breakup

  11. Instability and noise-induced thermalization of Fermi–Pasta–Ulam recurrence in the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wabnitz, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.wabnitz@unibs.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Università degli Studi di Brescia, via Branze 38, 25123 Brescia (Italy); Wetzel, Benjamin [INRS-EMT, 1650 Blvd. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2014-07-25

    We investigate the spontaneous growth of noise that accompanies the nonlinear evolution of seeded modulation instability into Fermi–Pasta–Ulam recurrence. Results from the Floquet linear stability analysis of periodic solutions of the three-wave truncation are compared with full numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The predicted initial stage of noise growth is in a good agreement with simulations, and is expected to provide further insight into the subsequent dynamics of the field evolution after recurrence breakup.

  12. Cu-based shape memory alloys with enhanced thermal stability and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C.Y.; Lam, C.W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Cu-based shape memory alloys were developed in the 1960s. They show excellent thermoelastic martensitic transformation. However the problems in mechanical properties and thermal instability have inhibited them from becoming promising engineering alloys. A new Cu-Zn-Al-Mn-Zr Cu-based shape memory alloy has been developed. With the addition of Mn and Zr, the martensitic transformation behaviour and the grain size ca be better controlled. The new alloys demonstrates good mechanical properties with ultimate tensile strenght and ductility, being 460 MPa and 9%, respectively. Experimental results revealed that the alloy has better thermal stability, i.e. martensite stabilisation is less serious. In ordinary Cu-Zn-Al alloys, martensite stabilisation usually occurs at room temperature. The new alloy shows better thermal stability even at elevated temperature (∝150 C, >A f =80 C). A limited small amount of martensite stabilisation was observed upon ageing of the direct quenched samples as well as the step quenched samples. This implies that the thermal stability of the new alloy is less dependent on the quenching procedure. Furthermore, such minor martensite stabilisation can be removed by subsequent suitable parent phase ageing. The new alloy is ideal for engineering applications because of its better thermal stability and better mechanical properties. (orig.)

  13. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties of Crushed Sand Concrete containing Rubber Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Guendouz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past twenty years, the rubber wastes are an important part of municipal solid waste. This work focuses on the recycling of rubber waste, specifically rubber waste of used shoes discharged into the nature and added in the mass of crushed sand concrete with percentage (10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. The physical (workability, fresh density, mechanical (compressive and flexural strength and thermal (thermal conductivity of different crushed sand concrete made are analyzed and compared to the respective controls. The use of rubber waste in crushed sand concrete contributes to reduce the bulk density and performance of sand concrete. Nevertheless, the use of rubber aggregate leads to a significant reduction in thermal conductivity, which improves the thermal insulation of crushed sand concrete.

  14. Mechanical and thermal properties of HSC with fine natural pozzolana as SCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    KoÅ¥átková, Jaroslava; Čáchová, Monika; KoÅáková, Dana; Vejmelková, Eva; Reiterman, Pavel

    2017-07-01

    The paper is dealing with an influence of fine pozzolanic admixture supplementing a part of cement on various properties of high-strength concrete. The measured characteristics were basic physical properties, compressive strength and thermal properties (thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity). Replacing the cement by the natural pozzolana in higher dosages leads to the higher porosity and thus to the lower compressive strength of the developed material. Conversely, in case of lower amounts of pozzolana (up to 10% of weight) such replacement has an opposite consequence, the open porosity decreases which results in the higher compressive strength. Taking into account thermal properties which are enhanced by an increase of amount of pores, it is evident that it is necessary to optimize the amount of pozzolana (pozzolanic) admixture in order to obtain reasonable mechanical and thermal properties.

  15. Thermal modal analysis of novel non-pneumatic mechanical elastic wheel based on FEM and EMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youqun; Zhu, Mingmin; Lin, Fen; Xiao, Zhen; Li, Haiqing; Deng, Yaoji

    2018-01-01

    A combination of Finite Element Method (FEM) and Experiment Modal Analysis (EMA) have been employed here to characterize the structural dynamic response of mechanical elastic wheel (ME-Wheel) operating under a specific thermal environment. The influence of high thermal condition on the structural dynamic response of ME-Wheel is investigated. The obtained results indicate that the EMA results are in accordance with those obtained using the proposed Finite Element (FE) model, indicting the high reliability of this FE model applied in analyzing the modal of ME-Wheel working under practical thermal environment. It demonstrates that the structural dynamic response of ME-Wheel operating under a specific thermal condition can be predicted and evaluated using the proposed analysis method, which is beneficial for the dynamic optimization design of the wheel structure to avoid tire temperature related vibration failure and improve safety of tire.

  16. Analysis of noise radiation mechanisms in hot subsonic jet from a validated large eddy simulation solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorteau, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.lorteau@onera.fr; Cléro, Franck, E-mail: franck.clero@onera.fr; Vuillot, François, E-mail: francois.vuillot@onera.fr [Onera–The French Aerospace Lab, F-92322 Châtillon (France)

    2015-07-15

    In the framework of jet noise computation, a numerical simulation of a subsonic turbulent hot jet is performed using large-eddy simulation. A geometrical tripping is used in order to trigger the turbulence at the nozzle exit. In a first part, the validity of the simulation is assessed by comparison with experimental measurements. The mean and rms velocity fields show good agreement, so do the azimuthal composition of the near pressure field and the far field spectra. Discrepancies remain close to the nozzle exit which lead to a limited overestimation of the pressure levels in both near and far fields, especially near the 90{sup ∘} angular sector. Two point correlation analyses are then applied to the data obtained from the simulation. These enable to link the downstream acoustic radiation, which is the main direction of radiation, to pressure waves developing in the shear layer and propagating toward the potential core end. The intermittency of the downstream acoustic radiation is evidenced and related to the coherent structures developing in the shear layer.

  17. Analysis of thermal-hydrologic-mechanical behavior near an emplacement drift at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2002-01-01

    A coupled thermal, hydrologic and mechanical (THM) analysis is conducted to evaluate the impact of coupled THM processes on the performance of a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The analysis considers changes in rock mass porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure caused by rock deformations during drift excavation, as well as those caused by thermo-mechanically induced rock deformations after emplacement of the heat-generating waste. The analysis consists of a detailed calibration of coupled hydraulic-mechanical rock mass properties against field experiments, followed by a prediction of the coupled thermal, hydrologic, and mechanical behavior around a potential repository drift. For the particular problem studied and parameters used, the analysis indicates that the stress-induced permeability changes will be within one order of magnitude and that these permeability changes do not significantly impact the overall flow pattern around the repository drift

  18. New WC-Cu thermal barriers for fusion applications: High temperature mechanical behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejado, E.; Dias, M.; Correia, J. B.; Palacios, T.; Carvalho, P. A.; Alves, E.; Pastor, J. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The combination of tungsten carbide and copper as a thermal barrier could effectively reduce the thermal mismatch between tungsten and copper alloy, which are proposed as base armour and heat sink, respectively, in the divertor of future fusion reactors. Furthermore, since the optimum operating temperature windows for these divertor materials do not overlap, a compatible thermal barrier interlayer between them is required to guarantee a smooth thermal transition, which in addition may mitigate radiation damage. The aim of this work is to study the thermo-mechanical properties of WC-Cu cermets fabricated by hot pressing. Focus is placed on the temperature effect and composition dependence, as the volume fraction of copper varies from 25 to 50 and 75 vol%. To explore this behaviour, fracture experiments are performed within a temperature range from room temperature to 800 °C under vacuum. In addition, elastic modulus and thermal expansion coefficient are estimated from these tests. Results reveal a strong dependence of the performance on temperature and on the volume fraction of copper and, surprisingly, a slight percent of Cu (25 vol%) can effectively reduce the large difference in thermal expansion between tungsten and copper alloy, which is a critical point for in service applications. The thermal performance of these materials, together with their mechanical properties could indeed reduce the heat transfer from the PFM to the underlying element while supporting the high thermal stresses of the joint. Thus, the presence of these cermets could allow the reactor to operate above the ductile to brittle transition temperature of tungsten, without compromising the underlying materials.

  19. Evaluation of the basic mechanical and thermal properties of deep crystalline rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Chun Soo; Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Young Kwon; Jeon, Seok Won

    2001-04-01

    This report provides the mechanical and thermal properties of granitic intact rocks obtained from Deep Core Drilling Program which is carried out as part of the assessment of deep geological environmental condition. These data are the basic material properties of the core samples from the boreholes drilled up to 500 m depth at the Yusung and Kosung sites. These sites were selected based on the result of preliminary site evaluation study. In this study, the mechanical properties include density, porosity, P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, tensile strength, and shear strength of fractures, and the thermal properties are heat conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat and so on. Those properties were measured through laboratory tests and these data are compared with the existing test results of several domestic rocks

  20. Mechanical and thermal properties of polypropylene composites with curaua fibre irradiated with gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egute, Nayara S.; Forster, Pedro L.; Parra, Duclerc F.; Fermino, Danilo M.; Santana, Sebastiao; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical behavior of polypropylene with curaua fibre composites were investigated. The treatment of the curaua fibres was processed in alkaline solution (10% wt NaOH). A coupling agent was used (maleic anhydride) to increase the adhesion of the fibre/matrix interface. This composite was irradiated with gamma source in the doses of 5, 15 and 30 kGy and the adhesion between the fibres and the polymeric matrix was monitored to observe probable changes. The thermal behavior was evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Thermogravimetry (TGA). The mechanical behavior was evaluated using tensile strength in comparison with non-reinforced polypropylene resin. The morphology of the composite fracture surface was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There were no significant changes in the thermal properties neither in the adhesion of irradiated fibres at doses of 5, 15 and 30 kGy of gamma radiation. (author)

  1. The Effect of Mechanical Load on the Thermal Conductivity of Building Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toman

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of mechanical load on the thermal conductivity of building materials in the design of envelope parts of building structures is studied. A typical building material is chosen in the practical investigation of this effect, namely the cement mortar. It is concluded that in the range of hygroscopic moisture content, lower levels of mechanical load, typically up to 90 % of compressive strength (CS, are not dangerous from the point of view of worsening the designed thermal properties, but in the overhygroscopic region, the load as low as 57 % of CS may be dangerous. The higher levels of loading are found to be always significant because they lead to marked increase of thermal conductivity which is always a negative information for a building designer.

  2. COMETHE III J a computer code for predicting mechanical and thermal behaviour of a fuel pin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeek, P.; Hoppe, N.

    1976-01-01

    The design of fuel pins for power reactors requires a realistic evaluation of their thermal and mechanical performances throughout their irradiation life. This evaluation involves the knowledge of a number of parameters, very intricate and interconnected, for example, the temperature, the restructuring and the swelling rates of the fuel pellets, the dimensions, the stresses and the strains in the clad, the composition and the properties of gases, the inner gas pressure etc. This complex problem can only be properly handled by a computer programme which analyses the fuel pin thermal and mechanical behaviour at successive steps of its irradiation life. This report presents an overall description of the COMETHE III-J computer programme, designed to calculate the integral performance of oxide fuel pins with cylindrical metallic cladding irradiated in thermal or fast flux. (author)

  3. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of UO2 and PuO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.; Matsumoto, T.

    2015-01-01

    It is important to evaluate basic properties of UO 2 and PuO 2 as fundamental aspects of MA-bearing MOX fuel development. In this work, mechanical properties of UO 2 and PuO 2 were investigated by an ultrasound pulse-echo method. Longitudinal and transversal wave velocities were measured in UO 2 and PuO 2 pellets, and Young's modulus and shear modulus were evaluated, which were 219 MPa and 89 MPa for PuO 2 , and 249 MPa and 95 MPa for UO 2 , respectively. Poisson's ratio was 0.32 in both materials. The relationship between mechanical and thermal properties was described by using thermal expansion data which had been reported previously, and the heat capacity and thermal conductivity were analysed. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of the basic mechanical and thermal properties of deep crystalline rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoung Yoon; Bae, Dae Seok; Kim, Chun Soo; Kim, Kyung Su; Koh, Young Kwon; Jeon, Seok Won

    2001-04-01

    This report provides the mechanical and thermal properties of granitic intact rocks obtained from Deep Core Drilling Program which is carried out as part of the assessment of deep geological environmental condition. These data are the basic material properties of the core samples from the boreholes drilled up to 500 m depth at the Yusung and Kosung sites. These sites were selected based on the result of preliminary site evaluation study. In this study, the mechanical properties include density, porosity, P-wave velocity, S-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, tensile strength, and shear strength of fractures, and the thermal properties are heat conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat and so on. Those properties were measured through laboratory tests and these data are compared with the existing test results of several domestic rocks.

  5. Ab Initio Study of Electronic, Structural, Thermal and Mechanical Characterization of Cadmium Chalcogenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Prasadh P.S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on Density Functional Theory, we have applied Full Potential Augmented Plane Wave plus local orbital method (FAPW+loto study the electronic, structural, optical, thermal and mechanical properties of some semiconducting materials. In this paper we discuss the Zinc blende, CdX (X = S, Se and Te compounds with the full-potential linear-augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW method within the framework of the density functional theory (DFT for electronic, structural, thermal and mechanical properties using the WIEN2k code. For the purpose of exchange-correlation energy (Exc determination in Kohn–Sham calculation, the standard local density approximation (LDA formalism is utilized. Murnaghan’s equation of state (EOS is used for volume optimization by minimizing the total energy with respect to the unit cell volume. The calculated lattice parameters and thermal parameters are in good agreement with other theoretical calculations as well as available experimental data.

  6. The mechanical and thermal characteristics of phenolic foam reinforced with kaolin powder and glass fiber fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wenya; Huang, Zhixiong; Ding, Jie

    2017-12-01

    In this work, kaolin powder and glass fiber fabric were added to PF in order to improve its thermal stability and mechanical property. Micro-structures of carbonized PF with kaolin powder were inspected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to demonstrate the filler’s pinning effect. SEM results illustrated modified PF had well morphology after high-temperature heat treatment. The Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) test was carried out and found that kaolin powder only physically dispersed in PF. The compression test and thermal weight loss test were done on two groups of modified PF (Group A: add powder and fabric; Group B: add powder only). Results showed that all modified PF were better than pure PF, while foams with powder and fabric showed better mechanical characteristic and thermal stability compared with foams with powder only.

  7. Modification of Akhieser mechanism in Si nanomembranes and thermal conductivity dependence of the Q-factor of high frequency nanoresonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chávez-Ángel, E; Gomis-Bresco, J; Alzina, F; Sotomayor Torres, C M; Zarate, R A

    2014-01-01

    We present and validate a reformulated Akhieser model that takes into account the reduction of thermal conductivity due to the impact of boundary scattering on the thermal phonons’ lifetime. We consider silicon nanomembranes with mechanical mode frequencies in the GHz range as textbook examples of nanoresonators. The model successfully accounts for the measured shortening of the mechanical mode lifetime. Moreover, the thermal conductivity is extracted from the measured lifetime of the mechanical modes in the high-frequency regime, thereby demonstrating that the Q-factor can be used as an indication of the thermal conductivity and/or diffusivity of a mechanical resonator. (invited article)

  8. Thermal-mechanical aspects for radioactive waste storage into underground caverns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Alvaro.

    1985-12-01

    The thermal and mechanical behaviors of rock mass by analytical models, considering transient effects of the heat generation from radioactive wastes, are analysed. The models were applied to Brazilian gneissic type of rock, considering the usual design of vitrified waste cylinders individually installed into conveniently spaced holes. (M.C.K.) [pt

  9. Mechanical and thermal properties of phthalonitrile resin reinforced with silicon carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derradji, Mehdi; Ramdani, Noureddine; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Jun; Feng, Tian-tian; Wang, Hui; Liu, Wen-bin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • SiC microparticles improve the mechanical properties of phthalonitrile resin. • Excellent thermal stability achieved by adding SiC particles in phthalonitrile resin. • Adding 20 wt.% of SiC microparticles increases the T g by 38 °C. • Silane coupling agent can enhance the adhesion and dispersion of particles/matrix. - Abstract: A new type of composite based on phthalonitrile resin reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) microparticles was prepared. For various weight ratios ranging between 0% and 20%, the effect of the micro-SiC particles on the mechanical and thermal properties has been studied. Results from thermal analysis revealed that the starting decomposition temperature and the residual weight were significantly improved upon adding the reinforcing phase. At the maximum micro-SiC loading, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed an important enhancement in both the storage modulus and glass transition temperature (T g ), reaching 3.1 GPa and 338 °C, respectively. The flexural strength and modulus as well as the microhardness were significantly enhanced by adding the microfillers. Tensile test revealed enhancements in the composites toughness upon adding the microparticles. Polarization optical microscope (POM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis confirmed that mechanical and thermal properties improvements are essentially attributed to the good dispersion and adhesion between the particles and the resin

  10. Thermal and Mechanical Performance of the First MICE Coupling Coil and the Fermilab Solenoid Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabehl, Roger [Fermilab; Carcagno, Ruben [Fermilab; Caspi, Shlomo [LBNL, Berkeley; DeMello, Allan [LBNL, Berkeley; Kokoska, Lidija [Fermilab; Orris, D. [Fermilab; Pan, Heng [LBNL, Berkeley; Sylvester, Cosmore [Fermilab; Tartaglia, Michael

    2014-11-06

    The first coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has been tested in a conduction-cooled environment at the Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab. An overview of the thermal and mechanical performance of the magnet and the test stand during cool-down and power testing of the magnet is presented.

  11. Improving methane production from digested manure biofibers by mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Kougias, Panagiotis; Frison, A.

    2016-01-01

    the effluent stream of biogas reactors. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of these pretreatments. In batch experiments, the mechanical pretreatment improved the degradability up to 45%. Even higher efficiency was shown by applying thermal alkaline pretreatments...

  12. FORMING OF MECHANICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SLUGS OF TITANIC ALLOY BT23 AT THERMAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Fedulov

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Тhе changings of the initial plate structure of alloy BT23 at running of high-temperature thermal treatment of large-sized slugs with heating up to 650- 950 eC and cooling on air and in water and their influence on forming of complex of mechanical characteristics are examined.

  13. Humidity Effects on Soluble Core Mechanical and Thermal Properties (Polyvinyl Alcohol/Microballoon Composite)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This document constitutes the final report for the study of humidity effects and loading rate on soluble core (PVA/MB composite material) mechanical and thermal properties. This report describes test results, procedures employed, and any unusual occurrences or specific observations associated with this test program.

  14. Mechanical and thermal cycling effects on the flexural strength of glass ceramics fused to titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasquez, Vanessa; Ozcan, Mutlu; Nishioka, Renato; Souza, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Alfredo; Pavanelli, Carlos

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical and thermal cycling on the flexural strength (ISO 9693) of three brands of ceramics fused to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Metallic frameworks of 25 x 3 x 0.5 mm dimensions (N = 84) were cast in cpTi, followed by 150-mu m aluminum oxide airborne

  15. Thermal crackling: study of the mechanical effects of quick temperature fluctuations on metallic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradel, P.

    1984-05-01

    After a brief overview of the thermohydraulical conditions of liquid sodium leading to important temperature fluctuations near the metallic surfaces, the author examines the transfer modes of these fluctuations in the structure thickness and the long term mechanical effects. Dimensioning models based on thermal and metallurgical properties are under study for structures subject to such sodium loads [fr

  16. Bio-composites based on polypropylene reinforced with Almond Shells particles: Mechanical and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essabir, H.; Nekhlaoui, S.; Malha, M.; Bensalah, M.O.; Arrakhiz, F.Z.; Qaiss, A.; Bouhfid, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Almond Shells (ASs) particles have been used as reinforcement in polypropylene matrix. • The SEBS-g-MA has been used to improve the adhesion between matrix and particles. • The mechanical and thermal properties of the composite have been improved by the AS. - Abstract: In this work, Almond Shells (ASs) particles are used as reinforcement in a thermoplastic matrix as polypropylene (PP). Composites containing Almond Shells (ASs) particles with and without compatibilizer (maleic anhydride grafted polypropylene; SEBS-g-MA) for various particle content (5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 wt.%) was investigated by means of studying their mechanical, thermal and rheological properties. The composites were prepared in a twin-screw extruder and assessed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile testing and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). Results show a clear improvement in mechanical and rheological properties from the use of Almond Shells particles in the matrix without and with maleic anhydride compatibilizer, corresponding to a gain in Young’s modulus of 56.2% and 35% respectively, at 30 wt.% particle loading. Thermal analysis revealed that incorporation of particle in the composites resulted in increase in the initial thermal decomposition temperatures

  17. Effect of electron beam irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of aluminum based epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Sarath Chandran, C.; Melnikova, T. V.; Nazarenko, S. Yu.; Kim, J.-C.

    2017-07-01

    The epoxy resins are widely used in nuclear and aerospace industries. The certain properties of epoxy resins as well as the resistance to radiation can be improved by the incorporation of different fillers. This study examines the effect of electron beam irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy composites filled with aluminum nanoparticles at percentage of 0.35 wt%. The epoxy composites were exposed to the irradiation doses of 30, 100 and 300 kGy using electron beam generated by the linear electron accelerator ELU-4. The effects of the doses on thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites were investigated by the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, tensile test, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The results revealed that the studied epoxy composites showed good radiation resistance. The thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites increased with increasing the irradiation dose up to 100 kGy and decreased with further increasing the dose.

  18. MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF COMPOSITES FROM UNSATURATED POLYESTER FILLED WITH OIL PALM ASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Ibrahim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Oil palm ash (OPA is available in abundance, is renewable, can be obtained at no cost and shows good performance at high thermal conditions. Combinations of the unsaturated polyester with natural fillers have been reported to improve the mechanical and thermal properties of composites. Utilisation of oil palm ash as a filler in the manufacture of polymer composites can significantly reduce the requirement for other binders or matrixes of composite materials. This research uses oil palm ash as a filler to form composites through the investigation of the effect of different contents of filler on the properties of OPA-filled unsaturated polyester (UP/OPA composites. The effect of different volume fractions, i.e., 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% of oil palm ash introduced into 100, 90, 80 and 70 vol.% of an unsaturated polyester matrix on the composite mechanical properties, i.e., tensile and flexural, has been studied, together with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC. Specimens were prepared using compression moulding techniques based on the ASTM D790 and D5083 standards for flexural and tensile tests, respectively. The tensile and flexural mechanical properties of UP/OPA composites were improved in modulus by increasing the filler content. Thermal stability of the composites increased as the OPA filler content was increased, which was a logical consequence because of the high thermal stability of the silica compound of the OPA filler compared with that of the UP matrix. The results from the surface electron microscope (SEM analysis were the extension of mechanical and thermal tests.

  19. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(butylene succinate Films Reinforced with Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangviroon Nanthaporn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent year, bioplastics have become more popular resulting from the growing concerns on environmental issues and the rising fossil fuel price. However, their applications were limited by its mechanical and thermal properties. The aim of this research is thus to improve mechanical and thermal properties of PBS bioplastic films by reinforcing with silica. Due to the poor interfacial interaction between the PBS matrix and silica, glycidyl methacrylate grafted poly(butylene succinate (PBS-g-GMA was used as a compatibilizer in order to improve the interaction between bioplastic films and filler. PBS-g-GMA was prepared in a twin-screw extruder and analyzed by the FTIR spectrometer. PBS and silica were then mixed in a twin-screw extruder and processed into films by a chill-roll cast extruder. The effects of silica loading on thermal and mechanical properties of the prepared bioplastic films were investigated. It was found that the mechanical properties of PBS/silica composite films were improved when 1%wt of silica was added. However, the mechanical properties decreased with increasing silica loading due to the agglomeration of silica particles. The results also show that the silica/PBS films with PBS-g-GMA possessed improved mechanical properties over the films without the compatibilizer.

  20. Improvement and evaluation of thermal, electrical, sealing and mechanical contacts, and their interface materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiangcheng

    Material contacts, including thermal, electrical, seating (fluid sealing and electromagnetic sealing) and mechanical (pressure) contacts, together with their interface materials, were, evaluated, and in some cases, improved beyond the state of the art. The evaluation involved the use of thermal, electrical and mechanical methods. For thermal contacts, this work evaluated and improved the heat transfer efficiency between two contacting components by developing various thermal interface pastes. Sodium silicate based thermal pastes (with boron nitride particles as the thermally conductive filler) as well as polyethylene glycol (PEG) based thermal pastes were developed and evaluated. The optimum volume fractions of BN in sodium silicate based pastes and PEG based pastes were 16% and 18% respectively. The contribution of Li+ ions to the thermal contact conductance in the PEG-based paste was confirmed. For electrical contacts, the relationship between the mechanical reliability and electrical reliability of solder/copper and silver-epoxy/copper joints was addressed. Mechanical pull-out testing was conducted on solder/copper and silver-epoxy/copper joints, while the contact electrical resistivity was measured. Cleansing of the copper surface was more effective for the reliability of silver-epoxy/copper joint than that of solder/copper joint. For sealing contacts, this work evaluated flexible graphite as an electromagnetic shielding gasket material. Flexible graphite was found to be at least comparable to conductive filled silicone (the state of the art) in terms of the shielding effectiveness. The conformability of flexible graphite with its mating metal surface under repeated compression was characterized by monitoring the contact electrical resistance, as the conformability is important to both electromagnetic scaling and fluid waling using flexible graphite. For mechanical contacts, this work focused on the correlation of the interface structure (such as elastic

  1. Lamb Wave Stiffness Characterization of Composites Undergoing Thermal-Mechanical Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires a thorough understanding of the long term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading upon those materials. Analytical methods investigating the effects of intense thermal heating combined with mechanical loading have been investigated. The damage mechanisms and fatigue lives were dependent on test parameters as well as stress levels. Castelli, et al. identified matrix dominated failure modes for out-of-phase cycling and fiber dominated damage modes for in-phase cycling. In recent years, ultrasonic methods have been developed that can measure the mechanical stiffness of composites. To help evaluate the effect of aging, a suitably designed Lamb wave measurement system is being used to obtain bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system works by exciting an antisymmetric Lamb wave and calculating the velocity at each frequency from the known transducer separation and the measured time-of-flight. The same peak in the waveforms received at various distances is used to measure the time difference between the signals. The velocity measurements are accurate and repeatable to within 1% resulting in reconstructed stiffness values repeatable to within 4%. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the dispersion curve. A mechanical scanner is used to move the sensors over the surface to map the time-of-flight, velocity, or stiffnesses of the entire specimen. Access to only one side of the material is required and no immersion or couplants are required because the sensors are dry coupled to the surface of the plate. In this study, the elastic stiffnesses D(sub 11), D(sub 22), A(sub 44), and A(sub 55) as well as time-of-flight measurements for composite samples that have undergone combined thermal and mechanical aging for

  2. Nanoscale thermal-mechanical probe determination of 'softening transitions' in thin polymer films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jing; Berry, Brian; Douglas, Jack F; Karim, Alamgir; Snyder, Chad R; Soles, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    We report a quantitative study of the softening behavior of glassy polystyrene (PS) films at length scales on the order of 100 nm using nano-thermomechanometry (nano-TM), an emerging scanning probe technique in which a highly doped silicon atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip is resistively heated on the surface of a polymer film. The apparent 'softening temperature' T s of the film is found to depend on the logarithm of the square root of the thermal ramping rate R. This relation allows us to estimate a quasi-equilibrium (or zero rate) softening transition temperature T s0 by extrapolation. We observe marked shifts of T s0 with decreasing film thickness, but the nature of these shifts, and even their sign, depend strongly on both the thermal and mechanical properties of the supporting substrate. Finite element simulations suggest that thin PS films on rigid substrates with large thermal conductivities lead to increasing T s0 with decreasing film thickness, whereas softer, less thermally conductive substrates promote reductions in T s0 . Experimental observations on a range of substrates confirm this behavior and indicate a complicated interplay between the thermal and mechanical properties of the thin PS film and the substrate. This study directly points to relevant factors for quantitative measurements of thermophysical properties of materials at the nanoscale using this nano-TM based method.

  3. Experimental analysis on physical and mechanical properties of thermal shock damage of granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the changes of mechanical and physical properties of granite under different thermal loading effects. Uniaxial compression experiments studying the rules of the influence of temperature load on mechanical properties of granite were carried out. After high-temperature heating at above 600 °C, granite tended to have stronger ductility and plasticity as well as declined peak stress and compressive strength. Thermogravimetry - differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC analysis results showed that, thermal load at different temperatures induced reactions such as water loss, oxidation and crystallization in the microstructure of granite, which led to physical changes of granite. Hence it is concluded that, heating can significantly weaken the mechanical performance of granite, which provides an important support for the optimization of heating assisted processing of granite. It also reveals that, heating assisted cutting technique can effectively lower energy consumption and improve processing efficiency.

  4. Thermal and mechanical properties of selected 3D printed thermoplastics in the cryogenic temperature regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, K-P; Bagrets, N; Lange, C; Goldacker, W; Wohlgemuth, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulating materials for use in cryogenic boundary conditions are still limited to a proved selection as Polyamid, Glasfiber reinforced resins, PEEK, Vespel etc. These materials are usually formed to parts by mechanical machining or sometimes by cast methods. Shaping complex geometries in one piece is limited. Innovative 3D printing is now an upcoming revolutionary technology to construct functional parts from a couple of thermoplastic materials as ABS, Nylon and others which possess quite good mechanical stability and allow realizing very complex shapes with very subtle details. Even a wide range of material mixtures is an option and thermal treatments can be used to finish the material structure for higher performance. The use of such materials in cryogenic environment is very attractive but so far poor experience exists. In this paper, first investigations of the thermal conductivity, expansion and mechanical strength are presented for a few selected commercial 3D material samples to evaluate their application prospects in the cryogenic temperature regime. (paper)

  5. Enhanced thermal and mechanical properties of PVA composites formed with filamentous nanocellulose fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Wu, Qiong; Zhao, Xin; Huang, Zhanhua; Cao, Jun; Li, Jian; Liu, Shouxin

    2014-11-26

    Long filamentous nanocellulose fibrils (NCFs) were prepared from chemical-thermomechanical pulps (CTMP) using ultrasonication. Their contribution to enhancements in thermal stability and mechanical properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) films were investigated. The unique chemical pretreatment and mechanical effects of CTMP loosen and unfold fibers during the pulping process, which enables further chemical purification and subsequent ultrasound treatment for formation of NCFs. The NCFs exhibited higher crystallinity (72.9%) compared with that of CTMP (61.5%), and had diameters ranging from 50 to 120 nm. A NCF content of 6 wt% was found to yield the best thermal stability, light transmittance, and mechanical properties in the PVA/NCF composites. The composites also exhibited a visible light transmittance of 73.7%, and the tensile strength and Young's modulus were significantly improved, with values 2.8 and 2.4 times larger, respectively, than that of neat PVA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mechanical, thermal and swelling properties of phosphorylated nanocellulose fibrils/PVA nanocomposite membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Muhammad Bilal Khan; Jahan, Zaib; Berg, Sigrun Sofie; Gregersen, Øyvind Weiby

    2017-12-01

    Cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) have strong reinforcing properties when incorporated in a compatible polymer matrix. This work reports the effect of the addition of phosphorylated nanocellulose (PCNF) on the mechanical, thermal and swelling properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) nanocomposite membranes. The incorporation of nanocellulose in PVA reduced the crystallinity at 0%RH. However, when the films were exposed to higher humidities the crystallinity increased. No apparent trend is observed for mechanical properties for dry membranes (0% RH). However, at 93% RH the elastic modulus increased strongly from 0.12MPa to 0.82MPa when adding 6% PCNF. At higher humidities, the moisture uptake has large influence on storage modulus, tan δ and tensile properties. Membranes containing 1% PCNF absorbed most moisture. Swelling, thermal and mechanical properties indicate a good potential for applying of PVA/phosphorylated nanocellulose composite membranes for CO 2 separation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Sustainability of Recycled ABS and PA6 by Banana Fiber Reinforcement: Thermal, Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rupinder; Kumar, Ranvijay; Ranjan, Nishant

    2018-01-01

    In the present study efforts have been made to prepare functional prototypes with improved thermal, mechanical and morphological properties from polymeric waste for sustainability. The primary recycled acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polyamide 6 (PA6) has been selected as matrix material with bio-degradable and bio-compatible banana fibers (BF) as reinforcement. The blend (in form of feed stock filament wire) of ABS/PA6 and BF was prepared in house by conventional twin screw extrusion (TSE) process. Finally feed stock filament of ABS/PA6 reinforced with BF was put to run on open source fused deposition modelling based three dimensional printer (without any change in hardware/software of the system) for printing of functional prototypes with improved thermal/mechanical/morphological properties. The results are supported by photomicrographs, thermographs and mechanical testing.

  8. Mechanical and thermal properties of irradiated films based on Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabato, S.F. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, 05508 900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.br; Nakamurakare, N.; Sobral, P.J.A. [Food Engineering Department, ZEA/FZEA/USP, Av. Duque de Caxias Norte 225, 13635 900 Pirassununga, SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-15

    Proteins are considered potential material in natural films as alternative to traditional packaging. When gamma radiation is applied to protein film forming solution it resulted in an improvement in mechanical properties of whey protein films. The objective of this work was the characterization of mechanical and thermal properties of irradiated films based on muscle proteins from Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The films were prepared according to a casting technique with two levels of plasticizer: 25% and 45% glycerol and irradiated in electron accelerator type Radiation Dynamics, 0.550 MeV at dose range from 0 to 200 kGy. Thermal properties and mechanical properties were determined using a differential scanning calorimeter and a texture analyzer, respectively. Radiation from electron beam caused a slightly increase on its tensile strength characteristic at 100 kGy, while elongation value at this dose had no reduction.

  9. Mechanical and thermal properties of irradiated films based on Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Nakamurakare, N.; Sobral, P.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Proteins are considered potential material in natural films as alternative to traditional packaging. When gamma radiation is applied to protein film forming solution it resulted in an improvement in mechanical properties of whey protein films. The objective of this work was the characterization of mechanical and thermal properties of irradiated films based on muscle proteins from Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). The films were prepared according to a casting technique with two levels of plasticizer: 25% and 45% glycerol and irradiated in electron accelerator type Radiation Dynamics, 0.550 MeV at dose range from 0 to 200 kGy. Thermal properties and mechanical properties were determined using a differential scanning calorimeter and a texture analyzer, respectively. Radiation from electron beam caused a slightly increase on its tensile strength characteristic at 100 kGy, while elongation value at this dose had no reduction

  10. Thermal and mechanical properties of polyamide 6/compatibilizer/clay nano composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, P.; Brito, G.F.; Cunha, C.T.C.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the thermal and mechanical properties of Polyamide 6 (PA6)/compatibilizer/clay (CL20A) nanocomposites were investigated. The nanocomposites were prepared in a counter-rotating twin screw extruder at 240 deg C and 50 rpm, and characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetry (TG) and mechanical properties. XRD results showed that when the clay is mixed with PA6, the clay peak is shifted to lower 2θ angles, indicating that PA6 was intercalated between the clay platelets. For PA6/compatibilizer/clay system, the results indicated that a nanocomposite with exfoliated structure was formed. TG results showed that the thermal stability of PA6/CL20A and PA6/compatibilizer/CL20A was higher than that of neat PA6. The mechanical properties results showed that the addition of the compatibilizer to PA6/CL20A substantially increased the impact strength and decreased the stiffness. (author)

  11. Mechanism of antioxidant interaction on polymer oxidation by thermal and radiation ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Tamura, Kiyotoshi; Shimada, Akihiko; Sugimoto, Masaki; Kudoh, Hisaaki

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of polymer oxidation by radiation and thermal ageing was investigated for the life evaluation of cables installed in radiation environments. The antioxidant as a stabilizer was very effective for thermal oxidation with a small content in polymers, but was not effective for radiation oxidation. The ionizing radiation induced the oxidation to result in chain scission even at low temperature, because the free radicals were produced and the antioxidant could not stop the oxidation of radicals with the chain scission. A new mechanism of antioxidant effect for polymer oxidation was proposed. The effect of antioxidant was not the termination of free radicals in polymer chains such as peroxy radicals, but was the depression of initial radical formation in polymer chains by thermal activation. The antioxidant molecule was assumed to delocalize the activated energy in polymer chains by the Boltzmann statics (distribution) to result in decrease in the probability of radical formation at a given temperature. The interaction distance (delocalization volume) by one antioxidant molecule was estimated to be 5–10 nm by the radius of sphere in polymer matrix, though the value would depend on the chemical structure of antioxidant. - Highlights: ► Interaction of antioxidant on polymer oxidation is discussed for thermal and radiation ageings. ► Antioxidant is very effective for thermal oxidation, but not for radiation induced oxidation. ► Interaction of antioxidant is not the termination reaction of radicals on polymers. ► Antioxidant is supposed to reduce the provability of polymer radical formation by thermal activation. ► Mechanism of polymer oxidation may not be chain reaction via peroxy radical and hydro-peroxide.

  12. Crack formation and crack propagation under multiaxial mechanical and thermal stresses. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The 25th meeting of the DV Fracture Group was held on 16/17 February 1993 at Karlsruhe Technical University. The main topic, ''Crack formation and crack propagation under multiaxial mechanical and thermal stresses'', was discussed by five invited papers (by K.J. Miller, D. Loehe, H.A. Richard, W. Brocks, A. Brueckner-Foit) and 23 short papers. The other 21 papers were devoted to various domains of fracture mechanics, with emphasis on elastoplastic fracture mechanics. (orig./MM) [de

  13. Thermal runaway reaction hazards and mechanisms of hydroxylamine with acid/base contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Chunyang; Saraf, Sanjeev R.; Rogers, William J.; Sam Mannan, M.

    2004-01-01

    Hydroxylamine (HA) has been involved in two incidents since 1999 because of its thermal instability and incompatibility. In this study, thermal runaway reactions of hydroxylamine with various concentrations of KOH and HCl were studied using the reactive system screening tool (RSST) and automatic pressure tracking adiabatic calorimeter (APTAC). The thermokinetic data, such as onset temperature, heat of reaction, maximum self-heat rate, maximum pressure rate, and non-condensable gas pressure, were compared with those of hydroxylamine solution without added impurity. Our study shows that the thermal decomposition behavior of hydroxylamine is affected by the presence of acid/base, and mixing of hydroxylamine with acid/base may cause thermal decomposition at lower temperatures. Different decomposition pathways can be initiated by hydrogen ion and hydroxide ion. The decomposition mechanisms of hydroxylamine in alkaline and acidic solutions are proposed based on the products, information from the literature, and quantum mechanical calculations. The experimental results are discussed in terms of the proposed reaction mechanisms

  14. A New Model for Optimal Mechanical and Thermal Performance of Cement-Based Partition Wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shiping; Hu, Mengyu; Huang, Yonghui; Cui, Nannan; Wang, Weifeng

    2018-04-17

    The prefabricated cement-based partition wall has been widely used in assembled buildings because of its high manufacturing efficiency, high-quality surface, and simple and convenient construction process. In this paper, a general porous partition wall that is made from cement-based materials was proposed to meet the optimal mechanical and thermal performance during transportation, construction and its service life. The porosity of the proposed partition wall is formed by elliptic-cylinder-type cavities. The finite element method was used to investigate the mechanical and thermal behaviour, which shows that the proposed model has distinct advantages over the current partition wall that is used in the building industry. It is found that, by controlling the eccentricity of the elliptic-cylinder cavities, the proposed wall stiffness can be adjusted to respond to the imposed loads and to improve the thermal performance, which can be used for the optimum design. Finally, design guidance is provided to obtain the optimal mechanical and thermal performance. The proposed model could be used as a promising candidate for partition wall in the building industry.

  15. A New Model for Optimal Mechanical and Thermal Performance of Cement-Based Partition Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiping Huang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The prefabricated cement-based partition wall has been widely used in assembled buildings because of its high manufacturing efficiency, high-quality surface, and simple and convenient construction process. In this paper, a general porous partition wall that is made from cement-based materials was proposed to meet the optimal mechanical and thermal performance during transportation, construction and its service life. The porosity of the proposed partition wall is formed by elliptic-cylinder-type cavities. The finite element method was used to investigate the mechanical and thermal behaviour, which shows that the proposed model has distinct advantages over the current partition wall that is used in the building industry. It is found that, by controlling the eccentricity of the elliptic-cylinder cavities, the proposed wall stiffness can be adjusted to respond to the imposed loads and to improve the thermal performance, which can be used for the optimum design. Finally, design guidance is provided to obtain the optimal mechanical and thermal performance. The proposed model could be used as a promising candidate for partition wall in the building industry.

  16. Thermal and mechanical improvement of aluminum open-cells foams through electrodeposition of copper and graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoncini Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to its planar structure, graphene is characterized by unique properties, such as excellent chemical inactivity, high electrical and thermal conductivity, high optical transparency, extraordinary flexibility and high mechanical resistance, which make it suitable in a very wide range of applications. This paper details the state of the art in graphene coating applied to aluminum open-cells foams for the improvement of their mechanical and thermal behavior. Metallic foams are highly porous materials with extremely high convective heat transfer coefficients, thanks to their complex structure of three-dimensional open-cells. Graphene nanoplatelets have been used to improve thermal conductivity of aluminum foams, to make them better suitable during heat transfer in transient state. Also, an improvement of mechanical resistance has been observed. Before electrodeposition, all the samples have been subjected to sandblasting process, to eliminate the oxide layer on the surface, enabling a better adhesion of the coating. Different nanoparticles of graphene have been used. The experimental findings revealed a higher thermal conductivity for aluminum open cells foams electroplated with graphene. Considered the relatively low process costs and the improvements obtainable, these materials are very promising in many technological fields. The topics covered include surface modification, electrochemical plating, thermo-graphic analysis.

  17. Equilibrium and shot noise in mesoscopic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, T.

    1994-10-01

    Within the last decade, there has been a resurgence of interest in the study of noise in Mesoscopic devices, both experimentally and theoretically. Noise in solid state devices can have different origins: there is 1/f noise, which is believed to arise from fluctuations in the resistance of the sample due to the motion of impurities. On top of this contribution is a frequency independent component associated with the stochastic nature of electron transport, which will be the focus of this paper. If the sample considered is small enough that dephasing and inelastic effects can be neglected, equilibrium (thermal) and excess noise can be completely described in terms of the elastic scattering properties of the sample. As mentioned above, noise arises as a consequence of random processes governing the transport of electrons. Here, there are two sources of randomness: first, electrons incident on the sample occupy a given energy state with a probability given by the Fermi-Dirac distribution function. Secondly, electrons can be transmitted across the sample or reflected in the same reservoir where they came from with a probability given by the quantum mechanical transmission/reflection coefficients. Equilibrium noise refers to the case where no bias voltage is applied between the leads connected to the sample, where thermal agitation alone allows the electrons close to the Fermi level to tunnel through the sample. In general, equilibrium noise is related to the conductance of the sample via the Johnson-Nyquist formula. In the presence of a bias, in the classical regime, one expects to recover the full shot noise < {Delta}{sup 2}I >= 2I{Delta}{mu} as was observed a long time ago in vacuum diodes. In the Mesoscopic regime, however, excess noise is reduced below the shot noise level. The author introduces a more intuitive picture, where the current passing through the device is a superposition of pulses, or electron wave packets, which can be transmitted or reflected.

  18. Thermal and mechanical effect during rapid heating of astroloy for improving structural integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoolaa, A.P.I.; Oluwasegun, K.M.; Olorunniwo, O.E.; Atanda, P.O.; Aigbodion, V.S.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astroloy(Turbine Disc alloy) a Powder metallurgy (PM) nickel base superalloy has been investigated. The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of an inertia friction welded Astroloy were simulated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulation system. Detailed microstructural examination of the simulated TMAZ and HAZ and those present in actual inertial friction welded specimens showed that γ′ particles persisted during rapid heating up to a temperature where the formation of liquid is thermodynamically favoured, and subsequently re-solidified eutectically. The result obtained showed that forging during the thermo-mechanical simulation significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. This is attributable to strain-induced rapid isothermal dissolution of the constitutional liquation products within 150 μm from the centre of the forged sample. This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens. - Highlights: • The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astrology • The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). • significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. • This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. • The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens.

  19. Thermal and mechanical effect during rapid heating of astroloy for improving structural integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popoolaa, A.P.I., E-mail: popoolaapi@tut.ac.za [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Oluwasegun, K.M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Olorunniwo, O.E., E-mail: segun_nniwo@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Atanda, P.O. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Obafemi Awolowo University (Nigeria); Aigbodion, V.S. [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria)

    2016-05-05

    The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astroloy(Turbine Disc alloy) a Powder metallurgy (PM) nickel base superalloy has been investigated. The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of an inertia friction welded Astroloy were simulated using a Gleeble thermo-mechanical simulation system. Detailed microstructural examination of the simulated TMAZ and HAZ and those present in actual inertial friction welded specimens showed that γ′ particles persisted during rapid heating up to a temperature where the formation of liquid is thermodynamically favoured, and subsequently re-solidified eutectically. The result obtained showed that forging during the thermo-mechanical simulation significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. This is attributable to strain-induced rapid isothermal dissolution of the constitutional liquation products within 150 μm from the centre of the forged sample. This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens. - Highlights: • The behaviour of γ′ phase to thermal and mechanical effects during rapid heating of Astrology • The thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ). • significantly enhanced resistance to weld liquation cracking of the alloy. • This was not observed in purely thermally simulated samples. • The microstructure within the TMAZ of the as-welded alloy is similar to the microstructure in the forged Gleeble specimens.

  20. Detection mechanisms in silicon diodes used as α-particle and thermal neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerofolini, G.F.; Ferla, G.; Foglio Para, A.

    1981-01-01

    Some common silicon devices (diodes, RAMs etc.) can be used as α and thermal neutron detectors. An α resolution of approx. equal to 3% can be obtained utilizing p + /n or n + /p diodes with no external bias. Thermal neutrons are detected by means of the reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li on the 10 B present in the devices. Neutron efficiency has been substantially improved by implantation of 10 B ions in the p + region of the diodes. Experimental results allow us to clarify the carrier collection mechanisms throughout the device. Some current opinions in the field are contradicted. (orig.)

  1. Mechanical and Thermal Characterisation of a TT Half-Module Prototype

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, F; Pangilinan, M; Siegler, M

    2005-01-01

    This note describes the mechanical effects of thermal cycles on a TT half-module, to demonstrate that the detectors can withstand the expected thermal gradients without damage. The stress transferred by the carbon fiber rails and the ceramic to the silicon sensors was investigated, and the deformation that occurred during these tests was measured by strain gauges that were attached to sensors on a test half-module. In addition, heat transfer through the carbon fiber rails was studied. Furthermore, we present a comparison of different materials proposed to build the carbon fiber rails of the modules.

  2. Determination of the mechanical, diffractometer and thermal properties of chitosan and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose films (HPMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotta, Jefferson; Minatti, Edson; Barreto, Pedro L.M.

    2009-01-01

    This work examined the mechanical, diffractometry and thermal properties of chitosan-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) films. The solutions of chitosan and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose were mixed at different proportions (100/0; 70/30; 50/50; 30/70 and 0/100) respectively, and 20 m L was casting at Petri dishes to posterior analysis of dried films. The miscibility of polymers has been assessed by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). It was shown that although weak hydrogen bonding exists between the polymer functional groups, the films are not fully miscible at a dry state. (author)

  3. Mechanical and thermal stability of graphene and graphene-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galashev, A. E.; Rakhmanova, O. R.

    2014-10-01

    Graphene has rapidly become one of the most popular materials for technological applications and a test material for new condensed matter ideas. This paper reviews the mechanical properties of graphene and effects related to them that have recently been discovered experimentally or predicted theoretically or by simulation. The topics discussed are of key importance for graphene's use in integrated electronics, thermal materials, and electromechanical devices and include the following: graphene transformation into other sp^2 hybridization forms; stability to stretching and compression; ion-beam-induced structural modifications; how defects and graphene edges affect the electronic properties and thermal stability of graphene and related composites.

  4. All-mechanical quantum noise cancellation for accelerometry: broadband with momentum measurements, narrow band without

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, Kurt; Balu, Radhakrishnan; Tezak, Nikolas; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the ability to make direct measurements of momentum, in addition to the usual direct measurements of position, allows a simple configuration of two identical mechanical oscillators to be used for broadband back-action-free force metrology. This would eliminate the need for an optical reference oscillator in the scheme of Tsang and Caves (2010 Phys. Rev. Lett.  105 123601), along with its associated disadvantages. We also show that if one is restricted to position measurements alone then two copies of the same two-oscillator configuration can be used for narrow-band back-action-free force metrology. (paper)

  5. Effect of Surfactants on Mechanical, Thermal, and Photostability of a Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarkhed, Meera; O'Dell, Courtney; Hsieh, Ming-Ching; Zhang, Jingming; Goldstein, Joel; Srivastava, Arvind

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of commonly used surfactants (at 0.01% w/v concentration) on mechanical, thermal, and photostability of a monoclonal antibody (MAb1) of IgG1 sub-class and to evaluate the minimum concentration of surfactant (Polysorbate 80) required in protecting MAb1 from mechanical stress. Surfactants evaluated were non-ionic surfactants, Polysorbate 80, Polysorbate 20, Pluronic F-68 (polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block polymer), Brij 35 (polyoxyethylene lauryl ether), Triton X-100, and an anionic surfactant, Caprylic acid (1-Heptanecarboxylic acid). After evaluating effect of surfactants and determining stabilizing effect of Polysorbate 80 against mechanical stress without compromising thermal and photostability of MAb1, the minimum concentration of Polysorbate 80 required for mechanical stability was further examined. Polysorbate 80 concentration was varied from 0 to 0.02%. Mechanical stability was evaluated by agitation of MAb1 at 300 rotations per minute at room temperature for 72 h. Samples were analyzed for purity by SEC-HPLC, turbidity by absorbance at 350 nm, visible particles by visual inspection, and sub-visible particles by light obscuration technique on a particle analyzer. All non-ionic surfactants tested showed a similar effect in protecting against mechanical stress and did not exhibit any significant negative effect on thermal and photostability. However, Caprylic acid had a slightly negative effect on mechanical and photostability when compared to the non-ionic surfactants or sample without surfactant. This work demonstrated that polysorbate 80 is better than other surfactants tested and that a concentration of at least 0.005% (w/v) Polysorbate 80 is needed to protect MAb1 against mechanical stress.

  6. Thermal fluid-solid interaction model and experimental validation for hydrostatic mechanical face seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weifeng; Liao, Chuanjun; Liu, Xiangfeng; Suo, Shuangfu; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    Hydrostatic mechanical face seals for reactor coolant pumps are very important for the safety and reliability of pressurized-water reactor power plants. More accurate models on the operating mechanism of the seals are needed to help improve their performance. The thermal fluid-solid interaction (TFSI) mechanism of the hydrostatic seal is investigated in this study. Numerical models of the flow field and seal assembly are developed. Based on the mechanism for the continuity condition of the physical quantities at the fluid-solid interface, an on-line numerical TFSI model for the hydrostatic mechanical seal is proposed using an iterative coupling method. Dynamic mesh technology is adopted to adapt to the changing boundary shape. Experiments were performed on a test rig using a full-size test seal to obtain the leakage rate as a function of the differential pressure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the TFSI model were verified by comparing the simulation results and experimental data. Using the TFSI model, the behavior of the seal is presented, including mechanical and thermal deformation, and the temperature field. The influences of the rotating speed and differential pressure of the sealing device on the temperature field, which occur widely in the actual use of the seal, are studied. This research proposes an on-line and assembly-based TFSI model for hydrostatic mechanical face seals, and the model is validated by full-sized experiments.

  7. First wall thermal--mechanical analyses of the reference theta-pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Cort, G.E.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal-mechanical response of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) first wall was analyzed. The first wall problems anticipated for a pulsed, high-β fusion power plant can be ameliorated by either alterations in the physics operating point, materials reengineering, or blanket/first wall reconfiguration. Within the latter ''configuration'' scenario, a two-fold approach has been adopted for the thermal-mechanical portion of the RTPR first wall technology assessment. First, a number of new first wall configurations (bonded or unbonded laminated composites, all-ceramic structures, protective and/or sacrificial ''bumpers'') were considered. Second, a more quantitative failure criterion, based on the developing theories of fracture mechanics, was identified. For each first wall configuration, transient heat transfer and thermoelastic stress calculations have been made. Two-dimensional finite element structural analyses have been made for a variety of mechanical boundary conditions. Only the Al 2 O 3 /Nb - 1 Zr system has been considered. The results of this study indicated a wide range of design solutions to the pulsed thermal stress problem anticipated for the RTPR

  8. Thermal behavior and mechanical properties of physically crosslinked PVA/Gelatin hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yurong; Geever, Luke M; Kennedy, James E; Higginbotham, Clement L; Cahill, Paul A; McGuinness, Garrett B

    2010-02-01

    Poly (vinyl alcohol)/Gelatin hydrogels are under active investigation as potential vascular cell culture biomaterials, tissue models and vascular implants. The PVA/Gelatin hydrogels are physically crosslinked by the freeze-thaw technique, which is followed by a coagulation bath treatment. In this study, the thermal behavior of the gels was examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). Rheological measurement and uniaxial tensile tests revealed key mechanical properties. The role of polymer fraction in relation to these mechanical properties is explored. Gelatin has no significant effect on the thermal behavior of PVA, which indicates that no substantial change occurs in the PVA crystallite due to the presence of gelatin. The glass transition temperature, melting temperature, degree of crystallinity, polymer fraction, storage modulus (G') and ultimate strength of one freeze-thaw cycle (1FT) hydrogels are inferior to those of 3FT hydrogels. With coagulation, both 1FT and 3FT hydrogels shifted to a lower value of T(g), melting temperature and polymer fraction are further increased and the degree of crystallinity is depressed. The mechanical properties of 1FT, but not 3FT, were strengthened with coagulation treatment. This study gives a detailed investigation of the microstructure formation of PVA/Gelatin hydrogel in each stage of physical treatments which helps us to explain the role of physical treatments in tuning their physical properties for biomechanical applications. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mechanical and thermal properties of environmentally friendly composites derived from sugar palm tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahari, J.; Sapuan, S.M.; Zainudin, E.S.; Maleque, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We successfully developed biocomposites derived from sugar palm tree. ► The addition of SPF improve the mechanical properties of biocomposites. ► The thermal stability of biocomposites increase with increasing of SPF. ► The water absorption of biocomposites decrease with increasing of SPF. ► We investigate the morphological fracture through scanning electron microscopy. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is to study the effect of fibre content on mechanical properties, water absorption behaviour and thermal properties of sugar palm fibre (SPF) reinforced plasticized sugar palm starch (SPF/SPS) biocomposites. The biocomposites were prepared with different amounts of fibres (i.e. 10%, 20% and 30% by weight percent) by using glycerol as plasticizer for the starch. The mechanical properties of plasticized SPS improved with the incorporation of fibres. Fibre loading also increased the thermal stability of the biocomposite in this investigation. Water uptake and moisture content of SPF/SPS biocomposites decreased with the incorporation of fibres, which is due to better interfacial bonding between the matrix and fibres as well as the hindrance to absorption caused by the fibres. Fractographic studies through scanning electron microscopy showed homogeneous distribution of fibres and matrix with good adhesion which play an important role in improving the mechanical properties of biocomposites

  10. 3D Thermal and Mechanical Analysis of a Single Event Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretti, Gabriela; Demarco, Gustavo; Romero, Eduardo; Tais, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a study related to thermal and mechanical behavior of power DMOS transistors during a Single Event Burnout (SEB) process. We use a cylindrical heat generation region for emulating the thermal and mechanical phenomena related to the SEB. In this way, it is avoided the complexity of the mathematical treatment of the ion-device interaction. This work considers locating the heat generation region in positions that are more realistic than the ones used in previous work. For performing the study, we formulate and validate a new 3D model for the transistor that maintains the computational cost at reasonable level. The resulting mathematical models are solved by means of the Finite Element Method. The simulations results show that the failure dynamics is dominated by the mechanical stress in the metal layer. Additionally, the time to failure depends on the heat source position, for a given power and dimension of the generation region. The results suggest that 3D modeling should be considered for a detailed study of thermal and mechanical effects induced by SEBs.

  11. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Bamboo Pulp Fiber Reinforced Polyethylene Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhan Ren

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanical and thermal properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE composites reinforced by bamboo pulp fibers (BPF. Using a twin-screw extruder, polymer composites were fabricated using BPF and bamboo flour (BF as the reinforcement and HDPE as the matrix. Tensile and flexural tests of the HDPE composites were performed to determine the mechanical properties under different conditions. The thermal properties of HDPE composites were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. The results showed that BPF improved the mechanical and thermal properties of the polymer composites more than did BF. The tensile and flexural strength of composites with 30 wt% BPF were increased by 61.46% and 22.94%, respectively, while the tensile and flexural modulus were increased by 84.52% and 27.30%, respectively. Compared to composites with 50 wt% BF, the T5% of composites with 50 wt% BPF increased by 20.18 °C. As the BPF content increased, the storage modulus (E’ and loss modulus (E” initially increased, followed by a decrease. Compared to the BF/HDPE composites, BPF/HDPE composites reinforced at 30 wt% had a higher storage modulus (E’ and loss modulus (E” and lower damping parameter (tanδ.

  12. Effect of acoustic softening on the thermal-mechanical process of ultrasonic welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunkun; Zhang, Yansong; Wang, Hongze

    2017-03-01

    Application of ultrasonic energy can reduce the static stress necessary for plastic deformation of metallic materials to reduce forming load and energy, namely acoustic softening effect (ASE). Ultrasonic welding (USW) is a rapid joining process utilizing ultrasonic energy to form a solid state joint between two or more pieces of metals. Quantitative characterization of ASE and its influence on specimen deformation and heat generation is essential to clarify the thermal-mechanical process of ultrasonic welding. In the present work, experiments were set up to found out mechanical behavior of copper and aluminum under combined effect of compression force and ultrasonic energy. Constitutive model was proposed and numerical implemented in finite element model of ultrasonic welding. Thermal-mechanical analysis was put forward to explore the effect of ultrasonic energy on the welding process quantitatively. Conclusions can be drawn that ASE increases structural deformation significantly, which is beneficial for joint formation. Meanwhile, heat generation from both frictional work and plastic deformation is slightly influenced by ASE. Based on the proposed model, relationship between ultrasonic energy and thermal-mechanical behavior of structure during ultrasonic welding was constructed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanism for thermal relic dark matter of strongly interacting massive particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Volansky, Tomer; Wacker, Jay G

    2014-10-24

    We present a new paradigm for achieving thermal relic dark matter. The mechanism arises when a nearly secluded dark sector is thermalized with the standard model after reheating. The freeze-out process is a number-changing 3→2 annihilation of strongly interacting massive particles (SIMPs) in the dark sector, and points to sub-GeV dark matter. The couplings to the visible sector, necessary for maintaining thermal equilibrium with the standard model, imply measurable signals that will allow coverage of a significant part of the parameter space with future indirect- and direct-detection experiments and via direct production of dark matter at colliders. Moreover, 3→2 annihilations typically predict sizable 2→2 self-interactions which naturally address the "core versus cusp" and "too-big-to-fail" small-scale structure formation problems.

  14. The fuel and channel thermal/mechanical behaviour code FACTAR 2.0 (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbye, C.J.; Mackinnon, J.C.; Gu, B.W.

    1996-01-01

    The computer code FACTAR 2.0 (LOCA) models the thermal and mechanical response of components within a single CANDU fuel channel under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. This code version is the successor to the FACTAR 1.x code series, and features many modelling enhancements over its predecessor. In particular, the thermal hydraulic treatment has been extended to model reverse and bi-directional coolant flow, and the axial variation in coolant flow rate. Thermal radiation is calculated by a detailed surface-to-surface model, and the ability to represent a greater range of geometries (including experimental configurations employed in code validation) has been implemented. Details of these new code treatments are described in this paper. (author)

  15. Thermal, Electrical and Mechanical Response to a Quench in Nb3Sn Superconducting Coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferracin, F.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Gourlay, S.A.; Hafalia, R.R.; Imbasciati, L.; Lietzke, A.F.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2003-01-01

    During a quench, significant temperatures can arise as a magnet's stored energy is dissipated in the normal zone. Temperature gradients during this process give rise to localized strains within the coil. Reactive forces in the magnet structure balance the electromagnetic and thermal forces and maintain on equilibrium. In this paper we present a complete 3D finite element analysis of a racetrack coil. Specifically, the analysis focuses on thermal, electrical and mechanical conditions in a 10 T Nb 3 Sn coil built and tested as part of LBNL's Subscale Magnet Program. The study attempts to simulate time history of the temperature and voltage rise during quench propagation. The transient thermal stress after the quench is then evaluated and discussed

  16. Electromagnetic and thermal analysis of electromagnet for SMART control element drive mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huh, H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, J. S.; Kim, Y. W.; Kim, J. I.

    1999-01-01

    A numerical electromagnetic and thermal analysis was performed for the electromagnet which is installed in the control element drive mechanism(CEDM) of the integral reactor SMART. A model for the electromagnetic analysis of the electromagnet was developed and theoretical bases for the model were established. Design parameters related to thrust force were identified, and the optimum design point was determined by analyzing the trend of the magnetic saturation with finite element method. Also It is important that the temperature of the electomagnet windings be maintained within the allowable limit of the insulation, since the electromagnet of CEDM is always supplied with current during the reactor operation. So the thermal analysis of the winding insulation which is composed of polyimide and air were performed by finite element method. The electromagnetic and thermal properties obtained here will be used as input for the optimization analysis of the electromagnet

  17. Characterisation of Ground Thermal and Thermo-Mechanical Behaviour for Shallow Geothermal Energy Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieira, Ana; Alberdi-Pagola, Maria; Christodoulides, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Increasing use of the ground as a thermal reservoir is expected in the near future. Shallow geothermal energy (SGE) systems have proved to be sustainable alternative solutions for buildings and infrastructure conditioning in many areas across the globe in the past decades. Recently novel solutions......-hydro-mechanical behaviour of soil is introduced and discussed. These coupled processes are important for confirming the structural integrity of energy geostructures, but routine methods for parameter determination are still lacking (Energies). Keywords: shallow geothermal systems; soil thermal behaviour; laboratory testing......, including energy geostructures, where SGE systems are coupled with foundation heat exchangers, have also been developed. The performance of these systems is dependent on a series of factors, among which the thermal properties of the soil play a major role. The purpose of this paper is to present...

  18. Studies on mechanical, thermal and dynamic mechanical properties of untreated (raw) and treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh Kumar, S.M.; Duraibabu, D.; Subramanian, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • UTCSE and TCSE composites have been fabricated by compression molding technique. • The prepared specimens were characterized by FTIR, DMA, TGA and SEM techniques. • TCSE composite showed higher mechanical properties compared to UTCSE composite. • DMA showed that TCSE composite exhibited higher storage modulus than UTCSE composite. • TCSE composite showed higher thermal stability than UTCSE composite. - Abstract: The untreated (raw) coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy (UTCSE) composite and treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy (TCSE) composite have been fabricated using hand layup followed by compression molding technique. The prepared specimens were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The prepared specimens are cut as per ASTM Standards to measure tensile, flexural and impact strengths by using universal testing machine and izod impact tester respectively. The treated coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composite (TCSE) posses higher mechanical strength and thermal stability compared to untreated (raw) coconut sheath fiber reinforced epoxy composite (UTCSE). In the SEM fracture analysis, TCSE composite showed better fiber–matrix bonding and absence of voids compared to UTCSE composite

  19. The effect of thermal processing on microstructure and mechanical properties in a nickel-iron alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling

    The correlation between processing conditions, resulted microstructure and mechanical properties is of interest in the field of metallurgy for centuries. In this work, we investigated the effect of thermal processing parameters on microstructure, and key mechanical properties to turbine rotor design: tensile yield strength and crack growth resistance, for a nickel-iron based superalloy Inconel 706. The first step of the designing of experiments is to find parameter ranges for thermal processing. Physical metallurgy on superalloys was combined with finite element analysis to estimate variations in thermal histories for a large Alloy 706 forging, and the results were adopted for designing of experiments. Through the systematic study, correlation was found between the processing parameters and the microstructure. Five different types of grain boundaries were identified by optical metallography, fractography, and transmission electron microscopy, and they were found to be associated with eta precipitation at the grain boundaries. Proportions of types of boundaries, eta size, spacing and angle respect to the grain boundary were found to be dependent on processing parameters. Differences in grain interior precipitates were also identified, and correlated with processing conditions. Further, a strong correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties was identified. The grain boundary precipitates affect the time dependent crack propagation resistance, and different types of boundaries have different levels of resistance. Grain interior precipitates were correlated with tensile yield strength. It was also found that there is a strong environmental effect on time dependent crack propagation resistance, and the sensitivity to environmental damage is microstructure dependent. The microstructure with eta decorated on grain boundaries by controlled processing parameters is more resistant to environmental damage through oxygen embrittlement than material without eta

  20. Noise and the statistical mechanics of distributed transport in a colony of interacting agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katifori, Eleni; Graewer, Johannes; Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Mazza, Marco G.

    Inspired by the process of liquid food distribution between individuals in an ant colony, in this work we consider the statistical mechanics of resource dissemination between interacting agents with finite carrying capacity. The agents move inside a confined space (nest), pick up the food at the entrance of the nest and share it with other agents that they encounter. We calculate analytically and via a series of simulations the global food intake rate for the whole colony as well as observables describing how uniformly the food is distributed within the nest. Our model and predictions provide a useful benchmark to assess which strategies can lead to efficient food distribution within the nest and also to what level the observed food uptake rates and efficiency in food distribution are due to stochastic fluctuations or specific food exchange strategies by an actual ant colony.

  1. Role of temperature and composition on the thermal-hydro-mechanical coupling of concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brue, Flore

    2009-01-01

    The French project of the storage of nuclear wastes, which is managed by the Andra, needs some experimental data on the durability of the concrete. Loadings which are taken into account are the desaturation/re-saturation processes, the heat load and the mechanical evolution. Hence this study focuses on the coupling thermo-hydro-mechanical on concretes of the research program of Andra, made with CEM I and CEM V/A cement type. The water saturation degree and shrinkages of materials, which are subjected to desiccation or re-saturation, are dependent on the imposed thermal and hydrous conditions and on their microstructural characteristics. Moreover the study of the mechanical evolution is gone further at 20 C in function of the water saturation degree. Different short-term tests highlight a hydrous damage, which determine the mechanical behaviour. The long-term study of desiccation creep shows the coupling between the durability, the mechanical evolution and the desiccation. (author)

  2. Vulcanization Kinetics and Mechanical Properties of Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer Thermal Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Irfan Fathurrohman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The vulcanization kinetics of Ethylene-propylene diene monomer (EPDM rubber thermal insulation was studied by using rheometer under isothermal condition at different temperatures. The rheometry analysis was used to determining the cure kinetic parameters and predicting the cure time of EPDM thermal insulation. The experimental results revealed that the curing curves of EPDM thermal insulation were marching and the optimum curing time decreased with increasing the temperature. The kinetic parameters were determined from the autocatalytic model showed close fitting with the experimental results, indicating suitability of autocatalytic model in characterizing the cure kinetics. The activation energy was determined from the autocatalytic model is 46.3661 kJ mol-1. The cure time were predicted from autocatalytic model and the obtained kinetic parameter by using the relationship among degree of conversion, cure temperature, and cure time. The predictions of cure time provide information for the actual curing characteristic of EPDM thermal insulation. The mechanical properties of EPDM thermal insulation with different vulcanization temperatures showed the same hardness, tensile strength and modulus at 300%, except at temperature 70 °C, while the elongation at breaking point decreased with increasing temperature of vulcanization. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 8th April 2014; Revised: 7th January 2015; Accepted: 16th January 2015How to Cite: Fathurrohman, M.I., Maspanger, D.R., Sutrisno, S. (2015. Vulcanization Kinetics and Mechanical Properties of Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer Thermal Insulation. Bulletin of Chemi-cal Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2, 104-110. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.6682.104-110Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.6682.104-110 

  3. Thermal loads and their effect on integrity of mechanical systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, G.; Schoeckle, F.

    2010-01-01

    The initial step to establish a required quality status of systems and components is performed during the state of design. Main goal of the design is to consider every possible damage mechanism of the future operation (by specification of loads, medium and environment and the selection of the materials). The knowledge during the state of design determines the reliability of the component. Regarding the thermal loads, especially, only global parameters are specified usually (transients of flow and temperature connected to specified operation). These global transients are analyzed according to the standards. In operation, the safety (integrity) resp. remaining life of a component is determined by the real operation history. As experience showed, failures, defects and not specified (new) loads were discovered during operation, e.g. stratification effects in feedwater pipes and in surge lines or thermal effects in the region of valves due to switching or internal leakage. Standard surveillance in operation is performed using plant transducers that can only monitor global loads. However, problems usually are of local nature. Thermal loads like - turbulent temperatures due to mixing of media with different temperatures - temperature differences across shells or in regions of nozzles/thermal sleeves - temperature differences in piping cross sections (local and global stratification effects) - temperature differences along sections of piping systems have to be monitored by use of local instrumentation. During analysis, both the local loads and construction details have to be considered, in detail, using appropriate calculation / analysis tools. The complexity of the loads requires a comprehensive procedure: - determine the types of loads resulting from measured temperature transients - perform sensitivity studies to identify the load type that results in relevant stresses - evaluate the stresses of the significant loads - assess these stresses according to component

  4. Thermal Depth Profiling Reconstruction by Multilayer Thermal Quadrupole Modeling and Particle Swarm Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao-Jiang, Chen; Shu-Yi, Zhang

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid inversion method for depth profiling reconstruction of thermal conductivities of inhomogeneous solids is proposed based on multilayer quadrupole formalism of thermal waves, particle swarm optimization and sequential quadratic programming. The reconstruction simulations for several thermal conductivity profiles are performed to evaluate the applicability of the method. The numerical simulations demonstrate that the precision and insensitivity to noise of the inversion method are very satisfactory. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  5. Three-dimensional FE analysis of the thermal-mechanical behaviors in the nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Yijie; Cui Yi; Huo Yongzhong; Ding Shurong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We establish three-dimensional finite element models for nuclear fuel rods. → The thermal-mechanical behaviors at the initial stage of burnup are obtained. → Several parameters on the in-pile performances are investigated. → The parameters have remarkable effects on the in-pile behaviors. → This study lays a foundation for optimal design and irradiation safety. - Abstract: In order to implement numerical simulation of the thermal-mechanical behaviors in the nuclear fuel rods, a three-dimensional finite element model is established. The thermal-mechanical behaviors at the initial stage of burnup in both the pellet and the cladding are obtained. Comparison of the obtained numerical results with those from experiments validates the developed finite element model. The effects of the constraint conditions, several operation and structural parameters on the thermal-mechanical performances of the fuel rod are investigated. The research results indicate that: (1) with increasing the heat generation rates from 0.15 to 0.6 W/mm 3 , the maximum temperature within the pellet increases by 99.3% and the maximum radial displacement at the outer surface of the pellet increases by 94.3%. And the maximum Mises stresses in the cladding all increase; while the maximum values of the first principal stresses within the pellet decrease as a whole; (2) with increasing the heat transfer coefficients between the cladding and the coolant, the internal temperatures reduce and the temperature gradient remains similar; when the heat transfer coefficient is lower than a critical value, the temperature change is sensitive to the heat transfer coefficient. The maximum temperature increases only 7.13% when h changes from 0.5 W/mm 2 K to 0.01 W/mm 2 K, while increases up to 54.7% when h decreases from 0.01 W/mm 2 K to 0.005 W/mm 2 K; (3) the initial gap sizes between the pellet and the cladding significantly affect the thermal-mechanical behaviors in the fuel rod; when the

  6. Fracture mechanics assessment of thermal aged nuclear piping based on the Leak-Before-Break concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingya, E-mail: chenmingya@cgnpc.com.cn [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Yu, Weiwei [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China); Qian, Guian [Paul Scherrer Institute, Nuclear Energy and Safety Department, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Wang, Rongshan; Lu, Feng; Zhang, Guodong; Xue, Fei; Chen, Zhilin [Suzhou Nuclear Power Research Institute, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • The effects of thermal aging on crack unstable tearing are studied. • The critical size of crack unstable tearing is calculated by different methods. • The critical failure models are compared. • The conservatism of J–T diagram is shown. - Abstract: The Leak-Before-Break (LBB) concept has been accepted to design the primary piping system of the pressurized water reactor (PWR). Due to thermal aging of long term operation, the cast stainless steels (CSSs) which are used for the primary piping of PWR, suffer a significant loss of fracture toughness, and as a consequence the safety margin of the thermal aged pipe decreases. Therefore, the aged piping should be analyzed and validated by the LBB concept. In this paper, elastic–plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) assessments of the thermal aged piping are presented according to the LBB concept. The critical break size of crack unstable tearing is calculated by the EPFM method. The crack driving force diagram (J–a diagram), the stability assessment diagram (J–T diagram) and a numerical method are applied to calculate the critical crack size of crack break. The effects of thermal aging on the plastic limit load, J–T diagram, critical crack size of the EPFM and the critical failure mode are studied. The results show that the thermal aging effect decreases the maximum allowed J-integral at a certain ductile tearing modulus by more than 50% and it increases the flow stress and plastic limit load by 11.78%. The results based on the J–T diagram are about 40% conservative than those based on the direct numerical method for the high loading case. For the thermal aged piping, it is important to consider the competition failure modes between plastic collapse and unstable ductile tearing.

  7. Basic thermal–mechanical properties and thermal shock, fatigue resistance of swaged + rolled potassium doped tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Yan, Qingzhi, E-mail: qzyan@ustb.edu.cn; Lang, Shaoting; Xia, Min; Ge, Changchun

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The potassium doped tungsten grade was achieved via swaging + rolling process. • The cracking threshold of the W–K alloy was in the range of 0.44–0.66 GW/m{sup 2}. • Recrystallization occurred at 0.66–1.1 GW/m{sup 2} during the thermal shock tests. • No cracks emerged during the thermal fatigue tests (0.44 GW/m{sup 2}, 1000 cycles). • Recrystallization occurred after 1000 cycles during the thermal fatigue tests. - Abstract: The potassium doped tungsten (W–K) grade was achieved via swaging + rolling process. The swaged + rolled W–K alloy exhibited acceptable thermal conductivity of 159.1 W/m K and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of about 873 K while inferior mechanical properties attributed to the coarse pores and small deformation degree. Then the thermal shock, fatigue resistance of the W–K grade were characterized by an electron beam facility. Thermal shock tests were conducted at absorbed power densities varied from 0.22 to 1.1 GW/m{sup 2} in a step of 0.22 GW/m{sup 2}. The cracking threshold was in the range of 0.44–0.66 GW/m{sup 2}. Furthermore, recrystallization occurred in the subsurface of the specimens tested at 0.66–1.1 GW/m{sup 2} basing on the analysis of microhardness and microstructure. Thermal fatigue tests were performed at 0.44 GW/m{sup 2} up to 1000 cycles and no cracks emerged throughout the tests. Moreover, recrystallization occurred after 1000 cycles.

  8. The testing of thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical processes using a large block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.; Wilder, D.G.; Blink, J.A.; Blair, S.C.; Buscheck, T.A.; Chesnut, D.A.; Glassley, W.E.; Lee, K.; Roberts, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    The radioactive decay heat from nuclear waste packages may, depending on the thermal load, create coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes in the near-field environment of a repository. A group of tests on a large block (LBT) are planned to provide a timely opportunity to test and calibrate some of the TMHC model concepts. The LBT is advantageous for testing and verifying model concepts because the boundary conditions are controlled, and the block can be characterized before and after the experiment. A block of Topopah Spring tuff of about 3 x 3 x 4.5 m will be sawed and isolated at Fran Ridge, Nevada Test Site. Small blocks of the rock adjacent to the large block will be collected for laboratory testing of some individual thermal-mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes. A constant load of about 4 MPa will be applied to the top and sides of the large block. The sides will be sealed with moisture and thermal barriers. The large block will be heated with one heater in each borehole and guard heaters on the sides so that a dry-out zone and a condensate zone will exist simultaneously. Temperature, moisture content, pore pressure, chemical composition, stress and displacement will be measured throughout the block during the heating and cool-down phases. The results from the experiments on small blocks and the tests on the large block will provide a better understanding of some concepts of the coupled TMHC processes

  9. Enhancement the Thermal Stability and the Mechanical Properties of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Copolymer by Grafting Antioxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Ibrahim Al-Ghonamy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monomeric antioxidants are widely used as effective antioxidants to protect polymers against thermal oxidation. Low molecular weight antioxidants are easily lost from polymer through migration, evaporation, and extraction. Physical loss of antioxidants is considered to be major concern in the environmental issues and safety regulation as well as long life time of polymers. The grafting copolymerization of natural rubber and o-aminophenol was carried out by using two-roll mill machine. The prepared natural rubber-graft-o-Aminophenol, NR-graft-o-AP, was analysed by using Infrared and 1H-NMR Spectroscopy techniques. The thermal stability, mechanical properties, and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient were evaluated for NBR vulcanizates containing the commercial antioxidant, N-phenyl--naphthylamine (PBN, the prepared grafted antioxidant, NR-graft-o-AP, and the control vulcanizate. Results of the thermal stability showed that the prepared NR-graft-o-AP can protect NBR vulcanizate against thermal treatment much better than the commercial antioxidant, PBN, and control mix, respectively. The prepared grafted antioxidant improves the mechanical properties of NBR vulcanizate.

  10. Enhancement the Thermal Stability and the Mechanical Properties of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene Copolymer by Grafting Antioxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghonamy, A.I.; El-Wakil, A.A.; Ramadan, M.; El-Wakil, A.A.; Ramadan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Monomeric antioxidants are widely used as effective antioxidants to protect polymers against thermal oxidation. Low molecular weight antioxidants are easily lost from polymer through migration, evaporation, and extraction. Physical loss of antioxidants is considered to be major concern in the environmental issues and safety regulation as well as long life time of polymers. The grafting copolymerization of natural rubber and o-aminophenol was carried out by using two-roll mill machine. The prepared natural rubber-graft-o-Aminophenol, NR-graft-o-AP, was analysed by using Infrared and 1H-NMR Spectroscopy techniques. The thermal stability, mechanical properties, and ultrasonic attenuation coefficient were evaluated for NBR vulcanizations containing the commercial antioxidant, N-phenyl-β-naphthylamine (PBN), the prepared grafted antioxidant, NR-graft-o-AP, and the control vulcanization. Results of the thermal stability showed that the prepared NR-graft-o-AP can protect NBR vulcanization against thermal treatment much better than the commercial antioxidant, PBN, and control mix, respectively. The prepared grafted antioxidant improves the mechanical properties of NBR vulcanization.

  11. Thermal and mechanical pain sensitization in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Debora; Zanin, Marilia; Benedetti, Camila; Florencio, Lidiane; Oliveira, Anamaria

    2018-02-26

    The aim was to assess sensitization using quantitative sensory testing in mechanical and thermal modes in individuals with and without osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee. Pain thresholds were correlated with functionality, symptoms of depression and intensity of pain. Thirty control volunteers and 30 patients with OA of the knee were assessed. Punctate pain thresholds using Von Frey filaments and thermal pain thresholds using a Thermal Sensory Analyzer were evaluated in the periarticular region of the knee and forearm. Using a digital pressure algometer, pressure pain thresholds were assessed in the periarticular region of the knee and on the root exit zone on the lumbar and sacral spine. Punctate, pressure, and thermal pain thresholds differed significantly between participants with and without OA (p pain sensitization. Pressure pain thresholds also showed moderate and negative correlations with data on functionality, symptoms of depression and intensity of pain (-0.36  -0.56), contributing up to 30% of their variability. Allodynia and hyperalgesia were demonstrated in the OA group, suggesting central sensitization in patients with mild to moderate severity of joint damage. Correlation between mechanical hypersensitivity and psychosocial factors seems to be small, despite of its significance.

  12. Thermal conduction mechanisms in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Ivana; Mingo, Natalio; Stewart, Derek

    2009-03-01

    We present first principles studies which determine dominant effects limiting the heat conduction in isotope-disordered boron nitride and carbon nanotubes [1]. Using an ab initio atomistic Green's function approach, we demonstrate that localization cannot be observed in the thermal conductivity measurements [1], and that diffusive scattering is the dominant mechanism which reduces the thermal conductivity [2]. We also give concrete predictions of the magnitude of the isotope effect on the thermal conductivities of carbon and boron nitride single-walled nanotubes [2]. We furthermore show that intershell scattering is not the main limiting mechanism for the heat flow through multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes [1], and that heat conduction restricted to a few shells leads to the low thermal conductivities experimentally measured [1]. We consequently successfully compare the results of our calculations [3] with the experimental measurements [1]. [1] C. W. Chang, A. M. Fennimore, A. Afanasiev, D. Okawa, T. Ikuno, H. Garcia, D. Li, A. Majumdar, A. Zettl, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2006, 97, 085901. [2] I. Savic, N. Mingo, D. A. Stewart, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2008, 101, 165502. [3] I. Savic, D. A. Stewart, N. Mingo, to be published.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Layered La2Zr2O7 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xingye; Li, Li; Park, Hyeon-Myeong; Knapp, James; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Zhang, Jing

    2018-04-01

    Lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7) has been proposed as a promising thermal barrier coating (TBC) material due to its low thermal conductivity and high stability at high temperatures. In this work, both single and double-ceramic-layer (DCL) TBC systems of La2Zr2O7 and 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) were prepared using air plasma spray (APS) technique. The thermomechanical properties and microstructure were investigated. Thermal gradient mechanical fatigue (TGMF) tests were applied to investigate the thermal cycling performance. The results showed that DCL La2Zr2O7 + 8YSZ TBC samples lasted fewer cycles compared with single-layered 8YSZ TBC samples in TGMF tests. This is because DCL La2Zr2O7 TBC samples had higher residual stress during the thermal cycling process, and their fracture toughness was lower than that of 8YSZ. Bond strength test results showed that 8YSZ TBC samples had higher bond strength compared with La2Zr2O7. The erosion rate of La2Zr2O7 TBC samples was higher than that of 8YSZ samples, due to the lower critical erodent velocity and fracture toughness of La2Zr2O7. DCL porous 8YSZ + La2Zr2O7 had a lower erosion rate than other SCL and DCL La2Zr2O7 coatings, suggesting that porous 8YSZ serves as a stress-relief buffer layer.

  14. Approximations to camera sensor noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaodan; Hirakawa, Keigo

    2013-02-01

    Noise is present in all image sensor data. Poisson distribution is said to model the stochastic nature of the photon arrival process, while it is common to approximate readout/thermal noise by additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN). Other sources of signal-dependent noise such as Fano and quantization also contribute to the overall noise profile. Question remains, however, about how best to model the combined sensor noise. Though additive Gaussian noise with signal-dependent noise variance (SD-AWGN) and Poisson corruption are two widely used models to approximate the actual sensor noise distribution, the justification given to these types of models are based on limited evidence. The goal of this paper is to provide a more comprehensive characterization of random noise. We concluded by presenting concrete evidence that Poisson model is a better approximation to real camera model than SD-AWGN. We suggest further modification to Poisson that may improve the noise model.

  15. Fracture mechanics evaluation for the cast duplex stainless steel after thermal aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Shigeru [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    For the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan, cast duplex stainless steel which is excellent in terms of strength, corrosion resistance, and weldability has conventionally been used. The cast duplex stainless steel contains the ferrite phase in the austenite matrix and thermal aging after long term service is known to change its material characteristics. It is considered appropriate to apply the methodology of elastic plastic fracture mechanics for an evaluation of the integrity of the primary coolant piping after thermal aging. Therefore, we evaluated the integrity of the primary coolant piping for an initial PWR plant in Japan by means of elastic plastic fracture mechanics. The evaluation results show that the crack will not grow into an unstable fracture and the integrity of the piping will be secured, even when such through wall crack length is assumed to equal the fatigue crack growth length for a service period of up to 60 years. (author)

  16. Thermal and mechanical properties of TPU/PBT reinforced by carbon fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jintao; Liu, Huanyu; Lu, Xiang; Qu, Jinping, E-mail: jpqu@scut.edu.cn [National Engineering Research Center of Novel Equipment for Polymer Processing, The Key Laboratory of Polymer Processing Engineering of the Ministry of Education, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510640, Guangdong (China)

    2016-03-09

    In this study, thermal, mechanical properties and processability were performed on a series of carbon fiber (CF) filled thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)/poly (butylene terephthalate) (PBT) composites to identify the effect of CF weight fraction on the properties of TPU/PBT. Scanning Electronic Microscope (SEM) show that CFs are uniformly dispersed in TPU/PBT matrix and there are no agglomerations. Melt flow index (MFI) show that the melt viscosity increased with the CF loading. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed that the introduction of CF into organic materials tend to improve their thermal stability. The mechanical properties indicated that tensile strength and modulus, flexural strength and modulus, improved with an increase in CF loading, but the impact strength decreased by the loading of CF.

  17. Effect of thermal history on mechanical properties of polyetheretherketone below the glass transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebe, Peggy; Chung, Shirley Y.; Hong, Su-Don

    1987-01-01

    The effect of thermal history on the tensile properties of polyetheretherketone neat resin films was investigated at different test temperatures (125, 25, and -100) using four samples: fast-quenched amorphous (Q); quenched, then crystallized at 180 C (C180); slowly cooled (for about 16 h) from the melt (SC); and air-cooled (2-3 h) from the melt (AC). It was found that thermal history significantly affects the tensile properties of the material below the glass transition. Fast quenched amorphous films were most tough, could be drawn to greatest strain before rupture, and undergo densification during necking; at the test temperature of -100 C, these films had the best ultimate mechanical properties. At higher temperatures, the semicrystalline films AC and C180 had properties that compared favorably with the Q films. The SC films exhibited poor mechanical properties at all test temperatures.

  18. Mechanical, thermal and microstructural characteristics of cellulose fibre reinforced epoxy/organoclay nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, H.

    2012-10-01

    Epoxy nanocomposites reinforced with recycled cellulose fibres (RCFs) and organoclay platelets (30B) have been fabricated and investigated in terms of WAXS, TEM, mechanical properties and TGA. Results indicated that mechanical properties generally increased as a result of the addition of nanoclay into the epoxy matrix. The presence of RCF significantly enhanced flexural strength, fracture toughness, impact strength and impact toughness of the composites. However, the inclusion of 1 wt.% clay into RCF/epoxy composites considerably increased the impact strength and toughness. The presence of either nanoclay or RCF accelerated the thermal degradation of neat epoxy, but at high temperature, thermal stability was enhanced with increased char residue over neat resin. The failure micromechanisms and energy dissipative processes in these nanocomposites were discussed in terms of microstructural observations. © 2012 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation of polyvinyl alcohol graphene oxide phosphonate film and research of thermal stability and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihui; Song, Yunna; Ma, Zheng; Li, Ning; Niu, Shuai; Li, Yongshen

    2018-05-01

    In this article, flake graphite, nitric acid, peroxyacetic acid and phosphoric acid are used to prepare graphene oxide phosphonic and phosphinic acids (GOPAs), and GOPAs and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) are used to synthesize polyvinyl alcohol graphene oxide phosphonate and phosphinate (PVAGOPs) in the case of faint acidity and ultrasound irradiation, and PVAGOPs are used to fabricate PVAGOPs film, and the structure and morphology of GOPAs, PVAGOPs and PVAGOPs film are characterized, and the thermal stability and mechanical properties of PVAGOPs film are investigated. Based on these, it has been proved that GOPAs consist of graphene oxide phosphonic acid and graphene oxide phosphinic acid, and there are CP covalent bonds between them, and PVAGOPs are composed of GOPAs and PVA, and there are six-member lactone rings between GOPAs and PVA, and the thermal stability and mechanical properties of PVAGOPs film are improved effectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal creep effects on 20% cold worked AISI 316 mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.R.

    1980-09-01

    The effects of thermal creep on subsequent mechanical properties of 20% cold worked AISI 316 pressurized tubes were investigated. Specimens were subjected to temperatures of 811 to 977 0 K and stresses of 86 MPa to 276 MPa. This resulted in strains up to 1.3%. Subsequent mechanical property tests included load change stress rupture tests (original test pressure increased or decreased), uniaxial tensile tests, and temperature ramp burst tests. Load change stress rupture tests were consistent with predictions from isobaric tests, and thus, consistent with the linear life fraction rule. Tests with large stress increases and tests at 866 0 K displayed a tendency for earlier than predicted failure. Tensile and temperature ramp burst tests had only slight effects on material properties (property changes were attributed to thermal recovery). The test results showed that, under the conditions of investigation, dislocation structure recovery was the most significant effect of creep. 9 figures, 5 tables

  1. Flexible hybrid energy cell for simultaneously harvesting thermal, mechanical, and solar energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya; Zhang, Hulin; Zhu, Guang; Lee, Sangmin; Lin, Zong-Hong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2013-01-22

    We report the first flexible hybrid energy cell that is capable of simultaneously or individually harvesting thermal, mechanical, and solar energies to power some electronic devices. For having both the pyroelectric and piezoelectric properties, a polarized poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) film-based nanogenerator (NG) was used to harvest thermal and mechanical energies. Using aligned ZnO nanowire arrays grown on the flexible polyester (PET) substrate, a ZnO-poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) heterojunction solar cell was designed for harvesting solar energy. By integrating the NGs and the solar cells, a hybrid energy cell was fabricated to simultaneously harvest three different types of energies. With the use of a Li-ion battery as the energy storage, the harvested energy can drive four red light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

  2. JT-60 power tests from mechanical and thermal viewpoints of tokamak machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, H.; Yamamoto, M.; Ohkubo, M.

    1986-01-01

    JT-60 power tests were carried out, to demonstrate, in advance of actual plasma operation, satisfactory performance of the tokamak machine, power suppliers and control system in combination. The tests began with low power ones of individual coil systems, progressed to full power ones and concluded successfully. The present paper describes the principal results of JT-60 power tests from mechanical and thermal viewpoints of tokamak machine. All of the coil systems were raised up to full power operation in combination and system performance was verified including thermal and mechanical integrity of tokamak machine. Measured strain and displacement showed good agreements with those predicted in the design, which was an evidence that electromagnetic loads were supported adequately as expected in the design. Vibration of the vacuum vessel was found to be large up to 48 m/s/sup 2/ and caused excessive vibration of the lateral port gate-valves. A few limitations to machine operation were also made clear quantatively

  3. Evaluation of ethanol aged PVDF: diffusion, crystallinity and dynamic mechanical thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Agmar J.J.; Costa, Marysilvia F.

    2015-01-01

    This work discuss firstly the effect of the ethanol fuel absorption by PVDF at 60°C through mass variation tests. A Fickian character was observed for the ethanol absorption kinetics of the aged PVDF at 60°C. In the second step, the dynamic mechanical thermal properties (E’, E’, E” and tan δ) of the PVDF were evaluated through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The chemical structure of the materials was analyzed by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and significant changes in the degree of crystallinity were verified after the aging. However, DMTA results showed a reduction in the storage modulus (E') of the aged PVDF, which was associated to diffusion of ethanol and swelling of the PVDF, which generated a prevailing plasticizing effect and led to reduction of its structural stiffness. (author)

  4. Thermal and mechanical behavior of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, John M. (Editor); Moeller, Helen H. (Editor); Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses local stresses in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermal and mechanical loads, the computational simulation of high-temperature MMCs' cyclic behavior, an analysis of a ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) flexure specimen, and a plasticity analysis of fibrous composite laminates under thermomechanical loads. Also discussed are a comparison of methods for determining the fiber-matrix interface frictional stresses of CMCs, the monotonic and cyclic behavior of an SiC/calcium aluminosilicate CMC, the mechanical and thermal properties of an SiC particle-reinforced Al alloy MMC, the temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of a graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMC, the fiber/matrix interface bonding strength of MMCs, and fatigue crack growth in an Al2O3 short fiber-reinforced Al-2Mg matrix MMC.

  5. Design of Friction Stir Spot Welding Tools by Using a Novel Thermal-Mechanical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zheng-Ming; Qiu, Qi-Hong; Lin, Pai-Chen

    2016-08-09

    A simple thermal-mechanical model for friction stir spot welding (FSSW) was developed to obtain similar weld performance for different weld tools. Use of the thermal-mechanical model and a combined approach enabled the design of weld tools for various sizes but similar qualities. Three weld tools for weld radii of 4, 5, and 6 mm were made to join 6061-T6 aluminum sheets. Performance evaluations of the three weld tools compared fracture behavior, microstructure, micro-hardness distribution, and welding temperature of welds in lap-shear specimens. For welds made by the three weld tools under identical processing conditions, failure loads were approximately proportional to tool size. Failure modes, microstructures, and micro-hardness distributions were similar. Welding temperatures correlated with frictional heat generation rate densities. Because the three weld tools sufficiently met all design objectives, the proposed approach is considered a simple and feasible guideline for preliminary tool design.

  6. Effects of voids on thermal-mechanical reliability of lead-free solder joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benabou Lahouari

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Reliability of electronic packages has become a major issue, particularly in systems used in electrical or hybrid cars where severe operating conditions must be met. Many studies have shown that solder interconnects are critical elements since many failure mechanisms originate from their typical response under thermal cycles. In this study, effects of voids in solder interconnects on the electronic assembly lifetime are estimated based on finite element simulations.

  7. Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fibre-reinforced polypropylene composite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phiri, G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ?C). Figure 1 shows the processing steps followed to produce composite samples. Up to 15% fibre loading could be achieved and the sisal fibres were coated with water glass to improve fire resistance. In order to improve the adhesion between sisal... preparation process: (A) WG coated fibre, (B) High speed granulator, (C) Composite granules, (D) Single screw extruder, (E) Injection moulder and (F) Composite samples (dumbbells) Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fi bre...

  8. Thermal, electrical and mechanical properties during cristallization of the amorphous alloy Co33Zr67

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaus, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Topic of this work is to study the crystallization process of amorphous CO 33 Zr 67 alloy and to characterize its thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Studies were carried out by calorimetry, vibrating-Reed technique, electrical-resistance measurement, dilatometry, X-ray diffraction and electron-transmission-microscopy. Results of microstructure analysis, kinetic analysis, specific heat, dilatometry (isothermal and non-isothermal) and electrical resistance are discussed in detail here

  9. Synthesis and mechanism of formation of oxadeazaflavines by microwave thermal cyclization of ortho-halobenzylidene barbiturates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa-Villar, J. Daniel; Oliveira, Sandra C.G. de, E-mail: figueroa@ime.eb.br [Grupo de Quimica Medicinal, Departamento de Quimica, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    The thermal cyclization reaction of o-halobenzylidene barbiturates was developed as an efficient and simple method for the preparation of oxadeazaflavines. The use of solid state reaction conditions with microwave irradiation afforded the products in 5 min with 47 to 98% yield. Experimental synthetic results and thermogravimetric reaction analyses agree with the molecular modeling mechanism simulation, indicating that this reaction occurs through an intramolecular hetero-Diels-Alder cyclization followed by fast re-aromatization. (author)

  10. Thermal and mechanical analyses for the HCPB Submodules in-pile test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakker, K. [Fuels, Actinides and Isotopes, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

    1998-12-01

    A description is given of the Finite Element Method (FEM) and thermal and mechanical computations that have been performed for the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Submodules in-pile tests, which have been planned for irradiation in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten. In this test, four submodules will be placed at core position H4. The report presents the temperature and stress distribution for the highest powered submodule of these four submodules. 9 refs

  11. Effect of Thermally Reduced Graphene Oxide on Mechanical Properties of Woven Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Nitai Chandra Adak; Suman Chhetri; Naresh Chandra Murmu; Pranab Samanta; Tapas Kuila

    2018-01-01

    Thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO) was incorporated as a reinforcing filler in the epoxy resin to investigate the effect on the mechanical properties of carbon fiber (CF)/epoxy composites. At first, the epoxy matrix was modified by adding different wt % of TRGO from 0.05 to 0.4 wt % followed by the preparation of TRGO/CF/epoxy composites througha vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process. The prepared TRGO was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman Spe...

  12. Enhanced Thermal, Mechanical and Morphological Properties of CNT/HDPE Nanocomposite Using MMT as Secondary Filler

    OpenAIRE

    M. E. Ali Mohsin; Agus Arsad; Othman Y. Alothman

    2014-01-01

    This study explains the influence of secondary filler on the dispersion of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced high density polyethylene (HDPE) nanocomposites (CNT/HDPE). In order to understand the mixed-fillers system, Montmorillonite (MMT) was added to CNT/HDPE nanocomposites. It was followed by investigating their effect on the thermal, mechanical and morphological properties of the aforesaid nanocomposite. Incorporation of 3 wt% each of MMT into CNT/HDPE nanocomposite resulted to the increas...

  13. Analytical Study on Thermal and Mechanical Design of Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Su-Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kim, Eung-Soo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The analytical methodologies for the thermal design, mechanical design and cost estimation of printed circuit heat exchanger are presented in this study. In this study, three flow arrangements of parallel flow, countercurrent flow and crossflow are taken into account. For each flow arrangement, the analytical solution of temperature profile of heat exchanger is introduced. The size and cost of printed circuit heat exchangers for advanced small modular reactors, which employ various coolants such as sodium, molten salts, helium, and water, are also presented.

  14. Thermal, mechanical and morphological behavior of starch thermoplastic (TPS) and polycaprolactone (PCL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Adriana de; Marconcini, Jose M.; Mattoso, Luiz H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal, mechanical and morphological properties of thermoplastic starch (TPS) and polycaprolactone (PCL) blend obtained by extrusion was studied. The results showed that TPS/PCL blends are immiscible, however it is suggested some interaction in the interphase between TPS and PCL as observed by crystallinity decrease of the blend. The PCL addition in the TPS improves the properties and decreases the cost of the blend. (author)

  15. Classical to quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism crossover in thermal transitions between magnetic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Sergei; Bessarab, Pavel F; Uzdin, Valery M; Jónsson, Hannes

    2016-12-22

    Transitions between states of a magnetic system can occur by jumps over an energy barrier or by quantum mechanical tunneling through the energy barrier. The rate of such transitions is an important consideration when the stability of magnetic states is assessed for example for nanoscale candidates for data storage devices. The shift in transition mechanism from jumps to tunneling as the temperature is lowered is analyzed and a general expression derived for the crossover temperature. The jump rate is evaluated using a harmonic approximation to transition state theory. First, the minimum energy path for the transition is found with the geodesic nudged elastic band method. The activation energy for the jumps is obtained from the maximum along the path, a saddle point on the energy surface, and the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix at that point as well as at the initial state minimum used to estimate the entropic pre-exponential factor. The crossover temperature for quantum mechanical tunneling is evaluated from the second derivatives of the energy with respect to orientation of the spin vector at the saddle point. The resulting expression is applied to test problems where analytical results have previously been derived, namely uniaxial and biaxial spin systems with two-fold anisotropy. The effect of adding four-fold anisotropy on the crossover temperature is demonstrated. Calculations of the jump rate and crossover temperature for tunneling are also made for a molecular magnet containing an Mn 4 group. The results are in excellent agreement with previously reported experimental measurements on this system.

  16. Influence of mechanical and thermal treatments on microstructure and mechanical properties of titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidhom, H.

    1983-12-01

    Thermal and mechanical treatments for microstructure optimization in titanium stabilized austenitic stainless steels used in nuclear industry are examined. The steels studied Z10CNDT15-15B and Z6CNDT17-13 are of the type 15-15 Ti and 316 Ti. These treatments allow the elimination of casting heterogeneity produced by dendritic solidification, improve mechanical properties particularly creep and the best compromise between grain size solid solution of metal additions is obtained. Secondary precipitation of (TiMo)C on dislocations is improved by a previous strain hardening. The precipitation reinforce the good effect of strain hardening by stabilization of the microstructure producing a better resistance to recrystallization [fr

  17. Incorporation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes to acrylic based bone cements: effects on mechanical and thermal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormsby, Ross; McNally, Tony; Mitchell, Christina; Dunne, Nicholas

    2010-02-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites with a weight loading of 0.1% were prepared using 3 different methods of MWCNT incorporation. The mechanical and thermal properties of the resultant nanocomposite cements were characterised in accordance with the international standard for acrylic resin cements. The mechanical properties of the resultant nanocomposite cements were influenced by the type of MWCNT and method of incorporation used. The exothermic polymerisation reaction for the PMMA bone cement was significantly reduced when thermally conductive functionalised MWCNTs were added. This reduction in exotherm translated in a decrease in thermal necrosis index value of the respective nanocomposite cements, which potentially could reduce the hyperthermia experienced in vivo. The morphology and degree of dispersion of the MWCNTs in the PMMA matrix at different scales were analysed using scanning electron microscopy. Improvements in mechanical properties were attributed to the MWCNTs arresting/retarding crack propagation through the cement by providing a bridging effect into the wake of the crack, normal to the direction of crack growth. MWCNT agglomerations were evident within the cement microstructure, the degree of these agglomerations was dependent on the method used to incorporate the MWCNTs into the cement. Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Microstructural, mechanical, and thermal characteristics of recycled cellulose fiber-halloysite-epoxy hybrid nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Alamri, H.

    2012-02-26

    Epoxy hybrid-nanocomposites reinforced with recycled cellulose fibers (RCF) and halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) have been fabricated and investigated. The dispersion of HNTs was studied by synchrotron radiation diffraction (SRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The influences of RCF/HNTs dispersion on the mechanical properties and thermal properties of these composites have been characterized in terms of flexural strength, flexural modulus, fracture toughness, impact toughness, impact strength, and thermogravimetric analysis. The fracture surface morphology and toughness mechanisms were investigated by SEM. Results indicated that mechanical properties increased because of the addition of HNTs into the epoxy matrix. Flexural strength, flexural modulus, fracture toughness, and impact toughness increased by 20.8, 72.8, 56.5, and 25.0%, respectively, at 1 wt% HNTs load. The presence of RCF dramatically enhanced flexural strength, fracture toughness, impact strength, and impact toughness of the composites by 160%, 350%, 444%, and 263%, respectively. However, adding HNTs to RCF/epoxy showed only slight enhancements in flexural strength and fracture toughness. The inclusion of 5 wt% HNTs into RCF/epoxy ecocomposites increased the impact toughness by 27.6%. The presence of either HNTs or RCF accelerated the thermal degradation of neat epoxy. However, at high temperature, samples reinforced with RCF and HNTs displayed better thermal stability with increased char residue than neat resin. © 2012 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  19. On the interfacial degradation mechanisms of thermal barrier coating systems: Effects of bond coat composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, R.T., E-mail: WU.Rudder@nims.go.jp [International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); Wang, X.; Atkinson, A. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems based on an electron beam physical vapour deposited, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coat and a substrate material of CMSX-4 superalloy were identically prepared to systematically study the behaviour of different bond coats. The three bond coat systems investigated included two {beta}-structured Pt-Al types and a {gamma}-{gamma}' type produced by Pt diffusion without aluminizing. Progressive evolution of stress in the thermally grown aluminium oxide (TGO) upon thermal cycling, and its relief by plastic deformation and fracture, were studied using luminescence spectroscopy. The TBCs with the LT Pt-Al bond coat failed by a rumpling mechanism that generated isolated cracks at the interface between the TGO and the YSZ. This reduced adhesion at this interface and the TBC delaminated when it could no longer resist the release of the stored elastic energy of the YSZ, which stiffened with time due to sintering. In contrast, the TBCs with Pt diffusion bond coats did not rumple, and the adhesion of interfaces in the coating did not obviously degrade. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms are strongly associated with differences in the high-temperature mechanical properties of the bond coats.

  20. Significant Enhancement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Thermoplastic Polyester Elastomer by Polymer Blending and Nanoinclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manwar Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic elastomer composites and nanocomposites were fabricated via melt processing technique by blending thermoplastic elastomer (TPEE with poly(butylene terephthalate (PBT thermoplastic and also by adding small amount of organo modified nanoclay and/or polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. We study the effect of polymer blending on the mechanical and thermal properties of TPEE blends with and without nanoparticle additions. Significant improvement was observed by blending only TPEE and virgin PBT polymers. With a small amount (0.5 wt.% of nanoclay or PTFE particles added to the TPEE composite, there was further improvement in both the mechanical and thermal properties. To study mechanical properties, flexural strength (FS, flexural modulus (FM, tensile strength (TS, and tensile elongation (TE were all investigated. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC were used to analyze the thermal properties, including the heat distortion temperature (HDT, of the composites. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to observe the polymer fracture surface morphology. The dispersion of the clay and PTFE nanoparticles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis. This material is proposed for use as a baffle plate in the automotive industry, where both high HDT and high modulus are essential.

  1. Influence Of Gamma Irradiation On Mechanical And Thermal Properties Of Waste Polyethylene / Nitrile Butadiene Rubber Blend

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, R.O.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma irradiation radical-radical interaction crosslinking of elastomers and thermoplastic is a special type of crosslinking technique that has gained importance over conventional chemical crosslinking method as process is fast, pollution free and simple. In this study, a blend polymer, based on waste polyethylene and nitrile butadiene rubber, has been irradiated with gamma rays then mechanically and thermally investigated at varying NBR content. FTIR and SEM techniques were used in addition to the swelling behaviour by toluene solvent to emphasize the blend formation. The mechanical properties like tensile strength, elongation at break and modulus at different elongations were studied and compared with those of non-irradiated ones. A relatively low radiation dose was found effective in improving the level of mechanical properties. Differential scanning calorimeter and thermogravimetric analysis were used to study the thermal characteristics of the irradiated polymer. Enhancement in thermal stability has been observed for higher NBR containing blends and via radiation-induced crosslinking up to ≅ 50 kGy

  2. Effects of alkali treatment on the mechanical and thermal properties of Sansevieria trifasciata fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardiyati, Steven, Rizkiansyah, Raden Reza; Senoaji, A.; Suratman, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, Sansevieria trifasciata fibers were treated by NaOH with concentration 1%,3%, and 5wt% at 100°C for 2 hours. Chesson-Datta methods was used to determine the lignocellulose content of raw sansevieria fibers and to investigate effect of alkali treatment on lignin content of the fiber. Mechanical properties and thermal properties of treated and untreated fibers were measured by means of tensile testing machine and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).The cellulose and lignin contents of raw sansevieria fiber obtained from Chesson-Datta method were 56% and 6% respectively. Mechanical testing of fibers showed the increase of tensile strength from 647 MPa for raw fibers to 902 MPa for 5wt% NaOH treated fibers. TGA result showed the alkali treatment increase the thermal resistance of fibers from 288°C for raw fibers to 307°C for 5% NaOH treated fiber. It was found that alkali treatment affect the mechanical properties and thermal properties of sansevieria fibers.

  3. Thermal and mechanical properties of polypropylene/titanium dioxide nanocomposite fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esthappan, Saisy Kudilil; Kuttappan, Suma Kumbamala; Joseph, Rani

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Wet synthesis method was used for the synthesis of TiO 2 nano particles. ► Mechanical properties of polypropylene fibers were increased by the addition of TiO 2 nanoparticles. ► Thermal stability of polypropylene fiber was improved significantly by the addition of TiO 2 nano particles. ► TiO 2 nanoparticles dispersed well in polypropylene fibers. -- Abstract: Titanium dioxide nanoparticles were prepared by wet synthesis method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies. The nanotitanium dioxide then used to prepare polypropylene/titanium dioxide composites by melt mixing method. It was then made into fibers by melt spinning and subsequent drawing. Mechanical properties of the fibers were studied using Favimat tensile testing machine with a load cell of 1200 cN capacity. Thermal behavior of the fibers was studied using differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. Scanning electron microscope studies were used to investigate the titanium dioxide surface morphology and crosssection of the fiber. Mechanical properties of the polypropylene fiber was improved by the addition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Incorporation of nanoparticles improves the thermal stability of polypropylene. Differential scanning calorimetric studies revealed an improvement in crystallinity was observed by the addition of titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

  4. Optical and mechanical tolerances in hybrid concentrated thermal-PV solar trough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Liliana Ruiz; Cocilovo, Byron; Miles, Alexander; Pan, Wei; Blanche, Pierre-Alexandre; Norwood, Robert A

    2018-05-14

    Hybrid thermal-PV solar trough collectors combine concentrated photovoltaics and concentrated solar power technology to harvest and store solar energy. In this work, the optical and mechanical requirements for optimal efficiency are analyzed using non-sequential ray tracing techniques. The results are used to generate opto-mechanical tolerances that can be compared to those of traditional solar collectors. We also explore ideas on how to relieve tracking tolerances for single-axis solar collectors. The objective is to establish a basis for tolerances required for the fabrication and manufacturing of hybrid solar trough collectors.

  5. Thermal-mechanical analysis for a viscoelastoplastic model by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, L.E.; Vaz, R.O.E.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present a formulation and a computer program which permits the study of problems involving the influence of the temperature on the mechanical behavior of a viscoelastoplastic material. The thermo-mechanical analysis is carried out in two steps. The first step performs the transient thermal analysis. The second step uses the time-history of the temperature distribution that results on the first step, for the transient stress analysis. The program treat plane and axi-symmetrical problems. As an application of the formulation the quenching of a cylinder of metal is examined. (author)

  6. Efficient Simulation and Abuse Modeling of Mechanical-Electrochemical-Thermal Phenomena in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Graf, Peter A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pesaran, Ahmad A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Chao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lamb, Joshua [Sandia National Laboratories; Abraham, Daniel [Argonne National Laboratory; Dees, Dennis [Argonne National Laboratory; Yao, Pierre [Argonne National Laboratory

    2017-08-08

    NREL's Energy Storage team is exploring the effect of mechanical crush of lithium ion cells on their thermal and electrical safety. PHEV cells, fresh as well as ones aged over 8 months under different temperatures, voltage windows, and charging rates, were subjected to destructive physical analysis. Constitutive relationship and failure criteria were developed for the electrodes, separator as well as packaging material. The mechanical models capture well, the various modes of failure across different cell components. Cell level validation is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories.

  7. Atomistic modeling of BN nanofillers for mechanical and thermal properties: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Parashar, Avinash

    2016-01-07

    Due to their exceptional mechanical properties, thermal conductivity and a wide band gap (5-6 eV), boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets have promising applications in the field of engineering and biomedical science. Accurate modeling of failure or fracture in a nanomaterial inherently involves coupling of atomic domains of cracks and voids as well as a deformation mechanism originating from grain boundaries. This review highlights the recent progress made in the atomistic modeling of boron nitride nanofillers. Continuous improvements in computational power have made it possible to study the structural properties of these nanofillers at the atomistic scale.

  8. KEY COMPARISON: CCEM.RF-K9: International comparison of thermal noise standards between 12.4 GHz and 18 GHz (GT-RF/99-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allal, Djamel; Achkar, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    An international comparison of thermal noise-power measurements has been carried out among five national metrology institutes between 12.4 GHz and 18 GHz. Four transfer standards were measured. The following national institutes participated: BNM-LCIE (France), NPL (United Kingdom), PTB (Germany), NIST (United States of America) and VNIIFTRI (Russia). The Bureau National de Métrologie-Laboratoire Central des Industries Electriques (France) acted as the pilot laboratory for the comparison. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCEM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  9. Mechanical and thermal properties of date palm leaf fiber reinforced recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghani, Alireza; Madadi Ardekani, Sara; Al-Maadeed, Mariam A.; Hassan, Azman; Wahit, Mat Uzir

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel natural fiber reinforced recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) composite was prepared. • Mechanical performance and thermal behavior of the composites were investigated. • Composites with improved toughness and strength were achieved. - Abstract: Development of a recycled poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PETr) reinforced with surface treated date palm leaf fiber (DPLF) composites with enhanced mechanical properties have been studied. Surface modified date palm leaf fiber reinforced PETr composites were prepared using twin-screw extruder followed by injection molding and the influence of the DPLF content on the mechanical and thermal behavior of the PETr matrix was evaluated. Upon the addition of fibers, remarkable enhancements in the mechanical properties of the composites were observed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images taken from DPLF fibers showed significant enhancements in the fiber’s surface topography after the surface treatment process. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) indicated that the addition of DPLF to PETr matrix increased the composites toughness. The crystallization behavior of the samples, analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) indicated an increase in the onset crystallization temperature and showed a higher degree of crystallinity of the composites as compared to PETr, demonstrating that DPLF particles could act as nucleating agents. The results point to the composite’s potential in wider indoor applications

  10. Thermal stress analysis and thermo-mechanical fatigue for gas turbine blade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, J. S.; Kim, B. S.; Kang, M. S.; Ha, J. S.; Lee, Y. S.

    2002-01-01

    The numerical analysis for gas turbine blades were carried out under several conditions by compounding temperature field, velocity field, thermal conduction of blade, and cooling heat transfer. The three types of 1,100 deg. C class 1st-stage gas turbine blades were analyzed. The analysis results are applied to the study on evaluating the remaining life for thermo-mechanical fatigue life. The thermo-mechanical fatigue experiments under out-of-phase and in-phase have been performed. The physical-based life prediction models which considered the contribution of different damage mechanisms have been applied. These models were applied to the temperature and strain rate dependences of isothermal cycling fatigue lives, and the strain-temperature history effect on the thermo-mechanical fatigue lives

  11. Enhanced mechanical behavior of a nanocrystallised stainless steel and its thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, T.; Retraint, D.; Lu, K.; Lu, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of a nanocrystallised stainless steel obtained using surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) and the underlying grain refinement mechanism using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was shown that grain refinement down to the nanometer range has the potential to significantly improve the mechanical properties of a 316L stainless steel which becomes comparable in strength to titanium alloys. Hence, promising structural applications could be considered for such a material. At the same time, the thermal stability of this nanocrystallised material was studied in the temperature range from 100 to 800 deg. C. The results show that the nanometer scaled microstructure is retained up to 600 deg. C and that a controlled annealing treatment could even lead to enhancement of both strength and ductility of this material. All these results are explained in terms of microstructural investigations, X-ray diffraction measurements, tensile and bending tests as well as microhardness measurements

  12. Enhanced mechanical behavior of a nanocrystallised stainless steel and its thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roland, T. [ICD, LASMIS, University of Technology of Troyes, 10010 Troyes (France); Retraint, D. [ICD, LASMIS, University of Technology of Troyes, 10010 Troyes (France)]. E-mail: delphine.retraint@utt.fr; Lu, K. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110015 (China); Lu, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2007-02-15

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of a nanocrystallised stainless steel obtained using surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) and the underlying grain refinement mechanism using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was shown that grain refinement down to the nanometer range has the potential to significantly improve the mechanical properties of a 316L stainless steel which becomes comparable in strength to titanium alloys. Hence, promising structural applications could be considered for such a material. At the same time, the thermal stability of this nanocrystallised material was studied in the temperature range from 100 to 800 deg. C. The results show that the nanometer scaled microstructure is retained up to 600 deg. C and that a controlled annealing treatment could even lead to enhancement of both strength and ductility of this material. All these results are explained in terms of microstructural investigations, X-ray diffraction measurements, tensile and bending tests as well as microhardness measurements.

  13. A case study of interior low-frequency noise from box-shaped bridge girders induced by running trains: Its mechanism, prediction and countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xun; Li, Xiaozhen; Hao, Hong; Wang, Dangxiong; Li, Yadong

    2016-04-01

    A side effect of high-speed railway and urban rail transit systems is the associated vibration and noise. Since the use of concrete viaducts is predominant in railway construction due to scarce land resources, low-frequency (20-200 Hz) structure-radiated noise from concrete bridges is a principal concern. Although it is the most commonly used bridge type, the mechanism of noise emission from box-shaped bridge girders when subjected to impact forces from moving trains, which sounds like beating a drum, has not been well studied. In this study, a field measurement was first made on a simply-supported box-shaped bridge to record the acceleration of the slabs and the associated sound pressures induced by running trains. These data indicated that a significant beat-wave noise occurred in the box-shaped cavity when the train speed was around 340 km/h, which arose from the interference between two sound waves of 75.0 Hz and 78.8 Hz. The noise leakage from the bridge expansion joint was serious and resulted in obvious noise pollution near the bridge once the beat-wave noise was generated in the cavity. The dominant frequency of the interior noise at 75.0 Hz was confirmed from the spectrum of the data and the modal analysis results, and originated from the peak vibration of the top slab due to resonance and the first-order vertical acoustic mode, which led to cavity resonance, amplifying the corresponding noise. The three-dimensional acoustic modes and local vibration modes of the slab were calculated by using the finite element method. A simplified vehicle-track-bridge coupling vibration model was then developed to calculate the wheel-rail interaction force in a frequency range of 20-200 Hz. Numerical simulations using the boundary element method confirmed the cavity resonance effect and the numerical results agreed well with the data. Based on the calibrated numerical model, three noise reduction measures, i.e., adding a horizontal baffle in the interior cavity, narrowing

  14. Mechanical and thermal properties of bulk ZrB{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamori, Fumihiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Ohishi, Yuji, E-mail: ohishi@ms.see.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Muta, Hiroaki; Kurosaki, Ken [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Fukumoto, Ken-ichi [Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan); Yamanaka, Shinsuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Research Institute of Nuclear Engineering, University of Fukui (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    ZrB{sub 2} appears to have formed in the fuel debris at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster site, through the reaction between Zircaloy cladding materials and the control rod material B{sub 4}C. Since ZrB{sub 2} has a high melting point of 3518 K, the ceramic has been widely studied as a heat-resistant material. Although various studies on the thermochemical and thermophysical properties have been performed for ZrB{sub 2}, significant differences exist in the data, possibly due to impurities or the porosity within the studied samples. In the present study, we have prepared a ZrB{sub 2} bulk sample with 93.1% theoretical density by sintering ZrB{sub 2} powder. On this sample, we have comprehensively examined the thermal and mechanical properties of ZrB{sub 2} by the measurement of specific heat, ultrasonic sound velocities, thermal diffusivity, and thermal expansion. Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were also measured and found to be 13–23 GPa and 1.8–2.8 MPa m{sup 0.5}, respectively. The relationships between these properties were carefully examined in the present study. - Highlights: • A ZrB{sub 2} bulk sample with 93.1% theoretical density was prepared by sintering ZrB{sub 2} powder. • We have evaluated mechanical and thermal properties such as Vickers hardness, fracture toughness and thermal conductivity. • The relationships between these properties were carefully examined.

  15. Stress and reliability analyses of multilayered composite cylinder under thermal and mechanical loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua

    The coupling resulting from the mutual influence of material thermal and mechanical parameters is examined in the thermal stress analysis of a multilayered isotropic composite cylinder subjected to sudden axisymmetric external and internal temperature. The method of complex frequency response functions together with the Fourier transform technique is utilized. Because the coupling parameters for some composite materials, such as carbon-carbon, are very small, the effect of coupling is neglected in the orthotropic thermal stress analysis. The stress distributions in multilayered orthotropic cylinders subjected to sudden axisymmetric temperature loading combined with dynamic pressure as well as asymmetric temperature loading are also obtained. The method of Fourier series together with the Laplace transform is utilized in solving the heat conduction equation and thermal stress analysis. For brittle materials, like carbon-carbon composites, the strength variability is represented by two or three parameter Weibull distributions. The 'weakest link' principle which takes into account both the carbon-carbon composite cylinders. The complex frequency response analysis is performed on a multilayered orthotropic cylinder under asymmetrical thermal load. Both deterministic and random thermal stress and reliability analyses can be based on the results of this frequency response analysis. The stress and displacement distributions and reliability of rocket motors under static or dynamic line loads are analyzed by an elasticity approach. Rocket motors are modeled as long hollow multilayered cylinders with an air core, a thick isotropic propellant inner layer and a thin orthotropic kevlar-epoxy case. The case is treated as a single orthotropic layer or a ten layered orthotropic structure. Five material properties and the load are treated as random variable with normal distributions when the reliability of the rocket motor is analyzed by the first-order, second-moment method (FOSM).

  16. Thermal, dielectric characteristics and conduction mechanism of azodyes derived from quinoline and their copper complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ghamaz, N A; Diab, M A; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z; Nozha, S G

    2015-05-15

    A novel series of (5-(4'-derivatives phenyl azo)-8-hydroxy-7-quinolinecarboxaldehyde) (AQLn) (n=1, p-OCH3; n=2, R=H; and n=3; p-NO2) and their complexes [Cu(AQLn)2]·5H2O are synthesized and investigated. The optimized bond lengths, bond angles and the calculated quantum chemical parameters for AQLn are investigated. HOMO-LUMO energy gap, absolute electronegativities, chemical potentials, and absolute hardness are also calculated. The thermal properties, dielectric properties, alternating current conductivity (σac) and conduction mechanism are investigated in the frequency range 0.1-100kHz and temperature range 293-568K for AQL1-3 and 318-693K for [Cu(AQL1-3)2]·5H2O complexes. The thermal properties are of ligands (AQLn) and their Cu(II) complexes investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The temperature and frequency dependence of the real and the imaginary part of the dielectric constant are studied. The values of the thermal activation energy of conduction mechanism for AQLn and their complexes [Cu(AQLn)2]·5H2O under investigation are calculated at different test frequencies. The values of thermal activation energies ΔE1 and ΔE2 for AQLn and [Cu(AQLn)2]·5H2O decrease with increasing the values of frequency. The ac conductivity is found to be depending on the chemical structure of the compounds. Different conduction mechanisms have been proposed to explain the obtained experimental data. The small polaron tunneling (SPT) is the dominant conduction mechanism for AQL1 and its complex [Cu(AQL1)2]·5H2O. The quantum mechanical tunneling (QMT) is the dominant conduction mechanism for AQL2 and its complex [Cu(AQL2)2]·5H2O. The correlated barrier hopping (CBH) is the dominant conduction mechanism for AQL3 and its complex [Cu(AQL3)2]·5H2O, and the values of the maximum barrier height (Wm) are calculated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanical Behaviour of Stainless Steels under Dynamic Loading: An Investigation with Thermal Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa De Finis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Stainless steels are the most exploited materials due to their high mechanical strength and versatility in producing different alloys. Although there is great interest in these materials, mechanical characterisation, in particular fatigue characterisation, requires the application of several standardised procedures involving expensive and time-consuming experimental campaigns. As a matter of fact, the use of Standard Test Methods does not rely on a physical approach, since they are based on a statistical evaluation of the fatigue limit with a fixed probabilistic confidence. In this regard, Infra-Red thermography, the well-known, non-destructive technique, allows for the development of an approach based on evaluation of dissipative sources. In this work, an approach based on a simple analysis of a single thermographic sequence has been presented, which is capable of providing two indices of the damage processes occurring in material: the phase shift of thermoelastic signal φ and the amplitude of thermal signal at twice the loading frequency, S2. These thermal indices can provide synergetic information about the mechanical (fatigue and fracture behaviour of austenitic AISI 316L and martensitic X4 Cr Ni Mo 16-5-1; since they are related to different thermal effects that produce damage phenomena. In particular, the use of φ and S2 allows for estimation of the fatigue limit of stainless steels at loading ratio R = 0.5 in agreement with the applied Standard methods. Within Fracture Mechanics tests, both indices demonstrate the capacity to localize the plastic zone and determine the position of the crack tip. Finally, it will be shown that the value of the thermoelastic phase signal can be correlated with the mechanical behaviour of the specific material (austenitic or martensitic.

  18. A low-noise measurement system for scanning thermal microscopy resistive nanoprobes based on a transformer ratio-arm bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkowski, Michał; Wojtuś, Arkadiusz; Wielgoszewski, Grzegorz; Rudek, Maciej; Piasecki, Tomasz; Jóźwiak, Grzegorz; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2018-04-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a widely used technology for the investigation and characterization of nanomaterials. Its functionality can be easily expanded by applying dedicated extension modules, which can measure the electrical conductivity or temperature of a sample. In this paper, we introduce a transformer ratio-arm bridge setup dedicated to AFM-based thermal imaging. One of the key features of the thermal module is the use of a low-power driving signal that prevents undesirable tip heating during resistance measurement, while the other is the sensor location in a ratio-arm transformer bridge working in the audio frequency range and ensuring galvanic isolation of the tip, enabling contact-mode scanning of electronic circuits. The proposed expansion module is compact and it can be integrated onto the AFM head close to the cantilever. The calibration process and the resolution of 11 mK of the proposed setup are shown.

  19. Thermal Mechanical Processing Effects on Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of the Sintered Ti-22Al-25Nb Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanxin; Lu, Zhen; Zhang, Kaifeng; Zhang, Dalin

    2016-03-11

    This work illustrates the effect of thermal mechanical processing parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the Ti-22Al-25Nb alloy prepared by reactive sintering with element powders, consisting of O, B2 and Ti₃Al phases. Tensile and plane strain fracture toughness tests were carried out at room temperature to understand the mechanical behavior of the alloys and its correlation with the microstructural features characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the increased tensile strength (from 340 to 500 MPa) and elongation (from 3.6% to 4.2%) is due to the presence of lamellar O/B2 colony and needle-like O phase in B2 matrix in the as-processed Ti-22Al-25Nb alloys, as compared to the coarse lath O adjacent to B2 in the sintered alloys. Changes in morphologies of O phase improve the fracture toughness ( K IC ) of the sintered alloys from 7 to 15 MPa·m -1/2 . Additionally, the fracture mechanism shifts from cleavage fracture in the as-sintered alloys to quasi-cleavage fracture in the as-processed alloys.

  20. Numerical analysis of thermal impact on hydro-mechanical properties of clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuerui Wang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As is known, high-level radioactive waste (HLW is commonly heat-emitting. Heat output from HLW will dissipate through the surrounding rocks and induce complex thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC processes. In highly consolidated clayey rocks, thermal effects are particularly significant because of their very low permeability and water-saturated state. Thermal impact on the integrity of the geological barriers is of most importance with regard to the long-term safety of repositories. This study focuses on numerical analysis of thermal effects on hydro-mechanical properties of clayey rock using a coupled thermo-mechanical multiphase flow (TH2M model which is implemented in the finite element programme OpenGeoSys (OGS. The material properties of the numerical model are characterised by a transversal isotropic elastic model based on Hooke's law, a non-isothermal multiphase flow model based on van Genuchten function and Darcy's law, and a transversal isotropic heat transport model based on Fourier's law. In the numerical approaches, special attention has been paid to the thermal expansion of three different phases: gas, fluid and solid, which could induce changes in pore pressure and porosity. Furthermore, the strong swelling and shrinkage behaviours of clayey material are also considered in the present model. The model has been applied to simulate a laboratory heating experiment on claystone. The numerical model gives a satisfactory representation of the observed material behaviour in the laboratory experiment. The comparison of the calculated results with the laboratory findings verifies that the simulation with the present numerical model could provide a deeper understanding of the observed effects.

  1. Thermal Stability, Combustion Behavior, and Mechanical Property in a Flame-Retardant Polypropylene System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively improve the strength, toughness, flame retardancy, smoke suppression, and thermal stability of polypropylene (PP, layered double hydroxide (LDH Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH was synthesized by a coprecipitation method coupled with the microwave-hydrothermal treatment. The X-ray diffraction (XRD, morphology, mechanical, thermal, and fire properties for PP composites containing 1 wt %–20 wt % Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH were investigated. The cone calorimeter tests confirm that the peak heat release rate (pk–HRR of PP–20%LDH was decreased to 500 kW/m2 from the 1057 kW/m2 of PP. The pk–HRR, average mass loss rate (AMLR and effective heat of combustion (EHC analysis indicates that the condensed phase fire retardant mechanism of Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH in the composites. The production rate and mean release yield of CO for composites gradually decrease as Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH increases in the PP matrix. Thermal analysis indicates that the decomposition temperature for PP–5%LDH and PP–10%LDH is 34 °C higher than that of the pure PP. The mechanical tests reveal that the tensile strength of PP–1%LDH is 7.9 MPa higher than that of the pure PP. Furthermore, the elongation at break of PP–10%LDH is 361% higher than PP. In this work, the synthetic LDH Ni0.2Mg2.8Al–LDH can be used as a flame retardant, smoke suppressant, thermal stabilizer, reinforcing, and toughening agent of PP products.

  2. Mechanism for optimization of signal-to-noise ratio of dopamine release based on short-term bidirectional plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cunha, Claudio; McKimm, Eric; Da Cunha, Rafael M; Boschen, Suelen L; Redgrave, Peter; Blaha, Charles D

    2017-07-15

    Repeated electrical stimulation of dopamine (dopamine) fibers can cause variable effects on further dopamine release; sometimes there are short-term decreases while in other cases short-term increases have been reported. Previous studies have failed to discover what factors determine in which way dopamine neurons will respond to repeated stimulation. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate what determines the direction and magnitude of this particular form of short-term plasticity. Fixed potential amperometry was used to measure dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens in response to two trains of electrical pulses administered to the ventral tegmental area of anesthetized mice. When the pulse trains were of equal magnitude we found that low magnitude stimulation was associated with short-term suppression and high magnitude stimulation with short-term facilitation of dopamine release. Secondly, we found that the magnitude of the second pulse train was critical for determining the sign of the plasticity (suppression or facilitation), while the magnitude of the first pulse train determined the extent to which the response to the second train was suppressed or facilitated. This form of bidirectional plasticity might provide a mechanism to enhance signal-to-noise ratio of dopamine neurotransmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental Study on Conversion of Stored Thermal Energy to Mechanical Work in FCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii-e, Y.; Kondo, S.; Mivazaki, K.

    1976-01-01

    In the present study the process how the thermal energy stored in the coolant should be converted into the mechanical work is emphasized as well as the generation of pressure waves, eliminating the complicated problems involved in FCI, such as fragmentation, heat transfer from molten fuel to coolant, etc. A simulation experiment has been performed in a small scale vertical channel using stagnant potassium. Large superheat inherent in liquid metals was utilized as the method to accumulate the thermal energy. The following experimental parameters were chosen to examine their effects on the energy conversion ratio: the heat flux, the cover gas pressure, the liquid column length, the temperature of the upper unheated region and the incipient boiling superheat (corresponding to the stored thermal energy). The results are summarized that the conversion ratio from thermal to kinetic energies has increasing trends with increases of the incipient boiling superheat, the cover gas pressure and the temperature of upper unheated region, ranging over 0.02-0.75% in the present experiment. The important conclusions of the present experiment are summarized as follows. The thermal to kinetic energy conversion ratio n k ranges over 0.02-0.75 % for ΔT s = 10-150 deg.C, estimating from the maximum velocity measured. The thermal to mechanical work conversion ratio n w ranges over 0.14-5.6%. The effect of the heat flux on the both conversion ratios is small within the range covered by the present experiment (g≤133 W/cm 2 ). The effect of the liquid column length is not presented. The thermal to kinetic energy conversion ratio increases with the incipient boiling superheat which corresponds to the stored thermal energy in the present experiment. The both conversion ratio decrease with a decrease of the cover gas pressure. This is attributable to the thermal contact in the upper unheated region. The both conversion ratios increase with an increase in the temperature of the upper

  4. Failure Mechanisms of SAC/Fe-Ni Solder Joints During Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Yin; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Li, Cai-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Thermal cycling tests have been conducted on Sn-Ag-Cu/Fe- xNi ( x = 73 wt.% or 45 wt.%) and Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu solder joints according to the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council industrial standard to study their interfacial reliability under thermal stress. The interfacial intermetallic compounds formed for solder joints on Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni were 4.5 μm, 1.7 μm, and 1.4 μm thick, respectively, after 3000 cycles, demonstrating excellent diffusion barrier effect of Fe-Ni under bump metallization (UBM). Also, two deformation modes, viz. solder extrusion and fatigue crack formation, were observed by scanning electron microscopy and three-dimensional x-ray microscopy. Solder extrusion dominated for solder joints on Cu, while fatigue cracks dominated for solder joints on Fe-45Ni and both modes were detected for those on Fe-73Ni. Solder joints on Fe-Ni presented inferior reliability during thermal cycling compared with those on Cu, with characteristic lifetime of 3441 h, 3190 h, and 1247 h for Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni UBM, respectively. This degradation of the interfacial reliability for solder joints on Fe-Ni is attributed to the mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at interconnection level. The CTE mismatch at microstructure level was also analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction for clearer identification of recrystallization-related deformation mechanisms.

  5. Is phenotypic plasticity a key mechanism for responding to thermal stress in ants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oms, Cristela Sánchez; Cerdá, Xim; Boulay, Raphaël

    2017-06-01

    Unlike natural selection, phenotypic plasticity allows organisms to respond quickly to changing environmental conditions. However, plasticity may not always be adaptive. In insects, body size and other morphological measurements have been shown to decrease as temperature increases. This relationship may lead to a physiological conflict in ants, where larger body size and longer legs often confer better thermal resistance. Here, we tested the effect of developmental temperature (20, 24, 28 or 32 °C) on adult thermal resistance in the thermophilic ant species Aphaenogaster senilis. We found that no larval development occurred at 20 °C. However, at higher temperatures, developmental speed increased as expected and smaller adults were produced. In thermal resistance tests, we found that ants reared at 28 and 32 °C had half-lethal temperatures that were 2 °C higher than those of ants reared at 24 °C. Thus, although ants reared at higher temperatures were smaller in size, they were nonetheless more thermoresistant. These results show that A. senilis can exploit phenotypic plasticity to quickly adjust its thermal resistance to local conditions and that this process is independent of morphological adaptations. This mechanism may be particularly relevant given current rapid climate warming.

  6. Effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical, thermal and rheological behavior of HDPE filled with seaweed residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catano, L.; Albano, C.; Karam, A.; Dominguez, N.; Sanchez, Y.; Gonzalez, J.

    2005-01-01

    The present work shows the results obtained during the investigation of the influence of gamma irradiation on mechanical, thermal and rheological properties of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) filled with seaweed residues (SR). The SR used was located on Venezuelan coastlines and they are composed mainly by CaCO 3 in aragonite phase. The HDPE was extruded along with the filler at different compositions (20, 30 and 40 wt.%). The composites were exposed to a 60 Co source irradiated at 25 and 100 kGy. From the obtained results, it was noticed that Young modulus remained constant with filler content. Moreover, the influence of filler content was found to be more prominent on properties like tensile stress and elongation at break. On the other hand, thermal analysis showed that filler content had no significant influence on thermal stability. Still, it is necessary to point out that low radiation doses improved thermal stability of the composites. From rheological studies it was observed a decreasing of melt flow index (MFI) by increasing the SR amount and radiation. Therefore, was determinate that high filler content composites are the best choice to be considered for biomedical and industrial applications

  7. Characterisation of Ground Thermal and Thermo-Mechanical Behaviour for Shallow Geothermal Energy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Vieira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing use of the ground as a thermal reservoir is expected in the near future. Shallow geothermal energy (SGE systems have proved to be sustainable alternative solutions for buildings and infrastructure conditioning in many areas across the globe in the past decades. Recently novel solutions, including energy geostructures, where SGE systems are coupled with foundation heat exchangers, have also been developed. The performance of these systems is dependent on a series of factors, among which the thermal properties of the soil play a major role. The purpose of this paper is to present, in an integrated manner, the main methods and procedures to assess ground thermal properties for SGE systems and to carry out a critical review of the methods. In particular, laboratory testing through either steady-state or transient methods are discussed and a new synthesis comparing results for different techniques is presented. In situ testing including all variations of the thermal response test is presented in detail, including a first comparison between new and traditional approaches. The issue of different scales between laboratory and in situ measurements is then analysed in detail. Finally, the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of soil is introduced and discussed. These coupled processes are important for confirming the structural integrity of energy geostructures, but routine methods for parameter determination are still lacking.

  8. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingxun; Wang, Tongxin; Chow, Laurence C; Yang, Mingshu; Mitchell, James W

    Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA) may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA) on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline) have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), scanning electron microscope (SEM), instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA.

  9. Effects of Inorganic Fillers on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(lactic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxun Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Addition of filler to polylactic acid (PLA may affect its crystallization behavior and mechanical properties. The effects of talc and hydroxyapatite (HA on the thermal and mechanical properties of two types of PLA (one amorphous and one semicrystalline have been investigated. The composites were prepared by melt blending followed by injection molding. The molecular weight, morphology, mechanical properties, and thermal properties have been characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, scanning electron microscope (SEM, instron tensile tester, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. It was found that the melting blending led to homogeneous distribution of the inorganic filler within the PLA matrix but decreased the molecular weight of PLA. Regarding the filler, addition of talc increased the crystallinity of PLA, but HA decreased the crystallinity of PLA. The tensile strength of the composites depended on the crystallinity of PLA and the interfacial properties between PLA and the filler, but both talc and HA filler increased the toughness of PLA.

  10. Interaction of thermal and mechanical processes in steep permafrost rock walls: A conceptual approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draebing, D.; Krautblatter, M.; Dikau, R.

    2014-12-01

    Degradation of permafrost rock wall decreases stability and can initiate rock slope instability of all magnitudes. Rock instability is controlled by the balance of shear forces and shear resistances. The sensitivity of slope stability to warming results from a complex interplay of shear forces and resistances. Conductive, convective and advective heat transport processes act to warm, degrade and thaw permafrost in rock walls. On a seasonal scale, snow cover changes are a poorly understood key control of the timing and extent of thawing and permafrost degradation. We identified two potential critical time windows where shear forces might exceed shear resistances of the rock. In early summer combined hydrostatic and cryostatic pressure can cause a peak in shear force exceeding high frozen shear resistance and in autumn fast increasing shear forces can exceed slower increasing shear resistance. On a multiannual system scale, shear resistances change from predominantly rock-mechanically to ice-mechanically controlled. Progressive rock bridge failure results in an increase of sensitivity to warming. Climate change alters snow cover and duration and, hereby, thermal and mechanical processes in the rock wall. Amplified thawing of permafrost will result in higher rock slope instability and rock fall activity. We present a holistic conceptual approach connecting thermal and mechanical processes, validate parts of the model with geophysical and kinematic data and develop future scenarios to enhance understanding on system scale.

  11. Mechanical synthesis of copper-carbon nanocomposites: Structural changes, strengthening and thermal stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, D., E-mail: daniela.nunes@ist.utl.pt [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Livramento, V. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Mateus, R. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Alves, L.C. [ITN, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Vilarigues, M. [Departamento de Conservacao e Restauro e R and D Unit Vidro e da Ceramica Para as Artes, FCT-UNL, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Bioengenharia, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} The study characterized Cu-nanodiamond (Cu-nD) and Cu-graphite (Cu-G) composites. {yields} Preservation of nD crystalline structure during high-energy milling was demonstrated. {yields} Higher refinement of matrix in Cu-nD comparing to Cu-G is due to a milling mechanism. {yields} Remarkable thermal stability and microhardness have been achieved in Cu-nD and Cu-G. {yields} Strengthening resulted mainly from grain refinement and second-phase reinforcement. - Abstract: Processing of copper-carbon nanocomposites by mechanical synthesis poses specific challenges as carbon phases are prone to amorphization and exhibit an intrinsically difficult bonding with copper. The present work investigates Cu-nanodiamond (Cu-nD) and Cu-graphite (Cu-G) composites produced by mechanical synthesis and subsequent heat treatments. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed homogeneous particle distributions and intimate bonding between the metallic matrix and the carbon phases. Ring diffraction patterns of chemically extracted carbon phases demonstrated that milled nanodiamond preserved crystallinity, while an essentially amorphous nature could be inferred for milled graphite. Raman spectra confirmed that nanodiamond particles remained essentially unaffected by the mechanical synthesis, whereas the bands of milled graphite were significantly changed into the typical amorphous carbon fingerprint. Particle-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy showed that the total contamination originating from the milling media remained below 0.7 wt.%. The Cu-nanodiamond composite exhibited remarkable microhardness and microstructural thermal stability when compared with pure nanostructured copper.

  12. Mechanical synthesis of copper-carbon nanocomposites: Structural changes, strengthening and thermal stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, D.; Livramento, V.; Mateus, R.; Correia, J.B.; Alves, L.C.; Vilarigues, M.; Carvalho, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The study characterized Cu-nanodiamond (Cu-nD) and Cu-graphite (Cu-G) composites. → Preservation of nD crystalline structure during high-energy milling was demonstrated. → Higher refinement of matrix in Cu-nD comparing to Cu-G is due to a milling mechanism. → Remarkable thermal stability and microhardness have been achieved in Cu-nD and Cu-G. → Strengthening resulted mainly from grain refinement and second-phase reinforcement. - Abstract: Processing of copper-carbon nanocomposites by mechanical synthesis poses specific challenges as carbon phases are prone to amorphization and exhibit an intrinsically difficult bonding with copper. The present work investigates Cu-nanodiamond (Cu-nD) and Cu-graphite (Cu-G) composites produced by mechanical synthesis and subsequent heat treatments. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed homogeneous particle distributions and intimate bonding between the metallic matrix and the carbon phases. Ring diffraction patterns of chemically extracted carbon phases demonstrated that milled nanodiamond preserved crystallinity, while an essentially amorphous nature could be inferred for milled graphite. Raman spectra confirmed that nanodiamond particles remained essentially unaffected by the mechanical synthesis, whereas the bands of milled graphite were significantly changed into the typical amorphous carbon fingerprint. Particle-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy showed that the total contamination originating from the milling media remained below 0.7 wt.%. The Cu-nanodiamond composite exhibited remarkable microhardness and microstructural thermal stability when compared with pure nanostructured copper.

  13. Effects of Heating Rate on the Dynamic Tensile Mechanical Properties of Coal Sandstone during Thermal Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of coal layered combustion and the heat injection rate on adjacent rock were examined in the process of underground coal gasification and coal-bed methane mining. Dynamic Brazilian disk tests were conducted on coal sandstone at 800°C and slow cooling from different heating rates by means of a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB test system. It was discovered that thermal conditions had significant effects on the physical and mechanical properties of the sandstone including longitudinal wave velocity, density, and dynamic linear tensile strength; as the heating rates increased, the thermal expansion of the sandstone was enhanced and the damage degree increased. Compared with sandstone at ambient temperature, the fracture process of heat-treated sandstone was more complicated. After thermal treatment, the specimen had a large crack in the center and cracks on both sides caused by loading; the original cracks grew and mineral particle cracks, internal pore geometry, and other defects gradually appeared. With increasing heating rates, the microscopic fracture mode transformed from ductile fracture to subbrittle fracture. It was concluded that changes in the macroscopic mechanical properties of the sandstone were result from changes in the composition and microstructure.

  14. Study on thermal and mechanical properties of U-tube materials for steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rheu, Woo Suk; Kang, Young Hwan; Park, Jong Man; Joo, Ki Nam; Kim, Sung Soo; Maeng, Wan Young; Park, Se Jin

    1993-01-01

    Most of domestic nuclear plants have used I600 TT material for steam generator U-tube, and piled up the field experience. I600 HTMA and I690 TT, however, are recommended for an alternative of U-tube by ABB-CE since YK-3 and 4. Field experience of I600 HTMA and I690 TT have not compiled in the country, so it is concerned to select the future materials for U-tube. Thus, database on the thermal and mechanical properties of U-tube materials is very necessary for design documentations. In this study, the thermal, mechanical and metallugical properties were tested and evaluated to establish the database for steam generator U-tube. In addition, thermal conductivity of I600 and I690 was measured and compared statistically, providing a basic document for applying I690 to U-tube. The results will be used to improve the manufacturing process in order to increase the integrity of U-tube. (Author)

  15. Mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of poly(lactic acid)/ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacharawichanant, S.; Hoysang, P.; Ratchawong, S.

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports a melt blend of poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/ethylene-butyl acrylate copolymer (EBAC) with organoclay content at 3 phr. The mechanical, thermal and morphological properties of PLA/EBAC blends and nanocomposites were investigated. The morphological analysis revealed EBAC phase dispersed as a spherical domain in PLA matrix and the domain size of EBAC dispersed phase increased with increasing EBAC content. The addition of organoclay could improve the miscibility of PLA/EBAC blends due to the decrease of domain size of EBAC dispersed phase. The mechanical properties indicated that the strain at break and impact strength of PLA increased when added EBAC, but Young’s modulus and tensile strength decreased. Storage modulus increased with the addition of organoclay to the PLA/EBAC blends. The thermal properties found that the incorporation of organoclay in the PLA/EBAC blends did not effect on the glass transition temperature and melting temperature values relative to PLA. The degradation temperature of PLA improved with the addition of EBAC. This indicated that EBAC has more thermal stability and degradation temperature than PLA. From X-ray diffraction patterns displayed the characteristic peak in PLA/EBAC/organoclay nanocomposites appeared at the lower angle, which indicated the dispersed clay is intercalated in the polymer matrix. However, second-order diffraction peak appeared at the higher angle indicated that there was partially the conventional composite.

  16. Numerical modelling of levee stability based on coupled mechanical, thermal and hydrogeological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwornik Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The numerical modelling of coupled mechanical, thermal and hydrogeological processes for a soil levee is presented in the paper. The modelling was performed for a real levee that was built in Poland as a part of the ISMOP project. Only four parameters were changed to build different flood waves: the water level, period of water increase, period of water decrease, and period of low water level after the experiment. Results of numerical modelling shows that it is possible and advisable to calculate simultaneously changes of thermal and hydro-mechanical fields. The presented results show that it is also possible to use thermal sensors in place of more expensive pore pressure sensors, with some limitations. The results of stability analysis show that the levee is less stable when the water level decreases, after which factor of safety decreases significantly. For all flooding wave parameters described in the paper, the levee is very stable and factor of safety variations for any particular stage were not very large.

  17. Mechanisms of thermally induced threshold voltage instability in GaN-based heterojunction transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shu; Liu, Shenghou; Liu, Cheng; Lu, Yunyou; Chen, Kevin J., E-mail: eekjchen@ust.hk [Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we attempt to reveal the underlying mechanisms of divergent V{sub TH}-thermal-stabilities in III-nitride metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT) and MOS-Channel-HEMT (MOSC-HEMT). In marked contrast to MOSC-HEMT featuring temperature-independent V{sub TH}, MIS-HEMT with the same high-quality gate-dielectric/III-nitride interface and similar interface trap distribution exhibits manifest thermally induced V{sub TH} shift. The temperature-dependent V{sub TH} of MIS-HEMT is attributed to the polarized III-nitride barrier layer, which spatially separates the critical gate-dielectric/III-nitride interface from the channel and allows “deeper” interface trap levels emerging above the Fermi level at pinch-off. This model is further experimentally validated by distinct V{sub G}-driven Fermi level movements at the critical interfaces in MIS-HEMT and MOSC-HEMT. The mechanisms of polarized III-nitride barrier layer in influencing V{sub TH}-thermal-stability provide guidelines for the optimization of insulated-gate III-nitride power switching devices.

  18. Mechanisms of thermally induced threshold voltage instability in GaN-based heterojunction transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Shu; Liu, Shenghou; Liu, Cheng; Lu, Yunyou; Chen, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we attempt to reveal the underlying mechanisms of divergent V TH -thermal-stabilities in III-nitride metal-insulator-semiconductor high-electron-mobility transistor (MIS-HEMT) and MOS-Channel-HEMT (MOSC-HEMT). In marked contrast to MOSC-HEMT featuring temperature-independent V TH , MIS-HEMT with the same high-quality gate-dielectric/III-nitride interface and similar interface trap distribution exhibits manifest thermally induced V TH shift. The temperature-dependent V TH of MIS-HEMT is attributed to the polarized III-nitride barrier layer, which spatially separates the critical gate-dielectric/III-nitride interface from the channel and allows “deeper” interface trap levels emerging above the Fermi level at pinch-off. This model is further experimentally validated by distinct V G -driven Fermi level movements at the critical interfaces in MIS-HEMT and MOSC-HEMT. The mechanisms of polarized III-nitride barrier layer in influencing V TH -thermal-stability provide guidelines for the optimization of insulated-gate III-nitride power switching devices

  19. DACS II - A distributed thermal/mechanical loads data acquisition and control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Behzad; Trover, William F.; Anderson, Karl F.

    1987-01-01

    A distributed data acquisition and control system has been developed for the NASA Flight Loads Research Facility. The DACS II system is composed of seven computer systems and four array processors configured as a main computer system, three satellite computer systems, and 13 analog input/output systems interconnected through three independent data networks. Up to three independent heating and loading tests can be run concurrently on different test articles or the entire system can be used on a single large test such as a full scale hypersonic aircraft. Thermal tests can include up to 512 independent adaptive closed loop control channels. The control system can apply up to 20 MW of heating to a test specimen while simultaneously applying independent mechanical loads. Each thermal control loop is capable of heating a structure at rates of up to 150 F per second over a temperature range of -300 to +2500 F. Up to 64 independent mechanical load profiles can be commanded along with thermal control. Up to 1280 analog inputs monitor temperature, load, displacement and strain on the test specimens with real time data displayed on up to 15 terminals as color plots and tabular data displays. System setup and operation is accomplished with interactive menu-driver displays with extensive facilities to assist the users in all phases of system operation.

  20. Comprehensive thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical analysis of core and fuel rods for the safety validation of real refueling at the Kozloduy WWER-440

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, S; Panajotov, D; Ilieva, B; Vitkova, M; Simeonova, V; Passage, G; Manolova, M [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika

    1996-12-31

    Safety analysis aimed at determination of thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical margins of core and fuel rods has been carried out using computer codes COBSOFM and PIN-micro. Thermal-hydraulic calculations for the part of the core with maximum heat flux during steady-state regime show that the coolant, cladding and fuel temperatures are within the design limits. A severe accident with reactor blackout has been simulated. It is found that at 95% probability level there is no boiling crisis anywhere in the core. The thermal-mechanical parameters of working assembly fuel rod with maximum load have been calculated. The assembly linear power reached a maximum of 25 kW/m during the second fuel cycle, the fuel temperature remaining well below 1000{sup o} C. As the fuel assembly with typical power history has enough safety margins, it was proposed to use it for one more cycle. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  1. Mechanism of Thermal Reversal of the (Fulvalene)tetracarbonyldiruthenium Photoisomerization: Toward Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanai, Y; Srinivasan, V; Meier, S K; Vollhardt, K P; Grossman, J C

    2010-02-18

    In the currently intensifying quest to harness solar energy for the powering of our planet, most efforts are centered around photoinduced generic charge separation, such as in photovoltaics, water splitting, other small molecule activation, and biologically inspired photosynthetic systems. In contrast, direct collection of heat from sunlight has received much less diversified attention, its bulk devoted to the development of concentrating solar thermal power plants, in which mirrors are used to focus the sun beam on an appropriate heat transfer material. An attractive alternative strategy would be to trap solar energy in the form of chemical bonds, ideally through the photoconversion of a suitable molecule to a higher energy isomer, which, in turn, would release the stored energy by thermal reversal. Such a system would encompass the essential elements of a rechargeable heat battery, with its inherent advantages of storage, transportability, and use on demand. The underlying concept has been explored extensively with organic molecules (such as the norbornadiene-quadricyclane cycle), often in the context of developing photoswitches. On the other hand, organometallic complexes have remained relatively obscure in this capacity, despite a number of advantages, including expanded structural tunability and generally favorable electronic absorption regimes. A highly promising organometallic system is the previously reported, robust photo-thermal fulvalene (Fv) diruthenium couple 1 {l_reversible} 2 (Scheme 1). However, although reversible and moderately efficient, lack of a full, detailed atom-scale understanding of its key conversion and storage mechanisms have limited our ability to improve on its performance or identify optimal variants, such as substituents on the Fv, ligands other than CO, and alternative metals. Here we present a theoretical investigation, in conjunction with corroborating experiments, of the mechanism for the heat releasing step of 2 {yields} 1 and

  2. Numerical Simulation Procedure for Modeling TGO Crack Propagation and TGO Growth in Thermal Barrier Coatings upon Thermal-Mechanical Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a numerical simulation procedure to model crack propagation in TGO layer and TGO growth near a surface groove in metal substrate upon multiple thermal-mechanical cycles. The material property change method is employed to model TGO formation cycle by cycle, and the creep properties for constituent materials are also incorporated. Two columns of repeated nodes are placed along the interface of the potential crack, and these nodes are bonded together as one node at a geometrical location. In terms of critical crack opening displacement criterion, onset of crack propagation in TGO layer has been determined by finite element analyses in comparison with that without predefined crack. Then, according to the results from the previous analyses, the input values for the critical failure parameters for the subsequent analyses can be decided. The robust capabilities of restart analysis in ABAQUS help to implement the overall simulation for TGO crack propagation. The comparison of the TGO final deformation profile between numerical and experimental observation shows a good agreement indicating the correctness and effectiveness of the present procedure, which can guide the prediction of the failure in TGO for the future design and optimization for TBC system.

  3. Thermal hydraulic-Mechanic Integrated Simulation for Advanced Cladding Thermal Shock Fracture Analysis during Reflood Phase in LBLOCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Seong Min; Lee, You Ho; Cho, Jae Wan; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study suggested thermal hydraulic-mechanical integrated stress based methodology for analyzing the behavior of ATF type claddings by SiC-Duplex cladding LBLOCA simulation. Also, this paper showed that this methodology could predict real experimental result well. That concept for enhanced safety of LWR called Advanced Accident-Tolerance Fuel Cladding (ATF cladding, ATF) is researched actively. However, current nuclear fuel cladding design criteria for zircaloy cannot be apply to ATF directly because those criteria are mainly based on limiting their oxidation. So, the new methodology for ATF design criteria is necessary. In this study, stress based analysis methodology for ATF cladding design criteria is suggested. By simulating LBLOCA scenario of SiC cladding which is the one of the most promising candidate of ATF. Also we'll confirm our result briefly through comparing some facts from other experiments. This result is validating now. Some of results show good performance with 1-D failure analysis code for SiC fuel cladding that already developed and validated by Lee et al,. It will present in meeting. Furthermore, this simulation presented the possibility of understanding the behavior of cladding deeper. If designer can predict the dangerous region and the time precisely, it may be helpful for designing nuclear fuel cladding geometry and set safety criteria.

  4. Tube-like natural halloysite/poly(tetrafluoroethylene) nanocomposites: simultaneous enhancement in thermal and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamini, Suresh; Vasu, V.; Bose, Suryasarathi

    2017-04-01

    In the current study, PTFE (polytetrafluroethylene) matrix is reinforced with different wt% (2%-10%) of Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs). PTFE samples are fabricated with 2 wt% increment and are designated from ‘B’to ‘F’ and designation ‘A’ refers to neat PTFE. Thermal and mechanical characterization of the fabricated composites is studied. The calorimetric measurements showed enhanced degree of crystallinity of the nanocomposites, which is from 57.83% to 74.7%. The dynamic mechanical analysis results have shown enhanced storage modulus and loss modulus and reduced damping behaviour, without affecting glass transition temperature. Moreover, significant improvements in mechanical properties are observed from the experimental results. The results are discussed and validated with the existing literature. The phase and the fracture morphology of the nanocomposites is studied using scanning electron microscope and discussed herein.

  5. Fatigue behaviour of coke drum materials under thermal-mechanical cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Coke drums are vertical pressure vessels used in the delayed coking process in petroleum refineries. Significant temperature variation during the delayed coking process causes damage in coke drums in the form of bulging and cracking. There were some studies on the fatigue life estimation for the coke drums, but most of them were based on strain-fatigue life curves at constant temperatures, which do not consider simultaneous cyclic temperature and mechanical loading conditions. In this study, a fatigue testing system is successfully developed to allow performing thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF test similar to the coke drum loading condition. Two commonly used base and one clad materials of coke drums are then experimentally investigated. In addition, a comparative study between isothermal and TMF lives of these materials is conducted. The experimental findings lead to better understanding of the damage mechanisms occurring in coke drums and more accurate prediction of fatigue life of coke drum materials.

  6. Mechanical and thermal properties of short-coirfiber-reinforced natural rubber/polyethylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zh. H.; Kong, Zh. N.

    2014-07-01

    Natural rubber (NR) and polyethylene (PE) composites were compounded with chemically treated coir fibers by using a heated two-roll mill. Two chemical treatments of the fibers — by silane and sodium hydroxide — were carried out to improve the interfacial adhesion between them and the polyethylene matrix. The mechanical properties of the composites obtained were evaluated and compared with those made from a neat polymer and untreated fibers. The mechanical properties of the composites, such as the tensile strength, Young's modulus, and the elongation at break, were examined, and their shrinkage and flame retardant characteristics were measured. From these experiments, the effect of plasma treatment on the mechanical-physical behavior of coconut-fiberreinforced NR/PE composites was identified. In addition, their thermal characteristics were evaluated, and the results showed a slight decrease in them with increasing content of coir fibers.

  7. Mechanical and thermal properties of commercial multilayer PET/PP film irradiated with electron-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz, Angel V.; Nogueira, Beatriz R.; Oliveira, Vitor M.; Moura, Esperidiana A.B.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of electron-beam irradiation on mechanical and thermal properties, for one commercial flexible food packaging multilayer structure, were studied. The laminated poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET)/ polypropylene (PP) structure was irradiated up to 60 kGy, using a 1.5 MeV electron beam accelerator, at room temperature in the presence of air. Mechanical properties showed significant changes (p < 0.05). In addition, the DSC analysis, after treatment, showed that the fusion enthalpy and crystallinity of the PET/PP structure components presented significant changes (p < 0.05) with the electron-beam radiation doses applied. It was observed an increase in PP crystallinity while the PET crystallinity decreases. Such decrease in PET crystallinity indicates the predominance of a cross-linking process on the irradiated PET layer; responsible for the increase in some mechanical properties of the studied film. (author)

  8. Effect of thermal and mechanical parameter’s damage numerical simulation cycling effects on defects in hot metal forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amri, Abdelouahid; el yakhloufi Haddou, Mounir; Khamlichi, Abdellatif

    2017-10-01

    Damage mechanisms in hot metal forming processes are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during Thermal and mechanical properties variations, because it consists of the materials with different thermal and mechanical loadings and swelling coefficients. In this work, 3D finite element models (FEM) are developed to simulate the effect of Temperature and the stresses on the model development, using a general purpose FE software ABAQUS. Explicit dynamic analysis with coupled Temperature displacement procedure is used for a model. The purpose of this research was to study the thermomechanical damage mechanics in hot forming processes. The important process variables and the main characteristics of various hot forming processes will also be discussed.

  9. Study of the thermal and mechanical sensitivity of bitumen/oxygen salt mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backof, E.; Diepold, W.

    1975-07-01

    The safe handling characteristics of radioactive wastes containing nitrate salts to be fixed in bitumen for ultimate storage in salt mines according to a process developed at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center have been examined with respect to their combustibility and shock sensitivity in tests of inactive bitumen/salt mixtures. Samples containing 40% bitumen and 60% nitrates of alkali, alkaline earth, and heavy metals, organic acids and rare earths were used to determine the thermal sensitivity (ignition temperature, duration of burning, heating under contained conditions), the mechanical sensitivity (shock sensitivity) and, in order to simulate major shock stresses, the sensitivity against detonation stresses. A few basic experiments were also performed on some beta-irradiated inactive samples. It appeared that although the addition of nitrates increased the combustibility of bitumen, neither the high thermal nor the detonation stresses resulted in any explosion-type reaction. (orig.) [de

  10. Mechanical, thermal, rheological and morphological behaviour of irradiated PP/HA composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, C.; Albano, C.; Karam, A.; Dominguez, N.; Sanchez, Y.; Gonzalez, G.

    2005-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) reinforced polypropylene (PP) composites are being developed as bone graft materials. In this research, the effect of γ irradiation on mechanical, rheological, thermal and morphological behaviour of PP-HA composites was studied. The melt flow index of polymer increased markedly when it was exposed to radiation. This is indicative of chain scission reaction as the predominant process. During the tensile testing, the composites exhibited brittle behaviour, showing no fluency point. Elongation at break showed a tendency to decrease with the increase in radiation dose while stress at break did not show significant variation with radiation dose. High HA content (>20%) and radiation dose (25 kGy) had significant influence on thermal stability

  11. Mechanical and thermal properties of sisal fiber-reinforced rubber seed oil-based polyurethane composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakare, I.O.; Okieimen, F.E.; Pavithran, C.; Abdul Khalil, H.P.S.; Brahmakumar, M.

    2010-01-01

    The development of high-performance composite materials from locally sourced and renewable materials was investigated. Rubber seed oil polyurethane resin synthesized using rubber seed monoglyceride derived from glycerolysis of the oil was used as matrix in the composite samples. Rubber seed oil-based polyurethane composite reinforced with unidirectional sisal fibers were prepared and characterized. Results showed that the properties of unidirectional fiber-reinforced rubber seed oil-based polyurethane composites gave good thermal and mechanical properties. Also, the values of tensile strengths and flexural moduli of the polyurethane composites were more than tenfold and about twofold higher than un-reinforced rubber seed oil-based polyurethane. The improved thermal stability and the scanning electron micrographs of the fracture surface of the composites were attributed to good fiber-matrix interaction. These results indicate that high-performance 'all natural products' composite materials can be developed from resources that are readily available locally.

  12. Fabrication of dense yttrium oxyfluoride ceramics by hot pressing and their mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Ryuki; Tsunoura, Toru; Yoshida, Katsumi; Yano, Toyohiko; Kishi, Yukio

    2018-06-01

    Excellent corrosion-resistant materials have been strongly required to reduce particle contamination during the plasma process in semiconductor production. Yttrium oxyfluoride can be a candidate as highly corrosion-resistant material. In this study, three types of dense yttrium oxyfluoride ceramics with different oxygen contents, namely, YOF, Y5O4F7 and Y5O4F7 + YF3, were fabricated by hot pressing, and their mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties were evaluated. Y5O4F7 ceramics showed an excellent thermal stability up to 800 °C, a low loss factor, and volume resistivity comparable to conventional plasma-resistant oxides, such as Y2O3. From these results, yttrium oxyfluoride ceramics are strongly suggested to be used as electrostatic chucks in semiconductor production.

  13. Effect of CNTs dispersion on the thermal and mechanical properties of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhsan, Ali Samer, E-mail: alisameer2007@gmail.com, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: alisameer2007@gmail.com, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Yusoff, Puteri Sri Melor Megat Bt, E-mail: puteris@petronas.com.my [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP) (Malaysia); Mohamed, Norani M., E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), UTP (Malaysia); Raza, M. Rafi, E-mail: rafirazamalik@gmail.com [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    Modified technique of metal injection molding (MIM) was used to fabricate multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced Cu nanocomposites. The effect of adding different amount of CNTs (0-10 vol.%) on the thermal and mechanical behaviour of the fabricated nanocomposites is presented. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed homogenous dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrices at different CNTs contents. The experimentally measured thermal conductivities of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites showed extraordinary increase (76% higher than pure sintered Cu) with addition of 10 vol.% CNTs. As compared to the pure sintered Cu, increase in modulus of elasticity (Young's modulus) of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites sintered at 1050°C for 2.5 h was measured to be 48%. However, in case of 7.5 vol.% CNTs, Young's modulus was increased significantly about 51% compared to that of pure sintered Cu.

  14. Mechanical, Thermal and Acoustic Properties of Open-pore Phenolic Multi-structured Cryogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Rui; Yao, Zhengjun; Zhou, Jintang; Liu, Peijiang; Lei, Yiming

    2017-09-01

    Open-pore phenolic cryogel acoustic multi-structured plates (OCMPs) were prepared via modified sol gel polymerization and freeze-dried methods. The pore morphology, mechanical, thermal and acoustic properties of the cryogels were investigated. From the experimental results, the cryogels exhibited a porous sandwich microstructure: A nano-micron double-pore structure was observed in the core layer of the plates, and nanosized pores were observed in the inner part of the micron pores. In addtion, compared with cryogel plates with uniform-pore (OCPs), the OCMPs had lower thermal conductivities. What’s more, the compressive and tensile strength of the OCMPs were much higher than those of OCPs. Finally, the OCMPs exhibited superior acoustic performances (20% solid content OCMPs performed the best) as compared with those of OCPs. Moreover, the sound insulation value and sound absorption bandwidth of OCMPs exhibited an improvement of approximately 3 and 2 times as compared with those of OCPs, respectively.

  15. Non-destructive assay of mechanical components using gamma-rays and thermal neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Erica Silvani; Avelino, Mila R. [PPG-EM/UERJ, R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Maracana - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines S. [IEN/CNEN, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    This work presents the results obtained in the inspection of several mechanical components through neutron and gamma-ray transmission radiography. The 4.46 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} thermal neutron flux available at the main port of the Argonauta research reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear has been used as source for the neutron radiographic imaging. The 412 keV {gamma}-ray emitted by {sup 198}Au, also produced in that reactor, has been used as interrogation agent for the gamma radiography. Imaging Plates - IP specifically designed to operate with thermal neutrons or with X-rays have been employed as detectors and storage devices for each of these radiations.

  16. RESOLUTION STRATEGY FOR GEOMECHANICALLY-RELATED REPOSITORY DESIGN FOR THERMAL-MECHANICAL EFFECTS (RDTME)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Board, M.

    2003-01-01

    In September of 2000, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued an Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2000). The Key Technical Issue (KTI) agreements on Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) were jointly developed at the Technical Exchange and Management Meeting held on February 6-8, 2001 in Las Vegas, Nevada. In that report, a number of geomechanically-related issues were raised regarding the determination of rock properties, the estimation of the impacts of geologic variability, the use of numerical models, and the examination of drift degradation and design approach to the ground support system for the emplacement drifts. Ultimately, the primary end products of the KTI agreement resolution processes are an assessment of the preclosure stability of emplacement drifts and the associated ground support requirements. There is also an assessment of the postclosure degradation of the excavations when subjected to thermal and seismic-related stresses as well as in situ loading over time

  17. Physicochemical, mechanical and thermal properties of chitosan films with and without sorbitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Zhou, Yibin; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Chen; Cao, Shengnan

    2014-09-01

    The effect of sorbitol on the physicochemical, mechanical and thermal properties of chitosan films with different degrees of deacetylation (DD; i.e., DD85% and DD95%) was investigated. The thickness, moisture content (MC), water solubility (WS) and water-vapor permeability (WVP) of the films were evaluated. Sorbitol addition reduced MC, increased WS and significantly (psorbitol increased the strain and decreased stress for both DD films, but DD95% could sustain higher strain and DD85% could sustain higher stress. Thermogravimetrics analysis and differential scanning calorimetry showed that sorbitol elicited a lower degradation temperature for both films, and that DD95% films exhibited higher thermal stability than DD85% films. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Analysis of the thermal fragmentation as a mechanism for the initiation of steam explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamome, J.; Meignen, R.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a theoretical study of the film behaviour and its stability during the phenomenon of drop thermal fragmentation. We discuss the role of the various possible influences on the film collapse and instability processes. First, we discuss the possibility of simple fuel/coolant contacts as a mechanism for the drop instability. Under this assumption, we then describe and test our model on Nelson and Duda explodability maps, with a particular emphasis on the description of the film evolution. The reasonable agreement obtained allows us to analyse the effect of various parameters as the ambient pressure, subcooling and trigger pulse shape on the film behaviour in Nelson and Duda experiments. The perspectives of this work are then shortly discussed including extrapolation to more prototypic situations and the role of thermal fragmentation itself. (authors)

  19. Thermal optimality of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide and underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niu, Shuli; Luo, Yiqi; Fei, Shenfeng

    2012-01-01

    distributed sites of eddy covariance and quantified the temperature response functions of net ecosystem exchange (NEE), an ecosystem‐level property, to determine whether NEE shows thermal optimality and to explore the underlying mechanisms. We found that the temperature response of NEE followed a peak curve......, with the optimum temperature (corresponding to the maximum magnitude of NEE) being positively correlated with annual mean temperature over years and across sites. Shifts of the optimum temperature of NEE were mostly a result of temperature acclimation of gross primary productivity (upward shift of optimum...... ecosystem–climate change feedbacks. The thermal optimality of NEE has implications for understanding fundamental properties of ecosystems in changing environments and benchmarking global models....

  20. Control of thermal deformation in dielectric mirrors using mechanical design and atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Nicholas T; Kim, Sangho S; Talghader, Joseph J

    2009-07-01

    A mechanical design technique for optical coatings that simultaneously controls thermal deformation and optical reflectivity is reported. The method requires measurement of the refractive index and thermal stress of single films prior to the design. Atomic layer deposition was used for deposition because of the high repeatability of the film constants. An Al2O3/HfO2 distributed Bragg reflector was deposited with a predicted peak reflectivity of 87.9% at 542.4 nm and predicted edge deformation of -360 nm/K on a 10 cm silicon substrate. The measured peak reflectivity was 85.7% at 541.7 nm with an edge deformation of -346 nm/K.

  1. Epoxy based nanocomposites with fully exfoliated unmodified clay: mechanical and thermal properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Binghai; Zhang, Xiaohong; Gao, Jianming; Song, Zhihai; Qi, Guicun; Liu, Yiqun; Qiao, Jinliang

    2010-09-01

    The unmodified clay has been fully exfoliated in epoxy resin with the aid of a novel ultrafine full-vulcanized powdered rubber. Epoxy/rubber/clay nanocomposites with exfoliated morphology have been successfully prepared. The microstructures of the nanocomposites were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the unmodified clay was fully exfoliated and uniformly dispersed in the resulting nanocomposite. Characterizations of mechanical properties revealed that the impact strength of this special epoxy/rubber/clay nanocomposite increased up 107% over the neat epoxy resin. Thermal analyses showed that thermal stability of the nanocomposite was much better than that of epoxy nanocomposite based on organically modified clay.

  2. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  3. Uniaxial Negative Thermal Expansion and Mechanical Properties of a Zinc-Formate Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongqiang Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermal expansion behavior of a metal-formate framework, Zn(HCOO2·2(H2O (1, has been systematically studied via variable temperature single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Our results demonstrate that this formate exhibits significant negative thermal expansion (NTE, −26(2 MK−1 along its c-axis. Detailed structural analyses reveal that the large NTE response is attributed to the ‘hinge-strut’ like framework motion. In addition, the fundamental mechanical properties of framework 1 have been explored via nanoindentation experiments. The measured elastic modulus and hardness properties on the (00-2/(100/(110 facets are 35.5/35.0/27.1 and 2.04/1.83/0.47 GPa, respectively. The stiffness and hardness anisotropy can be correlated well with the underlying framework structure, like its thermoelastic behavior.

  4. Thermal and mechanical properties of injection molded recycled high density polyethylene blends with virgin isotactic polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madi, N.K.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Recycled high density polyethylene and isotactic polypropylene blends have been prepared by melt compounding. ► Thermal study showed that iPP is not well dispersed into the rHDPE matrix. ► Tensile testing shows that there is strong correlation between the thermal properties and the tensile behavior of rHDPE/ipp blends. - Abstract: Polymer blending has become an important field in polymer research and especially in the area of recycling. In this research the target was to reduce the polymer waste problem. Therefore, recycled high density polyethylene (rHDPE) and virgin isotactic polypropylene (vPP) blends containing upto 30 wt% of vPP have been prepared by melt compounding method using injection molding at 220 °C. The thermal properties, thermal degradation and the mechanical properties of the polymer blends were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and tensile testing method. DSC study shows that in all the blends there are two melting peaks, one around the melting temperature of rHDPE and another one around the melting point of vPP, indicating that vPP is not well dispersed into the rHDPE matrix. The changes in the heat of fusion for the rHDPE/iPP polymer blends versus vPP content suggests that incorporating vPP affects the crystallinity of the system. TGA analysis of the polymer blends shows that parts of rHDPE with 95/5 upto 80/20 of vPP are mostly stable composition which brings about valuable stabilization to the rHDPE. Tensile testing shows that there is strong correlation between the thermal properties and the tensile behavior of rHDPE/vpp blends

  5. The impact of human perception of simultaneous exposure to thermal load, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Ole; Witterseh, Thomas; Clausen, Geo

    1999-01-01

    Human perception of simultaneous exposure to combinations of three different levels of operative temperature, low-frequency ventilation noise and indoor air pollution (27 combinations) was studied in climate chambers. The operative temperatures studied were: 26.0 deg.C, 27.6 deg.C and 29.6 deg.......C, and the sound pressure levels were: 45 dB(A), 48 dB(A) and 51 dB(A). The air pollution corresponding to these three levels of perceived air quality (at 26 deg.C) was: 1.1 decipol (dp), 2.4 dp and 4.5 dp. A 1 deg.C change in operative temperature had the same impact on the human perception of the overall...... conditions as a change of 3.8 dB(A) in sound pressure level or a change of 7 dp in air pollution (at 26 deg.C). The percentage of dissatisfied with the perceived air quality increased with increasing temperature. An elevated temperature had a dominant impact on the human perception of the indoor environment...

  6. Mechanism of reduction in hydrogen atmosphere and thermal transformation of synthetic ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, C.J., E-mail: colani.masina@nmmu.ac.za [Centre for HRTEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Neethling, J.H.; Olivier, E.J. [Centre for HRTEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Ferg, E. [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Manzini, S.; Lodya, L.; Mohlala, P.; Ngobeni, M.W. [Sasol Technology R and D, 1 Klasie Havenga Road, Sasolburg (South Africa)

    2015-01-10

    Highlights: • Magnetic measurements used to study thermal transformation of ferrihydrite. • Reduction mechanisms of ferrihydrite were monitored by TPR, MS, and in-situ XRD. • Nanocrystalline Fe was produced by the reducing ferrihydrite in H{sub 2}. • The presence of SiO{sub 2} in ferrihydrite alters the reduction pathway of ferrihydrite. - Abstract: The thermal transformation under vacuum and the reduction behavior in hydrogen atmosphere of 2- and 6-line ferrihydrite (FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O) as well as 2-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O deposited onto silica are reported. The investigation methods include magnetization measurements, temperature programmed reduction, in-situ X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal transformation of FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O to hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was monitored through changes in the magnetization as a function of temperature; it appears to proceed through the loss of the lattice water and sintering accompanied by improved crystallinity and structural changes. Such a transformation is initiated at T ∼ 580 K for 2-line and 6-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O and at T ∼ 660 K for 2-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}, i.e., the presence of SiO{sub 2} appears to inhibit the transformation. SiO{sub 2} also tends to prevent the increase of the crystallite size above a certain threshold value. Reduction reactions are initiated at relatively lower temperatures (∼480 K) implying that a gaseous environment facilitates the thermal dehydration/dehydroxylation process. Three different reduction mechanisms of FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O to metallic iron (α-Fe) are observed: a two-stage process via magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) as an intermediate phase for 2-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O, a three-step reduction involving Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and wüstite (FeO) as intermediate phases for 2-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} and a thermal transformation to α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} followed by a two-step reduction via Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} intermediate for 6-line Fe

  7. Mechanism of reduction in hydrogen atmosphere and thermal transformation of synthetic ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masina, C.J.; Neethling, J.H.; Olivier, E.J.; Ferg, E.; Manzini, S.; Lodya, L.; Mohlala, P.; Ngobeni, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnetic measurements used to study thermal transformation of ferrihydrite. • Reduction mechanisms of ferrihydrite were monitored by TPR, MS, and in-situ XRD. • Nanocrystalline Fe was produced by the reducing ferrihydrite in H 2 . • The presence of SiO 2 in ferrihydrite alters the reduction pathway of ferrihydrite. - Abstract: The thermal transformation under vacuum and the reduction behavior in hydrogen atmosphere of 2- and 6-line ferrihydrite (FeOOH·nH 2 O) as well as 2-line FeOOH·nH 2 O deposited onto silica are reported. The investigation methods include magnetization measurements, temperature programmed reduction, in-situ X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal transformation of FeOOH·nH 2 O to hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) was monitored through changes in the magnetization as a function of temperature; it appears to proceed through the loss of the lattice water and sintering accompanied by improved crystallinity and structural changes. Such a transformation is initiated at T ∼ 580 K for 2-line and 6-line FeOOH·nH 2 O and at T ∼ 660 K for 2-line FeOOH·nH 2 O/SiO 2 , i.e., the presence of SiO 2 appears to inhibit the transformation. SiO 2 also tends to prevent the increase of the crystallite size above a certain threshold value. Reduction reactions are initiated at relatively lower temperatures (∼480 K) implying that a gaseous environment facilitates the thermal dehydration/dehydroxylation process. Three different reduction mechanisms of FeOOH·nH 2 O to metallic iron (α-Fe) are observed: a two-stage process via magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) as an intermediate phase for 2-line FeOOH·nH 2 O, a three-step reduction involving Fe 3 O 4 and wüstite (FeO) as intermediate phases for 2-line FeOOH·nH 2 O/SiO 2 and a thermal transformation to α-Fe 2 O 3 followed by a two-step reduction via Fe 3 O 4 intermediate for 6-line FeOOH·nH 2 O. It is inferred that SiO 2 interacts with Fe species to form Fe–O–Fe structures which tend

  8. A Rat Model of Full Thickness Thermal Injury Characterized by Thermal Hyperalgesia, Mechanical Allodynia, Pronociceptive Peptide Release and Tramadol Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    tramadol reduces acute, postoperative, neuropathic and cancer pain [9,10,12 14] and may have a lower propensity to induce addiction [15] with little to...opioid systems simultaneously, we next examined whether tramadol could attenuate burn evoked pain behaviors in our rat model of full thickness thermal...injury. Tramadol attenuated thermal hyperalgesia when administered one week following thermal injury, a time point when pain behaviors peak in this

  9. Effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformation and mechanical strengthening of stainless steels – A phase-field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Shaw, Brian A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D elastoplastic phase-field model is used to study the effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformationas well as on mechanical strengthening of both austenite and martensite in stainless steel. The results show that with an increasing number of thermal cycles, martensite becomes more...

  10. Effects of electron irradiation in space environment on thermal and mechanical properties of carbon fiber/bismaleimide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Qi; Chen, Ping; Gao, Yu; Ma, Keming; Lu, Chun; Xiong, Xuhai

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Electron irradiation decreased the storage modulus finally. •T g decreased first and then increased and finally decreased. •The thermal stability was reduced and then improved and finally decreased. •The changing trend of flexural strength and ILSS are consistent. -- Abstract: The effects of electron irradiation in simulated space environment on thermal and mechanical properties of high performance carbon fiber/bismaleimide composites were investigated. The dynamic mechanical properties of the composites exposed to different fluences of electron irradiation were evaluated by Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). Thermogravimetric analysis was applied to investigate the changes in thermal stability of the resin matrix after exposure to electron irradiation. The changes in mechanical properties of the composites were evaluated by flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS). The results indicated that electron irradiation in high vacuum had an impact on thermal and mechanical properties of CF/BMI composites, which depends on irradiation fluence. At lower irradiation fluences less than 5 × 10 15 cm −2 , the dynamic storage modulus, cross-linking degree, thermal stability and mechanical properties that were determined by a competing effect between chain scission and cross-linking process, decreased firstly and then increased. While at higher fluences beyond 5 × 10 15 cm −2 , the chain scission process was dominant and thus led to the degradation in thermal and mechanical properties of the composites

  11. Thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical responses in the single heater test at the ESF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, W.; Blair, S.; Buettner, M

    1997-01-01

    The Single Heater Test (SHT) is conducted in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) to study the thermal-mechanical responses of the rock mass. A set of boreholes were drilled in the test region for conducting a scoping test of the coupled thermal-mechanical- hydrological-chemical (TMHC) processes. The holes for the TMHC tests include electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), neutron logging/temperature, hydrological, and optical multiple point borehole extensometers. A 4-kW heater was installed in the heater hole, and was energized on August 26, 1996. Some observed movements of the water around the heater are associated with a possible dry-out region near the heater. The water that has been moved is more dilute than the in situ ground water, except for the concentration of Ca. This indicates that fractures are the major water pathways, and the displaced water may have reached an equilibrium with carbonate minerals on the fracture surfaces. No mechanical-hydrological coupling has been observed. The tests are on-going, and more data will be collected and analyzed

  12. Change Spectroscopic, thermal and mechanical studies of PU/PVC blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hezma, A.M. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Center, Giza (Egypt); Elashmawi, I.S. [Spectroscopy Department, Physics Division, National Research Center, Giza (Egypt); Physic Department, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, Al-Ula (Saudi Arabia); Rajeh, A., E-mail: a.rajeh88@yahoo.com [Physic Department, Faculty of Science, Amran University, Sa' dah (Yemen); Physics Department, Faculty of science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Kamal, Mustafa [Physics Department, Faculty of science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2016-08-15

    Blends of polyurethane (PU) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with different concentrations were prepared by casting method. The effects of PU on PVC blends was examined by Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR), Ultra-violet visible studies (UV/VIS.), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermogravimetric (TGA), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and mechanical properties (stress–strain curve). The interaction between PU and PVC was examined by FT-IR through the absorbance of the N–H groups and was correlated to mechanical/thermal properties. Ultra-violet visible said that optical energy gap decrease with increasing concentration of PU. Differential scanning calorimetry results was observed a single glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) for blends this confirming existence miscibility within the blends. The causes for best thermal stability of some blends may be described by measurements of interactions between C=O groups of PU and the α-hydrogen of PVC or a dipole–dipole –C=O..Cl–C– interactions. Significant alterations in FTIR, X-ray and DSC examination shows an interactions between blends had good miscibility. X-ray shows some alterations in the intensity with additional PU. PU change the mechanical behavior of PVC through of the blends. When polyurethane content increase causes polyvinyl chloride tensile strength decreases and elongation at break increase.

  13. Quantum Corrected Non-Thermal Radiation Spectrum from the Tunnelling Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subenoy Chakraborty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The tunnelling mechanism is today considered a popular and widely used method in describing Hawking radiation. However, in relation to black hole (BH emission, this mechanism is mostly used to obtain the Hawking temperature by comparing the probability of emission of an outgoing particle with the Boltzmann factor. On the other hand, Banerjee and Majhi reformulated the tunnelling framework deriving a black body spectrum through the density matrix for the outgoing modes for both the Bose-Einstein distribution and the Fermi-Dirac distribution. In contrast, Parikh and Wilczek introduced a correction term performing an exact calculation of the action for a tunnelling spherically symmetric particle and, as a result, the probability of emission of an outgoing particle corresponds to a non-strictly thermal radiation spectrum. Recently, one of us (C. Corda introduced a BH effective state and was able to obtain a non-strictly black body spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism corresponding to the probability of emission of an outgoing particle found by Parikh and Wilczek. The present work introduces the quantum corrected effective temperature and the corresponding quantum corrected effective metric is written using Hawking’s periodicity arguments. Thus, we obtain further corrections to the non-strictly thermal BH radiation spectrum as the final distributions take into account both the BH dynamical geometry during the emission of the particle and the quantum corrections to the semiclassical Hawking temperature.

  14. Thermal and Mechanical Buckling and Postbuckling Responses of Selected Curved Composite Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Nicole L.; Hyer, Michael W.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The results of an experimental and numerical study of the buckling and postbuckling responses of selected unstiffened curved composite panels subjected to mechanical end shortening and a uniform temperature increase are presented. The uniform temperature increase induces thermal stresses in the panel when the axial displacement is constrained. An apparatus for testing curved panels at elevated temperature is described, numerical results generated by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code are presented. Several analytical modeling refinements that provide more accurate representation of the actual experimental conditions, and the relative contribution of each refinement, are discussed. Experimental results and numerical predictions are presented and compared for three loading conditions including mechanical end shortening alone, heating the panels to 250 F followed by mechanical end shortening, and heating the panels to 400 F. Changes in the coefficients of thermal expansion were observed as temperature was increased above 330 F. The effects of these changes on the experimental results are discussed for temperatures up to 400 F.

  15. High Density Polyethylene Composites Reinforced with Hybrid Inorganic Fillers: Morphology, Mechanical and Thermal Expansion Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birm-June Kim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of individual and combined talc and glass fibers (GFs on mechanical and thermal expansion performance of the filled high density polyethylene (HDPE composites was studied. Several published models were adapted to fit the measured tensile modulus and strength of various composite systems. It was shown that the use of silane-modified GFs had a much larger effect in improving mechanical properties and in reducing linear coefficient of thermal expansion (LCTE values of filled composites, compared with the use of un-modified talc particles due to enhanced bonding to the matrix, larger aspect ratio, and fiber alignment for GFs. Mechanical properties and LCTE values of composites with combined talc and GF fillers varied with talc and GF ratio at a given total filler loading level. The use of a larger portion of GFs in the mix can lead to better composite performance, while the use of talc can help lower the composite costs and increase its recyclability. The use of 30 wt % combined filler seems necessary to control LCTE values of filled HDPE in the data value range generally reported for commercial wood plastic composites. Tensile modulus for talc-filled composite can be predicted with rule of mixture, while a PPA-based model can be used to predict the modulus and strength of GF-filled composites.

  16. High Density Polyethylene Composites Reinforced with Hybrid Inorganic Fillers: Morphology, Mechanical and Thermal Expansion Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Runzhou; Xu, Xinwu; Lee, Sunyoung; Zhang, Yang; Kim, Birm-June; Wu, Qinglin

    2013-09-17

    The effect of individual and combined talc and glass fibers (GFs) on mechanical and thermal expansion performance of the filled high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites was studied. Several published models were adapted to fit the measured tensile modulus and strength of various composite systems. It was shown that the use of silane-modified GFs had a much larger effect in improving mechanical properties and in reducing linear coefficient of thermal expansion (LCTE) values of filled composites, compared with the use of un-modified talc particles due to enhanced bonding to the matrix, larger aspect ratio, and fiber alignment for GFs. Mechanical properties and LCTE values of composites with combined talc and GF fillers varied with talc and GF ratio at a given total filler loading level. The use of a larger portion of GFs in the mix can lead to better composite performance, while the use of talc can help lower the composite costs and increase its recyclability. The use of 30 wt % combined filler seems necessary to control LCTE values of filled HDPE in the data value range generally reported for commercial wood plastic composites. Tensile modulus for talc-filled composite can be predicted with rule of mixture, while a PPA-based model can be used to predict the modulus and strength of GF-filled composites.

  17. Date palm biochar-polymer composites: An investigation of electrical, mechanical, thermal and rheological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulose, Anesh Manjaly; Elnour, Ahmed Yagoub; Anis, Arfat; Shaikh, Hamid; Al-Zahrani, S M; George, Justin; Al-Wabel, Mohammad I; Usman, Adel R; Ok, Yong Sik; Tsang, Daniel C W; Sarmah, Ajit K

    2018-04-01

    The application of biochar (BC) as a filler in polymers can be viewed as a sustainable approach that incorporates pyrolysed waste based value-added material and simultaneously mitigate bio-waste in a smart way. The overarching aim of this work was to investigate the electrical, mechanical, thermal and rheological properties of biocomposite developed by utilizing date palm waste-derived BC for the reinforcing of polypropylene (PP) matrix. Date palm waste derived BC prepared at (700 and 900°C) were blended at different proportions with polypropylene and the resultant composites (BC/PP) were characterized using an array of techniques (scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy). Additionally the thermal, mechanical, electrical and rheological properties of the BC/PP composites were evaluated at different loading of BC content (from 0 to15% w/w). The mechanical properties of BC/PP composites showed an improvement in the tensile modulus while that of electrical characterization revealed an enhanced electrical conductivity with increased BC loading. Although the BC incorporation into the PP matrix has significantly reduced the total crystallinity of the resulted composites, however; a positive effect on the crystallization temperature (T c ) was observed. The rheological characterization of BC/PP composites revealed that the addition of BC had minimal effect on the storage modulus (G') compared to the neat (PP). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Flexural resonance mechanism of thermal transport across graphene-SiO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Qiu, Bo; Xu, Shanglong; Ruan, Xiulin; Pop, Eric

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the microscopic mechanism of heat dissipation at the dimensionally mismatched interface between a two-dimensional (2D) crystal and its substrate is crucial for the thermal management of devices based on 2D materials. Here, we study the lattice contribution to thermal (Kapitza) transport at graphene-SiO2 interfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF). We find that 78 percent of the Kapitza conductance is due to sub-20 THz flexural acoustic modes, and that a resonance mechanism dominates the interfacial phonon transport. MD and NEGF estimate the classical Kapitza conductance to be hK ≈ 10 to 16 MW K-1 m-2 at 300 K, respectively, consistent with existing experimental observations. Taking into account quantum mechanical corrections, this value is approximately 28% lower at 300 K. Our calculations also suggest that hK scales as T2 at low temperatures (T < 100 K) due to the linear frequency dependence of phonon transmission across the graphene-SiO2 interface at low frequencies. Our study sheds light on the role of flexural acoustic phonons in heat dissipation from graphene to its substrate.

  19. Mechanical properties and shape memory effect of thermal-responsive polymer based on PVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liulan; Zhang, Lingfeng; Guo, Yanwei

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the effect of content of glutaraldehyde (GA) on the shape memory behavior of a shape memory polymer based on polyvinyl alcohol chemically cross-linked with GA was investigated. Thermal-responsive shape memory composites with three different GA levels, GA-PVA (3 wt%, 5 wt%, 7 wt%), were prepared by particle melting, mold forming and freeze-drying technique. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and shape memory behavior were measured by differential scanning calorimeter, physical bending test and cyclic thermo-mechanical test. The addition of GA to PVA led to a steady shape memory transition temperature and an improved mechanical compressive strength. The composite with 5 wt% of GA exhibited the best shape recoverability. Further increase in the crosslinking agent content of GA would reduce the recovery force and prolong the recovery time due to restriction in the movement of the soft PVA chain segments. These results provide important information for the study on materials in 4D printing.

  20. Stimulation of chondrocyte proliferation following photothermal, thermal, and mechanical injury in ex-vivo cartilage grafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandoh, Nidhi S.; Truong, Mai T.; Diaz-Valdes, Sergio H.; Gardiner, David M.; Wong, Brian J.

    2002-06-01

    Laser irradiation may stimulate chondrocytes proliferation in the peripheral region surrounding a photothermally-heated area in rabbit nasal septal cartilage. In this study, ex- vivo rabbit nasal septal cartilages maintained in culture were irradiated with an Nd:YAG laser ((lambda) equals1.32 micrometers , 4-16 sec, 10-45 W/cm2) to examine the relationship between the diameter of replicating cells and irradiation time. Also, this study investigated whether proliferation occurs following heating (by immersion in hot saline baths, with a heated metal rod, and a soldering iron) and mechanical modification (crushing with a metal stamp and scoring with a scalpel). Replicating chondrocytes were identified using a Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) double antibody detection system in whole mount tissue. Light microscopy was used to confirm the presence of BrdU stained chondrocytes. The mechanical and thermal stressors used failed to produce a proliferative response in chondrocytes as previously seen with laser irradiation. We suspect that chondrocyte proliferation may be induced as a response to alteration in matrix structure produced by photothermal, thermal, or mechanical modification of the matrix. Heat generated by a laser to stimulate chondrocyte proliferation may lead to new treatment options for degenerative articular diseases and disorders. Laser technology can be adapted for use with minimally invasive surgical instrumentation to deliver light into otherwise inaccessible regions of the body.