WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal mass

  1. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass.We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass.The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation.It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected,which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux.Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory.For larger thermal perturbation,however,the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model,i.e.the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition,is eliminated by the general heat conduction law,which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  2. Study on thermal wave based on the thermal mass theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU RuiFeng; CAO BingYang

    2009-01-01

    The conservation equations for heat conduction are established based on the concept of thermal mass. We obtain a general heat conduction law which takes into account the spatial and temporal inertia of thermal mass. The general law introduces a damped thermal wave equation. It reduces to the well-known CV model when the spatial inertia of heat flux and temperature and the temporal inertia of temperature are neglected, which indicates that the CV model only considers the temporal inertia of heat flux. Numerical simulations on the propagation and superposition of thermal waves show that for small thermal perturbation the CV model agrees with the thermal wave equation based on the thermal mass theory. For larger thermal perturbation, however, the physically impossible phenomenon pre-dicted by CV model, i.e. the negative temperature induced by the thermal wave superposition, is eliminated by the general heat conduction law, which demonstrates that the present heat conduction law based on the thermal mass theory is more reasonable.

  3. Thermal effects on the photon mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloshyn, R.M.

    1982-09-01

    It is shown that processes of O(αGsub(F)) in which the photon interacts indirectly with the thermal neutrino background dominate electric screening at low temperature. The photon electric mass still comes out to be much smaller than the present experimental limit

  4. A new thermal ionisation mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, C.; Merren, T.O.; Unsworth, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    The Isomass 54E, a new thermal ionisation mass spectrometer for precise measurements of isotopic composition is described in detail. It combines the fruits of three development pro ects, viz. automation, energy filters and extended geometry with existing micromass expertise and experience. The hardware and software which are used for the automation as well as the energy filter used, are explained. The 'extended geometry' ion optical system adopted for better performance is discussed in detail. (K.B.)

  5. Automation of a thermal ionisation mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pamula, A.; Leuca, M.; Albert, S.; Benta, Adriana

    2001-01-01

    A thermal ionization mass spectrometer was upgraded in order to be monitored by a PC. A PC-LMP-16 National Instruments data acquisition board was used for the ion current channel and the Hall signal channel. A dedicated interface was built to allow commands from the computer to the current supply of the analyzing magnet and to the high voltage unit of the mass spectrometer. A software application was worked out to perform the adjustment of the spectrometer, magnetic scanning and mass spectra acquisition, data processing and isotope ratio determination. The apparatus is used for isotope ratio 235 U/ 238 U determination near the natural abundance. A peak jumping technique is applied to choose between the 235 U and 238 U signal, by switching the high voltage applied to the ion source between two preset values. This avoids the delay between the acquisition of the peaks of interest, a delay that would appear in the case of a 'pure' magnetic scanning. Corrections are applied for the mass discrimination effects and a statistical treatment of the data is achieved. (authors)

  6. The Effect of Thermal Mass on Annual Heat Load and Thermal Comfort in Cold Climate Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevens, Vanessa; Kotol, Martin; Grunau, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    been shown to reduce the annual heating demand. However, few studies exist regarding the effects of thermal mass in cold climates. The purpose of this research is to determine the effect of high thermal mass on the annual heat demand and thermal comfort in a typical Alaskan residence using energy......Thermal mass in building construction refers to a building material's ability to absorb and release heat based on changing environmental conditions. In building design, materials with high thermal mass used in climates with a diurnal temperature swing around the interior set-point temperature have...... modeling software. The model simulations show that increased thermal mass can decrease the risk of summer overheating in Alaskan residences. They also show that increased thermal mass does not significantly decrease the annual heat load in residences located in cold climates. These results indicate...

  7. Convective Concrete: additive manufacturing to facilitate activation of thermal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis de Witte

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Convective Concrete is about a research-driven design process of an innovative thermal mass concept. The goal is to improve building energy efficiency and comfort levels by addressing some of the shortcomings of conventional building slabs with high thermal storage capacity. Such heavyweight constructions tend to have a slow response time and do not make use of the available thermal mass effectively. Convective Concrete explores new ways of using thermal mass in buildings more intelligently. To accomplish this ondemand charging of thermal mass, a network of ducts and fans is embedded in the concrete wall element. This is done by developing customized formwork elements in combination with advanced concrete mixtures. To achieve an efficient airflow rate, the embedded lost formwork and the concrete itself function like a lung.

  8. High-efficiency thermal ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, Jose A.

    1996-01-01

    A version of the thermal ionization cavity (TIC) source developed specifically for use in mass spectrometry is presented. The performance of this ion source has been characterized extensively both with the use of an isotope separator and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A detailed description of the TIC source for mass spectrometry is given along with the performance characteristics observed

  9. Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS): what, how and why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) is one of the oldest mass spectrometric techniques, which has been used for determining the isotopic composition and concentration of different elements using isotope dilution. In spite of the introduction of many other inorganic mass spectrometric techniques like spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS), glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the TIMS technique plays the role of a definitive analytical methodology and still occupies a unique position in terms of its capabilities with respect to precision and accuracy as well as sensitivity

  10. An analytical study on the thermal stress of mass concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, H.; Sawada, T.; Yamazaki, M.; Miyashita, T.; Morikawa, H.; Hayami, Y.; Shibata, K.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal stress in mass concrete occurs as a result of the effect associated with the heat of hydration of the cement. Sometimes, the excessive stresses cause the cracking or other tensile failure in concrete. Therefore it is becoming necessary in the design and construction of mass concrete to predict the thermal stress. The thermal stress analysis of mass concrete requires to take account of the dependence of the elastic modulus on the age of concrete as well as the stress relaxation by creep effect. The studies of those phenomena and the analytical methods have been reported so far. The paper presents the analytical method and discusses its reliability through the application of the method to the actual structure, measuring the temperatures and the thermal stresses. The method is the time dependent thermal stress analysis based on the finite element method, which takes account of creep effect, the aging of concrete and the effect of temperature variation in time. (orig./HP)

  11. Convective Concrete : Additive Manufacturing to facilitate activation of thermal mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, D.; de Klijn-Chevalerias, M.L.; Loonen, R.C.G.M.; Hensen, JLM; Knaack, U.; Zimmermann, G

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the research-driven design process of an innovative thermal mass concept: Convective Concrete. The goal is to improve building energy efficiency and comfort levels by addressing some of the shortcomings of conventional building slabs with high thermal storage capacity. Such

  12. Thermal modelling of Advanced LIGO test masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H; Dovale Álvarez, M; Mow-Lowry, C M; Freise, A; Blair, C; Brooks, A; Kasprzack, M F; Ramette, J; Meyers, P M; Kaufer, S; O’Reilly, B

    2017-01-01

    High-reflectivity fused silica mirrors are at the epicentre of today’s advanced gravitational wave detectors. In these detectors, the mirrors interact with high power laser beams. As a result of finite absorption in the high reflectivity coatings the mirrors suffer from a variety of thermal effects that impact on the detectors’ performance. We propose a model of the Advanced LIGO mirrors that introduces an empirical term to account for the radiative heat transfer between the mirror and its surroundings. The mechanical mode frequency is used as a probe for the overall temperature of the mirror. The thermal transient after power build-up in the optical cavities is used to refine and test the model. The model provides a coating absorption estimate of 1.5–2.0 ppm and estimates that 0.3 to 1.3 ppm of the circulating light is scattered onto the ring heater. (paper)

  13. Study of thermal conductivity and thermal rectification in exponential mass graded lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Tejal N. [Bhavan' s Sheth R.A. College of Science, Khanpur, Ahmedabad 380 001, Gujarat (India); Gajjar, P.N., E-mail: pngajjar@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, University School of Sciences, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380 009, Gujarat (India)

    2012-01-09

    Concept of exponential mass variation of oscillators along the chain length of N oscillators is proposed in the present Letter. The temperature profile and thermal conductivity of one-dimensional (1D) exponential mass graded harmonic and anharmonic lattices are studied on the basis of Fermi–Pasta–Ulam (FPU) β model. Present findings conclude that the exponential mass graded chain provide higher conductivity than that of linear mass graded chain. The exponential mass graded anharmonic chain generates the thermal rectification of 70–75% which is better than linear mass graded materials, so far. Thus instead of using linear mass graded material, the use of exponential mass graded material will be a better and genuine choice for controlling the heat flow at nano-scale. -- Highlights: ► In PRE 82 (2010) 040101, use of mass graded material as a thermal devices is explored. ► Concept of exponential mass graded material is proposed. ► The rectification obtained is about 70–75% which is better than linear mass graded materials. ► The exponential mass graded material will be a better choice for the thermal devices at nano-scale.

  14. Total evaporation in thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callis, E.L.; Cappis, J.H.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the effects of impurities on the total evaporation method for mass spectrometric measurement of the isotope ratio of uranium. Standard samples were spiked with Na, Ca, Fe, Zr and Ba. The results indicated that only Fe, and possible Na, displayed any interference, and then only at high concentrations. One problem limiting the accuracy of the method is the determination of the relative efficiency of the collectors in the multicollector system. 3 refs., 1 tab

  15. Thermal instabilities in low-mass subgiants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Rudloff, I.R.; Vandenberg, D.A.; Hartwick, F.D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stability of evolving stars in globular clusters has been examined in order to determine whether or not gaps and the observationally inferred deep mixing near the base of the red-giant branch can be explained in terms of an instability of the hydrogen-burning shell. The results of this investigation are that, in agreement with previous suggestions, the greatest potential for such an instability occurs just at the point where a star begins to ascend the giant branch - i.e., where gaps are seen in some systems - but, in contrast with earlier predictions, the standard models do not actually become unstable. However, from all indications, the stability is believed to be marginal, and it is suggested that rotation, which has now been observed in some globulars, may be the mechanism by which an instability is produced. 36 references

  16. Mass and stiffness calibration of nanowires using thermally driven vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiracofe, D R; Raman, A; Yazdanpanah, M M

    2011-01-01

    Cantilevered or suspended nanowires show promise for force or mass sensing applications due to their small mass, high force sensitivity and high frequency bandwidth. To use these as quantitative sensors, their bending stiffness or mass must be calibrated experimentally, often using thermally driven vibration. However, this can be difficult because nanowires are slightly asymmetric, which results in two spatially orthogonal bending eigenmodes with closely spaced frequencies. This asymmetry presents problems for traditional stiffness calibration methods, which equate the measured thermal vibration spectrum near a resonance to that of a single eigenmode. Moreover, the principal axes may be arbitrarily rotated with respect to the measurement direction. In this work, the authors propose a method for calibrating the bending stiffness and mass of such nanowires' eigenmodes using a single measurement taken at an arbitrary orientation with respect to the principal axes.

  17. Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry: recent developments and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the current state of art of thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) instrumentation and highlights some of the recent applications of TIMS in geological, biological and nuclear sciences with special emphasis on some of the recent work undertaken in the area of nuclear science and technology. A few examples from the published literature are also discussed here

  18. Thermal mass impact on energy performance of a low, medium and heavy mass building in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Bojan V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy mass materials used in building structures and architecture can significantly affect building energy performance and occupant comfort. The purpose of this study was to investigate if thermal mass can improve the internal environment of a building, resulting in lower energy requirements from the mechanical systems. The study was focused on passive building energy performance and compared annual space heating and cooling energy requirements for an office building in Belgrade with several different applications of thermal mass. A three-dimensional building model was generated to represent a typical office building. Building shape, orientation, glazing to wall ratio, envelope insulation thickness, and indoor design conditions were held constant while location and thickness of building mass (concrete was varied between cases in a series of energy simulations. The results were compared and discussed in terms of the building space heating and cooling energy and demand affected by thermal mass. The simulation results indicated that with addition of thermal mass to the building envelope and structure: 100% of all simulated cases experienced reduced annual space heating energy requirements, 67% of all simulated cases experienced reduced annual space cooling energy requirements, 83% of all simulated cases experienced reduced peak space heating demand and 50% of all simulated cases experienced reduced peak space cooling demand. The study demonstrated that there exists a potential for reducing space heating and cooling energy requirements with heavy mass construction in the analyzed climate region (Belgrade, Serbia.

  19. Modeling energy flexibility of low energy buildings utilizing thermal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Heller, Alfred; Rode, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In the future energy system a considerable increase in the penetration of renewable energy is expected, challenging the stability of the system, as both production and consumption will have fluctuating patterns. Hence, the concept of energy flexibility will be necessary in order for the consumption...... to match the production patterns, shifting demand from on-peak hours to off-peak hours. Buildings could act as flexibility suppliers to the energy system, through load shifting potential, provided that the large thermal mass of the building stock could be utilized for energy storage. In the present study...... the load shifting potential of an apartment of a low energy building in Copenhagen is assessed, utilizing the heat storage capacity of the thermal mass when the heating system is switched off for relieving the energy system. It is shown that when using a 4-hour preheating period before switching off...

  20. A high efficiency thermal ionization source adapted to mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlin, E.P.; Olivares, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A tungsten crucible thermal ionization source mounted on a quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The crucible is a disposable rod with a fine hole bored in one end; it is heated by electron bombardment. The schematic design of the assembly, including water cooling, is described and depicted. Historically, the design is derived from that of ion sources used on ion separators at Los Alamos and Dubna, but the crucible is made smaller and simplified. 10 refs., 4 figs

  1. The analogic model ''RIC'' of thermal behaviour of mass concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Redondo, M.; Gonzalez de Posada, F.; Plana Claver, J.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the thermal field and calorific flows in heat sources (i.e. mass concrete during setting) we have conceived, built and experimented with an analogical electric model. This model, named RIC, consists of resistors (R) and capacitors (C) in which nodes an electric current (I) has been injected. Several analogical constants were used for the mathematical approximation. Thus, this paper describes the analogical RIC model, simulating heat generation, boundary and initial conditions and concreting. (Author) 4 refs

  2. Variational approach to thermal masses in compactified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominici, Daniele [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Università di Firenze and INFN - Sezione di Firenze,Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Roditi, Itzhak [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas - CBPF/MCT,Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-20

    We investigate by means of a variational approach the effective potential of a 5DU(1) scalar model at finite temperature and compactified on S{sup 1} and S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} as well as the corresponding 4D model obtained through a trivial dimensional reduction. We are particularly interested in the behavior of the thermal masses of the scalar field with respect to the Wilson line phase and the results obtained are compared with those coming from a one-loop effective potential calculation. We also explore the nature of the phase transition.

  3. U-series dating using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    U-series dating is based on the decay of the two long-lived isotopes 238 U(τ 1/2 =4.47 x 10 9 years) and 235 U (τ 1/2 0.7 x 10 9 years). 238 U and its intermediate daughter isotopes 234 U (τ 1/2 = 245.4 ka) and 230 Th (τ 1/2 = 75.4 ka) have been the main focus of recently developed mass spectrometric techniques (Edwards et al., 1987) while the other less frequently used decay chain is based on the decay 235 U to 231 Pa (τ 1/2 = 32.8 ka). Both the 238 U and 235 U decay chains terminate at the stable isotopes 206 Pb and 207 Pb respectively. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) has a number of inherent advantages, mainly the ability to measure isotopic ratios at high precision on relatively small samples. In spite of these now obvious advantages, it is only since the mid-1980's when Chen et al., (1986) made the first precise measurements of 234 U and 232 Th in seawater followed by Edwards et al., (1987) who made combined 234 U- 230 Th measurements, was the full potential of mass spectrometric methods first realised. Several examples are given to illustrate various aspects of TIMS U-series

  4. Isotopic analysis of boron by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakazu, M.H.; Sarkis, J.E.S.; Souza, I.M.S.

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents a methodology for isotopic analysis of boron by thermal ionization mass spectrometry technique through the ion intensity measurement of Na 2 BO + 2 in H 3 BO 3 , B o and B 4 C. The samples were loaded on single tantalum filaments by different methods. In the case of H 3 BO 3 , the method of neutralization with NaOH was used. For B 4 C the alcaline fusion with Na 2 CO 3 and for B o dissolution with 1:1 nitric sulfuric acid mixture followed by neutralization with NaOH was used. The isotopic ratio measurements were obtained by the use of s Faraday cup detector with external precision of ±0,4% and accuracy of ±0,1%, relative to H 3 BO 3 isotopic standard NBS 951. The effects of isotopic fractionation was studied in function of the time during the analyses and the different chemical forms of deposition. (author)

  5. Controllable isotope fractionation with thermal ionisation mass-spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebeda, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    Isotopic ratios measured with thermal ionisation mass-spectrometers are biased by fractionation effects. A sample must therefore be analyzed according to the same procedures as applied for the analysis of the standard reference material. A comparison of the behaviour of the sample with that of the standard can then be used as a criterion whether the analytical results are acceptable or not. In this way it is possible to obtain reproducibilities similar to those for elements acceptable or not. In this way it is possible to obtain reproducibilities similar to those for elements where the fractionation can be determined by an internal standard. This procedure of controlled fractionation is demonstrated by means of the 88 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios measured on geological samples and the SRM 987 standard. (orig.)

  6. U-series dating using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, M.T. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia). Research School of Earth Science

    1999-11-01

    U-series dating is based on the decay of the two long-lived isotopes{sup 238}U({tau}{sub 1/2}=4.47 x 10{sup 9} years) and {sup 235}U ({tau}{sub 1/2} 0.7 x 10{sup 9} years). {sup 238}U and its intermediate daughter isotopes {sup 234}U ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 245.4 ka) and {sup 230}Th ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 75.4 ka) have been the main focus of recently developed mass spectrometric techniques (Edwards et al., 1987) while the other less frequently used decay chain is based on the decay {sup 235}U to {sup 231}Pa ({tau}{sub 1/2} = 32.8 ka). Both the {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U decay chains terminate at the stable isotopes {sup 206}Pb and {sup 207}Pb respectively. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) has a number of inherent advantages, mainly the ability to measure isotopic ratios at high precision on relatively small samples. In spite of these now obvious advantages, it is only since the mid-1980`s when Chen et al., (1986) made the first precise measurements of {sup 234}U and {sup 232}Th in seawater followed by Edwards et al., (1987) who made combined {sup 234}U-{sup 230}Th measurements, was the full potential of mass spectrometric methods first realised. Several examples are given to illustrate various aspects of TIMS U-series 9 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Spatially resolved thermal desorption/ionization coupled with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Van Berkel, Gary J; Ovchinnikova, Olga S

    2013-02-26

    A system and method for sub-micron analysis of a chemical composition of a specimen are described. The method includes providing a specimen for evaluation and a thermal desorption probe, thermally desorbing an analyte from a target site of said specimen using the thermally active tip to form a gaseous analyte, ionizing the gaseous analyte to form an ionized analyte, and analyzing a chemical composition of the ionized analyte. The thermally desorbing step can include heating said thermally active tip to above 200.degree. C., and positioning the target site and the thermally active tip such that the heating step forms the gaseous analyte. The thermal desorption probe can include a thermally active tip extending from a cantilever body and an apex of the thermally active tip can have a radius of 250 nm or less.

  8. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lim, Hyunkyung [STONY BROOK UNIV; Li, Xiao - Lin [STONY BROOK UNIV; Gilmm, James G [STONY BROOK UNIV

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without

  9. Mass transfer in horizontal flow channels with thermal gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendrich, G.; Shemilt, L.W.

    1997-01-01

    Mass transfer to a wall of a horizontal rectangular channel reactor was investigated by the limiting current technique for Reynolds numbers ranging from 200 to 32000. Overall mass transfer coefficients at various mass transfer surface angles were obtained while the reactor was operated under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. Dimensionless correlations were developed for isothermal flows from 25 to 55 o C and for non-isothermal flows with applied temperature differences up to 30 o C. In the laminar flow range natural convection dominated, but under turbulent conditions combined natural and forced convection prevailed. Mass transfer was approximately doubled under optimum selection of channel surface rotation, temperature gradient and flow rate. (author)

  10. A metric for characterizing the effectiveness of thermal mass in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talyor, Robert A.; Miner, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposes a metric for interior thermal mass materials (floors, walls, counters). • Simple, yet effective, metric composed of easily calculated ‘local’ and ‘global’ variables. • Like Energy Star, the proposed metric gives a single number to aid consumer choice. • The metric is calculated and compared for selected, readily available data. • Drywall, concrete flooring, and wood paneling are quite effective thermal mass. - Abstract: Building energy use represents approximately 25% of the average total global energy consumption (for both residential and commercial buildings). Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) – in most climates – embodies the single largest draw inside our buildings. In many countries around the world a concerted effort is being made towards retrofitting existing buildings to improve energy efficiency. Better windows, insulation, and ducting can make drastic differences in the energy consumption of a building HVAC system. Even with these improvements, HVAC systems are still required to compensate for daily and seasonal temperature swings of the surrounding environment. Thermal mass inside the thermal envelope can help to alleviate these swings. While it is possible to add specialty thermal mass products to buildings for this purpose, commercial uptake of these products is low. Common building interior building materials (e.g. flooring, walls, countertops) are often overlooked as thermal mass products, but herein we propose and analyze non-dimensional metrics for the ‘benefit’ of selected commonly available products. It was found that location-specific variables (climate, electricity price, material price, insolation) can have more than an order of magnitude influence in the calculated metrics for the same building material. Overall, this paper provides guidance on the most significant contributors to indoor thermal mass, and presents a builder- and consumer-friendly metric to inform decisions about

  11. Thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Conventional multi-component gas analysis is based either on laser spectroscopy, laser and photoacoustic absorption at specific wavelengths, or on gas chromatography by separating the components of a gas mixture primarily due to boiling point (or vapor pressure) differences. This paper will present a new gas molecular mass detection method based on thermally modulated nano-trampoline material as smart skin for gas molecular mass detection by fiber Bragg grating-based gas sensors. Such a nanomaterial and fiber Bragg grating integrated sensing device has been designed to be operated either at high-energy level (highly thermal strained status) or at low-energy level (low thermal strained status). Thermal energy absorption of gas molecular trigs the sensing device transition from high-thermal-energy status to low-thermal- energy status. Experiment has shown that thermal energy variation due to gas molecular thermal energy absorption is dependent upon the gas molecular mass, and can be detected by fiber Bragg resonant wavelength shift with a linear function from 17 kg/kmol to 32 kg/kmol and a sensitivity of 0.025 kg/kmol for a 5 micron-thick nano-trampoline structure and fiber Bragg grating integrated gas sensing device. The laboratory and field validation data have further demonstrated its fast response characteristics and reliability to be online gas analysis instrument for measuring effective gas molecular mass from single-component gas, binary-component gas mixture, and multi-gas mixture. The potential industrial applications include fouling and surge control for gas charge centrifugal compressor ethylene production, gas purity for hydrogen-cooled generator, gasification for syngas production, gasoline/diesel and natural gas fuel quality monitoring for consumer market.

  12. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, H; Yu, Y; Glimm, J; Li, X-L; Sharp, D H

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new method for the large eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent mixing flows. The method yields convergent probability distribution functions (PDFs) for temperature and concentration and a chemical reaction rate when applied to reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) unstable flows. Because such a mesh convergence is an unusual and perhaps original capability for LES of RM flows, we review previous validation studies of the principal components of the algorithm. The components are (i) a front tracking code, FronTier, to control numerical mass diffusion and (ii) dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) models to compensate for unresolved scales in the LES. We also review the relevant code comparison studies. We compare our results to a simple model based on 1D diffusion, taking place in the geometry defined statistically by the interface (the 50% isoconcentration surface between the two fluids). Several conclusions important to physics could be drawn from our study. We model chemical reactions with no closure approximations beyond those in the LES of the fluid variables itself, and as with dynamic SGS models, these closures contain no adjustable parameters. The chemical reaction rate is specified by the joint PDF for temperature and concentration. We observe a bimodal distribution for the PDF and we observe significant dependence on fluid transport parameters.

  13. Heat and mass transfer effects on moving vertical plate in the presence of thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation effects on moving infinite vertical plate in the presence variable temperature and mass diffusion is considered. The fluid considered here is a gray, absorbing-emitting radiation but a non-scattering medium. The plate temperature and the concentration level near the plate are raised linearly with time. The dimensionless governing equations are solved using the Laplace-transform technique. The velocity and skin-friction are studied for different parameters like thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number, time and radiation parameter. It is observed that the velocity slightly decreases with increasing value of the radiation parameter.

  14. Applications for skimmer coupling systems, combining simultaneous thermal analysers with mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaisersberger, E.; Post, E.

    1998-01-01

    The sensitivity of the Skimmer coupling for combining the simultaneous thermal analysis (STA) method TG-DTA/DSC and mass spectrometry (MS) is further improved by a factor of three using an automatic vacuum control device. Especially high mass numbers are detected without the common condensation problems met in capillary couplings, as is shown by application of the skimmer coupling for coal, CuGaSe 2 -semiconductor material and polystyrene. The basic idea of the novel pulse thermal analysis technique (PTA) is demonstrated. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Influence of the effective mass of water molecule on thermal neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovic, M.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of the effective water molecule mass on the thermal neutron scattering on the nucleus of the hydrogen atom has been investigated. Besides the actual water molecule mass (M = 18) the investigations have been carried out with its two effective values (M1 = 16 and M2 = 20). The differential and total cross sections have been calculated for the incident thermal neutron energy E o = 1 eV. Investigation results show different prominence of the quantum effects and for M2 the appearance of peaks in the quasielastic scattering. (author)

  16. Synergic effects of thermal mass and natural ventilation on the thermal behaviour of traditional massive buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, A.; Nocera, F.; Patania, F.; Moschella, A.; Detommaso, M.; Evola, G.

    2016-05-01

    The energy policies about energy efficiency in buildings currently focus on new buildings and on existing buildings in case of energy retrofit. However, historic and heritage buildings, that are the trademark of numerous European cities, should also deserve attention; nevertheless, their energy efficiency is nowadays not deeply investigated. In this context, this study evaluates the thermal performance of a traditional massive building situated in a Mediterranean city. Dynamic numerical simulations were carried out on a yearly basis through the software DesignBuilder, both in free-running conditions and in the presence of an air-conditioning (AC) system. The results highlight that the massive envelope of traditional residential buildings helps in maintaining small fluctuations of the indoor temperature, thus limiting the need for AC in the mid-season and in summer. This feature is highly emphasised by exploiting natural ventilation at night, which allows reducing the building energy demand for cooling by about 30%.The research also indicates that, for Mediterranean climate, the increase in thermal insulation does not always induce positive effects on the thermal performance in summer, and that it might even produce an increase in the heat loads due to the transmission through the envelope.

  17. Thermal analysis/mass spectrometry as a tool for studying environmental pollution by coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuschek, G.; Kettrup, A.A. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, GmbH, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Neuherberg, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Five different German standard coals were investigated. A simultaneous thermal analyzer/mass spectrometer was used for the characterization of the coal samples and the identification of the volatiles evolved during the heating of the sample up to 1400C. The TG and DTA results were discussed for the investigations under different atmospheres. The on line recorded mass spectra were interpreted with respect to the evolution of hazardous substances

  18. Thermal analysis/mass spectrometry as a tool for studying environmental pollution by coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matuschek, G.; Kettrup, A.A. [GSF-Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit, GmbH, Institut fuer Oekologische Chemie, Neuherberg, D-85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Five different German standard coals were investigated. A simultaneous thermal analyzer/mass spectrometer was used for the characterization of the coal samples and the identification of the volatiles evolved during the heating of the sample up to 1400C. The TG and DTA results were discussed for the investigations under different atmospheres. The on line recorded mass spectra were interpreted with respect to the evolution of hazardous substances.

  19. An Update on the Non-Mass-Dependent Isotope Fractionation under Thermal Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard; Liu, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Mass flow and compositional gradient (elemental and isotope separation) occurs when flu-id(s) or gas(es) in an enclosure is subjected to a thermal gradient, and the phenomenon is named thermal diffusion. Gas phase thermal diffusion has been theoretically and experimentally studied for more than a century, although there has not been a satisfactory theory to date. Nevertheless, for isotopic system, the Chapman-Enskog theory predicts that the mass difference is the only term in the thermal diffusion separation factors that differs one isotope pair to another,with the assumptions that the molecules are spherical and systematic (monoatomic-like structure) and the particle collision is elastic. Our previous report indicates factors may be playing a role because the Non-Mass Dependent (NMD) effect is found for both symmetric and asymmetric, linear and spherical polyatomic molecules over a wide range of temperature (-196C to +237C). The observed NMD phenomenon in the simple thermal-diffusion experiments demands quantitative validation and theoretical explanation. Besides the pressure and temperature dependency illustrated in our previous reports, efforts are made in this study to address issues such as the role of convection or molecular structure and whether it is a transient, non-equilibrium effect only.

  20. New simultaneous thermogravimetry and modulated molecular beam mass spectrometry apparatus for quantitative thermal decomposition studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of instrument has been designed and constructed to measure quantitatively the gas phase species evolving during thermal decompositions. These measurements can be used for understanding the kinetics of thermal decomposition, determining the heats of formation and vaporization of high-temperature materials, and analyzing sample contaminants. The new design allows measurements to be made on the same time scale as the rates of the reactions being studied, provides a universal detection technique to study a wide range of compounds, gives quantitative measurements of decomposition products, and minimizes interference from the instrument on the measurements. The instrument design is based on a unique combination of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and modulated beam mass spectroscopy (MBMS) which are brought together into a symbiotic relationship through the use of differentially pumped vacuum systems, modulated molecular beam techniques, and computer control and data-acquisition systems. A data analysis technique that calculates partial pressures in the reaction cell from the simultaneous microbalance force measurements and the modulated mass spectrometry measurements has been developed. This eliminates the need to know the ionization cross section, the ion dissociation channels, the quadrupole transmission, and the ion detector sensitivity for each thermal decomposition product prior to quantifying the mass spectral data. The operation of the instrument and the data analysis technique are illustrated with the thermal decomposition of contaminants from a precipitated palladium powder

  1. Cancellation of infrared and mass singularities in the thermal di-lepton rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altherr, T.; Becherrawy, T.

    1989-03-01

    We give a rigorous proof that, at first order in α s , the thermal di-lepton rate is free of infrared and mass singularities. The calculation is performed for massive quarks in the real-time formalism with the n-dimensional regularization scheme. The cancellation is shown to occur within each topology

  2. In situ measurement of the thermal conductivity in propylite rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooka, Kenji; Araki, Kunio; Suda, Shintaro.

    1982-11-01

    The safety evaluation for the geological disposal of the high level waste becomes an urgent problem to establish the backend of nuclear fuel cycle. The stability of the original host rock and the flow of groundwater will be perturbed by the thermal disturbances from the waste. So the heater experiment at a depth of 90 m below the surface was carried out to study the conduction of decay heat. For measuring the thermal conductivity of propylite rock mass, a cylindrical heater and 13 thermocouples were inserted in 6 boreholes. The power output of the heater was kept at 880 W constant during the experimental periods of 61 days. From the observed temperature rise around the heater, the thermal conductivity 2.1 W/m 0 C was calculated by steady-state calculation. The value of the rock mass was found to be slightly bigger compared with 1.5 - 1.6 W/m 0 C of core samples. (author)

  3. Rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs using thermal desorption – SALDI mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grechnikov, A A; Kubasov, A E; Borodkov, A S; Georgieva, V B; Nikiforov, S M; Simanovsky, Ya O; Alimpiev, S S

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to the rapid screening of pharmaceutical drugs by surface assisted laser desorption-ionization (SALDI) mass spectrometry with the rotating ball interface coupled with temperature programmed thermal desorption has been developed. Analytes were thermally desorbed and deposited onto the surface of amorphous silicon substrate attached to the rotating ball. The ball was rotated and the deposited analytes were analyzed using SALDI. The effectiveness of coupling SALDI mass spectrometry with thermal desorption was evaluated by the direct and rapid analysis of tablets containing lidocaine, diphenhydramine and propranolol without any sample pretreatment. The overall duration of the screening procedure was 30÷40 sec. Real urine samples were studied for drug analysis. It is shown that with simple preparation steps, urine samples can be quantitatively analyzed using the proposed technique with the detection limits in the range of 0.2÷0.5 ng/ml.

  4. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Controlling Thermal Cracks in Mass Concrete Foundation by Circulating Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenchao Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes an engineering experience of solving the problem of thermal cracking in mass concrete by using a large project, Zhongguancun No.1 (Beijing, China, as an example. A new method is presented for controlling temperature cracks in the mass concrete of a foundation. The method involves controlled cycles of water circulating between the surface of mass concrete foundation and the atmospheric environment. The temperature gradient between the surface and the core of the mass concrete is controlled at a relatively stable state. Water collected from the well-points used for dewatering and from rainfall is used as the source for circulating water. Mass concrete of a foundation slab is experimentally investigated through field temperature monitoring. Numerical analyses are performed by developing a finite element model of the foundation with and without water circulation. The calculation parameters are proposed based on the experiment, and finite element analysis software MIDAS/CIVIL is used to calculate the 3D temperature field of the mass concrete during the entire process of heat of hydration. The numerical results are in good agreement with the measured results. The proposed method provides an alternative practical basis for preventing thermal cracks in mass concrete.

  5. Origin of coronal mass ejection and magnetic cloud: Thermal or magnetic driven?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gong-Liang; Wang, Chi; He, Shuang-Hua

    1995-01-01

    A fundamental problem in Solar-Terrestrial Physics is the origin of the solar transient plasma output, which includes the coronal mass ejection and its interplanetary manifestation, e.g. the magnetic cloud. The traditional blast wave model resulted from solar thermal pressure impulse has faced with challenge during recent years. In the MHD numerical simulation study of CME, the authors find that the basic feature of the asymmetrical event on 18 August 1980 can be reproduced neither by a thermal pressure nor by a speed increment. Also, the thermal pressure model fails in simulating the interplanetary structure with low thermal pressure and strong magnetic field strength, representative of a typical magnetic cloud. Instead, the numerical simulation results are in favor of the magnetic field expansion as the likely mechanism for both the asymmetrical CME event and magnetic cloud.

  6. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  7. Exact solution of thermal radiation on vertical oscillating plate with variable temperature and mass flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation effects on unsteady flow past an infinite vertical oscillating plate in the presence of variable temperature and uniform mass flux is considered. The fluid considered here is a gray, absorbing-emitting radiation but a non-scattering medium. The plate temperature is raised linearly with time and the mass is diffused from the plate to the fluid at an uniform rate. The dimensionless governing equations are solved using the Laplace transform technique. The velocity, concentration and temperature are studied for different physical parameters like the phase angle, radiation parameter, Schmidt number, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number and time. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing phase angle ωt.

  8. Impact of thermal energy storage properties on solar dynamic space power conversion system mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Coles-Hamilton, Carolyn E.; Lacy, Dovie E.

    1987-01-01

    A 16 parameter solar concentrator/heat receiver mass model is used in conjunction with Stirling and Brayton Power Conversion System (PCS) performance and mass computer codes to determine the effect of thermal energy storage (TES) material property changes on overall PCS mass as a function of steady state electrical power output. Included in the PCS mass model are component masses as a function of thermal power for: concentrator, heat receiver, heat exchangers (source unless integral with heat receiver, heat sink, regenerator), heat engine units with optional parallel redundancy, power conditioning and control (PC and C), PC and C radiator, main radiator, and structure. Critical TES properties are: melting temperature, heat of fusion, density of the liquid phase, and the ratio of solid-to-liquid density. Preliminary results indicate that even though overall system efficiency increases with TES melting temperature up to 1400 K for concentrator surface accuracies of 1 mrad or better, reductions in the overall system mass beyond that achievable with lithium fluoride (LiF) can be accomplished only if the heat of fusion is at least 800 kJ/kg and the liquid density is comparable to that of LiF (1800 kg/cu m).

  9. Behavioural responses to thermal conditions affect seasonal mass change in a heat-sensitive northern ungulate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floris M van Beest

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer. We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in

  10. Behavioural responses to thermal conditions affect seasonal mass change in a heat-sensitive northern ungulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beest, Floris M; Milner, Jos M

    2013-01-01

    Empirical tests that link temperature-mediated changes in behaviour (activity and resource selection) to individual fitness or condition are currently lacking for endotherms yet may be critical to understanding the effect of climate change on population dynamics. Moose (Alces alces) are thought to suffer from heat stress in all seasons so provide a good biological model to test whether exposure to non-optimal ambient temperatures influence seasonal changes in body mass. Seasonal mass change is an important fitness correlate of large herbivores and affects reproductive success of female moose. Using GPS-collared adult female moose from two populations in southern Norway we quantified individual differences in seasonal activity budget and resource selection patterns as a function of seasonal temperatures thought to induce heat stress in moose. Individual body mass was recorded in early and late winter, and autumn to calculate seasonal mass changes (n = 52 over winter, n = 47 over summer). We found large individual differences in temperature-dependent resource selection patterns as well as within and between season variability in thermoregulatory strategies. As expected, individuals using an optimal strategy, selecting young successional forest (foraging habitat) at low ambient temperatures and mature coniferous forest (thermal shelter) during thermally stressful conditions, lost less mass in winter and gained more mass in summer. This study provides evidence that behavioural responses to temperature have important consequences for seasonal mass change in moose living in the south of their distribution in Norway, and may be a contributing factor to recently observed declines in moose demographic performance. Although the mechanisms that underlie the observed temperature mediated habitat-fitness relationship remain to be tested, physiological state and individual variation in thermal tolerance are likely contributory factors. Climate-related effects on animal

  11. Metabolic heat production and thermal conductance are mass-independent adaptations to thermal environment in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fristoe, Trevor S; Burger, Joseph R; Balk, Meghan A; Khaliq, Imran; Hof, Christian; Brown, James H

    2015-12-29

    The extent to which different kinds of organisms have adapted to environmental temperature regimes is central to understanding how they respond to climate change. The Scholander-Irving (S-I) model of heat transfer lays the foundation for explaining how endothermic birds and mammals maintain their high, relatively constant body temperatures in the face of wide variation in environmental temperature. The S-I model shows how body temperature is regulated by balancing the rates of heat production and heat loss. Both rates scale with body size, suggesting that larger animals should be better adapted to cold environments than smaller animals, and vice versa. However, the global distributions of ∼9,000 species of terrestrial birds and mammals show that the entire range of body sizes occurs in nearly all climatic regimes. Using physiological and environmental temperature data for 211 bird and 178 mammal species, we test for mass-independent adaptive changes in two key parameters of the S-I model: basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermal conductance. We derive an axis of thermal adaptation that is independent of body size, extends the S-I model, and highlights interactions among physiological and morphological traits that allow endotherms to persist in a wide range of temperatures. Our macrophysiological and macroecological analyses support our predictions that shifts in BMR and thermal conductance confer important adaptations to environmental temperature in both birds and mammals.

  12. Transient Mass and Thermal Transport during Methane Adsorption into the Metal-Organic Framework HKUST-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Hasan; McGaughey, Alan J H; Wilmer, Christopher E

    2018-01-24

    Methane adsorption into the metal-organic framework (MOF) HKUST-1 and the resulting heat generation and dissipation are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Transient simulations reveal that thermal transport in the MOF occurs two orders of magnitude faster than gas diffusion. A large thermal resistance at the MOF-gas interface (equivalent to 127 nm of bulk HKUST-1), however, prevents fast release of the generated heat. The mass transport resistance at the MOF-gas interface is equivalent to 1 nm of bulk HKUST-1 and does not present a bottleneck in the adsorption process. These results provide important insights into the application of MOFs for gas storage applications.

  13. Determination of molybdenum in plant reference material by thermal-ionization isotope-dilution mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saumer, M.; Gantner, E.; Reinhardt, J.; Ache, H.J.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical method is described for the determination of the concentration and the isotopic composition of molybdenum in plant samples using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. After microwave acid digestion and liquid-liquid extractive separation with Amberlite LA-2, the molybdenum isotopes are measured as MoO 3 - -ions in a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In all cases, the relative standard deviation of the measurements of both natural and spike molybdenum was better than 3% for all ratios measured. The concentration of molybdenum found in three different plant reference materials agreed well with the certified values. (orig.)

  14. The interaction of thermal radiation on vertical oscillating plate with variable temperature and mass diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthucumaraswamy R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal radiation effects on unsteady free convective flow of a viscous incompressible flow past an infinite vertical oscillating plate with variable temperature and mass diffusion has been studied. The fluid considered here is a gray, absorbing-emitting radiation but a non-scattering medium. The plate temperature is raised linearly with respect to time and the concentration level near the plate is also raised linearly with respect to time. An exact solution to the dimensionless governing equations has been obtained by the Laplace transform method, when the plate is oscillating harmonically in its own plane. The effects of velocity, temperature and concentration are studied for different parameters like phase angle, radiation parameter, Schmidt number, thermal Grashof number, mass Grashof number and time are studied. It is observed that the velocity increases with decreasing phase angle ωt. .

  15. Burn-up determination of irradiated thoria samples by isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Jaison, P.G.; Telmore, V.M.; Shah, R.V.; Sant, V.L.; Sasibhushan, K.; Parab, A.R.; Alamelu, D.

    2010-03-01

    Burn-up was determined experimentally using thermal ionization mass spectrometry for two samples from ThO 2 bundles irradiated in KAPS-2. This involved quantitative dissolution of the irradiated fuel samples followed by separation and determination of Th, U and a stable fission product burn-up monitor in the dissolved fuel solution. Stable fission product 148 Nd was used as a burn-up monitor for determining the number of fissions. Isotope Dilution-Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (ID-TIMS) using natural U, 229 Th and enriched 142 Nd as spikes was employed for the determination of U, Th and Nd, respectively. Atom % fission values of 1.25 ± 0.03 were obtained for both the samples. 232 U content in 233 U determined by alpha spectrometry was about 500 ppm and this was higher by a factor of 5 compared to the theoretically predicted value by ORIGEN-2 code. (author)

  16. Specificity Switching Pathways in Thermal and Mass Evaporation of Multicomponent Hydrocarbon Droplets: A Mesoscopic Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Rasoul; Luo, Kai H

    2017-07-10

    For well over one century, the Hertz-Knudsen equation has established the relationship between thermal - mass transfer coefficients through a liquid - vapour interface and evaporation rate. These coefficients, however, have been often separately estimated for one-component equilibrium systems and their simultaneous influences on evaporation rate of fuel droplets in multicomponent systems have yet to be investigated at the atomic level. Here we first apply atomistic simulation techniques and quantum/statistical mechanics methods to understand how thermal and mass evaporation effects are controlled kinetically/thermodynamically. We then present a new development of a hybrid method of quantum transition state theory/improved kinetic gas theory, for multicomponent hydrocarbon systems to investigate how concerted-distinct conformational changes of hydrocarbons at the interface affect the evaporation rate. The results of this work provide an important physical concept in fundamental understanding of atomistic pathways in topological interface transitions of chain molecules, resolving an open problem in kinetics of fuel droplets evaporation.

  17. Lighter touch keeps in the heat. [Advantages of low-thermal-mass insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipes, A.

    1979-04-01

    Low-thermal-mass insulation of ceramic fibers and light refractory materials is more suitable to applications with intermittent processes and lower-temperature melting and retreating, where the heat-retention requirements do not require traditional furnace design. Old furnaces can be retrofitted by replacing bricks with insulation or by veneering. Insulating materials include ceramic, alumina, and quartz fibers, and microtherm in the form of blocks, blankets and other shapes. 4 figures. (DCK)

  18. Investigation of naproxen drug using mass spectrometry, thermal analyses and semi-empirical molecular orbital calculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Zayed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Naproxen (C14H14O3 is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID. It is important to investigate its structure to know the active groups and weak bonds responsible for medical activity. In the present study, naproxen was investigated by mass spectrometry (MS, thermal analysis (TA measurements (TG/DTG and DTA and confirmed by semi empirical molecular orbital (MO calculation, using PM3 procedure. These calculations included, bond length, bond order, bond strain, partial charge distribution, ionization energy and heat of formation (ΔHf. The mass spectra and thermal analysis fragmentation pathways were proposed and compared to select the most suitable scheme representing the correct fragmentation pathway of the drug in both techniques. The PM3 procedure reveals that the primary cleavage site of the charged molecule is the rupture of the COOH group (lowest bond order and high strain which followed by CH3 loss of the methoxy group. Thermal analysis of the neutral drug reveals a high response to the temperature variation with very fast rate. It decomposed in several sequential steps in the temperature range 80–400 °C. These mass losses appear as two endothermic and one exothermic peaks which required energy values of 255.42, 10.67 and 371.49 J g−1 respectively. The initial thermal ruptures are similar to that obtained by mass spectral fragmentation (COOH rupture. It was followed by the loss of the methyl group and finally by ethylene loss. Therefore, comparison between MS and TA helps in selection of the proper pathway representing its fragmentation. This comparison is successfully confirmed by MO-calculation.

  19. High precision analysis of trace lithium isotope by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lei; Liu Xuemei; Long Kaiming; Liu Zhao; Yang Tianli

    2010-01-01

    High precision analysis method of ng lithium by thermal ionization mass spectrometry is developed. By double-filament measurement,phosphine acid ion enhancer and sample pre-baking technique,the precision of trace lithium analysis is improved. For 100 ng lithium isotope standard sample, relative standard deviation is better than 0.086%; for 10 ng lithium isotope standard sample, relative standard deviation is better than 0.90%. (authors)

  20. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler with low mass flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Jie; Yang Dong; Chen Gongming; Zhou Xu; Bi Qincheng

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler becomes an important development trend for coal-fired power plant and thermal-hydraulic analysis is a key factor for the design and operation of water wall. According to the boiler structure and furnace-sided heat flux, the water wall system of a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler is treated in this paper as a flow network consisting of series-parallel loops, pressure grids and connecting tubes. A mathematical model for predicting the thermal-hydraulic characteristics in boiler heating surface is based on the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations of these components, which introduces numerous empirical correlations available for heat transfer and hydraulic resistance calculation. Mass flux distribution and pressure drop data in the water wall at 30%, 75% and 100% of the boiler maximum continuous rating (BMCR) are obtained by iteratively solving the model. Simultaneity, outlet vapor temperatures and metal temperatures in water wall tubes are estimated. The results show good heat transfer performance and low flow resistance, which implies that the water wall design of supercritical CFB boiler is applicable. - Highlights: → We proposed a model for thermal-hydraulic analysis of boiler heating surface. → The model is applied in a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler. → We explore the pressure drop, mass flux and temperature distribution in water wall. → The operating safety of boiler is estimated. → The results show good heat transfer performance and low flow resistance.

  1. Effectiveness of indirect evaporative cooling and thermal mass in a hot arid climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, Eduardo [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Tecnologia/Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Civil, Departamento de Construcao Civil, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana - UTFPR, Av. Sete de Setembro, 3165. Curitiba PR, CEP. 80230-901 (Brazil); Gonzalez Cruz, Eduardo [Instituto de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Arquitectura y Diseno (IFAD), Universidad del Zulia, Nucleo Tecnico de LUZ, Av. Goajira (16) con Calle 67, Maracaibo, CP 4011-A-526 (Venezuela); Givoni, Baruch [Department of Architecture, School of Arts and Architecture, UCLA, Los Angeles CA, USA, and Ben Gurion University (Israel)

    2010-06-15

    In this paper, we compare results of a long-term temperature monitoring in a building with high thermal mass to indoor temperature predictions of a second building that uses an indirect evaporative cooling system as a means of passive cooling (Vivienda Bioclimatica Prototipo -VBP-1), for the climatic conditions of Sde Boqer, Negev region of Israel (local latitude 30 52'N, longitude 34 46'E, approximately 480 m above sea level). The high-mass building was monitored from January through September 2006 and belongs to a student dormitory complex located at the Sde Boqer Campus of Ben-Gurion University. VBP-1 was designed and built in Maracaibo, Venezuela (latitude 10 34'N, longitude 71 44'W, elevation 66 m above sea level) and had its indoor air temperatures, below and above a shaded roof pond, as well as the pond temperature monitored from February to September 2006. Formulas were developed for the VBP-1, based on part of the whole monitoring period, which represent the measured daily indoor maximum, average and minimum temperatures. The formulas were then validated against measurements taken independently in different time periods. The developed formulas were here used for estimating the building's thermal and energy performance at the climate of Sde Boqer, allowing a comparison of two different strategies: indirect evaporative cooling and the use of thermal mass. (author)

  2. Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings:Field Tests, Simulation and Audits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

    2005-09-01

    The principle of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads and reducing or shedding related electrical demand during the peak periods. Cost savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies (Braun 1990, Ruud et al. 1990, Conniff 1991, Andresen and Brandemuehl 1992, Mahajan et al. 1993, Morris et al. 1994, Keeney and Braun 1997, Becker and Paciuk 2002, Xu et al. 2003). This technology appears to have significant potential for demand reduction if applied within an overall demand response program. The primary goal associated with this research is to develop information and tools necessary to assess the viability of and, where appropriate, implement demand response programs involving building thermal mass in buildings throughout California. The project involves evaluating the technology readiness, overall demand reduction potential, and customer acceptance for different classes of buildings. This information can be used along with estimates of the impact of the strategies on energy use to design appropriate incentives for customers.

  3. Hydromagnetic nonlinear thermally radiative nanoliquid flow with Newtonian heat and mass conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ijaz Khan

    Full Text Available This paper communicates the analysis of MHD three-dimensional flow of Jeffrey nanoliquid over a stretchable surface. Flow due to a bidirectional surface is considered. Heat and mass transfer subject to volume fraction of nanoparticles, heat generation and nonlinear solar radiation are examined. Newtonian heat and mass transportation conditions are employed at surface. Concept of boundary layer is utilized to developed the mathematical problem. The boundary value problem is dictated by ten physical parameters: Deborah number, Hartman number, ratio of stretching rates, thermophoretic parameter, Brownian motion parameter, Prandtl number, temperature ratio parameter, conjugate heat and mass parameters and Lewis number. Convergent solutions are obtained using homotopic procedure. Convergence zone for obtained results is explicitly identified. The obtained solutions are interpreted physically. Keywords: Hydromagnetic flow, Viscoelastic nanofluid, Thermophoretic and Brownian moment, Nonlinear thermal radiation, Heat generation

  4. Mercury (Hg) in meteorites: Variations in abundance, thermal release profile, mass-dependent and mass-independent isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Cloquet, Christophe; Marty, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    We have measured the concentration, isotopic composition and thermal release profiles of Mercury (Hg) in a suite of meteorites, including both chondrites and achondrites. We find large variations in Hg concentration between different meteorites (ca. 10 ppb to 14,000 ppb), with the highest concentration orders of magnitude above the expected bulk solar system silicates value. From the presence of several different Hg carrier phases in thermal release profiles (150-650 °C), we argue that these variations are unlikely to be mainly due to terrestrial contamination. The Hg abundance of meteorites shows no correlation with petrographic type, or mass-dependent fractionation of Hg isotopes. Most carbonaceous chondrites show mass-independent enrichments in the odd-numbered isotopes 199Hg and 201Hg. We show that the enrichments are not nucleosynthetic, as we do not find corresponding nucleosynthetic deficits of 196Hg. Instead, they can partially be explained by Hg evaporation and redeposition during heating of asteroids from primordial radionuclides and late-stage impact heating. Non-carbonaceous chondrites, most achondrites and the Earth do not show these enrichments in vapor-phase Hg. All meteorites studied here have however isotopically light Hg (δ202Hg = ∼-7 to -1) relative to the Earth's average crustal values, which could suggest that the Earth has lost a significant fraction of its primordial Hg. However, the late accretion of carbonaceous chondritic material on the order of ∼2%, which has been suggested to account for the water, carbon, nitrogen and noble gas inventories of the Earth, can also contribute most or all of the Earth's current Hg budget. In this case, the isotopically heavy Hg of the Earth's crust would have to be the result of isotopic fractionation between surface and deep-Earth reservoirs.

  5. Energy efficiency and comfort conditions in passive solar buildings: Effect of thermal mass at equatorial high altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogoli, David Mwale

    This dissertation is based on the philosophy that architectural design should not just be a function of aesthetics, but also of energy-efficiency, advanced technologies and passive solar strategies. A lot of published literature is silent regarding buildings in equatorial highland regions. This dissertation is part of the body of knowledge that attempts to provide a study of energy in buildings using thermal mass. The objectives were to establish (1) effect of equatorial high-altitude climate on thermal mass, (2) effect of thermal mass on moderating indoor temperatures, (3) effect of thermal mass in reducing heating and cooling energy, and (4) the amount of time lag and decrement factor of thermal mass. Evidence to analyze the effect of thermal mass issues came from three sources. First, experimental physical models involving four houses were parametrically conducted in Nairobi, Kenya. Second, energy computations were made using variations in thermal mass for determining annual energy usage and costs. Third, the data gathered were observed, evaluated, and compared with currently published research. The findings showed that: (1) Equatorial high-altitude climates that have diurnal temperature ranging about 10--15°C allow thermal mass to moderate indoor temperatures; (2) Several equations were established that indicate that indoor mean radiant temperatures can be predicted from outdoor temperatures; (3) Thermal mass can reduce annual energy for heating and cooling by about 71%; (4) Time lag and decrement of 200mm thick stone and concrete thermal mass can be predicted by a new formula; (5) All windows on a building should be shaded. East and west windows when shaded save 51% of the cooling energy. North and south windows when fully shaded account for a further 26% of the cooling energy; (6) Insulation on the outside of a wall reduces energy use by about 19.6% below the levels with insulation on the inside. The basic premise of this dissertation is that decisions that

  6. Development of low thermal mass cement-sand block utilizing peat soil and effective microorganism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irham Hameeda Mohamad Idris

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of low thermal mass cement-sand block by incorporating peat soil and Effective Microorganism (EM was studied systematically. In total, seven mixtures of cement-sand block targeted at a 28-days compressive strength of 7 MPa are designed. One control sample is made with a water/cement ratio (w/c of 0.5, three mixes using 3%, 6% and 10% peat soil replacing sand and three mixes using 10%, 20% and 30% EM replacing water. Modified blocks with 6% of peat soil and 30% of EM are the most optimum blocks to be used in the construction of masonry as they successfully reduced the thermal conductivity of the blocks with the value of 1.275 W/mK and 1.792 W/mK respectively when being compared to the thermal conductivity of the control sample which is 2.400 W/mK. Besides, they are also able to achieve higher strength than the desired compressive strength which is 7 MPa. The compressive strength of the samples with 6% of peat soil is 16.48 MPa at 28-days while 30.39 MPa for samples with 30% of EM. On the other hand, the water absorption rate of samples with 6% of peat soil is 7.6% while 6.1% for samples with 30% EM and both are okay since their rate of water absorption is lower than 20%. In conclusion, the addition of peat soil and EM in the cement-sand mix show promising performance as a low cost material to produce low thermal mass cement-sand block. Keywords: Effective microorganism, Peat soil, Thermal conductivity, Cement brick

  7. RSMASS-D nuclear thermal propulsion and bimodal system mass models

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Donald B.; Marshall, Albert C.

    1997-01-01

    Two relatively simple models have been developed to estimate reactor, radiation shield, and balance of system masses for a particle bed reactor (PBR) nuclear thermal propulsion concept and a cermet-core power and propulsion (bimodal) concept. The approach was based on the methodology developed for the RSMASS-D models. The RSMASS-D approach for the reactor and shield sub-systems uses a combination of simple equations derived from reactor physics and other fundamental considerations along with tabulations of data from more detailed neutron and gamma transport theory computations. Relatively simple models are used to estimate the masses of other subsystem components of the nuclear propulsion and bimodal systems. Other subsystem components include instrumentation and control (I&C), boom, safety systems, radiator, thermoelectrics, heat pipes, and nozzle. The user of these models can vary basic design parameters within an allowed range to achieve a parameter choice which yields a minimum mass for the operational conditions of interest. Estimated system masses are presented for a range of reactor power levels for propulsion for the PBR propulsion concept and for both electrical power and propulsion for the cermet-core bimodal concept. The estimated reactor system masses agree with mass predictions from detailed calculations with xx percent for both models.

  8. Effect of thermal mass on life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodoo, Ambrose; Gustavsson, Leif; Sathre, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effect of thermal mass on life cycle primary energy balance of concrete and wood building is analyzed. ► A concrete building has slightly lower space heating demand than a wood alternative. ► Still, a wood building has a lower life cycle primary energy use than a concrete alternative. ► The influence of thermal mass on space heating energy use for buildings in Nordic climate is small. -- Abstract: In this study we analyze the effect of thermal mass on space heating energy use and life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building. The analysis includes primary energy use during the production, operation, and end-of-life phases. Based on hour-by-hour dynamic modeling of heat flows in building mass configurations we calculate the energy saving benefits of thermal mass during the operation phase of the buildings. Our results indicate that the energy savings due to thermal mass is small and varies with the climatic location and energy efficiency levels of the buildings. A concrete-frame building has slightly lower space heating demand than a wood-frame alternative, due to the higher thermal mass of concrete-based materials. Still, a wood-frame building has a lower life cycle primary energy balance than a concrete-frame alternative. This is due primarily to the lower production primary energy use and greater bioenergy recovery benefits of the wood-frame buildings. These advantages outweigh the energy saving benefits of thermal mass. We conclude that the influence of thermal mass on space heating energy use for buildings located in Nordic climate is small and that wood-frame buildings with cogeneration based district heating would be an effective means of reducing primary energy use in the built environment.

  9. Structure investigation, spectral, thermal, X-ray and mass characterization of piroxicam and its metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, M. A.; Nour El-Dien, F. A.; Mohamed, Gehad G.; El-Gamel, Nadia E. A.

    2004-10-01

    [M(H 2L) 2](A) 2. yH 2O (where H 2L: neutral piroxicam (Pir), A: Cl - in case of Ni(II) or acetate anion in case of Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions and y=0-2.5) and [M(H 2L) 3](A) z. yH 2O (A: SO 42- in case of Fe(II) ion ( z=1) or Cl - in case of Fe(III) ( z=3) and Co(II) ions ( z=2) and y=1-4) chelates are prepared and characterized using elemental analyses, IR, magnetic and electronic reflectance measurements, mass spectra and thermal analyses. IR spectra reveal that Pir behaves a neutral bidentate ligand coordinated to the metal ions through the pyridyl-N and carbonyl-O of the amide moiety. The reflectance and magnetic moment measurements reveal that these chelates have tetrahedral, square planar and octahedral geometrical structures. Mass spectra and thermal analyses are also used to confirm the proposed formulae and the possible fragments resulted from fragmentation of Pir and its chelates. The thermal behaviour of the chelates (TGA and DTA) are discussed in detail and the thermal stability of the anhydrous chelates follow the order Ni(II)≅Cu(II)

  10. Determination of Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) of 20MPa Mass Concrete Using Granite Aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee Siang, GO

    2017-07-01

    Experimental test was carried out to determine the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value of 20MPa mass concrete using granite aggregate. The CTE value was established using procedure proposed by Kada et al. 2002 in determining the magnitude of early-ages CTE through laboratory test which is a rather accurate way by eliminating any possible superimposed effect of others early-age thermal deformation shrinkages such as autogenous, carbonation, plastic and drying shrinkage. This was done by submitting granite concrete block samples instrumented with ST4 vibrating wire extensometers to thermal shocks. The response of the concrete samples to this shock results in a nearly instantaneous deformation, which are measured by the sensor. These deformations, as well as the temperature signal, are used to calculate the CTE. By repeating heat cycles, the variation in the early-ages of concrete CTE over time was monitored and assessed for a period of upto 7 days. The developed CTE value facilitating the verification and validation of actual maximum permissible critical temperature differential limit (rather than arbitrarily follow published value) of cracking potential. For thick sections, internal restraint is dominant and this is governed by differentials mainly. Of the required physical properties for thermal modelling, CTE is of paramount importance that with given appropriate internal restraint factor the condition of cracking due to internal restraint is governs by equation, ΔTmax= 3.663ɛctu / αc. Thus, it can be appreciated that an increase in CTE will lower the maximum allowable differential for cracking avoidance in mass concrete while an increase of tensile strain capacity will increase the maximum allowable temperature differential.

  11. Yucca Mountain Project thermal and mechanical codes first benchmark exercise: Part 3, Jointed rock mass analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costin, L.S.; Bauer, S.J.

    1991-10-01

    Thermal and mechanical models for intact and jointed rock mass behavior are being developed, verified, and validated at Sandia National Laboratories for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Benchmarking is an essential part of this effort and is one of the tools used to demonstrate verification of engineering software used to solve thermomechanical problems. This report presents the results of the third (and final) phase of the first thermomechanical benchmark exercise. In the first phase of this exercise, nonlinear heat conduction code were used to solve the thermal portion of the benchmark problem. The results from the thermal analysis were then used as input to the second and third phases of the exercise, which consisted of solving the structural portion of the benchmark problem. In the second phase of the exercise, a linear elastic rock mass model was used. In the third phase of the exercise, two different nonlinear jointed rock mass models were used to solve the thermostructural problem. Both models, the Sandia compliant joint model and the RE/SPEC joint empirical model, explicitly incorporate the effect of the joints on the response of the continuum. Three different structural codes, JAC, SANCHO, and SPECTROM-31, were used with the above models in the third phase of the study. Each model was implemented in two different codes so that direct comparisons of results from each model could be made. The results submitted by the participants showed that the finite element solutions using each model were in reasonable agreement. Some consistent differences between the solutions using the two different models were noted but are not considered important to verification of the codes. 9 refs., 18 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Stable isotope dilution analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broekman, A.; Raaphorst, J.G. van

    1984-01-01

    The combination of stable isotope dilution analysis (SIDA) and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is in use for lead and uranium determination at milligram per kilogram levels for over 20 years. However, several other elements can also be determined accurately by SIDA/TIMS. In this study the determinations of cadmium and copper are described. Details of the digestion, electrochemical and ion-exchange separations and the loading of the elements on a filament are given. The advantages of the SIDA/TIMS technique are shown and illustrated with results for several certified reference materials. (orig.) [de

  13. Thallium determination in reference materials by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) using thermal ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waidmann, E.; Hilpert, K.; Stoeppler, M.

    1990-01-01

    Using Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry (IDMS) with thermal ionization, thallium concentrations were determined in reference materials from NIST and BCR, from other sources, and reference materials from the German Environmental Specimen Bank 203 Tl spike solution is applied for the isotope dilution technique. Thallium concentrations in the investigated materials range from 2.67 μg Tl.kg -1 to 963 μg Tl.kg -1 with a relative standard deviation from 0.14 to 10%. The detection limit was 0.1 ng thallium for this work. (orig.)

  14. Thermal spectrum of pseudo-scalar glueballs and Debye screening mass from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Nelson R.F.; Ferreira, Luiz F. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-10-15

    The finite temperature spectrum of pseudo-scalar glueballs in a plasma is studied using a holographic model. The 0{sup -+} glueball is represented by a pseudo-scalar (axion) field living in a five dimensional geometry that comes from a solution of Einstein equations for gravity coupled with a dilaton scalar field. The spectral function obtained from the model shows a clear peak corresponding to the quasi-particle ground state. Analyzing the variation of the position of the peak with temperature, we describe the thermal behavior of the Debye screening mass of the plasma. As a check of consistency, the zero temperature limit of the model is also investigated. The glueball masses obtained are consistent with previous lattice results. (orig.)

  15. Determining picogram quantities of U in human urine by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, W.R.; Fassett, J.D.; Hotes, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The U concentration in Standard Reference Material 2670 (Toxic Metals in Freeze-Dried Urine) and the urine of two preschool-age children were determined by measuring the chemically separated U by isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry using ion counting detection. This procedure can detect about 1% of the U atoms loaded into the mass spectrometer and has a total chemical blank of about 5 pg U. The U concentration in SRM 2670 was found to be 113 +/- 2 pg 238 U/ml (1 s). At this concentration, a 1-ml sample is sufficient for a determination with a total uncertainty of less than 5%. The U concentrations in the two children were 3.1 +/- 0.9 and 3.6 +/- 0.9 pg 238 U/g. These values suggest that the U concentration in urine of unexposed persons may be at this low level or lower

  16. The Core Mass Growth and Stellar Lifetime of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Marigo, Paola; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel

    2014-02-01

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M initial = 2.8-3.8 M ⊙. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M initial = 1.6 and 2.0 M ⊙. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z initial = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M initial = 1.6 to 2.0 M ⊙. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ~10% at M initial = 3.4 M ⊙, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M initial = 3.8 M ⊙. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t ~ 3 Myr and E = 1.2 × 1010 L ⊙ yr for M initial ~ 2 M ⊙ (t ~ 2 Myr

  17. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Marigo, Paola

    2014-01-01

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M initial = 2.8-3.8 M ☉ . We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M initial = 1.6 and 2.0 M ☉ . Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z initial = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M initial = 1.6 to 2.0 M ☉ . At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ∼10% at M initial = 3.4 M ☉ , after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M initial = 3.8 M ☉ . These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t ∼ 3 Myr and E = 1.2 × 10 10 L ☉ yr for M initial ∼ 2 M

  18. The core mass growth and stellar lifetime of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalirai, Jason S.; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Marigo, Paola, E-mail: jkalirai@stsci.edu, E-mail: paola.marigo@unipd.it, E-mail: ptremblay@lsw.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

    2014-02-10

    We establish new constraints on the intermediate-mass range of the initial-final mass relation, and apply the results to study the evolution of stars on the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB). These constraints derive from newly discovered (bright) white dwarfs in the nearby Hyades and Praesepe star clusters, including a total of 18 high signal-to-noise ratio measurements with progenitor masses of M {sub initial} = 2.8-3.8 M {sub ☉}. We also include a new analysis of existing white dwarfs in the older NGC 6819 and NGC 7789 star clusters, M {sub initial} = 1.6 and 2.0 M {sub ☉}. Over this range of initial masses, stellar evolutionary models for metallicity Z {sub initial} = 0.02 predict the maximum growth of the core of TP-AGB stars. By comparing the newly measured remnant masses to the robust prediction of the core mass at the first thermal pulse on the AGB (i.e., from stellar interior models), we establish several findings. First, we show that the stellar core mass on the AGB grows rapidly from 10% to 30% for stars with M {sub initial} = 1.6 to 2.0 M {sub ☉}. At larger masses, the core-mass growth decreases steadily to ∼10% at M {sub initial} = 3.4 M {sub ☉}, after which there is a small hint of a upturn out to M {sub initial} = 3.8 M {sub ☉}. These observations are in excellent agreement with predictions from the latest TP-AGB evolutionary models in Marigo et al. We also compare to models with varying efficiencies of the third dredge-up and mass loss, and demonstrate that the process governing the growth of the core is largely the stellar wind, while the third dredge-up plays a secondary, but non-negligible role. Based on the new white dwarf measurements, we perform an exploratory calibration of the most popular mass-loss prescriptions in the literature, as well as of the third dredge-up efficiency as a function of the stellar mass. Finally, we estimate the lifetime and the integrated luminosity of stars on the TP-AGB to peak at t

  19. Isotope Dilution - Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometric Analysis for Tin in a Fly Ash Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, C.; Fernandez, M.; Quejido, A. L.

    2006-01-01

    Isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) analysis has been applied to the determination of tin in a fly ash sample supplied by the EC Joint Research Centre (Ispra, Italy). The proposed procedure includes the silica gel/phosphoric acid technique for tin thermal ionisation activation and a strict heating protocol for isotope ratio measurements. Instrumental mass discrimination factor has been previously determined measuring a natural tin standard solution. Spike solutions has been prepared from 112Sn-enriched metal and quantified by reverse isotope dilution analysis. Two sample aliquots were spiked and tin was extracted with 4,5 M HCI during 25 min ultrasound esposure time. Due to the complex matrix of this fly ash material, a two-steps purification stage using ion-exchange chromatography was required prior TIMS analysis. Obtained results for the two sample-spike blends (10,10 + - 0,55 y 10,50 + - 0,64 imolg-1) are comprarable, both value and uncertainty. Also a good reproducibility is observed between measurements. The proposed ID-TIMS procedure, as a primary method and due to the lack of fly ash reference material certified for tin content, can be used to validate more routine methodologies applied to tin determination in this kind of materials. (Author) 75 refs

  20. Detailed energy saving performance analyses on thermal mass walls demonstrated in a zero energy house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, L. [School of Architecture, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Hurt, R.; Correia, D.; Boehm, R. [Center for Energy Research, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    An insulated concrete wall system{sup 1}1 was used on exterior walls of a zero energy house. Its thermal functions were investigated using actual data in comparison to a conventional wood frame system. The internal wall temperature of massive systems changes more slowly than the conventional wall constructions, leading to a more stable indoor temperature. The Energy10 simulated equivalent R-value and DBMS of the mass walls under actual climate conditions are, respectively, 6.98 (m{sup 2} C)/W and 3.39. However, the simulated heating energy use was much lower for the massive walls while the cooling load was a little higher. Further investigation on the heat flux indicates that the heat actually is transferred inside all day and night, which results in a higher cooling energy consumption. A one-dimensional model further verified these analyses, and the calculated results are in good agreement with the actual data. We conclude that the thermal mass wall does have the ability to store heat during the daytime and release it back at night, but in desert climates with high 24-h ambient temperature and intense sunlight, more heat will be stored than can be transferred back outside at night. As a result, an increased cooling energy will be required. (author)

  1. Multi-thermal dynamics and energetics of a coronal mass ejection in the low solar atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, I. G.; Kontar, E. P.

    2013-05-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to determine the multi-thermal characteristics and plasma energetics of an eruptive plasmoid and occulted flare observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA). Methods: We study a 2010 Nov. 3 event (peaking at 12:20 UT in GOES soft X-rays) of a coronal mass ejection and occulted flare that demonstrates the morphology of a classic erupting flux rope. The high spatial and time resolution and six coronal channels of the SDO/AIA images allows the dynamics of the multi-thermal emission during the initial phases of eruption to be studied in detail. The differential emission measure is calculated, using an optimized version of a regularized inversion method, for each pixel across the six channels at different times, resulting in emission measure maps and movies in a variety of temperature ranges. Results: We find that the core of the erupting plasmoid is hot (8-11, 11-14 MK) with a similarly hot filamentary "stem" structure connecting it to the lower atmosphere, which could be interpreted as the current sheet in the flux rope model, though is wider than these models suggest. The velocity of the leading edge of the eruption is 597-664 km s-1 in the temperature range ≥3-4 MK and between 1029-1246 km s-1 for ≤2-3 MK. We estimate the density (in 11-14 MK) of the erupting core and stem during the impulsive phase to be about 3 × 109 cm-3, 6 × 109 cm-3, 9 × 108 cm-3 in the plasmoid core, stem, and surrounding envelope of material. This gives thermal energy estimates of 5 × 1029 erg, 1 × 1029 erg, and 2 × 1030 erg. The kinetic energy for the core and envelope is slightly lower. The thermal energy of the core and current sheet grows during the eruption, suggesting continuous influx of energy presumably via reconnection. Conclusions: The combination of the optimized regularized inversion method and SDO/AIA data allows the multi-thermal characteristics (i.e. velocity, density, and thermal energies) of the

  2. GoAmazon 2014/15 Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, JN [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TDCIMS) deployment to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility T3 site in Manacapuru, Brazil, was motivated by two main scientific objectives of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 field campaign. 1) Study the interactions between anthropogenic and biogenic emissions by determining important molecular species in ambient nanoparticles. To address this, TDCIMS data will be combined with coincident measurements such as gas-phase sulfuric acid to determine the contribution of sulfuric acid condensation to nucleation and growth. We can then compare that result to TDCIMS-derived nanoparticle composition to determine the fraction of growth that can be attributed to the uptake of organic compounds. The molecular composition of sampled particles will also be used to attribute specific chemical species and mechanisms to growth, such as the condensation of low-volatility species or the oligomerization of α-dicarbonyl compounds. 2) Determine the source of new ambient nanoparticles in the Amazon. The hypothesis prior to measurements was that potassium salts formed from the evaporation of primary particles emitted by fungal spores can provide a unique and important pathway for new particle production in the Amazon basin. To explore this hypothesis, the TDCIMS recorded the mass spectra of sampled ambient particles using a protonated water cluster Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS). Laboratory tests performed using potassium salts show that the TDCIMS can detect potassium with high sensitivity with this technique.

  3. A low thermal mass fast gas chromatograph and its implementation in fast gas chromatography mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Moragn, Mati; Amirav, Aviv

    2011-12-30

    A new type of low thermal mass (LTM) fast gas chromatograph (GC) was designed and operated in combination with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with supersonic molecular beams (SMB), including GC-MS-MS with SMB, thereby providing a novel combination with unique capabilities. The LTM fast GC is based on a short capillary column inserted inside a stainless steel tube that is resistively heated. It is located and mounted outside the standard GC oven on its available top detector port, while the capillary column is connected as usual to the standard GC injector and supersonic molecular beam interface transfer line. This new type of fast GC-MS with SMB enables less than 1 min full range temperature programming and cooling down analysis cycle time. The operation of the fast GC-MS with SMB was explored and 1 min full analysis cycle time of a mixture of 16 hydrocarbons in the C(10)H(22) up to C(44)H(90) range was achieved. The use of 35 mL/min high column flow rate enabled the elution of C(44)H(90) in less than 45 s while the SMB interface enabled splitless acceptance of this high flow rate and the provision of dominant molecular ions. A novel compound 9-benzylazidanthracene was analyzed for its purity and a synthetic chemistry process was monitored for the optimization of the chemical reaction yield. Biodiesel was analyzed in jet fuel (by both GC-MS and GC-MS-MS) in under 1 min as 5 ppm fatty acid methyl esters. Authentic iprodion and cypermethrin pesticides were analyzed in grapes extract in both full scan mode and fast GC-MS-MS mode in under 1 min cycle time and explosive mixture including TATP, TNT and RDX was analyzed in under 1 min combined with exhibiting dominant molecular ion for TATP. Fast GC-MS with SMB is based on trading GC separation for speed of analysis while enhancing the separation power of the MS via the enhancement of the molecular ion in the electron ionization of cold molecules in the SMB. This paper further discusses several features of

  4. Sensitivity analysis of efficiency thermal energy storage on selected rock mass and grout parameters using design of experiment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wołoszyn, Jerzy; Gołaś, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Paper propose a new methodology to sensitivity study of underground thermal storage. • Using MDF model and DOE technique significantly shorter of calculations time. • Calculation of one time step was equal to approximately 57 s. • Sensitivity study cover five thermo-physical parameters. • Conductivity of rock mass and grout material have a significant impact on efficiency. - Abstract: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of selected parameters on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage. In this paper, besides thermal conductivity, the effect of such parameters as specific heat, density of the rock mass, thermal conductivity and specific heat of grout material was investigated. Implementation of this objective requires the use of an efficient computational method. The aim of the research was achieved by using a new numerical model, Multi Degree of Freedom (MDF), as developed by the authors and Design of Experiment (DoE) techniques with a response surface. The presented methodology can significantly reduce the time that is needed for research and to determine the effect of various parameters on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage. Preliminary results of the research confirmed that thermal conductivity of the rock mass has the greatest impact on the efficiency of underground thermal energy storage, and that other parameters also play quite significant role

  5. Resin bead-thermal ionization mass spectrometry for determination of plutonium concentration in irradiated fuel dissolver solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Sumana; Shah, R.V.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Pandey, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Determination of isotopic composition (IC) and concentration of plutonium (Pu) is necessary at various stages of nuclear fuel cycle which involves analysis of complex matrices like dissolver solution of irradiated fuel, nuclear waste stream etc. Mass spectrometry, e.g. thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) are commonly used for determination of IC and concentration of plutonium. However, to circumvent matrix interferences, efficient separation as well as preconcentration of Pu is required prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Purification steps employing ion-exchange resins are widely used for the separation of Pu from dissolver solution or from mixture of other actinides e.g. U, Am. However, an alternative way is to selectively preconcentrate Pu on a resin bead, followed by direct loading of the bead on the filament of thermal ionization mass spectrometer

  6. Thermal analysis of mass concrete embedded with double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling water pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jian; Hu Yu; Zuo Zheng; Jin Feng; Li Qingbin

    2012-01-01

    Removal of hydration heat from mass concrete during construction is important for the quality and safety of concrete structures. In this study, a three-dimensional finite element program for thermal analysis of mass concrete embedded with double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling water pipes was developed based on the equivalent equation of heat conduction including the effect of cooling water pipes and hydration heat of concrete. The cooling function of the double-layer staggered heterogeneous cooling pipes in a concrete slab was derived from the principle of equivalent cooling. To improve the applicability and precision of the equivalent heat conduction equation under small flow, the cooling function was revised according to its monotonicity and empirical formulas of single-phase forced-convection heat transfer in tube flow. Considering heat hydration of concrete at later age, a double exponential function was proposed to fit the adiabatic temperature rise curve of concrete. Subsequently, the temperature variation of concrete was obtained, and the outlet temperature of cooling water was estimated through the energy conservation principle. Comparing calculated results with actual measured data from a monolith of an arch dam in China, the numerical model was proven to be effective in sufficiently simulating accurate temperature variations of mass concrete. - Highlights: ► Three-dimensional program is developed to model temperature history of mass concrete. ► Massive concrete is embedded with double-layer heterogeneous cooling pipes. ► Double exponential function is proposed to fit the adiabatic temperature rise curve. ► Outlet temperature of cooling water is estimated. ► A comparison is made between the calculated and measured data.

  7. Separation Techniques for Uranium and Plutonium at Trace Levels for the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, M. Y.; Han, S. H.; Kim, J. G.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, W. H.

    2005-12-01

    This report describes the state of the art and the progress of the chemical separation and purification techniques required for the thermal ionization mass spectrometric determination of uranium and plutonium in environmental samples at trace or ultratrace levels. Various techniques, such as precipitation, solvent extraction, extraction chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, for separation of uranium and plutonium were evaluated. Sample preparation methods and dissolution techniques for environmental samples were also discussed. Especially, both extraction chromatographic and anion exchange chromatographic procedures for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples, such as soil, sediment, plant, seawater, urine, and bone ash were reviewed in detail in order to propose some suitable methods for the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from the safeguards environmental or swipe samples. A survey of the IAEA strengthened safeguards system, the clean room facility of IAEA's NWAL(Network of Analytical Laboratories), and the analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples was also discussed here

  8. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of actinides: Pushing the limits of accuracy and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stefan; Boulyga, Sergei; Cunningham, Alan; Klose, Dilani; Koepf, Andreas; Poths, Jane [Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Stephan [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC-EU, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    New method developments in multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) for actinide isotope ratio analysis to improve accuracy and limits of detection will be presented. With respect to limits of detection, results on improving work function using various carbon additives will be reviewed and presented as well as developments in cavity ion source (as compared to standard flat ribbon filament ion source) for femto- and attogram levels of uranium, plutonium, and americium. With respect to accuracy, results on isotope ratio measurements of isotopes of uranium (relative accuracy of 0.3% to 0.01%) are presented with an example being U-234-Th-230 age-dating (NBL CRM 112-A). In this context, the importance of traceability (to the S.I. units) and the use of (certified) reference materials are emphasized. The focus of this presentation is on applications to nuclear safeguards / forensics.

  9. Quality control for total evaporation technique by surface/thermal ionization mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Seikou; Inoue, Sinichi; Yamaguchi, Katsuyuki; Tsutaki, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    For the measurement of uranium and plutonium isotopic composition, the surface/thermal ionization mass spectrometry is widely used at the both nuclear facilities and safeguards verification laboratories. The progress of instrument specification makes higher sensitivity. The total evaporation technique is one of the latest measurement techniques by using this progress, in which all of uranium or plutonium on the filament would be evaporated by increasing the filament current. The accuracy and precision of this technique is normally checked by using the certified isotope reference materials measurement. But the fluctuation of ion beam is very different by each filament, depending on the chemical form of evaporation. So, it should be considered how to check the measurement quality of unknown samples which has no certified values. This presentation is focused on the monitoring of ion yields and pattern of isotope ratio fluctuation to attain the traceability between reference material and unknown sample as quality control approach of total evaporation technique. (author)

  10. Interfacing of thermal ionization mass spectrometer with PC/XT and related software development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorthy, A.D.; Gurba, P.B.; Rajendrakumar; Singh, R.K.; Bajpai, D.D.; Coelho, G.J.M.; Das, K.V.; Indurkar, V.S.

    1992-01-01

    A completely automated Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS), is used in Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant (PREFRE) Tarapur for precise and accurate measurement of isotopic composition and concentration determination of special nuclear materials (Uranium and Plutonium) for the purpose of input accounting of the plant. It is provided with one Hewlett-Packard, H-9845B desktop computer to control various instrument parameters and perform automatic analysis of 13 samples in sequence. The computer gave fairly good service for six years with intermittent minor maintenance before it developed major problems. In view of the fact that its repair and maintenance cost is several times the cost of locally available computer, it was decided to replace the imported Hewlett-Packard 9845B desktop computer with PC/XT. This report describes the interfacing of TIMS with PC/XT and the related Software development. (author). 3 refs., 8 figs., 2 annexures

  11. Analytical developments in thermal ionization mass spectrometry for the isotopic analysis of very small amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mialle, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the French transmutation project of nuclear wastes, experiments consisted in the irradiation in a fast neutron reactor of few milligrams of isotopically enriched powders. Hence, the isotopic analysis of very small amount of irradiation products is one of the main issues. The aim of this study was to achieve analytical developments in thermal ionization mass spectrometry in order to accurately analyze these samples. Several axes were studied including the new total evaporation method, deposition techniques, electron multiplier potentialities and comparison between different isotope measurement techniques. Results showed that it was possible to drastically decrease the amounts needed for analysis, especially with Eu and Nd, while maintaining an uncertainty level in agreement with the project requirements. (author) [fr

  12. Simultaneous determination of mass and thermal accommodation coefficients from temporal evolution of an evaporating water microdroplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zientara, M; Jakubczyk, D; Derkachov, G; Kolwas, K; Kolwas, M

    2005-01-01

    Scattering of coherent light by an evaporating droplet of pure water several micrometres in size was investigated. The droplet was levitated in an electrodynamic trap placed in a small climatic chamber. The evolution of the droplet radius and the evolution dynamics were investigated by means of analysing the scattering patterns with the aid of Mie theory. A numerical model of droplet evolution, incorporating the kinetic effects near the droplet surface, was constructed. Application of this model to the experimental data allowed us to determine the mass and thermal accommodation coefficients to be α C = 0.12 ± 0.02 and α T = 0.65 ± 0.09, respectively. This model enabled us to determine with high precision the temperature evolution of the droplet and the relative humidity in the droplet vicinity

  13. Separation Techniques for Uranium and Plutonium at Trace Levels for the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, M. Y.; Han, S. H.; Kim, J. G.; Park, Y. J.; Kim, W. H

    2005-12-15

    This report describes the state of the art and the progress of the chemical separation and purification techniques required for the thermal ionization mass spectrometric determination of uranium and plutonium in environmental samples at trace or ultratrace levels. Various techniques, such as precipitation, solvent extraction, extraction chromatography, and ion exchange chromatography, for separation of uranium and plutonium were evaluated. Sample preparation methods and dissolution techniques for environmental samples were also discussed. Especially, both extraction chromatographic and anion exchange chromatographic procedures for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples, such as soil, sediment, plant, seawater, urine, and bone ash were reviewed in detail in order to propose some suitable methods for the separation and purification of uranium and plutonium from the safeguards environmental or swipe samples. A survey of the IAEA strengthened safeguards system, the clean room facility of IAEA's NWAL(Network of Analytical Laboratories), and the analytical techniques for safeguards environmental samples was also discussed here.

  14. Trace level detection of explosives in solution using leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption ambient mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Chen, Lee Chuin; Ninomiya, Satoshi; Shida, Yasuo; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates the detection of explosives in solution using thermal desorption technique at a temperature higher than Leidenfrost temperature of the solvent in combination with low temperature plasma (LTP) ionization. Leidenfrost temperature of a solvent is the temperature above which the solvent droplet starts levitation instead of splashing when placed on a hot metallic surface. During this desorption process, slow and gentle solvent evaporation takes place, which leads to the pre-concentration of less-volatile explosive molecules in the droplet and the explosive molecules are released at the last moment of droplet evaporation. The limits of detection for explosives studied by using this thermal desorption LTP ionization method varied in a range of 1 to 10 parts per billion (ppb) using a droplet volume of 20 μL (absolute sample amount 90-630 fmol). As LTP ionization method was applied and ion-molecule reactions took place in ambient atmosphere, various ion-molecule adduct species like [M+NO2](-), [M+NO3](-), [M+HCO3](-), [M+HCO4](-) were generated together with [M-H](-) peak. Each peak was unambiguously identified using 'Exactive Orbitrap' mass spectrometer in negative ionization mode within 3 ppm deviation compared to its exact mass. This newly developed technique was successfully applied to detect four explosives contained in the pond water and soil sample with minor sample pre-treatment and the explosives were detected with ppb levels. The present method is simple, rapid and can detect trace levels of explosives with high specificity from solutions.

  15. Thermal Protection System Mass Estimating Relationships For Blunt-Body, Earth Entry Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepka, Steven A.; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2015-01-01

    Mass estimating relationships (MERs) are developed to predict the amount of thermal protection system (TPS) necessary for safe Earth entry for blunt-body spacecraft using simple correlations that are non-ITAR and closely match estimates from NASA's highfidelity ablation modeling tool, the Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Analysis Program (FIAT). These MERs provide a first order estimate for rapid feasibility studies. There are 840 different trajectories considered in this study, and each TPS MER has a peak heating limit. MERs for the vehicle forebody include the ablators Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA) and Carbon Phenolic atop Advanced Carbon-Carbon. For the aftbody, the materials are Silicone Impregnated Reusable Ceramic Ablator (SIRCA), Acusil II, SLA- 561V, and LI-900. The MERs are accurate to within 14% (at one standard deviation) of FIAT prediction, and the most any MER can under predict FIAT TPS thickness is 18.7%. This work focuses on the development of these MERs, the resulting equations, model limitations, and model accuracy.

  16. Mass spectrometric comparison of swift heavy ion-induced and anaerobic thermal degradation of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, V.; Hossain, U. H.; Walbert, T.; Seidl, T.; Ensinger, W.

    2018-03-01

    The study of polymers irradiated by highly energetic ions and the resulting radiation-induced degradation is of major importance for space and particle accelerator applications. The mechanism of ion-induced molecular fragmentation of polyethylene, polyethyleneimine and polyamide was investigated by means of mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the introduction of nitrogen and oxygen into the polymer influences the stability rendering aliphatic polymers with heteroatoms less stable. A comparison to thermal decomposition data from literature reveals that ion-induced degradation is different in its bond fracture mechanism. While thermal degradation starts at the weakest bond, which is usually the carbon-heteroatom bond, energetic ion irradiation leads in the first step to scission of all types of bonds creating smaller molecular fragments. This is due to the localized extreme energy input under non-equilibrium conditions when the ions transfer kinetic energy onto electrons. These findings are of relevance for the choice of polymers for long-term application in both space and accelerator facilities.

  17. Investigation of the impact of using thermal mass with the net zero energy town house in Toronto using TRNSYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, O.; Fung, A.; Tse, H.; Zhang, D. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

    2008-07-01

    Since buildings in Canada account for 30 per cent of the country's total energy consumption, it has become necessary to find ways to reduce the overall energy use in buildings. Heating and cooling loads in buildings can be effectively reduced by using the thermal mass incorporated into the building envelope, particularly in climates where a large daily temperature fluctuations exist. Thermal mass is defined as any building material that has a high heat storage capacity that can be integrated into the structural fabric of the building to use the passive solar energy for heating or cooling purposes. Concrete slabs, bricks and ceramic blocks are some of the commonly used materials. This study analyzed the impact of using thermal mass with a highly insulated building envelope such as that used in Low Energy or Net Zero housing. In particular, TRNSYS was used to simulate a Net Zero Energy Town House located in Toronto, in which a ground source heat pump was integrated with an infloor radiant heating system. The simulation revealed that for colder climates such as in Canada, thermal mass can replace some of the insulation while still providing excellent results in terms of the reductions in daily indoor temperature fluctuations. The impact of thermal mass during the winter was more significant when compared with summer, possibly because of the unique construction and orientation of the Net Zero Energy House. The optimum thickness of the concrete slab was determined to be 6 inches for the winter season and 4 inches for summer. The optimum location for the thermal mass was found to be right next to the gypsum wallboard that forms the interior part of the wall. 12 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  18. Phase structure of thermal lattice QCD with N{sub f} = 2 twisted mass Wilson fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilgenfritz, E.M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Lombardo, M. P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy); Mueller-Preussker, M.; Petschlies, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Philipsen, O.; Zeidlewicz, L. [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Wilhelms-Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    We present numerical results for the phase diagram of lattice QCD at finite temperature in the formulation with twisted mass Wilson fermions and a tree-level Symanzik-improved gauge action. Our simulations are performed on lattices with temporal extent N{sub {tau}}=8, and lattice coupling {beta} ranging from strong coupling to the scaling domain. Covering a wide range in the space spanned by the lattice coupling {beta} and the hopping and twisted mass parameters {kappa} and {mu}, respectively, we obtain a comprehensive picture of the rich phase structure of the lattice theory. In particular, we verify the existence of an Aoki phase in the strong coupling region and the realisation of the Sharpe-Singleton scenario at intermediate couplings. In the weak coupling region we identify the phase boundary for the physical finite temperature phase transition/crossover. Its shape in the three-dimensional parameter space is consistent with Creutz's conjecture of a cone-shaped thermal transition surface. (orig.)

  19. Dynamic freeze-in: impact of thermal masses and cosmological phase transitions on dark matter production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Michael J.; Breitbach, Moritz; Kopp, Joachim; Mittnacht, Lukas

    2018-03-01

    The cosmological abundance of dark matter can be significantly influenced by the temperature dependence of particle masses and vacuum expectation values. We illustrate this point in three simple freeze-in models. The first one, which we call kinematically induced freeze-in, is based on the observation that the effective mass of a scalar temporarily becomes very small as the scalar potential undergoes a second order phase transition. This opens dark matter production channels that are otherwise forbidden. The second model we consider, dubbed vev-induced freeze-in, is a fermionic Higgs portal scenario. Its scalar sector is augmented compared to the Standard Model by an additional scalar singlet, S, which couples to dark matter and temporarily acquires a vacuum expectation value (a two-step phase transition or "vev flip-flop"). While ≠ 0, the modified coupling structure in the scalar sector implies that dark matter production is significantly enhanced compared to the = 0 phases realised at very early times and again today. The third model, which we call mixing-induced freeze-in, is similar in spirit, but here it is the mixing of dark sector fermions, induced by non-zero , that temporarily boosts the dark matter production rate. For all three scenarios, we carefully dissect the evolution of the dark sector in the early Universe. We compute the DM relic abundance as a function of the model parameters, emphasising the importance of thermal corrections and the proper treatment of phase transitions in the calculation.

  20. Thermal Emission of Alkali Metal Ions from Al30-Pillared Montmorillonite Studied by Mass Spectrometric Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motalov, V B; Karasev, N S; Ovchinnikov, N L; Butman, M F

    2017-01-01

    The thermal emission of alkali metal ions from Al 30 -pillared montmorillonite in comparison with its natural form was studied by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 770-930 K. The measurements were carried out on a magnetic mass spectrometer MI-1201. For natural montmorillonite, the densities of the emission currents ( j ) decrease in the mass spectrum in the following sequence (T = 805 K, A/cm 2 ): K + (4.55 · 10 -14 ), Cs + (9.72 · 10 -15 ), Rb + (1.13 · 10 -15 ), Na + (1.75 · 10 -16 ), Li + (3.37 · 10 -17 ). For Al 30 -pillared montmorillonite, thermionic emission undergoes temperature-time changes. In the low-temperature section of the investigated range (770-805 K), the value of j increases substantially for all ions in comparison with natural montmorillonite (T = 805 K, A/cm 2 ): Cs + (6.47 · 10 -13 ), K + (9.44 · 10 -14 ), Na + (3.34 · 10 -15 ), Rb + (1.77 · 10 -15 ), and Li + (4.59 · 10 -16 ). A reversible anomaly is observed in the temperature range 805-832 K: with increasing temperature, the value of j of alkaline ions falls abruptly. This effect increases with increasing ionic radius of M + . After a long heating-up period, this anomaly disappears and the ln j - 1/ T dependence acquires a classical linear form. The results are interpreted from the point of view of the dependence of the efficiency of thermionic emission on the phase transformations of pillars.

  1. Thermal Emission of Alkali Metal Ions from Al30-Pillared Montmorillonite Studied by Mass Spectrometric Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Motalov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal emission of alkali metal ions from Al30-pillared montmorillonite in comparison with its natural form was studied by mass spectrometry in the temperature range 770–930 K. The measurements were carried out on a magnetic mass spectrometer MI-1201. For natural montmorillonite, the densities of the emission currents (j decrease in the mass spectrum in the following sequence (T = 805 K, A/cm2: K+ (4.55 · 10−14, Cs+ (9.72 · 10−15, Rb+ (1.13 · 10−15, Na+ (1.75 · 10−16, Li+ (3.37 · 10−17. For Al30-pillared montmorillonite, thermionic emission undergoes temperature-time changes. In the low-temperature section of the investigated range (770–805 K, the value of j increases substantially for all ions in comparison with natural montmorillonite (T = 805 K, A/cm2: Cs+ (6.47 · 10−13, K+ (9.44 · 10−14, Na+ (3.34 · 10−15, Rb+ (1.77 · 10−15, and Li+ (4.59 · 10−16. A reversible anomaly is observed in the temperature range 805–832 K: with increasing temperature, the value of j of alkaline ions falls abruptly. This effect increases with increasing ionic radius of M+. After a long heating-up period, this anomaly disappears and the lnj-1/T dependence acquires a classical linear form. The results are interpreted from the point of view of the dependence of the efficiency of thermionic emission on the phase transformations of pillars.

  2. Possibilities of using thermal mass in buildings to save energy, cut power consumption peaks and increase the thermal comfort

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this project was to generate knowledge to enable us to take advantage of heat storage in heavy building structures with regard to as energy savings, better thermal indoor climate, and reduced peak powers. This could include buildings that can function without energy input during cold periods, buildings that give a robust indoor climate without installed cooling, and buildings with good thermal comfort also in case of higher outdoor temperatures resulting from global warming. To rea...

  3. The role of the shot effect in the accumulation of nuclide masses and activities in the thermal reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepoleao, P.; Rudak, E.; Wiley, J.

    1998-01-01

    A method is proposed for estimating masses and activities of nuclides in the thermal reactor core with an arbitrary dependence of specific masses on the burnout depth. The method takes into account the statistical character of micro processes accompanying the fuel burning out and accumulation of fission and activation products. For the RBMK reactor of Chernobyl NPP the method gives practically the same results as exact numerical calculations. (author)

  4. Essentials of iron, chromium, and calcium isotope analysis of natural materials by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantle, M.S.; Bullen, T.D.

    2009-01-01

    The use of isotopes to understand the behavior of metals in geological, hydrological, and biological systems has rapidly expanded in recent years. One of the mass spectrometric techniques used to analyze metal isotopes is thermal ionization mass spectrometry, or TIMS. While TIMS has been a useful analytical technique for the measurement of isotopic composition for decades and TIMS instruments are widely distributed, there are significant difficulties associated with using TIMS to analyze isotopes of the lighter alkaline earth elements and transition metals. Overcoming these difficulties to produce relatively long-lived and stable ion beams from microgram-sized samples is a non-trivial task. We focus here on TIMS analysis of three geologically and environmentally important elements (Fe, Cr, and Ca) and present an in-depth look at several key aspects that we feel have the greatest potential to trouble new users. Our discussion includes accessible descriptions of different analytical approaches and issues, including filament loading procedures, collector cup configurations, peak shapes and interferences, and the use of isotopic double spikes and related error estimation. Building on previous work, we present quantitative simulations, applied specifically in this study to Fe and Ca, that explore the effects of (1) time-variable evaporation of isotopically homogeneous spots from a filament and (2) interferences on the isotope ratios derived from a double spike subtraction routine. We discuss how and to what extent interferences at spike masses, as well as at other measured masses, affect the double spike-subtracted isotope ratio of interest (44Ca/40Ca in the case presented, though a similar analysis can be used to evaluate 56Fe/54Fe and 53Cr/52Cr). The conclusions of these simulations are neither intuitive nor immediately obvious, making this examination useful for those who are developing new methodologies. While all simulations are carried out in the context of a

  5. Atmospheric Pressure-Thermal Desorption (AP-TD)/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry for the Rapid Analysis of Bacillus Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    A technique is described where an atmospheric pressure-thermal desorption (AP-TD) device and electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry are coupled and used for the rapid analysis of Bacillus spores in complex matrices. The resulting AP-TD/ESI-MS technique combines the generation of volatile co...

  6. Utilizing thermal building mass for storage in district heating systems: Combined building level simulations and system level optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominkovic, D. F.; Gianniou, P.; Münster, M.

    2018-01-01

    on the energy supply of district heating. Results showed that longer preheating time increased the possible duration of cut-off events. System optimization showed that the thermal mass for storage was used as intra-day storage. Flexible load accounted for 5.5%–7.7% of the total district heating demand...

  7. A longitudinal thermal actuation principle for mass detection using a resonant micro -cantilever in a fluid medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigorov, Alexander; Davis, Zachary James; Rasmussen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We propose a new thermal actuation mechanical principle, which allows dynamic actuation in most media: air, water, etc. It is used to excite a cantilever, aiming to perform mass detection using resonance shifts, in place of the electrostatic or magnetic actuation that are normally used. It differs...... configuration, subject of investigation in the following paper. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. Mass extinction in tetraodontiform fishes linked to the Palaeocene-Eocene thermal maximum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcila, Dahiana; Tyler, James C

    2017-11-15

    Integrative evolutionary analyses based upon fossil and extant species provide a powerful approach for understanding past diversification events and for assessing the tempo of evolution across the Tree of Life. Herein, we demonstrate the importance of integrating fossil and extant species for inferring patterns of lineage diversification that would otherwise be masked in analyses that examine only one source of evidence. We infer the phylogeny and macroevolutionary history of the Tetraodontiformes (triggerfishes, pufferfishes and allies), a group with one of the most extensive fossil records among fishes. Our analyses combine molecular and morphological data, based on an expanded matrix that adds newly coded fossil species and character states. Beyond confidently resolving the relationships and divergence times of tetraodontiforms, our diversification analyses detect a major mass-extinction event during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), followed by a marked increase in speciation rates. This pattern is consistently obtained when fossil and extant species are integrated, whereas examination of the fossil occurrences alone failed to detect major diversification changes during the PETM. When taking into account non-homogeneous models, our analyses also detect a rapid lineage diversification increase in one of the groups (tetraodontoids) during the middle Miocene, which is considered a key period in the evolution of reef fishes associated with trophic changes and ecological opportunity. In summary, our analyses show distinct diversification dynamics estimated from phylogenies and the fossil record, suggesting that different episodes shaped the evolution of tetraodontiforms during the Cenozoic. © 2017 The Author(s).

  9. Separation and Analysis of Boron Isotope in High Plant by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingcai Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of boron and its isotope in plants is useful to better understand the transposition and translocation of boron within plant, the geochemical behavior in the interface between soil and plant, and the biogeochemical cycle of boron. It is critical to develop a useful method to separate boron from the plant for the geochemical application of boron and its isotope. A method was developed for the extraction of boron in plant sample, whose isotope was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The results indicated that this method of dry ashing coupled with two-step ion-exchange chromatography is powerful for the separation of boron in plant sample with large amounts of organic matters completely. The ratios of boron isotope composition in those plant tissue samples ranged from -19.45‰ to +28.13‰ (total range: 47.58‰ with a mean value of 2.61±11.76‰ SD. The stem and root isotopic compositions were lower than those in flower and leaf. The molecular mechanism of boron isotope may be responsible for the observed variation of boron isotopic composition and are considered as a useful tool for the better understanding of boron cycling process in the environment and for the signature of living systems.

  10. Performance characteristics of a Bioassay method for plutonium using thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linauskas, S.H.; Elliot, N.L.; Paterson, L.M.; Totland, M.M

    2003-01-01

    Plutonium-in-urine analysis by radiochemical isolation of Pu followed by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) is capable of high sensitivity and precision measurements {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu. Bias and precision estimates for the TIMS bioassay program at Chalk River Laboratories easily met the ANSI N13.30 performance criteria standards with {sup 239}Pu results of 1.5% and 3.0%, respectively. Analytical blanks derived from water, artificial urine and true urine samples did not produce any statistically different results. During a four-year period of development and implementation of {sup 239}Pu measurements by TIMS, average sample blank values were reduced from 3.9 fg (9.0 {mu}Bq) to 0.57 fg (1.3 {mu}Bq). This reduction was achieved through rigorous application of clean-room handling techniques throughout sample processing. Blank data were found to follow a Iognormal distribution, and current detection limit parameters for L{sub c} and L{sub d} at the 95% significance levels are 0.85 fg {sup 239}Pu (2.0 {mu}Bq) and 1.3 fg {sup 239}Pu (3.0 {mu}Bq), respectively. Detection limits in this range are expected to be sufficient to identify intakes of Pu/Am mixtures at levels that are around one-twentieth of an ALl or better under routine monitoring situations for ICRP Type S and Type M inhalation solubility classes. (author)

  11. Characterisation of Dissolved Organic Carbon by Thermal Desorption - Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materić, Dušan; Peacock, Mike; Kent, Matthew; Cook, Sarah; Gauci, Vincent; Röckmann, Thomas; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an integral component of the global carbon cycle. DOC represents an important terrestrial carbon loss as it is broken down both biologically and photochemically, resulting in the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere. The magnitude of this carbon loss can be affected by land management (e.g. drainage). Furthermore, DOC affects autotrophic and heterotrophic processes in aquatic ecosystems, and, when chlorinated during water treatment, can lead to the release of harmful trihalomethanes. Numerous methods have been used to characterise DOC. The most accessible of these use absorbance and fluorescence properties to make inferences about chemical composition, whilst high-performance size exclusion chromatography can be used to determine apparent molecular weight. XAD fractionation has been extensively used to separate out hydrophilic and hydrophobic components. Thermochemolysis or pyrolysis Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) give information on molecular properties of DOC, and 13C NMR spectroscopy can provide an insight into the degree of aromaticity. Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a sensitive, soft ionisation method suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile and semi-volatile organic vapours. So far, PTR-MS has been used in various environmental applications such as real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources, chemical composition measurements of aerosols etc. However, as the method is not compatible with water, it has not been used for analysis of organic traces present in natural water samples. The aim of this work was to develop a method based on thermal desorption PTR-MS to analyse water samples in order to characterise chemical composition of dissolved organic carbon. We developed a clean low-pressure evaporation/sublimation system to remove water from samples and thermal desorption system to introduce

  12. High-precision measurements of seawater Pb isotope compositions by double spike thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maxence; Bridgestock, Luke; Rehkämper, Mark; van DeFlierdt, Tina; Weiss, Dominik

    2015-03-10

    A new method for the determination of seawater Pb isotope compositions and concentrations was developed, which combines and optimizes previously published protocols for the separation and isotopic analysis of this element. For isotopic analysis, the procedure involves initial separation of Pb from 1 to 2L of seawater by co-precipitation with Mg hydroxide and further purification by a two stage anion exchange procedure. The Pb isotope measurements are subsequently carried out by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using a (207)Pb-(204)Pb double spike for correction of instrumental mass fractionation. These methods are associated with a total procedural Pb blank of 28±21 pg (1sd) and typical Pb recoveries of 40-60%. The Pb concentrations are determined by isotope dilution (ID) on 50 mL of seawater, using a simplified version of above methods. Analyses of multiple aliquots of six seawater samples yield a reproducibility of about ±1 to ±10% (1sd) for Pb concentrations of between 7 and 50 pmol/kg, where precision was primarily limited by the uncertainty of the blank correction (12±4 pg; 1sd). For the Pb isotope analyses, typical reproducibilities (±2sd) of 700-1500 ppm and 1000-2000 ppm were achieved for (207)Pb/(206)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb and (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (207)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, respectively. These results are superior to literature data that were obtained using plasma source mass spectrometry and they are at least a factor of five more precise for ratios involving the minor (204)Pb isotope. Both Pb concentration and isotope data, furthermore, show good agreement with published results for two seawater intercomparison samples of the GEOTRACES program. Finally, the new methods were applied to a seawater depth profile from the eastern South Atlantic. Both Pb contents and isotope compositions display a smooth evolution with depth, and no obvious outliers. Compared to previous Pb isotope data for seawater, the (206)Pb/(204)Pb ratios are well correlated

  13. Mass spectrometry in nuclear technology - a review of application of thermal ionization mass spectrometry in fuel reprocessing plants. PD-7-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakshinamoorthy, A.

    2007-01-01

    Mass spectrometry finds the widespread application in nuclear science and technology due to the fact that it can be employed for isotope composition measurements of different elements of interest and also concentration measurements of these elements using isotope dilution techniques. Thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS), Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) and gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GC-MS) are the different types of mass spectrometers used in nuclear industry for the analyses of isotope composition of special nuclear material, trace impurities in nuclear fuels and components and characterization of various solvents respectively. Among them, TIMS plays a vital role in the nuclear fuel cycle in determining precisely the isotope composition of uranium, plutonium, D/H ratio in heavy water etc. TIMS is an indispensable analytical tool for nuclear material accounting at the input stage of a reprocessing plant by carrying out precise and accurate concentration measurement of plutonium and uranium by isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). It is the only accepted measurement technique for the purpose because of its high precision, better sensitivity and no quantitative separation is needed. The isotope abundance measurements of uranium and plutonium at this point are also useful for burn-up studies and isotope correlations. Mass spectrometric analysis of uranium and plutonium is also required for nuclear data measurements and calibrating other chemical methods

  14. Approximate energies and thermal properties of a position-dependent mass charged particle under external magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Eshghi; H Mehraban; S M Ikhdair

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Schr(o)dinger equation with a position-dependent mass (PDM) charged particle interacted via the superposition of the Morse-plus-Coulomb potentials and is under the influence of external magnetic and Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux fields.The nonrelativistic bound state energies together with their wave functions are calculated for two spatially-dependent mass distribution functions.We also study the thermal quantifies of such a system.Further,the canonical formalism is used to compute various thermodynamic variables for second choosing mass by using the Gibbs formalism.We give plots for energy states as a function of various physical parameters.The behavior of the internal energy,specific heat,and entropy as functions of temperature and mass density parameter in the inverse-square mass case for different values of magnetic field are shown.

  15. Approximate energies and thermal properties of a position-dependent mass charged particle under external magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshghi, M; Mehraban, H; Ikhdair, S M

    2017-01-01

    We solve the Schrödinger equation with a position-dependent mass (PDM) charged particle interacted via the superposition of the Morse-plus-Coulomb potentials and is under the influence of external magnetic and Aharonov–Bohm (AB) flux fields. The nonrelativistic bound state energies together with their wave functions are calculated for two spatially-dependent mass distribution functions. We also study the thermal quantities of such a system. Further, the canonical formalism is used to compute various thermodynamic variables for second choosing mass by using the Gibbs formalism. We give plots for energy states as a function of various physical parameters. The behavior of the internal energy, specific heat, and entropy as functions of temperature and mass density parameter in the inverse-square mass case for different values of magnetic field are shown. (paper)

  16. Evolution of thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars. IV. Constraining mass loss and lifetimes of low mass, low metallicity AGB stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Weisz, Daniel; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Marigo, Paola [Department of Physics and Astronomy G. Galilei, University of Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Girardi, Léo; Gullieuszik, Marco [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bressan, Alessandro [Astrophysics Sector, SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Aringer, Bernhard [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Turkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria)

    2014-07-20

    The evolution and lifetimes of thermally pulsating asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars suffer from significant uncertainties. In this work, we analyze the numbers and luminosity functions of TP-AGB stars in six quiescent, low metallicity ([Fe/H] ≲ –0.86) galaxies taken from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury sample, using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) photometry in both optical and near-infrared filters. The galaxies contain over 1000 TP-AGB stars (at least 60 per field). We compare the observed TP-AGB luminosity functions and relative numbers of TP-AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars, N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB}, to models generated from different suites of TP-AGB evolutionary tracks after adopting star formation histories derived from the HST deep optical observations. We test various mass-loss prescriptions that differ in their treatments of mass loss before the onset of dust-driven winds (pre-dust). These comparisons confirm that pre-dust mass loss is important, since models that neglect pre-dust mass loss fail to explain the observed N{sub TP-AGB}/N{sub RGB} ratio or the luminosity functions. In contrast, models with more efficient pre-dust mass loss produce results consistent with observations. We find that for [Fe/H] ≲ –0.86, lower mass TP-AGB stars (M ≲ 1 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes of ∼0.5 Myr and higher masses (M ≲ 3 M{sub ☉}) must have lifetimes ≲ 1.2 Myr. In addition, assuming our best-fitting mass-loss prescription, we show that the third dredge-up has no significant effect on TP-AGB lifetimes in this mass and metallicity range.

  17. The Effect of Fuel Mass Fraction on the Combustion and Fluid Flow in a Sulfur Recovery Unit Thermal Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lang Yeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur recovery unit (SRU thermal reactors are negatively affected by high temperature operation. In this paper, the effect of the fuel mass fraction on the combustion and fluid flow in a SRU thermal reactor is investigated numerically. Practical operating conditions for a petrochemical corporation in Taiwan are used as the design conditions for the discussion. The simulation results show that the present design condition is a fuel-rich (or air-lean condition and gives acceptable sulfur recovery, hydrogen sulfide (H2S destruction, sulfur dioxide (SO2 emissions and thermal reactor temperature for an oxygen-normal operation. However, for an oxygen-rich operation, the local maximum temperature exceeds the suggested maximum service temperature, although the average temperature is acceptable. The high temperature region must be inspected very carefully during the annual maintenance period if there are oxygen-rich operations. If the fuel mass fraction to the zone ahead of the choke ring (zone 1 is 0.0625 or 0.125, the average temperature in the zone behind the choke ring (zone 2 is higher than the zone 1 average temperature, which can damage the downstream heat exchanger tubes. If the zone 1 fuel mass fraction is reduced to ensure a lower zone 1 temperature, the temperature in zone 2 and the heat exchanger section must be monitored closely and the zone 2 wall and heat exchanger tubes must be inspected very carefully during the annual maintenance period. To determine a suitable fuel mass fraction for operation, a detailed numerical simulation should be performed first to find the stoichiometric fuel mass fraction which produces the most complete combustion and the highest temperature. This stoichiometric fuel mass fraction should be avoided because the high temperature could damage the zone 1 corner or the choke ring. A higher fuel mass fraction (i.e., fuel-rich or air-lean condition is more suitable because it can avoid deteriorations of both zone 1

  18. Design of a compact thermal ionization mass spectrometer for isotopic ratio measurement of nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, R.K.; Yadav, V.K.; Ravisankar, E.; Nataraju, V.; Gadkari, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    High precision isotope ratio analysis of materials of interest in nuclear and geological applications is carried out by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) technique. One of the important mandates of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) has been developing these instruments and several TIMS instruments have been developed and deployed at user sites covering a wide range material of interest relevant to various stages of the nuclear power cycle. The instrument designs for above applications are based on two geometries of magnetic sector ie., 15 cm sector radius and 30 cm sector radius with resolutions as 200 and 400 respectively. There has been a conscious effort to improve the the sensitivity and precision of these models by modifying the designs of the sub-systems. In the recent past, a new ion optical element viz., variable dispersion zoom optics (VDZO) was introduced in the collector system of the standard model with 30cm radius magnet, to increase the dispersion of the ion beams which enabled to fix the locations of the Faraday cups (upto 6 nos.) instead of the conventional movable ones. After establishing the usefulness of VDZO, an attempt is being made to design and develop a 20 cm magnet based TIMS which will have a much smaller foot print compared to the standard 30 cm model and also covers the usual range of elements (viz. Li - U). The ion optical design was optimized using computer simulations with SIMION 7.0 software and subsequently the mechanical design was carried out using Autocad computer software. Some of the details of this new design are presented in this abstract

  19. Triple sorbent thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry determination of vapor phase organic contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.Y.; Skeen, J.T.; Dindal, A.B.; Higgins, C.E.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    A thermal desorption/ps chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) has been evaluated for the determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCS) in vapor phase samples using Carbosieve S-III/Carbotrap/Carotrap C triple sorbent traps (TST) similar to those available from a commercial source. The analysis was carried out with a Hewlett-Packard 5985A or 5995 GC/MS system with a modified injector to adapt an inhouse manufactured short-path desorber for transferring desorbate directly onto a cryofocusing loop for subsequent GC/MS analysis. Vapor phase standards generated from twenty six compounds were used for method validation, including alkanes, alkyl alcohols, alkyl ketones, and alkyl nitrites, a group of representative compounds that have previously been identified in a target airborne matrix. The method was validated based on the satisfactory results in terms of reproducibility, recovery rate, stability, and linearity. A relative, standard deviation of 0.55 to 24.3 % was obtained for the entire TD process (generation of gas phase standards, spiking the standards on and desorbing from TST) over a concentration range of 20 to 500 ng/trap. Linear correlation coefficients for the calibration curves as determined ranged from 0.81 to 0.99 and limits of detection ranged from 3 to 76 ng. For a majority of standards, recoveries of greater than 90% were observed. For three selected standards spiked on TSTS, minimal loss (10 to 22%) was observed after storing the spiked in, a 4 degree C refrigerator for 29 days. The only chromatographable artifact observed was a 5% conversion of isopropanol to acetone. The validated method been successfully applied, to the determination of VOCs collected from various emission sources in a diversified concentration range

  20. Effects of Neutron Emission on Fragment Mass and Kinetic Energy Distribution from Thermal Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Saetone, E.

    2007-01-01

    The mass and kinetic energy distribution of nuclear fragments from thermal neutron-induced fission of 235 U(n th ,f) have been studied using a Monte-Carlo simulation. Besides reproducing the pronounced broadening in the standard deviation of the kinetic energy at the final fragment mass number around m = 109, our simulation also produces a second broadening around m = 125. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data obtained by Belhafaf et al. and other results on yield of mass. We conclude that the obtained results are a consequence of the characteristics of the neutron emission, the sharp variation in the primary fragment kinetic energy and mass yield curves. We show that because neutron emission is hazardous to make any conclusion on primary quantities distribution of fragments from experimental results on final quantities distributions

  1. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  2. High precision mass measurements of thermalized relativistic uranium projectile and fission fragments with a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayet San Andres, Samuel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Justus Liebig Universitaet, Giessen (Germany); Collaboration: FRS Ion Catcher-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    At the FRS Ion Catcher at GSI, a relativistic beam of {sup 238}U at 1GeV/u was used to produce fission and projectile fragments on a beryllium target. The ions were separated in-flight at the FRS, thermalized in a cryogenic stopping cell and transferred to a multiple-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer (MR-TOF-MS) where high precision mass measurements were performed. The masses of several fission and projectile fragments were measured (including short-lived nuclei with half-lives down to 18 ms) and the possibility of tailoring an isomerically clean beam for other experiments was demonstrated. With the demonstrated performance of the MR-TOF-MS and the expected production rates of exotic nuclei far from stability at the next-generation facilities such as FAIR, novel mass measurements of nuclei close to the neutron drip line will be possible and key information for understanding the r-process will be available. The results from the last experiment and an outlook of possible future mass measurements close to the neutron drip line at FAIR with the MR-TOF-MS are presented.

  3. Determination of La and Nd by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) pre-separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaison, P.G.; Raut, N.M.; Parab, A.R.; Khodade, P.S.; Govindan, R.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    Determination of La and Nd by TIMS is required for accurate determination of burn-up of nuclear fuels. During their thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) analysis, 138 Ce and 142 Ce show spectroscopic isobaric interferences at 138 La and 142 Nd, respectively. Hence, it is essential to remove Ce from La and Nd for their accurate isotopic composition determination. Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a promising technique for rapid and effective separation

  4. Influence of a thermal gradient on water-rock interactions and mass transport in geologic media (marine pelagic clay)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seyfried, W.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A brief outline of the role of thermodiffusional processes in mass transport and sediment alteration for a sediment/seawater system that is subjected to a thermal gradient and maximum temperature and pressure condition, such as in a subseabed repository is presented. The author underscores the need to investigate the effect of basic physical and chemical parameters on Soret coefficients for various electrolyte fluids. Such experiments will require the design and development of unique hydrothermal apparatus

  5. Ink dating using thermal desorption and gas chromatography / mass spectrometry: comparison of results obtained in two laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, A.; Bügler, J.; Kirsch, D.; Köhler, F.; Weyermann, C.

    2015-01-01

    Recent ink dating methods focused mainly on changes in solvent amounts occurring over time. A promising method was developed at the Landeskriminalamt of Munich using thermal desorption (TD) followed by gas chromatography / mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Sequential extractions of the phenoxyethanol present in ballpoint pen ink entries were carried out at two different temperatures. This method is applied in forensic practice and is currently implemented in several laboratories participati...

  6. Effects of non-linearity of material properties on the coupled mechanical-hydraulic-thermal behavior in rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Akira; Ohnishi, Yuzo

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinearity of material properties used in the coupled mechanical-hydraulic-thermal analysis is investigated from the past literatures. Some nonlinearity that is respectively effective for the system is introduced into our computer code for analysis such a coupling problem by using finite element method. And the effects of nonlinearity of each material property on the coupled behavior in rock mass are examined for simple model and Stripa project model with the computer code. (author)

  7. Thermal performance analysis of heat exchanger for closed wet cooling tower using heat and mass transfer analogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Seong Yeon; Han, Kyu Hyun; Kim, Jin Hyuck

    2010-01-01

    In closed wet cooling towers, the heat transfer between the air and external tube surfaces can be composed of the sensible heat transfer and the latent heat transfer. The heat transfer coefficient can be obtained from the equation for external heat transfer of tube banks. According to experimental data, the mass transfer coefficient was affected by the air velocity and spray water flow rate. This study provides the correlation equation for mass transfer coefficient based on the analogy of the heat and mass transfer and the experimental data. The results from this correlation equation showed fairly good agreement with experimental data. The cooling capacity and thermal efficiency of the closed wet cooling tower were calculated from the correlation equation to analyze the performance of heat exchanger for the tower

  8. Direct Detection of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products from Aqueous Samples with Thermally-Assisted Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Ian S.; Ton, Alain T.; Mulligan, Christopher C.

    2011-07-01

    An ambient mass spectrometric method based on desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) has been developed to allow rapid, direct analysis of contaminated water samples, and the technique was evaluated through analysis of a wide array of pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP) contaminants. Incorporating direct infusion of aqueous sample and thermal assistance into the source design has allowed low ppt detection limits for the target analytes in drinking water matrices. With this methodology, mass spectral information can be collected in less than 1 min, consuming ~100 μL of total sample. Quantitative ability was also demonstrated without the use of an internal standard, yielding decent linearity and reproducibility. Initial results suggest that this source configuration is resistant to carryover effects and robust towards multi-component samples. The rapid, continuous analysis afforded by this method offers advantages in terms of sample analysis time and throughput over traditional hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques.

  9. Comparison of Three Infrared Thermal Detection Systems and Self Report for Mass Fever Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Nicole Cohen describes research that examined the usefulness of thermal scanners for detecting fever in large groups of people in public settings, such as hospitals and airports.

  10. Direct analysis of anabolic steroids in urine using Leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption-dielectric barrier discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Nonami, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2014-08-11

    Rapid detection of trace level anabolic steroids in urine is highly desirable to monitor the consumption of performance enhancing anabolic steroids by athletes. The present article describes a novel strategy for identifying the trace anabolic steroids in urine using Leidenfrost phenomenon assisted thermal desorption (LPTD) coupled to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ionization mass spectrometry. Using this method the steroid molecules are enriched within a liquid droplet during the thermal desorption process and desorbed all-together at the last moment of droplet evaporation in a short time domain. The desorbed molecules were ionized using a dielectric barrier discharge ion-source in front of the mass spectrometer inlet at open atmosphere. This process facilitates the sensitivity enhancement with several orders of magnitude compared to the thermal desorption at a lower temperature. The limits of detection (LODs) of various steroid molecules were found to be in the range of 0.05-0.1 ng mL(-1) for standard solutions and around two orders of magnitude higher for synthetic urine samples. The detection limits of urinary anabolic steroids could be lowered by using a simple and rapid dichloromethane extraction technique. The analytical figures of merit of this technique were evaluated at open atmosphere using suitable internal standards. The technique is simple and rapid for high sensitivity and high throughput screening of anabolic steroids in urine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal controls of building storage systems using both ice storage and thermal mass – Part II: Parametric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajiah, Ali; Krarti, Moncef

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A detailed analysis is presented to assess the performance of thermal energy storage (TES) systems. ► Utility rates have been found to be significant in assessing the operation of TES systems. ► Optimal control strategies for TES systems can save up to 40% of total energy cost of office buildings. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of a series of parametric analysis to investigate the factors that affect the effectiveness of using simultaneously building thermal capacitance and ice storage system to reduce total operating costs (including energy and demand costs) while maintaining adequate occupant comfort conditions in buildings. The analysis is based on a validated model-based simulation environment and includes several parameters including the optimization cost function, base chiller size, and ice storage tank capacity, and weather conditions. It found that the combined use of building thermal mass and active thermal energy storage system can save up to 40% of the total energy costs when integrated optimal control are considered to operate commercial buildings.

  12. Significant Enhancement of Thermal Conductivity in Nanofibrillated Cellulose Films with Low Mass Fraction of Nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Na; Cui, Siqi; Hou, Xingshuang; Ding, Peng; Shi, Liyi

    2017-11-22

    High thermal conductive nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) hybrid films based on nanodiamond (ND) were fabricated by a facile vacuum filtration technique. In this issue, the thermal conductivity (TC) on the in-plane direction of the NFC/ND hybrid film had a significant enhancement of 775.2% at a comparatively low ND content (0.5 wt %). The NFC not only helps ND to disperse in the aqueous medium stably but also plays a positive role in the formation of the hierarchical structure. ND could form a thermal conductive pathway in the hierarchical structures under the intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Moreover, the hybrid films composed of zero-dimensional ND and one-dimensional NFC exhibit remarkable mechanical properties and optical transparency. The NFC/ND hybrid films possessing superior TC, mechanical properties, and optical transparency can open applications for portable electronic equipment as a lateral heat spreader.

  13. Thermal analysis of the cold mass of the 2T solenoid for the PANDA detector at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rolando, G; Dudarev, A; Pais Da Silva, H; Vodopyanov, A; Schmitt, L

    2015-01-01

    The superconducting solenoid of the PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany) is designed to provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a length of about 4 m in a bore of 1.9 m. To allow a warm target feed pipe oriented transversely to the solenoid axis and penetrating through the cryostat and solenoid cold mass, the magnet is split into 3 inter-connected coils fitted in a common support cylinder. During normal operation, cooling of the cold mass to the working temperature of 4.5 K will be achieved through the circulation by natural convection of two-phase helium in cooling pipes attached to the Al-alloy support cylinder. Pure aluminium strips acting as heat drains and glued to the inner surface of the three coils and thermally bonded to the cooling pipes allow minimizing the temperature gradient across the 6-layers coils. In this paper the thermal design of the cold mass during normal operation and current ramps up and down is validated using an analytical appro...

  14. Evaluation of lead isotope compositions of NIST NBS 981 measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometer and multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglin Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Because Pb isotopes can be used for tracing, they are widely used in many disciplines. The detection and analysis of Pb isotopes of bulk samples are usually conducted using thermal ionization mass spectrometer (TIMS and multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS, both of which need external reference materials with known isotopic compositions to correct for the mass discrimination effect produced during analysis. NIST NBS 981 is the most widely used reference material for Pb isotope analysis; however, the isotopic compositions reported by various analytical laboratories, especially those using TIMS, vary from each other. In this study, we statistically evaluated 229 reported TIMS analysis values collected by GeoReM in the last 30 years, 176 reported MC-ICP-MS analysis values, and 938 MC-ICP-MS analysis results from our laboratory in the last five years. After careful investigation, only 40 TIMS results were found to have double or triple spikes. The ratios of the overall weighted averages, 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb, obtained from 40 spiked TIMS reports and 1114 MC-ICP-MS results of NIST NBS 981 isotopes were 16.9406 ± 0.0003 (2s, 15.4957 ± 0.0002 (2s, and 36.7184 ± 0.0007 (2s, respectively.

  15. Numerical analysis of the influence of thermal mass, phase change materials and furniture / indoor content on building energy flexibility (long abstract)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johra, Hicham

    investigating the influence of the different types of thermal inertia on buildings energy flexibility. Although the insulation level and thermal mass of a building envelope are the dominant parameters, it appears that indoor content cannot be neglected for lightweight structure building simulations. Finally...

  16. A theoretical and numerical consideration of rock mass behaviour under thermal loading of radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivinen, M.; Freund, J.; Eloranta, E.

    1996-08-01

    The aim of the study is to model the geodynamic response of a ground rock block under horizontal stresses and also consider the thermal fields and deformations, especially on the ground surface, caused by the heat produced by nuclear waste. (12 refs.)

  17. Comparison of Three Infrared Thermal Detection Systems and Self Report for Mass Fever Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-20

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. Nicole Cohen describes research that examined the usefulness of thermal scanners for detecting fever in large groups of people in public settings, such as hospitals and airports.  Created: 10/20/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 10/20/2010.

  18. Introduction to computer control and future aspects in thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagemann, R.

    The author considers the computer control of the measurement program which is already available in modern mass spectrometers. Future areas for computer control are considered e.g. the heating program, ion optics and focusing, and sample changer control. (Auth.)

  19. Introduction to computer control and future aspects in thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, R. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1978-12-15

    The author considers the computer control of the measurement program which is already available in modern mass spectrometers. Future areas for computer control are considered e.g. the heating program, ion optics and focusing, and sample changer control.

  20. A wide low-mass binary model for the origin of axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kool, M. de; Heuvel, E.P.J. van den

    1985-01-01

    An accreting binary model has been proposed by recent workers to account for the origin of the axially symmetric non-thermal radio sources. The authors show that the only type of binary system that can produce the observed structural properties, is a relatively wide neutron star binary, in which the companion of the neutron star is a low-mass giant. Binaries of this type are expected to resemble closely the eight brightest galactic bulge X-ray sources as well as the progenitors of the two wide radio pulsar binaries. (U.K.)

  1. Use of the Isomass 54E thermal ionisation mass spectrometer at AEE Winfrith. Part II: plutonium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, A.P.

    1982-06-01

    This report describes the application of the Isomass 54E Thermal ionisation mass spectrometer for the isotopic analysis of plutonium, and gives details of the development of a method for quantitative determination of plutonium in sample solutions using isotopic dilution. A computer program for the control of the 54E is also described. Isotope dilution was used to compare results of plutonium content of twelve zebra reactor fuel pellets with results obtained by titrimetry. The Isomass 54E is shown to be capable of high precision analysis of plutonium sample solutions for both isotopic content and total plutonium concentration using an isotope dilution technique. (U.K.)

  2. Double spike methodology for uranium determination by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry: separation and purification of 234U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, P.M.; Saxena, M.K.; Sanjai Kumar; Aggarwal, S.K.; Jain, H.C.

    1995-01-01

    With an objective to prepare double spike of 233 U+ 234 U for determination of uranium concentration by Isotopic Dilution Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (ID-TIMS), 234 U was separated and purified from aged 238 Pu sample (15 years old) using several ion exchange and solvent extraction procedures. Final product containing 95% and 5% alpha activities of 234 and 238 Pu, respectively, which translates into 99.998 atom% of 234 U and 0.002 atom% of 238 Pu was found suitable for double spike. (author). 1 ref

  3. Water/rock interactions and mass transport within a thermal gradient Application to the confinement of high level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Ch.; Ecole Normale Superieure, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses

    1998-01-01

    The initial stage of a high level nuclear waste disposal will be characterised by a large heat release within the near-field environment of the canisters. This heat flux caused by radioactive decay will lead to an increase of temperature and a subsequent thermal gradient between the 'hot' canisters and the 'cold'geological medium. In addition, this thermal gradient will decrease with time due to the heat decay although it could last hundred years. What will be the consequences of such a thermal field varying both on space and time for the alteration of the different constituents of the near field environment. In particular, what could be the effects on the radionuclides migration in the accidental case of an early breach of a canister during the thermal stage? This study brings significant answers to these questions in the light of a performance assessment study. This work is supported by a triple methodological approach involving experimental studies, modelling calculations and a natural analogues study. This complete work demonstrates that a thermal gradient leads to a large re-distribution of elements within the system: some elements are incorporated in the solid phases of the hot end (Si, Zr, Ca) whereas some others are in those of the cold end (Fe, Al, Zn). The confrontation of the results of very simple experiments with the results of a model built on equilibrium thermodynamics allow us to evidence the probable mechanisms causing this mass transport: out-of-equilibrium thermodiffusion processes coupled to irreversible precipitation. Moreover, the effects of the variation of temperatures with time is studied by the way of a natural system which underwent a similar temperature evolution as a disposal and which was initially rich in uranium: the Jurassic Alpine bauxites. In addition, part of the initial bauxite escaped this temperature transformations due to their incorporation in outer thrusting nappes. They are used as a reference. (author)

  4. Hyphenation of two simultaneously employed soft photo ionization mass spectrometers with thermal analysis of biomass and biochar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fendt, Alois; Geissler, Robert; Streibel, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► First simultaneous hyphenation of two time-of-flight mass spectrometers with different soft photo ionization techniques (SPI and REMPI) to Thermal Analysis using a newly developed prototype for EGA is presented. ► Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) enables sensitive and selective analysis of aromatic species. ► Single photon ionization (SPI) using VUV light supplied by an innovative electron-beam pumped excimer light source (EBEL) comprehensively ionizes (nearly) all organic molecules. ► The resulting mass spectra show distinct patterns for the evolved gases of the miscellaneous biomasses and chars thereof. ► The potential for detailed kinetic studies is apparent on account of the complex pyrolysis gas compositions. - Abstract: Evolved gas analysis (EGA) is a powerful and complementary tool for Thermal Analysis. In this context, two time-of-flight mass spectrometers with different soft photo-ionization techniques are simultaneously hyphenated to a thermo balance and applied in form of a newly developed prototype for EGA of pyrolysis gases from biomass and biochar. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) is applied for selective analysis of aromatic species. Furthermore, single photon ionization (SPI) using VUV light supplied by an electron-beam pumped excimer light source (EBEL) was used to comprehensively ionize (nearly) all organic molecules. The soft ionization capability of photo-ionization techniques allows direct and on-line analysis of the evolved pyrolysis gases. Characteristic mass spectra with specific patterns could be obtained for the miscellaneous biomass feeds used. Temperature profiles of the biochars reveal a desorption step, followed by pyrolysis as observed for the biomasses. Furthermore, the potential for kinetic studies is apparent for this instrumental setup.

  5. Hyphenation of two simultaneously employed soft photo ionization mass spectrometers with thermal analysis of biomass and biochar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fendt, Alois [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group for Analysis of Complex Molecular Systems, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), IngolstaedterLandstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Geissler, Robert [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group for Analysis of Complex Molecular Systems, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), IngolstaedterLandstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg, 86159 Augsburg (Germany); Streibel, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.streibel@uni-rostock.de [Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Chair of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Rostock, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Joint Mass Spectrometry Centre, Cooperation Group for Analysis of Complex Molecular Systems, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), IngolstaedterLandstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); and others

    2013-01-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First simultaneous hyphenation of two time-of-flight mass spectrometers with different soft photo ionization techniques (SPI and REMPI) to Thermal Analysis using a newly developed prototype for EGA is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) enables sensitive and selective analysis of aromatic species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single photon ionization (SPI) using VUV light supplied by an innovative electron-beam pumped excimer light source (EBEL) comprehensively ionizes (nearly) all organic molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The resulting mass spectra show distinct patterns for the evolved gases of the miscellaneous biomasses and chars thereof. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potential for detailed kinetic studies is apparent on account of the complex pyrolysis gas compositions. - Abstract: Evolved gas analysis (EGA) is a powerful and complementary tool for Thermal Analysis. In this context, two time-of-flight mass spectrometers with different soft photo-ionization techniques are simultaneously hyphenated to a thermo balance and applied in form of a newly developed prototype for EGA of pyrolysis gases from biomass and biochar. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) is applied for selective analysis of aromatic species. Furthermore, single photon ionization (SPI) using VUV light supplied by an electron-beam pumped excimer light source (EBEL) was used to comprehensively ionize (nearly) all organic molecules. The soft ionization capability of photo-ionization techniques allows direct and on-line analysis of the evolved pyrolysis gases. Characteristic mass spectra with specific patterns could be obtained for the miscellaneous biomass feeds used. Temperature profiles of the biochars reveal a desorption step, followed by pyrolysis as observed for the biomasses. Furthermore, the potential for kinetic studies is apparent for this instrumental setup.

  6. Measurement of small ion beams by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry using new 1013 Ohm resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koornneef, J.M.; Bouman, C.; Schwieters, J.B.; Davies, G.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • First data are presented using 10 13 Ohm resistors connected to Faraday collectors. • 5 prototype 10 13 Ohm resistors were installed in a TRITON-Plus TIMS. • Performance was tested by measuring Sr and Nd isotope ratios on  13 Ohm resistors perform better than ion counting and 10 11 Ohm resistors. • Fourth decimal variability can be resolved for Nd isotope ratios on 10 pg samples. - Abstract: We tested 5 newly manufactured – prototype – 10 13 Ohm resistors in the feedback loop of Faraday cup amplifiers to measure small ion beams by Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS). The high Ohmic resistors installed in the TRITON Plus at the VU University Amsterdam theoretically have 10 times lower noise levels relative to the default 10 11 Ohm resistors. To investigate the precision and accuracy of analyses using these new amplifiers we measured Sr and Nd isotopes of reference standards at a range of ion currents (3.2 × 10 −16 to 1 × 10 −12 A, corresponding to intensities of 32 μV to 100 mV on a default 10 11 Ohm amplifier) and on small amounts of material (100 and 10 pg). Internal precision and external reproducibility for Sr and Nd isotope ratios are both better when collected on 10 13 compared 10 12 Ohm resistors and to the default 10 11 Ohm resistors. At an 87 Sr ion current of 3 × 10 −14 A (3 mV on a 10 11 Ohm amplifier) the internal precision (2 SE) of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr is 5 times better for 10 13 Ohm resistors compared to 10 11 Ohm resistors. The external reproducibility (2 SD) at this beam intensity is 9 times better. Multiple 100 and 10 pg Sr standards, ran to exhaustion, yielded low 87 Sr/ 86 Sr compared to the long term average (e.g. 10 pg average = 0.710083 ± 164 (n = 11) instead of 0.710244 ± 12, n = 73). The average off-set for 10 pg standards can be explained by a loading blank contribution of 1.3 pg. In contrast, Nd data on 100 pg and 10 pg samples are accurate suggesting that Nd loading blanks do not compromise the

  7. Neutron emission effects on fragment mass and kinetic energy distribution from fission of 239Pu induced by thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, M.; Rojas, J.; Lobato, I.

    2010-01-01

    The average of fragment kinetic energy (E-bar sign*) and the multiplicity of prompt neutrons (ν(bar sign)) as a function of fragment mass (m*), as well as the fragment mass yield (Y(m*)) from thermal neutron-induced fission of 239 Pu have been measured by Tsuchiya et al.. In that work the mass and kinetic energy are calculated from the measured kinetic energy of one fragment and the difference of time of flight of the two complementary fragments. However they do not present their results about the standard deviation σ E *(m*). In this work we have made a numerical simulation of that experiment which reproduces its results, assuming an initial distribution of the primary fragment kinetic energy (E(A)) with a constant value of the standard deviation as function of fragment mass (σ E (A)). As a result of the simulation we obtain the dependence σ E *(m*) which presents an enhancement between m* = 92 and m* = 110, and a peak at m* = 121.

  8. Measuremental analysis of thermal performance of direct gain houses in Kanto district. Effects of thermal mass and caves; Kanto chiho ni tatsu direct gain jutaku no netsuseino jissoku. Netsuyoryo to hisashi no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, K; Sunaga, N; Muro, K [Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-10-27

    The thermal performance of direct gain passive solar houses was measured. Mr. M`s two-storied RC residence with double glazing windows and thermal storage floors, walls and ceilings of brick or concrete was provided for measurement. Its double eaves of the south window and both SE and SW overhanging exterior walls play a role in sunshade. Mr. I`s two-storied wooden residence with thermal storage RC floors and brick walls, and no eaves of the south window and no overhanging exterior walls was also provided. The summer and winter measurement results were in complete contrast between the residences. In summer, large thermal mass and eaves of Mr. M`s residence were effective, while in winter, small thermal mass and no eaves of Mr. I`s residence were effective. The following ideas are important in design from the viewpoint of indoor thermal environment: a movable sunshade for taking in solar radiation as much as possible in winter, well-balanced arrangement of thermal storage parts with suitable thermal mass corresponding to movement of the sun, a large screen door for cross ventilation in summer, and a night insulation shutter for reducing heat loss in winter. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  9. On-line mass spectrometry measurement of fission gas release from nuclear fuel submitted to thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigues, E.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Pontillon, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The work presented in this paper has been performed in the framework of a joint research program between Aix-Marseille University and CEA Cadarache. The aim is to develop a mass spectrometer (MS) device for the MERARG facility. MERARG is devoted to the study of fission gas release measurement, from nuclear fuels submitted to annealing tests in high activity laboratory such as LECA-STAR, thanks to gamma spectrometry. The mass spectrometer will then extend the measurement capability from the γ-emitters gases to all the gases involved in the release in order to have a better understanding of the fission gas release dynamics from fuel during thermal transients. Furthermore, the mass spectrometer instrument combines the capabilities and performances of both on-line (for release kinetic) and off-line implementations (for delayed accurate analysis of capacities containing total release gas). The paper deals with two main axes: (1) the modelling of gas sampling inlet device and its performance and (2) the first MS qualification/calibration results. The inlet device samples the gas and also adapts the pressure between MERARG sweeping line at 1.2 bar and mass spectrometer chamber at high vacuum. It is a two-stage device comprising a capillary at inlet, an intermediate vacuum chamber, a molecular leak inlet and a two-stage pumping device. Pressure drops, conductance and throughputs are estimated both for mass spectrometer operation and for exhaust gas recovery. Possible gas segregation is also estimated and device modification is proposed to attain a more accurate calibration. First experimental results obtained from a standard gas bottle show that the quantitative analysis at a few ppm level can be achieved for all isotopes of Kr and Xe, as well as masses 2 and 4 u. (authors)

  10. Mass Dependency of Isotope Fractionation of Gases Under Thermal Gradient and Its Possible Implications for Planetary Atmosphere Escaping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Physical processes that unmix elements/isotopes of gas molecules involve phase changes, diffusion (chemical or thermal), effusion and gravitational settling. Some of those play significant roles for the evolution of chemical and isotopic compositions of gases in planetary bodies which lead to better understanding of surface paleoclimatic conditions, e.g. gas bubbles in Antarctic ice, and planetary evolution, e.g. the solar-wind erosion induced gas escaping from exosphere on terrestrial planets.. A mass dependent relationship is always expected for the kinetic isotope fractionations during these simple physical processes, according to the kinetic theory of gases by Chapman, Enskog and others [3-5]. For O-bearing (O16, -O17, -O18) molecules the alpha O-17/ alpha O-18 is expected at 0.5 to 0.515, and for S-bearing (S32,-S33. -S34, -S36) molecules, the alpha S-33/ alpha S-34 is expected at 0.5 to 0.508, where alpha is the isotope fractionation factor associated with unmixing processes. Thus, one isotope pair is generally proxied to yield all the information for the physical history of the gases. However, we recently] reported the violation of mass law for isotope fractionation among isotope pairs of multiple isotope system during gas diffusion or convection under thermal gradient (Thermal Gradient Induced Non-Mass Dependent effect, TGI-NMD). The mechanism(s) that is responsible to such striking observation remains unanswered. In our past studies, we investigated polyatomic molecules, O2 and SF6, and we suggested that nuclear spin effect could be responsible to the observed NMD effect in a way of changing diffusion coefficients of certain molecules, owing to the fact of negligible delta S-36 anomaly for SF6.. On the other hand, our results also showed that for both diffusion and convection under thermal gradient, this NMD effect is increased by lower gas pressure, bigger temperature gradient and lower average temperature, which indicate that the nuclear spin effect may

  11. Intercomparison study of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry and fission track analysis of μBq quantities of 239Pu in synthetic urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inn, K.G.W.; McCurdy, D.; Kuruvilla, L.; Barss, N.M.; Bell III, R.T.; Pietrzak, R.; Kaplan, E.; Inkret, W.; Efurd, W.; Rokop, D.; Lewis, D.; Gautier, P.

    2001-01-01

    Even today, some Marshall Islanders are looking forward to permanently resettling their islands after five decades. The U.S. Department of Energy and the resettled residents require reasonable but cost-prudent assurance that the doses to resident from residual 239 Pu will not exceed recognized international standards or recommendations, as estimated from the excretion of 239 Pu in urine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the bias, uncertainty and sensitivity of analytical techniques that measure 3-56 μBq 239 Pu in synthetic urine. The analytical techniques studied in this work included inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry and fission track analysis. The results of the intercomparison demonstrated that all three techniques were capable of marking the measurements, although not with equal degree of bias and uncertainty. The estimated minimum detectable activity was 1 μBq of 239 Pu per synthetic urine sample. This exercise is also the first effort to certify test materials of plutonium in the nBqxg -1 range. (author)

  12. Time dependent thermal treatment of oxidized MWCNTs studied by the electron and mass spectroscopy methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stobinski, L.; Lesiak, B.; Zemek, Josef; Jiříček, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 258, č. 20 (2012), s. 7912-7917 ISSN 0169-4332 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : MWCNTs * ox-MWCNTs * functional materials * electron spectroscopy * mass spectroscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.112, year: 2012

  13. Use of the Isomass 54E thermal ionisation mass spectrometer at AEE Winfrith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, A.P.

    1982-03-01

    A Vacuum Generators Isomass 54E mass spectrometer is used to carry out isotopic analyses. The capabilities of the instrument and its method of operation are outlined, and the technique used for isotopic analysis of uranium is described in detail, with results of tests on NBS standard specimens and Zebra fuel element pellets. (U.K.)

  14. Thermal mass vs. insulation building envelope design in six climatic regions of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumirai, T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available is defined in Ecotect as a homogenous enclosed volume of air. In most cases this corresponds to a single room. It is assumed that the air within a zone is able to mix freely. Every room in the simulation model was defined as distinct thermal zone... of the Ecotect simulation model and simulation of houses with base case characteristics and energy efficient measures in six South African cities. 3.1 Building infiltration rate measurements High infiltration rates means a leaky building meaning...

  15. Improved analytical sensitivity for uranium and plutonium in environmental samples: Cavity ion source thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingeneri, Kristofer; Riciputi, L.

    2001-01-01

    Following successful field trials, environmental sampling has played a central role as a routine part of safeguards inspections since early 1996 to verify declared and to detect undeclared activity. The environmental sampling program has brought a new series of analytical challenges, and driven a need for advances in verification technology. Environmental swipe samples are often extremely low in concentration of analyte (ng level or lower), yet the need to analyze these samples accurately and precisely is vital, particularly for the detection of undeclared nuclear activities. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is the standard method of determining isotope ratios of uranium and plutonium in the environmental sampling program. TIMS analysis typically employs 1-3 filaments to vaporize and ionize the sample, and the ions are mass separated and analyzed using magnetic sector instruments due to their high mass resolution and high ion transmission. However, the ionization efficiency (the ratio of material present to material actually detected) of uranium using a standard TIMS instrument is low (0.2%), even under the best conditions. Increasing ionization efficiency by even a small amount would have a dramatic impact for safeguards applications, allowing both improvements in analytical precision and a significant decrease in the amount of uranium and plutonium required for analysis, increasing the sensitivity of environmental sampling

  16. The measurement of the isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using double isotope dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhongguo

    1994-01-01

    The isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc are measured by silicagel-thermal ionization mass spectrometry using the double isotope spikers. The double isotope spikers ( 70 Zn and 67 Zn-enriched isotopes) are used to correct the isotope mass fractionation for the zinc isotope ratios, and to certify the zinc concentrations in the unknown samples. The zinc concentrations of these double isotope spikers are surveyed by a spiker made of pure (99.99%) natural zinc metal powder. The correcting factors (f a , f t and f n ) of the zinc isotope ratios in the spiked mixture, spike and unspiked samples for the isotope mass fractionation, and the spike-to-unspiked ratios (X r ) of the zinc isotope r in the spiked mixture samples can be obtained to solve the matrix equations by numerical approximation. The natural zinc isotope ratios are: 64 Zn/ 67 Zn = 11.8498, 66 Zn/ 67 Zn = 6.7977, 68 Zn/ 67 Zn = 4.5730 and 70 Zn/ 67 Zn = 0.1520. The uncertainties determined of the isotope ratios and concentrations of zinc are +- 0.16% and +-0.31%, respectively

  17. Statistical program for the data evaluation of a thermal ionization mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Raaphorst, J. G.

    1978-12-15

    A computer program has been written to statistically analyze mass spectrometer measurements. The program tests whether the difference between signal and background intensities is statistically significant, corrects for signal drift in the measured values, and calculates ratios against the main isotope from the corrected intensities. Repeated ratio value measurements are screened for outliers using the Dixon statistical test. Means of ratios and the coefficient of variation are calculated and reported. The computer program is written in Basic and is available for anyone who is interested.

  18. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for 239Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Koester, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the 239 Pu(n th ,f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on γ-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  19. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for 239Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Köster, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-09-01

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the 239Pu(nth,f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on γ-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  20. Multi-element determination in environmental samples by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis using thermal ionization. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilpert, K.; Waidmann, E.

    1988-01-01

    An analytical procedure for the multi-element analysis of the elements Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Rb, Sr, Cd, Ba, Tl, and Pb in pine needles by mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis using thermal ionization has been reported in Part I of this paper. This procedure is now transferred to the non-vegetable material 'Oyster Tissue' (Standard Reference Material 1566, National Bureau of Standards, USA). By a modification of the analytical procedure, it was possible to determine Cr in this material in addition to the aforementioned elements. No concentrations are certified for the elements Ga, Ba and Tl analyzed in this work. The concentrations of the remaining elements obtained by the multi-element analysis agree well with those certified. (orig.)

  1. Performance evaluation of indigenous thermal ionization mass spectrometer for determination of 235U/238U atom ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamelu, D.; Parab, A.R.; Sasi Bhushan, K.; Shah, Raju V.; Jagdish Kumar, S.; Rao, Radhika M.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Bhatia, R.K.; Yadav, V.K.; Sharma, Madhavi P.; Tulsyan, Puneet; Chavda, Pradip; Sriniwasan, P.

    2014-07-01

    A magnetic sector based Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS) designed and developed at Technical Physics Division, B.A.R.C., was evaluated for its performance for the determination of 235 U/ 238 U atom ratios in uranium samples. This consisted of evaluating the precision and accuracy on the 235 U/ 238 U atom ratios in various isotopic reference materials as well as indigenously generated uranium samples. The results obtained by the indigenous TIMS were also compared with those obtained using a commercially available TIMS system. The internal and external precision were found to be around 0.1% for determining 235 U/ 238 U atom ratios close to those of natural uranium ( i.e. 0.00730). (author)

  2. Corrosion of ferritic steels by molten lithium: Influence of competing thermal gradient mass transfer and surface product reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1987-10-01

    An Fe-12Cr-1MoVW steel was exposed to thermally convective lithium for 6962 h. Results showed that the weight change profile of Fe-12Cr-1MoVW steel changed substantially as the maximum loop temperature was raised from 500 to 600 0 C. Furthermore, for a particular loop experiment, changes in the structure and composition of the exposed surfaces did not reflect typical thermal gradient mass transfer effects for all elements: the surface concentration of chromium was often a maximum at intermediate temperatures, while nickel (present at low concentrations in the starting material) tended to be transported to the coldest part of the loop. Such data were interpreted in terms of a qualitative model in which there are different dominant reactions or the various constituents of the ferritic steels (surface product formation involving nitrogen and/or carbon and solubility-driven elemental transport). This competition among different reactions is important in evaluating overall corrosion behavior and the effects of temperature. The overall corrosion rate of the 12Cr-1MoVW steel was relatively low when compared to that for austenitic stainless steel exposed under similar conditions

  3. Hydrodynamics and mass transfer deaeration of water on thermal power plants when used natural gas as a desorbing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharapov, V. I.; Kudryavtseva, E. V.

    2017-11-01

    The technology of low-temperature deaeration of water in thermal power plants was developed. It is proposed to use natural gas supplied to the furnace as desorbing agent in the deaerator instead steam or superheated water. Natural gas has low, often - negative temperature after reducing installs. At the same time, it contains virtually no corrosive gases, oxygen and carbon dioxide, thereby successfully may be used as a stripping agent in water deaeration. The calculation of the energy efficiency of the technology for a typical unit of CHP has shown that achieved a significant annual saving of fuel equivalent in the transition from the traditional method of deaeration of water in the low temperature deaeration. Hydrodynamic and mass transfer indicators were determined for the deaerator thermal power plants using as stripping medium natural gas supplied to the boiler burners. Theoretically required amount and the real specific consumption of natural gas were estimated for deaeration of water standard quality. The calculation of the hydrodynamic characteristics was presented for jet-bubbling atmospheric deaerator with undescended perforated plate when operating on natural gas. The calculation shows the possibility of using commercially available atmospheric deaerators for the application of the new low-temperature water deaeration technology.

  4. Analysis of femtogram-sized plutonium samples by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.H.; Duckworth, D.C.; Bostick, D.T.; Coleman, R.M.; McPherson, R.L.; McKown, H.S.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to extend the ability to perform isotopic analysis of plutonium to samples as small as possible. Plutonium ionizes thermally with quite good efficiency (first ionization potential 5.7 eV). Sub-nanogram sized samples can be analyzed on a near-routine basis given the necessary instrumentation. Efforts in this laboratory have been directed at rhenium-carbon systems; solutions of carbon in rhenium provide surfaces with work functions higher than pure rhenium (5.8 vs. ∼ 5.4 eV). Using a single resin bead as a sample loading medium both concentrates the sample nearly to a point and, due to its interaction with rhenium, produces the desired composite surface. Earlier work in this area showed that a layer of rhenium powder slurried in solution containing carbon substantially enhanced precision of isotopic measurements for uranium. Isotopic fractionation was virtually eliminated, and ionization efficiencies 2-5 times better than previously measured were attained for both Pu and U (1.7 and 0.5%, respectively). The other side of this coin should be the ability to analyze smaller samples, which is the subject of this report

  5. A simplified kinetic and mass transfer modelling of the thermal hydrolysis of vegetable oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forero-Hernandez, Hector Alexander; Jones, Mark Nicholas; Sarup, Bent

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a combined modelling approach to investigate the kinetics and masstransfer effects on the hydrolysis of vegetable oils under subcritical conditions. The primary purpose of this simplified model is to interpret experimental data collected from typical batch tests and to estimate...... parameters for the proposed model. Due to its heterogeneous nature, the hydrolysis reaction is affected not only by the chemical kinetics but also by the rate of mass transfer between the oil and water as well as their specific contact area in this two phase emulsion. Considering these properties, a model...... and improvement accompanied by Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis. Since the lack of experimental data is a crucial issue in the hydrolysis of vegetable oils, this model-based analysis of data is of substantial value to provide necessary information for detailed modeling and characterization of the process....

  6. Application of thermal neutron radiography for the mass transport of moisture through freezing soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, M.A.

    1989-04-01

    This thesis reports on the development of a technique to evaluate hydraulic conductivities in a soil (Snowcal) subject to freezing conditions. The technique draws on three distinctly different disciplines, Nuclear Physics, Soil Physics and Remote Sensing to provide a non-destructive and reliable evaluation of hydraulic conductivity throughout a freezing test. Thermal neutron radiography is used to provide information on local water/ice contents at anytime throughout the test. The experimental test rig is designed so that the soil matrix can be radiated by a neutron beam, from a nuclear reactor, to obtain radiographs. The radiographs can then be interpreted, following a process of remote sensing image enhancement, to yield information on relative water/ice contents. Interpretation of the radiographs is accommodated using image analysis equipment capable of distinguishing between 256 shades of grey. Remote sensing image enhancing techniques are then employed to develop false colour images which show the movement of water and development of ice lenses in the soil. Instrumentation is incorporated in the soil in the form of psychrometer/thermocouples, to record water potential, electrical resistance probes to enable ice and water to be differentiated on the radiographs and thermocouples to record the temperature gradient. Water content determinations are made from the enhanced images and plotted against potential measurements to provide the moisture characteristic for the soil. With relevant mathematical theory pore water distributions are obtained and combined with water content data to give hydraulic conductivities. The values for hydraulic conductivity in the saturated soil and at the frozen fringe are compared with established values for silts and silty-sands. The values are in general agreement and, with refinement, this non-destructive technique could afford useful information on a whole range of soils. (author)

  7. Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrena, R.; Canovas, C.; Sanchez, A.

    2006-01-01

    A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 deg. C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large composting masses could be predicted by means of this simplified energy balance, which takes into account terms of convective, conductive and radiation heat dissipation. Heat losses in a large composting mass are not significant due to the similar temperatures found at the surroundings and at the surface of the pile (ranging from 15 to 40 deg. C). In contrast, thermophilic temperature in the core of the pile was maintained during the whole maturation process. Heat generation was estimated with the static respiration index, a parameter that is typically used to monitor the biological activity and stability of composting processes. In this study, the static respiration index is presented as a parameter to estimate the metabolic heat that can be generated according to the biodegradable organic matter content of a compost sample, which can be useful in predicting the temperature of the composting process

  8. Rapid screening of basic colorants in processed vegetables through mass spectrometry using an interchangeable thermal desorption electrospray ionization source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ling; Lin, Hong-Yi; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2018-06-20

    Thermal desorption electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (TD-ESI-MS) employing a quickly interchangeable ionization source is a relatively new ambient ionization mass spectrometric technique that has had, to date, only a limited number of applications related to food safety control. With reallocation of resources, this direct-analysis technique has had wider use in food analysis when operated in dual-working mode (pretreatment-free qualitative screening and conventional quantitative confirmation) after switching to an ambient ionization source from a traditional atmospheric pressure ionization source. Herein, we describe the benefits and challenges associated with the use of a TD-ESI source to detect adulterants in processed vegetables (PVs), as a proof-of-concept for the detection of basic colorants. While TD-ESI can offer direct qualitative screening analyses for PVs with detection capabilities lower than those provided with liquid chromatography/UV detection within 30 s, the use of TD-ESI for semi-quantification is applicable only for homogeneous food matrices. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of the distribution of uranium and the transuranic elements in the environment by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chastagner, P.

    1987-01-01

    Protection of the world population from releases of uranium, plutonium, and other transuranic materials requires, among other things, a knowledge of the sources, transport, and distribution of these elements in the environment. Both isotopic and quantitative analytical data are required in the determination of these factors. Also, the analyses must be precise and accurate enough to distinguish newly released material from older material such as the worldwide deposits from atmospheric weapons testing. For this reason, uranium, neptunium, and plutonium and other transuranic elements in the environment are routinely determined by high-sensitivity thermal ionization mass spectrometric techniques. With current instrumentation and techniques, routine isotope dilution and isotopic analyses are made with purified elemental samples as small as 2 x 10 -14 g. The detection limit for uranium and most of the transuranic isotopes is ∼ 5 x 10 18 g (∼ 13,000 atoms), which is at least an order of magnitude better than the detection limits of the radiometric counting techniques normally employed. The mass spectral sensitivities are equal for all of the isotopes of a given element but vary from element to element. Thus, each elemental sample must be highly purified. Separation techniques recover ∼ 80% of the uranium and the transuranic material from soils and other materials. Interelement separation factors > 10 5 are achieved with advanced ion exchange methods. Results of recent application of these techniques at the Savannah River Lab. and other laboratories are include

  10. Leidenfrost Phenomenon-assisted Thermal Desorption (LPTD) and Its Application to Open Ion Sources at Atmospheric Pressure Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Subhrakanti; Chen, Lee Chuin; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-03-01

    This work describes the development and application of a new thermal desorption technique that makes use of the Leidenfrost phenomenon in open ion sources at atmospheric pressure for direct mass spectrometric detection of ultratrace levels of illicit, therapeutic, and stimulant drugs, toxicants, and peptides (molecular weight above 1 kDa) in their unaltered state from complex real world samples without or with minor sample pretreatment. A low temperature dielectric barrier discharge ion source was used throughout the experiments and the analytical figures of merit of this technique were investigated. Further, this desorption technique coupled with other ionization sources such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and dc corona discharge atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) in open atmosphere was also investigated. The use of the high-resolution `Exactive Orbitrap' mass spectrometer provided unambiguous identification of trace levels of the targeted compounds from complex mixtures and background noise; the limits of detection for various small organic molecules and peptides treated with this technique were at the level of parts per trillion and 10-9 M, respectively. The high sensitivity of the present technique is attributed to the spontaneous enrichment of analyte molecules during the slow evaporation of the solvent, as well as to the sequential desorption of molecules from complex mixtures based on their volatilities. This newly developed desorption technique is simple and fast, while molecular ions are observed as the major ions.

  11. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report

  12. Influence of the effective mass of water molecule on thermal neutron scattering; Uticaj efektivne mase molekula vode na rasejanje termalnih neutrona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markovic, M [Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia). Elektrotehnicki Fakultet

    1981-07-01

    The influence of the effective water molecule mass on the thermal neutron scattering on the nucleus of the hydrogen atom has been investigated. Besides the actual water molecule mass (M = 18) the investigations have been carried out with its two effective values (M1 = 16 and M2 = 20). The differential and total cross sections have been calculated for the incident thermal neutron energy E{sub o} = 1 eV. Investigation results show different prominence of the quantum effects and for M2 the appearance of peaks in the quasielastic scattering. (author)

  13. Characterization of thermal reaction of aluminum/copper (II) oxide/poly(tetrafluoroethene) nanocomposite by thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, mass spectrometry and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiangyu; Yang, Hongtao; Li, Yan-chun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal reaction properties of the Al/CuO/PTFE nanocomposite were investigated. • The Al/PTFE and CuO/PTFE nanocomposites were prepared and tested for comparison. • TG/DSC–MS and XRD analysis were performed. • PTFE is oxidizing Al and reducing CuO during the thermal decomposition. - Abstract: The application of fluoropolymers as reactive agent in energetic materials have attracted significant interest recently. In this study, the thermal reaction properties of the aluminum nanoparticles/copper (II) oxide nanoparticles/poly(tetrafluoroethene) (Al-NPs/CuO-NPs/PTFE) nanocomposite (mass ratio of Al-NPs/CuO-NPs/PTFE = 20/60/20) were investigated by means of thermogravimetry/differential scanning calorimetry–mass spectrometry (TG/DSC–MS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The Al-NPs/PTFE (mass ratio of Al-NPs/PTFE = 50/50) and CuO-NPs/PTFE (mass ratio of CuO-NPs/PTFE = 75/25) nanocomposites were also prepared and tested for comparison. It is observed that PTFE is acting as both oxidizer and reducer during the thermal decomposition process of Al-NPs/CuO-NPs/PTFE nanocomposites. Before 615 °C, PTFE is oxidized by CuO-NPs and oxidizing Al-NPs, resulting mass reduction. After 615 °C, the excessive aluminum and copper (I)/copper (II) oxide will proceed the exothermic condensed phase reaction.

  14. Magnetic headspace adsorptive extraction of chlorobenzenes prior to thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Lorena; Ahmadi, Mazaher; Fernández, Elena; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Canals, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This study presents a new, user-friendly, cost-effective and portable headspace solid-phase extraction technique based on graphene oxide decorated with iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles as sorbent, located on one end of a small neodymium magnet. Hence, the new headspace solid-phase extraction technique has been called Magnetic Headspace Adsorptive Extraction (Mag-HSAE). In order to assess Mag-HSAE technique applicability to model analytes, some chlorobenzenes were extracted from water samples prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. A multivariate approach was employed to optimize the experimental parameters affecting Mag-HSAE. The method was evaluated under optimized extraction conditions (i.e., sample volume, 20 mL; extraction time, 30 min; sorbent amount, 10 mg; stirring speed, 1500 rpm, and ionic strength, non-significant), obtaining a linear response from 0.5 to 100 ng L −1 for 1,3-DCB, 1,4-DCB, 1,2-DCB, 1,3,5-TCB, 1,2,4-TCB and 1,2,3-TCB; from 0.5 to 75 ng L −1 for 1,2,4,5-TeCB, and PeCB; and from 1 to 75 ng L −1 for 1,2,3,4-TeCB. The repeatability of the proposed method was evaluated at 10 ng L −1 and 50 ng L −1 spiking levels, and coefficients of variation ranged between 1.5 and 9.5% (n = 5). Limits of detection values were found between 93 and 301 pg L −1 . Finally, tap, mineral and effluent water were selected as real water samples to assess method applicability. Relative recoveries varied between 86 and 110% showing negligible matrix effects. - Highlights: • A new extraction technique named Magnetic Headspace Adsorptive Extraction is presented. • Graphene oxide/iron oxide composite deposited on a neodymiun magnet as sorbent. • Sorbent of low cost, rapid and simple synthesis, easy manipulation and portability options. • Fast and efficient extraction and sensitive determination of chlorobenzenes in water samples.

  15. Comparison of mass and energy balances for air blown and thermally ballasted fluidized bed gasifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysenko, Steve; Sadaka, Samy; Brown, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the mass and energy balances for a conventional air blown fluidized bed gasifier and a ballasted fluidized bed gasifier developed at Iowa State University. The ballasted gasifier is an indirectly heated gasifier that uses a single reactor for both combustion and pyrolysis. Heat accumulated in high-temperature phase change material during the combustion phase is released during the pyrolysis phase to generate producer gas. Gas composition, tar and char contents, cold gas efficiency, carbon conversion, and hydrogen yield per unit biomass input were determined as part of these evaluation. During the pyrolysis phase of ballasted gasification, higher volumetric concentrations of hydrogen and methane were obtained than during air blown gasification. Hydrogen yield for ballasted gasification was 14 g kg −1 of biomass, which was about 20% higher than that obtained during air blown gasification. The higher heating value of the producer gas also reached higher levels during the ballasted pyrolysis phase than that of air blown gasification. Heating value for air blown gasification was 5.2 MJ m −3 whereas the heating value for the ballasted pyrolysis phase averaged 5.5 MJ m −3 , reaching a maximum of 8.0 MJ m −3 . The ballasted gasifier was expected to yield producer gas with average heating value as high as 15 MJ m −3 but excessive use of nitrogen to purge and cool the fuel feeder system greatly diluted the producer gas. Relatively simple redesign of the feeder system would greatly reduce the use of purge gas and may increase the heating values to about 17.5 MJ m −3 . Higher char production per kilogram of biomass was associated with the ballasted system, producing 140 g kg −1 of biomass compared to only 53 g kg −1 of biomass during air blown gasification. On the other hand, tar concentrations in the producer gas were 6.0 g m −3 for ballasted gasification compared to 11.7 g m −3 for air blown gasification. On

  16. Magnetic headspace adsorptive extraction of chlorobenzenes prior to thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Lorena, E-mail: lorena.vidal@ua.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences and University Institute of Materials, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain); Ahmadi, Mazaher [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fernández, Elena [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences and University Institute of Materials, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain); Madrakian, Tayyebeh [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Canals, Antonio, E-mail: a.canals@ua.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Sciences and University Institute of Materials, University of Alicante, P.O. Box 99, E-03080, Alicante (Spain)

    2017-06-08

    This study presents a new, user-friendly, cost-effective and portable headspace solid-phase extraction technique based on graphene oxide decorated with iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles as sorbent, located on one end of a small neodymium magnet. Hence, the new headspace solid-phase extraction technique has been called Magnetic Headspace Adsorptive Extraction (Mag-HSAE). In order to assess Mag-HSAE technique applicability to model analytes, some chlorobenzenes were extracted from water samples prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination. A multivariate approach was employed to optimize the experimental parameters affecting Mag-HSAE. The method was evaluated under optimized extraction conditions (i.e., sample volume, 20 mL; extraction time, 30 min; sorbent amount, 10 mg; stirring speed, 1500 rpm, and ionic strength, non-significant), obtaining a linear response from 0.5 to 100 ng L{sup −1} for 1,3-DCB, 1,4-DCB, 1,2-DCB, 1,3,5-TCB, 1,2,4-TCB and 1,2,3-TCB; from 0.5 to 75 ng L{sup −1} for 1,2,4,5-TeCB, and PeCB; and from 1 to 75 ng L{sup −1} for 1,2,3,4-TeCB. The repeatability of the proposed method was evaluated at 10 ng L{sup −1} and 50 ng L{sup −1} spiking levels, and coefficients of variation ranged between 1.5 and 9.5% (n = 5). Limits of detection values were found between 93 and 301 pg L{sup −1}. Finally, tap, mineral and effluent water were selected as real water samples to assess method applicability. Relative recoveries varied between 86 and 110% showing negligible matrix effects. - Highlights: • A new extraction technique named Magnetic Headspace Adsorptive Extraction is presented. • Graphene oxide/iron oxide composite deposited on a neodymiun magnet as sorbent. • Sorbent of low cost, rapid and simple synthesis, easy manipulation and portability options. • Fast and efficient extraction and sensitive determination of chlorobenzenes in water samples.

  17. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry investigation of the impact of thermal processing and storage on peach procyanidins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yun-Jeong; Barrett, Diane M; Mitchell, Alyson E

    2004-04-21

    Normal-phase liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) was used to determine the levels and fate of procyanidins in frozen and canned Ross clingstone peaches as well as in the syrup used in the canning over a 3 month period. Procyanidin oligomers, monomers through undecamers, were identified in Ross clingstone peaches. Optimized methods allowed for the quantitation of oligomers through octamers. The profile of procyanidins in peaches is similar to profiles found in grapes, chocolate, and beverages linked to health benefits such as tea and wine. The monomer content in frozen peeled peaches was found to be 19.59 mg/kg. Dimers (39.59 mg/kg) and trimers (38.81 mg/kg) constituted the largest percent composition of oligomers in the peaches. Tetramers through octamers were present in levels of 17.81, 12.43, 10.62, 3.94 and 1.75 mg/kg, respectively. Thermal processing resulted in an 11% reduction in monomers, a 9% reduction in dimers, a 12% reduction in trimers, a 6% reduction in tetramers, and a 5% reduction in pentamers. Hexamers and heptamers demonstrated an approximate 30% loss, and octamers were no longer detected. Analysis of the syrup after thermal processing indicates that there is a migration of procyanidin monomers through hexamers into the syrup that can account for the losses observed during the canning process. Storage of canned peaches for 3 months demonstrated a time-related loss in higher oligomers and that by 3 months oligomers larger than tetramers are not observed. At 3 months postcanning, levels of monomers had decreased by 10%, dimers by 16%, trimers by 45%, and tetramers by 80%. A similar trend was observed in the canning syrup.

  18. Characterization of olive oil volatiles by multi-step direct thermal desorption-comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry using a programmed temperature vaporizing injector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Koning, S.; Kaal, E.; Janssen, H.-G.; van Platerink, C.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.

    2008-01-01

    The feasibility of a versatile system for multi-step direct thermal desorption (DTD) coupled to comprehensive gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometric (TOF-MS) detection is studied. As an application the system is used for the characterization of fresh versus aged olive

  19. Effects of Thermal Mass, Window Size, and Night-Time Ventilation on Peak Indoor Air Temperature in the Warm-Humid Climate of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Amos-Abanyie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Most office buildings in the warm-humid sub-Saharan countries experience high cooling load because of the predominant use of sandcrete blocks which are of low thermal mass in construction and extensive use of glazing. Relatively, low night-time temperatures are not harnessed in cooling buildings because office openings remain closed after work hours. An optimization was performed through a sensitivity analysis-based simulation, using the Energy Plus (E+ simulation software to assess the effects of thermal mass, window size, and night ventilation on peak indoor air temperature (PIAT. An experimental system was designed based on the features of the most promising simulation model, constructed and monitored, and the experimental data used to validate the simulation model. The results show that an optimization of thermal mass and window size coupled with activation of night-time ventilation provides a synergistic effect to obtain reduced peak indoor air temperature. An expression that predicts, indoor maximum temperature has been derived for models of various thermal masses.

  20. Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer in a thermally linearly stratified non-darcy porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.

    2011-12-26

    Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer from a vertical surface embedded in a liquid saturated thermally stratified non - Darcy porous medium has been analyzed using a local non-similar procedure. The wall temperature and concentration are constant and the medium is linearly stratified in the vertical direction with respect to the thermal conditions. The fluid flow, temperature and concentration fields are affected by the complex interactions among the diffusion ratio Le, buoyancy ratio N, thermo-diffusion parameter Sr and stratification parameter ?. Non-linear interactions of all these parameters on the convective transport has been analyzed and variation of heat and mass transfer coefficients with thermo-diffusion parameter in the thermally stratified non-Darcy porous media is presented through computer generated plots.

  1. Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer in a thermally linearly stratified non-darcy porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.; El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer from a vertical surface embedded in a liquid saturated thermally stratified non - Darcy porous medium has been analyzed using a local non-similar procedure. The wall temperature and concentration are constant and the medium is linearly stratified in the vertical direction with respect to the thermal conditions. The fluid flow, temperature and concentration fields are affected by the complex interactions among the diffusion ratio Le, buoyancy ratio N, thermo-diffusion parameter Sr and stratification parameter ?. Non-linear interactions of all these parameters on the convective transport has been analyzed and variation of heat and mass transfer coefficients with thermo-diffusion parameter in the thermally stratified non-Darcy porous media is presented through computer generated plots.

  2. Rapid detection of illegal colorants on traditional Chinese pastries through mass spectrometry with an interchangeable thermal desorption electrospray ionization source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Ying; Chen, Yen-Ling; Chen, Wei-Chu; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Huang, Yeou-Lih

    2018-06-30

    Ambient mass spectrometry using an interchangeable thermal desorption/electrospray ionization source (TD-ESI) is a relatively new technique that has had only a limited number of applications to date. Nevertheless, this direct-analysis technique has potential for wider use in analytical chemistry (e.g., in the rapid direct detection of contaminants, residues, and adulterants on and in food) when operated in dual-working mode (pretreatment-free qualitative screening and conventional quantitative confirmation) after switching to a TD-ESI source from a conventional ESI source. Herein, we describe the benefits and challenges associated with the use of a TD-ESI source to detect adulterants on traditional Chinese pastries (TCPs), as a proof-of-concept for the detection of illegal colorants. While TD-ESI can offer direct (i.e., without any sample preparation) qualitative screening analyses for TCPs with adequate sensitivity within 30 s, the use of TD-ESI for semi-quantification is applicable only for homogeneous matrices (e.g., tang yuan). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption-tandem mass spectrometry (LDTD-MS-MS) in forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Nichole D; Moore, Katherine N; Grabenauer, Megan

    2014-10-01

    Many forensic laboratories experience backlogs due to increased drug-related cases. Laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD) has demonstrated its applicability in other scientific areas by providing data comparable with instrumentation, such as liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, in less time. LDTD-MS-MS was used to validate 48 compounds in drug-free human urine and blood for screening or quantitative analysis. Carryover, interference, limit of detection, limit of quantitation, matrix effect, linearity, precision and accuracy and stability were evaluated. Quantitative analysis indicated that LDTD-MS-MS produced precise and accurate results with the average overall within-run precision in urine and blood represented by a %CV forensic toxicology but before it can be successfully implemented that there are some challenges that must be addressed. Although the advantages of the LDTD system include minimal maintenance and rapid analysis (∼10 s per sample) which makes it ideal for high-throughput forensic laboratories, a major disadvantage is its inability or difficulty analyzing isomers and isobars due to the lack of chromatography without the use of high-resolution MS; therefore, it would be best implemented as a screening technique. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Real-time mass spectroscopy analysis of Li-ion battery electrolyte degradation under abusive thermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaulupeau, B.; Delobel, B.; Cahen, S.; Fontana, S.; Hérold, C.

    2017-02-01

    The lithium-ion batteries are widely used in rechargeable electronic devices. The current challenges are to improve the capacity and safety of these systems in view of their development to a larger scale, such as for their application in electric and hybrid vehicles. Lithium-ion batteries use organic solvents because of the wide operating voltage. The corresponding electrolytes are usually based on combinations of linear, cyclic alkyl carbonates and a lithium salt such as LiPF6. It has been reported that in abusive thermal conditions, a catalytic effect of the cathode materials lead to the formation fluoro-organics compounds. In order to understand the degradation phenomenon, the study at 240 °C of the interaction between positive electrode materials (LiCoO2, LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2, LiMn2O4 and LiFePO4) and electrolyte in dry and wet conditions has been realized by an original method which consists in analyzing by mass spectrometry in real time the volatile molecules produced. The evolution of specific gases channels coupled to the NMR reveal the formation of rarely discussed species such as 2-fluoroethanol and 1,4-dioxane. Furthermore, it appears that the presence of water or other protic impurities greatly influence their formation.

  5. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air.

  6. Thermal, chemical, and mass transport processes induced in abyssal sediments by the emplacement of nuclear wastes: Experimental and modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, D.F.; Erickson, K.L.; Seyfried, W.E. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In this chapter the authors discuss the current status of heat and mass transport studies in the marine red clay sediments that are being considered as a nuclear waste isolation medium and review analytical and experimental studies. Calculations based on numerical models indicate that for a maximum allowable sediment-canister interface temperatures of 200 0 to 250 0 C, the sediment can absorb about 1.5kW initial power from waste buried 30 m in the sediment in a canister that is 3 m long and 0.3 m in diameter. The resulting fluid displacement due to convections is found to be small, less than 1 m. Laboratory studies of the geochemical effects induced by heating sediment-seawater mixtures indicate that the canister and waste form should be designed to resist a hot, relatively acidic oxidizing environment. Since the thermally altered sediment volume of about 5.5 m/sup 3/ is small relative to the sediment volume overlying the canister, the acid and oxidizing conditions should significantly affect the properties of the far field only if thermodiffusional process (Soret effect) prove to be significant. If thermodiffusional effects are important, however, near-field chemistry will differ considerably from that predicted from results of constant temperature sediment-seawater interaction experiments

  7. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of Nonvolatile Inorganic Oxidizer-Based Explosives from Wipe Collections by Infrared Thermal Desorption-Direct Analysis in Real Time Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Sisco, Edward; Staymates, Matthew

    2018-05-07

    Infrared thermal desorption (IRTD) was coupled with direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) for the detection of both inorganic and organic explosives from wipe collected samples. This platform generated discrete and rapid heating rates that allowed volatile and semivolatile organic explosives to thermally desorb at relatively lower temperatures, while still achieving elevated temperatures required to desorb nonvolatile inorganic oxidizer-based explosives. IRTD-DART-MS demonstrated the thermal desorption and detection of refractory potassium chlorate and potassium perchlorate oxidizers, compounds difficult to desorb with traditional moderate-temperature resistance-based thermal desorbers. Nanogram to sub-nanogram sensitivities were established for analysis of a range of organic and inorganic oxidizer-based explosive compounds, with further enhancement limited by the thermal properties of the most common commercial wipe materials. Detailed investigations and high-speed visualization revealed conduction from the heated glass-mica base plate as the dominant process for heating of the wipe and analyte materials, resulting in thermal desorption through boiling, aerosolization, and vaporization of samples. The thermal desorption and ionization characteristics of the IRTD-DART technique resulted in optimal sensitivity for the formation of nitrate adducts with both organic and inorganic species. The IRTD-DART-MS coupling and IRTD in general offer promising explosive detection capabilities to the defense, security, and law enforcement arenas.

  9. HOW THERMAL EVOLUTION AND MASS-LOSS SCULPT POPULATIONS OF SUPER-EARTHS AND SUB-NEPTUNES: APPLICATION TO THE KEPLER-11 SYSTEM AND BEYOND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Eric D.; Miller, Neil; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    We use models of thermal evolution and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven mass loss to explore the composition and history of low-mass, low-density transiting planets. We investigate the Kepler-11 system in detail and provide estimates of both the current and past planetary compositions. We find that an H/He envelope on Kepler-11b is highly vulnerable to mass loss. By comparing to formation models, we show that in situ formation of the system is extremely difficult. Instead we propose that it is a water-rich system of sub-Neptunes that migrated from beyond the snow line. For the broader population of observed planets, we show that there is a threshold in bulk planet density and incident flux above which no low-mass transiting planets have been observed. We suggest that this threshold is due to the instability of H/He envelopes to XUV-driven mass loss. Importantly, we find that this mass-loss threshold is well reproduced by our thermal evolution/contraction models that incorporate a standard mass-loss prescription. Treating the planets' contraction history is essential because the planets have significantly larger radii during the early era of high XUV fluxes. Over time low-mass planets with H/He envelopes can be transformed into water-dominated worlds with steam envelopes or rocky super-Earths. Finally, we use this threshold to provide likely minimum masses and radial-velocity amplitudes for the general population of Kepler candidates. Likewise, we use this threshold to provide constraints on the maximum radii of low-mass planets found by radial-velocity surveys.

  10. THERMAL CONDUCTANCE IN AQUATIC BIRDS IN RELATION TO THE DEGREE OF WATER CONTACT, BODY-MASS, AND BODY-FAT - ENERGETIC IMPLICATIONS OF LIVING IN A STRONG COOLING ENVIRONMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, J; VANEERDEN, MR

    1995-01-01

    Thermal conductance of carcasses of 14 aquatic bird species was determined by the warming constant technique. The effect on thermal conductance of body mass, age sex, fat deposits, and the degree of contact with water were studied. Only body mass and the degree of submergence in water had an effect.

  11. Direct determination of the samarium:neodymium ratio in geological materials by inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometry with cryogenic desolvation. Comparison with isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, Christian; Telouk, Philippe; Imbert, J.-L.

    1995-01-01

    A cryogenic desolvation unit in the sample introduction system reduces differences in oxide formation between Sm and Nd to very low levels, enabling the direct, standardless determination of their ratio in bulk solutions by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The measured values are in reasonably good agreement with those determined by the isotope dilution thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) reference technique. Although this method cannot, at present, compete with ID-TIMS in terms of precision and accuracy, it is much more straightforward and can be used in geochemistry for studies involving the screening of a large number of samples. (author)

  12. Study of mixed radiative thermal mass transfer in the case of spherical liquide particle evaporation in a high temperature thermal air plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garandeau, S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiative transfer in a semi-transparent non-isothermal medium with spherical configuration has been studied. Limit conditions have been detailed, among which the semi-transparent inner sphere case is a new case. Enthalpy and matter transfer equations related to these different cases have been established. An adimensional study of local conservation laws allowed to reveal a parameter set characteristic of radiation coupled phenomena thermal conduction, convection, diffusion. Transfer equations in the case of evaporation of a liquid spherical particle in an air thermal plasma have been simplified. An analytical solution for matter transfer is proposed. Numerical solution of radiative problems and matter transfer has been realized [fr

  13. Comparison of two common adsorption materials for thermal desorption gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of biogenic volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcillo, Andrea; Jakimovska, Viktorija; Widdig, Anja; Birkemeyer, Claudia

    2017-09-08

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are commonly collected from gaseous samples by adsorption to materials such as the porous polymer Tenax TA. Adsorbed compounds are subsequently released from these materials by thermal desorption (TD) and separated then by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization (FID) or mass spectrometry (MS) detection. Tenax TA is known to be particularly suitable for non-polar to semipolar volatiles, however, many volatiles from environmental and biological samples possess a rather polar character. Therefore, we tested if the polymer XAD-2, which so far is widely used to adsorb organic compounds from aqueous and organic solvents, could provide a broader coverage for (semi)polar VOCs during gas-phase sampling. Mixtures of volatile compounds covering a wide range of volatility (bp. 20-256°C) and different chemical classes were introduced by liquid spiking into sorbent tubes with one of the two porous polymers, Tenax TA or XAD-2, and analyzed by TD/GC-MS. At first, an internal standard mixture composed of 17 authentic standards was used to optimize desorption temperature with respect to sorbent degradation and loading time for calibration. Secondly, we tested the detectability of a complex standard mixture composed of 57 volatiles, most of them common constituents of the body odor of mammals. Moreover, the performance of XAD-2 compared with Tenax TA was assessed as limit of quantitation and linearity for the internal standard mixture and 33 compounds from the complex standard mixture. Volatiles were analyzed in a range between 0.01-∼250ng/tube depending on the compound and material. Lower limits of quantitation were between 0.01 and 3 ng±0.9). Interestingly, we found different kinetics for compound adsorption with XAD-2, and a partially better sensitivity in comparison with Tenax TA. For these analytes, XAD-2 might be recommended as an alternative of Tenax TA for TD/GC-MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. 226Ra measurement by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry: Use of 226Ra and 14C for groundwater dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dever, L.

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and in chemical separation Ra and Ba allow to analyse 226 Ra on smaller water samples ( 3 litres). The sampling has been realised on the Chalk aquifer of the Paris basin. The water samples have been collected in the unsaturated zone using in situ filtering devices and in the unconfined and confined parts of the aquifer in the boreholes used for public water supply. 226 Ra contents vary from 0.064±0.02 dpm/kg (n=6) in the unsaturated zone to 0.119±0.069 dpm/kg (n=7) in the unconfined aquifer and 0.319±0.057 dpm/kg (n=9) in the confined aquifer. For all the samples the 226 Ra/ 238 U activity ratios are much lower than the secular equilibrium. This points out that the two isotopes have different input function in the water during the mineralisation of the solution. The good correlation (r 2 =0.9) between the 226 Ra and Sr indicates that dissolution of Chalk is the dominant mechanism of mineralisation in 226 Ra of the solution. In the Chalk the mineralisation of the water occurs in the first metres of the unsaturated zone, during the water percolation the water rock interaction takes place through dissolution and precipitation of calcite in a non steady state. According to his distribution coefficient Sr is then a better tracer of dissolution/precipitation process than Ba. Using a geochemical model based on 226 Ra/Sr and Sr/Ca ratios an 'age' of the water could be determined. With 226 Ra half life of 1620 years we obtain 'ages' varying from 150 years to 1950 years in the unconfined aquifer. For the confined part of the aquifer where the redox condition is different it is necessary to use a geochemical model based on the U concentration in the water, the 226 Ra gives in such case ages varying from 1.8ka to 12.8ka. The radiocarbon ages obtained through usual chemical and/or isotopic models are quite similar and an isochrome between 226 Ra and 14 C ages can be calculated between 0 and 8ka

  15. A new method for calibrating the current gain of 1013 Ω amplifiers in thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiqin; Zeng, Yuling; Xu, Jifeng; Liu, Wengui

    2018-03-09

    We report a new method for calibrating the current gain of 10 13 Ω amplifiers in both positive and negative mode used in thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS). This method uses any isotopic standard or sample to calibrate the gain factor as long as it can produce a stable current signal. It is simpler and more flexible than that recommended by Thermo-Fisher (the manufacture of the TIMS). In these analyses, the gains of five 10 13 Ω amplifiers were assessed. The precision of gain factors was better than 100 ppm (2 RSD) in a day, and the long term reproducibility was better than 300 ppm (2 RSD) within 2 - 8 months. After a gain was calibrated, the ratio accuracy and precision in the positive mode for 87 Sr/ 88 Sr of NIST 987 Sr and 143 Nd/ 144 Nd of La Jolla Nd were 0.710242 ± 60 (2 SD, n = 14) and 0.511842 ± 10 (2 SD, n = 22), respectively, at intensities of 88 Sr 0.3 V and 142 Nd 0.4 V, while in the negative mode for 187 Os/ 188 Os of Merck Os was 0.120229± 34 (2 SD, n = 23) at an intensity of 187 OsO 3 0.01 mV. In addition, a difference in the gain factors between the negative mode TIMS (NTIMS) and positive mode TIMS (PTIMS) has been recognized. The values of the gain factor for NTIMS and PTIMS show a deviation of 0.54% on the Triton and 0.31% on the Triton Plus TIMS in this study; therefore, gain calibration should be carried out on both NTIMS and PTIMS. Moreover, a bias of ~ 1.5×10 -5 between H and L Faraday cups for the same 10 13 Ω amplifier has been detected, hinting that the efficiency of different Faraday cups may affect the gain factors, which can be eliminated through the new method of "cross-calibration" discribed in this study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of variable properties on MHD heat and mass transfer flow near a stagnation point towards a stretching sheet in a porous medium with thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Salem, A.; Rania, Fathy

    2012-05-01

    The effect of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on steady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) heat and mass transfer flow of viscous and incompressible fluid near a stagnation point towards a permeable stretching sheet embedded in a porous medium are presented, taking into account thermal radiation and internal heat genberation/absorbtion. The stretching velocity and the ambient fluid velocity are assumed to vary linearly with the distance from the stagnation point. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The governing fundamental equations are first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using a scaling group of transformations and are solved numerically by using the fourth-order Rung—Kutta method with the shooting technique. A comparison with previously published work has been carried out and the results are found to be in good agreement. The results are analyzed for the effect of different physical parameters, such as the variable viscosity and thermal conductivity, the ratio of free stream velocity to stretching velocity, the magnetic field, the porosity, the radiation and suction/injection on the flow, and the heat and mass transfer characteristics. The results indicate that the inclusion of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity into the fluids of light and medium molecular weight is able to change the boundary-layer behavior for all values of the velocity ratio parameter λ except for λ = 1. In addition, the imposition of fluid suction increases both the rate of heat and mass transfer, whereas fluid injection shows the opposite effect.

  17. Effects of variable properties on MHD heat and mass transfer flow near a stagnation point towards a stretching sheet in a porous medium with thermal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, A. M.; Fathy, Rania

    2012-01-01

    The effect of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on steady magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) heat and mass transfer flow of viscous and incompressible fluid near a stagnation point towards a permeable stretching sheet embedded in a porous medium are presented, taking into account thermal radiation and internal heat genberation/absorbtion. The stretching velocity and the ambient fluid velocity are assumed to vary linearly with the distance from the stagnation point. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The governing fundamental equations are first transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using a scaling group of transformations and are solved numerically by using the fourth-order Rung—Kutta method with the shooting technique. A comparison with previously published work has been carried out and the results are found to be in good agreement. The results are analyzed for the effect of different physical parameters, such as the variable viscosity and thermal conductivity, the ratio of free stream velocity to stretching velocity, the magnetic field, the porosity, the radiation and suction/injection on the flow, and the heat and mass transfer characteristics. The results indicate that the inclusion of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity into the fluids of light and medium molecular weight is able to change the boundary-layer behavior for all values of the velocity ratio parameter λ except for λ = 1. In addition, the imposition of fluid suction increases both the rate of heat and mass transfer, whereas fluid injection shows the opposite effect. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Feasibility of coupling a thermal/optical carbon analyzer to a quadrupole mass spectrometer for enhanced PM2.5 speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Gustavo M; Chow, Judith C; Cropper, Paul M; Wang, Xiaoliang; Yatavelli, Reddy L N; Yang, Xufei; Watson, John G

    2018-05-01

    A thermal/optical carbon analyzer (TOA), normally used for quantification of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in PM 2.5 (fine particulate matter) speciation networks, was adapted to direct thermally evolved gases to an electron impact quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), creating a TOA-QMS. This approach produces spectra similar to those obtained by the Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), but the ratios of the mass to charge (m/z) signals differ and must be remeasured using laboratory-generated standards. Linear relationships are found between TOA-QMS signals and ammonium (NH 4 + ), nitrate (NO 3 - ), and sulfate (SO 4 2- ) standards. For ambient samples, however, positive deviations are found for SO 4 2- , compensated by negative deviations for NO 3 - , at higher concentrations. This indicates the utility of mixed-compound standards for calibration or separate calibration curves for low and high ion concentrations. The sum of the QMS signals across all m/z after removal of the NH 4 + , NO 3 - , and SO 4 2- signals was highly correlated with the carbon content of oxalic acid (C₂H₂O₄) standards. For ambient samples, the OC derived from the TOA-QMS method was the same as the OC derived from the standard IMPROVE_A TOA method. This method has the potential to reduce complexity and costs for speciation networks, especially for highly polluted urban areas such as those in Asia and Africa. Ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate can be quantified by the same thermal evolution analysis applied to organic and elemental carbon. This holds the potential to replace multiple parallel filter samples and separate laboratory analyses with a single filter and a single analysis to account for a large portion of the PM 2.5 mass concentration.

  19. Influence of internal thermal mass on the indoor thermal dynamics and integration of phase change materials in furniture for building energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johra, Hicham; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2017-01-01

    The increasing share of intermittent renewable energy on the grid encourages researchers to develop demand-side management strategies. Passive heat storage in the indoor space is a promising solution to improve the building energy flexibility. It relies on an accurate control of the transient...... building temperature. However, many of the current numerical models for building energy systems assume empty rooms and do not account entirely for the internal thermal inertia of objects like furniture. This review article points out that such assumption is not valid for dynamic calculations...

  20. Structural changes and thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO₂ cathode materials studied by combined in situ time-resolved XRD and mass spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Seong-Min; Hu, Enyuan; Zhou, Yongning; Yu, Xiqian; Senanayake, Sanjaya D; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Bum; Chung, Kyung Yoon; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Nam, Kyung-Wan

    2014-12-24

    Thermal stability of charged LiNixMnyCozO2 (NMC, with x + y + z = 1, x:y:z = 4:3:3 (NMC433), 5:3:2 (NMC532), 6:2:2 (NMC622), and 8:1:1 (NMC811)) cathode materials is systematically studied using combined in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and mass spectroscopy (TR-XRD/MS) techniques upon heating up to 600 °C. The TR-XRD/MS results indicate that the content of Ni, Co, and Mn significantly affects both the structural changes and the oxygen release features during heating: the more Ni and less Co and Mn, the lower the onset temperature of the phase transition (i.e., thermal decomposition) and the larger amount of oxygen release. Interestingly, the NMC532 seems to be the optimized composition to maintain a reasonably good thermal stability, comparable to the low-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC333 and NMC433), while having a high capacity close to the high-nickel-content materials (e.g., NMC811 and NMC622). The origin of the thermal decomposition of NMC cathode materials was elucidated by the changes in the oxidation states of each transition metal (TM) cations (i.e., Ni, Co, and Mn) and their site preferences during thermal decomposition. It is revealed that Mn ions mainly occupy the 3a octahedral sites of a layered structure (R3̅m) but Co ions prefer to migrate to the 8a tetrahedral sites of a spinel structure (Fd3̅m) during the thermal decomposition. Such element-dependent cation migration plays a very important role in the thermal stability of NMC cathode materials. The reasonably good thermal stability and high capacity characteristics of the NMC532 composition is originated from the well-balanced ratio of nickel content to manganese and cobalt contents. This systematic study provides insight into the rational design of NMC-based cathode materials with a desired balance between thermal stability and high energy density.

  1. Measurement of small ion beams by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry using new 10(13) Ohm resistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koornneef, J M; Bouman, C; Schwieters, J B; Davies, G R

    2014-03-28

    We tested 5 newly manufactured - prototype - 10(13)Ohm resistors in the feedback loop of Faraday cup amplifiers to measure small ion beams by Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS). The high Ohmic resistors installed in the TRITON Plus at the VU University Amsterdam theoretically have 10 times lower noise levels relative to the default 10(11)Ohm resistors. To investigate the precision and accuracy of analyses using these new amplifiers we measured Sr and Nd isotopes of reference standards at a range of ion currents (3.2×10(-16) to 1×10(-12) A, corresponding to intensities of 32 μV to 100 mV on a default 10(11)Ohm amplifier) and on small amounts of material (100 and 10 pg). Internal precision and external reproducibility for Sr and Nd isotope ratios are both better when collected on 10(13) compared 10(12)Ohm resistors and to the default 10(11)Ohm resistors. At an (87)Sr ion current of 3×10(-14) A (3 mV on a 10(11)Ohm amplifier) the internal precision (2 SE) of (87)Sr/(86)Sr is 5 times better for 10(13)Ohm resistors compared to 10(11)Ohm resistors. The external reproducibility (2 SD) at this beam intensity is 9 times better. Multiple 100 and 10 pg Sr standards, ran to exhaustion, yielded low (87)Sr/(86)Sr compared to the long term average (e.g. 10 pg average=0.710083±164 (n=11) instead of 0.710244±12, n=73). The average off-set for 10 pg standards can be explained by a loading blank contribution of 1.3 pg. In contrast, Nd data on 100 pg and 10 pg samples are accurate suggesting that Nd loading blanks do not compromise the data. The external reproducibility of (143)Nd/(144)Nd on 100 pg samples is 125 ppm and 3.3‰ on 10 pg samples (2 RSD=relative standard deviation, n=10). Thus, variability in Nd and Sr isotope ratios in the 4th decimal place, e.g. (143)Nd/(144)Nd 0.5110-0.5119 or (87)Sr/(86)Sr 0.7100-0.7109, can be resolved in 10 to 100 pg samples provided that the procedural blanks and chemical separation are optimal. For measurements in the beam

  2. Les méthodesthermiques de production des hydrocarbures. Chapitre 1 : transfert de chaleur et de masse Thermal Methods of Hydrocarbon Production. Chapter 1 : Heat and Mass Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bia P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Après un rappel général sur le transfert de chaleur et de masse ainsi que sur les lois de conservation dans les milieux continus, on traite de l'adaptation de ces lois au cas des milieux poreux. On donne ensuite des informations quantitatives sur les grandeurs physiques mises en jeu par les phénomènes de transfert en milieu poreux. After making a general review of heat and mass transfer a well as of laws of conservation in continua, this chapter describes how these laws con be adopted to the case of porous media. Quantitative data are then given on the physical magnitudes brought into play by transfer phenomena in porous media.

  3. Assessment of a new method for the analysis of decomposition gases of polymers by a combining thermogravimetric solid-phase extraction and thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duemichen, E; Braun, U; Senz, R; Fabian, G; Sturm, H

    2014-08-08

    For analysis of the gaseous thermal decomposition products of polymers, the common techniques are thermogravimetry, combined with Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR) and mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). These methods offer a simple approach to the decomposition mechanism, especially for small decomposition molecules. Complex spectra of gaseous mixtures are very often hard to identify because of overlapping signals. In this paper a new method is described to adsorb the decomposition products during controlled conditions in TGA on solid-phase extraction (SPE) material: twisters. Subsequently the twisters were analysed with thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (TDS-GC-MS), which allows the decomposition products to be separated and identified using an MS library. The thermoplastics polyamide 66 (PA 66) and polybutylene terephthalate (PBT) were used as example polymers. The influence of the sample mass and of the purge gas flow during the decomposition process was investigated in TGA. The advantages and limitations of the method were presented in comparison to the common analysis techniques, TGA-FTIR and TGA-MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lensing substructure quantification in RXJ1131-1231: a 2 keV lower bound on dark matter thermal relic mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birrer, Simon; Amara, Adam; Refregier, Alexandre, E-mail: simon.birrer@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: adam.amara@phys.ethz.ch, E-mail: alexandre.refregier@phys.ethz.ch [Institute for Astronomy, Department of Physics, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27, 8093, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-05-01

    We study the substructure content of the strong gravitational lens RXJ1131-1231 through a forward modelling approach that relies on generating an extensive suite of realistic simulations. We use a semi-analytic merger tree prescription that allows us to stochastically generate substructure populations whose properties depend on the dark matter particle mass. These synthetic halos are then used as lenses to produce realistic mock images that have the same features, e.g. luminous arcs, quasar positions, instrumental noise and PSF, as the data. We then analyse the data and the simulations in the same way with summary statistics that are sensitive to the signal being targeted and are able to constrain models of dark matter statistically using Approximate Bayesian Computing (ABC) techniques. (In this work, we focus on the thermal relic mass estimate and fix the semi-analytic descriptions of the substructure evolution based on recent literature.) We are able, based on the HST data for RXJ1131-1231, to rule out a warm dark matter thermal relic mass below 2 keV at the 2σ confidence level.

  5. Mass discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeckman, A. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1978-12-15

    In thermal ionization mass spectrometry the phenomenon of mass discrimination has led to the use of a correction factor for isotope ratio-measurements. The correction factor is defined as the measured ratio divided by the true or accepted value of this ratio. In fact this factor corrects for systematic errors of the whole procedure; however mass discrimination is often associated just with the mass spectrometer.

  6. Optimal control of building storage systems using both ice storage and thermal mass – Part I: Simulation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajiah, Ali; Krarti, Moncef

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A simulation environment is described to account for both passive and active thermal energy storage (TES) systems. ► Laboratory testing results have been used to validate the predictions from the simulation environment. ► Optimal control strategies for TES systems have been developed as part of the simulation environment. - Abstract: This paper presents a simulation environment that can evaluate the benefits of using simultaneously building thermal capacitance and ice storage system to reduce total operating costs including energy and demand charges while maintaining adequate occupant comfort conditions within commercial buildings. The building thermal storage is controlled through pre-cooling strategies by setting space indoor air temperatures. The ice storage system is controlled by charging the ice tank and operating the chiller during low electrical charge periods and melting the ice during on-peak periods. Optimal controls for both building thermal storage and ice storage are developed to minimize energy charges, demand charges, or combined energy and demand charges. The results obtained from the simulation environment are validated using laboratory testing for an optimal controller.

  7. Numerical analysis of passive strategies for energy retrofit of existing buildings in Mediterranean climate: thermal mass and natural ventilation combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calcerano Filippo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the potential of coupling natural ventilation and thermal storage systems to improve hygrothermal comfort and reduce energy consumption during summer season in an existing building in the Mediterranean. It aims at bridging the knowledge gap between designers, researchers and building scientists, fostering a multidisciplinary approach and promoting numerical simulation of the energy performance of buildings within architectural professional practice. The study analyses the interaction between six natural ventilation systems (single sided ventilation through facade openings; cross ventilation through facade openings, inlet wind tower, thermal chimney, evaporative cool tower, earth pipes and with two thermal storage typology (heavy and medium-light within four strategic Italian location (Rome, Naples, Messina and Catania. For each interaction we perform a numerical dynamic simulation of indoor comfort, indoor air quality and energy consumption during the summer period, on a reference building model corresponding to the most common Italian typology. Results show that the use of the chosen systems ensures significant reductions of discomfort hours and energy consumption in all configurations. The study also highlights the high efficiency of non invasive systems (single-sided and cross ventilation with automatic control present discomfort hours reduction and energy consumption reduction above 68% for all combinations and the significant influence of the daily thermal range value on the performance of systems without air pre-treatment.

  8. Determination of rare earth elements, thorium and uranium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and strontium isotopes by thermal ionization mass spectrometry in soil samples of Bryansk region contaminated due to Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, S.K.; Yonehara, H.; Kurotaki, K.; Shiraishi, K.; Ramzaev, V.; Barkovski, A.

    2001-01-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) determination of rare earth elements (REEs), thorium and uranium in forest, pasture, field and kitchen garden soils from a Russian territory and in certified reference materials (JLK-1, JSD-2 and BCR-1) is described. In addition to concentration data, strontium isotopic composition of the soil samples were measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The measurements contributed to the understanding of the background levels of these elements in an area contaminated due to Chernobyl accident. There was not a significant variation in the concentration of REEs at different depth levels in forest soil samples, however, the ratio of Th/U varied from 3.32 to 3.60. Though concentration of U and Th varied to some extent, the ratio did not show much variation. The value of 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratio, was in the top layer soil sample relatively higher than in the lower layers. (author)

  9. Use of thermal desorption gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry for the comparison of identified and unidentified odor active compounds emitted from building products containing linseed oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P. A.; Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose; Larsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The emission of odor active volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a floor oil based on linseed oil, the linseed oil itself and a low-odor linseed oil was investigated by thermal desorption gas chromatography combined with olfactometry and mass spectrometry (TD-GC-O/MS). The oils were applied...... to filters and conditioned in the micro emission cell, FLEC, for 1-3 days at ambient temperature, an air exchange rate of 26.9 h-1 and a 30% relative humidity. These conditions resulted in dynamic headspace concentrations and composition of the odor active VOCs that may be similar to real indoor setting...

  10. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A. M.; Farges, F.; Carlot, G.

    2007-05-01

    In a nuclear reactor, 35Cl present as an impurity in the nuclear fuel is activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of the nuclear fuel, 36Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute significantly to the 'instant release fraction'. In order to elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This paper deals with the thermal diffusion of chlorine in depleted UO2. For this purpose, sintered UO2 pellets were implanted with 37Cl at an ion fluence of 1013 cm-2 and successively annealed in the 1175-1475 K temperature range. The implanted chlorine is used to simulate the behaviour of the displaced one due to recoil and to interactions with the fission fragments during reactor operation. The behaviour of the pristine and the implanted chlorine was investigated during thermal annealing. SIMS and μ-XAS (at the Cl-K edge) analyses show that: the thermal migration of implanted chlorine becomes significant at 1275 K; this temperature and the calculated activation energy of 4.3 eV points out the great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO2 at relatively low temperatures, the behaviour of the implanted chlorine which aggregates into 'hot spots' during annealing before its effusion is clearly different from that of the pristine one which remains homogenously distributed after annealing, the 'hot spot' and the pristine chlorine seem to be in different structural environments. Both types of chlorine are assumed to have a valence state of -I, the comparison between an U2O2Cl5 reference compound and the pristine chlorine environment shows a contribution of the U2O2Cl5 to the pristine chlorine.

  11. Thermal diffusion of chlorine in uranium dioxide studied by secondary ion mass spectrometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pipon, Y.; Toulhoat, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Raimbault, L.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Farges, F.; Carlot, G.

    2007-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, 35 Cl present as an impurity in the nuclear fuel is activated by thermal neutron capture. During interim storage or geological disposal of the nuclear fuel, 36 Cl may be released from the fuel to the geo/biosphere and contribute significantly to the 'instant release fraction'. In order to elucidate the diffusion mechanisms, both irradiation and thermal effects must be assessed. This paper deals with the thermal diffusion of chlorine in depleted UO 2 . For this purpose, sintered UO 2 pellets were implanted with 37 Cl at an ion fluence of 10 13 cm -2 and successively annealed in the 1175-1475K temperature range. The implanted chlorine is used to simulate the behaviour of the displaced one due to recoil and to interactions with the fission fragments during reactor operation. The behaviour of the pristine and the implanted chlorine was investigated during thermal annealing. SIMS and μ-XAS (at the Cl-K edge) analyses show that: (1) the thermal migration of implanted chlorine becomes significant at 1275K; this temperature and the calculated activation energy of 4.3eV points out the great ability of chlorine to migrate in UO 2 at relatively low temperatures; (2) the behaviour of the implanted chlorine which aggregates into 'hot spots' during annealing before its effusion is clearly different from that of the pristine one which remains homogenously distributed after annealing; (3) the 'hot spot' and the pristine chlorine seem to be in different structural environments. Both types of chlorine are assumed to have a valence state of -I; (4) the comparison between an U 2 O 2 Cl 5 reference compound and the pristine chlorine environment shows a contribution of the U 2 O 2 Cl 5 to the pristine chlorine

  12. Improved accuracy and precision in δ15 NAIR measurements of explosives, urea, and inorganic nitrates by elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry using thermal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Michael J; Howa, John D; Chesson, Lesley A; Ehleringer, James R

    2015-08-15

    Elemental analyzer systems generate N(2) and CO(2) for elemental composition and isotope ratio measurements. As quantitative conversion of nitrogen in some materials (i.e., nitrate salts and nitro-organic compounds) is difficult, this study tests a recently published method - thermal decomposition without the addition of O(2) - for the analysis of these materials. Elemental analyzer/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS) was used to compare the traditional combustion method (CM) and the thermal decomposition method (TDM), where additional O(2) is eliminated from the reaction. The comparisons used organic and inorganic materials with oxidized and/or reduced nitrogen and included ureas, nitrate salts, ammonium sulfate, nitro esters, and nitramines. Previous TDM applications were limited to nitrate salts and ammonium sulfate. The measurement precision and accuracy were compared to determine the effectiveness of converting materials containing different fractions of oxidized nitrogen into N(2). The δ(13) C(VPDB) values were not meaningfully different when measured via CM or TDM, allowing for the analysis of multiple elements in one sample. For materials containing oxidized nitrogen, (15) N measurements made using thermal decomposition were more precise than those made using combustion. The precision was similar between the methods for materials containing reduced nitrogen. The %N values were closer to theoretical when measured by TDM than by CM. The δ(15) N(AIR) values of purchased nitrate salts and ureas were nearer to the known values when analyzed using thermal decomposition than using combustion. The thermal decomposition method addresses insufficient recovery of nitrogen during elemental analysis in a variety of organic and inorganic materials. Its implementation requires relatively few changes to the elemental analyzer. Using TDM, it is possible to directly calibrate certain organic materials to international nitrate isotope reference materials without off

  13. An Integrated Hot-Stage Microscope-Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry System for Studying the Thermal Behavior of Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Gage P; Harding, Lindsay P; Parkes, Gareth M B

    2017-12-19

    This paper describes a new analytical instrument that combines a precisely temperature-controlled hot-stage with digital microscopy and Direct Analysis in Real Time-mass spectrometry (DART-MS) detection. The novelty of the instrument lies in its ability to monitor processes as a function of temperature through the simultaneous recording of images, quantitative color changes, and mass spectra. The capability of the instrument was demonstrated through successful application to four very varied systems including profiling an organic reaction, decomposition of silicone polymers, and the desorption of rhodamine B from an alumina surface. The multidimensional, real-time analytical data provided by this instrument allow for a much greater insight into thermal processes than could be achieved previously.

  14. Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass

    OpenAIRE

    Barrena Gómez, Raquel

    2006-01-01

    A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 °C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large compo...

  15. Effect of thermal radiation and Hall current on heat and mass transfer of unsteady MHD flow of a viscoelastic micropolar fluid through a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.I. Olajuwon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Heat and mass transfer effects on unsteady flow of a viscoelastic micropolar fluid over an infinite moving permeable plate in a saturated porous medium in the presence of a transverse magnetic field with Hall effect and thermal radiation are studied. The governing system of partial differential equations is transformed to dimensionless equations using dimensionless variables. The dimensionless equations are then solved analytically using perturbation technique to obtain the expressions for velocity, microrotation, temperature and concentration. With the help of graphs, the effects of magnetic field parameter M, thermal radiation parameter Nr, Hall current parameter m, K, viscoelastic parameter a, and slip parameter h on the velocity, microrotation, temperature and concentration fields within the boundary layer are discussed. The result showed that increase in Nr and m increases translational velocity across the boundary layer while (a decreases translational velocity in the vicinity of the plate but the reverse happens when away from the plate. As h increases the translational velocity across the boundary layer increases. The higher the values of Nr, the higher the micro-rotational velocity effect while m lowers it. Also the effects n, a, m, Nr, Pr and Sc on the skin friction coefficient, Nusselt number and Sherwood numbers are presented numerically in tabular form. The result also revealed that increase in n reduces the skin friction coefficient. Pr enhances the rate of heat transfer while Sc enhances the rate of mass transfer.

  16. Ratios of colony mass to thermal conductance of tree and man-made nest enclosures of Apis mellifera: implications for survival, clustering, humidity regulation and Varroa destructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Derek

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of human intervention, the honeybee ( Apis mellifera L.) usually constructs its nest in a tree within a tall, narrow, thick-walled cavity high above the ground (the enclosure); however, most research and apiculture is conducted in the thin-walled, squat wooden enclosures we know as hives. This experimental research, using various hives and thermal models of trees, has found that the heat transfer rate is approximately four to seven times greater in the hives in common use, compared to a typical tree enclosure in winter configuration. This gives a ratio of colony mass to lumped enclosure thermal conductance (MCR) of less than 0.8 kgW-1 K for wooden hives and greater than 5 kgW-1 K for tree enclosures. This result for tree enclosures implies higher levels of humidity in the nest, increased survival of smaller colonies and lower Varroa destructor breeding success. Many honeybee behaviours previously thought to be intrinsic may only be a coping mechanism for human intervention; for example, at an MCR of above 2 kgW-1 K, clustering in a tree enclosure may be an optional, rare, heat conservation behaviour for established colonies, rather than the compulsory, frequent, life-saving behaviour that is in the hives in common use. The implied improved survival in hives with thermal properties of tree nests may help to solve some of the problems honeybees are currently facing in apiculture.

  17. Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

    2013-02-01

    Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 ÀC. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (#6 and #10), one commercially available formulation (#21), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl #10 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl #10 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

  18. Heat and Mass Transfer in a High-Porous Low-Temperature Thermal Insulation in Real Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovnikov Vyacheslav Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of numerical simulation of heat and mass transfer in a high-porous low-temperature insulation in conditions of insulation freezing, a moisture migration to the front of phase transition and a condensation forming on an outer contour of interaction were obtained. Values of heat leakage were established.

  19. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses of thermal degradation products of common plastics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacakova, V.; Leclercq, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The thermo-oxidation of five commonly used materials, namely low-density polyethylene, retarded polyethylene, paper with a polyethylene foil, a milk package and filled polypropylene, was studied. Capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the volatile

  20. Characterisation of the semi-volatile component of Dissolved Organic Matter by Thermal Desorption - Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Materić, Dušan; Peacock, Mike; Kent, Matthew; Cook, Sarah; Gauci, Vincent; Röckmann, Thomas; Holzinger, Rupert

    2017-01-01

    Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) is a sensitive, soft ionisation method suitable for qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile and semi-volatile organic vapours. PTR-MS is used for various environmental applications including monitoring of volatile organic compounds

  1. Heat and water mass transfer in unsaturated swelling clay based buffer: discussion on the effect of the thermal gradient and on the diffusion of water vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinet, J.O. [Euro-Geomat-Consulting (France)]|[Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 35 - Rennes (France); Plas, F. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France)

    2005-07-01

    The modelling of heat, mass transfer and the behaviour coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical in swelling clay require the development of appropriate constitutive laws as well as experimental data. This former approach, allows the quantitative validation of the theoretical models. In general modelling approaches consider dominant mechanisms, (i) Fourier law for diffusion of heat, (ii) generalized Darcy law for convection of liquid water, (iii) Flick law for diffusion of water vapour, and elastic-plastic models wit h hydric hardening and thermal damage/expansion for strain-stress behaviour. Transfer of dry air and water under thermal gradient and capillary (e.g. suction) gradient in unsaturated compacted swelling clays consider evaporation, migration and condensation. These transfers take into account the capillary effect. This effect is an evaporation of liquid water in the hot part for temperature higher than 100 C associated with a, diffusion of water vapor towards cold part then condensation, and convection of liquid water with gradient of suction in the opposite direction of the water vapour diffusion. High values of the diffusion coefficient of the vapour water are considered about 10{sup -7}m{sup 2}/s. Some thermal experiments related (i) low values of the water vapour diffusion coefficient in compacted swelling clays, 2004) and (ii) a significant drying associated with a water transfer even for temperature lower than 100 C. Other enhancement phenomena are used to explain these data and observations: the vaporization is a continuous process. At short term the mechanism of drying at short term is the thermal effect on the capillary pressure (e.g. surface tension depending of temperature); the thermal gradient is a driving force. When a temperature gradient is applied, diffusion occurs in order to reach equilibrium, e.g. to make the chemical potential (m) of each component uniform throughout. This mechanism is called thermal diffusion. This paper proposes a discussion

  2. Thermal convection loop experiments and analysis of mass transport process in Lithium/Fe-12Cr-1MoVW systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, G.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Lithium is an attractive coolant and breeder material for first- generation fusion reactor blankets. The compatibility of lithium with structural alloys, in the form of mass transport and deposition, may impose restrictions on blanket operating parameters such as temperature and lithium purity. A ferritic steel, such as Fe-12CrlMoVW, is a candidate for use as a structural alloy in a self-cooled lithium blanket design. Experimental data on mass transport in lithium/Fe-12CrlMoVW were obtained from two thermal convection loops which spanned the fusion relevant temperature range; one operated from 360 to 505/degree/C for 3040 hours and the other from 525 to 655/degree/C for 2510 hours. The experimental effort was supported by analysis of the mechanisms and processes of mass transport and deposition. It was found that mass transport and deposition, as measured by specimen weight change, were not simple functions of temperature for the entire temperature range investigated. The mass transfer behavior and surface morphology at low temperatures were dominated by impurity reactions of nitrogen and carbon in the lithium with the steel. In the experiment between 360 and 505/degree/C, nitrogen levels were sufficient below 450/degree/C to allow the formation of the adherent, protective corrosion product Li 9 CrN 5 . Weight losses in the 360 to 505/degree/C experiment were insensitive to temperature below 450/degree/C. Between 450 and 505/degree/C, the precipitation of carbon in the form of chromium-rich M 23 C 6 (M = Fe or Cr) carbides, due to the formation of Li 9 CrN 5 and corresponding release of carbon, resulted in weight gains for the highest temperature specimens in the experiment. 98 refs., 83 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses of thermal degradation products of common plastics

    OpenAIRE

    Pacakova, V.; Leclercq, P.A.

    1991-01-01

    The thermo-oxidation of five commonly used materials, namely low-density polyethylene, retarded polyethylene, paper with a polyethylene foil, a milk package and filled polypropylene, was studied. Capillary gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the volatile degradation products, while high-performance liquid chromatography was employed to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The results are discussed from the point of view of toxicity of the prod...

  4. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  5. Simultaneous determination of picogram per gram concentrations of Ba, Pb and Pb isotopes in Greenland ice by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimi, Salah I.; Rosman, Kevin J.R.; Candelone, Jean-Pierre; Burn, Laurie J. [Curtin University of Technology, Department of Imaging and Applied Physics, Perth (Australia); Hong, Sungmin [Polar Research Centre, Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute, Ansan, P.O. Box 29, Seoul (Korea); Boutron, Claude F. [Domaine Universitaire, Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique du l' Environnement, 54 rue Moliere, Saint Martin d' Heres (France); UFR de Mecanique, Universite Joseph Fourier de Grenoble (Institut Universitaire de France), Domaine Universitaire, Grenoble (France)

    2008-01-15

    A technique has been developed to simultaneously measure picogram per gram concentrations of Ba and Pb by isotope dilution mass spectrometry, as well as Pb isotopic ratios in polar ice by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry. BaPO{sup +}{sub 2} and Pb{sup +} ions were employed for these determinations. A calibrated mixture of enriched {sup 205}Pb and {sup 137}Ba was added to the samples providing an accuracy of better than approximately 2% for Pb/Ba element ratio determinations. Interference by molecular ions in the Pb mass spectrum occurred only at {sup 204}Pb and {sup 205}Pb, but these contributions were negligible in terms of precisions expected on picogram-sized Pb samples. The technique is illustrated with measurements on Greenland firn, using a drill-core section that includes the Laki volcanic eruption of 1783-1784. The data show deviations from the element concentrations indicating volatile metal enrichments, but the Pb isotopic signature of the Laki lava could not be identified. (orig.)

  6. Standard test method for determination of uranium or plutonium isotopic composition or concentration by the total evaporation method using a thermal ionization mass spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This method describes the determination of the isotopic composition and/or the concentration of uranium and plutonium as nitrate solutions by the thermal ionization mass spectrometric (TIMS) total evaporation method. Purified uranium or plutonium nitrate solutions are loaded onto a degassed metal filament and placed in the mass spectrometer. Under computer control, ion currents are generated by heating of the filament(s). The ion beams are continually measured until the sample is exhausted. The measured ion currents are integrated over the course of the run, and normalized to a reference isotope ion current to yield isotopic ratios. 1.2 In principle, the total evaporation method should yield isotopic ratios that do not require mass bias correction. In practice, some samples may require this bias correction. When compared to the conventional TIMS method, the total evaporation method is approximately two times faster, improves precision from two to four fold, and utilizes smaller sample sizes. 1.3 The tot...

  7. Stable Chlorine Isotopes and Elemental Chlorine by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Ion Chromatography; Martian Meteorites, Carbonaceous Chondrites and Standard Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Shih, C.-Y.; Fujitani, T.; Okano, O.

    2011-01-01

    Recently significantly large mass fractionation of stable chlorine isotopes has been reported for terrestrial and lunar samples [1,2]. In addition, in view of possible early solar system processes [3] and also potential perchlorate-related fluid/microbial activities on the Martian surface [4,5], a large chlorine isotopic fractionation might be expected for some types of planetary materials. Due to analytical difficulties of isotopic and elemental analyses, however, current chlorine analyses for planetary materials are controversial among different laboratories, particularly between IRMS (gas source mass spectrometry) and TIMS (Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) groups [i.e. 1,6,7] for isotopic analyses, as well as between those doing pyrohydrolysis and other groups [i.e. 6,8]. Additional careful investigations of Cl isotope and elemental abundances are required to confirm real chlorine isotope and elemental variations for planetary materials. We have developed a TIMS technique combined with HF-leaching/ion chromatography at NASA JSC that is applicable to analysis of small amounts of meteoritic and planetary materials. We present here results for several standard rocks and meteorites, including Martian meteorites.

  8. A study of the solid-phase thermal decomposition of NTO using simultaneous thermogravimetric modulated beam mass spectrometry (STMBMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minier, L.; Behrens, R. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Burkey, T.J. [Univ. of Memphis, TN (United States). Chemistry Dept.

    1997-01-01

    The solid phase thermal reaction chemistry of NTO between 190 and 250 C is presently being evaluated by utilizing STMBMS, a technique that enables the authors to measure the vapor pressure of NTO and to explore the reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics associated with the NTO thermal decomposition process. The vapor pressure of NTO is expressed as Log{sub 10} p(torr) = 12.5137 + 6,296.553(1/t{sub k}) and the {Delta}H{sub subl} = 28.71 {+-} 0.07 kcal/mol (120.01 {+-} 0.29 kJ/mol). The pyrolysis of NTO results in the formation of gaseous products and a condensed-phase residue. The identity of the major gaseous products and their origin from within the NTO molecules are determined based on the results from pyrolysis of NTO, NTO-3-{sup 13}C, NTO-1,2-{sup 15}N{sub 2} and NTO-{sup 2}H{sub 2}. Identification of the products show the major gaseous products to be N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, NO, HNCO, H{sub 2}O and some N{sub 2}O, CO, HCN and NH{sub 3}. The N{sub 2} is mostly derived from the N-1 and N-2 positions with some being from the N-4 and N-1 or N-2 positions. The CO{sub 2} is derived from both carbons in the NTO molecule in comparable amounts. The residue has an elemental formula of C{sub 2.1}H{sub .26}N{sub 2.9}O and FTIR analysis suggests that the residue is polyurea- and polycarbamate-like in nature. The temporal behaviors of the rates of formation of the gaseous products indicate that the overall thermal decomposition of NTO in the temperature range evaluated involves four major processes: (1) NTO sublimation; (2) an apparent solid-solid phase transition between 190 and 195 C; (3) a decomposition regime induced by the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O at the onset of decomposition; and (4) a decomposition regime that occurs at the onset of decomposition and continues until the depletion of NTO. Decomposition pathways that are consistent with the data are presented.

  9. Thermal radiation and mass transfer effects on unsteady MHD free convection flow past a vertical oscillating plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, B. M. Jewel; Ahmed, Rubel; Ahmmed, S. F.

    2017-06-01

    Unsteady MHD free convection flow past a vertical porous plate in porous medium with radiation, diffusion thermo, thermal diffusion and heat source are analyzed. The governing non-linear, partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless by using non-dimensional quantities. Then the resultant dimensionless equations are solved numerically by applying an efficient, accurate and conditionally stable finite difference scheme of explicit type with the help of a computer programming language Compaq Visual Fortran. The stability and convergence analysis has been carried out to establish the effect of velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, Nusselt number, Sherwood number, stream lines and isotherms line. Finally, the effects of various parameters are presented graphically and discussed qualitatively.

  10. Analysis of asymmetric resonance response of thermally excited silicon micro-cantilevers for mass-sensitive nanoparticle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertke, Maik; Hamdana, Gerry; Wu, Wenze; Suryo Wasisto, Hutomo; Uhde, Erik; Peiner, Erwin

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the asymmetric resonance frequency (f 0) responses of thermally in-plane excited silicon cantilevers for a pocket-sized, cantilever-based airborne nanoparticle detector (Cantor) are analysed. By measuring the shift of f 0 caused by the deposition of nanoparticles (NPs), the cantilevers are used as a microbalance. The cantilever sensors are low cost manufactured from silicon by bulk-micromachining techniques and contain an integrated p-type heating actuator and a sensing piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge. f 0 is tracked by a homemade phase-locked loop (PPL) for real-time measurements. To optimize the sensor performance, a new cantilever geometry was designed, fabricated and characterized by its frequency responses. The most significant characterisation parameters of our application are f 0 and the quality factor (Q), which have high influences on sensitivity and efficiency of the NP detector. Regarding the asymmetric resonance signal, a novel fitting function based on the Fano resonance replacing the conventionally used function of the simple harmonic oscillator and a method to calculate Q by its fitting parameters were developed for a quantitative evaluation. To obtain a better understanding of the resonance behaviours, we analysed the origin of the asymmetric line shapes. Therefore, we compared the frequency response of the on-chip thermal excitation with an external excitation using an in-plane piezo actuator. In correspondence to the Fano effect, we could reconstruct the measured resonance curves by coupling two signals with constant amplitude and the expected signal of the cantilever, respectively. Moreover, the phase of the measurement signal can be analysed by this method, which is important to understand the locking process of the PLL circuit. Besides the frequency analysis, experimental results and calibration measurements with different particle types are presented. Using the described analysis method, decent results to optimize a next

  11. Experimental study of the thermal fission of uranium 235 in the region of symmetrical masses; Contribution a l'etude experimentale de la fission thermique de l'uranium 235 dans la region des masses symetriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribrag, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-15

    Energy correlation experiments with fission fragments are strongly perturbed, in the symmetric region, by the detection of spurious events caused by the apparatus. We show that the measurement of an additional parameter, namely the difference in time-of-flight between the fragments, enables us to eliminate these difficulties. In this work we show also an original method of calibration of the time-of-flight set-up. For thermal fission of {sup 235}U, values of mass yields in the symmetric region are found to agree quantitatively with radiochemical values. Moreover, the average total kinetic energy distribution as a function of the pre-neutron emission masses of the fragments has been calculated. This curve presents in the symmetric region a large dip, the value of which takes on the value 21.2 {+-} 0.8 MeV. This value is smaller than previously published results. (author) [French] Les mesures correlees des energies cinetiques des fragments de fission sont fortement perturbees, dans la region symetrique, par la detection d'evenements aberrants d'origine instrumentale. Nous montrons que la mesure d'un parametre supplementaire, a savoir, la difference des temps de vol des deux fragments, nous permet d'eliminer ces difficultes. Dans ce travail, nous indiquons egalement une methode originale de calibration du dispositif de mesure des temps de vol. Dans le cas de la fission thermique de {sup 235}U, nous avons trouve, dans la region symetrique, une courbe de rendement des masses, en accord quantitatif avec les donnees radiochimiques. De plus, nous avons calcule la distribution de l'energie cinetique totale moyenne en fonction de la masse des fragments, avant emission neutronique. Cette courbe presente, dans la region symetrique, un creux important, dont la valeur atteint 21,2 {+-} 0,8 MeV. Cette valeur est inferieure aux resultats precedemment publies. (auteur)

  12. Modelling the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. Part I: wind stresses, thermal and haline fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Valioulis

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a computer model capable of simulating the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. There is historical, phenomenological and recent experimental evidence of important hydrographical features whose causes have been variably identified as the highly complex bathymetry, the extreme seasonal variations in temperature, the considerable fresh water fluxes, and the large gradients in salinity or temperature across neighbouring water masses (Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. In the approach taken here, physical processes are introduced into the model one by one. This method reveals the parameters responsible for permanent and seasonal features of the Aegean Sea circulation. In the first part of the work reported herein, wind-induced circulation appears to be seasonally invariant. This yearly pattern is overcome by the inclusion of baroclinicity in the model in the form of surface thermohaline fluxes. The model shows an intricate pattern of sub-basin gyres and locally strong currents, permanent or seasonal, in accord with the experimental evidence.

  13. Modelling the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. Part I: wind stresses, thermal and haline fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Valioulis

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a computer model capable of simulating the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. There is historical, phenomenological and recent experimental evidence of important hydrographical features whose causes have been variably identified as the highly complex bathymetry, the extreme seasonal variations in temperature, the considerable fresh water fluxes, and the large gradients in salinity or temperature across neighbouring water masses (Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. In the approach taken here, physical processes are introduced into the model one by one. This method reveals the parameters responsible for permanent and seasonal features of the Aegean Sea circulation. In the first part of the work reported herein, wind-induced circulation appears to be seasonally invariant. This yearly pattern is overcome by the inclusion of baroclinicity in the model in the form of surface thermohaline fluxes. The model shows an intricate pattern of sub-basin gyres and locally strong currents, permanent or seasonal, in accord with the experimental evidence.

  14. An initial study on modeling the global thermal and fast reactor fuel cycle mass flow using Vensim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinton, Samuel

    2008-01-01

    This study concentrated on modeling the construction and decommissioning rates of five major facilities comprising the nuclear fuel cycle: (1) current LWRs with a 60-year service life, (2) new LWRs burning MOX fuel, (3) new LWRs to replace units in the current fleet, (4) new FRs to be added to the fleet, and (5) new spent fuel reprocessing facilities. This is a mass flow mode starting from uranium ore and following it to spent forms. The visual dynamic modeling program Vensim was used to create a system of equations and variables to track the mass flows from enrichment, fabrication, burn-up, and the back-end of the fuel cycle. The scenarios considered provide estimates of the uranium ore requirements, quantities of LLW and HLW production, and the number of reprocessing facilities necessary to reduce recently reported levels of spent fuel inventory. Preliminary results indicate that the entire national spent fuel inventory produced in the next 100 years can be reprocessed with a reprocessing plant built every 11 years (small capacity) or even as low as every 23 years (large capacity). (authors)

  15. A THERMAL INFRARED IMAGING STUDY OF VERY LOW MASS, WIDE-SEPARATION BROWN DWARF COMPANIONS TO UPPER SCORPIUS STARS: CONSTRAINING CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip M.; Su, Kate Y. L.; Hoffmann, William F.; Rieke, George; Rodigas, Timothy; Skemer, Andrew; Vaitheeswaran, Vidhya [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Currie, Thayne [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Hill, John M. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Jones, Terry [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kim, Jihun [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, 1630 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Leisenring, Jarron; Meyer, Michael [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule-Zuerich, CH-8093 (Switzerland); Murray-Clay, Ruth; Skrutskie, Michael F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Harvard University, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Nelson, Matthew J., E-mail: vbailey@as.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); and others

    2013-04-10

    We present a 3-5 {mu}m LBT/MMT adaptive optics imaging study of three Upper Scorpius stars with brown dwarf (BD) companions with very low masses/mass ratios (M{sub BD} <25 M{sub Jup}; M{sub BD}/M{sub *} Almost-Equal-To 1%-2%) and wide separations (300-700 AU): GSC 06214, 1RXS 1609, and HIP 78530. We combine these new thermal IR data with existing 1-4 {mu}m and 24 {mu}m photometry to constrain the properties of the BDs and identify evidence for circumprimary/circumsecondary disks in these unusual systems. We confirm that GSC 06214B is surrounded by a disk, further showing that this disk produces a broadband IR excess due to small dust near the dust sublimation radius. An unresolved 24 {mu}m excess in the system may be explained by the contribution from this disk. 1RXS 1609B exhibits no 3-4 {mu}m excess, nor does its primary; however, the system as a whole has a modest 24 {mu}m excess, which may come from warm dust around the primary and/or BD. Neither object in the HIP 78530 system exhibits near- to mid-IR excesses. We additionally find that the 1-4 {mu}m colors of HIP 78530B match a spectral type of M3 {+-} 2, inconsistent with the M8 spectral type assigned based on its near-IR spectrum, indicating that it may be a low-mass star rather than a BD. We present new upper limits on additional low-mass companions in the system (<5 M{sub Jup} beyond 175 AU). Finally, we examine the utility of circumsecondary disks as probes of the formation histories of wide BD companions, finding that the presence of a disk may disfavor BD formation near the primary with subsequent outward scattering.

  16. Double diffusive magnetohydrodynamic heat and mass transfer of nanofluids over a nonlinear stretching/shrinking sheet with viscous-Ohmic dissipation and thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulal Pal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD convective heat and mass transfer near a stagnation-point flow over stretching/shrinking sheet of nanofluids is presented in this paper by considering thermal radiation, Ohmic heating, viscous dissipation and heat source/sink parameter effects. Non-similarity method is adopted for the governing basic equations before they are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method using shooting technique. The numerical results are validated by comparing the present results with previously published results. The focus of this paper is to study the effects of some selected governing parameters such as Richardson number, radiation parameter, Schimdt number, Eckert number and magnetic parameter on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as on skin-friction coefficient, local Nusselt number and Sherwood number.

  17. Direct thermal desorption in the analysis of cheese volatiles by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry: comparison with simultaneous distillation-extraction and dynamic headspace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, E; Sanz, J; Martínez-Castro, I

    2001-06-01

    Direct thermal desorption (DTD) has been used as a technique for extracting volatile components of cheese as a preliminary step to their gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. In this study, it is applied to different cheese varieties: Camembert, blue, Chaumes, and La Serena. Volatiles are also extracted using other techniques such as simultaneous distillation-extraction and dynamic headspace. Separation and identification of the cheese components are carried out by GC-mass spectrometry. Approximately 100 compounds are detected in the examined cheeses. The described results show that DTD is fast, simple, and easy to automate; requires only a small amount of sample (approximately 50 mg); and affords quantitative information about the main groups of compounds present in cheeses.

  18. An Investigation of the Complexity of Maillard Reaction Product Profiles from the Thermal Reaction of Amino Acids with Sucrose Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Golon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal treatment of food changes its chemical composition drastically with the formation of “so-called” Maillard reaction products, being responsible for the sensory properties of food, along with detrimental and beneficial health effects. In this contribution, we will describe the reactivity of several amino acids, including arginine, lysine, aspartic acid, tyrosine, serine and cysteine, with carbohydrates. The analytical strategy employed involves high and ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry followed by chemometric-type data analysis. The different reactivity of amino acids towards carbohydrates has been observed with cysteine and serine, resulting in complex MS spectra with thousands of detectable reaction products. Several compounds have been tentatively identified, including caramelization reaction products, adducts of amino acids with carbohydrates, their dehydration and hydration products, disproportionation products and aromatic compounds based on molecular formula considerations.

  19. Measurement of the delta34S value in methionine by double spike multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry using Carius tube digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jacqueline L; Kelly, W Robert

    2010-09-15

    Methionine is an essential amino acid and is the primary source of sulfur for humans. Using the double spike ((33)S-(36)S) multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) technique, three sample bottles of a methionine material obtained from the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements have been measured for delta(34)S and sulfur concentration. The mean delta(34)S value, relative to Vienna Canyon Diablo Troilite (VCDT), determined was 10.34 +/- 0.11 per thousand (n = 9) with the uncertainty reported as expanded uncertainties (U). These delta(34)S measurements include a correction for blank which has been previously ignored in studies of sulfur isotopic composition. The sulfur concentrations for the three bottles range from 56 to 88 microg/g. The isotope composition and concentration results demonstrate the high accuracy and precision of the DS-MC-TIMS technique for measuring sulfur in methionine.

  20. A comparison using Faraday cups with 1013 Ω amplifiers and a secondary electron multiplier to measure Os isotopes by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiqin; Sun, Tiantian; Xu, Jifeng

    2017-10-15

    According to the Johnson-Nyquist noise equation, the value of electron noise is proportional to the square root of the resistor value. This relationship gives a theoretical improvement of 100 in the signal/noise ratio by going from 10 11 Ω to 10 13 Ω amplifiers for Faraday detection in thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). We measured Os isotopes using static Faraday cups with 10 13 Ω amplifiers in negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry (NTIMS) and compared the results with those obtained with 10 11 Ω amplifiers and by peak-hopping on a single secondary electron multiplier (SEM). We analysed large loads of Os (1 μg) at a range of intensities of 187 OsO 3 (0.02-10 mV) in addition to small loads of Os (5-500 pg) to compare the results of the three methods. Using 10 13 Ω amplifiers, the long-term reproducibility determined from Merck Os was 187 Os/ 188 Os = 0.1211 ± 0.0086 and 0.120229 ± 0.000034 at 0.02 mV and 10 mV of 187 OsO 3 intensities. Meanwhile, the analysed JMC Os loadings of 5 and 500 pg showed 187 Os/ 188 Os = 0.10669 ± 0.00036 and 0.106807 ± 0.000023. In comparison, the values measured by the SEM were 187 Os/ 188 Os = 0.10704 ± 0.00056 and 0.10690 ± 0.00013. All errors are in 2 standard deviation (SD). Both the accuracy and the precision determined using the 10 13 Ω amplifiers and the SEM are identical when the Os amounts are within 10-50 pg. However, the former analysis time can be shortened by approximately two-thirds. The SEM measurement is still the most precise method for Os amounts 50 pg. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Thermal discomfort with cold extremities in relation to age, gender, and body mass index in a random sample of a Swiss urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orgül Selim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this epidemiological study was to investigate the relationship of thermal discomfort with cold extremities (TDCE to age, gender, and body mass index (BMI in a Swiss urban population. Methods In a random population sample of Basel city, 2,800 subjects aged 20-40 years were asked to complete a questionnaire evaluating the extent of cold extremities. Values of cold extremities were based on questionnaire-derived scores. The correlation of age, gender, and BMI to TDCE was analyzed using multiple regression analysis. Results A total of 1,001 women (72.3% response rate and 809 men (60% response rate returned a completed questionnaire. Statistical analyses revealed the following findings: Younger subjects suffered more intensely from cold extremities than the elderly, and women suffered more than men (particularly younger women. Slimmer subjects suffered significantly more often from cold extremities than subjects with higher BMIs. Conclusions Thermal discomfort with cold extremities (a relevant symptom of primary vascular dysregulation occurs at highest intensity in younger, slimmer women and at lowest intensity in elderly, stouter men.

  2. Fatty acidomics: Evaluation of the effects of thermal treatments on commercial mussels through an extended characterization of their free fatty acids by liquid chromatography - Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losito, Ilario; Facchini, Laura; Valentini, Alessandra; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco

    2018-07-30

    An unprecedented characterization of free fatty acids (FFA) in the lipid extracts of fresh or thermally treated mussels of sp. Mytilus galloprovincialis, including up to 128 saturated, mono- or poly-unsaturated and 63 oxidized (i.e., modified by hydroxylic, carbonylic and/or epoxylic groups) compounds, was achieved using reverse phase chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-Fourier transform single and tandem mass spectrometry (RPC-ESI-FTMS,MS/MS). Subsequent Principal Components Analysis (PCA) evidenced several effects of thermal treatments on the mussel FFA profiles. In particular, death-inducing low temperature treatments (freezing at -16 °C or refrigeration at 4 °C for several days) induced a peculiar increase in the incidence of FFA, whereas the effect was absent in mussels undergoing death upon prolonged storage at room temperature (25 °C, 6 h) or fast cooking (100 °C, 5 min). Alive mussels, either fresh or resulting from short term (up to 48 h) refrigeration were actually indistinguishable by PCA, although subtle seasonal effects were observed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Determination of short chain chlorinated paraffins in water by stir bar sorptive extraction-thermal desorption-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tölgyessy, P; Nagyová, S; Sládkovičová, M

    2017-04-21

    A simple, robust, sensitive and environment friendly method for the determination of short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in water using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) coupled to thermal desorption-gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (TD-GC-QqQ-MS/MS) was developed. SBSE was performed using 100mL of water sample, 20mL of methanol as a modifier, and a commercial sorptive stir bar (with 10mm×0.5mm PDMS layer) during extraction period of 16h. After extraction, the sorptive stir bar was thermally desorbed and online analysed by GC-MS/MS. Method performance was evaluated for MilliQ and surface water spiked samples. For both types of matrices, a linear dynamic range of 0.5-3.0μgL -1 with correlation coefficients >0.999 and relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the relative response factors (RRFs) <12% was established. The limits of quantification (LOQs) of 0.06 and 0.08μgL -1 , and the precision (repeatability) of 6.4 and 7.7% (RSDs) were achieved for MilliQ and surface water, respectively. The method also showed good robustness, recovery and accuracy. The obtained performance characteristics indicate that the method is suitable for screening and monitoring and compliance checking with environmental quality standards (EQS, set by the EU) for SCCPs in surface waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous Screening of Major Flame Retardants and Plasticizers in Polymer Materials Using Pyrolyzer/Thermal Desorption Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py/TD–GC–MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Yanagisawa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with the aim of achieving the simultaneous screening of various additives in polymer materials by utilizing a solvent-free pyrolyzer/thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (Py/TD-GC–MS method. As a first step to achieve this goal, simultaneous screening has been examined by selecting major substances representing plasticizers and flame retardants, such as short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs, decabromodiphenyl ether (DecaBDE, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD, and di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP. A quantitative MS analysis was performed to check for the peak areas and sensitivities. Since Py/TD-GC–MS is fraught with the risk of thermal degradation of the sample, temperatures during the analytical process were finely tuned for securing reliable results. The instrumental sensitivity was confirmed by the S/N ratio on each component. The detection limits of all components were less than 50 mg/kg, which are sufficiently lower than the regulatory criteria. With regard to reproducibility, a relative standard deviation (RSD of about 5% was confirmed by employing a spike recovery test on a polystyrene polymer solution containing mixed standard solution (ca. 1000 mg/kg. In conclusion, the results obtained in this study indicate that Py/TD-GC–MS is applicable for the screening of major flame retardants and plasticizers in real samples with sufficient reproducibility at regulatory levels.

  5. Thermal decomposition of foundry resins: A determination of organic products by thermogravimetry–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (TG–GC–MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kmita

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research on thermal decomposition of Ester-Cured Alkaline Phenolic No-Bake (ALPHASET binders used in molding technology. In the ALPHASET system phenol-formaldehyde resin of resole type is cured with a liquid mixture of esters. Under the influence of the molten metal the thermal decomposition of the binder follows, resulting in the evolution of gases, often harmful, e.g. from benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX or Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH groups. The identification of gases evolved during the pyrolysis of the binders was carried out and their decomposition temperatures were determined using the Thermogravimetry–Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (TG–GC–MS technique. The tests were subjected to two types of binders from different manufacturers. Among the products of pyrolysis there have been identified mainly benzene and its derivatives, and phenol and its derivatives. Compounds identified in pyrolytic gas are largely considered to be harmful to humans and the environment (some of the compounds are carcinogenic and mutagenic. The presented results of the TG–GC–MS measurements show that the applied analytic methods are feasible to perform a qualitative and also quantitative characterization of the binder samples.

  6. Thermal radiation effects on magnetohydrodynamic free convection heat and mass transfer from a sphere in a variable porosity regime

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Vallampati Ramachandra Ramachandra

    2012-02-01

    A mathematical model is presented for multiphysical transport of an optically-dense, electrically-conducting fluid along a permeable isothermal sphere embedded in a variable-porosity medium. A constant, static, magnetic field is applied transverse to the cylinder surface. The non-Darcy effects are simulated via second order Forchheimer drag force term in the momentum boundary layer equation. The surface of the sphere is maintained at a constant temperature and concentration and is permeable, i.e. transpiration into and from the boundary layer regime is possible. The boundary layer conservation equations, which are parabolic in nature, are normalized into non-similar form and then solved numerically with the well-tested, efficient, implicit, stable Keller-box finite difference scheme. Increasing porosity (ε) is found to elevate velocities, i.e. accelerate the flow but decrease temperatures, i.e. cool the boundary layer regime. Increasing Forchheimer inertial drag parameter (Λ) retards the flow considerably but enhances temperatures. Increasing Darcy number accelerates the flow due to a corresponding rise in permeability of the regime and concomitant decrease in Darcian impedance. Thermal radiation is seen to reduce both velocity and temperature in the boundary layer. Local Nusselt number is also found to be enhanced with increasing both porosity and radiation parameters. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Isotopic Determination of Nuclear Materials Using Nuclear Fission Track Registration Technique and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Young Sin; Pyo, Hyeong Yeol; Park, Yong Joon; Song, Kyu Seok; Kim, Won Ho; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2007-05-01

    It is very important to develope the technology for the determination of isotopic ratios of hot particles( 234 U, 235 U, 236 U etc.) detected from swipe samples of various nuclear facilities. This technology is highly competitive internationally and has to be established independently as long as our government maintains atomic energy and treats nuclear materials. In this text, sample pretreatment procedure, gamma-ray counting, alpha or fission track techniques, isotopic analysis of U and Pu, background problems and detection limits for mass determination, and their application to the real swipe sample were described with detailed procedure. This technology would contribute to the Korean economy's high growth rate as well as to superiority of government's leading research and development programs if successfully established

  8. Determination of boron content and isotopic composition in gypsum by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry using phase transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun-Qi; Peng, Zhang-Kuang; Yang, Jian; Xiao, Ying-Kai; Zhang, Yan-Ling

    2017-12-01

    As a stable isotope, boron plays an important role in hydrogeology, environmental geochemistry, ore deposit geochemistry and marine paleoclimatology. However, there is no report of boron isotopic composition in gypsum. This is mainly confined to complete dissolution of Gypsum by water or acid. In this study, gypsum was converted to calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) with ammonium bicarbonate(NH 4 HCO 3 ) by two steps at 50°C. In every step, the mass ratio of NH 4 HCO 3 /CaSO 4 ·2H 2 O was twice, and conversion rate reached more than 98%. Converted CaCO 3 was totally dissolved with hydrochloric acid (the dissolution rate was over 99%). In order to overcome the difficulties of the matrix interference and the detection limit of Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES), we use Amberlite IRA 743 resin to purify and enrichment the boron at first, then eluting boron from the resin with 10mL 0.1mol/L hydrochloric acid at 75°C. The boron isotopic composition of natural gypsum samples was determined using positive thermal ionization mass spectrometry (P-TIMS). The boron isotopic composition of gypsum may be an excellent indicator for the formation environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermal radiation and chemical reaction effects on MHD free convection heat and mass transfer in a micropolar fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasacharya, D.; Mendu, Upendar

    2011-01-01

    The steady laminar free convection heat and mass transfer boundary layer flow of a thermomicropolar fluid past a non-isothermal vertical flat plate in the presence of a homogeneous first order chemical reaction and a radiation with transverse magnetic field has been reported. It has been established that the flow problem has similarity solutions when the variation in temperature of the plate and variation in concentration of the fluid are linear functions of the distance from the leading edge measured along the plate. The nonlinear governing equations of the flow along with their appropriate boundary conditions are initially cast into dimensionless forms using similarity transformations which are used to reduce the governing partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. The resulting system of equations thus formed is then solved numerically by using the Keller-box method. The non-dimensional Nusselt number, Sherwood number and the skin friction coefficient and wall couple stress at the plate are derived, and a parametric study of the governing parameters, namely the magnetic field strength parameter, radiation parameter, chemical reaction parameter, Sherwood number profiles against to the coupling number as well as the skin friction coefficient, wall couple stress coefficient is conducted. (author)

  10. A comparative study of isotopic analysis of plutonium from organic and aqueous media by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, Radhika M.; Mirashi, Nirupama N.; Khodade, P.S.; Shah, P.M.; Parab, A.R.; Govindan, R.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2003-01-01

    For isotopic analysis of plutonium (Pu) in irradiated nuclear fuel samples, it is normally separated from Am, U and fission products by anion exchange method in nitrate medium. However, stripping of Pu from the column by dilute HNO 3 acid is slow due to tailing which requires long elution times and reduces the concentration of Pu in the eluted solution. The desorption of Pu from the column can be enhanced by using more dilute HNO 3 but there are problems of hydrolysis and polymer formation. Formic acid and ascorbic acid in formic acid are reported to be promising eluents for plutonium. Formic acid is also a good solvent for Pu. Further, the presence of ascorbic acid helps in reducing Pu (IV) to Pu (III) thereby leading to faster elution as well as better recovery in smaller volumes of the eluant and hence higher Pu concentrations in the collected fraction. This would circumvent the need of subsequent concentration steps allowing direct loading of Pu on the filament for analysis by TIMS. The aim of the present work was to compare the elution behaviour and mass spectrometric analysis of Pu using formic acid, formic acid + ascorbic acid and nitric acid with respect to ion current behaviour and isotopic ratios obtained

  11. Solid state thermal rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2016-07-05

    Thermal rectifiers using linear nanostructures as core thermal conductors have been fabricated. A high mass density material is added preferentially to one end of the nanostructures to produce an axially non-uniform mass distribution. The resulting nanoscale system conducts heat asymmetrically with greatest heat flow in the direction of decreasing mass density. Thermal rectification has been demonstrated for linear nanostructures that are electrical insulators, such as boron nitride nanotubes, and for nanostructures that are conductive, such as carbon nanotubes.

  12. Development and application of MASKA-LM code for calculation of thermal hydraulics and mass transfer of lead cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladimir Ya Kumaev; Andrei A Lebezov; Victor V Alexeev

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The report is devoted to the development and application of the two-dimensional MASKA-LM computer code intended for numerical calculations of lead coolant flows, temperatures and transport of impurities in BREST-type reactors of the integral design. The description of heat and mass transfer in liquid metal systems, proceeding in the coolant and at the interface 'coolant - structural materials', is a complex problem involving the joint simulation of thermal-hydraulic, physical and chemical processes in view of the real configuration of the reactor circuit. The report presents the state-of-the-art in the development of the two-dimensional code MASKA-LM and the results of trial calculations of heat and mass transfer in the primary circuit of the lead cooled reactor. The set of governing equations to be solved is based on the porous body model and describes the thermal-hydraulic processes in the reactor as a whole. The numerical method for solution of the governing equations is discussed. To check the code workability and study the technique by the way of solution of a particular task, calculations were performed in reference to the chosen version of the lead cooled BREST reactor under design. The examined domain of the reactor was simulated by a porous body with the parameters corresponding to those of the real reactor medium in terms of heat generation, resistance and the geometry of the hydraulic path of coolant. Analysis of the calculated two-dimensional fields of velocities, pressure and temperatures shows the existence of a complex coolant flow with stagnant and vortex zones. A nonuniform distribution of the coolant flow rate along the core radius was obtained. The results of calculations of the impurity transport of iron, oxygen and magnetite in the primary reactor circuit are discussed as well. The developed code MASKA-LM allows one to evaluate the issue of components of structural materials into coolant as impurities, their

  13. Formation of positive cluster ions Li(n) Br (n = 2-7) and ionization energies studied by thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veličković, S R; Đustebek, J B; Veljković, F M; Veljković, M V

    2012-05-01

    Clusters of the type Li(n)X (X = halides) can be considered as potential building blocks of cluster-assembly materials. In this work, Li(n)Br (n = 2-7) clusters were obtained by a thermal ionization source of modified design and selected by a magnetic sector mass spectrometer. Positive ions of the Li(n)Br (n = 4-7) cluster were detected for the first time. The order of ion intensities was Li(2)Br(+) > Li(4)Br(+) > Li(5)Br(+) > Li(6)Br(+) > Li(3)Br(+). The ionization energies (IEs) were measured and found to be 3.95 ± 0.20 eV for Li(2)Br, 3.92 ± 0.20 eV for Li(3)Br, 3.93 ± 0.20 eV for Li(4)Br, 4.08 ± 0.20 eV for Li(5)Br, 4.14 ± 0.20 eV for Li(6)Br and 4.19 ± 0.20 eV for Li(7)Br. All of these clusters have a much lower ionization potential than that of the lithium atom, so they belong to the superalkali class. The IEs of Li(n)Br (n = 2-4) are slightly lower than those in the corresponding small Li(n) or Li(n)H clusters, whereas the IEs of Li(n)Br are very similar to those of Li(n) or Li(n)H for n = 5 and 6. The thermal ionization source of modified design is an important means for simultaneously obtaining and measuring the IEs of Li(n)Br (n = 2-7) clusters (because their ions are hermodynamically stable with respect to the loss of lithium atoms in the gas phase) and increasingly contributes toward the development of clusters for practical applications. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Improved sample utilization in thermal ionization mass spectrometry isotope ratio measurements: refined development of porous ion emitters for nuclear forensic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baruzzini, Matthew Louis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-08

    The precise and accurate determination of isotopic composition in nuclear forensic samples is vital for assessing origin, intended use and process history. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is widely accepted as the gold standard for high performance isotopic measurements and has long served as the workhorse in the isotopic ratio determination of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensic and safeguard specialists have relied heavily on such methods for both routine and atypical e orts. Despite widespread use, TIMS methods for the assay of actinide systems continue to be hindered by poor ionization e ciency, often less than tenths of a percent; the majority of a sample is not measured. This represents a growing challenge in addressing nextgeneration nuclear detection needs by limiting the ability to analyze ultratrace quantities of high priority elements that could potentially provide critical nuclear forensic signatures. Porous ion emitter (PIE) thermal ion sources were developed in response to the growing need for new TIMS ion source strategies for improved ionization e ciency, PIEs have proven to be simple to implement, straightforward approach to boosting ion yield. This work serves to expand the use of PIE techniques for the analysis of trace quantities of plutonium and americium. PIEs exhibited superior plutonium and americium ion yields when compared to direct lament loading and the resin bead technique, one of the most e cient methods for actinide analysis, at similar mass loading levels. Initial attempts at altering PIE composition for the analysis of plutonium proved to enhance sample utilization even further. Preliminary investigations of the instrumental fractionation behavior of plutonium and uranium analyzed via PIE methods were conducted. Data collected during these initial trial indicate that PIEs fractionate in a consistent, reproducible manner; a necessity for high precision isotope ratio measurements. Ultimately, PIEs methods were applied for

  15. Implementation of gas concentration measurement systems using mass spectrometry in containment thermal-hydraulics test facilities: different approaches for calibration and measurement with steam/air/helium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auban, O.; Malet, J.; Brun, P.; Brinster, J.; Quillico, J. J.; Studer, E.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic test facilities are used to investigate various containment phenomena such as, for example, mixing and stratification of gases or steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable. Experiments are also required for validation of codes possessing capabilities for modelling such three-dimensional effects. The need for advanced instrumentation allowing to measure gas concentration in such conditions (typically: 100-180 .deg. C; 1-10 bar) and to get sufficiently refined information about spatial distribution of the different gas species has become apparent. This paper deals with the implementation of gas analysis systems using some commercial Quadrupole Mass Spectrometers (QMS) that have been recently added to the basic instrumentation in three thermal-hydraulics test facilities namely MISTRA (CEA, France), TOSQAN (IRSN, France) and PANDA (PSI, Switzerland). In recent years, QMS have increasingly been selected for various applications because of attractive metrological characteristics (sensibility, span of concentration range, response time, stability, etc.), relatively compact size and low cost. Although commercial QMS are sold as 'turnkey' systems, these instruments are delicate to bring into operation. As QMS are not absolute instruments, reliable calibration procedures are required for quantitative measurements. A mass spectrometer can be regarded as an ionisation gauge with subsequent separation system for the different ion species. The calculation of gas concentrations considers the partial pressure of a particular gas species to be proportional to the ion current it generates. Anyway, one must know the QMS sensitivity to the gases of interest and the only practical method is to use calibration gases. Calibration must be carried out using mixtures whose compositions are close to any possible sample compositions and the procedure selected should duplicate as closely as possible the measurement conditions established during the real experiment

  16. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Slack, W.W.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies

  17. An intercomparison experiment on isotope dilution thermal ionisation mass spectrometry using plutonium-239 spike for the determination of plutonium concentration in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, S.K.; Shah, P.M.; Saxena, M.K.; Jain, H.C.; Gurba, P.B.; Babbar, R.K.; Udagatti, S.V.; Moorthy, A.D.; Singh, R.K.; Bajpai, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    Determination of plutonium concentration in the dissolver solution of irradiated fuel is one of the key measurements in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of an intercomparison experiment performed between Fuel Chemistry Division (FCD) at BARC and PREFRE, Tarapur for determining plutonium concentration in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel using 239 Pu spike in isotope dilution thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS). The 239 Pu spike method was previously established at FCD as viable alternative to the imported enriched 242 Pu or 244 Pu; the spike used internationally for plutonium concentration determination by IDMS in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel. Precision and accuracy achievable for determining plutonium concentration are compared under the laboratory and the plant conditions using 239 Pu spike in IDMS. For this purpose, two different dissolver solutions with 240 Pu/ 239 Pu atom ratios of about 0.3 and 0.07 corresponding, respectively, to high and low burn-up fuels, were used. The results of the intercomparison experiment demonstrate that there is no difference in the precision values obtained under the laboratory and the plant conditions; with mean precision values of better than 0.2%. Further, the plutonium concentration values determined by the two laboratories agreed within 0.3%. This exercise, therefore, demonstrates that ID-TIMS method using 239 Pu spike can be used for determining plutonium concentration in dissolver solution of irradiated fuel, under the plant conditions. 7 refs., 8 tabs

  18. Performance evaluation of a thermal desorption/gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric method for the characterization of waste tank headspace samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.Y.; Skeen, J.T.; Dindal, A.B.; Bayne, C.K.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    A thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) method was validated for the determination of volatile organic compounds collected on carbonaceous triple sorbent traps and applied to characterize samples of headspace gases collected from underground nuclear waste storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford site, in Richland, WA. Method validation used vapor-phase standards generated from 25 target analytes, including alkanes, alkyl alcohols, alkyl ketones, alkylated aromatics, and alkyl nitriles. The target analytes represent a group of compounds identified in one of the most problematic tanks. TD/GC/MS was carried out with modified injectors. Performance was characterized based on desorption efficiency, reproducibility, stability, and linearity of the calibration, method detection limits, preanalytical holding time, and quality control limits for surrogate standard recoveries. Desorption efficiencies were all greater than 82%, and the majority of the analytes (23 out of 25) had reproducibility values less than 24% near the method detection levels. The method was applied to the analysis of a total of 305 samples collected from the headspaces of 48 underground waste storge tanks. Quality control procedures were implemented to monitor sampling and TD/GC/MS method. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Nature of unresolved complex mixture in size-distributed emissions from residential wood combustion as measured by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Michael D.; Smith, N. Dean; Dong, Yuanji

    2004-08-01

    Unresolved complex mixture (UCM) is an analytical artifact of gas chromatographs of combustion source-related fine aerosol extracts. In this study the UCM is examined in size-resolved fine aerosol emissions from residential wood combustion. The aerosols are sorted by size in an electrical low-pressure impactor (ELPI) and subsequently analyzed by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS). A semiquantitative system for predicting the branched alkane, cycloalkane, alkylbenzene, C3-, C4-, C5-alkylbenzene, methylnaphthalene, C3-, C4-, C5-alkylnaphthalene, methylphenanthrene C2-, C3-alkylphenanthrene, and dibenzothiophene concentrations in the UCM is introduced. Analysis by TD/GS/MS detects UCM on each ELPI stage for all six combustion tests. The UCM baseline among the different fuel types is variable. In particular, the UCM of Pseudotsuga sp. is enriched in later-eluting compounds of lower volatility. A high level of reproducibility is achieved in determining UCM areas. UCM fractions (UCM ion area/total extracted ion chromatograph area) by individual ELPI stage return a mean relative standard deviation of 19.1% over the entire combustion test set, indicating a highly consistent UCM fraction across the ELPI size boundaries. Among the molecular ions investigated, branched alkane (m/z 57) and dibenzothiophene (m/z 212 and 226) constituents are most abundant in UCM emissions from RWC, collectively accounting for 64-95% of the targeted chemical species. The total UCM emissions span 446-756 mg/kg of dry biomass burned and correspond to an upper limit of 7.1% of the PM2.5 mass. The UCM emissions are primarily accumulation mode (0.1 μm ≤ aerodynamic diameter (da) ≤ 1 μm), with a geometric mean diameter (dg) range of 120.3-518.4 nm. UCM in PM2.5 is chemically asymmetric (shifted to finer da), typically clustering at da ≤ 1 μm. Measurable shifts in dg and changes in distribution widths (σg) on an intratest basis suggest that the particle density

  20. Ambient aging of rhenium filaments used in thermal ionization mass spectrometry: Growth of oxo-rhenium crystallites and anti-aging strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Mannion

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Degassing is a common preparation technique for rhenium filaments used for thermal ionization mass spectrometric analysis of actinides, including plutonium. Although optimization studies regarding degassing conditions have been reported, little work has been done to characterize filament aging after degassing. In this study, the effects of filament aging after degassing were explored to determine a “shelf-life” for degassed rhenium filaments, and methods to limit filament aging were investigated. Zone-refined rhenium filaments were degassed by resistance heating under high vacuum before exposure to ambient atmosphere for up to 2 months. After degassing the nucleation and preferential growth of oxo-rhenium crystallites on the surface of polycrystalline rhenium filaments was observed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Compositional analysis of the crystallites was conducted using SEM-Raman spectroscopy and SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and grain orientation at the metal surface was investigated by electron back-scatter diffraction mapping. Spectra collected by SEM-Raman suggest crystallites are composed primarily of perrhenic acid. The relative extent of growth and crystallite morphology were found to be grain dependent and affected by the dissolution of carbon into filaments during annealing (often referred to as carbonization or carburization. Crystallites were observed to nucleate in region specific modes and grow over time through transfer of material from the surface. Factors most likely to affect the rates of crystallite growth include rhenium substrate properties such as grain size, orientation, levels of dissolved carbon, and relative abundance of defect sites; as well as environmental factors such as length of exposure to oxygen and relative humidity. Thin (∼180 nm hydrophobic films of poly(vinylbenzyl chloride were found to slow the growth of oxo-rhenium crystallites on the filament

  1. Thermal, chemical, and mass-transport processes induced in abyssal sediments by the emplacement of nuclear waste: experimental and modeling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McVey, D.F.; Erickson, K.L.; Seyfried, W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper discusses heat and mass transport studies of marine red clay sediments being considered as a nuclear waste isolation medium. Numerical models indicate that for a maximum allowable sediment/canister interface temperature of 200 to 250 0 C, the sediment can absorb about 1.5 kW initial power from waste in a 3 m long by 0.3 m dia canister buried 30 m in the sediment. Fluid displacement due to convection is found to be less than 1 m. Laboratory studies of the geochemical effects induced by heating sediment/seawater mixtures indicate that the canister and waste form must be designed to resist a hot, acid (pH 3 to 4) oxidizing environment. Since the thermally altered sediment volume of about 5.5 m 3 is small relative to the sediment volume overlying the canister, the acid and oxidizing conditions are not anticipated to effect the properties of the far field. Using sorption coefficient correlations, the migration of four nuclides 239 Pu, 137 Cs, 129 I, and 99 Tc were computer for a canister buried 30 m deep in a 60 m thick red clay sediment layer. It was found that the 239 Pu and 137 Cs are essentially completely contained in the sediments, while 129 I and 99 Tc broke through the 30 m of sediment in about 5000 years. The resultant peak injection rates of 4.6 x 10 -5 μCi/year-m 2 for 129 I and 1.6 x 10 -2 μCi/year-m 2 for 99 Tc were less than the natural radioactive flux of 226 Ra (3.5 to 8.8 x 10 -4 μCi/year-m 2 ) and 222 Rn

  2. [Target and non-target screening of volatile organic compounds in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huilian; Jin, Jing; Li, Yun; Chen, Jiping

    2017-10-08

    A method of comprehensive screening of the target and non-target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed. In this paper, two types of solid phase adsorption column were compared, and the Tenex SS TD Tube was selected. The analytes were enriched into the adsorption tube by constant flow sampling, and detected by TD-GC-MS in full scan mode. Target compounds were quantified by internal standard method, and the quantities of non-target compounds were calculated by response coefficient of toluene. The method detection limits (MDLs) for the 24 VOCs were 1.06 to 5.44 ng, and MDLs could also be expressed as 0.004 to 0.018 mg/m 3 assuming that the sampling volume was 300 mL. The average recoveries were in the range of 78.4% to 89.4% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.9% to 14.4% ( n =7). The established analytical method was applied for the comprehensive screening of VOCs in a waste incineration power plant in Dalian city. Twenty-nine VOCs were identified. In these compounds, only five VOCs were the target compounds set in advance, which accounted for 26.7% of the total VOCs identified. Therefore, this study further proved the importance of screening non-target compounds in the analysis of VOCs in industrial exhaust gas, and has certain reference significance for the complete determination of VOCs distribution.

  3. Analysis of trimethoprim, lincomycin, sulfadoxin and tylosin in swine manure using laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solliec, Morgan; Massé, Daniel; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2014-10-01

    A new extraction method coupled to a high throughput sample analysis technique was developed for the determination of four veterinary antibiotics. The analytes belong to different groups of antibiotics such as chemotherapeutics, sulfonamides, lincosamides and macrolides. Trimethoprim (TMP), sulfadoxin (SFX), lincomycin (LCM) and tylosin (TYL) were extracted from lyophilized manure using a sonication extraction. McIlvaine buffer and methanol (MeOH) were used as extraction buffers, followed by cation-exchange solid phase extraction (SPE) for clean-up. Analysis was performed by laser diode thermal desorption-atmospheric pressure chemical-ionization (LDTD-APCI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring (SRM) detection. The LDTD is a high throughput sample introduction method that reduces total analysis time to less than 15s per sample, compared to minutes when using traditional liquid chromatography (LC). Various SPE parameters were optimized after sample extraction: the stationary phase, the extraction solvent composition, the quantity of sample extracted and sample pH. LDTD parameters were also optimized: solvent deposition, carrier gas, laser power and corona discharge. The method limit of detection (MLD) ranged from 2.5 to 8.3 µg kg(-1) while the method limit of quantification (MLQ) ranged from 8.3 to 28µgkg(-1). Calibration curves in the manure matrix showed good linearity (R(2)≥ 0.996) for all analytes and the interday and intraday coefficients of variation were below 14%. Recoveries of analytes from manure ranged from 53% to 69%. The method was successfully applied to real manure samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. At-line gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of fatty acid profiles of green microalgae using a direct thermal desorption interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokker, P.; Pel, R.; Akoto, L.; Udo, A.; Brinkman, U.A.Th.; Vreuls, R.J.J.

    2002-01-01

    Thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation¯gas chromatography (THM¯GC) is an important tool to analyse fatty acid in complex matrices. Since THM¯GC has major drawbacks such as isomerisation when applied to fatty acids in natural matrices, a direct thermal desorption (DTD) interface and an

  5. Determination of a wide range of volatile organic compounds in ambient air using multisorbent adsorption/thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, J.F.; Luo, W.; Isabelle, L.M.; Bender, D.A.; Baker, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Adsorption/thermal desorption with multisorbent air-sampling cartridges was developed for the determination of 87 method analytes including halogenated alkanes, halogenated alkenes, ethers, alcohols, nitriles, esters, ketones, aromatics, a disulfide, and a furan. The volatilities of the compounds ranged from that of dichlorofluoromethane (CFC12) to that of 1,2,3- trichlorobenzene. The eight most volatile compounds were determined using a 1.5-L air sample and a sample cartridge containing 50 mg of Carbotrap B and 280 mg of Carboxen 1000; the remaining 79 compounds were determined using a 5-L air sample and a cartridge containing 180 mg of Carbotrap B and 70 mg of Carboxen 1000. Analysis and detection were by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The minimum detectable level (MDL) concentration values ranged from 0.01 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for chlorobenzene to 0.4 ppbv for bromomethane; most of the MDL values were in the range 0.02-0.06 ppbv. No breakthrough was detected with the prescribed sample volumes. Analyte stability on the cartridges was very good. Excellent recoveries were obtained with independent check standards. Travel spike recoveries ranged from 90 to 110% for 72 of the 87 compounds. The recoveries were less than 70% for bromomethane and chloroethene and for a few compounds such as methyl acetate that are subject to losses by hydrolysis; the lowest travel spike recovery was obtained for bromomethane (62%). Blank values for all compounds were either below detection or very low. Ambient atmospheric sampling was conducted in New Jersey from April to December, 1997. Three sites characterized by low, moderate, and high densities of urbanization/traffic were sampled. The median detected concentrations of the compounds were either similar at all three sites (as with the chlorofluorocarbon compounds) or increased with the density of urbanization/traffic (as with dichloromethane, MTBE, benzene, and toluene). For toluene, the median detected

  6. Thermal and mass implications of magmatic evolution in the Lassen volcanic region, California, and minimum constraints on basalt influx to the lower crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Clynne, M.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed the heat and mass demands of a petrologic model of basaltdriven magmatic evolution in which variously fractionated mafic magmas mix with silicic partial melts of the lower crust. We have formulated steady state heat budgets for two volcanically distinct areas in the Lassen region: the large, late Quaternary, intermediate to silicic Lassen volcanic center and the nearby, coeval, less evolved Caribou volcanic field. At Caribou volcanic field, heat provided by cooling and fractional crystallization of 52 km3 of basalt is more than sufficient to produce 10 km3 of rhyolitic melt by partial melting of lower crust. Net heat added by basalt intrusion at Caribou volcanic field is equivalent to an increase in lower crustal heat flow of ???7 mW m-2, indicating that the field is not a major crustal thermal anomaly. Addition of cumulates from fractionation is offset by removal of erupted partial melts. A minimum basalt influx of 0.3 km3 (km2 Ma)-1 is needed to supply Caribou volcanic field. Our methodology does not fully account for an influx of basalt that remains in the crust as derivative intrusives. On the basis of comparison to deep heat flow, the input of basalt could be ???3 to 7 times the amount we calculate. At Lassen volcanic center, at least 203 km3 of mantle-derived basalt is needed to produce 141 km3 of partial melt and drive the volcanic system. Partial melting mobilizes lower crustal material, augmenting the magmatic volume available for eruption at Lassen volcanic center; thus the erupted volume of 215 km3 exceeds the calculated basalt input of 203 km3. The minimum basalt input of 1.6 km3 (km2 Ma)-1 is >5 times the minimum influx to the Caribou volcanic field. Basalt influx high enough to sustain considerable partial melting, coupled with locally high extension rate, is a crucial factor in development of Lassen volcanic center; in contrast. Caribou volcanic field has failed to develop into a large silicic center primarily because basalt supply

  7. Measuring oxygen yields of a thermal conversion/elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometer for organic and inorganic materials through injection of CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xijie; Chen, Zhigang

    2014-12-01

    The thermal conversion/elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometer (TC/EA-IRMS) is widely used to measure the δ(18) O value of various substances. A premise for accurate δ(18) O measurement is that the oxygen in the sample can be converted into carbon monoxide (CO) quantitatively or at least proportionally. Therefore, a precise method to determine the oxygen yield of TC/EA-IRMS measurements is needed. Most studies have used the CO peak area obtained from a known amount of a solid reference material (for example, benzoic acid) to calibrate the oxygen yield of the sample. Although it was assumed that the oxygen yield of the solid reference material is 100%, no direct evidence has been provided. As CO is the analyte gas for δ(18) O measurement by IRMS, in this study, we use a six-port valve to inject CO gas into the TC/EA. The CO is carried to the IRMS by the He carrier gas and the CO peak area is measured by the IRMS. The CO peak area thus obtained from a known amount of the injected CO is used to calibrate the oxygen yield of the sample. The oxygen yields of commonly used organic and inorganic reference materials such as benzoic acid (C6 H5 COOH), silver phosphate (Ag3 PO4 ), calcium carbonate (CaCO3 ) and silicon dioxide (SiO2 ) are investigated at different reactor temperatures and sample sizes. We obtained excellent linear correlation between the peak area for the injected CO and its oxygen atom amount. C6 H5 COOH has the highest oxygen yield, followed by Ag3 PO4 , CaCO3 and SiO2 . The oxygen yields of TC/EA-IRMS are less than 100% for both organic and inorganic substances, but the yields are relatively stable at the specified reactor temperature and for a given quantity of sample. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Mass transfer in fuel cells. [electron microscopy of components, thermal decomposition of Teflon, water transport, and surface tension of KOH solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Results of experiments on electron microscopy of fuel cell components, thermal decomposition of Teflon by thermogravimetry, surface area and pore size distribution measurements, water transport in fuel cells, and surface tension of KOH solutions are described.

  9. Mass separation of rare-earth elements by a high-temperature thermal ion source coupled with a He-jet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Y.; Okano, K.; Aoki, K.

    1987-01-01

    By using a high-temperature thermal ion source coupled to a He-jet system, neutron-rich isotopes of rare-earth elements such as cerium, praseodymium, neodymium and promethium produced by the thermal-neutron fission of /sup 235/U were ionized and successfully separated. The temperature dependence of the ionization efficiency has been measured and found to be explained qualitatively by the vapour pressure of the relevant elements. The characteristic temperature dependence of the ionization efficiency has been utilized for Z-identification of several isobars of rare-earth elements. The heaviest isotopes of neodymium and promethium, /sup 155/Nd and /sup 156/Pm, have recently been identified

  10. Fatty acid profiling of raw human plasma and whole blood using direct thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, L.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Irth, H.; Pel, R.; Stellaard, F.

    2008-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) has in recent times become an important tool for the fatty acid profiling of human blood and plasma. An at-line procedure used in the fatty acid profiling of whole/intact aquatic micro-organisms without any sample preparation was adapted for this work. A direct thermal

  11. Fatty acid profiling of raw human plasma and whole blood using direct thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, L.; Vreuls, J.J.; Irth, H.; Pel, R.; Stellaard, F.

    2008-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) has in recent times become an important tool for the fatty acid profiling of human blood and plasma. An at-line procedure used in the fatty acid profiling of whole/intact aquatic micro-organisms without any sample preparation was adapted for this work. A direct thermal

  12. Fatty acid profiling of raw human plasma and whole blood using direct thermal desorption combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, Lawrence; Vreuls, Rene J. J.; Irth, Hubertus; Pel, Roel; Stellaard, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Gas chromatography (GC) has in recent times become an important tool for the fatty acid profiling of human blood and plasma. An at-line procedure used in the fatty acid profiling of whole/intact aquatic micro-organisms without any sample preparation was adapted for this work. A direct thermal

  13. Acclimation to different thermal conditions in a northerly wintering shorebird is driven by body mass-related changes in organ size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vezina, Francois; Jalvingh, Kirsten M.; Dekinga, Anne; Piersma, Theunis

    2006-01-01

    Seasonal acclimatization and experimental acclimation to cold in birds typically results from increased shivering endurance and elevated thermogenic capacity leading to improved resistance to cold. A wide array of physiological adjustments, ranging from biochemical transformations to organ mass

  14. Identification of alkylated phosphates by gas chromatography-mass spectrometric investigations with different ionization principles of a thermally aged commercial lithium ion battery electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Waldemar; Kraft, Vadim; Grützke, Martin; Wagner, Ralf; Winter, Martin; Nowak, Sascha

    2015-05-15

    The thermal aging process of a commercial LiPF6 based lithium ion battery electrolyte has been investigated in view of the formation of volatile phosphorus-containing degradation products. Aging products were analyzed by GC-MS. Structure determination of the products was performed by support of chemical ionization MS in positive and negative modes. A fraction of the discovered compounds belongs to the group of fluorophosphates (phosphorofluoridates) which are in suspect of potential toxicity. This is well known for relative derivatives, e.g. diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Another fraction of the identified compounds belongs to the group of trialkyl phosphates. These compounds may provide a positive impact on the thermal and electrochemical performance of Li-based batteries as repeatedly described in the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Isotope Dilution - Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometric Analysis for Tin in a Fly Ash Material; Analisis de Estano en una Ceniza de Combustion mediante Espectrometria de Masas de Ionizacion Termica con Dilucion Isotopica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, C; Fernandez, M; Quejido, A L

    2006-07-01

    Isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) analysis has been applied to the determination of tin in a fly ash sample supplied by the EC Joint Research Centre (Ispra, Italy). The proposed procedure includes the silica gel/phosphoric acid technique for tin thermal ionisation activation and a strict heating protocol for isotope ratio measurements. Instrumental mass discrimination factor has been previously determined measuring a natural tin standard solution. Spike solutions has been prepared from 112Sn-enriched metal and quantified by reverse isotope dilution analysis. Two sample aliquots were spiked and tin was extracted with 4,5 M HCI during 25 min ultrasound exposure time. Due to the complex matrix of this fly ash material, a two-step purification stage using ion-exchange chromatography was required prior TIMS analysis. Obtained results for the two sample-spike blends (10,10 + - 0,55 y 10,50 + - 0,64 imolg-1) are comprarable, both value and uncertainty. Also a good reproducibility is observed between measurements. The proposed ID-TIMS procedure, as a primary method and due to the lack of fly ash reference material certified for tin content, can be used to validate more routine methodologies applied to tin determination in this kind of materials. (Author) 75 refs.

  16. Ionic liquid based vortex assisted liquid-liquid microextraction combined with liquid chromatography mass spectrometry for the determination of bisphenols in thermal papers with the aid of response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Ankita; Satyanarayana, G N V; Panchal, Smita; Thakur, Ravindra Singh; Ansari, Nasreen G; Patel, Devendra K

    2017-08-04

    A sensitive, rapid and efficient ionic liquid-based vortex assisted liquid-liquid microextraction (IL-VALLME) with Liquid Chromatography Mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method is proposed for the determination of bisphenols in thermal paper. Extraction factors were systematically optimized by response surface methodology. Experimental factors showing significant effects on the analytical responses were evaluated using design of experiment. The limit of detection for Bisphenol-A (BPA) and Bisphenol-S (BPS) in thermal paper were 1.25 and 0.93μgkg -1 respectively. The dynamic linearity range for BPA was between 4 and 100μgkg -1 and the determination of coefficient (R 2 ) was 0.996. The values of the same parameters were 3-100μgkg -1 and 0.998 for BPS. The extraction recoveries of BPA and BPS in thermal paper were 101% and 99%. Percent relative standard deviation (% RSD) for matrix effect and matrix match effects were not more than 10%, for both bisphenols. The proposed method uses a statistical approach for the analysis of bisphenols in environmental samples, and is easy, rapid, requires minimum organic solvents and efficient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrating stormwater and greywater treatment for thermal regulation and the enhancement of biological diversity using mass balance of water as a design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mankiewicz, P.S.; Simon, D.B. [Gaia Inst., Bronx, NY (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper presented green roof projects scheduled for construction in New York City in 2007 which will test the hypothesis that green roof water budgets can favorably impact energy consumption in buildings and in their immediate surroundings. It presented specific methods and applications to move water and partition heat through vegetation to reach complementary goals in both ecology and economics of increasing plant coverage, decreasing urban summer temperature, and eliminating the expense of treating stormwater and greywater through evaporative cooling. A commercial facility will be retrofitted with a green roof and photovoltaic (PV) array as well as a below grade stormwater capture and recycle system. The overall energy efficiency, as well as PV performance, will be enhanced by coupling a green roof with water treatment with photovoltaic energy capture. Condensers for this building will be situated beneath a green roof and next to a vegetated landscape, resulting in cool air that is expected to increase air conditioning efficiencies. The objective is zero stormwater discharge into the combined sewer. The density of plant coverage, the quantity of available water, and the output of crops were studied in detail. The interdependent criteria of thermal partitioning, water loss, leaf area index, and green roof energetics have begun to receive attention because green roof evaluation has begun to focus on the ability of plants to discharge quantities of water into the atmosphere, and because this water movement pathway has large physical chemical impacts on the thermal environment. This paper revealed that green roofs contribute to thermal regulation and energy savings, with a kilowatt usage difference of 20 per cent or greater for black versus green roofs. 26 refs., 2 figs.

  18. A comparative study of 129I content in environmental standard materials IAEA-375, NIST SRM 4354 and NIST SRM 4357 by Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, John; Adamic, Mary; Snyder, Darin; Brookhart, Jacob; Hahn, Paula; Watrous, Matthew

    2016-11-01

    Iodine environmental measurements have consistently been backed up in the literature by standard materials like IAEA-375, Chernobyl Soil. There are not many other sources of a certified reference material for 129I content for mass spectrometry measurements. Some that have been found in the literature include NIST-4354 and NIST-4357. They are still available at the time of this writing. They don’t have certified content or isotopic values. There has been some work in the literature to show that iodine is present, but there hasn’t been enough to establish a consensus value. These materials have been analyzed at INL through two separate mass spectrometry techniques. They involve a combustion method of the starting material in oxygen, followed by TIMS analysis and a leaching preparation analyzed by accelerator mass spectrometry. Combustion/TIMS preparation of NIST SRM-4354 resulted in a 129I/127I ratio of 1.92 x 10-6 which agrees with AMS measurements which measured the 129I/127I ratio to be 1.93 x 10-6.

  19. Mass loss controlled thermal pretreatment system to assess the effects of pretreatment temperature on organic matter solubilization and methane yield from food waste.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Minale Yeshanew

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of thermal pretreatment (TP on the main characteristics of food waste (FW and its biochemical methane potential (BMP and distribution of volatile fatty acids (VFAs under mesophilic condition (35 ⁰C were investigated. The TP experiments were carried out at 80 °C, 100 °C, 120 °C for 2 hour and 140 °C for 1 hour. The designed TP set-up was able to minimize the organic matter loss during the course of the pretreatments. Soluble organic fractions evaluated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD and soluble protein increased linearly with pretreatment temperature. In contrast, the carbohydrate solubilization was more enhanced (30 % higher solubilization by the TP at lower temperature (80 °C. A slight increment of soluble phenols was found, particularly for temperatures exceeding 100 °C. Thermally pretreated FW under all conditions exhibited an improved methane yield than the untreated FW, due to the increased organic matter solubilization. The highest cumulative methane yield of 442 (± 8.6 mL/gVSadded, corresponding to a 28.1 % enhancement compared to the untreated FW, was obtained with a TP at 80 °C. No significant variation in the VFAs trends were observed during the BMP tests under all investigated conditions.

  20. Thermal food processing: new technologies and quality issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Da-Wen

    2012-01-01

    .... Part I, Modeling of Thermal Food Processes, discusses the thermal physical properties of foods, recent developments in heat and mass transfer, innovative modeling techniques including artificial...

  1. Polydimethylsiloxane rod extraction, a novel technique for the determination of organic micropollutants in water samples by thermal desorption-capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, L; Popp, P; Paschke, A; Pawliszyn, J

    2004-01-30

    A novel, simple and inexpensive approach to absorptive extraction of organic compounds from environmental samples is presented. It consists of a polydimethylsiloxane rod used as an extraction media, enriched with analytes during shaking, then thermally desorbed and analyzed by GC-MS. Its performance was illustrated and evaluated for the enrichment of sub- to ng/l of selected chlorinated compounds (chlorobenzenes and polychlorinated biphenyls) in water samples. The new approach was compared to the stir bar sorptive extraction performance. A natural ground water sample from Bitterfeld, Germany, was also extracted using both methods, showing good agreement. The proposed approach presented good linearity, high sensitivity, good blank levels and recoveries comparable to stir bars, together with advantages such as simplicity, lower cost and higher feasibility.

  2. Thermal Effects on the Body mass, Transpiration rate, Feeding and Food Conversion of the Pillbug Armadillo officinalis (Isopoda, Oniscidea Fed on the Dry Leaf of Punica Granatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelgader K. Youssef

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations were made on the body mass; transpiration rate; assimilation efficiency; gross and net production efficiencies; feeding, assimilation, conversion and metabolic rates of the pillbug Armadillo officinalis Dumeril acclimatized at 14º  and 21 °C for 15 days and fed on the dry leaf of Punica granatum (Pomegranate.  A brief description is given on the chemical composition of P. granatum leaf.  The difference in body mass increments of A. officinalis between the acclimatized temperatures was not significant (t = 1.09; p>0.05.  However, significant differences were discernible on the transpiration rate (t = 9.53; p<0.01, moisture (t = 9.01; p<0.01, assimilation efficiency (t = 5.16; p<0.01, feeding (t = 3.76; p<0.05 and conversion (t = 2.58; p<0.05  rates between the woodlice acclimatized at 14º and 21 °C.  Better feeding of    P. granatum leaf by these animals was observed at 21° C, but better assimilation efficiency at 14 °C.  Only 3.21% assimilated food at 14° C and 6.30% at 21 °C were converted into the production of new tissues.  The food consumption of A. officinalis at 14º and 21° C was 2.05% and 3.79% body mass/day respectively.  The effect of temperature on the activity of A. officinalis in the field is discussed.

  3. Effects of chemical reaction in thermal and mass diffusion of micropolar fluid saturated in porous regime with radiation and ohmic heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Hitesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyzes the chemically reacting free convection MHD micropolar flow, heat and mass transfer in porous medium past an infinite vertical plate with radiation and viscous dissipation. The non-linear coupled partial differential equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme known as Keller-box method. The results for concentration, transverse velocity, angular velocity and temperature are obtained and effects of various parameters on these functions are presented graphically. The numerical discussion with physical interpretations for the influence of various parameters also presented.

  4. A Thermote, a Novel Thermal Element Simplifying the Finding of a Medium's Entropy Emerges as a Sensible Dark Matter Candidate from Primordial Black Holes with a Mass in Range of Axion's, a Leading Candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feria, Erlan H.

    2017-06-01

    Black holes acting as dark matter have been predicted, e.g., via a duality theory in (Feria 2011, Proc. IEEE Int’l Conf. on SMC, Alaska, USA) and via observations in (Kashlinsky 2016, AJL). Here a thermote, a novel thermal element simplifying the finding of a medium’s entropy, emerges as a dark matter candidate from primordial black holes with a mass in range of axion's, a leading candidate. The thermote energy, eT, is defined as the average thermal energy contributed to a particle’s motion by the medium’s degrees of freedom (DoF) and is thus given by eT=NDoFkBT/2 where NDoF is the DoF number (e.g., NDoF=2 for a black-hole since only in its event-horizon particle motions can occur) and kBT/2 is the thermal energy contributed by each degree of freedom (kB is the Boltzmann constant and T is temperature). The entropy S of a spherical homogeneous medium is then simply stated as S=(kB/2)E/eT where E=Mc2 is the medium's rest-energy, with M its point-mass and c the speed of light, and eT=NDoFkBT/2 is the thermote's kinetic-energy. This simple equation naturally surfaced from a rest/kinetic or retention/motion mass-energy duality theory where, e.g., black-holes and vacuums form together such a duality with black holes offering the least resistance to mass-energy rest, or retention, and vacuums offering the least resistance to mass-energy kinetics, or motions. In turn, this duality theory has roots in the universal cybernetics duality principle (UCDP) stating “synergistic physical and mathematical dualities arise in efficient system designs” (Feria 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/2.1201407.005429, SPIE Newsroom). Our thermote based entropy finding method is applicable to spherical homogeneous mediums such as black-holes, photon-gases, and flexible-phase (Feria 2016, Proc. IEEE Int’l Conf. on Smart Cloud, Columbia University, NY, USA), where the thermote of a primordial black hole, with NDoF=2 and a CMB radiation temperature of T=2.725 kelvin, emerges as a

  5. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of a Hypersonic Vehicle with Significant Aero-Thermo-Elastic-Propulsion Interactions: Elastic, Thermal and Mass Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Jaidev

    This thesis examines themodeling, analysis, and control system design issues for scramjet powered hypersonic vehicles. A nonlinear three degrees of freedom longitudinal model which includes aero-propulsion-elasticity effects was used for all analyses. This model is based upon classical compressible flow and Euler-Bernouli structural concepts. Higher fidelity computational fluid dynamics and finite element methods are needed for more precise intermediate and final evaluations. The methods presented within this thesis were shown to be useful for guiding initial control relevant design. The model was used to examine the vehicle's static and dynamic characteristics over the vehicle's trimmable region. The vehicle has significant longitudinal coupling between the fuel equivalency ratio (FER) and the flight path angle (FPA). For control system design, a two-input two-output plant (FER - elevator to speed-FPA) with 11 states (including 3 flexible modes) was used. Velocity, FPA, and pitch were assumed to be available for feedback. Aerodynamic heat modeling and design for the assumed TPS was incorporated to original Bolender's model to study the change in static and dynamic properties. De-centralized control stability, feasibility and limitations issues were dealt with the change in TPS elasticity, mass and physical dimension. The impact of elasticity due to TPS mass, TPS physical dimension as well as prolonged heating was also analyzed to understand performance limitations of de-centralized control designed for nominal model.

  6. A Study on Thermal Properties and α( hcp) → β( bcc) Phase Transformation Energetics in Ti-5 mass% Ta-1.8 mass% Nb Alloy Using Inverse Drop Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Madhusmita; Raju, S.; Jeyaganesh, B.; Mythili, R.; Saroja, S.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate measurements of enthalpy increment ( H T - H 298.15) values have been made on a Ti-5 mass% Ta-1.8 mass% Nb alloy using the inverse drop calorimetry technique in the temperature range from 463 K to 1457 K. The measured enthalpy increment values show a steady increase with temperature in both α- hcp and β- bcc solid solution regions. It is found that both the onset as well the completion of the α → β phase change are demonstrated by a marked deviation of the enthalpy increment behavior from the otherwise smooth variation encountered in the respective low-temperature α- and high-temperature β-phase domains. The transformation start ( T s) and finish ( T f) temperatures of the α → β phase change are found to be (1072±10) K and (1156±10) K, respectively. In the actual α → β phase transformation region, the variation of the enthalpy with the progress of transformation is found to follow a sigmoidal shape which is in line with the diffusive nature of the phase transformation. An estimation of the total enthalpy change associated with the α → β phase transformation (Δ° H tr) has been made by assuming a simple diffusion limited kinetic model for the phase change. The net enthalpy change for the α → β transformation is found to be 76 J · g-1. The measured temperature variation of the enthalpy increment in both α- and β-phase regimes are fitted to simple analytical functional forms to obtain temperature-dependent estimates of the specific heat, C P . The total specific heat change associated with the α → β phase transformation {Δ^{circ}{CP^{α}}^{→{β}}} is estimated to be 904 J · kg-1 · K-1.

  7. THERMAL: A routine designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    THERMAL is designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering that is isotropic in the center of mass system. At low energy thermal motion will be included. At high energies the target nuclei are assumed to be stationary. The point of transition between low and high energies has been defined to insure a smooth transition. It is assumed that at low energy the elastic cross section is constant in the center of mass system. At high energy the cross section can be of any form. You can use this routine for all energies where the elastic scattering is isotropic in the center of mass system. In most materials this will be a fairly high energy

  8. Determination of 1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene and related compounds in marine pore water by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using disposable optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eganhouse, Robert P.; DiFilippo, Erica L

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for determination of ten DDT-related compounds in marine pore water based on equilibrium solid-phase microextraction (SPME) using commercial polydimethylsiloxane-coated optical fiber with analysis by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). Thermally cleaned fiber was directly exposed to sediments and allowed to reach equilibrium under static conditions at the in situ field temperature. Following removal, fibers were rinsed, dried and cut into appropriate lengths for storage in leak-tight containers at -20°C. Analysis by TD-GC/MS under full scan (FS) and selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes was then performed. Pore-water method detection limits in FS and SIM modes were estimated at 0.05-2.4ng/L and 0.7-16pg/L, respectively. Precision of the method, including contributions from fiber handling, was less than 10%. Analysis of independently prepared solutions containing eight DDT compounds yielded concentrations that were within 6.9±5.5% and 0.1±14% of the actual concentrations in FS and SIM modes, respectively. The use of optical fiber with automated analysis allows for studies at high temporal and/or spatial resolution as well as for monitoring programs over large spatial and/or long temporal scales with adequate sample replication. This greatly enhances the flexibility of the technique and improves the ability to meet quality control objectives at significantly lower cost.

  9. Mercury speciation and analysis in drinking water by stir bar sorptive extraction with in situ propyl derivatization and thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Rie; Kawaguchi, Migaku; Sakui, Norihiro; Honda, Hidehiro; Okanouchi, Noriya; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-10-31

    A method for mercury analysis and speciation in drinking water was developed, which involved stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) with in situ propyl derivatization and thermal desorption (TD)-GC-MS. Ten millilitre of tap water or bottled water was used. After a stir bar, pH adjustment agent and derivatization reagent were added, SBSE was performed. Then, the stir bar was subjected to TD-GC-MS. The detection limits were 0.01 ng mL(-1) (ethylmercury; EtHg), 0.02 ng mL(-1) (methylmercury; MeHg), and 0.2 ng mL(-1) (Hg(II) and diethylmercury (DiEtHg)). The method showed good linearity and correlation coefficients. The average recoveries of mercury species (n=5) in water samples spiked with 0.5, 2.0, and 6.0 ng mL(-1) mercury species were 93.1-131.1% (RSDmercury species in water samples.

  10. High-throughput trace analysis of explosives in water by laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjagbo, Koffi; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2012-07-03

    Harmful explosives can accumulate in natural waters in the long term during their testing, usage, storage, and dumping and can pose a health risk to humans and the environment. For the first time, attachment of small anions to neutral molecules in laser diode thermal desorption/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization was systematically investigated for the direct determination of trace nitroaromatics, nitrate esters, and nitramine explosives in water. Using ammonium chloride as an additive improved the instrument response for all the explosives tested and promoted the formation of several characteristic adduct ions. The method performs well achieving good linearity over at least 2 orders of magnitude, with coefficients of determination greater than 0.995. The resulting limits of detection are in the range of 0.009-0.092 μg/L. River water samples were successfully analyzed by the proposed method with accuracy in the range of 96-98% and a response time of 15 s, without any further pretreatment or chromatographic separation.

  11. Hydrogen retention studies on lithiated tungsten exposed to glow discharge plasmas under varying lithiation environments using Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy and mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A. de, E-mail: alfonso.decastro@ciemat.es [Fusion National Laboratory-CIEMAT, Av Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Valson, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Wendelsteinstraße 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Tabarés, F.L. [Fusion National Laboratory-CIEMAT, Av Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-04-15

    For the design of a Fusion Reactor based on a liquid lithium divertor target and a tungsten first wall at high temperature, the interaction of the wall material with plasmas of significant lithium content must be assessed, as issues like fuel retention, tungsten embrittlement and enhanced sputtering may represent a showstopper for the selection of the first wall material compatible with the presence of liquid metal divertor. In this work we address this topic for the first time at the laboratory level, hot W samples (100 °C) have been exposed to Glow Discharges of H{sub 2} or Li-seeded H{sub 2} followed by in situ thermal desorption studies (TDS) of the uptake of H{sub 2} on the samples. Pure and pre-lithiated tungsten was investigated in order to evaluate the differential effect of Li ion implantation on H retention. Global particle balance was also used for the determination of trapped H into the full W wall of the plasma chamber. A factor of 3-4 lower retention was deduced for samples and main W wall exposed to H/Li plasma than that measured on pre-lithiated W.

  12. Energy-constrained open-system magmatic processes IV: Geochemical, thermal and mass consequences of energy-constrained recharge, assimilation and fractional crystallization (EC-RAFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendy A. Bohrson Department of Geological Sciences, Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington, 98926, USA; Frank J. Spera Institute for Crustal Studies and Department of Geological Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, California, 93106, USA

    2003-01-01

    A wealth of geochemical and petrological data provide evidence that the processes of fractional crystallization, assimilation, and magma recharge (replenishment) dominate the chemical signatures of many terrestrial igneous rocks. Previous work [Spera and Bohrson, 2001 ; Bohrson and Spera, 2001] has established the importance of integrating energy, species and mass conservation into simulations of complex magma chamber processes. An extended version of the energy-constrained formulation, Energy-Constrained Recharge, Assimilation, Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC), tracks mass and compositional variations of melt, cumulates, and enclaves in a magma body undergoing simultaneous recharge, assimilation, and fractional crystallization [Spera and Bohrson, 2002]. Because many EC-RAFC results are distinct from those predicted by extant RAFC formulations, the primary goal of this paper is to present a range of geochemical and mass relationships for selected cases that highlight issues relevant to modern petrology. Among the plethora of petrologic problems that have important, well-documented analogues in nature are the geochemical distinctions that arise when a magma body undergoes continuous versus episodic recharge, the connection between erupted magmas and associated cumulate bodies, the behavior of recharge-fractionation dominated systems (RFC), thermodynamic conditions that promote the formation of enclaves versus cumulates, and the conditions under which magma bodies may be described as chemically homogeneous. Investigation of the effects of continuous versus episodic recharge for mafic magma undergoing RAFC in the lower crust indicates that the resulting geochemical trends for melt and solids are sensitive to the intensity and composition of recharge, suggesting that EC-RAFC may be used as a tool to distinguish the nature of the recharge events. Compared to the record preserved in melts, the geochemical and mass characteristics of solids associated with particular

  13. On Shocks Driven by High-mass Planets in Radiatively Inefficient Disks. III. Observational Signatures in Thermal Emission and Scattered Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hord, Blake; Lyra, Wladimir; Flock, Mario; Turner, Neal J.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2017-11-01

    Recent observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Be star HD 100546 show two bright features in infrared (H and {L}{\\prime } bands) at about 50 au,with one so far unexplained. We explore the observational signatures of a high-mass planet causing shock heating in order to determine if it could be the source of the unexplained infrared feature in HD 100546. More fundamentally, we identify and characterize planetary shocks as an extra, hitherto ignored, source of luminosity in transition disks. The RADMC-3D code is used to perform dust radiative transfer calculations on the hydrodynamical disk models, including volumetric heating. A stronger shock heating rate by a factor of 20 would be necessary to qualitatively reproduce the morphology of the second infrared source. Instead, we find that the outer edge of the gap carved by the planet heats up by about 50% relative to the initial reference temperature, which leads to an increase in the scale height. The bulge is illuminated by the central star, producing a lopsided feature in scattered light, as the outer gap edge shows an asymmetry in density and temperature attributable to a secondary spiral arm launched not from the Lindblad resonances but from the 2:1 resonance. We conclude that high-mass planets lead to shocks in disks that may be directly observed, particularly at wavelengths of 10 μm or longer, but that they are more likely to reveal their presence in scattered light by puffing up their outer gap edges and exciting multiple spiral arms.

  14. Ion mobility spectrometry–mass spectrometry studies of ion processes in air at atmospheric pressure and their application to thermal desorption of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabo, Martin; Malásková, Michaela; Matejčík, Štefan

    2014-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the negative reactant ion formation in a negative corona discharge (CD) using the corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (CD-IMS-oaTOF) technique. The reactant ions were formed in the CD operating in the reverse gas flow mode at an elevated temperature of 363.5 K in synthetic and ambient air. Under these conditions mainly O 2 − and their clusters were formed. We have also studied the influence of CCl 4 admixture to air (dopant gas) on the composition of the reactant ions, which resulted in the formation of Cl − and its clusters with a reduced ion mobility of 3.05 cm 2  V −1  s −1 as a major reactant ion peak. Additional IMS peaks with reduced ion mobilities of 2.49, 2.25 and 2.03 cm 2  V −1  s −1 were detected, and Cl −  · (NO 2 ) and Cl −  · (NO) n (n = 2, 3) anions were identified. The negative reactant ions were used to detect 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) using the thermal desorption (TD) technique using a CD-IMS instrument. Using TD sampling and a negative CD ion source doped by CCl 4 we have achieved a limit of detection of 350 pg for direct surface analysis of TNT. (paper)

  15. A modified commercial gas chromatograph for the continuous monitoring of the thermal degradation of sunflower oil and off-line solid phase extraction gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry characterization of released volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontañon, I; Sanz, J; Escudero, A; de Marcos, S; Ferreira, V; Galbán, J

    2015-04-03

    A homemade flow cell attached to a commercial Gas Chromatograph equipped with a Flame Ionization Detector (FID) has been designed for the continuous monitoring of volatile compounds released during heating edible oils. Analytical parameters such as mass of sample, temperature and flow rates have been optimized and the obtained results have been compared with the corresponding thermographs from standard TG systems. Results show that under optimum conditions, the profiles of volatiles released upon heating are comparable to the profiles of TG curves, suggesting that the FID based system could be an alternative to TGA. Additionally, volatiles have been retained in a Lichrolut EN(®) resin, eluted and analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. In this case, forty five compounds have been identified (acids, alcohols, alkanes, aldehydes, ketones and furans) and compared with the FID signals, working both in air or nitrogen atmosphere. It has been concluded that the oxidative thermal degradation is prevented in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermalized axion inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio, E-mail: rferreira@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: notari@ub.edu [Departament de Física Quàntica i Astrofísica i Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (ICCUB), Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès, 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton φ to gauge fields of the form φ F F-tilde / f , as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= φ-dot /(2 fH ), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H , due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξ∼>2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξ∼>3.4; however, observations require ξ∼>6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of T {sub eq} ≅ ξ H / g-bar where g-bar is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if φ is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H /(2 T ), if tensors do not thermalize.

  17. Thermalized axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo Z.; Notari, Alessio

    2017-09-01

    We analyze the dynamics of inflationary models with a coupling of the inflaton phi to gauge fields of the form phi F tilde F/f, as in the case of axions. It is known that this leads to an instability, with exponential amplification of gauge fields, controlled by the parameter ξ= dot phi/(2fH), which can strongly affect the generation of cosmological perturbations and even the background. We show that scattering rates involving gauge fields can become larger than the expansion rate H, due to the very large occupation numbers, and create a thermal bath of particles of temperature T during inflation. In the thermal regime, energy is transferred to smaller scales, radically modifying the predictions of this scenario. We thus argue that previous constraints on ξ are alleviated. If the gauge fields have Standard Model interactions, which naturally provides reheating, they thermalize already at ξgtrsim2.9, before perturbativity constraints and also before backreaction takes place. In absence of SM interactions (i.e. for a dark photon), we find that gauge fields and inflaton perturbations thermalize if ξgtrsim3.4 however, observations require ξgtrsim6, which is above the perturbativity and backreaction bounds and so a dedicated study is required. After thermalization, though, the system should evolve non-trivially due to the competition between the instability and the gauge field thermal mass. If the thermal mass and the instabilities equilibrate, we expect an equilibrium temperature of Teq simeq ξ H/bar g where bar g is the effective gauge coupling. Finally, we estimate the spectrum of perturbations if phi is thermal and find that the tensor to scalar ratio is suppressed by H/(2T), if tensors do not thermalize.

  18. A Sensitivity Study on the Effects of Particle Chemistry, Asphericity and Size on the Mass Extinction Efficiency of Mineral Dust in the Earth's Atmosphere: From the Near to Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, R. A., Jr.; Reid, J. S.; Tsay, S. C.; Roush, T. L.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2011-01-01

    To determine a plausible range of mass extinction efficiencies (MEE) of terrestrial atmospheric dust from the near to thermal IR, sensitivity analyses are performed over an extended range of dust microphysical and chemistry perturbations. The IR values are subsequently compared to those in the near-IR, to evaluate spectral relationships in their optical properties. Synthesized size distributions consistent with measurements, model particle size, while composition is defined by the refractive indices of minerals routinely observed in dust, including the widely used OPAC/Hess parameterization. Single-scattering properties of representative dust particle shapes are calculated using the T-matrix, Discrete Dipole Approximation and Lorenz-Mie light-scattering codes. For the parameterizations examined, MEE ranges from nearly zero to 1.2 square meters per gram, with the higher values associated with non-spheres composed of quartz and gypsum. At near-IR wavelengths, MEE for non-spheres generally exceeds those for spheres, while in the thermal IR, shape-induced changes in MEE strongly depend on volume median diameter (VMD) and wavelength, particularly for MEE evaluated at the mineral resonant frequencies. MEE spectral distributions appear to follow particle geometry and are evidence for shape dependency in the optical properties. It is also shown that non-spheres best reproduce the positions of prominent absorption peaks found in silicates. Generally, angular particles exhibit wider and more symmetric MEE spectral distribution patterns from 8-10 micrometers than those with smooth surfaces, likely due to their edge-effects. Lastly, MEE ratios allow for inferring dust optical properties across the visible-IR spectrum. We conclude the MEE of dust aerosol are significant for the parameter space investigated, and are a key component for remote sensing applications and the study of direct aerosol radiative effects.

  19. Leptogenesis and neutrino masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pluemacher, M.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal leptogenesis explains the baryon asymmetry of the universe by the out-of-equilibrium decays of heavy right-handed neutrinos. In the minimal seesaw model this leads to interesting implications for light neutrino properties. In particular, quasi-degenerate light neutrino masses are incompatible with leptogenesis. An upper bound on light neutrino masses of 0.1 eV can be derived, which will be tested by forthcoming laboratory experiments and cosmology. (author)

  20. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...

  1. Mass Spectrometry of Halopyrazolium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Elfinn; Egsgaard, Helge; Pande, U. C.

    1983-01-01

    Eleven halogen substituted 1-methyl-2-phenylpyrazolium bromides or chlorides were investigated by field desorption, field ionization, and electron impact mass spectrometry. Dealkylation was found to be the predominant thermal decomposition. An exchange between covalent and ionic halogen prior...

  2. Analysis of volatile organic compounds released from the decay of surrogate human models simulating victims of collapsed buildings by thermal desorption-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapiou, A; Zorba, E; Mikedi, K; McGregor, L; Spiliopoulou, C; Statheropoulos, M

    2015-07-09

    Field experiments were devised to mimic the entrapment conditions under the rubble of collapsed buildings aiming to investigate the evolution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the early dead body decomposition stage. Three pig carcasses were placed inside concrete tunnels of a search and rescue (SAR) operational field terrain for simulating the entrapment environment after a building collapse. The experimental campaign employed both laboratory and on-site analytical methods running in parallel. The current work focuses only on the results of the laboratory method using thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOF MS). The flow-modulated TD-GC×GC-TOF MS provided enhanced separation of the VOC profile and served as a reference method for the evaluation of the on-site analytical methods in the current experimental campaign. Bespoke software was used to deconvolve the VOC profile to extract as much information as possible into peak lists. In total, 288 unique VOCs were identified (i.e., not found in blank samples). The majority were aliphatics (172), aromatics (25) and nitrogen compounds (19), followed by ketones (17), esters (13), alcohols (12), aldehydes (11), sulfur (9), miscellaneous (8) and acid compounds (2). The TD-GC×GC-TOF MS proved to be a sensitive and powerful system for resolving the chemical puzzle of above-ground "scent of death". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Management and Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, Aqib

    2016-01-01

    During my internship in the Thermal Design Branch (ES3), I contributed to two main projects: i) novel passive thermal management system for future human exploration, ii) AVCOAT undercut thermal analysis. i) As NASA prepares to further expand human and robotic presence in space, it is well known that spacecraft architectures will be challenged with unprecedented thermal environments. Future exploration activities will have the need of thermal management systems that can provide higher reliability, mass and power reduction and increased performance. In an effort to start addressing the current technical gaps the NASA Johnson Space Center Passive Thermal Discipline has engaged in technology development activities. One of these activities was done through an in-house Passive Thermal Management System (PTMS) design for a lunar lander. The proposed PTMS, functional in both microgravity and gravity environments, consists of three main components: a heat spreader, a novel hybrid wick Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP), and a radiator. The aim of this PTMS is to keep electronics on a vehicle within their temperature limits (0 and 50 C for the current design) during all mission phases including multiple lunar day/night cycles. The VCHP was tested to verify its thermal performance. I created a thermal math model using Thermal Desktop (TD) and analyzed it to predict the PTMS performance. After testing, the test data provided a means to correlate the thermal math model. This correlation took into account conduction and convection heat transfer, representing the actual benchtop test. Since this PTMS is proposed for space missions, a vacuum test will be taking place to provide confidence that the system is functional in space environments. Therefore, the model was modified to include a vacuum chamber with a liquid nitrogen shroud while taking into account conduction and radiation heat transfer. Infrared Lamps were modelled and introduced into the model to simulate the sun

  4. Spacecraft Design Thermal Control Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Robert N.

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal Control Subsystem engineers task is to maintain the temperature of all spacecraft components, subsystems, and the total flight system within specified limits for all flight modes from launch to end-of-mission. In some cases, specific stability and gradient temperature limits will be imposed on flight system elements. The Thermal Control Subsystem of "normal" flight systems, the mass, power, control, and sensing systems mass and power requirements are below 10% of the total flight system resources. In general the thermal control subsystem engineer is involved in all other flight subsystem designs.

  5. Minimum critical mass systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van; Leege, P.F.A. de

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is presented of thermal systems with minimum critical mass, based on the use of materials with optimum neutron moderating and reflecting properties. The optimum fissile material distributions in the systems are obtained by calculations with standard computer codes, extended with a routine for flat fuel importance search. It is shown that in the minimum critical mass configuration a considerable part of the fuel is positioned in the reflector region. For 239 Pu a minimum critical mass of 87 g is found, which is the lowest value reported hitherto. (author)

  6. Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Measurement of 63 Ni in Copper Samples From Hiroshima by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tore Straume; Alfredo A. Marchetti; Stephen D. Egbert; James A. Roberts; Ping Men; Shoichiro Fujita; Kiyoshi Shizuma; Masaharu Hoshi; G. Rugel; W. Ruhm; G. Korschinek; J. E. McAninch; K. L. Carroll; T. Faestermann; K. Knie; R. E. Martinelli; A. Wallner; C. Wallner

    2005-01-14

    The present paper presents the {sup 36}Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of {sup 36}Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of {sup 36}Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of {sup 36}Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction {sup 35}Cl(n,{gamma}){sup 36}Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, {sup 39}K(n,{alpha}){sup 36}Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the {sup 36}Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain {approx} 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that {sup 36}Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of {sup 36}Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded {sup 36}Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been {sup 36}Cl measurements made by a Japanese

  7. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurial, J P; Caillat, T; Borshchevsky, A

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  8. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Implications of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupling on the Near-Field Safety of a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Homogeneous Rock Mass. Report of BMT1B/WP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, L.

    2005-02-01

    This report presents the works performed for the second phase (BMT1B) of BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project for the period of 1999-2002. The works of BMT1 is divided into three phases: BMT1A, BMT1B and BMT1C. The BMT1A concerns with calibration of the computer codes with a reference T-H-M experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan. The objective is to validate the numerical approaches, computer codes and material models, so that the teams simulating tools are at a comparable level of maturity and sophistication. The BMT1B uses the calibrated codes to perform scoping calculations, considering varying degrees of THM coupling and varying permeability values of the surrounding rock for a reference generic repository design without fractures. The aim is to identify the coupling mechanisms of importance for construction, performance and safety of the repository. The chosen measures for evaluating the long term safety and performance of the repository are the maximal temperature created by the thermal loading from the emplaced wastes, the time for re-saturation of the buffer, the maximal swelling stress developed in the buffer, the structural integrity of the rock mass and the permeability evolution in the rock mass. Six teams participated in BMT1B: IRSN/CEA (France), CNSC (Canada), ANDRA/INERIS (France), JNC (Japan), BGR/ISEB-ZAG (Germany) and SKI/KTH (Sweden). All teams used FEM approach except the ANDRA/INERIS team who used the FDM approach, with different codes. All research teams except ISEB/ZAG used models with full THM coupling capabilities. The governing equations in these models were derived within the framework of Biot's theory of consolidation and have for primary unknown variables: temperature, pore fluid pressure and displacements of the solid skeleton. Since the original Biot's theory of consolidation is applicable to saturated materials and isothermal conditions, the research teams have to extend Biot's theory in order to deal with thermal effects and the variably

  9. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Implications of Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupling on the Near-Field Safety of a Nuclear Waste Repository in a Homogeneous Rock Mass. Report of BMT1B/WP2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, L. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Engineering Geology; Nguyen, T.S. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, ON (Canada)] (eds.)

    2005-02-15

    This report presents the works performed for the second phase (BMT1B) of BMT1 of the DECOVALEX III project for the period of 1999-2002. The works of BMT1 is divided into three phases: BMT1A, BMT1B and BMT1C. The BMT1A concerns with calibration of the computer codes with a reference T-H-M experiment at Kamaishi Mine, Japan. The objective is to validate the numerical approaches, computer codes and material models, so that the teams simulating tools are at a comparable level of maturity and sophistication. The BMT1B uses the calibrated codes to perform scoping calculations, considering varying degrees of THM coupling and varying permeability values of the surrounding rock for a reference generic repository design without fractures. The aim is to identify the coupling mechanisms of importance for construction, performance and safety of the repository. The chosen measures for evaluating the long term safety and performance of the repository are the maximal temperature created by the thermal loading from the emplaced wastes, the time for re-saturation of the buffer, the maximal swelling stress developed in the buffer, the structural integrity of the rock mass and the permeability evolution in the rock mass. Six teams participated in BMT1B: IRSN/CEA (France), CNSC (Canada), ANDRA/INERIS (France), JNC (Japan), BGR/ISEB-ZAG (Germany) and SKI/KTH (Sweden). All teams used FEM approach except the ANDRA/INERIS team who used the FDM approach, with different codes. All research teams except ISEB/ZAG used models with full THM coupling capabilities. The governing equations in these models were derived within the framework of Biot's theory of consolidation and have for primary unknown variables: temperature, pore fluid pressure and displacements of the solid skeleton. Since the original Biot's theory of consolidation is applicable to saturated materials and isothermal conditions, the research teams have to extend Biot's theory in order to deal with thermal effects and

  10. Thermal Mass & Dynamic Effects Danish Building Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dreau, Jerome; Selman, Ayser Dawod; Heiselberg, Per

    This report is part of the work performed under the project “Multifunktionelle betonkonstruktioner til renovering og nybyg (EUDP projekt)”. The main purpose of this task is to develop a calculation tool that takes into consideration night-time ventilation in the program Be10. Therefore this repor...

  11. Electronics in thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattler, E. [Central Bureau for Nuclear Measurements, Geel (Belgium)

    1978-12-15

    The author restricts the discussion to electronic equipment serving for acquisition and handling of analogue measuring data such as: electrometer amplifiers; equipment for digitising the analogue measuring value e.g. voltage-to-frequency converters linked to counter/timer units or digital voltmeters; magnetic field control units.

  12. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Howard, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns high temperature thermal insulation of large vessels, such as the primary vessel of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor. The thermal insulation consists of multilayered thermal insulation modules, and each module comprises a number of metal sheet layers sandwiched between a back and front plate. The layers are linked together by straps and clips to control the thickness of the module. (U.K.)

  13. Constraining Non-thermal and Thermal properties of Dark Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupal eDev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the evolution of Dark Matter (DM abundance from the very onset of its creation from inflaton decay under the assumption of an instantaneous reheating. Based on the initial conditions such as the inflaton mass and its decay branching ratio to the DM species, the reheating temperature, and the mass and interaction rate of the DM with the thermal bath, the DM particles can either thermalize (fully/partially with the primordial bath or remain non-thermal throughout their evolution history. In the thermal case, the final abundance is set by the standard freeze-out mechanism for large annihilation rates, irrespective of the initial conditions. For smaller annihilation rates, it can be set by the freeze-in mechanism which also does not depend on the initial abundance, provided it is small to begin with. For even smaller interaction rates, the DM decouples while being non-thermal, and the relic abundance will be essentially set by the initial conditions. We put model-independent constraints on the DM mass and annihilation rate from over-abundance by exactly solving the relevant Boltzmann equations, and identify the thermal freeze-out, freeze-in and non-thermal regions of the allowed parameter space. We highlight a generic fact that inflaton decay to DM inevitably leads to an overclosure of the Universe for a large range of DM parameter space, and thus poses a stringent constraint that must be taken into account while constructing models of DM. For the thermal DM region, we also show the complementary constraints from indirect DM search experiments, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background, Planck measurements, and theoretical limits due to the unitarity of S-matrix. For the non-thermal DM scenario, we show the allowed parameter space in terms of the inflaton and DM masses for a given reheating temperature, and compute the comoving free-streaming length to identify the hot, warm and cold DM regimes.

  14. Evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for support of in vitro drug discovery assays: increasing scope, robustness and throughput of the LDTD technique for use with chemically diverse compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Iain; Smith, Aaron; Weston, Daniel J; White, Peter; Szwandt, Simon; Sealey, Laura

    2012-02-05

    Within the drug discovery environment, the key process in optimising the chemistry of a structural series toward a potential drug candidate is the design, make and test cycle, in which the primary screens consist of a number of in vitro assays, including metabolic stability, cytochrome P450 inhibition, and time-dependent inhibition assays. These assays are often carried out using multiple drug compounds with chemically diverse structural features, often in a 96 well-plate format for maximum time-efficiency, and are supported using rapid liquid chromatographic (LC) sample introduction with a tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) selected reaction monitoring (SRM) endpoint, taking around 6.5 h per plate. To provide a faster time-to-decision at this critical point, there exists a requirement for higher sample throughput and a robust, well-characterized analytical alternative. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD), a relatively new ambient sample ionization technique, for compound screening assays. By systematic modification of typical LDTD instrumentation and workflow, and providing deeper understanding around overcoming a number of key issues, this work establishes LDTD as a practical, rapid alternative to conventional LC-MS/MS in drug discovery, without need for extensive sample preparation or expensive, scope-limiting internal standards. Analysis of both the five and three cytochrome P450 competitive inhibition assay samples by LDTD gave improved sample throughput (0.75 h per plate) and provided comparable data quality as the IC₅₀ values obtained were within 3 fold of those calculated from the LC-MS/MS data. Additionally when applied generically to a chemically diverse library of over 250 proprietary compounds from the AstraZeneca design, make and test cycle, LDTD demonstrated a success rate of 98%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. An evaluation of a single-step extraction chromatography separation method for Sm-Nd isotope analysis of micro-samples of silicate rocks by high-sensitivity thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chaofeng; Li Xianhua; Li Qiuli; Guo Jinghui; Li Xianghui; Liu Tao

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Distribution curve of all eluting fractions for a BCR-2 (1-2-3.5-7 mg) on LN column using HCl and HF as eluting reagent. Highlights: → This analytical protocol affords a simple and rapid analysis for Sm and Nd isotope in minor rock samples. → The single-step separation method exhibits satisfactory separation effect for complex silicate samples. → Corrected 143 Nd/ 144 Nd data show excellent accuracy even if the 140 Ce 16 O + / 144 Nd 16 O + ratio reached to 0.03. - Abstract: A single-step separation scheme is presented for Sm-Nd radiogenic isotope system on very small samples (1-3 mg) of silicate rock. This method is based on Eichrom LN Spec chromatographic material and affords a straightforward separation of Sm-Nd from complex matrix with good purity and satisfactory blank levels, suitable for thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). This technique, characterized by high efficiency (single-step Sm-Nd separation) and high sensitivity (TIMS on NdO + ion beam), is able to process rapidly (3-4 h), with low procedure blanks ( 143 Nd/ 144 Nd ratios and Sm-Nd concentrations are presented for eleven international silicate rock reference materials, spanning a wide range of Sm-Nd contents and bulk compositions. The analytical results show a good agreement with recommended values within ±0.004% for the 143 Nd/ 144 Nd isotopic ratio and ±2% for Sm-Nd quantification at the 95% confidence level. It is noted that the uncertainty of this method is about 3 times larger than typical precision achievable with two-stage full separation followed by state-of-the-art conventional TIMS using Nd + ion beams which require much larger amounts of Nd. Hence, our single-step separation followed by NdO + ion beam technique is preferred to the analysis for microsamples.

  16. Thermal Properties of G-348 Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cottle, David L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City Univ. (CUNY), NY (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Fundamental measurements have been obtained in the INL Graphite Characterization Laboratory to deduce the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for G-348 isotropic graphite, which has been used by City College of New York in thermal experiments related to gas-cooled nuclear reactors. Measurements of thermal diffusivity, mass, volume and thermal expansion were converted to thermal conductivity in accordance with ASTM Standard Practice C781-08 (R-2014). Data are tabulated and a preliminary correlation for the thermal conductivity is presented as a function of temperature from laboratory temperature to 1000C.

  17. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  18. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Johan; Staub, Isabelle; Knight, Les

    2005-02-01

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability to real problems in

  19. DECOVALEX III III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan (comp.) [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden); Staub, Isabelle (comp.) [Golder Associates AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Knight, Les (comp.) [Nirex UK Ltd, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2005-02-15

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability

  20. Some aspects of thermal leptogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchmueller, W; Di Bari, P; Pluemacher, M

    2004-01-01

    Properties of neutrinos may be the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the universe. In the see-saw model for neutrino masses, this leads to important constraints on the properties of light and heavy neutrinos. In particular, an upper bound on the light neutrino masses of 0.1 eV can be derived. We review the present status of thermal leptogenesis with emphasis on the theoretical uncertainties and discuss some implications for lepton and quark mass hierarchies, CP violation and dark matter. We also comment on the 'leptogenesis conspiracy', the remarkable fact that neutrino masses may lie in the range where leptogenesis works best

  1. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  2. Measurement of breakthrough volumes of volatile chemical warfare agents on a poly(2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide)-based adsorbent and application to thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-09-04

    To establish adequate on-site solvent trapping of volatile chemical warfare agents (CWAs) from air samples, we measured the breakthrough volumes of CWAs on three adsorbent resins by an elution technique using direct electron ionization mass spectrometry. The trapping characteristics of Tenax(®) TA were better than those of Tenax(®) GR and Carboxen(®) 1016. The latter two adsorbents showed non-reproducible breakthrough behavior and low VX recovery. The specific breakthrough values were more than 44 (sarin) L/g Tenax(®) TA resin at 20°C. Logarithmic values of specific breakthrough volume for four nerve agents (sarin, soman, tabun, and VX) showed a nearly linear correlation with the reciprocals of their boiling points, but the data point of sulfur mustard deviated from this linear curve. Next, we developed a method to determine volatile CWAs in ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography (TD-GC/MS). CWA solutions that were spiked into the Tenax TA(®) adsorbent tubes were analyzed by a two-stage TD-GC/MS using a Tenax(®) TA-packed cold trap tube. Linear calibration curves for CWAs retained in the resin tubes were obtained in the range between 0.2pL and 100pL for sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and sulfur mustard; and between 2pL and 100pL for VX and Russian VX. We also examined the stability of CWAs in Tenax(®) TA tubes purged with either dry or 50% relative humidity air under storage conditions at room temperature or 4°C. More than 80% sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and sulfur mustard were recovered from the tubes within 2 weeks. In contrast, the recoveries of VX and Russian VX drastically reduced with storage time at room temperature, resulting in a drop to 10-30% after 2 weeks. Moreover, we examined the trapping efficiency of Tenax TA(®) adsorbent tubes for vaporized CWA samples (100mL) prepared in a 500mL gas sampling cylinder. In the concentration range of 0.2-2.5mg/m(3), >50% of sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and HD were

  3. Negative mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    Some physical aspects of negative mass are examined. Several unusual properties, such as the ability of negative mass to penetrate any armor, are analysed. Other surprising effects include the bizarre system of negative mass chasing positive mass, naked singularities and the violation of cosmic censorship, wormholes, and quantum mechanical results as well. In addition, a brief look into the implications for strings is given. (paper)

  4. Nominal Mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attygalle, Athula B; Pavlov, Julius

    2017-08-01

    The current IUPAC-recommended definition of the term "nominal mass," based on the most abundant naturally occurring stable isotope of an element, is flawed. We propose that Nominal mass should be defined as the sum of integer masses of protons and neutrons in any chemical species. In this way, all isotopes and isotopologues can be assigned a definitive identifier. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  5. Thermal Properties and Thermal Analysis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Safa; Tonchev, Dan

    The chapter provides a summary of the fundamental concepts that are needed to understand the heat capacity C P, thermal conductivity κ, and thermal expansion coefficient α L of materials. The C P, κ, and α of various classes of materials, namely, semiconductors, polymers, and glasses, are reviewed, and various typical characteristics are summarized. A key concept in crystalline solids is the Debye theory of the heat capacity, which has been widely used for many decades for calculating the C P of crystals. The thermal properties are interrelated through Grüneisen's theorem. Various useful empirical rules for calculating C P and κ have been used, some of which are summarized. Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a powerful and convenient thermal analysis technique that allows various important physical and chemical transformations, such as the glass transition, crystallization, oxidation, melting etc. to be studied. DSC can also be used to obtain information on the kinetics of the transformations, and some of these thermal analysis techniques are summarized. Temperature-modulated DSC, TMDSC, is a relatively recent innovation in which the sample temperature is ramped slowly and, at the same time, sinusoidally modulated. TMDSC has a number of distinct advantages compared with the conventional DSC since it measures the complex heat capacity. For example, the glass-transition temperature T g measured by TMDSC has almost no dependence on the thermal history, and corresponds to an almost step life change in C P. The new Tzero DSC has an additional thermocouple to calibrate better for thermal lags inherent in the DSC measurement, and allows more accurate thermal analysis.

  6. Thermal Runaway Severity Reduction Assessment and Implementation: On Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Preventing cell-cell thermal runaway propagation and flames/sparks from exiting battery enclosure is possible with proper thermal & electrical design and cell thermal runaway ejecta/effluent management and can be had with minimal mass/volume penalty.

  7. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking...... into account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...... under specific conditions. At operation level, only few variables are taken into account with unpredictable effects on the assessment of comfort indices. In this paper, the main criteria for the design and assessment of thermal comfort are discussed in order to help building and HVAC systems designers...

  8. Efficient thermal diode with ballistic spacer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shunda; Donadio, Davide; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio

    2018-03-01

    Thermal rectification is of importance not only for fundamental physics, but also for potential applications in thermal manipulations and thermal management. However, thermal rectification effect usually decays rapidly with system size. Here, we show that a mass-graded system, with two diffusive leads separated by a ballistic spacer, can exhibit large thermal rectification effect, with the rectification factor independent of system size. The underlying mechanism is explained in terms of the effective size-independent thermal gradient and the match or mismatch of the phonon bands. We also show the robustness of the thermal diode upon variation of the model's parameters. Our finding suggests a promising way for designing realistic efficient thermal diodes.

  9. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  10. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  11. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  12. Investigating the potential of a novel low-energy house concept with hybrid adaptable thermal storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, P.; Trcka, M.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Hoekstra Bonnema, B.

    2010-01-01

    In conventional buildings thermal mass is a permanent building characteristic depending on the building design. However, none of the permanent thermal mass concepts are optimal in all operational conditions. We propose a concept that combines the benefits of buildings with low and high thermal mass

  13. Investigating the potential of a novel low-energy house concept with hybrid adaptable thermal storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoes, P.; Trcka, M.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Hoekstra Bonnema, B.

    2011-01-01

    In conventional buildings thermal mass is a permanent building characteristic depending on the building design. However, none of the permanent thermal mass concepts are optimal in all operational conditions. We propose a concept that combines the benefits of buildings with low and high thermal mass

  14. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, optical dispersion and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... ... fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, thermogravimetric/ differential thermal analysis, and ... In UV spectrum, the transmittance increases followed by a sharp decrease at wavelength 700–750 nm within visible range.

  15. NEUTRINO MASS

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Boris

    1988-01-01

    This is a review article about the most recent developments on the field of neutrino mass. The first part of the review introduces the idea of neutrino masses and mixing angles, summarizes the most recent experimental data then discusses the experimental prospects and challenges in this area. The second part of the review discusses the implications of these results for particle physics and cosmology, including the origin of neutrino mass, the see-saw mechanism and sequential dominance, and la...

  16. Neutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed

  17. Thermal degradation of organo-soluble polyimides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄俐研; 史燚; 金熹高

    1999-01-01

    The thermal degradation behavior of two organo-soluble polyimides was investigated by high resolution pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The pyrolyzates of the polymers at various temperatures were identified and characterized quantitatively. The relationship between the polymer structure and pyrolyzate distribution was discussed. The kinetic parameters of the thermal degradation were calculated based on thermogravimetric measurements. Finally, the thermal degradation mechanism for the polymers was suggested.

  18. The unmasking of thermal Goldstone bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchholz, D.; Bros, J.

    1996-08-01

    The problem of extracting the modes of Goldstone bosons from a thermal background is reconsidered in the framework of relativistic quantum field theory. It is shown that in the case of spontaneous breakdown of an internal bosonic symmetry a recently established decomposition of thermal correlation functions contains certain specific contributions which can be attributed to a scalar particle of zero mass. (orig.)

  19. SPECTROSCOPIC, STRUCTURAL, THERMAL AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    and characterize the complexes of Mn(II), Fe(III), Co(II) and Ni(II) with L in order to ... Studies on 4,6-bis (4-chlorophenyl)-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carbonitrile ..... Mass spectra of (A) L, (B) [Mn(L)2(H2O)2]SO4,(C) [Fe(L)2(H2O)2](NO3)3, (D) .... S.A. Sadeek et al. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2015, 29(1). 86. Thermal analysis.

  20. Spacecraft Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller

    2009-01-01

    In the 21st century, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Russian Federal Space Agency, the National Space Agency of Ukraine, the China National Space Administration, and many other organizations representing spacefaring nations shall continue or newly implement robust space programs. Additionally, business corporations are pursuing commercialization of space for enabling space tourism and capital business ventures. Future space missions are likely to include orbiting satellites, orbiting platforms, space stations, interplanetary vehicles, planetary surface missions, and planetary research probes. Many of these missions will include humans to conduct research for scientific and terrestrial benefits and for space tourism, and this century will therefore establish a permanent human presence beyond Earth s confines. Other missions will not include humans, but will be autonomous (e.g., satellites, robotic exploration), and will also serve to support the goals of exploring space and providing benefits to Earth s populace. This section focuses on thermal management systems for human space exploration, although the guiding principles can be applied to unmanned space vehicles as well. All spacecraft require a thermal management system to maintain a tolerable thermal environment for the spacecraft crew and/or equipment. The requirements for human rating and the specified controlled temperature range (approximately 275 K - 310 K) for crewed spacecraft are unique, and key design criteria stem from overall vehicle and operational/programatic considerations. These criteria include high reliability, low mass, minimal power requirements, low development and operational costs, and high confidence for mission success and safety. This section describes the four major subsystems for crewed spacecraft thermal management systems, and design considerations for each. Additionally, some examples of specialized or advanced thermal system technologies are presented

  1. SUPERFAST THERMALIZATION OF PLASMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.C.

    1962-06-12

    A method is given for the superfast thermalization of plasma by shock conversion of the kinetic energy stored in rotating plasma rings or plasmoids colliding at near supersonic speeds in a containment field to heat energy in the resultant confined plasma mass. The method includes means for generating rotating plasmoids at the opposite ends of a Pyrotron or Astron containment field. The plasmoids are magnetically accelerated towards each other into the opposite ends of time containment field. During acceleration of the plasmoids toward the center of the containment field, the intensity of the field is sequentially increased to adiabatically compress the plasmoids and increase the plasma energy. The plasmoids hence collide with a violent shock at the eenter of the containment field, causing the substantial kinetic energy stored in the plasmoids to be converted to heat in the resultant plasma mass. (AEC)

  2. Etude par Spectrométrie de masse de la décomposition thermique sous vide de kérogènes appartenant à deux lignées évolutives distinctes Mass Spectrometry Investigation of the Vaccum Thermal Decomposition of Kerogens from Two Distinct Evolutive Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souron C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le but de cette étude est la connaissance qualitative et quantitative des composés dégagés lors de la décomposition thermique sous vide de quelques échantillons de kérogènes appartenant à deux lignées différentes. La principale technique utilisée est la spectrométrie de masse, appuyée sur des études préliminaires par thermogravi métrie et analyse élémentaire. Une adaptation particulière de l'appareillage et une mise au point de la méthode d'étalonnage permettent de doser les quatre composés minéraux les plus abondants et de donner une représentation des composés organiques. Cette étude montre que les composés formés au cours du chauffage comprennent, pour tous les kérogènes étudiés, des composés oxygénés et soufrés (CO, H2O, SH2, SOJ libérés principalement dans l'intervalle de température 200-400° C, et des composés hydrocarbonés, plus abondants, dans l'intervalle 300-500° C. On commente dans cet article l'origine supposée de ces composés; la formation de S02 au cours de la pyrolyse est particulièrement mal connue. On remarque que le rapport H2O/C02 peut être un critère de distinction des deux lignées de kérogènes étudiés. La distinction observée sur les produits hydrocarbonés nécessitera des recherches complémentaires pour être utilisée avec plus de sûreté. The aim of this investigation is to obtain a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the compounds given off during the vacuum thermal decomposition of several kerogen samples from two different lines. The main technique used is mass spectrometry, based on prior investigations by thermogravimetry and element onalysis. The equipment was specially adapted and a calibration method was developed for titrating the four most abundant minerai compounds and for representing the organic compounds. This investigation shows that the compounds formed during heating include, for oil the kerogens examined, oxygen-and sulfur

  3. Management of Mass Casualty Burn Disasters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Pruitt, Basil A

    2005-01-01

    Mass casualty burn disasters are potentially challenging, in part because the majority of health care providers are inexperienced in the care of thermally injured patients and in part because of the...

  4. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  5. Thermal expansion of granite rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephansson, O.

    1978-04-01

    The thermal expansion of rocks is strongly controlled by the thermal expansion of the minerals. The theoretical thermal expansion of the Stripa Granite is gound to be 21 . 10 -6 [deg C] -1 at 25 deg C and 38 . 10 -6 [deg C] -1 at 400 deg C. The difference in expansion for the rock forming minerals causes micro cracking at heating. The expansion due to micro cracks is found to be of the same order as the mineral expansion. Most of the micro cracks will close at pressures of the order of 10 - 20 MPa. The thermal expansion of a rock mass including the effect of joints is determined in the pilot heater test in the Stripa Mine

  6. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, M.

    2007-10-01

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  7. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durston, J.G.; Birch, W.; Facer, R.I.; Stuart, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. In the arrangement described the reactor vessel is clad with thermal insulation comprising a layer of insulating blocks spaced from the wall and from each other; each block is rigidly secured to the wall, and the interspaces are substantially closed against convectional flow of liquid by resilient closure members. A membrane covering is provided for the layer of blocks, with venting means to allow liquid from the reactor vessel to penetrate between the covering and the layer of blocks. The membrane covering may comprise a stainless steel sheet ribbed in orthogonal pattern to give flexibility for the accommodation of thermal strain. The insulating blocks may be comprised of stainless steel or cellular or porous material and may be hollow shells containing ceramic material or gas fillings. (U.K.)

  8. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  9. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become

  10. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    60, No. 3. — journal of. March 2003 physics pp. 415–422. Maximum stellar iron core mass. F W GIACOBBE. Chicago Research Center/American Air Liquide ... iron core compression due to the weight of non-ferrous matter overlying the iron cores within large .... thermal equilibrium velocities will tend to be non-relativistic.

  11. Alteration of diaspore by thermal treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨华明; 胡岳华; 杨武国; 敖伟琴; 邱冠周

    2004-01-01

    Diaspore (α-AlOOH) was heated at various temperatures from 300 to 1000 ℃ for 2 h. The alteration of diaspore by thermal treatment was investigated by differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction. The mechanism of thermal decomposition of diaspore was discussed according to the Coats-Redfern equation. It is found that after thermal treatment at 500 ℃, diaspore is transformed entirely to corundum (α-Al2O3). Combined with the mass loss ratio obtained from the thermogravimetric analysis data, the activation energies for the thermal treatment of diaspore are calculated as Ea=10.4 kJ/mol below 400 ℃ and Eb=47.5 kJ/mol above 400 ℃, respectively, which is directly related to the structural alteration of diaspore during the thermal treatment. The results indicate that the thermal decomposition of diaspore is conducted primarily by means of an interfacial reaction.

  12. Water/rock interactions and mass transport within a thermal gradient Application to the confinement of high level nuclear waste; Interactions solide/solution et transferts de matiere dans un gradient de temperature. Application au confinement des dechets nucleaires de haute-activite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, Ch [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d` Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets; [Ecole Normale Superieure, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Laboratoire de Geologie

    1999-12-31

    The initial stage of a high level nuclear waste disposal will be characterised by a large heat release within the near-field environment of the canisters. This heat flux caused by radioactive decay will lead to an increase of temperature and a subsequent thermal gradient between the `hot` canisters and the `cold`geological medium. In addition, this thermal gradient will decrease with time due to the heat decay although it could last hundred years. What will be the consequences of such a thermal field varying both on space and time for the alteration of the different constituents of the near field environment. In particular, what could be the effects on the radionuclides migration in the accidental case of an early breach of a canister during the thermal stage? This study brings significant answers to these questions in the light of a performance assessment study. This work is supported by a triple methodological approach involving experimental studies, modelling calculations and a natural analogues study. This complete work demonstrates that a thermal gradient leads to a large re-distribution of elements within the system: some elements are incorporated in the solid phases of the hot end (Si, Zr, Ca) whereas some others are in those of the cold end (Fe, Al, Zn). The confrontation of the results of very simple experiments with the results of a model built on equilibrium thermodynamics allow us to evidence the probable mechanisms causing this mass transport: out-of-equilibrium thermodiffusion processes coupled to irreversible precipitation. Moreover, the effects of the variation of temperatures with time is studied by the way of a natural system which underwent a similar temperature evolution as a disposal and which was initially rich in uranium: the Jurassic Alpine bauxites. In addition, part of the initial bauxite escaped this temperature transformations due to their incorporation in outer thrusting nappes. They are used as a reference. (author)

  13. Water/rock interactions and mass transport within a thermal gradient Application to the confinement of high level nuclear waste; Interactions solide/solution et transferts de matiere dans un gradient de temperature. Application au confinement des dechets nucleaires de haute-activite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poinssot, Ch. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Entreposage et de Stockage des Dechets]|[Ecole Normale Superieure, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Laboratoire de Geologie

    1998-12-31

    The initial stage of a high level nuclear waste disposal will be characterised by a large heat release within the near-field environment of the canisters. This heat flux caused by radioactive decay will lead to an increase of temperature and a subsequent thermal gradient between the `hot` canisters and the `cold`geological medium. In addition, this thermal gradient will decrease with time due to the heat decay although it could last hundred years. What will be the consequences of such a thermal field varying both on space and time for the alteration of the different constituents of the near field environment. In particular, what could be the effects on the radionuclides migration in the accidental case of an early breach of a canister during the thermal stage? This study brings significant answers to these questions in the light of a performance assessment study. This work is supported by a triple methodological approach involving experimental studies, modelling calculations and a natural analogues study. This complete work demonstrates that a thermal gradient leads to a large re-distribution of elements within the system: some elements are incorporated in the solid phases of the hot end (Si, Zr, Ca) whereas some others are in those of the cold end (Fe, Al, Zn). The confrontation of the results of very simple experiments with the results of a model built on equilibrium thermodynamics allow us to evidence the probable mechanisms causing this mass transport: out-of-equilibrium thermodiffusion processes coupled to irreversible precipitation. Moreover, the effects of the variation of temperatures with time is studied by the way of a natural system which underwent a similar temperature evolution as a disposal and which was initially rich in uranium: the Jurassic Alpine bauxites. In addition, part of the initial bauxite escaped this temperature transformations due to their incorporation in outer thrusting nappes. They are used as a reference. (author)

  14. Mass hysteria

    CERN Document Server

    Hellemans, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Considerable research is being undertaken to identify the Higgs particle that is believed to give things their mass. According to the standard model, what we call mass is really an indication of how strongly particles interact with an invisible syrupy substance called the Higgs field. Quantum mechanics say that the mass-giving field can also be thought of as a sea of electrically neutral Higgs particles that should be dislodged in collisions between subatomic particles with high enough energies. Particle physicists expect the Higgs to exist only for a fleeting moment before decaying into other particles, which are caught in a detector. (Edited abstract).

  15. Compact heat and mass exchangers of the plate fin type in thermal sorption systems: Application in an absorption heat pump with the working pair CH3OH-LiBr/ZnBr2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Harry

    The possible application of Compact Heat and Mass Exchangers (CHME) in a gas fired Absorption Heat Pump (AHP) for domestic heating is studied. The above mentioned heat and mass exchangers are of the plate type. The space between the parallel and plain plates is filled up with corrugated plates of a certain height. The plain and finned plates are stacked and welded together. This gives a heat and mass exchanger which is very compact, expressed by a high area density (m2/m3). This leads to heat and mass transfer processes with small temperature and concentration differences. For testing purposes a pilot plant was built using the above type of components in order to test their heat and/or mass transfer performance. Only the generator is of the Shell And Tube (SAT) type. As the working pair, CH3OH - LiBr/ ZnBr2 was chosen, with the alcohol as the solvent and the salt mixture as the absorbent. This leads to sub atmospheric working pressures with only solvent in the vapor phase. Three series of experiments have been carried out, during which the input parameters were varied over a certain range. It is concluded that the plate fin CHMES are very suitable for application in an AHP for domestic heating purposes.

  16. Minimalistic Neutrino Mass Model

    CERN Document Server

    De Gouvêa, A; Gouvea, Andre de

    2001-01-01

    We consider the simplest model which solves the solar and atmospheric neutrino puzzles, in the sense that it contains the smallest amount of beyond the Standard Model ingredients. The solar neutrino data is accounted for by Planck-mass effects while the atmospheric neutrino anomaly is due to the existence of a single right-handed neutrino at an intermediate mass scale between 10^9 GeV and 10^14 GeV. Even though the neutrino mixing angles are not exactly predicted, they can be naturally large, which agrees well with the current experimental situation. Furthermore, the amount of lepton asymmetry produced in the early universe by the decay of the right-handed neutrino is very predictive and may be enough to explain the current baryon-to-photon ratio if the right-handed neutrinos are produced out of thermal equilibrium. One definitive test for the model is the search for anomalous seasonal effects at Borexino.

  17. Heat switch technology for cryogenic thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Q. S.; Demko, J. A.; E Fesmire, J.

    2017-12-01

    Systematic review is given of development of novel heat switches at cryogenic temperatures that alternatively provide high thermal connection or ideal thermal isolation to the cold mass. These cryogenic heat switches are widely applied in a variety of unique superconducting systems and critical space applications. The following types of heat switch devices are discussed: 1) magnetic levitation suspension, 2) shape memory alloys, 3) differential thermal expansion, 4) helium or hydrogen gap-gap, 5) superconducting, 6) piezoelectric, 7) cryogenic diode, 8) magneto-resistive, and 9) mechanical demountable connections. Advantages and limitations of different cryogenic heat switches are examined along with the outlook for future thermal management solutions in materials and cryogenic designs.

  18. Thermal resonance in signal transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigada, Ramon; Sarmiento, Antonio; Lindenberg, Katja

    2001-01-01

    We use temperature tuning to control signal propagation in simple one-dimensional arrays of masses connected by hard anharmonic springs and with no local potentials. In our numerical model a sustained signal is applied at one site of a chain immersed in a thermal environment and the signal-to-noise ratio is measured at each oscillator. We show that raising the temperature can lead to enhanced signal propagation along the chain, resulting in thermal resonance effects akin to the resonance observed in arrays of bistable systems

  19. Thermal resonance in signal transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reigada, Ramon; Sarmiento, Antonio; Lindenberg, Katja

    2001-06-01

    We use temperature tuning to control signal propagation in simple one-dimensional arrays of masses connected by hard anharmonic springs and with no local potentials. In our numerical model a sustained signal is applied at one site of a chain immersed in a thermal environment and the signal-to-noise ratio is measured at each oscillator. We show that raising the temperature can lead to enhanced signal propagation along the chain, resulting in thermal resonance effects akin to the resonance observed in arrays of bistable systems.

  20. Concentrating solar thermal power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Steinhagen, Hans

    2013-08-13

    In addition to wind and photovoltaic power, concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) will make a major contribution to electricity provision from renewable energies. Drawing on almost 30 years of operational experience in the multi-megawatt range, CSP is now a proven technology with a reliable cost and performance record. In conjunction with thermal energy storage, electricity can be provided according to demand. To date, solar thermal power plants with a total capacity of 1.3 GW are in operation worldwide, with an additional 2.3 GW under construction and 31.7 GW in advanced planning stage. Depending on the concentration factors, temperatures up to 1000°C can be reached to produce saturated or superheated steam for steam turbine cycles or compressed hot gas for gas turbine cycles. The heat rejected from these thermodynamic cycles can be used for sea water desalination, process heat and centralized provision of chilled water. While electricity generation from CSP plants is still more expensive than from wind turbines or photovoltaic panels, its independence from fluctuations and daily variation of wind speed and solar radiation provides it with a higher value. To become competitive with mid-load electricity from conventional power plants within the next 10-15 years, mass production of components, increased plant size and planning/operating experience will be accompanied by technological innovations. On 30 October 2009, a number of major industrial companies joined forces to establish the so-called DESERTEC Industry Initiative, which aims at providing by 2050 15 per cent of European electricity from renewable energy sources in North Africa, while at the same time securing energy, water, income and employment for this region. Solar thermal power plants are in the heart of this concept.

  1. Modifications induced by swift heavy ions in poly(hydroxybutyrate-hydroxyvalerate) (PHB/HV) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) films. Part 1. Thermal behaviour and molecular mass modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouxhet, L.; Legras, R.

    2000-01-01

    Modifications induced by different energetic heavy ions in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(hydroxybutyrate-hydroxyvalerate) (PHB/HV) have been investigated by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and steric exclusion chromatography (SEC). A certain dose of damages, depending mainly on the charge and mass of the ion and on the intensity of irradiation, has to be overcome in order to detect any effect on PHB/HV. Actually, at a given intensity of irradiation, superior to 10 10 ions/cm 2 , the level of damage intensity increased with the increase in charge and mass of the ion. Moreover, according to the SEC results, there seems to be a critical mass and/or charge threshold above which the dominant type of damages changes. As a matter of fact, high-density irradiation with Ar 9+ and Kr 15+ resulted mainly in chain scission whereas cross-linking was dominant when irradiating the polymer with Xe 24+ and Pb 56+ . The irradiation of PCL in the conditions studied did not modify significantly the values of the melting point, the crystallisation temperature and the molecular masses of the system studied. The main effect of the irradiation detected by the DSC is the cross-linking of the polymer chains

  2. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, L.; Stellaard, F.; Irth, H.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Pel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  3. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography–time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, L.; Stellaard, F.; Irth, H.; Vreuls, R.J.J.; Pel, R.

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  4. Improved fatty acid detection in micro-algae and aquatic meiofauna species using a direct thermal desorption interface combined with comprehensive gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akoto, Lawrence; Stellaard, Frans; Irth, Hubertus; Vreuls, Rene J. J.; Pel, Roel

    2008-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection is used to profile the fatty acid composition of whole/intact aquatic microorganisms such as the common fresh water green algae Scenedesmus acutus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Limnothrix

  5. Thermal stability and thermal property characterisation of Fe–14.4Cr–15.4Ni–2.4Mo–2.36Mn–0.25Ti–1.02Si–0.042C–0.04P–0.005B (mass%) austenitic stainless steel (Alloy D9I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Haraprasanna [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Raju, S., E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Rai, Arun Kumar [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► High temperature enthalpy, specific heat, lattice thermal expansion of Alloy D9I determined. ► Melting and solidification studied by thermal analysis. ► Integrated modelling by Debye–Grüneisen quasiharmonic formalism. ► Comprehensive thermal property assessment for austenitic stainless steel. -- Abstract: High temperature measurements of enthalpy increment (ΔH{sub T}°) and lattice parameter have been carried out on Alloy D9I by means of drop calorimetry and high temperature X-ray diffraction techniques, respectively. In addition, the thermal stability during heating and cooling from the melting range has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that under near equilibrium cooling conditions (3 K min{sup −1}), Alloy D9I exhibits L → γ austenite → L + γ + δ ferrite → γ + δ → γ solidification mode. However, the phase fraction of δ ferrite and the temperature region of γ + δ two phase domain are found to be small. The on-cooling liquidus and solidus temperatures are found to be 1684 and 1631 ± 5 K, respectively. The latent heat of solidification is found to be in the range, 190–220 J g{sup −1}. The thermal analysis study has revealed that solution treated Alloy D9I exhibits an endothermic dissolution of Ti(C,N) particles at about 1323 ± 2 K, with an associated heat effect of 16–20 J g{sup −1}. The specific heat C{sub p} and coefficient of linear thermal expansion α{sub l} at 298.15 K are estimated to be 486 J kg{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 1.15 × 10{sup −5} K{sup −1}, respectively. The measured temperature dependencies of C{sub p} and α{sub l} for Alloy D9I are in good agreement with the general trend exhibited by many austenitic steels. Further, an empirical linear correlation has been found between the measured temperature dependent molar volume and molar enthalpy values. The measured thermal property data have been modelled through Debye–Grüneisen formalism to obtain an

  6. Neutrino mass?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, B.

    1992-01-01

    After arguing that we should be looking for evidence of neutrino mass, we illustrate the possible consequences of neutrino mass and mixing. We then turn to the question of whether neutrinos are their own antiparticles, and to the process which may answer this question: neutrinoless double beta decay. Next, we review the proposed Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution to the solar neutrino problem, and discuss models which can generate neutrino electromagnetic moments large enough to play a role in the sun. Finally, we consider how the possible 17 keV neutrino, if real, would fit in with everything we know about neutrinos. (orig.)

  7. Mass metrology

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, S V

    2012-01-01

    This book presents the practical aspects of mass measurements. Concepts of gravitational, inertial and conventional mass and details of the variation of acceleration of gravity are described. The Metric Convention and International Prototype Kilogram and BIPM standards are described. The effect of change of gravity on the indication of electronic balances is derived with respect of latitude, altitude and earth topography. The classification of weights by OIML is discussed. Maximum permissible errors in different categories of weights prescribed by national and international organizations are p

  8. Quantification of 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone using solid-phase extraction and direct microvial insert thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaofen; Qian, Michael

    2008-10-24

    A GC-MS method for the determination of furaneol in fruit juice was developed using Lichrolut-EN solid-phase extraction (SPE) coupled to microvial insert thermal desorption. Lichrolut-EN can effectively extract furaneol from juice, and had much less retention for pigments and other non-volatiles than HLB and C18 columns. The furaneol can be completely eluted out from the Lichrolut-EN SPE column with 1mL of methanol, which can be directly analyzed on GC-MS using an automated large volume microvial insert thermal desorption technique without further purification and concentration. The method is sensitive, has good recovery (98%) and reproducibility (CVfuraneol in some commonly grown strawberry, raspberry, and blackberry cultivars in Pacific Northwest of the United States was determined. Strawberries had the highest concentration of furaneol with 'Totem' and 'Pinnacle' cultivars over 13mgkg(-1) fruit. 'Marion' blackberry had 5 times more furaneol than 'Black Diamond', and 16 times more than 'Thornless Evergreen' blackberry. Raspberries had furaneol concentration ranged from 0.8 to 1.1mgkg(-1) fruit.

  9. Mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvang Hartmeyer, Gitte; Jensen, Anne Kvistholm; Böcher, Sidsel

    2010-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is currently being introduced for the rapid and accurate identification of bacteria. We describe 2 MALDI-TOF MS identification cases - 1 directly on spinal fluid and 1 on grown bacteria. Rapidly obtained...

  10. Theory of thermal sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.

    1977-01-01

    An energetic ion which is incident on a solid target causes a momentary temperature increase in the impact region, i.e., a so-called thermal spike occurs. Such spikes are capable of causing (or supplementing) disordering, precipitation, crystallization, electronic excitation, stoichiometry change, desorption, and sputtering, it being the contribution to sputtering that is considered here. The approach used is compatible with modern damage-distribution theory. Thus the temperature profile left by the incident ion is taken as a three-dimensional Gaussian with parameters appropriate to power-law scattering, and is used as the initial condition for solving the heat-conduction equation. Let us write this solution as T = T(t, y), where t is time and y is a dimension parallel to the target surface. The vaporization flux from a solid surface is taken as pnsup(1/2)(2π 2 >kT)sup(-1/2), where p, the equilibrium pressure of a vapor species containing n atoms, can be written as p 0 exp(-L/T), p 0 and L are constants largely independent of temperature, and 2 > is the mean mass per atom of target. An equation for the thermal sputtering coefficient is given: after integration the final result takes the form: Ssub(thermal)=pnsup(1/2)[2π 2 >k(Tsub(infinity)+cΔT 0 )]sup(-1/2)πlambda 2 tsub(eff.)atoms/ion, where Tsub(infinity) is the macroscopic target temperature, cΔT 0 is the maximum temperature increase at x = y = 0, p is to be evaluated at T = Tsub(infinity) + cΔT 0 , lambda is the mean atomic spacing of the target, and tsub(eff.) is a quantity with units of time. (author)

  11. Leptogenesis. Theory and neutrino masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchmueller, W.

    2012-12-15

    After a brief discussion of baryon and lepton number nonconservation, we review the status of thermal leptogenesis with GUT scale neutrino masses, as well as low scale alternatives with keV neutrinos as dark matter and heavy neutrino masses within the reach of the LHC. Recent progress towards a full quantum mechanical description of leptogenesis is described with resonant leptogenesis as an application. Finally, cosmological B-L breaking after inflation is considered as origin of the hot early universe, generating entropy, baryon asymmetry and dark matter.

  12. Thermal stress mitigation by Active Thermal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soldati, Alessandro; Dossena, Fabrizio; Pietrini, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    This work proposes an Active Thermal Control (ATC) of power switches. Leveraging on the fact that thermal stress has wide impact on the system reliability, controlling thermal transients is supposed to lengthen the lifetime of electronic conversion systems. Indeed in some environments...... results of control schemes are presented, together with evaluation of the proposed loss models. Experimental proof of the ability of the proposed control to reduce thermal swing and related stress on the device is presented, too....

  13. Guidelines for CubeSat's Thermal Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Ruiz, Juan; Patel, Deepak

    2015-01-01

    Thermal and Fluids Analysis Workshop 2015, Silver Spring, MD. NCTS 19104-15. What does it take to thermally designlow cost, low mass cubesats? What are the differences in the approach when you compare with large scale missions?What additional risk is acceptable? What is the approach to hardware? How is the testing campaign run? These aresome of the questions that will be addressed in this course, which is designed to equip the attendees to support thedevelopment of cubesats at their organization.

  14. Mass Sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2017-03-01

    Fitness has become one of the most popular kinds of the mass sport and has completely replaced the traditional “physical culture”. Dozens of variations of fitness and millions of participants pose a great challenge to contemporary architecture. The articles of our issue show the present and the future of architecture for fitness. We present a topical collection with a wide geographical range, including the Irkutsk Agglomeration, Tomsk, Krasnodar, sports in the Moscow Palace of Young Pioneers, and the anthology of the top foreign sports venues.

  15. Critical Mass

    CERN Multimedia

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070299

    2017-01-01

    Critical Mass is a cycling event typically held on the last Friday of every month; its purpose is not usually formalized beyond the direct action of meeting at a set location and time and traveling as a group through city or town streets on bikes. The event originated in 1992 in San Francisco; by the end of 2003, the event was being held in over 300 cities around the world. At CERN it is held once a year in conjunction with the national Swiss campaing "Bike to work".

  16. Investigating the potential of a novel low-energy house concept with hybrid adaptable thermal storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoes, P.; Trcka, M.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Hoekstra Bonnema, B.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → In conventional buildings thermal mass is a permanent building characteristic. → Permanent thermal mass concepts are not optimal in all operational conditions. → We propose a concept that combines the benefits of low and high thermal mass. → Building simulation shows the concept is able to reduce the energy demand with 35%. → Furthermore, the concept increases the performance robustness of the building. -- Abstract: In conventional buildings thermal mass is a permanent building characteristic depending on the building design. However, none of the permanent thermal mass concepts are optimal in all operational conditions. We propose a concept that combines the benefits of buildings with low and high thermal mass by applying hybrid adaptable thermal storage (HATS) systems and materials to a lightweight building. The HATS concept increases building performance and the robustness to changing user behavior, seasonal variations and future climate changes. Building performance simulation is used to investigate the potential of the novel concept for reducing heating energy demand and increasing thermal comfort. Simulation results of a case study in the Netherlands show that the optimal quantity of the thermal mass is sensitive to the change of seasons. This implies that the building performance will benefit from implementing HATS. Furthermore, the potential of HATS is quantified using a simplified HATS model. Calculations show heating energy demand reductions of up to 35% and increased thermal comfort compared to conventional thermal mass concepts.

  17. Thermal energy accumulators. A bibliographical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlety, Paul

    1971-01-01

    Energy storage is a challenge, notably for spacecraft, submarines and non-polluting automotive vehicles. After a comparison of mass energies of different principles of energy accumulation (magnetic, electrostatic, solid elasticity, kinetic energy, gaseous elasticity, electro-chemistry, sensitive heat, freezing heat, fuels, radioactivity, nuclear fission or fusion, mass energy), the author discusses the choice of thermal storage, presents the main bodies used for thermal energy accumulation (molten salts such as lithium hydride or lithium salt eutectics, or other compounds such as alumina, paraffins), and gives an overview of the main theoretical problems [fr

  18. Advanced Fuel Cell System Thermal Management for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA exploration program. An analysis of a state-of-the-art fuel cell cooling systems was done to benchmark the portion of a fuel cell system s mass that is dedicated to thermal management. Additional analysis was done to determine the key performance targets of the advanced passive thermal management technology that would substantially reduce fuel cell system mass.

  19. Thermal conductivity tests on buffermasses of bentonite/silt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutsson, S.

    1977-09-01

    The investigation concerns the thermal conductivity of the bentonite/quartz buffer mass suggested as embedding substance for radioactive canisters. The first part presents the theoretical relationships associated with the various heat transfer mechanisms in moist granular materials. Chapter 3 describes the author's experimental determination of the thermal conductivity of the buffer mass. The tested mass consisted of 10 percent (by weight) bentonite and 90 percent natural silt. Four tests were made with different water content values and degree of water saturation. A comparison between the measured and calculated thermal conductivities is given. It is shown that the conductivity can be calculated with an accuracy of +-20 percent. (author)

  20. Thermalization in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, F.; Lynch, W.G.; Bowman, D.R.; De Souza, R.T.; Gelbke, C.K.; Kim, Y.D.; Phair, L.; Tsang, M.B.; Williams, C.; Xu, H.M.; Dinius, J. (Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States) National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab., Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States))

    1992-05-28

    Impact parameter dependent excited state populations of intermediate mass fragments are investigated for {sup 36}Ar induced reactions on {sup 197}Au at E/A=35 MeV. Population inversions, indicative of non-thermal excitation mechanisms, are observed in peripheral collisions characterized by low associated charged particle multiplicities. These population inversions disappear for collisions with larger associated charged particle multiplicities, consistent with a more complete thermalization for more complex final states. Discrepancies, observed in central collisions, suggest that the limit of local thermal equilibrium has not yet been observed. (orig.).

  1. Thermal decomposition of lanthanide and actinide tetrafluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, J.K.; Haire, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal stabilities of several lanthanide/actinide tetrafluorides have been studied using mass spectrometry to monitor the gaseous decomposition products, and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify solid products. The tetrafluorides, TbF 4 , CmF 4 , and AmF 4 , have been found to thermally decompose to their respective solid trifluorides with accompanying release of fluorine, while cerium tetrafluoride has been found to be significantly more thermally stable and to congruently sublime as CeF 4 prior to appreciable decomposition. The results of these studies are discussed in relation to other relevant experimental studies and the thermodynamics of the decomposition processes. 9 refs., 3 figs

  2. Cs+ ion source for secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentz, B.L.; Weiss, H.; Liebl, H.

    1981-12-01

    Various types of cesium ionization sources currently used in secondary ion mass spectrometry are briefly reviewed, followed by a description of the design and performance of a novel, thermal surface ionization Cs + source developed in this laboratory. The source was evaluated for secondary ion mass spectrometry applications using the COALA ion microprobe mass analyzer. (orig.)

  3. Thermalization of squeezed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Allan I

    2005-01-01

    Starting with a thermal squeezed state defined as a conventional thermal state based on an appropriate Hamiltonian, we show how an important physical property, the signal-to-noise ratio, is degraded, and propose a simple model of thermalization (Kraus thermalization)

  4. Multifunctional Lattices with Low Thermal Expansion and Low Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hang; Liu, Lu; Pasini, Damiano

    Systems in space are vulnerable to large temperature changes when travelling into and out of the Earth's shadow. Variations in temperature can lead to undesired geometric changes in susceptible applications requiring very fine precision. In addition, temperature-sensitive electronic equipment hosted in a satellite needs adequate thermal-control to guarantee a moderate ambient temperature. To address these specifications, materials with low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) and low coefficient of thermal conductivity (CTC) over a wide range of temperatures are often sought, especially for bearing components in satellites. Besides low CTE and low CTC, these materials should also provide desirable stiffness, strength and extraordinarily low mass. This work presents ultralightweight bi-material lattices with tunable CTE and CTC, besides high stiffness and strength. We show that the compensation of the thermal expansion and joint rotation at the lattice joints can be used as an effective strategy to tailor thermomechanical performance. Proof-of-concept lattices are fabricated from Al and Ti alloy sheets via a simple snap-fit technique and vacuum brazing, and their CTE and CTC are assessed via a combination of experiments and theory. Corresponding Author.

  5. Entropy generation method to quantify thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boregowda, S. C.; Tiwari, S. N.; Chaturvedi, S. K.

    2001-01-01

    is needed in the future to fully establish the validity of the OTCI formula and the model. One of the practical applications of this index is that could it be integrated in thermal control systems to develop human-centered environmental control systems for potential use in aircraft, mass transit vehicles, intelligent building systems, and space vehicles.

  6. Cryogenic cooler thermal coupler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, K.E.; Talbourdet, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A thermal coupler assembly mounted to the coldfinger of a cryogenic cooler which provides improved thermal transfer between the coldfinger and the detector assembly mounted on the dewar endwell. The thermal coupler design comprises a stud and spring-loaded cap mounted on the coldfinger assembly. Thermal transfer is made primarily through the air space between the cap and coldwell walls along the radial surfaces. The cap is spring loaded to provide thermal contact between the cap and endwell end surfaces

  7. Thermally conductive, dielectric PCM-boron nitride nanosheet composites for efficient electronic system thermal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Lihui; Luo, Wei; Wan, Jiayu; Dai, Jiaqi; Han, Xiaogang; Fu, Kun; Henderson, Doug; Yang, Bao; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-11-24

    Phase change materials (PCMs) possessing ideal properties, such as superior mass specific heat of fusion, low cost, light weight, excellent thermal stability as well as isothermal phase change behavior, have drawn considerable attention for thermal management systems. Currently, the low thermal conductivity of PCMs (usually less than 1 W mK -1 ) greatly limits their heat dissipation performance in thermal management applications. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a two-dimensional material known for its excellent thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties, which make it a promising candidate to be used in electronic systems for thermal management. In this work, a composite, consisting of h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs) and commercialized paraffin wax was developed, which inherits high thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties from BNNSs and substantial heat of fusion from paraffin wax. With the help of BNNSs, the thermal conductivity of wax-BNNS composites reaches 3.47 W mK -1 , which exhibits a 12-time enhancement compared to that of pristine wax (0.29 W mK -1 ). Moreover, an 11.3-13.3 MV m -1 breakdown voltage of wax-BNNS composites was achieved, which shows further improved electrical insulating properties. Simultaneously enhanced thermally conductive and electrically insulating properties of wax-BNNS composites demonstrate their promising application for thermal management in electronic systems.

  8. Thermal morphing anisogrid smart space structures: thermal isolation design and linearity evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, Austin A.

    2017-04-01

    To meet the requirements for the next generation of space missions, a paradigm shift is required from current structures that are static, heavy and stiff, toward innovative structures that are adaptive, lightweight, versatile, and intelligent. A novel morphing structure, the thermally actuated anisogrid morphing boom, can be used to meet the design requirements by making the primary structure actively adapt to the on-orbit environment. The anisogrid structure is able to achieve high precision morphing control through the intelligent application of thermal gradients. This active primary structure improves structural and thermal stability performance, reduces mass, and enables new mission architectures. This effort attempts to address limits to the author's previous work by incorporating the impact of thermal coupling that was initially neglected. This paper introduces a thermally isolated version of the thermal morphing anisogrid structure in order to address the thermal losses between active members. To evaluate the isolation design the stiffness and thermal conductivity of these isolating interfaces need to be addressed. This paper investigates the performance of the thermal morphing system under a variety of structural and thermal isolation interface properties.

  9. Passenger thermal perceptions, thermal comfort requirements, and adaptations in short- and long-haul vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Huang, Kuo-Tsang; Sun, Chen-Yi; Huang, Ying-Che

    2010-05-01

    While thermal comfort in mass transportation vehicles is relevant to service quality and energy consumption, benchmarks for such comfort that reflect the thermal adaptations of passengers are currently lacking. This study reports a field experiment involving simultaneous physical measurements and a questionnaire survey, collecting data from 2,129 respondents, that evaluated thermal comfort in short- and long-haul buses and trains. Experimental results indicate that high air temperature, strong solar radiation, and low air movement explain why passengers feel thermally uncomfortable. The overall insulation of clothing worn by passengers and thermal adaptive behaviour in vehicles differ from those in their living and working spaces. Passengers in short-haul vehicles habitually adjust the air outlets to increase thermal comfort, while passengers in long-haul vehicles prefer to draw the drapes to reduce discomfort from extended exposure to solar radiation. The neutral temperatures for short- and long-haul vehicles are 26.2 degrees C and 27.4 degrees C, while the comfort zones are 22.4-28.9 degrees C and 22.4-30.1 degrees C, respectively. The results of this study provide a valuable reference for practitioners involved in determining the adequate control and management of in-vehicle thermal environments, as well as facilitating design of buses and trains, ultimately contributing to efforts to achieve a balance between the thermal comfort satisfaction of passengers and energy conserving measures for air-conditioning in mass transportation vehicles.

  10. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. The Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Responses to a Glacial Cycle and their Potential Implications for Deep Geological Disposal of Nuclear Fuel Waste in a Fractured Crystalline Rock Mass. Report of BMT3/WP4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, T.; Stanchell, F.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, Toronto (Canada); Christiansson, R. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Figeholm (Sweden); Boulton, G.S. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom). School of GeoSciences; Eriksson, L.O.; Vistrand, P.; Wallroth, T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Geology; Hartikainen, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Inst. of Mathematics; Jensen, M.R. [0ntario Power Generation, Toronto (Canada); Mas lvars, D. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Land and Water Resources engineering

    2005-02-15

    A number of studies related to past and on-going deep repository performance assessments have identified glaciation/deglaciation as major future events in the next few hundred thousand years capable of causing significant impact on the long term performance of the repository system. Benchmark Test 3 (BMT3) of the international DECOVALEX III project has been designed to provide an illustrative example that explores the mechanical and hydraulic response of a fractured crystalline rock mass to a period of glaciation. The primary purpose of this numerical study is to investigate whether transient events associated with a glacial cycle could significantly influence the performance of a deep geological repository in a crystalline shield setting. A conceptual site-scale (tens of kilometres) hydro-mechanical (HM) model was assembled based primarily on site-specific litho-structural, hydrogeological and geomechanical data from the Whiteshell Research Area in the Canadian Shield, with simplification and generalization. Continental glaciological modelling of the Laurentide ice sheet through the last glacial cycle lasting approximately 100,000 years suggests that this site was glaciated at about 60 ka and between about 22.5 ka and 11 ka before present with maximum ice sheet thickness reaching 2,500 m and maximum basal water pressure head reaching 2000 m. The ice-sheet/drainage model was scaled down to generate spatially and temporally variable hydraulic and mechanical glaciated surface boundary conditions for site-scale subsurface HM modelling and permafrost modelling. Under extreme periglacial conditions permafrost was able to develop down to the assumed 500-m repository horizon. Two- and three-dimensional coupled HM finite-element simulations indicate: during ice-sheet advance there is rapid rise in hydraulic head, high transient hydraulic gradients and high groundwater velocities 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than under nonglacial conditions; surface water recharges deeper

  11. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. The Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Responses to a Glacial Cycle and their Potential Implications for Deep Geological Disposal of Nuclear Fuel Waste in a Fractured Crystalline Rock Mass. Report of BMT3/WP4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.; Stanchell, F.W.; Christiansson, R.; Boulton, G.S.; Mas lvars, D.

    2005-02-01

    A number of studies related to past and on-going deep repository performance assessments have identified glaciation/deglaciation as major future events in the next few hundred thousand years capable of causing significant impact on the long term performance of the repository system. Benchmark Test 3 (BMT3) of the international DECOVALEX III project has been designed to provide an illustrative example that explores the mechanical and hydraulic response of a fractured crystalline rock mass to a period of glaciation. The primary purpose of this numerical study is to investigate whether transient events associated with a glacial cycle could significantly influence the performance of a deep geological repository in a crystalline shield setting. A conceptual site-scale (tens of kilometres) hydro-mechanical (HM) model was assembled based primarily on site-specific litho-structural, hydrogeological and geomechanical data from the Whiteshell Research Area in the Canadian Shield, with simplification and generalization. Continental glaciological modelling of the Laurentide ice sheet through the last glacial cycle lasting approximately 100,000 years suggests that this site was glaciated at about 60 ka and between about 22.5 ka and 11 ka before present with maximum ice sheet thickness reaching 2,500 m and maximum basal water pressure head reaching 2000 m. The ice-sheet/drainage model was scaled down to generate spatially and temporally variable hydraulic and mechanical glaciated surface boundary conditions for site-scale subsurface HM modelling and permafrost modelling. Under extreme periglacial conditions permafrost was able to develop down to the assumed 500-m repository horizon. Two- and three-dimensional coupled HM finite-element simulations indicate: during ice-sheet advance there is rapid rise in hydraulic head, high transient hydraulic gradients and high groundwater velocities 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than under nonglacial conditions; surface water recharges deeper

  12. Thermal diffusion in dilute nanofluids investigated by photothermal interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philip, J; Nisha, M R

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out a theoretical analysis of the dependence of the particle mass fraction on the thermal diffusivity of dilute suspensions of nanoparticles in liquids (dilute nanofluids). The analysis takes in to account adsorption of an ordered layer of solvent molecules around the nanoparticles. It is found that thermal diffusivity decreases with mass fraction for sufficiently small particle sizes. Beyond a critical particle size thermal diffusivity begins to increase with mass fraction for the same system. The results have been verified experimentally by measuring the thermal diffusivity of dilute suspensions of TiO 2 nanoparticles dispersed in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) medium. The effect is attributed to Kapitza resistance of thermal waves in the medium.

  13. Dynamic thermal environment and thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Ouyang, Q; Cao, B; Zhou, X; Yu, J

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that a stable thermal environment with tight temperature control cannot bring occupants more thermal comfort. Instead, such an environment will incur higher energy costs and produce greater CO2 emissions. Furthermore, this may lead to the degeneration of occupants' inherent ability to combat thermal stress, thereby weakening thermal adaptability. Measured data from many field investigations have shown that the human body has a higher acceptance to the thermal environment in free-running buildings than to that in air-conditioned buildings with similar average parameters. In naturally ventilated environments, occupants have reported superior thermal comfort votes and much greater thermal comfort temperature ranges compared to air-conditioned environments. This phenomenon is an integral part of the adaptive thermal comfort model. In addition, climate chamber experiments have proven that people prefer natural wind to mechanical wind in warm conditions; in other words, dynamic airflow can provide a superior cooling effect. However, these findings also indicate that significant questions related to thermal comfort remain unanswered. For example, what is the cause of these phenomena? How we can build a comfortable and healthy indoor environment for human beings? This article summarizes a series of research achievements in recent decades, tries to address some of these unanswered questions, and attempts to summarize certain problems for future research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Modelling and analysis of radial thermal stresses and temperature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The temperature field, heat transfer rate and thermal stresses were investigated with numerical simulation models using FORTRAN FE (finite element) software. ...... specific heats, International Communications in Heat and Mass Transfer, Vol.

  15. Thermal radio emission from the winds of single stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, D.C.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of thermal emission at radio wavelengths provides a powerful diagnostic of the rate of mass loss and temperature of the winds of early-type stars. Some winds are also strong sources of nonthermal emission. Case studies of known thermal and nonthermal sources provide empirical criteria for classifying the observed radio radiation. Mass loss rates are derived for 37 OB and Wolf-Rayet stars considered definite or probable thermal wind sources by these criteria. The rate of mass loss is strongly linked to stellar luminosity in OB stars and probably linked to stellar mass in Wolf-Rayet stars, with no measurable correlation with any other stellar property. A few late-type giants and supergiants also have detectable thermal emission, which arises from extended, accelerating, partially-ionized chromospheres. (orig.)

  16. modelling of thermal degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    dependence of the rate constant during thermal processing of pawpaw and potato obeyed the Arrhenius relationship with ... processing, distribution, storage and preparation. (Gregory, 1996) ... water solubility and mass transfer, heat sensitivity.

  17. Development of a Microelectromechanical System for Small Satellite Thermal Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beasley, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    .... This new direction requires a similar evolution in thermal control. Previous techniques such as heat pipes and conventional radiators have large masses themselves and are not scaleable to fit these smaller designs...

  18. Variable Emissive Smart Radiator for Dynamic Thermal Control

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trending towards reduced power and mass budget on satellites with a longer mission life, there is a need for a reliable thermal control system that is more efficient...

  19. Studies on thermal properties and thermal control effectiveness of a new shape-stabilized phase change material with high thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Wenlong; Liu Na; Wu Wanfan

    2012-01-01

    In order to overcome the difficulty of conventional phase change materials (PCMs) in packaging, the shape-stabilized PCMs are proposed to be used in the electronic device thermal control. However, the conventional shape-stabilized PCMs have the drawback of lower thermal conductivity, so a new shape-stabilized PCM with high thermal conductivity, which is suitable for thermal control of electronic devices, is prepared. The thermal properties of n-octadecane-based shape-stabilized PCM are tested and analyzed. The heat storage/release performance is studied by numerical simulation. Its thermal control effect for electronic devices is also discussed. The results show that the expanded graphite (EG) can greatly improve the thermal conductivity of the material with little effect on latent heat and phase change temperature. When the mass fraction of EG is 5%, thermal conductivity has reached 1.76 W/(m K), which is over 4 times than that of the original one. Moreover, the material has larger latent heat and good thermal stability. The simulation results show that the material can have good heat storage/release performance. The analysis of the effect of thermal parameters on thermal control effect for electronic devices provides references to the design of phase change thermal control unit. - Highlights: ► A new shape-stabilized PCM with higher thermal conductivity is prepared. ► The material overcomes the packaging difficulty of traditional PCMs used in thermal control unit. ► The EG greatly improves thermal conductivity with little effect on latent heat. ► The material has high thermal stability and good heat storage/release performance. ► The effectiveness of the material for electronic device thermal control is proved.

  20. Thermal properties of an erythritol derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trhlikova, Lucie; Prikryl, Radek; Zmeskal, Oldrich

    2016-06-01

    Erythritol (C4H10O4) is a sugar alcohol (or polyol) that is commonly used in the food industry. Its molar mass is 122.12 g.mol-1 and mass density 1450 kg.m-3. Erythritol, an odorless crystalline powder, can also be characterized by other physical parameters like melting temperature (121 °C) and boiling temperature (329 °C). The substance can be used for the accumulation of energy in heat exchangers based on various oils or water. The PlusICE A118 product manufactured by the PCM Products Ltd. company (melting temperature Θ = 118 °C, specific heat capacity cp = 2.70 kJ.K-1.kg-1, mass density 1450 kg.m-3, latent heat capacity 340 kJ.kg-1, volumetric heat capacity 493 MJ.m-3) is based on an erythritol-type medium. Thermal properties of the PlusICE A118 product in both solid and liquid phase were investigated for this purpose in terms of potential applications. Temperature dependences of its thermal parameters (thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity, and specific heat) were determined using a transient (step-wise) method. A fractal model of heat transport was used for determination of the above thermal parameters. This model is independent of geometry and type of sample heating. Moreover, it also considers heat losses. The experiment confirmed the formerly declared value of phase change temperature, about 120 °C.

  1. Thermal process of an air column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, F.T.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal process of a hot air column is discussed based on laws of thermodynamics. The kinetic motion of the air mass in the column can be used as a power generator. Alternatively, the column can also function as a exhaust/cooler

  2. Thermodynamical analysis of human thermal comfort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prek, Matjaz

    2006-01-01

    Traditional methods of human thermal comfort analysis are based on the first law of thermodynamics. These methods use an energy balance of the human body to determine heat transfer between the body and its environment. By contrast, the second law of thermodynamics introduces the useful concept of exergy. It enables the determination of the exergy consumption within the human body dependent on human and environmental factors. Human body exergy consumption varies with the combination of environmental (room) conditions. This process is related to human thermal comfort in connection with temperature, heat, and mass transfer. In this paper a thermodynamic analysis of human heat and mass transfer based on the 2nd law of thermodynamics in presented. It is shown that the human body's exergy consumption in relation to selected human parameters exhibits a minimal value at certain combinations of environmental parameters. The expected thermal sensation also shows that there is a correlation between exergy consumption and thermal sensation. Thus, our analysis represents an improvement in human thermal modelling and gives more information about the environmental impact on expected human thermal sensation

  3. Thermal escape from extrasolar giant planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Tommi T; Lavvas, Panayotis; Harris, Matthew J; Yelle, Roger V

    2014-04-28

    The detection of hot atomic hydrogen and heavy atoms and ions at high altitudes around close-in extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) such as HD209458b implies that these planets have hot and rapidly escaping atmospheres that extend to several planetary radii. These characteristics, however, cannot be generalized to all close-in EGPs. The thermal escape mechanism and mass loss rate from EGPs depend on a complex interplay between photochemistry and radiative transfer driven by the stellar UV radiation. In this study, we explore how these processes change under different levels of irradiation on giant planets with different characteristics. We confirm that there are two distinct regimes of thermal escape from EGPs, and that the transition between these regimes is relatively sharp. Our results have implications for thermal mass loss rates from different EGPs that we discuss in the context of currently known planets and the detectability of their upper atmospheres.

  4. MASS-RADIUS RELATIONSHIPS FOR VERY LOW MASS GASEOUS PLANETS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Stevenson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the Kepler spacecraft has detected a sizable aggregate of objects, characterized by giant-planet-like radii and modest levels of stellar irradiation. With the exception of a handful of objects, the physical nature, and specifically the average densities, of these bodies remain unknown. Here, we propose that the detected giant planet radii may partially belong to planets somewhat less massive than Uranus and Neptune. Accordingly, in this work, we seek to identify a physically sound upper limit to planetary radii at low masses and moderate equilibrium temperatures. As a guiding example, we analyze the interior structure of the Neptune-mass planet Kepler-30d and show that it is acutely deficient in heavy elements, especially compared with its solar system counterparts. Subsequently, we perform numerical simulations of planetary thermal evolution and in agreement with previous studies, show that generally, 10-20 M ⊕ , multi-billion year old planets, composed of high density cores and extended H/He envelopes can have radii that firmly reside in the giant planet range. We subject our results to stability criteria based on extreme ultraviolet radiation, as well as Roche-lobe overflow driven mass-loss and construct mass-radius relationships for the considered objects. We conclude by discussing observational avenues that may be used to confirm or repudiate the existence of putative low mass, gas-dominated planets.

  5. Thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, P; Imhof, R E; Cui, Y; Ciortea, L I; Berg, E P

    2010-01-01

    We present our latest study on the thermal diffusivity effect in opto-thermal skin measurements. We discuss how thermal diffusivity affects the shape of opto-thermal signal, and how to measure thermal diffusivity in opto-thermal measurements of arbitrary sample surfaces. We also present a mathematical model for a thermally gradient material, and its corresponding opto-thermal signal. Finally, we show some of our latest experimental results of this thermal diffusivity effect study.

  6. Primary Distributions of Nuclear Charge for Fission-Fragment Masses 132, 134, 136 and 137 from Thermal Fission of U{sup 235}; Repartition Primaire de la Charge Nucleaire pour les Fragments de Masse 132, 134, 136 et 137, Provenant de la Fission de {sup 235}U par Neutrons Thermiques; 041f 0415 0420 0414 ; Distribuciones Primarias de las Cargas Nucleares de los Fragmentos de Masa 132, 134, 136 y 137, Resultantes de la Fision del {sup 235}U por Neutrones Termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konecny, E.; Opower, H.; Guenther, H.; Goebel, H. [Physik-Department der Technischen Hochschule Muenchen, Munich and II. Physikalisches Institut der Justus Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, Federal Republic of Germany (Germany)

    1965-07-15

    By a mass spectrometer fission fragments from thermal fission of U{sup 235} are exactly separated with respect to mass and kinetic energy within a time of 10{sup -6} s after fission. The separated fragments are caught in a {beta}-sensitive Ilford G 5 emulsion that is located in the focal plane of the spectrometer. Development of the irradiated emulsions is carried out, if possible, after a time long compared with the longest half-life of the regarded decay chain. Half-lives of days or longer are not taken into account, but corrections can be easily made for them. After development of the emulsions all beta tracks emerging from the end of every fission-fragment track can be seen under the microscope. The possibility of correlating every single {beta}-track with a particular fission-fragment track allows the evaluation of the number n(x) of fission fragments possessing x {beta}-tracks, thus giving not only the mean chain length but also the {beta}-particle distribution. As the stable end product of each decay chain is known, this {beta}-distribution is an exact image of the primary nuclear charge distribution. In the measurements done up to now only {beta}-particles emitted into the half solid angle formed by the emulsion plate were registered, buta simple statistical calculation enables the desired 4{pi}-distribution to be evaluated. By this method {beta}-distributions at fixed kinetic energies near the mean kinetic energy of each fragment mass are given for the masses 132, 134, 136 and 137. For the lower masses 132 and 134 the neutron shell N = 82 is responsible for the most probable primary charges near 50 and 52 respectively. For M = 136 and 137 the primary charge is about 53 and 53.2. Additional approximative corrections in respect of conversion electrons (by omitting very short {beta}-tracks corresponding to very low {beta}-energies) and to delayed neutrons (for mass 137) were not very large. Similar measurements carried out directly in 4{pi}-geometry to avoid

  7. Second Law Analysis in Convective Heat and Mass Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ben Brahim

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the numerical determination of the entropy generation due to heat transfer, mass transfer and fluid friction in steady state for laminar double diffusive convection, in an inclined enclosure with heat and mass diffusive walls, by solving numerically the mass, momentum, species conservation and energy balance equations, using a Control Volume Finite-Element Method. The influences of the inclination angle, the thermal Grashof number and the buoyancy ratio on total entropy generation were investigated. The irreversibilities localization due to heat transfer, mass transfer and fluid friction is discussed for three inclination angles at a fixed thermal Grashof number.

  8. Thermogravimetry-evolved gas analysis–mass spectrometry system ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Thermal analysis is a widely used analytical technique for materials research. ... nique. This method can not distinguish the actual nature ... Among the different types of mass .... pressure and (iv) for qualitative and quantitative analysis.

  9. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a ;segmented; thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed ;segmented; model shows more precise than the ;non-segmented; model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the ;segmented; model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  10. The thermal Virasoro formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisaki, Haruo

    1991-01-01

    The thermal stability of non-planar duality is described at any finite temperature through the new-fashioned four-tachyon tree amplitude of closed bosonic thermal strings within the dispersion theoretic approach based upon the thermofield dynamics. (author)

  11. Thermal conductivity of technetium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, K.; Serizawa, H.; Fukuda, K.

    1998-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of technetium was measured on a disk sample of 5 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness by the laser flash method from room temperature to 1173 K, and the thermal conductivity was determined by the measured thermal diffusivity and density, and the reported specific heat capacity. The thermal diffusivity of technetium decreases with increasing temperature though it is almost constant above 600 K. The thermal conductivity of technetium shows a minimum around 400 K, above which the thermal conductivity increases with temperature. The electronic and phonon components of the thermal conductivity were evaluated approximately. The increase in the thermal conductivity of technetium with temperature is due to the increase in the electronic component. (orig.)

  12. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  13. Using Nanoparticles for Enhance Thermal Conductivity of Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baydaa Jaber Nabhan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Phase change materials (PCMs such as paraffin wax can be used to store or release large amount of energy at certain temperature at which their solid-liquid phase changes occurs. Paraffin wax that used in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES has low thermal conductivity. In this study, the thermal conductivity of paraffin wax has been enhanced by adding different mass concentration (1wt.%, 3wt.%, 5wt.% of (TiO2 nano-particles with about (10nm diameter. It is found that the phase change temperature varies with adding (TiO2 nanoparticles in to the paraffin wax. The thermal conductivity of the composites is found to decrease with increasing temperature. The increase in thermal conductivity has been found to increase by about (10% at nanoparticles loading (5wt.% and 15oC.

  14. Thermal Vacuum Test Correlation of a Zero Propellant Load Case Thermal Capacitance Propellant Gauging Analytical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckim, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the development and correlation of a thermal model that forms the foundation of a thermal capacitance spacecraft propellant load estimator. Specific details of creating the thermal model for the diaphragm propellant tank used on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale spacecraft using ANSYS and the correlation process implemented are presented. The thermal model was correlated to within plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius of the thermal vacuum test data, and was determined sufficient to make future propellant predictions on MMS. The model was also found to be relatively sensitive to uncertainties in applied heat flux and mass knowledge of the tank. More work is needed to improve temperature predictions in the upper hemisphere of the propellant tank where predictions were found to be 2 to 2.5 C lower than the test data. A road map for applying the model to predict propellant loads on the actual MMS spacecraft toward its end of life in 2017-2018 is also presented.

  15. A review of micromachined thermal accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Rahul; Basu, Joydeep; Mandal, Pradip; Guha, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-12-01

    A thermal convection based micro-electromechanical accelerometer is a relatively new kind of acceleration sensor that does not require a solid proof mass, yielding unique benefits like high shock survival rating, low production cost, and integrability with CMOS integrated circuit technology. This article provides a comprehensive survey of the research, development, and current trends in the field of thermal acceleration sensors, with detailed enumeration on the theory, operation, modeling, and numerical simulation of such devices. Different reported varieties and structures of thermal accelerometers have been reviewed highlighting key design, implementation, and performance aspects. Materials and technologies used for fabrication of such sensors have also been discussed. Further, the advantages and challenges for thermal accelerometers vis-à-vis other prominent accelerometer types have been presented, followed by an overview of associated signal conditioning circuitry and potential applications.

  16. Discrimination of thermal diffusivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Materials such as wood or metal which are at equal temperatures are perceived to be of different ‘coldness’ due to differences in thermal properties, such as the thermal diffusivity. The thermal diffusivity of a material is a parameter that controls the rate with which heat is extracted from the

  17. Electric Motor Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Thermal management enables more efficient and cost-effective motors. This Annual Merit Review presentation describes the technical accomplishments and progress in electric motor thermal management R&D over the last year. This project supports a broad industry demand for data, analysis methods, and experimental techniques to improve and better understand motor thermal management.

  18. Economically optimal thermal insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berber, J.

    1978-10-01

    Exemplary calculations to show that exact adherence to the demands of the thermal insulation ordinance does not lead to an optimal solution with regard to economics. This is independent of the mode of financing. Optimal thermal insulation exceeds the values given in the thermal insulation ordinance.

  19. Thermal energy systems design and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Penoncello, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    IntroductionThermal Energy Systems Design and AnalysisSoftwareThermal Energy System TopicsUnits and Unit SystemsThermophysical PropertiesEngineering DesignEngineering EconomicsIntroductionCommon Engineering Economics NomenclatureEconomic Analysis Tool: The Cash Flow DiagramTime Value of MoneyTime Value of Money ExamplesUsing Software to Calculate Interest FactorsEconomic Decision MakingDepreciation and TaxesProblemsAnalysis of Thermal Energy SystemsIntroductionNomenclatureThermophysical Properties of SubstancesSuggested Thermal Energy Systems Analysis ProcedureConserved and Balanced QuantitiesConservation of MassConservation of Energy (The First Law of Thermodynamics)Entropy Balance (The Second Law of Thermodynamics)Exergy Balance: The Combined LawEnergy and Exergy Analysis of Thermal Energy CyclesDetailed Analysis of Thermal Energy CyclesProblemsFluid Transport in Thermal Energy SystemsIntroductionPiping and Tubing StandardsFluid Flow FundamentalsValves and FittingsDesign and Analysis of Pipe NetworksEconomi...

  20. Thermal characteristics of rocks for high-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimooka, Kenji; Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Okamoto, Masamichi; Kumata, Masahiro; Araki, Kunio; Amano, Hiroshi

    1980-12-01

    Heat released by the radioactive decay of high-level waste in an underground repository causes a long term thermal disturbance in the surrounding rock mass. Several rocks constituting geological formations in Japan were gathered and specific heat, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient and compressive strength were measured. Thermal analysis and chemical analysis were also carried out. It was found that volcanic rocks, i.e. Andesite and Basalt had the most favorable thermal characteristics up to around 1000 0 C and plutonic rock, i.e. Granite had also favorable characteristics under 573 0 C, transition temperature of quartz. Other igneous rocks, i.e. Rhyolite and Propylite had a problem of decomposition at around 500 0 C. Sedimentary rocks, i.e. Zeolite, Tuff, Sandstone and Diatomite were less favorable because of their decomposition, low thermal conductivity and large thermal expansion coefficient. (author)

  1. Thermal effects and their compensation in Advanced Virgo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchi, A; Coccia, E; Fafone, V; Malvezzi, V; Minenkov, Y; Sperandio, L

    2012-01-01

    Thermal effects in the test masses of the gravitational waves interferometric detectors may result in a strong limitation to their operation and sensitivity. Already in initial LIGO and Virgo, these effects have been observed and required the installation of dedicated compensation systems. Based on CO 2 laser projectors, the thermal compensators heat the peripheral of the input test masses to reduce the lensing effect. In advanced detectors, the power circulating in the interferometer will increase, thus making thermal effects more relevant. In this paper, the concept of the compensation system for Advanced Virgo is described.

  2. Solar thermal barometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    After the bad year of 2002, the european solar thermal market returned to double-digit growth rate in 2003: 22%. Nevertheless, the sector still has not recovered the growth rate it had in the early 2000 and European Commission targets are still far from being reached. This paper presents the thermal solar industry barometer. Data on the evolution of annually installed surfaces in the european union since 1993, the cumulated capacity of thermal collectors installed in the European Union, the estimation of the annual energy production associated to european solar thermal capacities and the main companies of the European Union thermal solar sector are presented and discussed. (A.L.B.)

  3. Technical guide to thermal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosse, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is an attempt to present the necessary formulae and numerical data for research programs. The most recent data have been used wherever possible. The work is not limited merely to statements of thermal laws; emphasis has been given to the important thermodynamic ideas and to the thermophysical properties of the working fluids. It discusses the thermodynamic concepts which govern the amount of energy transferred to, or from, a system undergoing any process as well as those concepts which allow rates of heat transfer to be predicted. In the same way, mass, momentum and energy balances are presented in a single section to emphasize that the three balances must always be considered together in the analysis of a system. It has been necessary to select the information to be presented in order to provide the essential ideas of thermal analysis. This technical guide summarises the fundamental laws and the experimental data on which the engineer can base his methods of calculation in order to provide an optimum thermal design

  4. Thermal neutron moderating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigami, Hiroyuki.

    1995-01-01

    In a thermal neutron moderating device, superconductive coils for generating magnetic fields capable of applying magnetic fields vertical to the longitudinal direction of a thermal neutron passing tube, and superconductive coils for magnetic field gradient for causing magnetic field gradient in the longitudinal direction of the thermal neutron passing tube are disposed being stacked at the outside of the thermal neutron passing tube. When magnetic field gradient is present vertically to the direction of a magnetic moment, thermal neutrons undergo forces in the direction of the magnetic field gradient in proportion to the magnetic moment. Then, the magnetic moment of the thermal neutrons is aligned with the direction vertical to the passing direction of the thermal neutrons, to cause the magnetic field gradient in the passing direction of the thermal neutrons. The speed of the thermal neutrons can be optionally selected and the wavelength can freely be changed by applying forces to the thermal neutrons and changing the extent and direction of the magnetic field gradient. Superconductive coils are used as the coils for generating magnetic fields and the magnetic field gradient in order to change extremely high energy of the thermal neutrons. (N.H.)

  5. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  6. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than ∼2 x 10 -13 cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors

  7. Thermal design of AOTV heatshields for a conical drag brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, W. C.; Murbach, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    Results are presented from an on-going study of the thermal performance of thermal protection systems for a conical drag brake type AOTV. Three types of heatshield are considered: rigid ceramic insulation, flexible ceramic blankets, and ceramic cloths. The results for the rigid insulation apply to other types of AOTV as well. Charts are presented in parametric form so that they may be applied to a variety of missions and vehicle configurations. The parameters considered include: braking maneuver heat flux and total heat load, heatshield material and thickness, heatshield thermal mass and conductivity, absorptivity and emissivity of surfaces, thermal mass of support structure, and radiation transmission through thin heatshields. Results of temperature calculations presented show trends with and sensitivities to these parameters. The emphasis is on providing information that will be useful in estimating the minimum required mass of these heatshield materials.

  8. Mass Customization Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrich, Gerhard

    Topics of the IMCM’08 & PETO’08 and this book are: Mass customization in service, mass customizing financial services, mass customization in supply networks, implementation issues in logistics, product life cycle and mass customization. The research field of mass customization is more than 15 years...

  9. Thermal relic dark matter beyond the unitarity limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harigaya, Keisuke [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ibe, Masahiro [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); ICRR, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Institute for Basic Science (IBS),Daejeon 34051 (Korea, Republic of); Nakano, Wakutaka; Suzuki, Motoo [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); ICRR, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-08-25

    We discuss a simple model of thermal relic dark matter whose mass can be much larger than the so-called unitarity limit on the mass of point-like particle dark matter. The model consists of new strong dynamics with one flavor of fermions in the fundamental representation which is much heavier than the dynamical scale of the new strong dynamics. Dark matter is identified with the lightest baryonic hadron of the new dynamics. The baryonic hadrons annihilate into the mesonic hadrons of the new strong dynamics when they have large radii. Resultantly, thermal relic dark matter with a mass in the PeV range is possible.

  10. Determination of the neutron mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amador V, P.; Chacon R, A.; Arcos P, A.; Rodriguez N, S.; Pinedo S, A.; Vega C, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    The binding energy of the deuteron was measured and it was determined the neutron mass starting from the nuclear reaction, 1 0 n + 1 1 H → 2 1 D + γ. The produced photon is soon a gamma ray that is emitted when the hydrogen captures a thermal neutron. The photon energy was measured using two spectrometric systems for gamma rays. A system with a detector of NaI(TI) of 3'' x 3'' and the other one with a High-purity Germanium detector. The first detector has a bigger efficiency and a smaller resolution in comparison with the second detector. The energy of the measured photon is the binding energy of the deuteron. With the measurement of the photon energy and the masses of the proton and of the deuterium it was determined the neutron mass. The value of the mass obtained with both systems it was compared with the value reported in the literature. The nuclear reaction was induced in a volume of paraffin that it was bombing with a source 239 PuBe whose activity is of 3.7 x 10 10 Bq. (Author)

  11. Thermal applications of low-pressure diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubner, R.; Lux, B.

    1997-01-01

    During the last decade several applications of low-pressure diamond were developed. Main products are diamond heat-spreaders using its high thermal conductivity, diamond windows with their high transparency over a wide range of wavelengths and wear resistant tool coatings because of diamonds superhardness. A short description of the most efficient diamond deposition methods (microwave, DC-glow discharge, plasma-jet and arc discharge) is given. The production and applications of diamond layers with high thermal conductivity will be described. Problems of reproducibility of diamond deposition, the influence of impurities, the heat conductivity in electronic packages, reliability and economical mass production will be discussed. (author)

  12. A thermal ground cloak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Tianzhi; Wu, Qinghe; Xu, Weikai; Liu, Di; Huang, Lujun; Chen, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The thermal cloak has been a long-standing scientific dream of researchers and engineers. Recently thermal metamaterials with man-made micro-structure have been presented based on the principle of transformation optics (TO). This new concept has received considerable attention, which is a powerful tool for manipulating heat flux in thermal imaging systems. However, the inherent material singularity has long been a captivation of experimental realization. As an alternative method, the scattering-cancellation-based cloak (or bi-layer thermal cloak) has been presented to remove the singularity for achieving the same cloaking performance. Nevertheless, such strategy needs prerequisite knowledge (geometry and conductivity) of the object to be cloaked. In this paper, a new thermal ground cloak is presented to overcome the limitations. The device is designed, fabricated and measured to verify the thermal cloaking performance. We experimentally show that the remarkably low complexity of the device can fully and effectively be manipulated using realizable transformation thermal devices. More importantly, this thermal ground cloak is designed to exclude heat flux without knowing the information of the cloaked object. - Highlights: • We present the first thermal carpet cloak. • The carpet can thermally cloak any shaped object without knowing the properties of the object to be cloaked. • Excellent agreements between simulation and experiment are observed.

  13. On the isolation of elemental carbon (EC) for micro-molar 14C accelerator mass spectrometry: development of a hybrid reference material for 14C-EC accuracy assurance, and a critical evaluation of the thermal optical kinetic (TOK) EC isolation procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, L. A.; Kessler, J. D.

    2005-10-01

    The primary objective of the research reported here has been the development of a hybrid reference material (RM) to serve as a test of accuracy for elemental carbon (EC) isotopic (14C) speciation measurements. Such measurements are vital for the quantitative apportionment of fossil and biomass sources of "soot" (EC), the tracer of fire that has profound effects on health, atmospheric visibility, and climate. Previous studies of 14C-EC measurement quality, carried out with NIST SRM 1649a (Urban Dust), showed a range of results, but since the "truth" was not known for this natural matrix RM, one had to rely on isotopic-chemical consistency evidence (14C in PAH, EC) of measurement validity (Currie et al., 2002). Components of the new Hybrid RM (DiesApple), however, have known 14C and EC composition, and they are nearly orthogonal (isotopically and chemically). NIST SRM 2975 (Forklift Diesel Soot) has little or no 14C, and its major compositional component is EC; SRM 1515 (Apple Leaves) has the 14C content of biomass-C, and it has little or no EC. Thus, the Hybrid RM can serve as an absolute isotopic test for the absence of EC-mimicking pyrolysis-C (char) from SRM 1515 in the EC isolate of the Hybrid RM, as well as a test for conservation of its dominant soot fraction throughout the isolation procedure. The secondary objective was to employ the Hybrid RM for the comparative evaluation of the thermal optical kinetic (TOK) and thermal optical transmission (TOT) methods for the isolation of EC for micro-molar carbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). As part of this process, the relatively new TOK method was subjected to a critical evaluation and significant development. Key findings of our study are: (1) both methods exhibited biomass-C "leakage"; for TOT, the EC fraction isolated for AMS contained about 8% of the original biomass-C; for TOK, the refractory carbon (RC) isolated contained about 3% of the original biomass-C.; (2) the initial isothermal oxidation stage of

  14. On the isolation of elemental carbon (EC for micro-molar 14C accelerator mass spectrometry: development of a hybrid reference material for 14C-EC accuracy assurance, and a critical evaluation of the thermal optical kinetic (TOK EC isolation procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Currie

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of the research reported here has been the development of a hybrid reference material (RM to serve as a test of accuracy for elemental carbon (EC isotopic (14C speciation measurements. Such measurements are vital for the quantitative apportionment of fossil and biomass sources of 'soot' (EC, the tracer of fire that has profound effects on health, atmospheric visibility, and climate. Previous studies of 14C-EC measurement quality, carried out with NIST SRM 1649a (Urban Dust, showed a range of results, but since the 'truth' was not known for this natural matrix RM, one had to rely on isotopic-chemical consistency evidence (14C in PAH, EC of measurement validity (Currie et al., 2002. Components of the new Hybrid RM (DiesApple, however, have known 14C and EC composition, and they are nearly orthogonal (isotopically and chemically. NIST SRM 2975 (Forklift Diesel Soot has little or no 14C, and its major compositional component is EC; SRM 1515 (Apple Leaves has the 14C content of biomass-C, and it has little or no EC. Thus, the Hybrid RM can serve as an absolute isotopic test for the absence of EC-mimicking pyrolysis-C (char from SRM 1515 in the EC isolate of the Hybrid RM, as well as a test for conservation of its dominant soot fraction throughout the isolation procedure. The secondary objective was to employ the Hybrid RM for the comparative evaluation of the thermal optical kinetic (TOK and thermal optical transmission (TOT methods for the isolation of EC for micro-molar carbon accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS. As part of this process, the relatively new TOK method was subjected to a critical evaluation and significant development. Key findings of our study are: (1 both methods exhibited biomass-C 'leakage'; for TOT, the EC fraction isolated for AMS contained about 8% of the original biomass-C; for TOK, the refractory carbon (RC isolated contained about 3% of the original biomass-C.; (2 the initial isothermal oxidation stage

  15. Building ceramics with improved thermal insulation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rzepa Karol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important performance characteristics of masonry units is their high thermal insulation. There are many different ways to improve this parameter, however the most popular methods in case of ceramic masonry units are: addition of pore-creating raw materials and application of proper hole pattern. This study was an attempt to improve thermal insulation of ceramics by applying thermal insulation additives. Perlite dust created as a subgrain from expansion of perlite rock was used. Perlite subgrain is not very popular among consumers, that’s why it’s subjected to granulation to obtain coarse grain. The authors presented concept of direct application of perlite dust for the production of building ceramics with improved thermal insulation. Fineness of this additive is asset for molding of ceramic materials from plastic masses. Based on the results it was found that about 70% perlite by volume can be added to obtain material with a coefficient of heat conductivity of 0,37 W/mK. Higher content of this additive in ceramic mass causes deterioration of its rheological properties. Mass loses its plasticity, it tears up and formed green bodies are susceptible to deformation. During sintering perlite takes an active part in compaction process. Higher sintering dynamics is caused by: high content of alkali oxides in perlite and glass nature of perlite. Alkali oxides generate creation of liquid phase which intensifies mass compaction processes. Active role of perlite in sintering process causes good connection of its grains with clay groundwork which is important factor for mechanical parameters of ceramic materials. It was also noted that addition of perlite above 40% by volume of mass effectively neutralized negative effect of efflorescence in ceramic materials.

  16. Neutrino mass matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Given the many conflicting experimental results, examination is made of the neutrino mass matrix in order to determine possible masses and mixings. It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the electron, muon, and tau neutrinos is similar in form to those of the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed neutrino masses results from the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism. Analysis of masses and mixings for the neutrinos is performed using general structures for the Majorana mass matrix. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the neutrino masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. A very recent experimental neutrino mass result and its implications are discussed. Some general properties of matrices with structure similar to the Dirac mass matrices are discussed

  17. Thermal Performance of the LHC Short Straight Section Cryostat

    CERN Document Server

    Bergot, J B; Nielsen, L; Parma, Vittorio; Rohmig, P; Roy, E

    2002-01-01

    The LHC Short Straight Section (SSS) cryostat houses and thermally protects in vacuum the cold mass which contains a twin-aperture superconducting quadrupole magnet and superconducting corrector magnets operating at 1.9 K in superfluid helium. In addition to mechanical requirements, the cryostat is designed to minimize the heat in-leak from the ambient temperature to the cold mass. Mechanical components linking the cold mass to the vacuum vessel such as support posts and an insulation vacuum barrier are designed to have minimum heat conductivity with efficient thermalisations for heat interception. Heat in-leak by radiation is reduced by employing multilayer insulation wrapped around the cold mass and an actively cooled aluminium thermal shield. The recent commissioning and operation of two SSS prototypes in the LHC Test String 2 have given a first experimental validation of the thermal performance of the SSS cryostat in nominal operating conditions. Temperature sensors mounted in critical locations provide a...

  18. THERMAL: A routine designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1995-01-01

    THERMAL is designed to calculate neutron thermal scattering that is elastic and isotropic in the center of mass system. At low energy thermal motion will be included. At high energies the target nuclei are assumed to be stationary. The point of transition between low and high energies has been defined to insure a smooth transition. It is assumed that at low energy the elastic cross section is constant in the relative system. At high energy the cross section can be of any form. You can use this routine for all energies where the elastic scattering is isotropic in the center of mass system. In most materials this will be a fairly high energy, e.g., the keV energy range. The THERMAL method is simple, clean, easy to understand, and most important very efficient; on a SUN SPARC-10 workstation, at low energies with thermal scattering it can do almost 6 million scatters a minute and at high energy over 13 million. Warning: This version of THERMAL completely supersedes the original version described in the same report number, dated February 24, 1995. The method used in the original code is incorrect, as explained in this report

  19. Demonstration of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony; Wynne, Robert; Miller, Michael; Meyer, Al; Smith, William

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA Exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within highly thermally conductive cooling plates to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components within the fuel cell system which reduces mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous development demonstrated the performance of suitable highly thermally conductive cooling plates and integrated heat exchanger technology to collect the heat from the cooling plates (Ref. 1). The next step in the development of this passive thermal approach was the demonstration of the control of the heat removal process and the demonstration of the passive thermal control technology in actual fuel cell stacks. Tests were run with a simulated fuel cell stack passive thermal management system outfitted with passive cooling plates, an integrated heat exchanger and two types of cooling flow control valves. The tests were run to demonstrate the controllability of the passive thermal control approach. Finally, successful demonstrations of passive thermal control technology were conducted with fuel cell stacks from two fuel cell stack vendors.

  20. Josephson Thermal Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Solinas, Paolo; Braggio, Alessandro; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Giazotto, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    We propose a superconducting thermal memory device that exploits the thermal hysteresis in a flux-controlled temperature-biased superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID). This system reveals a flux-controllable temperature bistability, which can be used to define two well-distinguishable thermal logic states. We discuss a suitable writing-reading procedure for these memory states. The time of the memory writing operation is expected to be on the order of approximately 0.2 ns for a Nb-based SQUID in thermal contact with a phonon bath at 4.2 K. We suggest a noninvasive readout scheme for the memory states based on the measurement of the effective resonance frequency of a tank circuit inductively coupled to the SQUID. The proposed device paves the way for a practical implementation of thermal logic and computation. The advantage of this proposal is that it represents also an example of harvesting thermal energy in superconducting circuits.

  1. Negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of negative thermal expansion over an unprecedented temperature range in ZrW 2 O 8 (which contracts continuously on warming from below 2 K to above 1000 K) has stimulated considerable interest in this unusual phenomenon. Negative and low thermal expansion materials have a number of important potential uses in ceramic, optical and electronic applications. We have now found negative thermal expansion in a large new family of materials with the general formula A 2 (MO 4 ) 3 . Chemical substitution dramatically influences the thermal expansion properties of these materials allowing the production of ceramics with negative, positive or zero coefficients of thermal expansion, with the potential to control other important materials properties such as refractive index and dielectric constant. The mechanism of negative thermal expansion and the phase transitions exhibited by this important new class of low-expansion materials will be discussed. (orig.)

  2. The Improvement of Thermal Insulating Concrete Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ali Nasser Ali

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The Iraqi houses flattening the roof by a concrete panel, and because of the panels on the top directly exposed to the solar radiation become unbearably hot and cold during the summer and winter. The traditional concrete panel components are cement, sand, and aggregate, which have a poor thermal property. The usage of materials with low thermal conductivity with no negative reflects on its mechanical properties gives good improvements to the thermal properties of the concrete panel. The practical part of this work was built on a multi-stage mixing plan. In the first stage the mixing ratio based on the ratios of the sand to cement. The second stage mixing ratios based on replacing the coarse aggregate quantities with the Alabaster aggregates, and the third stage the mixing ratios based on the replacement of wood ash instead of the sand. While the fourth stage mixing ratios based on decreasing the thermal conductivity and increasing mechanical properties by adding a multilayer of a plastic net. The result shows that using a concrete panel with components (cement, sand, coarse aggregate, wood ash, and Alabaster aggregates with a mass ratio of (1:1:2:1:1 and 3-plastic layers, gives the best improvement of the thermal properties. Where, the thermal conductivity is reduced by 42% and the specific heat increased by 41.2% as compared to the traditional concrete panel mixing ratio, with mechanical properties are agreed with the Iraqi standards.

  3. Thermal decomposition process of silver behenate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xianhao; Lu Shuxia; Zhang Jingchang; Cao Weiliang

    2006-01-01

    The thermal decomposition processes of silver behenate have been studied by infrared spectroscopy (IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), combined thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis-mass spectrometry (TG-DTA-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. The TG-DTA and the higher temperature IR and XRD measurements indicated that complicated structural changes took place while heating silver behenate, but there were two distinct thermal transitions. During the first transition at 138 deg. C, the alkyl chains of silver behenate were transformed from an ordered into a disordered state. During the second transition at about 231 deg. C, a structural change took place for silver behenate, which was the decomposition of silver behenate. The major products of the thermal decomposition of silver behenate were metallic silver and behenic acid. Upon heating up to 500 deg. C, the final product of the thermal decomposition was metallic silver. The combined TG-MS analysis showed that the gas products of the thermal decomposition of silver behenate were carbon dioxide, water, hydrogen, acetylene and some small molecule alkenes. TEM and UV-vis spectroscopy were used to investigate the process of the formation and growth of metallic silver nanoparticles

  4. Atomic reactor thermal engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gwang Ryong

    1983-02-01

    This book starts the introduction of atomic reactor thermal engineering including atomic reaction, chemical reaction, nuclear reaction neutron energy and soon. It explains heat transfer, heat production in the atomic reactor, heat transfer of fuel element in atomic reactor, heat transfer and flow of cooler, thermal design of atomic reactor, design of thermodynamics of atomic reactor and various. This deals with the basic knowledge of thermal engineering for atomic reactor.

  5. Thermal comfort following immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéritée, Julien; Redortier, Bernard; House, James R; Tipton, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    Unlike thermal comfort in air, little research has been undertaken exploring thermal comfort around water sports. We investigated the impact of swimming and cooling in air after swimming on thermal comfort. After 10 min of swimming-and-resting cycles in 28°C water, volunteers wearing two types of garments or in swim briefs, faced winds in 24°C air, at rest or when stepping. Thermal comfort was significantly higher during swimming than resting. Post-immersion, following maximum discomfort, in 45 of 65 tests thermal comfort improved although mean skin temperature was still cooling (0.26 [SD 0.19] °C·min(-1) - max was 0.89°C·min(-1)). When thermal comfort was re-established mean skin temperature was lower than at maximal discomfort in 39 of 54 tests (0.81 [SD 0.58] °C - max difference was 2.68°C). The reduction in thermal discomfort in this scenario could be due to the adaptation of thermoreceptors, or to reductions in cooling rates to levels where discomfort was less stimulated. The relief from the recent discomfort may explain why, later, thermal comfort returned to initial levels in spite of poorer thermal profiles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Theory of thermal stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Boley, Bruno A

    1997-01-01

    Highly regarded text presents detailed discussion of fundamental aspects of theory, background, problems with detailed solutions. Basics of thermoelasticity, heat transfer theory, thermal stress analysis, more. 1985 edition.

  7. Mars Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the global thermal inertia of the Martian surface as measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor. The data were acquired during the first 5000 orbits of the MGS mapping mission. The pattern of inertia variations observed by TES agrees well with the thermal inertia maps made by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper experiment, but the TES data shown here are at significantly higher spatial resolution (15 km versus 60 km).The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  8. Space thermal control development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, M. J.; Grodzka, P. G.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of experimental investigations on a number of various phase change materials (PCMs) and PCMs in combination with metals and other materials are reported. The evaluations include the following PCM system performance characteristics: PCM and PCM/filler thermal diffusivities, the effects of long-term thermal cycling, PCM-container compatibility, and catalyst effectiveness and stability. Three PCMs demonstrated performance acceptable enough to be considered for use in prototype aluminum thermal control devices. These three PCMs are lithium nitrate trihydrate with zinc hydroxy nitrate catalyst, acetamide, and myristic acid. Of the fillers tested, aluminum honeycomb filler was found to offer the most increase in system thermal diffusivity.

  9. Thermal decomposition of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Popovic, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of natural pyrite (cubic, FeS 2 ) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis of pyrite ore from different sources showed the presence of associated minerals, such as quartz, szomolnokite, stilbite or stellerite, micas and hematite. Hematite, maghemite and pyrrhotite were detected as thermal decomposition products of natural pyrite. The phase composition of the thermal decomposition products depends on the terature, time of heating and starting size of pyrite chrystals. Hematite is the end product of the thermal decomposition of natural pyrite. (author) 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  10. Thermo-mechanical ratcheting in jointed rock masses

    KAUST Repository

    Pasten, C.; Garcí a, M.; Santamarina, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical coupling takes place in jointed rock masses subjected to large thermal oscillations. Examples range from exposed surfaces under daily and seasonal thermal fluctuations to subsurface rock masses affected by engineered systems such as geothermal operations. Experimental, numerical and analytical results show that thermo-mechanical coupling can lead to wedging and ratcheting mechanisms that result in deformation accumulation when the rock mass is subjected to a biased static-force condition. Analytical and numerical models help in identifying the parameter domain where thermo-mechanical ratcheting can take place.

  11. Thermo-mechanical ratcheting in jointed rock masses

    KAUST Repository

    Pasten, C.

    2015-09-01

    Thermo-mechanical coupling takes place in jointed rock masses subjected to large thermal oscillations. Examples range from exposed surfaces under daily and seasonal thermal fluctuations to subsurface rock masses affected by engineered systems such as geothermal operations. Experimental, numerical and analytical results show that thermo-mechanical coupling can lead to wedging and ratcheting mechanisms that result in deformation accumulation when the rock mass is subjected to a biased static-force condition. Analytical and numerical models help in identifying the parameter domain where thermo-mechanical ratcheting can take place.

  12. Thermophoretic torque in colloidal particles with mass asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarte-Plata, Juan; Rubi, J. Miguel; Bresme, Fernando

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the response of anisotropic colloids suspended in a fluid under a thermal field. Using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics computer simulations and nonequilibrium thermodynamics theory, we show that an anisotropic mass distribution inside the colloid rectifies the rotational Brownian motion and the colloids experience transient torques that orient the colloid along the direction of the thermal field. This physical effect gives rise to distinctive changes in the dependence of the Soret coefficient with colloid mass, which features a maximum, unlike the monotonic increase of the thermophoretic force with mass observed in homogeneous colloids.

  13. Photovoltaic. Solar thermal. Solar thermal electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The year 2008 was excellent for solar energy in the European Union. The growth of the installed capacity for photovoltaic was +159% (it means +4747.018 MW) to reach 9689.952 MW and that for solar thermal was +51.5% (it means +3172.5 MW) to reach 19982.7 MW. Worldwide concentrated solar thermal capacity stood at 679 MW in 2009, while this figure may seem low, the sector has a promising future ahead of it. (A.C.)

  14. The emergence of mass spectrometry in biochemical research

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The initial steps toward routinely applying mass spectrometry in the biochemical laboratory have been achieved. In the past, mass spectrometry was confined to the realm of small, relatively stable molecules; large or thermally labile molecules did not survive the desorption and ionization processes intact. Electrospray ionization (ESI) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry allow for the analysis of both small and large biomolecules through "mild" desorption...

  15. Thermal pressure and isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purs'kij, O.Yi.

    2005-01-01

    The analysis of the correlation between the thermal pressure and the isochoric thermal conductivity of solid CO 2 has been carried out. The temperature dependences of the thermal pressure and isochoric thermal conductivity for samples with various molar volumes have been obtained. The isothermal pressure dependences of the thermal conductivity of solid CO 2 have been calculated. The form of the temperature dependence of the isochoric thermal conductivity taking the thermal pressure into account has been revealed. Behaviour of the isochoric thermal conductivity is explained by phonon-phonon interaction and additional influence of the thermal pressure

  16. Thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material/expanded graphite composite across the phase change temperature range and a novel thermal conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Ziye; Chen, Jiajie; Xu, Tao; Fang, Xiaoming; Gao, Xuenong; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Expanded graphite can improve thermal conductivity of RT44HC by 20–60 times. • Thermal conductivity of PCM/EG composites keeps constant before/after melting. • Thermal conductivity of PCMs nearly doubled during phase changing. • Thermal conductivity of composite PCM increases with density and percentage of EG. • The simple model predicts thermal conductivity of EG-based composites accurately. - Abstract: This work studies factors that affect the thermal conductivity of an organic phase change material (PCM), RT44HC/expanded graphite (EG) composite, which include: EG mass fraction, composite PCM density and temperature. The increase of EG mass fraction and bulk density will both enhance thermal conductivity of composite PCMs, by up to 60 times. Thermal conductivity of RT44HC/EG composites remains independent on temperature outside the phase change range (40–45 °C), but nearly doubles during the phase change. The narrow temperature change during the phase change allows the maximum heat flux or minimum temperature for heat source if attaching PCMs to a first (constant temperature) or second (constant heat flux) thermal boundary. At last, a simple thermal conductivity model for EG-based composites is put forward, based on only two parameters: mass fraction of EG and bulk density of the composite. This model is validated with experiment data presented in this paper and in literature, showing this model has general applicability to any composite of EG and poor thermal conductive materials

  17. Improved hard-thermal-loop effective action for hot QED and QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flechsig, F.; Rebhan, A.K.

    1995-01-01

    The conventional results for hard thermal loops, which are the building blocks of resummed perturbation theory in thermal field theories, have collinear singularities when external momenta are light-like. It is shown that by taking into account asymptotic thermal masses these singularities are removed. The thus improved hard thermal loops can be summarized by compact gauge-invariant effective actions, generalizing the ones found by Taylor and Wong, and by Braaten and Pisarski. (orig.)

  18. Galaxy Clusters: Substructure and Mass Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying

    2010-07-01

    We calibrate the X-ray measured hydrostatic equilibrium (H.E.) mass and assess the origin of the H.E. mass systematics using 2-D spectrally measured X-ray properties. We obtained that the average X-ray mass derived from H.E. using XMM-Newton data is lower compared to the weak lensing mass from Subaru data for relaxed clusters in a sample of 12 clusters at z~0.2. This is comparable to the expectation of numerical simulations because of the non-thermal pressure support due to turbulence and bulk motions. The gas mass to weak lensing mass ratio shows no dependence on the cluster morphology, which indicates that the gas mass may be a good mass proxy regardless of the cluster dynamical state. To understand the origin of the systematics of the H.E. mass, we investigated 4 nearby clusters, for which the substructure is quantified by the radial fluctuations in the spectrally measured 2-D maps by a cumulative/differential scatter profile relative to the mean profile within/at a given radius. The amplitude of and the discontinuity in the scatter complements 2-D substructure diagnostics, e.g. indicating the most disturbed radial range. There is a tantalizing link between the substructure identified using the scatter of the entropy and pressure fluctuations and the deviation of the H.E. mass relative to the expected mass based on the representative scaling relation, e.g., M-Mgas, particularly at r500-the radius within which the over-density, Δ, is 500 with respect to the critical density. This indicates that at larger radii, the systematic error of the H.E. mass may well be caused by substructure.

  19. Horizontal steam generator thermal-hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubra, O. [SKODA Praha Company, Prague (Czechoslovakia); Doubek, M. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1995-09-01

    Horizontal steam generators are typical components of nuclear power plants with pressure water reactor type VVER. Thermal-hydraulic behavior of horizontal steam generators is very different from the vertical U-tube steam generator, which has been extensively studied for several years. To contribute to the understanding of the horizontal steam generator thermal-hydraulics a computer program for 3-D steady state analysis of the PGV-1000 steam generator has been developed. By means of this computer program, a detailed thermal-hydraulic and thermodynamic study of the horizontal steam generator PGV-1000 has been carried out and a set of important steam generator characteristics has been obtained. The 3-D distribution of the void fraction and 3-D level profile as functions of load and secondary side pressure have been investigated and secondary side volumes and masses as functions of load and pressure have been evaluated. Some of the interesting results of calculations are presented in the paper.

  20. Galaxy Masses : A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Courteau, Stephane; Cappellari, Michele; Jong, Roelof S. de; Dutton, Aaron A.; Koopmans, L.V.E.

    2013-01-01

    Galaxy masses play a fundamental role in our understanding of structure formation models. This review addresses the variety and reliability of mass estimators that pertain to stars, gas, and dark matter. The dierent sections on masses from stellar populations, dynamical masses of gas-rich and

  1. Thermal flow micro sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1999-01-01

    A review is given on sensors fabricated by silicon micromachining technology using the thermal domain for the measurement of fluid flow. Attention is paid especially to performance and geometry of the sensors. Three basic types of thermal flow sensors are discussed: anemometers, calorimetric flow

  2. Power Electronics Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Gilberto [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Thermal modeling was conducted to evaluate and develop thermal management strategies for high-temperature wide-bandgap (WBG)-based power electronics systems. WBG device temperatures of 175 degrees C to 250 degrees C were modeled under various under-hood temperature environments. Modeling result were used to identify the most effective capacitor cooling strategies under high device temperature conditions.

  3. Thermal background noise limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  4. Thermal solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.C.; Leal C, H.

    1998-01-01

    Some relative aspects to the development and current state of thermal solar energy are summarized, so much at domestic level as international. To facilitate the criteria understanding as the size of the facilities in thermal solar systems, topics as availability of the solar resource and its interactions with the matter are included. Finally, some perspectives for the development of this energetic alternative are presented

  5. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  6. Conceptual thermal design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Present thermal design tools and methods insufficiently support the development of structural concepts engaged by typical practicing designers. Research described in this thesis identifies the main thermal design problems in practice. In addition, models and methods are developed that support an

  7. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  8. Outdoor thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Marialena

    2011-06-01

    A review of the various approaches in understanding outdoor thermal comfort is presented. The emphasis on field surveys from around the world, particularly across Europe, enables us to understand thermal perception and evaluate outdoor thermal comfort conditions. The consistent low correlations between objective microclimatic variables, subjective thermal sensation and comfort outdoors, internationally, suggest that thermophysiology alone does not adequate describe these relationships. Focusing on the concept of adaptation, it tries to explain how this influences outdoor comfort, enabling us to inhabit and get satisfaction from outdoor spaces throughout the year. Beyond acclimatization and behavioral adaptation, through adjustments in clothing and changes to the metabolic heat, psychological adaptation plays a critical role to ensure thermal comfort and satisfaction with the outdoor environment. Such parameters include recent experiences and expectations; personal choice and perceived control, more important than whether that control is actually exercised; and the need for positive environmental stimulation suggesting that thermal neutrality is not a pre-requisite for thermal comfort. Ultimately, enhancing environmental diversity can influence thermal perception and experience of open spaces.

  9. Thermal diffusion (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemarechal, A.

    1963-01-01

    This report brings together the essential principles of thermal diffusion in the liquid and gaseous phases. The macroscopic and molecular aspects of the thermal diffusion constant are reviewed, as well as the various measurement method; the most important developments however concern the operation of the CLUSIUS and DICKEL thermo-gravitational column and its applications. (author) [fr

  10. Thermal Transport in Phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Hu, Ming

    2018-03-01

    Phosphorene, a novel elemental 2D semiconductor, possesses fascinating chemical and physical properties which are distinctively different from other 2D materials. The rapidly growing applications of phosphorene in nano/optoelectronics and thermoelectrics call for comprehensive studies of thermal transport properties. In this Review, based on the theoretical and experimental progresses, the thermal transport properties of single-layer phosphorene, multilayer phosphorene (nanofilms), and bulk black phosphorus are summarized to give a general view of the overall thermal conductivity trend from single-layer to bulk form. The mechanism underlying the discrepancy in the reported thermal conductivity of phosphorene is discussed by reviewing the effect of different functionals and cutoff distances on the thermal transport evaluations. This Review then provides fundamental insight into the thermal transport in phosphorene by reviewing the role of resonant bonding in driving giant phonon anharmonicity and long-range interactions. In addition, the extrinsic thermal conductivity of phosphorene is reviewed by discussing the effects of strain and substrate, together with phosphorene based heterostructures and nanoribbons. This Review summarizes the progress of thermal transport in phosphorene from both theoretical calculations and experimental measurements, which would be of significance to the design and development of efficient phosphorene based nanoelectronics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Scanning thermal microscopy of thermoelectric nanostructures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaniš, Jan; Zelinka, Jiří; Zeipl, Radek; Jelínek, Miroslav; Kocourek, Tomáš; Remsa, Jan; Navrátil, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2016), s. 1734-1739 ISSN 0361-5235 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-05864S; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-33056S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : thermoelectric layer * scanning thermal microscopy * pulsed laser deposition * laser deposition * secondary ion mass spectrometry Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CA - Inorganic Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 1.579, year: 2016

  12. Hydrogen production by thermal water splitting using a thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudesocque, N.; Lafon, C.; Girold, C.; Vandensteendam, C.; Baronnet, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    CEA has been working for more than 10 years in plasma technologies devoted to waste treatment: incineration, vitrification, gases and liquid treatment. Based on this experience, CEA experiments since several years an innovative route for hydrogen production by thermal water splitting, using a plasma as heat source. This new approach could be considered as an alternative to electrolysis for massive hydrogen production from water and electricity. This paper presents a brief state of the art of water thermal plasmas, showing the temperatures and quench velocity ranges technologically achievable today. Thermodynamic properties of a water plasma are presented and discussed. A kinetic computational model is presented, describing the behavior of splitted products during the quench in a plasma plume for various parameters, such as the quench rate. The model results are compared to gas analysis in the plasma plume obtained with in-situ sampling probe. The plasma composition measurements are issued from an Optical Emission Spectroscopic method (OES). The prediction of 30 % H 2 recovery with a 108 K.s -1 quench rate has been verified. A second experimentation has been performed: mass gas analysis, flowrate measurement and OES to study the 'behavior' and species in underwater electrical arc stricken between graphite electrodes. With this quench, a synthesis gas was produced with a content 55 % of hydrogen. (authors)

  13. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  14. Solar thermal aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  15. Tunable thermal link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  16. The Origin of Mass

    OpenAIRE

    森岡, 達史

    2013-01-01

    The quark-lepton mass problem and the ideas of mass protection are reviewed. The hierarchy problem and suggestions for its resolution, including Little Higgs models, are discussed. The Multiple Point Principle is introduced and used within the Standard Model to predict the top quark and Higgs particle masses. Mass matrix ans\\"{a}tze are considered; in particular we discuss the lightest family mass generation model, in which all the quark mixing angles are successfully expressed in terms of si...

  17. Heavy quark masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  18. Neutrino masses and oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, A Yu

    1996-11-01

    New effects related to refraction of neutrinos in different media are reviewed and implication of the effects to neutrino mass and mixing are discussed. Patterns of neutrino masses and mixing implied by existing hints/bounds are described. Recent results on neutrino mass generation are presented. They include neutrino masses in SO(10) GUT`s and models with anomalous U(1), generation of neutrino mass via neutrino-neutralino mixing, models of sterile neutrino. (author). 95 refs, 9 figs.

  19. Nuclear thermal propulsion engine cost trade studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschall, R.K.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA transportation strategy for the Mars Exploration architecture includes the use of nuclear thermal propulsion as the primary propulsion system for Mars transits. It is anticipated that the outgrowth of the NERVA/ROVER programs will be a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system capable of providing the propulsion for missions to Mars. The specific impulse (Isp) for such a system is expected to be in the 870 s range. Trade studies were conducted to investigate whether or not it may be cost effective to invest in a higher performance (Isp>870 s) engine for nuclear thermal propulsion for missions to Mars. The basic cost trades revolved around the amount of mass that must be transported to low-earth orbit prior to each Mars flight and the cost to launch that mass. The mass required depended on the assumptions made for Mars missions scenarios including piloted/cargo flights, number of Mars missions, and transit time to Mars. Cost parameters included launch cost, program schedule for development and operations, and net discount rate. The results were very dependent on the assumptions that were made. Under some assumptions, higher performance engines showed cost savings in the billions of dollars; under other assumptions, the additional cost to develop higher performance engines was not justified

  20. Sensors, Volume 4, Thermal Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Jorg; Ricolfi, Teresio

    1996-12-01

    'Sensors' is the first self-contained series to deal with the whole area of sensors. It describes general aspects, technical and physical fundamentals, construction, function, applications and developments of the various types of sensors. This volume describes the construction and applicational aspects of thermal sensors while presenting a rigorous treatment of the underlying physical principles. It provides a unique overview of the various categories of sensors as well as of specific groups, e.g. temperature sensors (resistance thermometers, thermocouples, and radiation thermometers), noise and acoustic thermometers, heat-flow and mass-flow sensors. Specific facettes of applications are presented by specialists from different fields including process control, automotive technology and cryogenics. This volume is an indispensable reference work and text book for both specialists and newcomers, researchers and developers.

  1. Alienation, Mass Society and Mass Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Hari N.

    This monograph examines the nature of alienation in mass society and mass culture. Conceptually based on the "Gemeinschaft-Gesellschaft" paradigm of sociologist Ferdinand Tonnies, discussion traces the concept of alienation as it appears in the philosophies of Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Sartre, and others. Dwight Macdonald's "A Theory of Mass…

  2. Relation between initial and minimum final white dwarf mass for Population I stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzitelli, I.; Dantona, F.

    1986-12-01

    The evolutionary paths for Population I stars having initial masses 1, 2.5, 3, 4, and 5 solar masses were computed from the homogeneous main sequence to the onset of the first major thermal pulse to evaluate the minimum mass and the chemical stratification of the remnant white dwarf (WD) associated with each parent mass. The helium flash phase was followed in detail for a 2.5 solar masses star, whereas for the 1 solar mass star the flash was bypassed, and the models at the beginning of the steady central helium burning phase were obtained by means of a scaling procedure upon the properly computed total and core masses. The results show that for a parent ranging between 1-3 solar masses the core mass at the first thermal pulse ranges only from 0.64-0.69 solar mass. If some very fast mass-loss mechanism is triggered in connection with the early stages of the thermal pulse phase, as suggested by the observed deficiency of asymptotic giant branch stars, the relation between final and initial mass is almost flat at least up to an initial mass of 3 solar masses, and the mass spectrum of the WDs is narrow and heavily peaked around 0.65 solar mass. 53 references.

  3. Relation between initial and minimum final white dwarf mass for Population I stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzitelli, I.; Dantona, F.; CNR, Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale, Frascati; Roma, Osservatorio Astronomico, Rome, Italy)

    1986-01-01

    The evolutionary paths for Population I stars having initial masses 1, 2.5, 3, 4, and 5 solar masses were computed from the homogeneous main sequence to the onset of the first major thermal pulse to evaluate the minimum mass and the chemical stratification of the remnant white dwarf (WD) associated with each parent mass. The helium flash phase was followed in detail for a 2.5 solar masses star, whereas for the 1 solar mass star the flash was bypassed, and the models at the beginning of the steady central helium burning phase were obtained by means of a scaling procedure upon the properly computed total and core masses. The results show that for a parent ranging between 1-3 solar masses the core mass at the first thermal pulse ranges only from 0.64-0.69 solar mass. If some very fast mass-loss mechanism is triggered in connection with the early stages of the thermal pulse phase, as suggested by the observed deficiency of asymptotic giant branch stars, the relation between final and initial mass is almost flat at least up to an initial mass of 3 solar masses, and the mass spectrum of the WDs is narrow and heavily peaked around 0.65 solar mass. 53 references

  4. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  5. Dynamical Dark Matter from thermal freeze-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienes, Keith R.; Fennick, Jacob; Kumar, Jason; Thomas, Brooks

    2018-03-01

    In the Dynamical Dark-Matter (DDM) framework, the dark sector comprises a large number of constituent dark particles whose individual masses, lifetimes, and cosmological abundances obey specific scaling relations with respect to each other. In particular, the most natural versions of this framework tend to require a spectrum of cosmological abundances which scale inversely with mass, so that dark-sector states with larger masses have smaller abundances. Thus far, DDM model-building has primarily relied on nonthermal mechanisms for abundance generation such as misalignment production, since these mechanisms give rise to abundances that have this property. By contrast, the simplest versions of thermal freeze-out tend to produce abundances that increase, rather than decrease, with the mass of the dark-matter component. In this paper, we demonstrate that there exist relatively simple modifications of the traditional thermal freeze-out mechanism which "flip" the resulting abundance spectrum, producing abundances that scale inversely with mass. Moreover, we demonstrate that a far broader variety of scaling relations between lifetimes, abundances, and masses can emerge through thermal freeze-out than through the nonthermal mechanisms previously considered for DDM ensembles. The results of this paper thus extend the DDM framework into the thermal domain and essentially allow us to "design" our resulting DDM ensembles at will in order to realize a rich array of resulting dark-matter phenomenologies.

  6. Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management (TOP-M)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-18

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 18-07-2017 Final Technical Jul 2015 - Jul 2017 NICOP - Thermally Optimized Paradigm of Thermal Management ...The main goal of this research was to present a New Thermal Management Approach, which combines thermally aware Very/Ultra Large Scale Integration...SPAD) image sensors were used to demonstrate the new thermal management approach. Thermal management , integrated temperature sensors, Vt extractor

  7. Apollo telescope mount thermal systems unit thermal vacuum test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucks, H. F.; Hueter, U.; Wise, J. H.; Bachtel, F. D.

    1971-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount's thermal systems unit was utilized to conduct a full-scale thermal vacuum test to verify the thermal design and the analytical techniques used to develop the thermal mathematical models. Thermal vacuum test philosophy, test objectives configuration, test monitoring, environment simulation, vehicle test performance, and data correlation are discussed. Emphasis is placed on planning and execution of the thermal vacuum test with particular attention on problems encountered in conducting a test of this maguitude.

  8. Systematic approach to thermal leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frossard, T.; Kartavtsev, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Garny, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hohenegger, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, LPPC, BSP (Switzerland); Mitrouskas, D. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    In this work we study thermal leptogenesis using non-equilibrium quantum field theory. Starting from fundamental equations for correlators of the quantum fields we describe the steps necessary to obtain quantum kinetic equations for quasiparticles. These can easily be compared to conventional results and overcome conceptional problems inherent in the canonical approach. Beyond CP-violating decays we include also those scattering processes which are tightly related to the decays in a consistent approximation of fourth order in the Yukawa couplings. It is demonstrated explicitly how the S-matrix elements for the scattering processes in the conventional approach are related to two- and three-loop contributions to the effective action. We derive effective decay and scattering amplitudes taking medium corrections and thermal masses into account. In this context we also investigate CP-violating Higgs decay within the same formalism. From the kinetic equations we derive rate equations for the lepton asymmetry improved in that they include quantum-statistical effects and medium corrections to the quasiparticle properties.

  9. Effect of carbon nanospheres on shape stabilization and thermal behavior of phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehrali, Mohammad; Tahan Latibari, Sara; Mehrali, Mehdi; Mahlia, Teuku Meurah Indra; Cornelis Metselaar, Hendrik Simon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Introducing novel form-stable PCM of stearic acid (SA)/carbon nanospheres (CNSs). • The highest stabilized SA content is 83 wt% in the SA/CNS composites. • Increasing thermal conductivity of composite phase change material with high amount of latent heat. - Abstract: Stearic acid (SA) is one of the main phase change materials (PCMs) for medium temperature thermal energy storage systems. In order to stabilize the shape and enhance the thermal conductivity of SA, the effects of adding carbon nanospheres (CNSs) as a carbon nanofiller were examined experimentally. The maximum mass fraction of SA retained in CNSs was found as 80 wt% without the leakage of SA in a melted state, even when it was heated over the melting point of SA. The dropping point test shows that there was clearly no liquid leakage through the phase change process at the operating temperature range of the composite PCMs. The thermal stability and thermal properties of composite PCMs were investigated with a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), respectively. The thermal conductivity of the SA/CNS composite was determined by the laser flash method. The thermal conductivity at 35 °C increased about 105% for the highest loading of CNS (50 wt%). The thermal cycling test proved that form-stable composite PCMs had good thermal reliability and chemical durability after 1000 cycles of melting and freezing, which is advantageous for latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES)

  10. Measurement of thermal conductance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchnir, M.

    1977-01-01

    The 6-m long, 45-kG, warm-iron superconducting magnets envisioned for the Energy Doubler stage of the Fermilab accelerator require stiff supports with minimized thermal conductances in order to keep the refrigeration power reasonable. The large number of supports involved in the system required a careful study of their heat conduction from the room temperature wall to the intercepting refrigeration at 20 0 K and to the liquid helium. For this purpose the thermal conductance of this support was measured by comparing it with the thermal conductance of a copper strap of known geometry. An association of steady-state thermal analysis and experimental thermal conductivity techniques forms the basis of this method. An important advantage is the automatic simulation of the 20 0 K refrigeration intercept by the copper strap, which simplifies the apparatus considerably. This relative resistance technique, which uses electrical analogy as a guideline, is applicable with no restrictions for materials with temperature-independent thermal conductivity. For other materials the results obtained are functions of the specific temperature interval involved in the measurements. A comprehensive review of the literature on thermal conductivity indicates that this approach has not been used before. A demonstration of its self-consistency is stressed here rather than results obtained for different supports

  11. Casting thermal simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamsuddin bin Sulaiman

    1994-01-01

    The whole of this study is concerned with process simulation in casting processes. This study describes the application of the finite element method as an aid to simulating the thermal design of a high pressure die casting die by analysing the cooling transients in the casting cycle. Two types of investigation were carried out to model the linear and non-linear cooling behavior with consideration of a thermal interface effect. The simulated cooling for different stages were presented in temperature contour form. These illustrate the successful application of the Finite Element Method to model the process and they illustrate the significance of the thermal interface at low pressure

  12. Advanced thermal management materials

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Guosheng; Kuang, Ken

    2012-01-01

    ""Advanced Thermal Management Materials"" provides a comprehensive and hands-on treatise on the importance of thermal packaging in high performance systems. These systems, ranging from active electronically-scanned radar arrays to web servers, require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires materials capable of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility with the packaging and dye. Its coverage includes all aspects of thermal management materials, both traditional and non-traditional, with an emphasis on metal based materials. An in-depth discussion of properties and m

  13. Thermal inflation with a thermal waterfall scalar field coupled to a light spectator scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Lyth, David H.; Rumsey, Arron

    2017-05-01

    A new model of thermal inflation is introduced, in which the mass of the thermal waterfall field is dependent on a light spectator scalar field. Using the δ N formalism, the "end of inflation" scenario is investigated in order to ascertain whether this model is able to produce the dominant contribution to the primordial curvature perturbation. A multitude of constraints are considered so as to explore the parameter space, with particular emphasis on key observational signatures. For natural values of the parameters, the model is found to yield a sharp prediction for the scalar spectral index and its running, well within the current observational bounds.

  14. Miniature Piezoelectric Macro-Mass Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Trebi-Ollennu, Ashitey; Bonitz, Robert G.; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2010-01-01

    Mass balances usually use a strain gauge that requires an impedance measurement and is susceptible to noise and thermal drift. A piezoelectric balance can be used to measure mass directly by monitoring the voltage developed across the piezoelectric balance, which is linear with weight or it can be used in resonance to produce a frequency change proportional to the mass change (see figure). The piezoelectric actuator/balance is swept in frequency through its fundamental resonance. If a small mass is added to the balance, the resonance frequency shifts down in proportion to the mass. By monitoring the frequency shift, the mass can be determined. This design allows for two independent measurements of mass. Additionally, more than one sample can be verified because this invention allows for each sample to be transported away from the measuring device upon completion of the measurement, if required. A piezoelectric actuator, or many piezoelectric actuators, was placed between the collection plate of the sampling system and the support structure. As the sample mass is added to the plate, the piezoelectrics are stressed, causing them to produce a voltage that is proportional to the mass and acceleration. In addition, a change in mass delta m produces a change in the resonance frequency with delta f proportional to delta m. In a microgravity environment, the spacecraft could be accelerated to produce a force on the piezoelectric actuator that would produce a voltage proportional to the mass and acceleration. Alternatively, the acceleration could be used to force the mass on the plate, and the inertial effects of the mass on the plate would produce a shift in the resonance frequency with the change in frequency related to the mass change. Three prototypes of the mass balance mechanism were developed. These macro-mass balances each consist of a solid base and an APA 60 Cedrat flextensional piezoelectric actuator supporting a measuring plate. A similar structure with 3 APA

  15. Thermal properties of a novel nanoencapsulated phase change material for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuensanta, Mónica; Paiphansiri, Umaporn; Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores; Guillem, Celia; López-Buendía, Ángel M.; Landfester, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A paraffin wax RT80 was encapsulated in styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer as polymer shell using miniemulsion polymerization process to obtain a novel nanoencapsulated PCM with 80 °C melting temperature. • Nano-PCMs have high compact structure, spherical morphology and thermal stability. • The nano-PCMs have potential applications as thermal energy storage materials. - Abstract: A novel nanoencapsulation of a paraffine type phase change material, RT80, in a styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer shell using the miniemulsion polymerization process was carried out. General characteristics of the RT80 nanoparticles in terms of thermal properties, morphology, chemical composition and particle size distribution were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The influence of different monomers (styrene, butyl acrylate) and the surfactant/paraffin mass ratios on nanoparticles properties such as thermal capacity, particle size and morphology were systematically investigated. In all cases studied, encapsulation efficiency was close to 80 wt% with a particle size distribution between 52 and 112 nm and regular spherical shape and uniform structure. The amount of encapsulated paraffin achieved was comprised between 8 and 20%. Melting and crystallization heats were found to be approximately 5–25 J g −1 , mainly depending on surfactant/paraffin mass ratio. Melting temperature of RT80 nanoparticles slightly decreased (1–7 °C) respect to the raw RT80. In addition, the encapsulated RT80 nanoparticles show thermal stability even after 200 thermal (heat-cooling) cycles

  16. Thermal properties of a novel nanoencapsulated phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuensanta, Mónica, E-mail: monica.fuensanta@aidico.es [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Paiphansiri, Umaporn [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores, E-mail: md.romero@aidico.es [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Guillem, Celia; López-Buendía, Ángel M. [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Landfester, Katharina [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-08-10

    Highlights: • A paraffin wax RT80 was encapsulated in styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer as polymer shell using miniemulsion polymerization process to obtain a novel nanoencapsulated PCM with 80 °C melting temperature. • Nano-PCMs have high compact structure, spherical morphology and thermal stability. • The nano-PCMs have potential applications as thermal energy storage materials. - Abstract: A novel nanoencapsulation of a paraffine type phase change material, RT80, in a styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer shell using the miniemulsion polymerization process was carried out. General characteristics of the RT80 nanoparticles in terms of thermal properties, morphology, chemical composition and particle size distribution were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The influence of different monomers (styrene, butyl acrylate) and the surfactant/paraffin mass ratios on nanoparticles properties such as thermal capacity, particle size and morphology were systematically investigated. In all cases studied, encapsulation efficiency was close to 80 wt% with a particle size distribution between 52 and 112 nm and regular spherical shape and uniform structure. The amount of encapsulated paraffin achieved was comprised between 8 and 20%. Melting and crystallization heats were found to be approximately 5–25 J g{sup −1}, mainly depending on surfactant/paraffin mass ratio. Melting temperature of RT80 nanoparticles slightly decreased (1–7 °C) respect to the raw RT80. In addition, the encapsulated RT80 nanoparticles show thermal stability even after 200 thermal (heat-cooling) cycles.

  17. Thermal and prompt photons at RHIC and the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paquet, Jean-François [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Shen, Chun [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Denicol, Gabriel [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada); Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Luzum, Matthew [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, E-15706 Santiago de Compostela, Galicia-Spain (Spain); Universidade de São Paulo, Rua do Matão Travessa R, no. 187, 05508-090, Cidade Universitária, São Paulo (Brazil); Schenke, Björn [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A2T8 (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    Thermal and prompt photon production in heavy ion collisions is evaluated and compared with measurements from both RHIC and the LHC. An event-by-event hydrodynamical model of heavy ion collisions that includes shear and bulk viscosities is used, along with up-to-date photon emission rates. Larger tension with measurements is observed at RHIC than at the LHC. The center-of-mass energy and centrality dependence of thermal and prompt photons is investigated.

  18. Graphene-based filament material for thermal ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shick, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-19

    The use of graphene oxide materials for thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of plutonium and uranium has been investigated. Filament made from graphene oxide slurries have been 3-D printed. A method for attaching these filaments to commercial thermal ionization post assemblies has been devised. Resistive heating of the graphene based filaments under high vacuum showed stable operation in excess of 4 hours. Plutonium ion production has been observed in an initial set of filaments spiked with the Pu 128 Certified Reference Material.

  19. Thermal explosion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Tso Chin [Malaya Univ., Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    1984-12-01

    The phenomenon of thermal explosion arises in several important safety problems, yet scientists are still baffled by its origin. This article reviews some of the models that have been proposed to explain the phenomenon.

  20. Thermal Properties Measurement Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, Jon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Braase, Lori [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Papesch, Cynthia [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hurley, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gofryk, Krzysztof [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harp, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Fielding, Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knight, Collin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meyer, Mitch [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The Thermal Properties Measurement Report summarizes the research, development, installation, and initial use of significant experimental thermal property characterization capabilities at the INL in FY 2015. These new capabilities were used to characterize a U3Si2 (candidate Accident Tolerant) fuel sample fabricated at the INL. The ability to perform measurements at various length scales is important and provides additional data that is not currently in the literature. However, the real value of the data will be in accomplishing a phenomenological understanding of the thermal conductivity in fuels and the ties to predictive modeling. Thus, the MARMOT advanced modeling and simulation capability was utilized to illustrate how the microstructural data can be modeled and compared with bulk characterization data. A scientific method was established for thermal property measurement capability on irradiated nuclear fuel samples, which will be installed in the Irradiated Material Characterization Laboratory (IMCL).