WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal imaging techniques

  1. A novel technique to monitor thermal discharges using thermal infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthulakshmi, A L; Natesan, Usha; Ferrer, Vincent A; Deepthi, K; Venugopalan, V P; Narasimhan, S V

    2013-09-01

    Coastal temperature is an important indicator of water quality, particularly in regions where delicate ecosystems sensitive to water temperature are present. Remote sensing methods are highly reliable for assessing the thermal dispersion. The plume dispersion from the thermal outfall of the nuclear power plant at Kalpakkam, on the southeast coast of India, was investigated from March to December 2011 using thermal infrared images along with field measurements. The absolute temperature as provided by the thermal infrared (TIR) images is used in the Arc GIS environment for generating a spatial pattern of the plume movement. Good correlation of the temperature measured by the TIR camera with the field data (r(2) = 0.89) make it a reliable method for the thermal monitoring of the power plant effluents. The study portrays that the remote sensing technique provides an effective means of monitoring the thermal distribution pattern in coastal waters.

  2. Segmentation techniques for extracting humans from thermal images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dickens, JS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available will be classified. Various methods for segmenting people from thermal images will be reviewed and compared. Image thresholding takes in a multi-valued input image and outputs a binary image where one of the states represents fore- ground objects and the other... that the between class variance, 2b , is: 2b = ( T!(k) (k)) 2 !(k) (1 !(k)) (6) Otsu?s method selects the optimal threshold Topt in order to maximise the between class variance. The optimal threshold is the value of k that maximises Equation 6, ie. Topt...

  3. Image processing techniques for thermal, x-rays and nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadda, V.K.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes image acquisition techniques for the non-visible range of electromagnetic spectrum especially thermal, x-rays and nuclear radiations. Thermal imaging systems are valuable tools used for applications ranging from PCB inspection, hot spot studies, fire identification, satellite imaging to defense applications. Penetrating radiations like x-rays and gamma rays are used in NDT, baggage inspection, CAT scan, cardiology, radiography, nuclear medicine etc. Neutron radiography compliments conventional x-rays and gamma radiography. For these applications, image processing and computed tomography are employed for 2-D and 3-D image interpretation respectively. The paper also covers main features of image processing systems for quantitative evaluation of gray level and binary images. (author)

  4. Mathematical Foundation Based Inter-Connectivity modelling of Thermal Image processing technique for Fire Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantan Nath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, integration between multiple functions of image processing and its statistical parameters for intelligent alarming series based fire detection system is presented. The proper inter-connectivity mapping between processing elements of imagery based on classification factor for temperature monitoring and multilevel intelligent alarm sequence is introduced by abstractive canonical approach. The flow of image processing components between core implementation of intelligent alarming system with temperature wise area segmentation as well as boundary detection technique is not yet fully explored in the present era of thermal imaging. In the light of analytical perspective of convolutive functionalism in thermal imaging, the abstract algebra based inter-mapping model between event-calculus supported DAGSVM classification for step-by-step generation of alarm series with gradual monitoring technique and segmentation of regions with its affected boundaries in thermographic image of coal with respect to temperature distinctions is discussed. The connectedness of the multifunctional operations of image processing based compatible fire protection system with proper monitoring sequence is presently investigated here. The mathematical models representing the relation between the temperature affected areas and its boundary in the obtained thermal image defined in partial derivative fashion is the core contribution of this study. The thermal image of coal sample is obtained in real-life scenario by self-assembled thermographic camera in this study. The amalgamation between area segmentation, boundary detection and alarm series are described in abstract algebra. The principal objective of this paper is to understand the dependency pattern and the principles of working of image processing components and structure an inter-connected modelling technique also for those components with the help of mathematical foundation.

  5. Micro-scanning error correction technique for an optical micro-scanning thermal microscope imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mei-Jing; Tan, Ai-Ling; Yang, Ming; Xu, Jie; Zu, Zhen-Long; Wang, Jing-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    With optical micro-scanning technology, the spatial resolution of the thermal microscope imaging system can be increased without reducing the size of the detector unit or increasing the detector dimensions. Due to optical micro-scanning error, the four low-resolution images collected by micro-scanning thermal micro- scope imaging system are not standard down-sampled images. The reconstructed image quality is degraded by the direct image interpolation with error, which influences the performance of the system. Therefore, the technique to reduce the system micro-scanning error need to be studied. Based on micro-scanning technology and combined with new edge directed interpolation(NEDI) algorithm, an error correction technique for the micro-scanning instrument is proposed. Simulations and experiments show that the proposed technique can reduce the optical micro-scanning error, improve the imaging effect of the system and improve the systems spatial resolution. It can be applied to other electro-optical imaging systems to improve their resolution.

  6. Novel thermal imaging analysis technique for detecting inflammation in thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Costanzo; Allen, John; Dickinson, Jane; Neoh, Christopher; Perros, Petros

    2014-12-01

    The disease phase in thyroid eye disease (TED) is commonly assessed by clinical investigation of cardinal signs of inflammation and using the clinical activity score (CAS). Although CAS is the current gold standard, the clinical assessment would benefit if a more objective tool were available. The aim of this work was to explore the clinical value of a novel thermal imaging analysis technique to objectively quantify the thermal characteristics of the eye and peri-orbital region and determine the disease phase in TED. This was a cross-sectional study comparing consecutive patients with active TED (CAS ≥ 3/7) attending a tertiary center, with a group of consecutive patients with inactive TED (CAS <3). Thermal images were acquired from 30 TED patients, 17 with active disease and 13 with inactive disease. Patients underwent standard ophthalmological clinical assessments and thermal imaging. Five novel thermal eye parameters (TEP) were developed to quantify the thermal characteristics of the eyes in terms of the highest level of inflammation (TEP1), overall level of inflammation (TEP2), right-left asymmetry in the level of inflammation (TEP3), maximum temperature variability across the eyes (TEP4), and right-left asymmetry in the temperature variability (TEP5). All five TEP were increased in active TED. TEP1 gave the largest accuracy (77%) at separating the two groups, with 65% sensitivity and 92% specificity. A statistical model combining all five parameters increased the overall accuracy, compared to using only one parameter, to 93% (94% sensitivity and 92% specificity). All five of the parameters were also found to be increased in patients with chemosis compared to those without. The potential diagnostic value of this novel thermal imaging analysis technique has been demonstrated. Further investigation on a larger group of patients is necessary to confirm these results.

  7. Systems and methods for thermal imaging technique for measuring mixing of fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booten, Charles; Tomerlin, Jeff; Winkler, Jon

    2016-06-14

    Systems and methods for thermal imaging for measuring mixing of fluids are provided. In one embodiment, a method for measuring mixing of gaseous fluids using thermal imaging comprises: positioning a thermal test medium parallel to a direction gaseous fluid flow from an outlet vent of a momentum source, wherein when the source is operating, the fluid flows across a surface of the medium; obtaining an ambient temperature value from a baseline thermal image of the surface; obtaining at least one operational thermal image of the surface when the fluid is flowing from the outlet vent across the surface, wherein the fluid has a temperature different than the ambient temperature; and calculating at least one temperature-difference fraction associated with at least a first position on the surface based on a difference between temperature measurements obtained from the at least one operational thermal image and the ambient temperature value.

  8. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  9. Ground-based thermal imaging of stream surface temperatures: Technique and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Scott A.; Petre, Sally J.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a ground-based handheld thermal imaging system for measuring water temperatures using data from eight southwestern USA streams and rivers. We found handheld thermal imagers could provide considerably more spatial information on water temperature (for our unit one image = 19,600 individual temperature measurements) than traditional methods could supply without a prohibitive amount of effort. Furthermore, they could provide measurements of stream surface temperature almost instantaneously compared with most traditional handheld thermometers (e.g., >20 s/reading). Spatial temperature analysis is important for measurement of subtle temperature differences across waterways, and identification of warm and cold groundwater inputs. Handheld thermal imaging is less expensive and equipment intensive than airborne thermal imaging methods and is useful under riparian canopies. Disadvantages of handheld thermal imagers include their current higher expense than thermometers, their susceptibility to interference when used incorrectly, and their slightly lower accuracy than traditional temperature measurement methods. Thermal imagers can only measure surface temperature, but this usually corresponds to subsurface temperatures in well-mixed streams and rivers. Using thermal imaging in select applications, such as where spatial investigations of water temperature are needed, or in conjunction with stationary temperature data loggers or handheld electronic or liquid-in-glass thermometers to characterize stream temperatures by both time and space, could provide valuable information on stream temperature dynamics. These tools will become increasingly important to fisheries biologists as costs continue to decline.

  10. An intelligent approach for cooling radiator fault diagnosis based on infrared thermal image processing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri-Garavand, Amin; Ahmadi, Hojjat; Omid, Mahmoud; Mohtasebi, Seyed Saeid; Mollazade, Kaveh; Russell Smith, Alan John; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria

    2015-01-01

    This research presents a new intelligent fault diagnosis and condition monitoring system for classification of different conditions of cooling radiator using infrared thermal images. The system was adopted to classify six types of cooling radiator faults; radiator tubes blockage, radiator fins blockage, loose connection between fins and tubes, radiator door failure, coolant leakage, and normal conditions. The proposed system consists of several distinct procedures including thermal image acquisition, image pre-processing, image processing, two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform (2D-DWT), feature extraction, feature selection using a genetic algorithm (GA), and finally classification by artificial neural networks (ANNs). The 2D-DWT is implemented to decompose the thermal images. Subsequently, statistical texture features are extracted from the original images and are decomposed into thermal images. The significant selected features are used to enhance the performance of the designed ANN classifier for the 6 types of cooling radiator conditions (output layer) in the next stage. For the tested system, the input layer consisted of 16 neurons based on the feature selection operation. The best performance of ANN was obtained with a 16-6-6 topology. The classification results demonstrated that this system can be employed satisfactorily as an intelligent condition monitoring and fault diagnosis for a class of cooling radiator. - Highlights: • Intelligent fault diagnosis of cooling radiator using thermal image processing. • Thermal image processing in a multiscale representation structure by 2D-DWT. • Selection features based on a hybrid system that uses both GA and ANN. • Application of ANN as classifier. • Classification accuracy of fault detection up to 93.83%

  11. Mirror image technique for the thermal analysis in cryoablation: Experimental setup and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaretto, Valter; Passerone, Claudio

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a set of experiments that were performed to characterize the freezing front propagation in water first, and in an agar-gel solution afterwards. The experimental setup made of Peltier devices, to emulate the cryogenic effect, and a copper cold finger, to mimic the cold probe interface, are described. We claim that by monitoring some temperatures at the generating cryodevice, several pieces of information can be derived through the cold interface to assess the outside thermodynamic changes. The employed technique, known as mirror image, allows determining the occurrence of the initial ice formation outside the cryo-probe and in the surrounding material, also with different magnitudes of the thermal contact resistance at the cold interface. For both water and agar the ice penetration was found to be non linear versus time, and proportional to the square root of time in the performed experiments. The ice drift velocity decreases according to its penetration inside the tested materials. At the beginning of ice formation, the measured drift velocities are approximately 0.11 mm/s and 0.06 mm/s for water and agar, respectively, and after the ice penetrates 2 mm, they become approximately 0.03 mm/s for both materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The application of novel nano-thermal and imaging techniques for monitoring drug microstructure and distribution within PLGA microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Chen, De; Guo, Zhe-Fei; Zhang, Yong-Ming; Liu, Yi; Askin, Sean; Craig, Duncan Q M; Zhao, Min

    2017-04-30

    Poly (d,l-lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) based microspheres have been extensively used as controlled drug release systems. However, the burst effect has been a persistent issue associated with such systems, especially for those prepared by the double emulsion technique. An effective approach to preventing the burst effect and achieving a more ideal drug release profile is to improve the drug distribution within the polymeric matrix. Therefore, it is of great importance to establish a rapid and robust tool for screening and optimizing the drug distribution during pre-formulation. Transition Temperature Microscopy (TTM), a novel nano-thermal and imaging technique, is an extension of nano-thermal analysis (nano-TA) whereby a transition temperature is detected at a localized region of a sample and then designated a color based on a particular temperature/color palette, finally resulting in a coded map based on transition temperatures detected by carrying out a series of nanoTA measurements across the surface of the sample. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of applying the aforementioned technique combined with other thermal, imaging and structural techniques for monitoring the drug microstructure and spatial distribution within bovine serum albumin (BSA) loaded and nimodipine loaded PLGA microspheres, with a view to better predicting the in vitro drug release performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An Infrared Thermal Images Database and a New Technique for Thyroid Nodules Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, José R; Damião, Charbel; Conci, Aura

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid nodules diseases are a common health problem and thyroidal cancer is becoming increasingly prevalent. They appear in the neck and bottom neck region, superficially over the trachea. Cancer tissues are characterized by higher temperatures than surrounding tissues. Thermography is a diagnostic tool increasingly used to detect cancer and abnormalities. Artificial intelligence is an approach which can be applied to thyroid nodules classification, but is necessary to have a proper number of cases with proven diagnosis. In this paper, a new database that contain infrared thermal images, clinical and physiological data is presented. The description of each nodule per patient, and the acquisition protocol (based on Dynamic Infrared Thermography approach) is considered as well. A semi-automatic method for image registration was implemented to pre-process the thermograms and a new method for the Region of Interest (ROI) extraction is proposed. Moreover, the obtained ROI results are confirmed by medical specialists and turned available for future comparison with other works.

  14. Calibration of a thin metal foil for infrared imaging video bolometer to estimate the spatial variation of thermal diffusivity using a photo-thermal technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Shwetang N; Peterson, Byron J; Sano, Ryuichi; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Drapiko, Evgeny A; Alekseyev, Andrey G; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Itomi, Muneji; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-05-01

    A thin metal foil is used as a broad band radiation absorber for the InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB), which is a vital diagnostic for studying three-dimensional radiation structures from high temperature plasmas in the Large Helical Device. The two-dimensional (2D) heat diffusion equation of the foil needs to be solved numerically to estimate the radiation falling on the foil through a pinhole geometry. The thermal, physical, and optical properties of the metal foil are among the inputs to the code besides the spatiotemporal variation of temperature, for reliable estimation of the exhaust power from the plasma illuminating the foil. The foil being very thin and of considerable size, non-uniformities in these properties need to be determined by suitable calibration procedures. The graphite spray used for increasing the surface emissivity also contributes to a change in the thermal properties. This paper discusses the application of the thermographic technique for determining the spatial variation of the effective in-plane thermal diffusivity of the thin metal foil and graphite composite. The paper also discusses the advantages of this technique in the light of limitations and drawbacks presented by other calibration techniques being practiced currently. The technique is initially applied to a material of known thickness and thermal properties for validation and finally to thin foils of gold and platinum both with two different thicknesses. It is observed that the effect of the graphite layer on the estimation of the thermal diffusivity becomes more pronounced for thinner foils and the measured values are approximately 2.5-3 times lower than the literature values. It is also observed that the percentage reduction in thermal diffusivity due to the coating is lower for high thermal diffusivity materials such as gold. This fact may also explain, albeit partially, the higher sensitivity of the platinum foil as compared to gold.

  15. Thermal imaging in medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaka Ogorevc

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Body temperature monitoring is one of the oldest and still one of the most basic diagnostic methods in medicine. In recent years thermal imaging has been increasingly used in measurements of body temperature for diagnostic purposes. Thermal imaging is non-invasive, non-contact method for measuring surface body temperature. Method is quick, painless and patient is not exposed to ionizing radiation or any other body burden.Application of thermal imaging in medicine: Pathological conditions can be indicated as hyper- or hypothermic patterns in many cases. Thermal imaging is presented as a diagnostic method, which can detect such thermal anomalies. This article provides an overview of the thermal imaging applications in various fields of medicine. Thermal imaging has proven to be a suitable method for human febrile temperature screening, for the detection of sites of fractures and infections, a reliable diagnostic tool in the detection of breast cancer and determining the type of skin cancer tumour. It is useful in monitoring the course of a therapy after spinal cord injury, in the detection of food allergies and detecting complications at hemodialysis and is also very effective at the course of treatment of breast reconstruction after mastectomy. With thermal imaging is possible to determine the degrees of burns and early detection of osteomyelitis in diabetic foot phenomenon. The most common and the oldest application of thermal imaging in medicine is the field of rheumatology.Recommendations for use and standards: Essential performance of a thermal imaging camera, measurement method, preparation of a patient and environmental conditions are very important for proper interpretation of measurement results in medical applications of thermal imaging. Standard for screening thermographs was formed for the human febrile temperature screening application.Conclusion: Based on presented examples it is shown that thermal imaging can

  16. Next generation thermal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marche, P.P.

    1988-01-01

    The best design of high performance thermal imagers for the 1990s will use horizontal quasi-linear arrays with focal plane processing associated with a simple vertical mechanical scanner. These imagers will have performance that is greatly improved compared to that of present-day devices (50 to 100 percent range and resolution improvement). 5 references

  17. Thermal (Infrared) Imaging Sensors (Review Paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhir Khare; S. S. Negi

    2007-01-01

    Recent developments in improved type of infrared detector technologies focal plane arrays,signal processing techniques, and innovative optical designs have enabled thermal imagingtechnology to undergo revolutionary advancement, leading to realisation of high performanceand compact thermal cameras for surveillance, target acquisition, tracking, and guidance.Instruments Research and Development Establishment (IRDE), Dehradun, has designed anddeveloped a variety of thermal imaging sights for dif...

  18. Microwave Breast Imaging Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhurbenko, Vitaliy; Rubæk, Tonny

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the applicability of microwave radiation for breast cancer detection. Microwave imaging systems are categorized based on their hardware architecture. The advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques are discussed. The fundamental tradeoffs are indicated between...... various requirements to be fulfilled in the design of an imaging system for breast cancer detection and some strategies to overcome these limitations....

  19. Thermal measurements and inverse techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Orlande, Helcio RB; Maillet, Denis; Cotta, Renato M

    2011-01-01

    With its uncommon presentation of instructional material regarding mathematical modeling, measurements, and solution of inverse problems, Thermal Measurements and Inverse Techniques is a one-stop reference for those dealing with various aspects of heat transfer. Progress in mathematical modeling of complex industrial and environmental systems has enabled numerical simulations of most physical phenomena. In addition, recent advances in thermal instrumentation and heat transfer modeling have improved experimental procedures and indirect measurements for heat transfer research of both natural phe

  20. Multimodality imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Sopena, Ramón; Bartumeus, Paula; Sopena, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    In multimodality imaging, the need to combine morphofunctional information can be approached by either acquiring images at different times (asynchronous), and fused them through digital image manipulation techniques or simultaneously acquiring images (synchronous) and merging them automatically. The asynchronous post-processing solution presents various constraints, mainly conditioned by the different positioning of the patient in the two scans acquired at different times in separated machines. The best solution to achieve consistency in time and space is obtained by the synchronous image acquisition. There are many multimodal technologies in molecular imaging. In this review we will focus on those multimodality image techniques more commonly used in the field of diagnostic imaging (SPECT-CT, PET-CT) and new developments (as PET-MR). The technological innovations and development of new tracers and smart probes are the main key points that will condition multimodality image and diagnostic imaging professionals' future. Although SPECT-CT and PET-CT are standard in most clinical scenarios, MR imaging has some advantages, providing excellent soft-tissue contrast and multidimensional functional, structural and morphological information. The next frontier is to develop efficient detectors and electronics systems capable of detecting two modality signals at the same time. Not only PET-MR but also MR-US or optic-PET will be introduced in clinical scenarios. Even more, MR diffusion-weighted, pharmacokinetic imaging, spectroscopy or functional BOLD imaging will merge with PET tracers to further increase molecular imaging as a relevant medical discipline. Multimodality imaging techniques will play a leading role in relevant clinical applications. The development of new diagnostic imaging research areas, mainly in the field of oncology, cardiology and neuropsychiatry, will impact the way medicine is performed today. Both clinical and experimental multimodality studies, in

  1. Multispectral thermal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, P.G.; Bender, S.C.; Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Smith, B.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group; Garrett, A.; Pendergast, M.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Corp., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Kay, R.R. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Monitoring Systems and Technology Center

    1998-12-01

    Many remote sensing applications rely on imaging spectrometry. Here the authors use imaging spectrometry for thermal and multispectral signatures measured from a satellite platform enhanced with a combination of accurate calibrations and on-board data for correcting atmospheric distortions. The approach is supported by physics-based end-to-end modeling and analysis, which permits a cost-effective balance between various hardware and software aspects. The goal is to develop and demonstrate advanced technologies and analysis tools toward meeting the needs of the customer; at the same time, the attributes of this system can address other applications in such areas as environmental change, agriculture, and volcanology.

  2. Nonmammographic breast imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywang-Köbrunner, S H

    1992-10-01

    Significant progress in early detection of malignancy has been achieved by the improvement of mammographic technique, the introduction of quality control, the demonstration of benefits from screening, and appropriate application of supplementary methods such as ultrasound, cytology, and stereotaxis. Certain problems in breast imaging, however, are still unsolved. These include early detection and exclusion of malignancy without microcalcifications in mammographically dense tissue (particularly in younger women), the still-limited accuracy of mammographic signs, and the management of diagnostic problems after surgery, radiation therapy, or silicone implants. Therefore, research is needed to further improve diagnostic capabilities. The research can be subdivided into different approaches: 1) further development of the mammographic technique (digital luminescence radiography); 2) evaluation of techniques that image other physical tissue properties (sonography, thermography, trans-illumination, CT, non-contrast-enhanced MR imaging, biomagnetism, biostereometry, and ductoscopy); 3) investigation of techniques that image metabolic changes (MR spectroscopy, positron-emission tomography) or metabolism-induced differences in perfusion or vascularity (Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced MR imaging); and 4) development of techniques that attempt tissue diagnosis using monoclonal antibodies. Among these techniques, digital luminescence radiography and contrast-enhanced MR imaging are the most developed and the most promising. They are at the threshold of becoming clinically important. Doppler ultrasound could be useful for certain indications. Whereas MR spectroscopy, positron-emission tomography, the search for appropriate antibodies, and possibly transillumination, ductoscopy, and biomagnetism offer interesting new aspects for research, the value of CT, thermography, and biostereometry is not yet established.

  3. Landsat and Thermal Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidson, Terry; Barsi, Julia; Jhabvala, Murzy; Reuter, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to describe the collection of thermal images by Landsat sensors already on orbit and to introduce the new thermal sensor to be launched in 2013. The chapter describes the thematic mapper (TM) and enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+) sensors, the calibration of their thermal bands, and the design and prelaunch calibration of the new thermal infrared sensor (TIRS).

  4. Imaging Techniques in Conservation

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Emma Marie

    2013-01-01

    New imaging techniques are increasingly being used within cultural heritage. This paper explores potential uses of such technologies within conservation and implications of their use on object preservation and accessibility. Study of their effects on objects is crucial because their employment is becoming irreplaceable; for example, polynomial texture mapping (PTM) has revealed previously undetectable surface features. In such cases, it is necessary to continue to use the technique to monitor...

  5. Applications of thermal imaging in avian science

    OpenAIRE

    McCafferty, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal imaging, or infrared thermography, has been used in avian science since the 1960s. More than 30 species of birds, ranging in size from passerines to ratites, have been studied using this technology. The main strength of this technique is that it is a non-invasive and non-contact method of measuring surface temperature. Its limitations and measurement errors are well understood and suitable protocols have been developed for a variety of experimental settings. Thermal imaging has been u...

  6. Imaging Techniques in Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Marie Payne

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available New imaging techniques are increasingly being used within cultural heritage. This paper explores potential uses of such technologies within conservation and implications of their use on object preservation and accessibility. Study of their effects on objects is crucial because their employment is becoming irreplaceable; for example, polynomial texture mapping (PTM has revealed previously undetectable surface features. In such cases, it is necessary to continue to use the technique to monitor object condition. 3D laser scanning, PTM, and CT scanning are investigated. Case studies are explored to investigate their current role in cultural heritage. The appropriateness of this role and whether it should be expanded is addressed by analysing advantages and disadvantages of the techniques, their feasibility, and risks caused to object preservation and accessibility. The results indicate that the technologies present some advantages over standard digital photography; PTM in particular is found to be an extremely useful, affordable technique. A more established role within conservation, especially for condition assessments, could be worthwhile. Use of the imaging techniques to create models for exhibition can also be advantageous; however, care must be taken to ensure that such models are used to enhance accessibility to original objects and not to replace them.

  7. Imaging Techniques and Indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, James M

    2017-04-01

    This article evaluates the utility of radiography, ultrasonography, and MRI in diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries. It reviews the pertinent anatomy of the Achilles and associated structures, and signs of disorder with each imaging technique. The economics of use ultrasonography and MRI are discussed. They should serve as complementary diagnostic tools, with ultrasonography the first choice because of its ease of use, ability to view dynamic function, and cost. However, clinical examination is often best for diagnosis; MRI and ultrasonography often should be considered only when the diagnosis is confounding or a patient does not respond to recommended conservative care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of salicylic acid elicitor against aphids on wheat and detection of infestation using infrared thermal imaging technique in Ismailia, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Farag Mahmoud

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wheat (Triticum sativum L. is one of the most important cereal crops in Egypt. Insect pests, such as aphids, are major threats in terms of yield reduction. Induced resistance in wheat using salicylic acid as a foliar application was tested on the farm of the Faculty of Agriculture, Suez Canal University during 2012/2013 and 2013/2014 seasons. Three wheat cultivars, Gemeza 9, Sakha 93 and Giza 168, were sprayed three times with two concentrations of salicylic acid (SA, 200 mg/l and 100 mg/l, after early detection of aphid infestation by infrared thermal imaging. The infrared thermal imaging technique is based on significant differences in surface temperature between infested and healthy leaves. Imaging data are digital, and a computer program can be used to detect infestation rapidly. The results showed that aphid infestation raised the temperature of infested leaves, compared to healthy leaves. The range temperature difference between maximum and minimum temperatures (At was 1.1 ºC in healthy leaves and 3.9 ºC in infected leaves. The results of SA application showed significant differences in the mean number of aphids and in reduction of infestation among treatments and cultivars. The higher of the two SA rates (200 mg/l gave higher efficacy in the three cultivars than the lower rate (100 mg/l over the five weeks of trial. The highest efficacy against aphids was reached one week after application (86.28% for Giza, 85.89% for Gemesa and 70.54% for Sakha. Moreover, SA treatment enhanced the wheat yield of all three cultivars, compared with control plants. The three cultivars (Giza, Gemesa and Sakha produced higher yields than the control when sprayed with 200 mg/l SA. Their grain yield was 2,491.5, 2,455.0, and 2,327.25 kg/feddan (1 fed = 0.42 ha, respectively. In conclusion, infrared thermal imaging can be employed in identification of infected leaves. Also, the application of SA on wheat induced plant resistance to aphids.

  9. Infrared thermal imaging in connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging (IRT) is a non-invasive, non-contact technique which allows one to measure and visualize infrared radiation. In medicine, thermal imaging has been used for more than 50 years in various clinical settings, including Raynaud's phenomenon and systemic sclerosis. Imaging and quantification of surface body temperature provides an indirect measure of the microcirculation's overall performance. As such, IRT is capable of confirming the diagnosis of Raynaud's phenomenon, and, with additional cold or heat challenge, of differentiating between the primary and secondary condition. In systemic sclerosis IRT has a potential role in assessing disease activity and monitoring treatment response. Despite certain limitations, thermal imaging can find a place in clinical practice, and with the introduction of small, low-cost infrared cameras, possibly become a part of routine rheumatological evaluation.

  10. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, M.; Breuer, F.; Koopmans, P.J.; Norris, David Gordon; Poser, B.A.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in-plane parallel imaging this can have

  11. Evaluation of drought and UV radiation impacts on above-ground biomass of mountain grassland by spectral reflectance and thermal imaging techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novotná, Kateřina; Klem, Karel; Holub, Petr; Rapantová, Barbora; Urban, Otmar

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, 1-2 (2016), s. 21-30 ISSN 1803-2451 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : above-ground biomass * drought stress * grassland * UV radiation * precipitation * spectral reflectance * thermal imaging Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  12. Nuclear medicine imaging techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordzij, Walter; Glaudemans, Andor W.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a rapidly developing field which focuses on the imaging of physiological processes and the evaluation of treatment of specific diseases. It involves the use of radiopharmaceuticals for both purposes. Different radiopharmaceuticals have different kinetics and can therefore be used

  13. Review of advanced imaging techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathology informatics encompasses digital imaging and related applications. Several specialized microscopy techniques have emerged which permit the acquisition of digital images ("optical biopsies" at high resolution. Coupled with fiber-optic and micro-optic components, some of these imaging techniques (e.g., optical coherence tomography are now integrated with a wide range of imaging devices such as endoscopes, laparoscopes, catheters, and needles that enable imaging inside the body. These advanced imaging modalities have exciting diagnostic potential and introduce new opportunities in pathology. Therefore, it is important that pathology informaticists understand these advanced imaging techniques and the impact they have on pathology. This paper reviews several recently developed microscopic techniques, including diffraction-limited methods (e.g., confocal microscopy, 2-photon microscopy, 4Pi microscopy, and spatially modulated illumination microscopy and subdiffraction techniques (e.g., photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, and stimulated emission depletion microscopy. This article serves as a primer for pathology informaticists, highlighting the fundamentals and applications of advanced optical imaging techniques.

  14. Advanced imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter has been divided into three main sections. The first of these is concerned with things that are orientated to a degree towards novel hardware. This is obviously true of coils - which are essential for high performance in NMR imaging. The section reviews surface coils, and their applications, and closely-coupled coils (although it does not consider resonators, which are the best whole region coil design in high field head and body imaging). Closely-coupled coils are only described cursorily, however, since they, too, can be regarded as approaching a routine solution. The other 'hardware' heading is gating - which is clearly a fair assessment in as far as cardiac gating is concerned, although respiratory gating methods make major demands on software as well as needing appropriate transducers. The second major section is concerned with reconstruction methods. This begins with systems which depend on phase mapping and display (things like flow and field homogeneity and susceptibility imaging). Finally, there is a review of some of the more specialist and unusual uses of sequences to manipulate tissue contrast, and produce effects designed to be applied to solving particular clinical problems

  15. Development of imaging techniques for fast neutron radiography in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujine, Shigenori; Yoneda, Kenji; Yoshii, Koji; Kamata, Masahiro; Tamaki, Masayoshi; Ohkubo, Kohei; Ikeda, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Hisao

    1999-01-01

    Neutron radiography with fast neutron beams (FNR) has been studied at the fast neutron source reactor 'YAYOI' of the University of Tokyo since 1986. Imaging techniques for FNR have been developed for CR-39 track-etch detector, electronic imaging system (television method), direct film method, imaging plate and also fast and thermal neutron concurrent imaging method. The review of FNR imaging techniques and some applications are reported in this paper

  16. Thermal infrared panoramic imaging sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutin, Mikhail; Tsui, Eddy K.; Gutin, Olga; Wang, Xu-Ming; Gutin, Alexey

    2006-05-01

    Panoramic cameras offer true real-time, 360-degree coverage of the surrounding area, valuable for a variety of defense and security applications, including force protection, asset protection, asset control, security including port security, perimeter security, video surveillance, border control, airport security, coastguard operations, search and rescue, intrusion detection, and many others. Automatic detection, location, and tracking of targets outside protected area ensures maximum protection and at the same time reduces the workload on personnel, increases reliability and confidence of target detection, and enables both man-in-the-loop and fully automated system operation. Thermal imaging provides the benefits of all-weather, 24-hour day/night operation with no downtime. In addition, thermal signatures of different target types facilitate better classification, beyond the limits set by camera's spatial resolution. The useful range of catadioptric panoramic cameras is affected by their limited resolution. In many existing systems the resolution is optics-limited. Reflectors customarily used in catadioptric imagers introduce aberrations that may become significant at large camera apertures, such as required in low-light and thermal imaging. Advantages of panoramic imagers with high image resolution include increased area coverage with fewer cameras, instantaneous full horizon detection, location and tracking of multiple targets simultaneously, extended range, and others. The Automatic Panoramic Thermal Integrated Sensor (APTIS), being jointly developed by Applied Science Innovative, Inc. (ASI) and the Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) combines the strengths of improved, high-resolution panoramic optics with thermal imaging in the 8 - 14 micron spectral range, leveraged by intelligent video processing for automated detection, location, and tracking of moving targets. The work in progress supports the Future Combat Systems (FCS) and the

  17. Simultaneous multislice (SMS) imaging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Markus; Breuer, Felix; Koopmans, Peter J; Norris, David G; Poser, Benedikt A

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous multislice imaging (SMS) using parallel image reconstruction has rapidly advanced to become a major imaging technique. The primary benefit is an acceleration in data acquisition that is equal to the number of simultaneously excited slices. Unlike in-plane parallel imaging this can have only a marginal intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio penalty, and the full acceleration is attainable at fixed echo time, as is required for many echo planar imaging applications. Furthermore, for some implementations SMS techniques can reduce radiofrequency (RF) power deposition. In this review the current state of the art of SMS imaging is presented. In the Introduction, a historical overview is given of the history of SMS excitation in MRI. The following section on RF pulses gives both the theoretical background and practical application. The section on encoding and reconstruction shows how the collapsed multislice images can be disentangled by means of the transmitter pulse phase, gradient pulses, and most importantly using multichannel receiver coils. The relationship between classic parallel imaging techniques and SMS reconstruction methods is explored. The subsequent section describes the practical implementation, including the acquisition of reference data, and slice cross-talk. Published applications of SMS imaging are then reviewed, and the article concludes with an outlook and perspective of SMS imaging. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Automated medical image segmentation techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate segmentation of medical images is a key step in contouring during radiotherapy planning. Computed topography (CT and Magnetic resonance (MR imaging are the most widely used radiographic techniques in diagnosis, clinical studies and treatment planning. This review provides details of automated segmentation methods, specifically discussed in the context of CT and MR images. The motive is to discuss the problems encountered in segmentation of CT and MR images, and the relative merits and limitations of methods currently available for segmentation of medical images.

  19. Thermal imaging of spin Peltier effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Shunsuke; Iguchi, Ryo; Hioki, Tomosato; Saitoh, Eiji; Uchida, Ken-Ichi

    2016-12-01

    The Peltier effect modulates the temperature of a junction comprising two different conductors in response to charge currents across the junction, which is used in solid-state heat pumps and temperature controllers in electronics. Recently, in spintronics, a spin counterpart of the Peltier effect was observed. The `spin Peltier effect' modulates the temperature of a magnetic junction in response to spin currents. Here we report thermal imaging of the spin Peltier effect; using active thermography technique, we visualize the temperature modulation induced by spin currents injected into a magnetic insulator from an adjacent metal. The thermal images reveal characteristic distribution of spin-current-induced heat sources, resulting in the temperature change confined only in the vicinity of the metal/insulator interface. This finding allows us to estimate the actual magnitude of the temperature modulation induced by the spin Peltier effect, which is more than one order of magnitude greater than previously believed.

  20. Image-guided thermal ablation with MR-based thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingming; Sun, Ziqi

    2017-01-01

    Thermal ablation techniques such as radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and laser have been used as minimally invasive strategies for the treatment of variety of cancers. MR thermometry methods are readily available for monitoring thermal distribution and deposition in real time, leading to decrease of incidents of normal tissue damage around targeted lesion. HIFU and laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are the two widely accepted tumor ablation techniques because of their compatibility with MR systems. MRI provides multiple temperature dependent parameters for thermal imaging, such as signal intensity, T1, T2, diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer, proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS, including phase imaging and spectroscopy) as well as frequency shift of temperature sensitive contrast agents. Absolute temperature mapping techniques, including both spectroscopic imaging using metabolites as a reference and phase imaging using fat as a reference, are immune to susceptibility effects and are not dependent on phase differences. These techniques are intrinsically more reliable than relative temperature measurement by phase mapping methods. If the limitation of low temporal and spatial resolution could be overcome, these methods may be preferred for MR-guided thermal ablation systems. As of today, the most popular MR thermal imaging method applied in tumor thermal ablation surgery is, however, still PRFS based phase mapping technique, which only provides relative temperature change and is prone to motion artifacts. PMID:28812002

  1. Image-guided thermal ablation with MR-based thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingming; Sun, Ziqi; Ng, Chin K

    2017-06-01

    Thermal ablation techniques such as radiofrequency, microwave, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and laser have been used as minimally invasive strategies for the treatment of variety of cancers. MR thermometry methods are readily available for monitoring thermal distribution and deposition in real time, leading to decrease of incidents of normal tissue damage around targeted lesion. HIFU and laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) are the two widely accepted tumor ablation techniques because of their compatibility with MR systems. MRI provides multiple temperature dependent parameters for thermal imaging, such as signal intensity, T1, T2, diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer, proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS, including phase imaging and spectroscopy) as well as frequency shift of temperature sensitive contrast agents. Absolute temperature mapping techniques, including both spectroscopic imaging using metabolites as a reference and phase imaging using fat as a reference, are immune to susceptibility effects and are not dependent on phase differences. These techniques are intrinsically more reliable than relative temperature measurement by phase mapping methods. If the limitation of low temporal and spatial resolution could be overcome, these methods may be preferred for MR-guided thermal ablation systems. As of today, the most popular MR thermal imaging method applied in tumor thermal ablation surgery is, however, still PRFS based phase mapping technique, which only provides relative temperature change and is prone to motion artifacts.

  2. Developments in medical imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, Cornelis

    1979-01-01

    A review of the developments in medical imaging in the past 25 years shows a strong increase in the number of physical methods which have become available for obtaining images of diagnostic value. It is shown that despite this proliferation of methods the equipment used for obtaining the images can be based on a common structure. Also the resulting images can be characterized by a few relevant parameters which indicate their information content. On the basis of this common architecture a study is made of the potential capabilities of the large number of medical imaging techniques available now and in the future. Also the requirements and possibilities for handling the images obtained and for controlling the diagnostic systems are investigated [fr

  3. EDITORIAL: Imaging systems and techniques Imaging systems and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George; Nikita, Konstantina; Pastorino, Matteo; Karras, Dimitrios

    2009-10-01

    The papers in this special issue focus on providing the state-of-the-art approaches and solutions to some of the most challenging imaging areas, such as the design, development, evaluation and applications of imaging systems, measuring techniques, image processing algorithms and instrumentation, with an ultimate aim of enhancing the measurement accuracy and image quality. This special issue explores the principles, engineering developments and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, and encourages broad discussion of imaging methodologies, shaping the future and identifying emerging trends. The multi-faceted field of imaging requires drastic adaptation to the rapid changes in our society, economy, environment and technological evolution. There is an urgent need to address new problems, which tend to be either static but complex, or dynamic, e.g. rapidly evolving with time, with many unknowns, and to propose innovative solutions. For instance, the battles against cancer and terror, monitoring of space resources and enhanced awareness, management of natural resources and environmental monitoring are some of the areas that need to be addressed. The complexity of the involved imaging scenarios and demanding design parameters, e.g. speed, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), specificity, contrast, spatial resolution, scatter rejection, complex background and harsh environments, necessitate the development of a multi-functional, scalable and efficient imaging suite of sensors, solutions driven by innovation, and operation on diverse detection and imaging principles. Efficient medical imaging techniques capable of providing physiological information at the molecular level present another important research area. Advanced metabolic and functional imaging techniques, operating on multiple physical principles, and using high-resolution, high-selectivity nano-imaging methods, quantum dots, nanoparticles, biomarkers, nanostructures, nanosensors, micro-array imaging chips

  4. Laboratory technique for quantitative thermal emissivity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thermal infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the compositional analysis of geological materials. The spectral feature in the mid-IR region is diagnostic of the mineralogy and spectral signatures of mixtures of minerals that add linearly, and therefore, can be used as an important tool to determine the mineralogy ...

  5. Remote Leak Detection: Indirect Thermal Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Remote sensing technologies are being considered for efficient, low cost gas leak detection. Eleven specific techniques have been identified for further study and evaluation of several of these is underway. The Indirect Thermal Technique is one of the techniques that is being explored. For this technique, an infrared camera is used to detect the temperature change of a pipe or fitting at the site of a gas leak. This temperature change is caused by the change in temperature of the gas expanding from the leak site. During the 10-week NFFP program, the theory behind the technique was further developed, experiments were performed to determine the conditions for which the technique might be viable, and a proof-of-concept system was developed and tested in the laboratory.

  6. Radar rainfall image repair techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Wesson

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There are various quality problems associated with radar rainfall data viewed in images that include ground clutter, beam blocking and anomalous propagation, to name a few. To obtain the best rainfall estimate possible, techniques for removing ground clutter (non-meteorological echoes that influence radar data quality on 2-D radar rainfall image data sets are presented here. These techniques concentrate on repairing the images in both a computationally fast and accurate manner, and are nearest neighbour techniques of two sub-types: Individual Target and Border Tracing. The contaminated data is estimated through Kriging, considered the optimal technique for the spatial interpolation of Gaussian data, where the 'screening effect' that occurs with the Kriging weighting distribution around target points is exploited to ensure computational efficiency. Matrix rank reduction techniques in combination with Singular Value Decomposition (SVD are also suggested for finding an efficient solution to the Kriging Equations which can cope with near singular systems. Rainfall estimation at ground level from radar rainfall volume scan data is of interest and importance in earth bound applications such as hydrology and agriculture. As an extension of the above, Ordinary Kriging is applied to three-dimensional radar rainfall data to estimate rainfall rate at ground level. Keywords: ground clutter, data infilling, Ordinary Kriging, nearest neighbours, Singular Value Decomposition, border tracing, computation time, ground level rainfall estimation

  7. The NPS Virtual Thermal Image Processing Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lenter, Yucel

    2001-01-01

    ...). The MRTD is a standard performance measure for forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imaging systems. It takes into account thermal imaging system modeling concerns, such as modulation transfer functions...

  8. Thermal imaging for the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, F.T.

    1986-01-01

    While, on its face, thermal imaging for the nuclear power industry bears little difference from infra-red imaging for the industrial complex, as a whole (in so far as equipment, trained personnel, and technique, are concerned), there are vast differences with regard to access, training, and movement within a nuclear facility. For the un-initiated, working inside of a nuclear power plant can be a series of frustrations, fraught with time wasting periods of training, classes, and seminars,--interspersed with an unending line of meetings and project planning sessions. For those used to working within the system, the experience can be of tremendous satisfaction in undertaking, and successfully completing a project under some very difficult circumstances

  9. Raman Imaging Techniques and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Raman imaging has long been used to probe the chemical nature of a sample, providing information on molecular orientation, symmetry and structure with sub-micron spatial resolution. Recent technical developments have pushed the limits of micro-Raman microscopy, enabling the acquisition of Raman spectra with unprecedented speed, and opening a pathway to fast chemical imaging for many applications from material science and semiconductors to pharmaceutical drug development and cell biology, and even art and forensic science. The promise of tip-enhanced raman spectroscopy (TERS) and near-field techniques is pushing the envelope even further by breaking the limit of diffraction and enabling nano-Raman microscopy.

  10. A review of imaging techniques for plant phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-10-24

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review.

  11. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity. These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision, imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing, thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT. This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review.

  12. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review. PMID:25347588

  13. Thermal imaging as a biometrics approach to facial signature authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, A M; Goryawala, M; Wang, Jin; Barreto, A; Andrian, J; Rishe, N; Adjouadi, M

    2013-01-01

    A new thermal imaging framework with unique feature extraction and similarity measurements for face recognition is presented. The research premise is to design specialized algorithms that would extract vasculature information, create a thermal facial signature and identify the individual. The proposed algorithm is fully integrated and consolidates the critical steps of feature extraction through the use of morphological operators, registration using the Linear Image Registration Tool and matching through unique similarity measures designed for this task. The novel approach at developing a thermal signature template using four images taken at various instants of time ensured that unforeseen changes in the vasculature over time did not affect the biometric matching process as the authentication process relied only on consistent thermal features. Thirteen subjects were used for testing the developed technique on an in-house thermal imaging system. The matching using the similarity measures showed an average accuracy of 88.46% for skeletonized signatures and 90.39% for anisotropically diffused signatures. The highly accurate results obtained in the matching process clearly demonstrate the ability of the thermal infrared system to extend in application to other thermal imaging based systems. Empirical results applying this approach to an existing database of thermal images proves this assertion.

  14. Thermal property testing technique on micro specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Tetsuya; Kishimoto, Isao; Taketoshi, Naoyuki

    2000-01-01

    This study aims at establishment of further development on some testing techniques on the nuclear advanced basic research accumulated by the National Research Laboratory of Metrology for ten years. For this purpose, a technology to test heat diffusion ratio and specific heat capacity of less than 3 mm in diameter and 1 mm in thickness of micro specimen and technology to test heat diffusion ratio at micro area of less than 1 mm in area along cross section of less than 10 mm in diameter of column specimen were developed to contribute to common basic technology supporting the nuclear power field. As a result, as an element technology to test heat diffusion ratio and specific heat capacity of the micro specimen, a specimen holding technique stably to hold a micro specimen with 3 mm in diameter could be developed. And, for testing the specific heat capacity by using the laser flush differential calorimetry, a technique to hold two specimen of 5 mm in diameter at their proximities was also developed. In addition, by promoting development of thermal property data base capable of storing thermal property data obtained in this study and with excellent workability in this 1998 fiscal year a data in/out-put program with graphical user interface could be prepared. (G.K.)

  15. Using geophysical techniques to control in situ thermal remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, S.; Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Wilt, M.; Goldman, R.; Kayes, D.; Kenneally, K.; Udell, K.; Hunter, R.

    1994-01-01

    Monitoring the thermal and hydrologic processes that occur during thermal environmental remediation programs in near real-time provides essential information for controlling the process. Geophysical techniques played a crucial role in process control as well as for characterization during the recent Dynamic Underground Stripping Project demonstration in which several thousand gallons of gasoline were removed from heterogeneous soils both above and below the water table. Dynamic Underground Stripping combines steam injection and electrical heating for thermal enhancement with ground water pumping and vacuum extraction for contaminant removal. These processes produce rapid changes in the subsurface properties including changes in temperature fluid saturation, pressure and chemistry. Subsurface imaging methods are used to map the heated zones and control the thermal process. Temperature measurements made in wells throughout the field reveal details of the complex heating phenomena. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) provides near real-time detailed images of the heated zones between boreholes both during electrical heating and steam injection. Borehole induction logs show close correlation with lithostratigraphy and, by identifying the more permeable gravel zones, can be used to predict steam movement. They are also useful in understanding the physical changes in the field and in interpreting the ERT images. Tiltmeters provide additional information regarding the shape of the steamed zones in plan view. They were used to track the growth of the steam front from individual injectors

  16. Measurements of He II Thermal Counterflow Using PIV Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S.W.

    2004-01-01

    Our previous experiments on the measurements of He II thermal counterflow using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) have shown that there exists a substantial discrepancy between the measured and theoretical values of normal fluid velocity. It was assumed that this is due to the slip velocity between tracer particles and liquid helium. In the present work, tracer particles with a much smaller mean diameter and a more uniform size distribution were selected in order to reduce the effect of slip velocity, and an improved two phase fluidized bed technique was used to introduce the particles into liquid helium. The normal fluid velocity of thermal counterflow was then measured using the PIV technique at various heat fluxes and bath temperatures. The experimental results, however, still show the existence of discrepancy between PIV measured particle velocities and the theoretical normal fluid velocity. A preliminary explanation of these results is given based on an interaction of tracer particles with the superfluid component in the He II

  17. Thermal imaging cameras characteristics and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The ability to see through smoke and mist and the ability to use the variances in temperature to differentiate between targets and their backgrounds are invaluable in military applications and have become major motivators for the further development of thermal imagers. As the potential of thermal imaging is more clearly understood and the cost decreases, the number of industrial and civil applications being exploited is growing quickly. In order to evaluate the suitability of particular thermal imaging cameras for particular applications, it is important to have the means to specify and measur

  18. Flame analysis using image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Her Jie, Albert Chang; Zamli, Ahmad Faizal Ahmad; Zulazlan Shah Zulkifli, Ahmad; Yee, Joanne Lim Mun; Lim, Mooktzeng

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents image processing techniques with the use of fuzzy logic and neural network approach to perform flame analysis. Flame diagnostic is important in the industry to extract relevant information from flame images. Experiment test is carried out in a model industrial burner with different flow rates. Flame features such as luminous and spectral parameters are extracted using image processing and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). Flame images are acquired using FLIR infrared camera. Non-linearities such as thermal acoustic oscillations and background noise affect the stability of flame. Flame velocity is one of the important characteristics that determines stability of flame. In this paper, an image processing method is proposed to determine flame velocity. Power spectral density (PSD) graph is a good tool for vibration analysis where flame stability can be approximated. However, a more intelligent diagnostic system is needed to automatically determine flame stability. In this paper, flame features of different flow rates are compared and analyzed. The selected flame features are used as inputs to the proposed fuzzy inference system to determine flame stability. Neural network is used to test the performance of the fuzzy inference system.

  19. Stereoscopic radiographic images with thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvani, M. I.; Almeida, G. L.; Rogers, J. D.; Lopes, R. T.

    2011-10-01

    Spatial structure of an object can be perceived by the stereoscopic vision provided by eyes or by the parallax produced by movement of the object with regard to the observer. For an opaque object, a technique to render it transparent should be used, in order to make visible the spatial distribution of its inner structure, for any of the two approaches used. In this work, a beam of thermal neutrons at the main port of the Argonauta research reactor of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear in Rio de Janeiro/Brazil has been used as radiation to render the inspected objects partially transparent. A neutron sensitive Imaging Plate has been employed as a detector and after exposure it has been developed by a reader using a 0.5 μm laser beam, which defines the finest achievable spatial resolution of the acquired digital image. This image, a radiographic attenuation map of the object, does not represent any specific cross-section but a convoluted projection for each specific attitude of the object with regard to the detector. After taking two of these projections at different object attitudes, they are properly processed and the final image is viewed by a red and green eyeglass. For monochromatic images this processing involves transformation of black and white radiographies into red and white and green and white ones, which are afterwards merged to yield a single image. All the processes are carried out with the software ImageJ. Divergence of the neutron beam unfortunately spoils both spatial and contrast resolutions, which become poorer as object-detector distance increases. Therefore, in order to evaluate the range of spatial resolution corresponding to the 3D image being observed, a curve expressing spatial resolution against object-detector gap has been deduced from the Modulation Transfer Functions experimentally. Typical exposure times, under a reactor power of 170 W, were 6 min for both quantitative and qualitative measurements. In spite of its intrinsic constraints

  20. The Effect of Image Enhancement Methods during Feature Detection and Matching of Thermal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, O.; Avsar, E. O.

    2017-05-01

    A successful image matching is essential to provide an automatic photogrammetric process accurately. Feature detection, extraction and matching algorithms have performed on the high resolution images perfectly. However, images of cameras, which are equipped with low-resolution thermal sensors are problematic with the current algorithms. In this paper, some digital image processing techniques were applied to the low-resolution images taken with Optris PI 450 382 x 288 pixel optical resolution lightweight thermal camera to increase extraction and matching performance. Image enhancement methods that adjust low quality digital thermal images, were used to produce more suitable images for detection and extraction. Three main digital image process techniques: histogram equalization, high pass and low pass filters were considered to increase the signal-to-noise ratio, sharpen image, remove noise, respectively. Later on, the pre-processed images were evaluated using current image detection and feature extraction methods Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER) and Speeded Up Robust Features (SURF) algorithms. Obtained results showed that some enhancement methods increased number of extracted features and decreased blunder errors during image matching. Consequently, the effects of different pre-process techniques were compared in the paper.

  1. Digital image processing for thermal observation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wee K.; Song, In Seob; Yoon, Eon S.; Lee, Y. S.; Moon, M. G.; Hong, Seok-Min; Kim, J. K.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the digital image processing techniques of a thermal observation system, which is a serial/parallel scan and standard TV display type using a SPRITE (Signal PRocessing In The Element) detector. The designed digital electronics has two major signal processing stages: a high speed digital scan converter and an autoregressive (AR) filter. The digital scan converter is designed with analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and dual port RAM that can carry out reading and writing simultaneously, thus enabling compact scan conversion. The scan converter reformats the five parallel analog signals generated from the detector elements into serial digital signals compatible with RS-170 video rate. For the improvement of signal-to- noise ratio and compensation for the gamma effect of the monitor, we have implemented a real time 1st order AR filter that adopts frame averaging method. With the look-up-table (LUT) ROM that contains the frame averaging factors and the gamma coefficients, this digital filter performs the noise reduction and the gamma correction at the same time. This digital image processor has been proven to provide excellent image quality and superior detection capability for distant targets at night time.

  2. A Thermal Imaging Instrument with Uncooled Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed work, we will perform an instrument concept study for sustainable thermal imaging over land with uncooled detectors. We will define the science and...

  3. Super-thermal light for imaging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allevi Alessia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on a new classical light source useful for ghost-imaging applications. The light is obtained by frequency doubling a conventional speckle pattern having an overall multi-mode thermal distribution. The frequency-doubled light acquires a super-thermal distribution, which induces higher correlations at a beam splitter and, as a consequence, a higher visibility in ghost-imaging protocols.

  4. Micromachined Chip Scale Thermal Sensor for Thermal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhawat, Gajendra S; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Jiryaei Sharahi, Hossein; Sarkar, Souravi; Hujsak, Karl; Li, Yuan; Hagglund, Karl; Kim, Seonghwan; Aden, Gary; Chand, Ami; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2018-02-27

    The lateral resolution of scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) has hitherto never approached that of mainstream atomic force microscopy, mainly due to poor performance of the thermal sensor. Herein, we report a nanomechanical system-based thermal sensor (thermocouple) that enables high lateral resolution that is often required in nanoscale thermal characterization in a wide range of applications. This thermocouple-based probe technology delivers excellent lateral resolution (∼20 nm), extended high-temperature measurements >700 °C without cantilever bending, and thermal sensitivity (∼0.04 °C). The origin of significantly improved figures-of-merit lies in the probe design that consists of a hollow silicon tip integrated with a vertically oriented thermocouple sensor at the apex (low thermal mass) which interacts with the sample through a metallic nanowire (50 nm diameter), thereby achieving high lateral resolution. The efficacy of this approach to SThM is demonstrated by imaging embedded metallic nanostructures in silica core-shell, metal nanostructures coated with polymer films, and metal-polymer interconnect structures. The nanoscale pitch and extremely small thermal mass of the probe promise significant improvements over existing methods and wide range of applications in several fields including semiconductor industry, biomedical imaging, and data storage.

  5. New Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    SET-151 Thermal Hyperspectral Imagery (Imagerie hyperspectrale thermique ). Meeting Proceedings of Sensors and Electronics Panel (SET) Specialists...broadband background. In a microbolometer, the pixels settle down to heat transfer equilibrium with target and surroundings. The pixel temperature is then

  6. Tooling Techniques Enhance Medical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    mission. The manufacturing techniques developed to create the components have yielded innovations advancing medical imaging, transportation security, and even energy efficiency.

  7. MR imaging techniques in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Makoto

    1999-01-01

    Recently developed MR imaging techniques, including fast spin echo, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, T 1 -weighted fast gradient echo, and Gd-enhanced 3D MR angiography, are reviewed. In fast spin echo sequences, blur, pseudo edge enhancement, edge enhancing effect, and ghost may appear depending on T 2 -weighting and discreteness in the k-space. Contrast modifications, such as signal attenuation by off-resonance RF pulses, bright fat on late echoes, low sensitivity to diffusion-mediated susceptibility effects, and delay of the T 1 recovery, are also discussed. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery is a ''moderately'' T 2 -weighted sequence with suppression of the CSF signal. With a relatively short repetition time, signal suppression is remarkable in the lesions with relatively long T 1 values, so that a very long repetition time more than 10 s is recommended. On T 1 -weighted spoiled fast gradient-echo sequences, the enhancement effect of parenchymal lesions by gadopentetate dimeglumine is insufficient compared with a T 1 -weighted spin echo sequence. IR-prepared fast gradient-echo sequences, such as MP-RAGE, may solve this problem to some degree, although their T 1 magnetization is difficult to estimate. On Gd-enhanced 3D MR angiography, k-space order, spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and background suppression are crucial to obtain sufficient images. They should be optimized for accurate evaluation of internal carotid artery lesions according to AHA guidelines. (author)

  8. Image reconstruction technique for neutron penumbra imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dongjian

    2006-01-01

    The principle of the neutron penumbra imaging was introduced, and the effect factors of the resolution of the imaging system were analyzed. The neutron penumbra imaging process was simulated with MCNP software. The coded image of one point source on the imaging principal axis and that of two point sources off the principal axis with and without noise and back-ground were reconstructed by the improved inverse filter and Wiener filter method respectively. The simulation results indicated that the Wiener filter method could restrain noise better. (authors)

  9. Imaging Techniques in Endodontics: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, B. S.; Subash, T. S.; Narmatha, V. J.; Anamika, T.; Snehil, T. K.; Nandini, D. B.

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the relevance of imaging techniques such as, computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, and ultrasound, to endodontic practice. Many limitations of the conventional radiographic techniques have been overcome by the newer methods. Advantages and disadvantages of various imaging techniques in endodontic practice are also discussed. PMID:22530184

  10. Comparing techniques for vegetation classification using multi- and hyperspectral images and ancillary environmental data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, R; Pebesma, E.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper evaluates the predictive power of innovative and more conventional statistical classification techniques. We use Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETMþ), Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and airborne imaging spectrometer (HyMap) images

  11. 4D thermal imaging system for medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    SKALA, KAROLJ; LIPIĆ, TOMISLAV; SOVIĆ, IVAN; GJENERO, LUKO; GRUBIŠIĆ, IVAN

    2011-01-01

    The dissipation of thermal radiation can be observed using thermal infrared cameras which generate images based on the amount of input radiation belonging to a small part of the electromagnetic spectrum (with wavelengths from 7 μmto 15 μm). Since thermal imaging is a simple, contactless, non-invasive and inexpensive imaging method, it is widely applicable in industry, medicine and research. The most common type of thermal imaging involves taking and analyzing only a single thermal image, a...

  12. An edge extraction technique for noisy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cios, K.J.; Sarieh, A.

    1990-01-01

    We present an algorithm for extracting edges from noisy images. Our method uses an unsupervised learning approach for local threshold computation by means of Pearson's method for mixture density identification. We tested the technique by applying it to computer-generated images corrupted with artificial noise and to an actual Thallium-201 heart image and it is shown that the technique has potential use for noisy images

  13. Object localization in handheld thermal images for fireground understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecasteele, Florian; Merci, Bart; Jalalvand, Azarakhsh; Verstockt, Steven

    2017-05-01

    Despite the broad application of the handheld thermal imaging cameras in firefighting, its usage is mostly limited to subjective interpretation by the person carrying the device. As remedies to overcome this limitation, object localization and classification mechanisms could assist the fireground understanding and help with the automated localization, characterization and spatio-temporal (spreading) analysis of the fire. An automated understanding of thermal images can enrich the conventional knowledge-based firefighting techniques by providing the information from the data and sensing-driven approaches. In this work, transfer learning is applied on multi-labeling convolutional neural network architectures for object localization and recognition in monocular visual, infrared and multispectral dynamic images. Furthermore, the possibility of analyzing fire scene images is studied and their current limitations are discussed. Finally, the understanding of the room configuration (i.e., objects location) for indoor localization in reduced visibility environments and the linking with Building Information Models (BIM) are investigated.

  14. More accurate thermal neutron coincidence counting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, N.

    1978-01-01

    Using passive thermal neutron coincidence counting techniques, the accuracy of nondestructive assays of fertile material can be improved significantly using a two-ring detector. It was shown how the use of a function of the coincidence count rate ring-ratio can provide a detector response rate that is independent of variations in neutron detection efficiency caused by varying sample moderation. Furthermore, the correction for multiplication caused by SF- and (α,n)-neutrons is shown to be separable into the product of a function of the effective mass of 240 Pu (plutonium correction) and a function of the (α,n) reaction probability (matrix correction). The matrix correction is described by a function of the singles count rate ring-ratio. This correction factor is empirically observed to be identical for any combination of PuO 2 powder and matrix materials SiO 2 and MgO because of the similar relation of the (α,n)-Q value and (α,n)-reaction cross section among these matrix nuclei. However the matrix correction expression is expected to be different for matrix materials such as Na, Al, and/or Li. Nevertheless, it should be recognized that for comparison measurements among samples of similar matrix content, it is expected that some function of the singles count rate ring-ratio can be defined to account for variations in the matrix correction due to differences in the intimacy of mixture among the samples. Furthermore the magnitude of this singles count rate ring-ratio serves to identify the contaminant generating the (α,n)-neutrons. Such information is useful in process control

  15. A Thermal Imaging Instrument with Uncooled Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, A. T.; Barrentine, E. M.; Brown, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we perform an instrument concept study for sustainable thermal imaging over land with uncooled detectors. The National Research Council's Committee on Implementation of a Sustained Land Imaging Program has identified the inclusion of a thermal imager as critical for both current and future land imaging missions. Such an imaging instrument operating in two bands located at approximately 11 and 12 microns (for example, in Landsat 8, and also Landsat 9 when launched) will provide essential information for furthering our hydrologic understanding at scales of human influence, and produce field-scale moisture information through accurate retrievals of evapotranspiration (ET). Landsat 9 is slated to recycle the TIRS-2 instrument launched with Landsat 8 that uses cooled quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), hence requiring expensive and massive cryocooler technology to achieve its required spectral and spatial accuracies. Our goal is to conceptualize and develop a thermal imaging instrument which leverages recent and imminent technology advances in uncooled detectors. Such detector technology will offer the benefit of greatly reduced instrument cost, mass, and power at the expense of some acceptable loss in detector sensitivity. It would also allow a thermal imaging instrument to be fielded on board a low-cost platform, e.g., a CubeSat. Sustained and enhanced land imaging is crucial for providing high-quality science data on change in land use, forest health, crop status, environment, and climate. Accurate satellite mapping of ET at the agricultural field scale (the finest spatial scale of the environmental processes of interest) requires high-quality thermal data to produce the corresponding accurate land surface temperature (LST) retrievals used to drive an ET model. Such an imaging instrument would provide important information on the following: 1) the relationship between land-use and land/water management practices and water use dynamics; 2) the

  16. 1.3 Imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The digital processing is described of X-ray images and the replacement of film with xerography and ionography. Advantages of the image digital processing are better resolution of the degree of attenuation of X-ray radiation, possibility of subsequent image processing, a lower radiation load and simplifyied examinations. In xeroradiography the film is replaced by a plate with a sensitive semiconductive layer. The obtained images have better resolution of interfaces of tissue with a different absorption of radiation which is advantageous for evaluation but can in some instances conceal certain details. Ionography provides high quality imao.es with increased resolution. Technical problems now stand in the way of the practical application of this method. (Ha)

  17. Thermal luminescence spectroscopy chemical imaging sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Arthur H; Buican, Tudor N; Roese, Erik S; Sutter, James; Samuels, Alan C

    2012-10-01

    The authors present a pseudo-active chemical imaging sensor model embodying irradiative transient heating, temperature nonequilibrium thermal luminescence spectroscopy, differential hyperspectral imaging, and artificial neural network technologies integrated together. We elaborate on various optimizations, simulations, and animations of the integrated sensor design and apply it to the terrestrial chemical contamination problem, where the interstitial contaminant compounds of detection interest (analytes) comprise liquid chemical warfare agents, their various derivative condensed phase compounds, and other material of a life-threatening nature. The sensor must measure and process a dynamic pattern of absorptive-emissive middle infrared molecular signature spectra of subject analytes to perform its chemical imaging and standoff detection functions successfully.

  18. Image enhancement framework for low-resolution thermal images in visible and LWIR camera systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukkanchanunt, Thapanapong; Tanaka, Masayuki; Okutomi, Masatoshi

    2017-10-01

    Infrared (IR) thermography camera became an essential tool for monitoring applications such as pedestrian detection and equipment monitoring. Most commonly used IR cameras are Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) cameras due to their suitable wavelength for environmental temperature. Even though the cost of LWIR cameras had been on a decline, the affordable ones only provided low-resolution images. Enhancement techniques that could be applied to visible images often failed to perform correctly on low-resolution LWIR images. Many attempts on thermal image enhancement had been on high-resolution images. Stereo calibration between visible cameras and LWIR cameras had recently been improved in term of accuracy and ease of use. Recent visible cameras and LWIR cameras are bundled into one device, giving the capability of simultaneously taking visible and LWIR images. However, few works take advantage of this camera systems. In this work, image enhancement framework for visible and LWIR camera systems is proposed. The proposed framework consists of two inter-connected modules: visible image enhancement module and LWIR image enhancement module. The enhancement technique that will be experimented is image stitching which serves two purposes: view expansion and super-resolution. The visible image enhancement module follows a regular workflow for image stitching. The intermediate results such as homography and seam carvings labels are passed to LWIR image enhancement module. The LWIR image enhancement module aligns LWIR images to visible images using stereo calibrations results and utilizes already computed homography from visible images to avoid feature extraction and matching on LWIR images. The framework is able to handle difference in image resolution between visible images and LWIR images by performing sparse pixel-to-pixel version of image alignment and image projection. Experiments show that the proposed framework leads to richer image stitching's results comparing to the

  19. Pest damage assessment in fruits and vegetables using thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkapattu Canthadai, Badrinath; Muthuraju, M. Esakki; Pachava, Vengalrao; Sengupta, Dipankar

    2015-05-01

    In some fruits and vegetables, it is difficult to visually identify the ones which are pest infested. This particular aspect is important for quarantine and commercial operations. In this article, we propose to present the results of a novel technique using thermal imaging camera to detect the nature and extent of pest damage in fruits and vegetables, besides indicating the level of maturity and often the presence of the pest. Our key idea relies on the fact that there is a difference in the heat capacity of normal and damaged ones and also observed the change in surface temperature over time that is slower in damaged ones. This paper presents the concept of non-destructive evaluation using thermal imaging technique for identifying pest damage levels of fruits and vegetables based on investigations carried out on random samples collected from a local market.

  20. Ultra high speed image processing techniques. [electronic packaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, T.; Hoeschele, D. F.; Connery, R.; Ehland, J.; Billings, J.

    1981-01-01

    Packaging techniques for ultra high speed image processing were developed. These techniques involve the development of a signal feedthrough technique through LSI/VLSI sapphire substrates. This allows the stacking of LSI/VLSI circuit substrates in a 3 dimensional package with greatly reduced length of interconnecting lines between the LSI/VLSI circuits. The reduced parasitic capacitances results in higher LSI/VLSI computational speeds at significantly reduced power consumption levels.

  1. Development of flow velocity measurement techniques in visible images. Improvement of particle image velocimetry techniques on image process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Motohiko; Kamide, Hideki; Hishida, Koichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Miyake, Yasuhiro [NDD Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    Noise reduction system was developed to improve applicability of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to complicated configure bounded flows. For fast reactor safety and thermal hydraulic studies, experiments are performed in scale models which usually have rather complicated geometry and structures such as fuel subassemblies, heat exchangers, etc. The structures and stuck dusts on the view window of the models obscure the particle image. Thus the image except the moving particles can be regarded as a noise. In the present study, two noise reduction techniques are proposed. The one is the Time-averaged Light Intensity Subtraction method (TIS) which subtracts the time-averaged light intensity of each pixel in the sequential images from the each corresponding pixel. The other one is the Minimum Light Intensity Subtraction method (MIS) which subtracts the minimum light intensity of each pixel in the sequential images from the each corresponding pixel. Both methods are examined on their capabilities of noise reduction. As for the original 'bench mark' image, the image made from Large Eddy Simulation was used. To the bench mark image, noises are added which are referred as sample images. Both methods reduce the rate of vector with the error of more than one pixel from 90% to less than 5%. Also, more than 50% of the vectors have the error of less than 0.2 pixel. The analysis of uncertainty shows that these methods enhances the accuracy of vector measurement 3 {approx} 12 times if the image with noise were processed, and the MIS method has 1.1 {approx} 2.1 times accuracy compared to the TIS. Thus the present noise reduction methods are quite efficient to enhance the accuracy of flow velocity fields measured with particle images including structures and deposits on the view window. (author)

  2. Development of flow velocity measurement techniques in visible images. Improvement of particle image velocimetry techniques on image process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Nobuyuki; Nishimura, Motohiko; Kamide, Hideki; Hishida, Koichi

    1999-10-01

    Noise reduction system was developed to improve applicability of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to complicated configure bounded flows. For fast reactor safety and thermal hydraulic studies, experiments are performed in scale models which usually have rather complicated geometry and structures such as fuel subassemblies, heat exchangers, etc. The structures and stuck dusts on the view window of the models obscure the particle image. Thus the image except the moving particles can be regarded as a noise. In the present study, two noise reduction techniques are proposed. The one is the Time-averaged Light Intensity Subtraction method (TIS) which subtracts the time-averaged light intensity of each pixel in the sequential images from the each corresponding pixel. The other one is the Minimum Light Intensity Subtraction method (MIS) which subtracts the minimum light intensity of each pixel in the sequential images from the each corresponding pixel. Both methods are examined on their capabilities of noise reduction. As for the original 'bench mark' image, the image made from Large Eddy Simulation was used. To the bench mark image, noises are added which are referred as sample images. Both methods reduce the rate of vector with the error of more than one pixel from 90% to less than 5%. Also, more than 50% of the vectors have the error of less than 0.2 pixel. The analysis of uncertainty shows that these methods enhances the accuracy of vector measurement 3 ∼ 12 times if the image with noise were processed, and the MIS method has 1.1 ∼ 2.1 times accuracy compared to the TIS. Thus the present noise reduction methods are quite efficient to enhance the accuracy of flow velocity fields measured with particle images including structures and deposits on the view window. (author)

  3. Thermal Wave Imaging: Flying SPOT Camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqian

    1993-01-01

    A novel "Flying Spot" infrared camera for nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and nondestructive characterization is presented. The camera scans the focal point of an unmodulated heating laser beam across the sample in a raster. The detector of the camera tracks the heating spot in the same raster, but with a time delay. The detector is thus looking at the "thermal wake" of the heating spot. The time delay between heating and detection is determined by the speed of the laser spot and the distance between it and the detector image. Since this time delay can be made arbitrarily small, the camera is capable of making thermal wave images of phenomena which occur on a very short time scale. In addition, because the heat source is a very small spot, the heat flow is fully three-dimensional. This makes the camera system sensitive to features, like tightly closed vertical cracks, which are invisible to imaging systems which employ full-field heating. A detailed theory which relates the temperature profile around the heating spot to the sample thermal properties is also described. The camera represents a potentially useful tool for measuring thermal diffusivities of materials by means of fitting the recorded temperature profiles to the theoretical curves with the diffusivity as a fitting parameter.

  4. Diagnosis of cutaneous thermal burn injuries by multispectral imaging analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, V. J.; Zawacki, B. E.

    1978-01-01

    Special photographic or television image analysis is shown to be a potentially useful technique to assist the physician in the early diagnosis of thermal burn injury. A background on the medical and physiological problems of burns is presented. The proposed methodology for burns diagnosis from both the theoretical and clinical points of view is discussed. The television/computer system constructed to accomplish this analysis is described, and the clinical results are discussed.

  5. Multisensor Fusion of Landsat Images for High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Images Using Sparse Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Sung Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface temperature (LST is an important parameter in the analysis of climate and human-environment interactions. Landsat Earth observation satellite data including a thermal band have been used for environmental research and applications; however, the spatial resolution of this thermal band is relatively low. This study investigates an efficient method of fusing Landsat panchromatic and thermal infrared images using a sparse representation (SR technique. The application of SR is used for the estimation of missing details of the available thermal infrared (TIR image to enhance its spatial features. First, we propose a method of building a proper dictionary considering the spatial resolution of the original thermal image. Second, a sparse representation relation between low- and high-resolution images is constructed in terms of the Landsat spectral response. We then compare the fused images created with different sampling factors and patch sizes. The results of both qualitative and quantitative evaluation show that the proposed method improves spatial resolution and preserves the thermal properties of basic LST data for use with environmental problems.

  6. Laboratory technique for quantitative thermal emissivity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This laboratory at the Department of Earth Sciences, IIT-Bombay is currently developing pure end mineral library of mineral particulates (> 65 m), and adding new end members to the existing ASU spectral library. The paper argues the need for considering Lunar Orbiter Thermal Emission Spectrometer (LOTES) for future ...

  7. Terahertz Imaging Systems With Aperture Synthesis Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krozer, Viktor; Löffler, Torsten; Dall, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    imaging systems are reviewed in terms of the employed architecture and data processing strategies. Active multichannel measurement method is found to be promising for real-time applications among the various terahertz imaging techniques and is chosen as a basis for the imaging instruments presented......This paper presents the research and development of two terahertz imaging systems based on photonic and electronic principles, respectively. As part of this study, a survey of ongoing research in the field of terahertz imaging is provided focusing on security applications. Existing terahertz...... in this paper. An active system operation allows for a wide dynamic range, which is important for image quality. The described instruments employ a multichannel high-sensitivity heterodyne architecture and aperture filling techniques, with close to real-time image acquisition time. In the case of the photonic...

  8. Online thermal imaging: a simple approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Mark; Hollock, Steve; Sandhu, Sat; Coy, Joanne; Parkin, Rob

    2003-04-01

    Continuous monitoring of plant and processes is widely practised but the use of thermal imagers in such systems has always been restricted by camera cost. A radiometric thermal imager can be regarded as equivalent to multiple single point radiometers or a matrix of thermocouples but with the advantages of far denser coverage, non-contact measurement, simpler installation and data processing; in addition several of the advantages of conventional machine vision systems such as shape and position recognition can be provided. IRISYS has developed a multipoint radiometer utilising its low-cost infrared array technology. This unit provides continuous real-time temperature monitoring of 256 data points at an affordable price; it is housed in a small, light-weight, sealed and robust metal case and generates RS232 or Ethernet data output. This paper reviews the radiometer technology and its application to single and multi-camera systems.

  9. Stream temperature estimated in situ from thermal-infrared images: best estimate and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iezzi, F; Todisco, M T

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to show a technique to estimate in situ the stream temperature from thermal-infrared images deepening its best estimate and uncertainty. Stream temperature is an important indicator of water quality and nowadays its assessment is important particularly for thermal pollution monitoring in water bodies. Stream temperature changes are especially due to the anthropogenic heat input from urban wastewater and from water used as a coolant by power plants and industrial manufacturers. The stream temperatures assessment using ordinary techniques (e.g. appropriate thermometers) is limited by sparse sampling in space due to a spatial discretization necessarily punctual. Latest and most advanced techniques assess the stream temperature using thermal-infrared remote sensing based on thermal imagers placed usually on aircrafts or using satellite images. These techniques assess only the surface water temperature and they are suitable to detect the temperature of vast water bodies but do not allow a detailed and precise surface water temperature assessment in limited areas of the water body. The technique shown in this research is based on the assessment of thermal-infrared images obtained in situ via portable thermal imager. As in all thermographic techniques, also in this technique, it is possible to estimate only the surface water temperature. A stream with the presence of a discharge of urban wastewater is proposed as case study to validate the technique and to show its application limits. Since the technique analyzes limited areas in extension of the water body, it allows a detailed and precise assessment of the water temperature. In general, the punctual and average stream temperatures are respectively uncorrected and corrected. An appropriate statistical method that minimizes the errors in the average stream temperature is proposed. The correct measurement of this temperature through the assessment of thermal- infrared images obtained in situ via portable

  10. Techniques for thyroid imaging; Les techniques d`imagerie thyroidienne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermans, J.

    1995-12-31

    Advances in imaging techniques has improved our understanding of diseases. The different imaging techniques for visualizing the thyroid parenchyma, including cyto-puncture, sonography, CT-scan, scintigraphy, magnetic resonance imaging, have provided various types of information. Do these techniques really provide the clinician with the answers to his questions. The information provided by the different imaging techniques is presented together with the insufficiencies of each method. Faced with the rising cost of health services, we developed analysis instruments which should help the clinician in a more rational use of diagnostic examinations. The question which most often arises is that of an isolated nodule within a multi-nodular goiter : is it malignant or benign. the analysis of the available techniques shows that cost-effective strategy uses conventional Tc99m or I123 scintigraphy and thallium 201 scintigraphy. With this strategy, the risk of missing a thyroid cancer is approximately 1.75%. With cyto-puncture, this risk is multiplied by a factor of 2.5 reaching 4.5%. (Author). 31 refs., 7 tabs.

  11. Image processing techniques for digital orthophotoquad production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Joy J.; Ladner, L. J.; Champion, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    Orthophotographs have long been recognized for their value as supplements or alternatives to standard maps. Recent trends towards digital cartography have resulted in efforts by the US Geological Survey to develop a digital orthophotoquad production system. Digital image files were created by scanning color infrared photographs on a microdensitometer. Rectification techniques were applied to remove tile and relief displacement, thereby creating digital orthophotos. Image mosaicking software was then used to join the rectified images, producing digital orthophotos in quadrangle format.

  12. [New techniques of scintigraphic imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of scintigraphic imaging is not to explore the morphology of an organ (or its abnormalities) but rather its functional and metabolic characteristics. It is thus important that a molecular structure (e.g., a hormonal receptor or an antigen) closely linked to the functional activity of an organ or tissue be targeted on its cell surface. Such diagnostic targeting requires the synthesis and labeling of a radiopharmaceutical substance specific for the receptor or antigen in question. It also requires a detection system adapted to count rates and signal-to-background ratios (generally moderate). The synthesis of new radiopharmaceutical agents, a critical stage for the future of nuclear medicine, is a long and often risky process in which success is difficult to foresee. Radiolabeling must be stable in vitro and in vivo, and the radiopharmaceutical must subsequently retain its capability of recognizing the targeted molecule. In endocrinology, the exemplary achievement in this direction has been the synthesis of 131I-6-iodomethylnorcholesterol and 131I-metaiodobenzylquanidine for functional scintigraphy of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Progress in detection equipment has been marked by the development of monophotonic tomoscintigraphy, using gamma cameras with a revolving head to obtain slices in different spatial planes showing the distribution in the organism of the injected radiopharmaceutical agent.

  13. Teaching physics and understanding infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael; Möllmann, Klaus-Peter

    2017-08-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a very rapidly evolving field. The latest trends are small smartphone IR camera accessories, making infrared imaging a widespread and well-known consumer product. Applications range from medical diagnosis methods via building inspections and industrial predictive maintenance etc. also to visualization in the natural sciences. Infrared cameras do allow qualitative imaging and visualization but also quantitative measurements of the surface temperatures of objects. On the one hand, they are a particularly suitable tool to teach optics and radiation physics and many selected topics in different fields of physics, on the other hand there is an increasing need of engineers and physicists who understand these complex state of the art photonics systems. Therefore students must also learn and understand the physics underlying these systems.

  14. Thermal characterization and tomography of carbon fiber reinforced plastics using individual identification technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavilov, V.P. [Tomsk Polytechnic Univ. (Russian Federation); Grinzato, E.; Bison, P.G.; Marinetti, S.; Bressan, C. [ITEF-CNR, Padova (Italy)

    1996-05-01

    A method for thermal characterization of defect depth and thickness using individual inversion functions is described. Experimental results are obtained with standard carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimens which contained Teflon inserts and impact damage. Accuracy in determining defect dimensions was about 10 percent for defect depth and 33 percent for defect thickness. A technique to synthesize images of defect parameters is proposed. Thermal tomography advantages in analyzing defect in-depth propagation are illustrated.

  15. Warping-based co-registration of thermal infrared images: Study of factors influencing its applicability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, D.; Pinti, P.; Di Donato, L.; Merla, A.

    2017-06-01

    A relevant issue for processing biomedical thermal imaging data is the availability of tools for objective and quantitative comparison of images across different conditions or subjects. To this goal, a solution can be offered by projecting the thermal distribution data onto a fictitious template to obtain a common reference for comparison across cases or subjects. In this preliminary study, we tested the feasibility of applying a warping procedure on infrared thermal images. Fifteen thermal images of checkerboard were recorded at three different distances and five different angles in order to evaluate which factor mostly influences the warping accuracy. The accuracy of three different warping transformation models (local weighted mean (LWM), polynomial, affine) was tested by comparing the positioning error between users' selected fiduciary points on each thermal image and their corresponding reference position assigned on the template image. Fifteen users, divided into three groups upon on their experience in thermal imaging processing, participated in this study in order to evaluate the effect of experience in applying a warping procedure to the analysis of thermal infrared images. The most relevant factor influencing the positioning and thermal errors is the acquisition distance, while the users' level of experience and the inclination angle do not seem to play the same importance. Comparing the three transformations, the LWM seems to be the best in terms of minimizing the two categories of errors. This preliminary work helps to understand the limits and the possibilities of applying warping techniques for objective, quantitative and automatic thermal image comparisons.

  16. Comparison of additive image fusion vs. feature-level image fusion techniques for enhanced night driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Edward J.; Reese, Colin E.; Van Der Wal, Gooitzen S.

    2003-02-01

    The Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has conducted a series of image fusion evaluations under the Head-Tracked Vision System (HTVS) program. The HTVS is a driving system for both wheeled and tracked military vehicles, wherein dual-waveband sensors are directed in a more natural head-slewed imaging mode. The HTVS consists of thermal and image-intensified TV sensors, a high-speed gimbal, a head-mounted display, and a head tracker. A series of NVESD field tests over the past two years has investigated the degree to which additive (A+B) image fusion of these sensors enhances overall driving performance. Additive fusion employs a single (but user adjustable) fractional weighting for all the features of each sensor's image. More recently, NVESD and Sarnoff Corporation have begun a cooperative effort to evaluate and refine Sarnoff's "feature-level" multi-resolution (pyramid) algorithms for image fusion. This approach employs digital processing techniques to select at each image point only the sensor with the strongest features, and to utilize only those features to reconstruct the fused video image. This selection process is performed simultaneously at multiple scales of the image, which are combined to form the reconstructed fused image. All image fusion techniques attempt to combine the "best of both sensors" in a single image. Typically, thermal sensors are better for detecting military threats and targets, while image-intensified sensors provide more natural scene cues and detect cultural lighting. This investigation will address the differences between additive fusion and feature-level image fusion techniques for enhancing the driver's overall situational awareness.

  17. Scanning Nanospin Ensemble Microscope for Nanoscale Magnetic and Thermal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetienne, Jean-Philippe; Lombard, Alain; Simpson, David A; Ritchie, Cameron; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2016-01-13

    Quantum sensors based on solid-state spins provide tremendous opportunities in a wide range of fields from basic physics and chemistry to biomedical imaging. However, integrating them into a scanning probe microscope to enable practical, nanoscale quantum imaging is a highly challenging task. Recently, the use of single spins in diamond in conjunction with atomic force microscopy techniques has allowed significant progress toward this goal, but generalization of this approach has so far been impeded by long acquisition times or by the absence of simultaneous topographic information. Here, we report on a scanning quantum probe microscope which solves both issues by employing a nanospin ensemble hosted in a nanodiamond. This approach provides up to an order of magnitude gain in acquisition time while preserving sub-100 nm spatial resolution both for the quantum sensor and topographic images. We demonstrate two applications of this microscope. We first image nanoscale clusters of maghemite particles through both spin resonance spectroscopy and spin relaxometry, under ambient conditions. Our images reveal fast magnetic field fluctuations in addition to a static component, indicating the presence of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic particles. We next demonstrate a new imaging modality where the nanospin ensemble is used as a thermometer. We use this technique to map the photoinduced heating generated by laser irradiation of a single gold nanoparticle in a fluid environment. This work paves the way toward new applications of quantum probe microscopy such as thermal/magnetic imaging of operating microelectronic devices and magnetic detection of ion channels in cell membranes.

  18. Ultrasonic Imaging Techniques for Breast Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.

    2008-02-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology is needed to enhance its relevance to breast cancer detection. A novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method is described that exploits classical straight-ray migration. This novel method improves signal processing for better image resolution and uses novel staging hardware options using a pulse-echo approach. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using the classical migration method and is compared to standard computed tomography (CT) scans. These innovative ultrasonic methods incorporate ultrasound data acquisition, beam profile characterization, and image reconstruction. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions of approximately 1 cm are resolved and identified. Better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering remission percentages. Using these new techniques the inclusions in the phantom are resolved and compared to the results of standard methods. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also discussed.

  19. Robust document image binarization technique for degraded document images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bolan; Lu, Shijian; Tan, Chew Lim

    2013-04-01

    Segmentation of text from badly degraded document images is a very challenging task due to the high inter/intra-variation between the document background and the foreground text of different document images. In this paper, we propose a novel document image binarization technique that addresses these issues by using adaptive image contrast. The adaptive image contrast is a combination of the local image contrast and the local image gradient that is tolerant to text and background variation caused by different types of document degradations. In the proposed technique, an adaptive contrast map is first constructed for an input degraded document image. The contrast map is then binarized and combined with Canny's edge map to identify the text stroke edge pixels. The document text is further segmented by a local threshold that is estimated based on the intensities of detected text stroke edge pixels within a local window. The proposed method is simple, robust, and involves minimum parameter tuning. It has been tested on three public datasets that are used in the recent document image binarization contest (DIBCO) 2009 & 2011 and handwritten-DIBCO 2010 and achieves accuracies of 93.5%, 87.8%, and 92.03%, respectively, that are significantly higher than or close to that of the best-performing methods reported in the three contests. Experiments on the Bickley diary dataset that consists of several challenging bad quality document images also show the superior performance of our proposed method, compared with other techniques.

  20. [X-ray radiographic imaging technique with high dynamic range].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Wang, Li-Ming; Su, Xin-Yan

    2014-04-01

    In conventional X-ray radiographic imaging system with a fixed energy parameter, the acquired X-ray images are usually overexposed and have no useful information available. It is due to some constraints, like special structure of component, different attenuation coefficients of materials and dynamic range of optoelectronic devices. When maximum of transmitted X-ray luminous exceed capacity limitation of X-ray radiographic imaging system in one scene, the device up to saturate. Also when minimum of transmitted X-ray luminous is below the thermal noise level of imaging system, no useful information is available for imaging. To solve the problem of difficulties in acquiring transmitted X-ray luminous in a wide dynamic range by conventional X-ray radiographic imaging system, we put forward a new X-ray radiographic imaging technique with high dynamic range based on adjusting tube voltage. In the article, the influence by charge capacity of X-ray radiographic imaging system on effective irradiating thickness is analyzed. Through experiments of some standard samples, we gained the relationship between voltage range of X-ray tube and materials or structure of component for best testing sensitivity. Then we put forward an adjusting strategy of tube voltage and effective subgraphs extraction method from acquired raw X-ray images. By the mentioned method, we carried out X-ray radiographic imaging experiments with high dynamic range for components with thickness from 0 to 20 mm. The results show that X-ray radiographic imaging technique with high dynamic range is effective to realize imaging for some components with different thickness. It is available for us to find more detailed projection information from fusion images.

  1. Interpretation techniques. [image enhancement and pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    The image enhancement and geometric correction and registration techniques developed and/or demonstrated on ERTS data are relatively mature and greatly enhance the utility of the data for a large variety of users. Pattern recognition was improved by the use of signature extension, feature extension, and other classification techniques. Many of these techniques need to be developed and generalized to become operationally useful. Advancements in the mass precision processing of ERTS were demonstrated, providing the hope for future earth resources data to be provided in a more readily usable state. Also in evidence is an increasing and healthy interaction between the techniques developers and the user/applications investigators.

  2. A summary of image segmentation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    Machine vision systems are often considered to be composed of two subsystems: low-level vision and high-level vision. Low level vision consists primarily of image processing operations performed on the input image to produce another image with more favorable characteristics. These operations may yield images with reduced noise or cause certain features of the image to be emphasized (such as edges). High-level vision includes object recognition and, at the highest level, scene interpretation. The bridge between these two subsystems is the segmentation system. Through segmentation, the enhanced input image is mapped into a description involving regions with common features which can be used by the higher level vision tasks. There is no theory on image segmentation. Instead, image segmentation techniques are basically ad hoc and differ mostly in the way they emphasize one or more of the desired properties of an ideal segmenter and in the way they balance and compromise one desired property against another. These techniques can be categorized in a number of different groups including local vs. global, parallel vs. sequential, contextual vs. noncontextual, interactive vs. automatic. In this paper, we categorize the schemes into three main groups: pixel-based, edge-based, and region-based. Pixel-based segmentation schemes classify pixels based solely on their gray levels. Edge-based schemes first detect local discontinuities (edges) and then use that information to separate the image into regions. Finally, region-based schemes start with a seed pixel (or group of pixels) and then grow or split the seed until the original image is composed of only homogeneous regions. Because there are a number of survey papers available, we will not discuss all segmentation schemes. Rather than a survey, we take the approach of a detailed overview. We focus only on the more common approaches in order to give the reader a flavor for the variety of techniques available yet present enough

  3. Thermal particle image velocity estimation of fire plume flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyang Zhou; Lulu Sun; Shankar Mahalingam; David R. Weise

    2003-01-01

    For the purpose of studying wildfire spread in living vegetation such as chaparral in California, a thermal particle image velocity (TPIV) algorithm for nonintrusively measuring flame gas velocities through thermal infrared (IR) imagery was developed. By tracing thermal particles in successive digital IR images, the TPIV algorithm can estimate the velocity field in a...

  4. Thermal Wavelength Measurement of Nanofluid in an Optical-Fiber Thermal Wave Cavity Technique to Determine the Thermal Diffusivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monir Noroozi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of optical-fiber thermal wave cavity (OF-TWC technique was investigated to measure the thermal diffusivity of Ag nanofluids. The thermal diffusivity was obtained by measuring the thermal wavelength of sample in a cavity scan mode. The spherical Ag nanoparticles samples were prepared at various sizes using the microwave method. Applying the thermal wavelength measurement in a flexible OF-TWC technique requires only two experimental data sets. It can be used to estimate thermal diffusivity of a small amount of liquid samples (0.3 ml in a brief period. UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to measure the characterization of the Ag nanoparticles. The thermal diffusivity of distilled water, glycerol, and two different types of cooking oil was measured and has an excellent agreement with the reported results in the literature (difference of only 0.3%–2.4%. The nanofluids showed that the highest value of thermal diffusivity was achieved for smaller sized nanoparticles. The results of this method confirmed that the thermal wavelength measurement method using the OF-TWC technique had potential as a tool to measure the thermal diffusivity of nanofluids with different variables such as the size, shape, and concentration of the nanoparticles.

  5. Cellular imaging electron tomography and related techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2018-01-01

    This book highlights important techniques for cellular imaging and covers the basics and applications of electron tomography and related techniques. In addition, it considers practical aspects and broadens the technological focus by incorporating techniques that are only now becoming accessible (e.g. block face imaging).  The first part of the book describes the electron microscopy 3D technique available to scientists around the world, allowing them to characterize organelles, cells and tissues. The major emphasis is on new technologies like scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography, though the book also reviews some of the more proven technologies like electron tomography. In turn, the second part is dedicated to the reconstruction of data sets, signal improvement and interpretation.

  6. Estimation technique on thermal properties data of reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Hidetaka; Baba, Tetsuya; Matsumoto, Tsuyoshi; Kishimoto, Isao; Taketoshi, Naoyuki; Arai, Teruo

    1998-01-01

    This study aims at rapid measurement of thermal properties (thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat capacity, and emissivity) with the highest precision and till ultra high temperature in the world under identifying high temperature materials expected at reactor engineering in future such as plasma facing materials of nuclear fusion reactor. It was conducted by setting some sub-theme such as highly precise measurement and characterization of thermal properties, estimation technique of their data. Thus, precise measurement on specific heat capacity of meso-phase graphite was conducted. Between those at 1000degC and 3000degC a difference of about 5% was observed. As a result, it was found that it was required for highly precise estimation of thermal property data to consider value of the specific heat capacity. (G.K.)

  7. Image processing techniques for remote sensing data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    interpretation and for processing of scene data for autonomous machine perception. The technique of digital image processing are used for' automatic character/pattern recognition, industrial robots for product assembly and inspection, military recognizance...-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 4. IMAGE PROCE:>SINGTOO~IQUE3FOR RmOTE SmSING DATA M. R. RAIirnH KUMAR National Institute of Oceanography, Dona PaUla, Goa-403004. Digital image processing is used for improvement of pictorial information for human...

  8. A "2-omega" technique for measuring anisotropy of thermal conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramu, Ashok T; Bowers, John E

    2012-12-01

    A popular method of measuring the thermal conductivity of thin films and substrates, the "3-omega" method, is modified to yield a new technique for measuring the anisotropy in thermal transport in bulk materials. The validity of the proposed technique is established by measuring the thermal conductivity of strontium titanate, which is expected to be isotropic because of its cubic unit cell. The technique is then applied to rutile TiO(2). The analysis of experimental results on (100) and (001) TiO(2) reveals that the anisotropy is a function of the crystalline quality, as quantified by the effective thermal conductivity obtained through conventional "3-omega" measurements. The advantages of the proposed technique are similar to those of the standard "3-omega" method, namely the simplicity of sample preparation and measurement, and negligible errors due to radiation because of the small volume of material being heated. For anisotropy determination, the proposed technique has the additional advantage that a single sample is sufficient to determine both components of the thermal conductivity, namely the values in and perpendicular to the plane of cleavage. This is significant for materials in which there is a large variation in the crystalline quality from sample to sample. For such materials, it is unreliable to use two different samples, one for measuring the thermal conductivity in each direction. Experimental data are analyzed using a 3D Fourier-series based method developed in this work. The proposed method determines each component of the thermal conductivity with an estimated accuracy of about 10%.

  9. Performance evaluation of breast image compression techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastassopoulos, G.; Lymberopoulos, D.; Panayiotakis, G.; Bezerianos, A.

    1994-01-01

    Novel diagnosis orienting tele working systems manipulate, store, and process medical data through real time communication - conferencing schemes. One of the most important factors affecting the performance of these systems is image handling. Compression algorithms can be applied to the medical images, in order to minimize : a) the volume of data to be stored in the database, b) the demanded bandwidth from the network, c) the transmission costs, and to minimize the speed of the transmitted data. In this paper an estimation of all the factors of the process that affect the presentation of breast images is made, from the time the images are produced from a modality, till the compressed images are stored, or transmitted in a Broadband network (e.g. B-ISDN). The images used were scanned images of the TOR(MAX) Leeds breast phantom, as well as typical breast images. A comparison of seven compression techniques has been done, based on objective criteria such as Mean Square Error (MSE), resolution, contrast, etc. The user can choose the appropriate compression ratio in order to achieve the desired image quality. (authors)

  10. Retinal Imaging Techniques for Diabetic Retinopathy Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, James Kang Hao; Cheung, Carol Y.; Sim, Shaun Sebastian; Tan, Pok Chien; Tan, Gavin Siew Wei; Wong, Tien Yin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, demand for diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening platforms is steeply increasing. Early detection and treatment of DR are key public health interventions that can greatly reduce the likelihood of vision loss. Current DR screening programs typically employ retinal fundus photography, which relies on skilled readers for manual DR assessment. However, this is labor-intensive and suffers from inconsistency across sites. Hence, there has been a recent proliferation of automated retinal image analysis software that may potentially alleviate this burden cost-effectively. Furthermore, current screening programs based on 2-dimensional fundus photography do not effectively screen for diabetic macular edema (DME). Optical coherence tomography is becoming increasingly recognized as the reference standard for DME assessment and can potentially provide a cost-effective solution for improving DME detection in large-scale DR screening programs. Current screening techniques are also unable to image the peripheral retina and require pharmacological pupil dilation; ultra-widefield imaging and confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, which address these drawbacks, possess great potential. In this review, we summarize the current DR screening methods using various retinal imaging techniques, and also outline future possibilities. Advances in retinal imaging techniques can potentially transform the management of patients with diabetes, providing savings in health care costs and resources. PMID:26830491

  11. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......) and sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that all methods used suggested that the KCl tablets were smoother than the NaCl tablets and higher compression pressure made the tablets smoother. Imaging methods like optical microscopy and SEM can give useful information about the roughness of the sample surface......, but they do not provide quantitative information about surface roughness. Laser profilometry and AFM on the other hand provide quantitative roughness data from two different scales, laser profilometer from 1 mm and atomic force microscope from 90 microm scale. AFM is a powerful technique but other imaging...

  12. Techniques of noninvasive optical tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Joseph; Abookasis, David; Gokhler, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Recently invented methods of optical tomographic imaging through scattering and absorbing media are presented. In one method, the three-dimensional structure of an object hidden between two biological tissues is recovered from many noisy speckle pictures obtained on the output of a multi-channeled optical imaging system. Objects are recovered from many speckled images observed by a digital camera through two stereoscopic microlens arrays. Each microlens in each array generates a speckle image of the object buried between the layers. In the computer each image is Fourier transformed jointly with an image of the speckled point-like source captured under the same conditions. A set of the squared magnitudes of the Fourier-transformed pictures is accumulated to form a single average picture. This final picture is again Fourier transformed, resulting in the three-dimensional reconstruction of the hidden object. In the other method, the effect of spatial longitudinal coherence is used for imaging through an absorbing layer with different thickness, or different index of refraction, along the layer. The technique is based on synthesis of multiple peak spatial degree of coherence. This degree of coherence enables us to scan simultaneously different sample points on different altitudes, and thus decreases the acquisition time. The same multi peak degree of coherence is also used for imaging through the absorbing layer. Our entire experiments are performed with a quasi-monochromatic light source. Therefore problems of dispersion and inhomogeneous absorption are avoided.

  13. Infrared imaging - A validation technique for computational fluid dynamics codes used in STOVL applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, R. R.; Mahan, J. R.; Smith, M. H.; Gelhausen, P. A.; Van Dalsem, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    The need for a validation technique for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes in STOVL applications has led to research efforts to apply infrared thermal imaging techniques to visualize gaseous flow fields. Specifically, a heated, free-jet test facility was constructed. The gaseous flow field of the jet exhaust was characterized using an infrared imaging technique in the 2 to 5.6 micron wavelength band as well as conventional pitot tube and thermocouple methods. These infrared images are compared to computer-generated images using the equations of radiative exchange based on the temperature distribution in the jet exhaust measured with the thermocouple traverses. Temperature and velocity measurement techniques, infrared imaging, and the computer model of the infrared imaging technique are presented and discussed. From the study, it is concluded that infrared imaging techniques coupled with the radiative exchange equations applied to CFD models are a valid method to qualitatively verify CFD codes used in STOVL applications.

  14. Comparative study of image restoration techniques in forensic image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijhold, Jurrien; Kuijper, Arjan; Westhuis, Jaap-Harm

    1997-02-01

    In this work we investigated the forensic applicability of some state-of-the-art image restoration techniques for digitized video-images and photographs: classical Wiener filtering, constrained maximum entropy, and some variants of constrained minimum total variation. Basic concepts and experimental results are discussed. Because all methods appeared to produce different results, a discussion is given of which method is the most suitable, depending on the image objects that are questioned, prior knowledge and type of blur and noise. Constrained minimum total variation methods produced the best results for test images with simulated noise and blur. In cases where images are the most substantial part of the evidence, constrained maximum entropy might be more suitable, because its theoretical basis predicts a restoration result that shows the most likely pixel values, given all the prior knowledge used during restoration.

  15. In vitro imaging techniques in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Långström, Bengt; Andrén, Per E; Lindhe, Orjan; Svedberg, Marie; Hall, Håkan

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegeneration induces various changes in the brain, changes that may be investigated using neuroimaging techniques. The in vivo techniques are useful for the visualization of major changes, and the progressing abnormalities may also be followed longitudinally. However, to study and quantify minor abnormalities, neuroimaging of postmortem brain tissue is used. These in vitro methods are complementary to the in vivo techniques and contribute to the knowledge of pathophysiology and etiology of the neurodegenerative diseases. In vitro radioligand autoradiography has given great insight in the involvement of different neuronal receptor systems in these diseases. Data on the dopamine and cholinergic systems in neurodegeneration are discussed in this review. Also, the amyloid plaques are studied using in vitro radioligand autoradiography. Using one of the newer methods, imaging matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, the distribution of a large number of peptides and proteins may be detected in vitro on brain cryosections. In this overview, we describe in vitro imaging techniques in the neurodegenerative diseases as a complement to in vivo positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography imaging.

  16. Thermal imaging method to visualize a hidden painting thermally excited by far infrared radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davin, T.; Wang, X.; Chabane, A.; Pawelko, R.; Guida, G.; Serio, B.; Hervé, P.

    2015-06-01

    The diagnosis of hidden painting is a major issue for cultural heritage. In this paper, a non-destructive active infrared thermographic technique was considered to reveal paintings covered by a lime layer. An extended infrared spectral range radiation was used as the excitation source. The external long wave infrared energy source delivered to the surface is then propagated through the material until it encounters a painting zone. Due to several thermal effects, the sample surface then presents non-uniformity patterns. Using a high sensitive infrared camera, the presence of covered pigments can thus be highlighted by the analysis of the non-stationary phenomena. Reconstituted thermal contrast images of mural samples covered by a lime layer are shown.

  17. Thermal-to-visible transducer (TVT) for thermal-IR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flusberg, Allen; Swartz, Stephen; Huff, Michael; Gross, Steven

    2008-04-01

    We have been developing a novel thermal-to-visible transducer (TVT), an uncooled thermal-IR imager that is based on a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI). The FPI-based IR imager can convert a thermal-IR image to a video electronic image. IR radiation that is emitted by an object in the scene is imaged onto an IR-absorbing material that is located within an FPI. Temperature variations generated by the spatial variations in the IR image intensity cause variations in optical thickness, modulating the reflectivity seen by a probe laser beam. The reflected probe is imaged onto a visible array, producing a visible image of the IR scene. This technology can provide low-cost IR cameras with excellent sensitivity, low power consumption, and the potential for self-registered fusion of thermal-IR and visible images. We will describe characteristics of requisite pixelated arrays that we have fabricated.

  18. Tablet surface characterisation by various imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitavuopio, Paulus; Rantanen, Jukka; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise tablet surfaces using different imaging and roughness analytical techniques including optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), laser profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The test materials compressed were potassium chloride (KCl......) and sodium chloride (NaCl). It was found that all methods used suggested that the KCl tablets were smoother than the NaCl tablets and higher compression pressure made the tablets smoother. Imaging methods like optical microscopy and SEM can give useful information about the roughness of the sample surface...

  19. Early detection of plant disease using infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huirong; Zhu, Shengpan; Ying, Yibin; Jiang, Huanyu

    2006-10-01

    By using imaging techniques, plant physiological parameters can be assessed without contact with the plant and in a non-destructive way. During plant-pathogen infection, the physiological state of the infected tissue is altered, such as changes in photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance, accumulation of Salicylic acid (SA) and even cell death. In this study, the different temperature distribution between the leaves infected by tobacco mosaic virus strain-TMV-U1 and the noninfected leaves was visualized by digital infrared thermal imaging with the microscopic observations of the different structure within different species tomatoes. Results show a presymptomatic decrease in leaf temperature about 0.5-1.3 °C lower than the healthy leaves. The temperature difference allowed the discrimination between the infected and healthy leaves before the appearance of visible necrosis on leaves.

  20. THz imaging techniques for nondestructive inspections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Kodo; Shibuya, Takayuki; Hayashi, Shin'ichiro; Suizu, Koji

    2010-08-01

    We have suggested a wide range of real-life applications using novel terahertz imaging techniques. A high-resolution terahertz tomography has been demonstrated by ultra short terahertz pulses using optical fiber and a nonlinear organic crystal. We also describe a nondestructive inspection system that can monitor the soot distribution in a ceramic filter using millimeter-to-terahertz wave computed tomography. Further, we report on the thickness measurement of very thin films using high-sensitivity metal mesh filter. These techniques are directly applicable to the nondestructive testing in industries.

  1. Comparison of four paper imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimasu, H.; Kim, D.; Suk, M.; Luner, P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses four paper imaging techniques (β-radiography, electrography, light transmission, and soft X-radiography) which were compared in terms of their process parameters and image characteristics (exposure time, spatial variation, contrast, spatial resolution, correlation with mass, and limitation in basis weight range) with the same newsprint samples and the same electron microscope film. Electrography gave a higher spatial resolution, shorter exposure time, and the wider basis weight range than β-radiography. The light transmission image could be obtained in a very short time, but it gave the poorest spatial resolution and correlation with mass. Soft X-radiography gave the biggest spatial resolution but the poorest spatial variation and contrast

  2. Advanced imaging techniques in pediatric body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtier, Jesse [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology, Charleston, SC (United States); Anupindi, Sudha A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    While there are many challenges specific to pediatric abdomino-pelvic MRI, many recent advances are addressing these challenges. It is therefore essential for radiologists to be familiar with the latest advances in MR imaging. Laudable efforts have also recently been implemented in many centers to improve the overall experience of pediatric patients, including the use of dedicated radiology child life specialists, MRI video goggles, and improved MR suite environments. These efforts have allowed a larger number of children to be scanned while awake, with fewer studies being done under sedation or anesthesia; this has resulted in additional challenges from patient motion and difficulties with breath-holding and tolerating longer scan times. In this review, we highlight common challenges faced in imaging the pediatric abdomen and pelvis and discuss the application of the newest techniques to address these challenges. Additionally, we highlight the newest advances in quantified imaging techniques, specifically in MR liver iron quantification. The techniques described in this review are all commercially available and can be readily implemented. (orig.)

  3. Argonne National Laboratory's thermal plume measurements: instruments and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Loon, L.S.; Frigo, A.A.; Paddock, R.A.

    1977-12-01

    Instrumentation and techniques were developed at Argonne National Laboratory for measuring the three-dimensional temperature structure of thermal plumes from power plants, along with the limnological, meteorological, and plant operating conditions affecting their behavior. The equipment and procedures were designed to provide field data for use in evaluating predictive models that describe thermal plume behavior, and over 100 sets of these data have been collected. The instrument systems and techniques employed in a typical thermal discharge survey are highly integrated. Continuous monitoring of ambient and plant conditions is coupled with plume mapping from a moving survey boat. The instantaneous location of the boat together with subsurface temperature measurements from a towed thermistor chain provide a quasisynoptic view of the plume structure. Real-time, onboard display of the boat path and vertical temperatures supply feedback to investigators for determining the extent and spatial resolution of measurements required. The unique design, reliability, accuracy, calibration, and historical development of the components of these integrated systems are described. Survey system interfaces with data handling and processing techniques are also explained. Special supportive studies to investigate plume dynamics, values of eddy diffusivities, time-temperature histories of water parcels in thermal plumes, and rapid changes in plume shape are also described along with instrumentation used

  4. Thermal inertia imaging - A new geologic mapping tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Gillespie, A. R.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1976-01-01

    A thermal model of the earth's surface has been developed and used to determine the thermal inertia of a test site in the Mojave Desert, California. The model, which includes meteorological heating terms as well as radiation and conduction heating terms, is used with remotely sensed surface temperature and reflectance data to determine the thermal inertia of the surface materials at the test site. The thermal inertia is displayed in image form, and can aid in the differentiation of the various lithologic materials in the test site. Since this thermal property is representative of the upper several cm of the surface, it complements visible and reflected near-IR image data.

  5. Upright CBCT: A novel imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenia J Fave

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a method for acquiring and correcting upright images using the on board CBCT imager. An upright imaging technique would allow for the introduction of upright radiation therapy treatments, which would benefit a variety of patients including those with thoracic cancers whose lung volumes are increased in an upright position and those who experience substantial discomfort during supine treatment positions.Methods: To acquire upright CBCT images, the linac head was positioned at 0 degrees, the KV imager and detector arms extended to their lateral positions, and the couch placed at 270 degrees. The KV imager was programmed to begin taking continuous fluoroscopic projections as the couch rotated from 270 to 90 degrees. The FOV was extended by performing this procedure twice, once with the detector shifted 14.5 cm towards the gantry and once with it shifted 14.5 cm away from the gantry. The two resulting sets of images were stitched together prior to reconstruction. The imaging parameters were chosen to deliver the some dose as that delivered during a simulation CT. A simulation CT was deformably registered to an upright CBCT reconstruction in order to evaluate the possibility of correcting the HU values via mapping.Results: Both spatial linearity and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright CBCT when compared to a simulation CT. Low contrast resolution and HU linearity decreased. Streaking artifacts were caused by the limited 180 degree arc angle and a sharp point artifact in the center of the axial slices resulted at the site of the stitching. A method for correcting the HUs was shown to be robust against these artifacts.Conclusion: Upright CBCT could be of great benefit to many patients. This study demonstrates its feasibility and presents solutions to some of its first hurdles before clinical implementation.--------------------------Cite this article as:Fave X, Yang J, Balter P, Court L. Upright CBCT: A novel imaging

  6. Techniques to Improve Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandukuri, Jayanth

    Novel approaches to the improvement of ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging--a relatively new imaging modality that combines ultrasound and optical imaging techniques--have been proposed for early cancer detection. In USF, a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beam is used to induce temperature rise within its acoustic focal region due to which a thermo-sensitive USF contrast agent undergoes a switch in its state by increasing the output of fluorescence photons. By using an increase in fluorescence, one can isolate and quantify the fluorescence properties within the ultrasonic focal area. Therefore, USF is able to provide fluorescence contrast while maintaining ultrasound resolution in tissue. The major challenge of the conventional USF technique is its low axial resolution and its sensitivity (i.e. its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)). This work focuses on investigating and developing a novel USF system design that can improve the resolution and SNR of USF imaging for biological applications. This work can be divided into two major parts: characterizing the performance of a high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer; and improving the axial resolution and sensitivity of the USF technique. Preliminary investigation was conducted by using an IR camera setup to detect temperature variation and thereby study the performance of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer to quantify different parameters of ultrasound-induced temperature focal size (UTFS). Investigations are conducted for the purpose of high-resolution imaging with an emphasis on HIFU-induced thermal focus size, short duration of HIFU-induced temperature increase (to avoid thermal diffusion or conduction), and control of HIFU-induced temperature increase within a few degrees Celsius. Next, the focus was shifted to improving the sensitivity of the ultrasound-switchable fluorescence-imaging technique. In this study, the USF signal is encoded with the modulation frequency of the

  7. Automation of disbond detection in aircraft fuselage through thermal image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, D. R.; Winfree, W. P.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for interpreting thermal images obtained during the nondestructive evaluation of aircraft bonded joints is presented. The procedure operates on time-derivative thermal images and resulted in a disbond image with disbonds highlighted. The size of the 'black clusters' in the output disbond image is a quantitative measure of disbond size. The procedure is illustrated using simulation data as well as data obtained through experimental testing of fabricated samples and aircraft panels. Good results are obtained, and, except in pathological cases, 'false calls' in the cases studied appeared only as noise in the output disbond image which was easily filtered out. The thermal detection technique coupled with an automated image interpretation capability will be a very fast and effective method for inspecting bonded joints in an aircraft structure.

  8. Probabilistic image: a concise image representation technique for multiple parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, L.C.; Yeh, S.H.; Liu, R.S. (Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan; National Yang-Mills Medical Coll., Taipei, Taiwan); Chen, Z. (National Chiao Tung Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan)

    1984-09-01

    In scintiscanning studies, an attempt has been made to use multiple parametric information to evaluate functional abnormalities in human organs, using the probabilistic domain instead of the parametric domain to present single or multiple parameters in one image. The construction of such a probabilistic image (PBI) has been illustrated from a /sup 99/Tcsup(m)-HIDA study in 32 normal subjects and in 20 patients with intrahepatic lithiasis. The results show that this technique shows the functional abnormalities in a structural format with a good contrast and probabilistic sense.

  9. Special feature on imaging systems and techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wuqiang; Giakos, George

    2013-07-01

    The IEEE International Conference on Imaging Systems and Techniques (IST'2012) was held in Manchester, UK, on 16-17 July 2012. The participants came from 26 countries or regions: Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, India, Iran, Iraq, Italy, Japan, Korea, Latvia, Malaysia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tunisia, UAE, UK and USA. The technical program of the conference consisted of a series of scientific and technical sessions, exploring physical principles, engineering and applications of new imaging systems and techniques, as reflected by the diversity of the submitted papers. Following a rigorous review process, a total of 123 papers were accepted, and they were organized into 30 oral presentation sessions and a poster session. In addition, six invited keynotes were arranged. The conference not only provided the participants with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas and disseminate research outcomes but also paved a way to establish global collaboration. Following the IST'2012, a total of 55 papers, which were technically extended substantially from their versions in the conference proceeding, were submitted as regular papers to this special feature of Measurement Science and Technology . Following a rigorous reviewing process, 25 papers have been finally accepted for publication in this special feature and they are organized into three categories: (1) industrial tomography, (2) imaging systems and techniques and (3) image processing. These papers not only present the latest developments in the field of imaging systems and techniques but also offer potential solutions to existing problems. We hope that this special feature provides a good reference for researchers who are active in the field and will serve as a catalyst to trigger further research. It has been our great pleasure to be the guest editors of this special feature. We would like to thank the authors for their contributions, without which it would

  10. Making Heat Visible: Promoting Energy Conservation Behaviors Through Thermal Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhew, Julie; Pahl, Sabine; Auburn, Tim; Goodhew, Steve

    2015-12-01

    Householders play a role in energy conservation through the decisions they make about purchases and installations such as insulation, and through their habitual behavior. The present U.K. study investigated the effect of thermal imaging technology on energy conservation, by measuring the behavioral effect after householders viewed images of heat escaping from or cold air entering their homes. In Study 1 ( n = 43), householders who received a thermal image reduced their energy use at a 1-year follow-up, whereas householders who received a carbon footprint audit and a non-intervention control demonstrated no change. In Study 2 ( n = 87), householders were nearly 5 times more likely to install draught proofing measures after seeing a thermal image. The effect was especially pronounced for actions that addressed an issue visible in the images. Findings indicate that using thermal imaging to make heat loss visible can promote energy conservation.

  11. Advanced Imaging Techniques for Multiphase Flows Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoresano, A.; Langella, G.; Di Santo, M.; Iodice, P.

    2017-08-01

    Advanced numerical techniques, such as fuzzy logic and neural networks have been applied in this work to digital images acquired on two applications, a centrifugal pump and a stationary spray in order to define, in a stochastic way, the gas-liquid interface evolution. Starting from the numeric matrix representing the image it is possible to characterize geometrical parameters and the time evolution of the jet. The algorithm used works with the fuzzy logic concept to binarize the chromatist of the pixels, depending them, by using the difference of the light scattering for the gas and the liquid phase.. Starting from a primary fixed threshold, the applied technique, can select the ‘gas’ pixel from the ‘liquid’ pixel and so it is possible define the first most probably boundary lines of the spray. Acquiring continuously the images, fixing a frame rate, a most fine threshold can be select and, at the limit, the most probably geometrical parameters of the jet can be detected.

  12. Electropyroelectric technique for measurement of the thermal effusivity of liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, R; Moreno, I; Araujo, C [Facultad de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Calz. Solidaridad Esquina Paseo de la Bufa s/n, C. P. 98060, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Marin, E, E-mail: emarin63@yahoo.e, E-mail: emarinm@ipn.m [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y TecnologIa Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, LegarIa 694, Colonia Irrigacion, C. P. 11500, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-06-09

    The photopyroelectric method has been recognized as a reliable and useful tool for the measurement of the thermal properties of condensed matter samples. Usually the photothermal signal is generated using intensity modulated light beams, whose amplitudes are difficult to maintain stable. In this paper we describe a variant of this technique that uses amplitude modulated electrical current as excitation source, via Joule heating of the metal contact on one side of the pyroelectric sensor. The possibilities of this method, called by us the electropyroelectric technique, for thermal effusivity measurements of liquid samples are shown using test samples of distilled water, ethanol and glycerine. The results obtained for this parameter agree well with the values reported in the literature. Our measurement uncertainties are about 3%, a fact that opens several possible applications.

  13. TIGER: Development of Thermal Gradient Compensation Algorithms and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hereford, James; Parker, Peter A.; Rhew, Ray D.

    2004-01-01

    In a wind tunnel facility, the direct measurement of forces and moments induced on the model are performed by a force measurement balance. The measurement balance is a precision-machined device that has strain gages at strategic locations to measure the strain (i.e., deformations) due to applied forces and moments. The strain gages convert the strain (and hence the applied force) to an electrical voltage that is measured by external instruments. To address the problem of thermal gradients on the force measurement balance NASA-LaRC has initiated a research program called TIGER - Thermally-Induced Gradients Effects Research. The ultimate goals of the TIGER program are to: (a) understand the physics of the thermally-induced strain and its subsequent impact on load measurements and (b) develop a robust thermal gradient compensation technique. This paper will discuss the impact of thermal gradients on force measurement balances, specific aspects of the TIGER program (the design of a special-purpose balance, data acquisition and data analysis challenges), and give an overall summary.

  14. Thermal feature extraction of servers in a datacenter using thermal image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Ran, Jian; Xie, Ting; Gao, Shan

    2017-09-01

    Thermal cameras provide fine-grained thermal information that enhances monitoring and enables automatic thermal management in large datacenters. Recent approaches employing mobile robots or thermal camera networks can already identify the physical locations of hot spots. Other distribution information used to optimize datacenter management can also be obtained automatically using pattern recognition technology. However, most of the features extracted from thermal images, such as shape and gradient, may be affected by changes in the position and direction of the thermal camera. This paper presents a method for extracting the thermal features of a hot spot or a server in a container datacenter. First, thermal and visual images are registered based on textural characteristics extracted from images acquired in datacenters. Then, the thermal distribution of each server is standardized. The features of a hot spot or server extracted from the standard distribution can reduce the impact of camera position and direction. The results of experiments show that image registration is efficient for aligning the corresponding visual and thermal images in the datacenter, and the standardization procedure reduces the impacts of camera position and direction on hot spot or server features.

  15. Adapting Local Features for Face Detection in Thermal Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Trung, Ngo Thanh; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Nagahara, Hajime; Shimada, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Rin-Ichiro

    2017-11-27

    A thermal camera captures the temperature distribution of a scene as a thermal image. In thermal images, facial appearances of different people under different lighting conditions are similar. This is because facial temperature distribution is generally constant and not affected by lighting condition. This similarity in face appearances is advantageous for face detection. To detect faces in thermal images, cascade classifiers with Haar-like features are generally used. However, there are few studies exploring the local features for face detection in thermal images. In this paper, we introduce two approaches relying on local features for face detection in thermal images. First, we create new feature types by extending Multi-Block LBP. We consider a margin around the reference and the generally constant distribution of facial temperature. In this way, we make the features more robust to image noise and more effective for face detection in thermal images. Second, we propose an AdaBoost-based training method to get cascade classifiers with multiple types of local features. These feature types have different advantages. In this way we enhance the description power of local features. We did a hold-out validation experiment and a field experiment. In the hold-out validation experiment, we captured a dataset from 20 participants, comprising 14 males and 6 females. For each participant, we captured 420 images with 10 variations in camera distance, 21 poses, and 2 appearances (participant with/without glasses). We compared the performance of cascade classifiers trained by different sets of the features. The experiment results showed that the proposed approaches effectively improve the performance of face detection in thermal images. In the field experiment, we compared the face detection performance in realistic scenes using thermal and RGB images, and gave discussion based on the results.

  16. Atherosclerosis staging: imaging using FLIM technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicchieri, Leticia B.; Barioni, Marina Berardi; Silva, Mônica Nascimento; Monteiro, Andrea Moreira; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio Martins; Ito, Amando S.; Courrol, Lilia C.

    2014-03-01

    In this work it was used fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to analyze biochemical composition of atherosclerotic plaque. For this purpose an animal experimentation was done with New Zealand rabbits divided into two groups: a control group of 4 rabbits that received a regular diet for 0, 20, 40 and 60 days; and an experimental group of 9 rabbits, divided in 3 subgroups, that were fed with 1% cholesterol diet for 20, 40 and 60 days respectively. The aortas slices stained with europium chlortetracycline were analyzed by FLIM exciting samples at 440 nm. The results shown an increase in the lifetime imaging of rabbits fed with cholesterol. It was observed that is possible to detect the metabolic changes associated with atherosclerosis at an early stage using FLIM technique exciting the tissue around 440 nm and observing autofluorescence lifetime. Lifetimes longer than 1.75 ns suggest the presence of porphyrins in the tissue and consequently, inflammation and the presence of macrophages.

  17. Use of advanced modeling techniques to optimize thermal packaging designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formato, Richard M; Potami, Raffaele; Ahmed, Iftekhar

    2010-01-01

    Through a detailed case study the authors demonstrate, for the first time, the capability of using advanced modeling techniques to correctly simulate the transient temperature response of a convective flow-based thermal shipper design. The objective of this case study was to demonstrate that simulation could be utilized to design a 2-inch-wall polyurethane (PUR) shipper to hold its product box temperature between 2 and 8 °C over the prescribed 96-h summer profile (product box is the portion of the shipper that is occupied by the payload). Results obtained from numerical simulation are in excellent agreement with empirical chamber data (within ±1 °C at all times), and geometrical locations of simulation maximum and minimum temperature match well with the corresponding chamber temperature measurements. Furthermore, a control simulation test case was run (results taken from identical product box locations) to compare the coupled conduction-convection model with a conduction-only model, which to date has been the state-of-the-art method. For the conduction-only simulation, all fluid elements were replaced with "solid" elements of identical size and assigned thermal properties of air. While results from the coupled thermal/fluid model closely correlated with the empirical data (±1 °C), the conduction-only model was unable to correctly capture the payload temperature trends, showing a sizeable error compared to empirical values (ΔT > 6 °C). A modeling technique capable of correctly capturing the thermal behavior of passively refrigerated shippers can be used to quickly evaluate and optimize new packaging designs. Such a capability provides a means to reduce the cost and required design time of shippers while simultaneously improving their performance. Another advantage comes from using thermal modeling (assuming a validated model is available) to predict the temperature distribution in a shipper that is exposed to ambient temperatures which were not bracketed

  18. Robust reflective ghost imaging against different partially polarized thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Guo; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Zhang, De-Jian; Liu, Hong-Chao; Li, Zong-Guo; Xiong, Jun

    2018-03-01

    We theoretically study the influence of degree of polarization (DOP) of thermal light on the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the reflective ghost imaging (RGI), which is a novel and indirect imaging modality. An expression for the CNR of RGI with partially polarized thermal light is carefully derived, which suggests a weak dependence of CNR on the DOP, especially when the ratio of the object size to the speckle size of thermal light has a large value. Different from conventional imaging approaches, our work reveals that RGI is much more robust against the DOP of the light source, which thereby has advantages in practical applications, such as remote sensing.

  19. Computer technique for correction of nonhomogeneous distribution in radiologic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florian, Rogerio V.; Frere, Annie F.; Schiable, Homero; Marques, Paulo M.A.; Marques, Marcio A.

    1996-01-01

    An image processing technique to provide a 'Heel' effect compensation on medical images is presented. It is reported that the technique can improve the structures detection due to background homogeneity and can be used for any radiologic system

  20. Ultrasonic imaging in LMFBRs using digital techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fothergill, J.R.; McKnight, J.A.; Barrett, L.M.

    Ultrasonic technology for providing images of components immersed in the opaque sodium of LMFBRs is being developed at RNL. For many years the application has been restricted by the unavailability of convenient ultrasonic sources and receivers capable of withstanding the reactor environment. Until recently, for example, important ultrasonic instrument design, such as for future sweep arms, had to be based on waveguided ultrasonics. RNL have developed an economic immersible transducer that can be deployed during reactor shut-down, when many demands for ultrasonic imaging are made. The transducer design is not suited at present to the sophisticated techniques of phased arrays; consequently image formation must depend on the physical scanning of a target using one or more transducers in pulse-echo mode. The difficulties of access into a fast reactor impose further restrictions. Some applications may involve easy scanning sequences, thus the sweep arm requires only a rotation to provide a map of the reactor core area. For a more detailed examination of the same area, however, special engineering solutions are needed to provide a more satisfactory scanning sequence. A compromise solution involving the rotating shield movement is being used for a PFR experiment to examine a limited area of the core. (author)

  1. Application of Acoustic Techniques in Thermal Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Sai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the power plant, for over two decades, use of acoustic techniques were limited only to detect steam leaks in the Boiler. Even this application has certain limitations like interfering background noises, sound wave attenuations, and inaccessibility of desired sensor locations. For these reasons a proper specialized technique, generally unique to a given application, be employed to ensure optimum sensitivity. This paper presents an innovative approach towards use of acoustic techniques in a 500 MW thermal power plant. The application areas include clinker /sagging detection, steam leak detection and combustion optimization. In the steam leak detection and combustion optimization, the present day limitations are overcome. The use of acoustic technology to detect clinker formation is a new concept. All the three applications are designed and implemented in a 500 MW power plant.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2013-08-01

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  3. Method and apparatus for implementing material thermal property measurement by flash thermal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiangang

    2017-11-14

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing measurement of material thermal properties including measurement of thermal effusivity of a coating and/or film or a bulk material of uniform property. The test apparatus includes an infrared camera, a data acquisition and processing computer coupled to the infrared camera for acquiring and processing thermal image data, a flash lamp providing an input of heat onto the surface of a two-layer sample with an enhanced optical filter covering the flash lamp attenuating an entire infrared wavelength range with a series of thermal images is taken of the surface of the two-layer sample.

  4. Three dimensional image presentation techniques in medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizer, S.M.; Fuchs, H.

    1987-01-01

    Medical images can be presented three-dimensionally by techniques that either calculate the effect of reflections from surfaces predefined from slices or project a three-space of luminosities computed from voxel intensities onto the visual receptors. Sliced-based reflective displays are the most common type. Means of producing surface descriptions both via voxel sets and via slice contours are reviewed. Advantages of and means of transparent display to allow the appreciation of the 3D relationships among objects are set forth. Ways to produce additional depth cues by stereoscopy and the kinetic depth effect are discussed, and the importance of interactive modification of viewpoint, clipping plane, displayed objects, etc. are explained. A new device, UNC's Pixel-planes, for accomplishing this in real time are illustrated. Voxel intensity based display methods avoid the need for time-consuming predefinition of object surfaces and thus can allow exploration of 3D image data. Varifocal mirror hardware and fast computation of one or more projections based on object probabilities are two of the more important approaches. While 3D display provides important information about 3D relationships, it cannot provide the kind of appreciation of subtle grey-scale changes that 2D display can. Methods that can combine these two kinds of information by superimposing 2D grey-scale slices on or in the context of 3D displays are discussed. Applications of these techniques for both diagnosis and radiotherapy planning are used as illustrations and guides to the usefulness of these techniques with CT, MRI, and other 3D medical imaging modalities. 24 refs.; 5 figs

  5. Multi-material classification of dry recyclables from municipal solid waste based on thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundupalli, Sathish Paulraj; Hait, Subrata; Thakur, Atul

    2017-12-01

    There has been a significant rise in municipal solid waste (MSW) generation in the last few decades due to rapid urbanization and industrialization. Due to the lack of source segregation practice, a need for automated segregation of recyclables from MSW exists in the developing countries. This paper reports a thermal imaging based system for classifying useful recyclables from simulated MSW sample. Experimental results have demonstrated the possibility to use thermal imaging technique for classification and a robotic system for sorting of recyclables in a single process step. The reported classification system yields an accuracy in the range of 85-96% and is comparable with the existing single-material recyclable classification techniques. We believe that the reported thermal imaging based system can emerge as a viable and inexpensive large-scale classification-cum-sorting technology in recycling plants for processing MSW in developing countries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Digital Enhancement of Night Vision and Thermal Images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teo, Chek

    2003-01-01

    .... This thesis explores the effect of the Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) process on night vision and thermal images With better contrast, target detection and discrimination can be improved...

  7. High Temperature Fiberoptic Thermal Imaging System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed Phase 1 program will fabricate and demonstrate a small diameter single fiber endoscope that can perform high temperature thermal imaging in a jet engine...

  8. A Noncontact Measurement Technique for the Density and Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Solid and Liquid Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sang K.; Thiessen, David B.; Rhim, Won-Kyu

    1996-01-01

    A noncontact measurement technique for the density and the thermal expansion refractory materials in their molten as well as solid phases is presented. This technique is based on the video image processing of a levitated sample. Experiments were performed using the high-temperature electrostatic levitator (HTESL) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which 2-3 mm diameter samples can be levitated, melted, and radiatively cooled in a vacuum. Due to the axisymmetric nature of the molten samples when levitated in the HTESL, a rather simple digital image analysis can be employed to accurately measure the volumetric change as a function of temperature. Density and the thermal expansion coefficient measurements were made on a pure nickel sample to test the accuracy of the technique in the temperature range of 1045-1565 C. The result for the liquid phase density can be expressed by p = 8.848 + (6.730 x 10(exp -4)) x T (degC) g/cu cm within 0.8% accuracy, and the corresponding thermal expansion coefficient can be expressed by Beta=(9.419 x 10(exp -5)) - (7.165 x 10(exp -9) x T (degC)/K within 0.2% accuracy.

  9. Thermal imaging for current D&S priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Robert; Parsons, John F.

    2012-11-01

    Supplying thermal imagers for today's operational needs requires flexibility, responsiveness and ever reducing costs. This paper will use the latest thermal imager development in the Catherine range from Thales UK to address the technical interactions with such issues as modularity, re-use, regions of deployment and supply chain management. All this is in the context of the increasingly public operations and the pressures on validating performance especially when weapon aiming is involved.

  10. Carbon filter property detection with thermal neutron technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Zhongbo; Han Jun; Li Wenjie

    2003-01-01

    The paper discussed the mechanism that the antigas property of the carbon filter will decrease because of its carbon bed absorbing water from the air while the carbon filter is being stored, and introduced the principle and method of detection the amount of water absorption with thermal neutron technique. Because some certain relation between the antigas property of the carbon filter and the amount of water absorption exists, the decrease degree of the carbon filter antigas property can be estimated through the amount of water absorption, offering a practicable facility technical pathway to quickly non-destructively detect the carbon filter antigas property

  11. Use of imaging techniques in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, C.; Rudder, D.; Jimenez, P.

    2002-01-01

    Imaging techniques are used in radiation oncology for: disease diagnosis, tumor localization and staging, treatment simulation, treatment planning, clinical dosimetry displays, treatment verification and patient follow up. In industrialized countries, up to the 1970's, conventional radiology was used for diagnosis, simulation and planning. Gamma cameras helped tumor staging by detecting metastases. In the 1970's, simulators were developed for exclusive use in radiation oncology departments. Clinical dosimetry displays consisted mainly in axial dose distributions. Treatment verification was done placing films in the radiation beam with the patient under treatment. In the 1980's, 2-D imaging was replaced by 3-D displays with the incorporation of computerized tomography (CT) scanners, and in the 1990's of magnetic resonance imagers (MRI). Ultrasound units, briefly used in the 1960's for treatment planning purposes, were found again useful, mainly for brachytherapy dosimetry. Digital portal imagers allowed accurate treatment field verification. Treatment planning systems incorporated the capability of 'inverse planning', i.e. once the desired dose distribution is decided, the field size, gantry, collimator and couch angles, etc, can be automatically selected. At the end of the millennium, image fusion permitted excellent anatomical display of tumors and adjacent sensitive structures. The 2000's are seeing a change from anatomical to functional imaging with the advent of MRI units capable of spectroscopy at 3 Tesla and positron emission tomography (PET) units. In 2001 combined CT/PET units appeared in RT departments. In 2002, fusion of CT, MRI and PET images became available. Molecular imaging is being developed. The situation in developing countries is quite different. To start with, cancer incidence is different in developing and in industrialized countries. In addition, the health services pattern is different: Cancer treatment is mostly done in public institutions

  12. Image Recognition Techniques for Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boese, M.; Heaton, T. H.; Hauksson, E.

    2011-12-01

    When monitoring on his/her PC a map of seismic stations, whose colors scale with the real-time transmitted ground motions amplitudes observed in a dense seismic network, an experienced person will fairly easily recognize when and where an earthquake occurs. Using the maximum amplitudes at stations at close epicentral distances, he/she might even be able to roughly estimate the size of the event. From the number and distribution of stations turning 'red', the person might also be able to recognize the rupturing fault in a large earthquake (M>>7.0), and to estimate the rupture dimensions while the rupture is still developing. Following this concept, we are adopting techniques for automatic image recognition to provide earthquake early warning. We rapidly correlate a set of templates with real-time ground motion observations in a seismic network. If a 'suspicious' pattern of ground motion amplitudes is detected, the algorithm starts estimating the location of the earthquake and its magnitude. For large earthquakes the algorithm estimates finite source dimensions and the direction of rupture propagation. These predictions are continuously up-dated using the current 'image' of ground motion observations. A priori information, such as on the orientation of mayor faults, helps enhancing estimates in less dense networks. The approach will be demonstrated for multiple simulated and real events in California.

  13. 3-D thermal weight function method and multiple virtual crack extension technique for thermal shock problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yanlin; Zhou Xiao; Qu Jiadi; Dou Yikang; He Yinbiao

    2005-01-01

    An efficient scheme, 3-D thermal weight function (TWF) method, and a novel numerical technique, multiple virtual crack extension (MVCE) technique, were developed for determination of histories of transient stress intensity factor (SIF) distributions along 3-D crack fronts of a body subjected to thermal shock. The TWF is a universal function, which is dependent only on the crack configuration and body geometry. TWF is independent of time during thermal shock, so the whole history of transient SIF distributions along crack fronts can be directly calculated through integration of the products of TWF and transient temperatures and temperature gradients. The repeated determinations of the distributions of stresses (or displacements) fields for individual time instants are thus avoided in the TWF method. An expression of the basic equation for the 3-D universal weight function method for Mode I in an isotropic elastic body is derived. This equation can also be derived from Bueckner-Rice's 3-D WF formulations in the framework of transformation strain. It can be understood from this equation that the so-called thermal WF is in fact coincident with the mechanical WF except for some constants of elasticity. The details and formulations of the MVCE technique are given for elliptical cracks. The MVCE technique possesses several advantages. The specially selected linearly independent VCE modes can directly be used as shape functions for the interpolation of unknown SIFs. As a result, the coefficient matrix of the final system of equations in the MVCE method is a triple-diagonal matrix and the values of the coefficients on the main diagonal are large. The system of equations has good numerical properties. The number of linearly independent VCE modes that can be introduced in a problem is unlimited. Complex situations in which the SIFs vary dramatically along crack fronts can be numerically well simulated by the MVCE technique. An integrated system of programs for solving the

  14. Some selected quantitative methods of thermal image analysis in Matlab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a new algorithm based on some selected automatic quantitative methods for analysing thermal images. It shows the practical implementation of these image analysis methods in Matlab. It enables to perform fully automated and reproducible measurements of selected parameters in thermal images. The paper also shows two examples of the use of the proposed image analysis methods for the area of ​​the skin of a human foot and face. The full source code of the developed application is also provided as an attachment. The main window of the program during dynamic analysis of the foot thermal image. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Thermal and electrical comparison of different joining techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szałapak, J.; Kiełbasiński, K.; Krzemiński, J.; Pawłowski, R.; Jakubowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    After the enforcement of Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive, one of the biggest problems in electronics is finding a substitution for led solders. Meanwhile, working conditions for the electronics are tougher and tougher - the temperatures the joints have to withstand can be much higher than working temperatures of the soft solders. In current article, the authors present the Low Temperature Joining Technique (LTJT) with the use of pastes based on the mixture of silver nanoparticles and silver microflakes. The authors also show the technology of joining, justify their sintering parameters selection and compare their silver joints with Pb solder and adhesive. The joints prepared with pastes containing silver nanoparticles have much better electrical and thermal properties than the ones made with other techniques.

  16. Infrared thermal facial image sequence registration analysis and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chieh-Li; Jian, Bo-Lin

    2015-03-01

    To study the emotional responses of subjects to the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), infrared thermal facial image sequence is preprocessed for registration before further analysis such that the variance caused by minor and irregular subject movements is reduced. Without affecting the comfort level and inducing minimal harm, this study proposes an infrared thermal facial image sequence registration process that will reduce the deviations caused by the unconscious head shaking of the subjects. A fixed image for registration is produced through the localization of the centroid of the eye region as well as image translation and rotation processes. Thermal image sequencing will then be automatically registered using the two-stage genetic algorithm proposed. The deviation before and after image registration will be demonstrated by image quality indices. The results show that the infrared thermal image sequence registration process proposed in this study is effective in localizing facial images accurately, which will be beneficial to the correlation analysis of psychological information related to the facial area.

  17. Characterization of thermal transport in one-dimensional microstructures using Johnson noise electro-thermal technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-06-01

    This work reports on the development of a Johnson noise electro-thermal (JET) technique to directly characterize the thermal conductivity of one-dimensional micro-/nanoscale materials. In this technique, the to-be-measured micro-/nanoscale sample is connected between two electrodes and is subjected to steady-state Joule heating. The average temperature rise of the sample is evaluated by simultaneously measuring the Johnson noise over it and its electrical resistance. The system's Johnson noise measurement accuracy is evaluated by measuring the Boltzmann constant ( k B). Our measured k B value (1.375 × 10-23 J/K) agrees very well with the reference value of 1.381 × 10-23 J/K. The temperature measurement accuracy based on Johnson noise is studied against the resistance temperature detector method, and sound agreement (4 %) is obtained. The thermal conductivity of a glass fiber with a diameter of 8.82 μm is measured using the JET technique. The measured value 1.20 W/m K agrees well with the result using a standard technique in our laboratory. The JET technique provides a very compelling way to characterize the thermophysical properties of micro-/nanoscale materials without calibrating the sample's resistance-temperature coefficient, thereby eliminating the effect of resistance drift/change during measurement and calibration. Since JET technique does not require resistance-temperature correlation, it is also applicable to semi-conductive materials which usually have a nonlinear I- V relation.

  18. Method for measuring thermal properties using a long-wavelength infrared thermal image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles L [Albuquerque, NM; Costin, Laurence S [Albuquerque, NM; Smith, Jody L [Albuquerque, NM; Moya, Mary M [Albuquerque, NM; Mercier, Jeffrey A [Albuquerque, NM

    2007-01-30

    A method for estimating the thermal properties of surface materials using long-wavelength thermal imagery by exploiting the differential heating histories of ground points in the vicinity of shadows. The use of differential heating histories of different ground points of the same surface material allows the use of a single image acquisition step to provide the necessary variation in measured parameters for calculation of the thermal properties of surface materials.

  19. Reflectance and thermal properties of the urban fabric studied with aerial spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burud, Ingunn; Thiis, Thomas; Gaitani, Niki

    2017-09-01

    The properties of materials used in the urban fabric play an essential role to the microclimate. Their thermal performance, one of the main impacting factors to urban heat island effects, is mainly determined by the physical characteristics, optical and thermal. The present research approach aims at analyzing the relation between material properties and their thermal behavior using airborne multispectral imaging in VIS/NIR and IR with sensors mounted on Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), at a survey in Athens. The images have been combined to form maps of surface temperature distribution and of material properties. Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI) maps were computed from the VIS/NIR images and were used to classify the surface material. Calibration of the temperatures was obtained by applying correct emissivity for different materials from the classified surface material map. Maps of estimated albedo and of apparent thermal inertia were derived from the VIS/NIR images and the temperature images. Combining the surface temperature maps with maps of NDVI, albedo and apparent thermal inertia makes it is possible to identify reflectance characteristics of a variety materials utilized in the urban setting in Athens and to relate these to their thermal properties. The applied multisensory technique demonstrates how novel advances in sensor development combined with advanced data analysis provide new and unique tools for urban climate studies. The results give new perspectives of urban features for revealing the complex mechanisms that lead to microclimatic modifications and to quantify their relative contribution.

  20. Thermal Infrared Imaging-Based Computational Psychophysiology for Psychometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Daniela; Pinti, Paola; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-01-01

    Thermal infrared imaging has been proposed as a potential system for the computational assessment of human autonomic nervous activity and psychophysiological states in a contactless and noninvasive way. Through bioheat modeling of facial thermal imagery, several vital signs can be extracted, including localized blood perfusion, cardiac pulse, breath rate, and sudomotor response, since all these parameters impact the cutaneous temperature. The obtained physiological information could then be used to draw inferences about a variety of psychophysiological or affective states, as proved by the increasing number of psychophysiological studies using thermal infrared imaging. This paper presents therefore a review of the principal achievements of thermal infrared imaging in computational physiology with regard to its capability of monitoring psychophysiological activity.

  1. Thermal Infrared Imaging-Based Computational Psychophysiology for Psychometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Daniela; Pinti, Paola; Merla, Arcangelo

    2015-01-01

    Thermal infrared imaging has been proposed as a potential system for the computational assessment of human autonomic nervous activity and psychophysiological states in a contactless and noninvasive way. Through bioheat modeling of facial thermal imagery, several vital signs can be extracted, including localized blood perfusion, cardiac pulse, breath rate, and sudomotor response, since all these parameters impact the cutaneous temperature. The obtained physiological information could then be used to draw inferences about a variety of psychophysiological or affective states, as proved by the increasing number of psychophysiological studies using thermal infrared imaging. This paper presents therefore a review of the principal achievements of thermal infrared imaging in computational physiology with regard to its capability of monitoring psychophysiological activity. PMID:26339284

  2. Coherence holography by achromatic 3-D field correlation of generic thermal light with an imaging Sagnac shearing interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Dinesh N; Ezawa, Takahiro; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Miyamoto, Yoko; Takeda, Mitsuo

    2012-08-27

    We propose a new technique for achromatic 3-D field correlation that makes use of the characteristics of both axial and lateral magnifications of imaging through a common-path Sagnac shearing interferometer. With this technique, we experimentally demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, 3-D image reconstruction of coherence holography with generic thermal light. By virtue of the achromatic axial shearing implemented by the difference in axial magnifications in imaging, the technique enables coherence holography to reconstruct a 3-D object with an axial depth beyond the short coherence length of the thermal light.

  3. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, Chanjuan; van der Heijden, Ferdi; Bus, Sicco A.

    2013-01-01

    Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the applicability

  4. Infrared thermal imaging for automated detection of diabetic foot complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; van Baal, Jeff G.; Liu, C.; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Bus, Sicco A.

    Background: Although thermal imaging can be a valuable technology in the prevention and management of diabetic foot disease, it is not yet widely used in clinical practice. Technological advancement in infrared imaging increases its application range. The aim was to explore the first steps in the

  5. Dentomaxillofacial imaging with computed-radiography techniques: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Chris C.; Kapa, Stanley F.; Furkart, Audrey J.; Gur, David

    1993-09-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using high resolution computed radiography techniques for dentomaxillofacial imaging. Storage phosphors were cut into various sizes and used with an experimental laser scanning reader for three different imaging procedures: intraoral, cephalometric and panoramic. Both phantom and patient images were obtained for comparing the computed radiography technique with the conventional screen/film or dental film techniques. It has been found that current computed radiography techniques are largely adequate for cephalometric and panoramic imaging but need further improvement on their spatial resolution capability for intraoral imaging. In this paper, the methods of applying the computer radiography techniques to dentomaxillofacial imaging are described and discussed. Images of phantoms, resolution bar patterns and patients are presented and compared. Issues on image quality and cost are discussed.

  6. A novel image inpainting technique based on median diffusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Image inpainting is the technique of filling-in the missing regions and removing unwanted objects from an image by diffusing the pixel information from the neighbourhood pixels. Image inpainting techniques are in use over a long time for various applications like removal of scratches, restoring damaged/missing portions or ...

  7. A review of equine renal imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, H.K.; Toal, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Radiography has a limited role in the evaluation of the kidneys in foals and adult horses. Ultrasonography is the current method of choice for structural evaluation of the kidneys in horses as it provides additional information to standard serum chemistry and urinalysis evaluation. A variety of structural abnormalities have been identified in diseased equine kidneys with the use of ultrasound. Ultrasound guided renal biopsy is the preferred method for performing renal biopsy in the horse. The use of Duplex Doppler ultrasound may allow for the characterization of regional hemodynamics of the equine kidney, but is currently an untapped method for evaluation of equine renal hemodynamics. Radionuclide methods including scintigraphy and quantitative renal function measurement can be used to provide further information about equine renal function. Scintigraphy can provide structural and possibly functional information. Quantitative methods using radiopharmaceuticals can provide precise measurement of glomerular filtration rate and effective renal blood flow. This method is especially helpful in identifying acute renal failure and in guiding response to treatment. All equine renal imaging techniques should be a supplement to the physical examination and standard laboratory tests. Additional diagnostic aids such as urinary tract endoscopy should also be considered in horses with hematuria, hydroureter, and suspected calculi. Taken together, all these modalities provide a thorough evaluation of the equine renal system and provide a basis for the clinician to select treatment options and provide prognostic information to the owner

  8. Thermal image filtering by bi-dimensional empirical mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriloaia, Bogdan-Mihai; Vizireanu, Constantin-Radu; Fratu, Octavian; Mara, Constantin; Vizireanu, Dragos-Nicolae; Preda, Radu; Gavriloaia, Gheorghe

    2015-02-01

    The abnormal function of cells can be detected by anatomic or physiological registrations. Most of modern approaches, as ultrasound, RMN or CT, show anatomic parametric modifications of tissues or organs. They highlight areas with a larger diameter 1 cm. In the case of skin or superficial cancers, local temperature is different, and it can be put out by thermal imager. Medical imaging is a leading role in modern diagnosis for abnormal or normal tissues or organs. Some information has to be improved for a better diagnosis by reducing or removing some unwanted information like noise affecting image texture. The traditional technologies for medical image enhancement use spatial or frequency domain methods, but whole image processing will hide both partial and specific information for human signals. A particular kind of medical images is represented by thermal imaging. Recently, these images were used for skin or superficial cancers diagnosis, but very clear outlines of certain alleged affected areas need to be shown. Histogram equalization cannot highlights the edges and control the effects of enhancement. A new filtering method was introduced by Huang by using the empirical mode decomposition, EMD. An improved filtering method for thermal images, based on EMD, is presented in this paper, and permits to analyze nonlinear and non-stationary data by the adaptive decomposition into intrinsic mode surfaces. The results, evaluated by SNR ratios, are compared with other filtering methods.

  9. Research of Registration Approaches of Thermal Infrared Images and Intensity Images of Point Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Wei, Z.; Liu, X.; Yang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    In order to realize the analysis of thermal energy of the objects in 3D vision, the registration approach of thermal infrared images and TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) point cloud was studied. The original data was pre-processed. For the sake of making the scale and brightness contrast of the two kinds of data meet the needs of basic matching, the intensity image of point cloud was produced and projected to spherical coordinate system, histogram equalization processing was done for thermal infrared image.This paper focused on the research of registration approaches of thermal infrared images and intensity images of point cloud based on SIFT EOH-SIFT and PIIFD operators. The latter of which is usually used for medical image matching with different spectral character. The comparison results of the experiments showed that PIIFD operator got much more accurate feature point correspondences compared to SIFT and EOH-SIFT operators. The thermal infrared image and intensity image also have ideal overlap results by quadratic polynomial transformation. Therefore, PIIFD can be used as the basic operator for the registration of thermal infrared images and intensity images, and the operator can also be further improved by incorporating the iteration method.

  10. RESEARCH OF REGISTRATION APPROACHES OF THERMAL INFRARED IMAGES AND INTENSITY IMAGES OF POINT CLOUD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to realize the analysis of thermal energy of the objects in 3D vision, the registration approach of thermal infrared images and TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner point cloud was studied. The original data was pre-processed. For the sake of making the scale and brightness contrast of the two kinds of data meet the needs of basic matching, the intensity image of point cloud was produced and projected to spherical coordinate system, histogram equalization processing was done for thermal infrared image.This paper focused on the research of registration approaches of thermal infrared images and intensity images of point cloud based on SIFT,EOH-SIFT and PIIFD operators. The latter of which is usually used for medical image matching with different spectral character. The comparison results of the experiments showed that PIIFD operator got much more accurate feature point correspondences compared to SIFT and EOH-SIFT operators. The thermal infrared image and intensity image also have ideal overlap results by quadratic polynomial transformation. Therefore, PIIFD can be used as the basic operator for the registration of thermal infrared images and intensity images, and the operator can also be further improved by incorporating the iteration method.

  11. Suitability of frequency modulated thermal wave imaging for skin cancer detection-A theoretical prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Arka; Repaka, Ramjee; Mulaveesala, Ravibabu; Mishra, Subhash C

    2015-07-01

    A theoretical study on the quantification of surface thermal response of cancerous human skin using the frequency modulated thermal wave imaging (FMTWI) technique has been presented in this article. For the first time, the use of the FMTWI technique for the detection and the differentiation of skin cancer has been demonstrated in this article. A three dimensional multilayered skin has been considered with the counter-current blood vessels in individual skin layers along with different stages of cancerous lesions based on geometrical, thermal and physical parameters available in the literature. Transient surface thermal responses of melanoma during FMTWI of skin cancer have been obtained by integrating the heat transfer model for biological tissue along with the flow model for blood vessels. It has been observed from the numerical results that, flow of blood in the subsurface region leads to a substantial alteration on the surface thermal response of the human skin. The alteration due to blood flow further causes a reduction in the performance of the thermal imaging technique during the thermal evaluation of earliest melanoma stages (small volume) compared to relatively large volume. Based on theoretical study, it has been predicted that the method is suitable for detection and differentiation of melanoma with comparatively large volume than the earliest development stages (small volume). The study has also performed phase based image analysis of the raw thermograms to resolve the different stages of melanoma volume. The phase images have been found to be clearly individuate the different development stages of melanoma compared to raw thermograms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermal Imaging of Aerospace Battery Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shue, Jack; Ramirez, Julian B.; Sullivan, David; Lee, Leonine; Rao, Gopalakrishna

    2006-01-01

    Surface Thermal Profiles of Eagle Picher rabbit-ear 50Ah NiH2 and of Saft 40 Ah Li-ion cylindrical cells have been studied using ThermCAM S60 FLIR Systems. Popping Phenomenon in NiH2 cell is demonstrated Temperature gradient in NiH2 is slightly higher than normally considered, for example. Middle of stack to top or bottom is about 12.9 C compared to <7 C (may be due to passive cooling). Less than 1 C thermal gradient on the Li-Ion cell vessel surface. Significantly lower heat generation in Li-Ion cell compared to NiH2 cell. -May be due to a favorable charge method used for Li-Ion cell.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planinsic, Gorazd

    2011-09-01

    Ten years ago, a book with a title like this would be interesting only to a narrow circle of specialists. Thanks to rapid advances in technology, the price of thermal imaging devices has dropped sharply, so they have, almost overnight, become accessible to a wide range of users. As the authors point out in the preface, the growth of this area has led to a paradoxical situation: now there are probably more infrared (IR) cameras sold worldwide than there are people who understand the basic physics behind them and know how to correctly interpret the colourful images that are obtained with these devices. My experience confirms this. When I started using the IR camera during lectures on the didactics of physics, I soon realized that I needed more knowledge, which I later found in this book. A wide range of potential readers and topical areas provides a good motive for writing a book such as this one, but it also represents a major challenge for authors, as compromises in the style of writing and choice of topics are required. The authors of this book have successfully achieved this, and indeed done an excellent job. This book addresses a wide range of readers, from engineers, technicians, and physics and science teachers in schools and universities, to researchers and specialists who are professionally active in the field. As technology in this area has made great progress in recent times, this book is also a valuable guide for those who opt to purchase an infrared camera. Chapters in this book could be divided into three areas: the fundamentals of IR thermal imaging and related physics (two chapters); IR imaging systems and methods (two chapters) and applications, including six chapters on pedagogical applications; IR imaging of buildings and infrastructure, industrial applications, microsystems, selected topics in research and industry, and selected applications from other fields. All chapters contain numerous colour pictures and diagrams, and a rich list of relevant

  14. Digital image processing techniques in archaeology

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Santanam, K.; Vaithiyanathan, R.; Tripati, S.

    Digital image processing involves the manipulation and interpretation of digital images with the aid of a computer. This form of remote sensing actually began in the 1960's with a limited number of researchers analysing multispectral scanner data...

  15. Effective evaluation of privacy protection techniques in visible and thermal imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Tahir; Berg, Amanda; Ferryman, James; Ahlberg, Jörgen; Felsberg, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Privacy protection may be defined as replacing the original content in an image region with a (less intrusive) content having modified target appearance information to make it less recognizable by applying a privacy protection technique. Indeed, the development of privacy protection techniques also needs to be complemented with an established objective evaluation method to facilitate their assessment and comparison. Generally, existing evaluation methods rely on the use of subjective judgments or assume a specific target type in image data and use target detection and recognition accuracies to assess privacy protection. An annotation-free evaluation method that is neither subjective nor assumes a specific target type is proposed. It assesses two key aspects of privacy protection: "protection" and "utility." Protection is quantified as an appearance similarity, and utility is measured as a structural similarity between original and privacy-protected image regions. We performed an extensive experimentation using six challenging datasets (having 12 video sequences), including a new dataset (having six sequences) that contains visible and thermal imagery. The new dataset is made available online for the community. We demonstrate effectiveness of the proposed method by evaluating six image-based privacy protection techniques and also show comparisons of the proposed method over existing methods.

  16. Utilizing Structure-from-Motion Photogrammetry with Airborne Visual and Thermal Images to Monitor Thermal Areas in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, B. B.; Vaughan, R. G.

    2017-12-01

    The thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming, USA) are constantly changing. Persistent monitoring of these areas is necessary to better understand the behavior and potential hazards of both the thermal features and the deeper hydrothermal system driving the observed surface activity. As part of the Park's monitoring program, thousands of visual and thermal infrared (TIR) images have been acquired from a variety of airborne platforms over the past decade. We have used structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry techniques to generate a variety of data products from these images, including orthomosaics, temperature maps, and digital elevation models (DEMs). Temperature maps were generated for Upper Geyser Basin and Norris Geyser Basin for the years 2009-2015, by applying SfM to nighttime TIR images collected from an aircraft-mounted forward-looking infrared (FLIR) camera. Temperature data were preserved through the SfM processing by applying a uniform linear stretch over the entire image set to convert between temperature and a 16-bit digital number. Mosaicked temperature maps were compared to the original FLIR image frames and to ground-based temperature data to constrain the accuracy of the method. Due to pixel averaging and resampling, among other issues, the derived temperature values are typically within 5-10 ° of the values of the un-resampled image frame. We also created sub-meter resolution DEMs from airborne daytime visual images of individual thermal areas. These DEMs can be used for resource and hazard management, and in cases where multiple DEMs exist from different times, for measuring topographic change, including change due to thermal activity. For example, we examined the sensitivity of the DEMs to topographic change by comparing DEMs of the travertine terraces at Mammoth Hot Springs, which can grow at > 1 m per year. These methods are generally applicable to images from airborne platforms, including planes, helicopters, and unmanned aerial

  17. Photogrammetric 3d Building Reconstruction from Thermal Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maset, E.; Fusiello, A.; Crosilla, F.; Toldo, R.; Zorzetto, D.

    2017-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of 3D building reconstruction from thermal infrared (TIR) images. We show that a commercial Computer Vision software can be used to automatically orient sequences of TIR images taken from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and to generate 3D point clouds, without requiring any GNSS/INS data about position and attitude of the images nor camera calibration parameters. Moreover, we propose a procedure based on Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm to create a model that combines high resolution and geometric accuracy of RGB images with the thermal information deriving from TIR images. The process can be carried out entirely by the aforesaid software in a simple and efficient way.

  18. PHOTOGRAMMETRIC 3D BUILDING RECONSTRUCTION FROM THERMAL IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Maset

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of 3D building reconstruction from thermal infrared (TIR images. We show that a commercial Computer Vision software can be used to automatically orient sequences of TIR images taken from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV and to generate 3D point clouds, without requiring any GNSS/INS data about position and attitude of the images nor camera calibration parameters. Moreover, we propose a procedure based on Iterative Closest Point (ICP algorithm to create a model that combines high resolution and geometric accuracy of RGB images with the thermal information deriving from TIR images. The process can be carried out entirely by the aforesaid software in a simple and efficient way.

  19. Metallographic techniques for evaluation of Thermal Barrier Coatings produced by Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, Matthew; Singh, Jogender; Todd, Judith; Copley, Steven; Wolfe, Douglas

    2008-01-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) produced by Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) are primarily applied to critical hot section turbine components. EB-PVD TBC for turbine applications exhibit a complicated structure of porous ceramic columns separated by voids that offers mechanical compliance. Currently there are no standard evaluation methods for evaluating EB-PVD TBC structure quantitatively. This paper proposes a metallographic method for preparing samples and evaluating techniques to quantitatively measure structure. TBC samples were produced and evaluated with the proposed metallographic technique and digital image analysis for columnar grain size and relative intercolumnar porosity. Incorporation of the proposed evaluation technique will increase knowledge of the relation between processing parameters and material properties by incorporating a structural link. Application of this evaluation method will directly benefit areas of quality control, microstructural model development, and reduced development time for process scaling

  20. Imaging fault zones using 3D seismic image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopini, David; Butler, Rob; Purves, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Significant advances in structural analysis of deep water structure, salt tectonic and extensional rift basin come from the descriptions of fault system geometries imaged in 3D seismic data. However, even where seismic data are excellent, in most cases the trajectory of thrust faults is highly conjectural and still significant uncertainty exists as to the patterns of deformation that develop between the main faults segments, and even of the fault architectures themselves. Moreover structural interpretations that conventionally define faults by breaks and apparent offsets of seismic reflectors are commonly conditioned by a narrow range of theoretical models of fault behavior. For example, almost all interpretations of thrust geometries on seismic data rely on theoretical "end-member" behaviors where concepts as strain localization or multilayer mechanics are simply avoided. Yet analogue outcrop studies confirm that such descriptions are commonly unsatisfactory and incomplete. In order to fill these gaps and improve the 3D visualization of deformation in the subsurface, seismic attribute methods are developed here in conjunction with conventional mapping of reflector amplitudes (Marfurt & Chopra, 2007)). These signal processing techniques recently developed and applied especially by the oil industry use variations in the amplitude and phase of the seismic wavelet. These seismic attributes improve the signal interpretation and are calculated and applied to the entire 3D seismic dataset. In this contribution we will show 3D seismic examples of fault structures from gravity-driven deep-water thrust structures and extensional basin systems to indicate how 3D seismic image processing methods can not only build better the geometrical interpretations of the faults but also begin to map both strain and damage through amplitude/phase properties of the seismic signal. This is done by quantifying and delineating the short-range anomalies on the intensity of reflector amplitudes

  1. A Hybrid Technique for Medical Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alamgir Nyma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical image segmentation is an essential and challenging aspect in computer-aided diagnosis and also in pattern recognition research. This paper proposes a hybrid method for magnetic resonance (MR image segmentation. We first remove impulsive noise inherent in MR images by utilizing a vector median filter. Subsequently, Otsu thresholding is used as an initial coarse segmentation method that finds the homogeneous regions of the input image. Finally, an enhanced suppressed fuzzy c-means is used to partition brain MR images into multiple segments, which employs an optimal suppression factor for the perfect clustering in the given data set. To evaluate the robustness of the proposed approach in noisy environment, we add different types of noise and different amount of noise to T1-weighted brain MR images. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms other FCM based algorithms in terms of segmentation accuracy for both noise-free and noise-inserted MR images.

  2. The technique of Cerenkov ring image detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langerveld, D.

    1990-01-01

    Charged particles with an energy between 2 GeV and 25 GeV can be identified in the DELPHI barrel RICH detector by using the technique of Cerenkov ring image detection. The method of identification is based on a determination of the Cerenkov angle by measuring the positions of the emitted Cerenkov photons to high precision in a photon detector. The resolution in the photon that can be obtained depends mainly on the chromatic dispersion in the radiators and on the resolution in the photon detector is used in the barrel RICH in combination with two radiators. The photon detector consists of 48 drift tubes, constructed from quarz plates, each equipped with a wire chamber at the end. The drift gas with which the tubes are filled contains a small admixture of TMAE vapour from which the Cerenkov photons can liberate photoelectrons. It is shown in this thesis that an efficient photon detection and an accurate localization of the photon conversion points is possible. The spatial resolution of the photon detector is determind by the resolution of the wire chambe, the accuracy of the drift measurement, the distortions in the paths of the drifting electrons. The resolution of the wire chamber has been measured to be 0.8 mm in the x- and 1.7 mm in the y-coordinate. The error in the z-coordinate introduced by the drift time measurement is 0.2 mm. The distortions in the paths of the drifting electrons have been measured both in the x and y-direction. The longitudinal and transverse diffusion coefficients have been measured as a function of the field strength for two different drift gas mixtures. (author). 96 refs.; 61 figs.; 11 tabs

  3. Thermal identification of clandestine burials: A signature analysis and image classification approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servello, John A.

    Clandestine burials, the interred human remains of forensic interest, are generally small features located in isolated environments. Typical ground searches can be both time-consuming and dangerous. Thermal remote sensing has been recognized for some time as a possible search strategy for such burials that are in relatively open areas; however, there is a paucity of published research with respect to this application. This project involved image manipulation, the analyses of signatures for "graves" of various depths when compared to an undisturbed background, and the use of image classification techniques to tease out these features. This research demonstrates a relationship between the depth of burial disturbance and the resultant signature. Further, image classification techniques, especially object-oriented algorithms, can be successfully applied to single band thermal imagery. These findings may ultimately decrease burial search times for law enforcement and increase the likelihood of locating clandestine graves.

  4. Diagnosis of the three-phase induction motor using thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacz, Adam; Glowacz, Zygfryd

    2017-03-01

    Three-phase induction motors are used in the industry commonly for example woodworking machines, blowers, pumps, conveyors, elevators, compressors, mining industry, automotive industry, chemical industry and railway applications. Diagnosis of faults is essential for proper maintenance. Faults may damage a motor and damaged motors generate economic losses caused by breakdowns in production lines. In this paper the authors develop fault diagnostic techniques of the three-phase induction motor. The described techniques are based on the analysis of thermal images of three-phase induction motor. The authors analyse thermal images of 3 states of the three-phase induction motor: healthy three-phase induction motor, three-phase induction motor with 2 broken bars, three-phase induction motor with faulty ring of squirrel-cage. In this paper the authors develop an original method of the feature extraction of thermal images MoASoID (Method of Areas Selection of Image Differences). This method compares many training sets together and it selects the areas with the biggest changes for the recognition process. Feature vectors are obtained with the use of mentioned MoASoID and image histogram. Next 3 methods of classification are used: NN (the Nearest Neighbour classifier), K-means, BNN (the back-propagation neural network). The described fault diagnostic techniques are useful for protection of three-phase induction motor and other types of rotating electrical motors such as: DC motors, generators, synchronous motors.

  5. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery 1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Nine specific techniques of combination of techniques developed for applying digital image processing technology to existing astronomical imagery are described. Photoproducts are included to illustrate the results of each of these investigations.

  6. Applying the digital-image-correlation technique to measure the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    digital-image-correlation) technique is used to measure the deformation of the retrofitted column. The result shows that the DIC technique can be successfully applied to measure the relative displacement of the column. Additionally, thismethod ...

  7. A content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images based on image recognition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosato, Hirokazu; Sakanashi, Hidenori; Takahashi, Eiichi; Murakawa, Masahiro

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method for optical colonoscopy images that can find images similar to ones being diagnosed. Optical colonoscopy is a method of direct observation for colons and rectums to diagnose bowel diseases. It is the most common procedure for screening, surveillance and treatment. However, diagnostic accuracy for intractable inflammatory bowel diseases, such as ulcerative colitis (UC), is highly dependent on the experience and knowledge of the medical doctor, because there is considerable variety in the appearances of colonic mucosa within inflammations with UC. In order to solve this issue, this paper proposes a content-based image retrieval method based on image recognition techniques. The proposed retrieval method can find similar images from a database of images diagnosed as UC, and can potentially furnish the medical records associated with the retrieved images to assist the UC diagnosis. Within the proposed method, color histogram features and higher order local auto-correlation (HLAC) features are adopted to represent the color information and geometrical information of optical colonoscopy images, respectively. Moreover, considering various characteristics of UC colonoscopy images, such as vascular patterns and the roughness of the colonic mucosa, we also propose an image enhancement method to highlight the appearances of colonic mucosa in UC. In an experiment using 161 UC images from 32 patients, we demonstrate that our method improves the accuracy of retrieving similar UC images.

  8. Pseudo color ghost coding imaging with pseudo thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, De-yang; Xia, Yun-jie

    2018-04-01

    We present a new pseudo color imaging scheme named pseudo color ghost coding imaging based on ghost imaging but with multiwavelength source modulated by a spatial light modulator. Compared with conventional pseudo color imaging where there is no nondegenerate wavelength spatial correlations resulting in extra monochromatic images, the degenerate wavelength and nondegenerate wavelength spatial correlations between the idle beam and signal beam can be obtained simultaneously. This scheme can obtain more colorful image with higher quality than that in conventional pseudo color coding techniques. More importantly, a significant advantage of the scheme compared to the conventional pseudo color coding imaging techniques is the image with different colors can be obtained without changing the light source and spatial filter.

  9. Application of digital imaging techniques to flare monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Shaun J; Yan, Yong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for detecting and monitoring flares in harsh industrial environments with the use of an imaging sensor combined with digital image processing. Flare images are captured via an imaging fibre and analysed to detect the flare's presence and region of interest. The flare characteristics are then determined using various image processing algorithms. A prototype system is designed, constructed and evaluated on a purpose built laboratory scale flare test rig. Results indicate that the imaging based technique has potential for the detection, monitoring and analysis of flares amidst various background conditions in the chemical and oil industries for plant safety, pollution prevention and control.

  10. Vesical endometriosis: utility of imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, M.; Cascon, E.; Robledo, R.; Perez, M.

    1999-01-01

    We present three cases of vesical endometriosis initially studied with ultrasound. One case was also studied with intravenous urography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. We discuss on the utility of these imaging methods in the diagnosis of vesical endometriosis. (Author) 9 refs

  11. New imaging techniques for liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Beers, Bernard E; Daire, Jean-Luc; Garteiser, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Newly developed or advanced methods of ultrasonography and MR imaging provide combined anatomical and quantitative functional information about diffuse and focal liver diseases. Ultrasound elastography has a central role for staging liver fibrosis and an increasing role in grading portal hypertension; dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography may improve tumor characterization. In clinical practice, MR imaging examinations currently include diffusion-weighted and dynamic MR imaging, enhanced with extracellular or hepatobiliary contrast agents. Moreover, quantitative parameters obtained with diffusion-weighted MR imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging and MR elastography have the potential to characterize further diffuse and focal liver diseases, by adding information about tissue cellularity, perfusion, hepatocyte transport function and visco-elasticity. The multiparametric capability of ultrasonography and more markedly of MR imaging gives the opportunity for high diagnostic performance by combining imaging biomarkers. However, image acquisition and post-processing methods should be further standardized and validated in multicenter trials. Copyright © 2014 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Confirmation of Thermal Images and Vibration Signals for Intelligent Machine Fault Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmad Widodo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the maintenance technique for industrial machinery using the artificial neural network so-called self-organizing map (SOM. The aim of this work is to develop intelligent maintenance system for machinery based on an alternative way, namely, thermal images instead of vibration signals. SOM is selected due to its simplicity and is categorized as an unsupervised algorithm. Following the SOM training, machine fault diagnostics is performed by using the pattern recognition technique of machine conditions. The data used in this work are thermal images and vibration signals, which were acquired from machine fault simulator (MFS. It is a reliable tool and is able to simulate several conditions of faulty machine such as unbalance, misalignment, looseness, and rolling element bearing faults (outer race, inner race, ball, and cage defects. Data acquisition were conducted simultaneously by infrared thermography camera and vibration sensors installed in the MFS. The experimental data are presented as thermal image and vibration signal in the time domain. Feature extraction was carried out to obtain salient features sensitive to machine conditions from thermal images and vibration signals. These features are then used to train the SOM for intelligent machine diagnostics process. The results show that SOM can perform intelligent fault diagnostics with plausible accuracies.

  13. Orbital maneuvering vehicle thermal design and analysis techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapter, J.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the OMV thermal design that is required to maintain components within temperature limits for all mission phases. A key element in the OMV thermal design is the application of a motorized thermal shade assembly that is a replacement for the more conventional variable conductance heat pipes or louvers. The thermal shade assembly covers equipment module radiator areas, and based upon the radiator temperature input to onboard computer, opens and closes the shade, varying the effective radiator area. Thermal design verification thermal analyses results are presented. Selected thermal analyses methods, including several unique subroutines, are discussed. A representation of enclosure Script F equations, in matrix form, is also included. Personal computer application to the development of the OMV thermal design is summarized.

  14. Human emotions detection based on a smart-thermal system of thermographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Albarran, Irving A.; Benitez-Rangel, Juan P.; Osornio-Rios, Roque A.; Morales-Hernandez, Luis A.

    2017-03-01

    This work presents a noninvasive methodology to obtain biomedical thermal imaging which provide relevant information that may assist in the diagnosis of emotions. Biomedical thermal images of the facial expressions of 44 subjects were captured experiencing joy, disgust, anger, fear and sadness. The analysis of these thermograms was carried out through its thermal value not with its intensity value. Regions of interest were obtained through image processing techniques that allow to differentiate between the subject and the background, having only the subject, the centers of each region of interest were obtained in order to get the same region of the face for each subject. Through the thermal analysis a biomarker for each region of interest was obtained, these biomarkers can diagnose when an emotion takes place. Because each subject tends to react differently to the same stimuli, a self-calibration phase is proposed, its function is to have the same thermal trend for each subject in order to make a decision so that the five emotions can be correctly diagnosed through a top-down hierarchical classifier. As a final result, a smart-thermal system that diagnose emotions was obtained and it was tested on twenty-five subjects (625 thermograms). The results of this test were 89.9% successful.

  15. Digital enhancement of night vision and thermal images

    OpenAIRE

    Teo, Chek Koon

    2003-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Low image contrast limits the amount of information conveyed to the user. With the proliferation of digital imagery and computer interface between man-and-machine, it is now viable to consider digitally enhancing the image before presenting it to the user, thus increasing the information throughput. This thesis explores the effect of the Contrast Limited Adaptive Histogram Equalization (CLAHE) process on night vision and thermal ima...

  16. New Frontiers for Applications of Thermal Infrared Imaging Devices: Computational Psychopshysiology in the Neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Daniela; Merla, Arcangelo

    2017-05-05

    Thermal infrared imaging has been proposed, and is now used, as a tool for the non-contact and non-invasive computational assessment of human autonomic nervous activity and psychophysiological states. Thanks to a new generation of high sensitivity infrared thermal detectors and the development of computational models of the autonomic control of the facial cutaneous temperature, several autonomic variables can be computed through thermal infrared imaging, including localized blood perfusion rate, cardiac pulse rate, breath rate, sudomotor and stress responses. In fact, all of these parameters impact on the control of the cutaneous temperature. The physiological information obtained through this approach, could then be used to infer about a variety of psychophysiological or emotional states, as proved by the increasing number of psychophysiology or neurosciences studies that use thermal infrared imaging. This paper presents a review of the principal achievements of thermal infrared imaging in computational psychophysiology, focusing on the capability of the technique for providing ubiquitous and unwired monitoring of psychophysiological activity and affective states. It also presents a summary on the modern, up-to-date infrared sensors technology.

  17. Multifunctional Inorganic Nanoparticles: Recent Progress in Thermal Therapy and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukula, Kondareddy; Manickavasagam Lekshmi, Kamali; Uthaman, Saji; Cho, Kihyun; Cho, Chong-Su; Park, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology has enabled the development of many alternative anti-cancer approaches, such as thermal therapies, which cause minimal damage to healthy cells. Current challenges in cancer treatment are the identification of the diseased area and its efficient treatment without generating many side effects. Image-guided therapies can be a useful tool to diagnose and treat the diseased tissue and they offer therapy and imaging using a single nanostructure. The present review mainly focuses on recent advances in the field of thermal therapy and imaging integrated with multifunctional inorganic nanoparticles. The main heating sources for heat-induced therapies are the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the near infrared region and alternating magnetic fields (AMFs). The different families of inorganic nanoparticles employed for SPR- and AMF-based thermal therapies and imaging are described. Furthermore, inorganic nanomaterials developed for multimodal therapies with different and multi-imaging modalities are presented in detail. Finally, relevant clinical perspectives and the future scope of inorganic nanoparticles in image-guided therapies are discussed. PMID:28335204

  18. Photothermal techniques applied to the study of thermal properties in biodegradable films

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martín-Martínez, E.; Aguilar-Méndez, M. A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; García-Quiroz, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to determine the thermal diffusivity and effusivity of biodegradable films by using photothermal techniques. The thermal diffusivity was studied by using the open photoacoustic cell technique. On the other hand the thermal effusivity was obtained by the photopyroelectric technique in a front detection configuration. The films were elaborated from mixtures of low density polyethylene (LDPE) and corn starch. The results showed that at high moisture values, the thermal diffusivity increased as the starch concentration was higher in the film. However at low moisture conditions (low extrusion moisture conditions (6.55%). As the moisture and starch concentration in the films were increased, the thermal effusivity diminished.

  19. Color image Segmentation using automatic thresholding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrabi, R.; Ben Braiek, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, entropy and between-class variance based thresholding methods for color images segmentation are studied. The maximization of the between-class variance (MVI) and the entropy (ME) have been used as a criterion functions to determine an optimal threshold to segment images into nearly homogenous regions. Segmentation results from the two methods are validated and the segmentation sensitivity for the test data available is evaluated, and a comparative study between these methods in different color spaces is presented. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the MVI method for color image segmentation.

  20. Unconventional techniques of fundus imaging: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh P Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The methods of fundus examination include direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and imaging with a fundus camera are an essential part of ophthalmic practice. The usage of unconventional equipment such as a hand-held video camera, smartphone, and a nasal endoscope allows one to image the fundus with advantages and some disadvantages. The advantages of these instruments are the cost-effectiveness, ultra portability and ability to obtain images in a remote setting and share the same electronically. These instruments, however, are unlikely to replace the fundus camera but then would always be an additional arsenal in an ophthalmologist's armamentarium.

  1. Thermal Conductivity of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings Evaluated by a Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Nagaraj, Ben A.; Bruce, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Zr02-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined by a steady-state heat flux laser technique. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of the EB-PVD ceramic coatings were also obtained in real time, at high temperatures, under the laser high heat flux, long term test conditions. The thermal conductivity increase due to micro-pore sintering and the decrease due to coating micro-delaminations in the EB-PVD coatings were evaluated for grooved and non-grooved EB-PVD coating systems under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions. The coating failure modes under the high heat flux test conditions were also investigated. The test technique provides a viable means for obtaining coating thermal conductivity data for use in design, development, and life prediction for engine applications.

  2. Imaging techniques in transcatheter aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaife RA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Robert A Quaife, Jennifer Dorosz, John C Messenger, Ernesto E Salcedo Division of Cardiology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Calcific aortic stenosis is now understood as a complex valvular degenerative process sharing many risk factors with atherosclerosis. Once patients develop symptomatic calcific aortic stenosis, the only effective treatment is aortic valve replacement. In the past decade, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR has been developed as an alternative to surgery to treat severe calcific aortic stenosis. Cardiac imaging plays a pivotal role in the contemporary management of patients with calcific aortic stenosis, and particularly in patients being considered for TAVR, who demand detailed imaging of the aortic valve apparatus. In this review, we highlight the role of cardiac imaging for patient selection, procedural guidance, and evaluation of results of TAVR. Keywords: aortic stenosis, cardiovascular imaging, transcutaneous aortic valve replacement

  3. Infrared Thermal Imaging System on a Mobile Phone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Feng Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel concept towards pervasively available low-cost infrared thermal imaging system lunched on a mobile phone (MTIS was proposed and demonstrated in this article. Through digestion on the evolutional development of milestone technologies in the area, it can be found that the portable and low-cost design would become the main stream of thermal imager for civilian purposes. As a representative trial towards this important goal, a MTIS consisting of a thermal infrared module (TIM and mobile phone with embedded exclusive software (IRAPP was presented. The basic strategy for the TIM construction is illustrated, including sensor adoption and optical specification. The user-oriented software was developed in the Android environment by considering its popularity and expandability. Computational algorithms with non-uniformity correction and scene-change detection are established to optimize the imaging quality and efficiency of TIM. The performance experiments and analysis indicated that the currently available detective distance for the MTIS is about 29 m. Furthermore, some family-targeted utilization enabled by MTIS was also outlined, such as sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS prevention, etc. This work suggests a ubiquitous way of significantly extending thermal infrared image into rather wide areas especially health care in the coming time.

  4. Pyramidal nanowire tip for atomic force microscopy and thermal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burouni, N.; Sarajlic, Edin; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel 3D nanowire pyramid as scanning microscopy probe for thermal imaging and atomic force microscopy. This probe is fabricated by standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four

  5. An efficient similarity measure technique for medical image registration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, an efficient similarity measure technique is proposed for medical image registration. The proposed approach is based on the Gerschgorin circles theorem. In this approach, image registration is carried out by considering Gerschgorin bounds of a covariance matrix of two compared images with normalized ...

  6. Image processing techniques for quantification and assessment of brain MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijf, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used technique to acquire digital images of the human brain. A variety of acquisition protocols is available to generate images in vivo and noninvasively, giving great opportunities to study the anatomy and physiology of the human brain. In my thesis,

  7. Study and analysis of wavelet based image compression techniques ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presented comprehensive study with performance analysis of very recent Wavelet transform based image compression techniques. Image compression is one of the necessities for such communication. The goals of image compression are to minimize the storage requirement and communication bandwidth.

  8. Red blood cell image enhancement techniques for cells with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    quality or challenging conditions of the images such as poor illumination of blood smear and most importantly overlapping RBC. The algorithm comprises of two RBC segmentation that can be selected based on the image quality, circle mask technique and grayscale blood smear image processing. Detail explanations ...

  9. Three-dimensional imaging techniques: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, Orhan Hakki; Toy, Ebubekir

    2014-01-01

    Imaging is one of the most important tools for orthodontists to evaluate and record size and form of craniofacial structures. Orthodontists routinely use 2-dimensional (2D) static imaging techniques, but deepness of structures cannot be obtained and localized with 2D imaging. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging has been developed in the early of 1990's and has gained a precious place in dentistry, especially in orthodontics. The aims of this literature review are to summarize the current state of the 3D imaging techniques and to evaluate the applications in orthodontics. PMID:24966761

  10. Techniques and software architectures for medical visualisation and image processing

    OpenAIRE

    Botha, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis presents a flexible software platform for medical visualisation and image processing, a technique for the segmentation of the shoulder skeleton from CT data and three techniques that make contributions to the field of direct volume rendering. Our primary goal was to investigate the use of visualisation techniques to assist the shoulder replacement process. This motivated the need for a flexible environment within which to test and develop new visualisation and also image processin...

  11. Geant4 Analysis of a Thermal Neutron Real-Time Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Arka; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2017-07-01

    Thermal neutron imaging is a technique for nondestructive testing providing complementary information to X-ray imaging for a wide range of applications in science and engineering. Advancement of electronic imaging systems makes it possible to obtain neutron radiographs in real time. This method requires a scintillator to convert neutrons to optical photons and a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to detect those photons. Alongside, a well collimated beam which reduces geometrical blurriness, the use of a thin scintillator can improve the spatial resolution significantly. A representative scintillator that has been applied widely for thermal neutron imaging is 6LiF:ZnS (Ag). In this paper, a multiphysics simulation approach for designing thermal neutron imaging system is investigated. The Geant4 code is used to investigate the performance of a thermal neutron imaging system starting with a neutron source and including the production of charged particles and optical photons in the scintillator and their transport for image formation in the detector. The simulation geometry includes the neutron beam collimator and sapphire filter. The 6LiF:ZnS (Ag) scintillator is modeled along with a pixelated detector for image recording. The spatial resolution of the system was obtained as the thickness of the scintillator screen was varied between 50 and 400 μm. The results of the simulation were compared to experimental results, including measurements performed using the PULSTAR nuclear reactor imaging beam, showing good agreement. Using the established model, further examination showed that the resolution contribution of the scintillator screen is correlated with its thickness and the range of the neutron absorption reaction products (i.e., the alpha and triton particles). Consequently, thinner screens exhibit improved spatial resolution. However, this will compromise detection efficiency due to the reduced probability of neutron absorption.

  12. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  13. Advanced techniques in digital mammographic images recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliu, R. Azir

    2011-01-01

    Computer Aided Detection and Diagnosis is used in digital radiography as a second thought in the process of determining diagnoses, which reduces the percentage of wrong diagnoses of the established interpretation of mammographic images. The issues that are discussed in the dissertation are the analyses and improvement of advanced technologies in the field of artificial intelligence, more specifically in the field of machine learning for solving diagnostic problems and automatic detection of speculated lesions in digital mammograms. The developed of SVM-based ICAD system with cascade architecture for analyses and comparison mammographic images in both projections (CC and MLO) gives excellent result for detection and masses and microcalcifications. In order to develop a system with optimal performances of sensitivity, specificity and time complexity, a set of relevant characteristics need to be created which will show all the pathological regions that might be present in the mammographic image. The structure of the mammographic image, size and the large number of pathological structures in this area are the reason why the creation of a set of these features is necessary for the presentation of good indicators. These pathological structures are a real challenge today and the world of science is working in that direction. The doctoral dissertation showed that the system has optimal results, which are confirmed by experts, and institutions, which are dealing with these same issues. Also, the thesis presents a new approach for automatic identification of regions of interest in the mammographic image where regions of interest are automatically selected for further processing mammography in cases when the number of examined patients is higher. Out of 480 mammographic images downloaded from MIAS database and tested with ICAD system the author shows that, after separation and selection of relevant features of ICAD system the accuracy is 89.7% (96.4% for microcalcifications

  14. Imaging in anatomy: a comparison of imaging techniques in embalmed human cadavers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A large variety of imaging techniques is an integral part of modern medicine. Introducing radiological imaging techniques into the dissection course serves as a basis for improved learning of anatomy and multidisciplinary learning in pre-clinical medical education. Methods Four different imaging techniques (ultrasound, radiography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging) were performed in embalmed human body donors to analyse possibilities and limitations of the respective techniques in this peculiar setting. Results The quality of ultrasound and radiography images was poor, images of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were of good quality. Conclusion Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have a superior image quality in comparison to ultrasound and radiography and offer suitable methods for imaging embalmed human cadavers as a valuable addition to the dissection course. PMID:24156510

  15. Full Parallax Integral 3D Display and Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Gook Lee

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Full parallax integral 3D display is one of the promising future displays that provide different perspectives according to viewing direction. In this paper, the authors review the recent integral 3D display and image processing techniques for improving the performance, such as viewing resolution, viewing angle, etc.Design/methodology/approach – Firstly, to improve the viewing resolution of 3D images in the integral imaging display with lenslet array, the authors present 3D integral imaging display with focused mode using the time-multiplexed display. Compared with the original integral imaging with focused mode, the authors use the electrical masks and the corresponding elemental image set. In this system, the authors can generate the resolution-improved 3D images with the n×n pixels from each lenslet by using n×n time-multiplexed display. Secondly, a new image processing technique related to the elemental image generation for 3D scenes is presented. With the information provided by the Kinect device, the array of elemental images for an integral imaging display is generated.Findings – From their first work, the authors improved the resolution of 3D images by using the time-multiplexing technique through the demonstration of the 24 inch integral imaging system. Authors’ method can be applied to a practical application. Next, the proposed method with the Kinect device can gain a competitive advantage over other methods for the capture of integral images of big 3D scenes. The main advantage of fusing the Kinect and the integral imaging concepts is the acquisition speed, and the small amount of handled data.Originality / Value – In this paper, the authors review their recent methods related to integral 3D display and image processing technique.Research type – general review.

  16. Thermalnet: a Deep Convolutional Network for Synthetic Thermal Image Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniaz, V. V.; Gorbatsevich, V. S.; Mizginov, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    Deep convolutional neural networks have dramatically changed the landscape of the modern computer vision. Nowadays methods based on deep neural networks show the best performance among image recognition and object detection algorithms. While polishing of network architectures received a lot of scholar attention, from the practical point of view the preparation of a large image dataset for a successful training of a neural network became one of major challenges. This challenge is particularly profound for image recognition in wavelengths lying outside the visible spectrum. For example no infrared or radar image datasets large enough for successful training of a deep neural network are available to date in public domain. Recent advances of deep neural networks prove that they are also capable to do arbitrary image transformations such as super-resolution image generation, grayscale image colorisation and imitation of style of a given artist. Thus a natural question arise: how could be deep neural networks used for augmentation of existing large image datasets? This paper is focused on the development of the Thermalnet deep convolutional neural network for augmentation of existing large visible image datasets with synthetic thermal images. The Thermalnet network architecture is inspired by colorisation deep neural networks.

  17. Comparing imaging procedures: techniques and examples. Gastroenterology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmud, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    The distinct advantages of nuclear medicine procedures, in comparison to radiography, contrast studies, computerized tomography and ultrasound, are emphasized. Scintigraphic methods offer quantitative data regarding function which competing imaging modalities are unable to provide, and make them the studies of choice in the evaluation of gastrointestinal physiology and functional abnormalities

  18. On the Image Watermarking Techniques Applications, Properties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract:With the coming and the expansion of the World Wide Web an increased amount of digital information, such as documents, images audio and video ... for copyright protection and a considerable interest in methods for inserting in a multimedia document a visible, or preferably invisible, mark to identify the owner.

  19. Optical replication techniques for image slicers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmoll, J.; Robertson, D.J.; Dubbeldam, C.M.; Bortoletto, F.; Pína, L.; Hudec, René; Prieto, E.; Norrie, C.; Ramsay- Howat, S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 50, 4-5 (2006), s. 263-266 ISSN 1387-6473 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : smart focal planes * image slicers * replication Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.914, year: 2006

  20. Quantitative subsurface analysis using frequency modulated thermal wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhani, S. K.; Suresh, B.; Ghali, V. S.

    2018-01-01

    Quantitative depth analysis of the anomaly with an enhanced depth resolution is a challenging task towards the estimation of depth of the subsurface anomaly using thermography. Frequency modulated thermal wave imaging introduced earlier provides a complete depth scanning of the object by stimulating it with a suitable band of frequencies and further analyzing the subsequent thermal response using a suitable post processing approach to resolve subsurface details. But conventional Fourier transform based methods used for post processing unscramble the frequencies with a limited frequency resolution and contribute for a finite depth resolution. Spectral zooming provided by chirp z transform facilitates enhanced frequency resolution which can further improves the depth resolution to axially explore finest subsurface features. Quantitative depth analysis with this augmented depth resolution is proposed to provide a closest estimate to the actual depth of subsurface anomaly. This manuscript experimentally validates this enhanced depth resolution using non stationary thermal wave imaging and offers an ever first and unique solution for quantitative depth estimation in frequency modulated thermal wave imaging.

  1. Jet-images: computer vision inspired techniques for jet tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cogan, Josh; Kagan, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon-initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  2. Jet-images: computer vision inspired techniques for jet tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, Josh; Kagan, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Schwarztman, Ariel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,Menlo Park, CA 94028 (United States)

    2015-02-18

    We introduce a novel approach to jet tagging and classification through the use of techniques inspired by computer vision. Drawing parallels to the problem of facial recognition in images, we define a jet-image using calorimeter towers as the elements of the image and establish jet-image preprocessing methods. For the jet-image processing step, we develop a discriminant for classifying the jet-images derived using Fisher discriminant analysis. The effectiveness of the technique is shown within the context of identifying boosted hadronic W boson decays with respect to a background of quark- and gluon-initiated jets. Using Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate that the performance of this technique introduces additional discriminating power over other substructure approaches, and gives significant insight into the internal structure of jets.

  3. Use of anomolous thermal imaging effects for multi-mode systems control during crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Real time image processing techniques, combined with multitasking computational capabilities are used to establish thermal imaging as a multimode sensor for systems control during crystal growth. Whereas certain regions of the high temperature scene are presently unusable for quantitative determination of temperature, the anomalous information thus obtained is found to serve as a potentially low noise source of other important systems control output. Using this approach, the light emission/reflection characteristics of the crystal, meniscus and melt system are used to infer the crystal diameter and a linear regression algorithm is employed to determine the local diameter trend. This data is utilized as input for closed loop control of crystal shape. No performance penalty in thermal imaging speed is paid for this added functionality. Approach to secondary (diameter) sensor design and systems control structure is discussed. Preliminary experimental results are presented.

  4. Application of Advanced Particle Swarm Optimization Techniques to Wind-thermal Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Sri Niwas; Østergaard, Jacob; Yadagiri, J.

    2009-01-01

    wind-thermal coordination algorithm is necessary to determine the optimal proportion of wind and thermal generator capacity that can be integrated into the system. In this paper, four versions of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) techniques are proposed for solving wind-thermal coordination problem...

  5. Estimation of the thermal conductivity of hemp based insulation material from 3D tomographic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sawalhi, R.; Lux, J.; Salagnac, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we are interested in the structural and thermal characterization of natural fiber insulation materials. The thermal performance of these materials depends on the arrangement of fibers, which is the consequence of the manufacturing process. In order to optimize these materials, thermal conductivity models can be used to correlate some relevant structural parameters with the effective thermal conductivity. However, only a few models are able to take into account the anisotropy of such material related to the fibers orientation, and these models still need realistic input data (fiber orientation distribution, porosity, etc.). The structural characteristics are here directly measured on a 3D tomographic image using advanced image analysis techniques. Critical structural parameters like porosity, pore and fiber size distribution as well as local fiber orientation distribution are measured. The results of the tested conductivity models are then compared with the conductivity tensor obtained by numerical simulation on the discretized 3D microstructure, as well as available experimental measurements. We show that 1D analytical models are generally not suitable for assessing the thermal conductivity of such anisotropic media. Yet, a few anisotropic models can still be of interest to relate some structural parameters, like the fiber orientation distribution, to the thermal properties. Finally, our results emphasize that numerical simulations on 3D realistic microstructure is a very interesting alternative to experimental measurements.

  6. Geologic application of thermal inertia imaging using HCMM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, H. N.; Kahle, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using thermal inertia, inferred from remotely sensed temperature data, to complement LANDSAT reflectivity data for reconnaissance geologic mapping and mineral exploration is under investigation. The bulk of HCMM data tapes was received and processed, and a thermal inertia image of one data set was made. Additional areas of interest were identified on the HCMM photographic products and data tapes were ordered for these areas. During analysis of selected subareas, various sedimentary rock units were distinguished in the Death Valley, California test site and areas of altered rock were identified in the Cuprite/Goldifield, Nevada test site.

  7. Hierarchical clustering techniques for image database organization and summarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellaikal, Asha; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    1998-10-01

    This paper investigates clustering techniques as a method of organizing image databases to support popular visual management functions such as searching, browsing and navigation. Different types of hierarchical agglomerative clustering techniques are studied as a method of organizing features space as well as summarizing image groups by the selection of a few appropriate representatives. Retrieval performance using both single and multiple level hierarchies are experimented with and the algorithms show an interesting relationship between the top k correct retrievals and the number of comparisons required. Some arguments are given to support the use of such cluster-based techniques for managing distributed image databases.

  8. Single photon imaging. New instrumentation and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Colsher, J.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of Anger scintillation cameras continues to be enhanced through a series of small improvements which result in significantly better imaging characteristics. The most recent changes in camera design consist of: (1) the introduction of photomultipliers with better photocathode and electron collection efficiencies, (2) the use of thinner (3/8 or 1/4 in) crystals giving slightly better intrinsic resolution for low gamma-ray energies, (3) inclusion of a spatially varying energy window to compensate for variations of light collection efficiency, (4) event-by-event, real-time distortion removal for uniformity correction, and (5) introduction of new methods to improve the count-rate capability. Whereas some of these improvements are due to better understanding of the fundamentals of camera design, others are the result of technological advances in electronic components such as analogue-to-digital converters, microprocessors and high-density digital memories. The development of single photon tomography has developed along two parallel paths. Multipinhole and rotating slant-hole collimator attachments provide some degree of longitudinal tomography, and are currently being applied to cardiac imaging. At the same time rotating camera systems capable of transverse as well as longitudinal imaging are being refined technically and evaluated clinically. Longitudinal tomography is of limited use in quantitative studies and is likely to be an interim solution to three-dimensional imaging. Rotating camera systems, on the other hand, not only provide equal resolution in all three dimensions but are also capable of providing quantitative accuracy. This is the result of progress in attenuation correction and the design of special collimators. Single photon tomography provides a small but noticeable improvement in diagnostic accuracy which is likely to result in widespread use of rotating camera systems in the future

  9. Direct Imaging of Shale Gas Leaks Using Passive Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, F.; Chamberland, M.; Morton, V.; Gagnon, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Natural gas is an energy resource in great demand worldwide. There are many types of gas fields including shale formations which are common especially in the St-Lawrence Valley (Qc). Regardless of its origin, methane (CH4) is the major component of natural gas. Methane gas is odorless, colorless and highly flammable. It is also an important greenhouse gas. Therefore, dealing efficiently with methane emanations and/or leaks is an important and challenging issue for both safety and environmental considerations. In this regard, passive remote sensing represents an interesting approach since it allows characterization of large areas from a safe location. The high propensity of methane contributing to global warming is mainly because it is a highly infrared-active molecule. For this reason, thermal infrared remote sensing represents one of the best approaches for methane investigations. In order to illustrate the potential of passive thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging for research on natural gas, imaging was carried out on a shale gas leak that unexpectedly happen during a geological survey near Hospital Enfant-Jésus (Québec City) in December 2014. Methane was selectively identified in the scene by its unique infrared signature. The estimated gas column density near the leak source was on the order of 65 000 ppm×m. It was estimated that the methane content in the shale gas is on the order of 6-7 %, which is in good agreement with previous geological surveys carried out in this area. Such leaks represent a very serious situation because such a methane concentration lies within the methane lower/upper explosion limits (LEL-UEL, 5-15 %). The results show how this novel technique could be used for research work dealing with methane gas.

  10. A review of imaging techniques for systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Ming J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a review of imaging techniques and of their utility in system biology. During the last decade systems biology has matured into a distinct field and imaging has been increasingly used to enable the interplay of experimental and theoretical biology. In this review, we describe and compare the roles of microscopy, ultrasound, CT (Computed Tomography, MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging, PET (Positron Emission Tomography, and molecular probes such as quantum dots and nanoshells in systems biology. As a unified application area among these different imaging techniques, examples in cancer targeting are highlighted.

  11. A low cost imaging displacement measurement system for spacecraft thermal vacuum testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Brian

    2006-01-01

    A low cost imaging displacement technique suitable for use in thermal vacuum testing was built and tested during thermal vacuum testing of the space infrared telescope facility (SIRTF, later renamed Spitzer infrared telescope facility). The problem was to measure the relative displacement of different portions of the spacecraft due to thermal expansion or contraction. Standard displacement measuring instrumentation could not be used because of the widely varying temperatures on the spacecraft and for fear of invalidating the thermal vacuum testing. The imaging system was conceived, designed, purchased, and installed in approximately 2 months at very low cost. The system performed beyond expectations proving that sub millimeter displacements could be measured from over 2 meters away. Using commercial optics it was possible to make displacement measurements down to 10 (mu)m. An automated image processing tool was used to process the data, which not only speeded up data reduction, but showed that velocities and accelerations could also be measured. Details of the design and capabilities of the system are discussed along with the results of the test on the observatory. Several images from the actual test are presented.

  12. Robust image modeling technique with a bioluminescence image segmentation application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianghong; Wang, Ruiping; Tian, Jie

    2009-02-01

    A robust pattern classifier algorithm for the variable symmetric plane model, where the driving noise is a mixture of a Gaussian and an outlier process, is developed. The veracity and high-speed performance of the pattern recognition algorithm is proved. Bioluminescence tomography (BLT) has recently gained wide acceptance in the field of in vivo small animal molecular imaging. So that it is very important for BLT to how to acquire the highprecision region of interest in a bioluminescence image (BLI) in order to decrease loss of the customers because of inaccuracy in quantitative analysis. An algorithm in the mode is developed to improve operation speed, which estimates parameters and original image intensity simultaneously from the noise corrupted image derived from the BLT optical hardware system. The focus pixel value is obtained from the symmetric plane according to a more realistic assumption for the noise sequence in the restored image. The size of neighborhood is adaptive and small. What's more, the classifier function is base on the statistic features. If the qualifications for the classifier are satisfied, the focus pixel intensity is setup as the largest value in the neighborhood.Otherwise, it will be zeros.Finally,pseudo-color is added up to the result of the bioluminescence segmented image. The whole process has been implemented in our 2D BLT optical system platform and the model is proved.

  13. Employing image processing techniques for cancer detection using microarray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan Khalilabad, Nastaran; Hassanpour, Hamid

    2017-02-01

    Microarray technology is a powerful genomic tool for simultaneously studying and analyzing the behavior of thousands of genes. The analysis of images obtained from this technology plays a critical role in the detection and treatment of diseases. The aim of the current study is to develop an automated system for analyzing data from microarray images in order to detect cancerous cases. The proposed system consists of three main phases, namely image processing, data mining, and the detection of the disease. The image processing phase performs operations such as refining image rotation, gridding (locating genes) and extracting raw data from images the data mining includes normalizing the extracted data and selecting the more effective genes. Finally, via the extracted data, cancerous cell is recognized. To evaluate the performance of the proposed system, microarray database is employed which includes Breast cancer, Myeloid Leukemia and Lymphomas from the Stanford Microarray Database. The results indicate that the proposed system is able to identify the type of cancer from the data set with an accuracy of 95.45%, 94.11%, and 100%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. New approaches in intelligent image analysis techniques, methodologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamatsu, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    This book presents an Introduction and 11 independent chapters, which are devoted to various new approaches of intelligent image processing and analysis. The book also presents new methods, algorithms and applied systems for intelligent image processing, on the following basic topics: Methods for Hierarchical Image Decomposition; Intelligent Digital Signal Processing and Feature Extraction; Data Clustering and Visualization via Echo State Networks; Clustering of Natural Images in Automatic Image Annotation Systems; Control System for Remote Sensing Image Processing; Tissue Segmentation of MR Brain Images Sequence; Kidney Cysts Segmentation in CT Images; Audio Visual Attention Models in Mobile Robots Navigation; Local Adaptive Image Processing; Learning Techniques for Intelligent Access Control; Resolution Improvement in Acoustic Maps. Each chapter is self-contained with its own references. Some of the chapters are devoted to the theoretical aspects while the others are presenting the practical aspects and the...

  15. Effectiveness of digital infrared thermal imaging in detecting lower extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fangge; Tang, Qing; Zeng, Guangqiao; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Nuofu; Zhong, Nanshan

    2015-05-01

    The authors aimed to determine the effectiveness of infrared thermal imaging (IRTI) as a novel, noninvasive technique in adjunctive diagnostic screening for lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The authors used an infrared thermal imaging sensor to examine the lower limbs of 64 DVT patients and 64 healthy volunteers. The DVT patients had been definitively diagnosed with either Doppler vascular compression ultrasonography or angiography. The mean area temperature (T_area) and mean linear temperature (T_line) in the region of interest were determined with infrared thermal imaging. Images were evaluated with qualitative pseudocolor analysis to verify specific color-temperature responses and with quantitative temperature analysis. Differences in T_area and T_line between the DVT limb and the nonaffected limb in each DVT patient and temperature differences (TDs) in T_area (TDarea) and T_line (TDline) between DVT patients and non-DVT volunteers were compared. Qualitative pseudocolor analysis revealed visible asymmetry between the DVT side and non-DVT side in the presentation and distribution characteristics (PDCs) of infrared thermal images. The DVT limbs had areas of abnormally high temperature, indicating the presence of DVT. Of the 64 confirmed DVT patients, 62 (96.88%) were positive by IRTI detection. Among these 62 IRTI-positive cases, 53 (82.81%) showed PDCs that agreed with the DVT regions detected by Doppler vascular compression ultrasonography or angiography. In nine patients (14.06%), IRTI PDCs did not definitively agree with the DVT regions established with other testing methods, but still correctly indicated the DVT-affected limb. There was a highly significant difference between DVT and non-DVT sides in DVT patients (P Infrared thermal imaging can be effectively used in DVT detection and adjunctive diagnostic screening because of its specific infrared PDCs and TDs values.

  16. Passive thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging for quantitative imaging of shale gas leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Marc-André; Tremblay, Pierre; Savary, Simon; Farley, Vincent; Guyot, Éric; Lagueux, Philippe; Morton, Vince; Giroux, Jean; Chamberland, Martin

    2017-10-01

    There are many types of natural gas fields including shale formations that are common especially in the St-Lawrence Valley (Canada). Since methane (CH4), the major component of shale gas, is odorless, colorless and highly flammable, in addition to being a greenhouse gas, methane emanations and/or leaks are important to consider for both safety and environmental reasons. Telops recently launched on the market the Hyper-Cam Methane, a field-deployable thermal infrared hyperspectral camera specially tuned for detecting methane infrared spectral features under ambient conditions and over large distances. In order to illustrate the benefits of this novel research instrument for natural gas imaging, the instrument was brought on a site where shale gas leaks unexpectedly happened during a geological survey near the Enfant-Jesus hospital in Quebec City, Canada, during December 2014. Quantitative methane imaging was carried out based on methane's unique infrared spectral signature. Optical flow analysis was also carried out on the data to estimate the methane mass flow rate. The results show how this novel technique could be used for advanced research on shale gases.

  17. Technique development for photoacoustic imaging guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Zhang, Haonan; Yuan, Jie; Feng, Ting; Xu, Guan; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), i.e. tissue destruction induced by a local increase of temperature by means of laser light energy transmission, has been frequently used for minimally invasive treatments of various diseases such as benign thyroid nodules and liver cancer. The emerging photoacoustic (PA) imaging, when integrated with ultrasound (US), could contribute to LITT procedure. PA can enable a good visualization of percutaneous apparatus deep inside tissue and, therefore, can offer accurate guidance of the optical fibers to the target tissue. Our initial experiment demonstrated that, by picking the strong photoacoustic signals generated at the tips of optical fibers as a needle, the trajectory and position of the fibers could be visualized clearly using a commercial available US unit. When working the conventional US Bscan mode, the fibers disappeared when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 60 degree; while working on the new PA mode, the fibers could be visualized without any problem even when the angle between the fibers and the probe surface was larger than 75 degree. Moreover, with PA imaging function integrated, the optical fibers positioned into the target tissue, besides delivering optical energy for thermotherapy, can also be used to generate PA signals for on-line evaluation of LITT. Powered by our recently developed PA physio-chemical analysis, PA measurements from the tissue can provide a direct and accurate feedback of the tissue responses to laser ablation, including the changes in not only chemical compositions but also histological microstructures. The initial experiment on the rat liver model has demonstrated the excellent sensitivity of PA imaging to the changes in tissue temperature rise and tissue status (from native to coagulated) when the tissue is treated in vivo with LITT.

  18. Superimpose signal processing method for micro-scale thermal imaging of solar salts at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Junko; Zamengo, Massimiliano; Kato, Yukitaka

    2016-05-01

    The global interest in energy applications activates the advanced study about the molten salts in the usage of fluids in the power cycle, such as for transport and heat storage in solar power facilities. However, the basic properties of molten salts show a general scattering in characterization especially in thermal properties. It is suggested that new studies are required on the measurement of thermal properties of solar salts using recent technologies. In this study, micro-scale heat transfer and phase change in molten salts are presented using our originally developed device: the micro-bolometer Infrared focal plane arrays (IR FPA) measuring system is a portable type instrument, which is re-designed to measure the thermal phenomena in high temperature up to 700 °C or higher. The superimpose system is newly setup adjusted to the signal processing in high temperature to realize the quantitative thermal imaging, simultaneously. The portable type apparatus for a quantitative micro-scale thermography using a micro-bolometer has been proposed based on an achromatic lens design to capture a micro-scale image in the long-wave infrared, a video signal superimposing for the real time emissivity correction, and a pseudo acceleration of a timeframe. Combined with the superimpose technique, the micro-scale thermal imaging in high temperature is achieved and the molten flows of the solar salts, sodium nitrate, and potassium nitrate are successfully observed. The solar salt, the mixture of sodium nitrate and potassium nitrate, shows a different shape of exothermic heat front morphology in the lower phase transition (solidification) temperature than the nitrates on cooling. The proposed measuring technique will be utilized to accelerate the screening step to determine the phase diagram and the eutectics of the multiple mixtures of candidate molten salts, which may be used as heat transport medium from the concentrated solar power to a processing plant for thermal energy

  19. Evaluation of radiographic imaging techniques in lung nodule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, J.T.; Kruger, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Dual-energy radiography appears to be the most effective technique to address bone superposition that compromises conventional chest radiography. A dual-energy, single-exposure, film-based technique was compared with a dual-energy, dual-exposure technique and conventional chest radiography in a simulated lung nodule detection study. Observers detected more nodules on images produced by dual-energy techniques than on images produced by conventional chest radiography. The difference between dual-energy and conventional chest radiography is statistically significant and the difference between dual-energy, dual-exposure and single-exposure techniques is statistically insignificant. The single-exposure technique has the potential to replace the dual-exposure technique in future clinical application

  20. Two-dimensional fruit ripeness estimation using thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Intaravanne, Yuttana

    2013-06-01

    Some green fruits do not change their color from green to yellow when being ripe. As a result, ripeness estimation via color and fluorescent analytical approaches cannot be applied. In this article, we propose and show for the first time how a thermal imaging camera can be used to two-dimensionally classify fruits into different ripeness levels. Our key idea relies on the fact that the mature fruits have higher heat capacity than the immature ones and therefore the change in surface temperature overtime is slower. Our experimental proof of concept using a thermal imaging camera shows a promising result in non-destructively identifying three different ripeness levels of mangoes Mangifera indica L.

  1. Intelligent MRTD testing for thermal imaging system using ANN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junyue; Ma, Dongmei

    2006-01-01

    The Minimum Resolvable Temperature Difference (MRTD) is the most widely accepted figure for describing the performance of a thermal imaging system. Many models have been proposed to predict it. The MRTD testing is a psychophysical task, for which biases are unavoidable. It requires laboratory conditions such as normal air condition and a constant temperature. It also needs expensive measuring equipments and takes a considerable period of time. Especially when measuring imagers of the same type, the test is time consuming. So an automated and intelligent measurement method should be discussed. This paper adopts the concept of automated MRTD testing using boundary contour system and fuzzy ARTMAP, but uses different methods. It describes an Automated MRTD Testing procedure basing on Back-Propagation Network. Firstly, we use frame grabber to capture the 4-bar target image data. Then according to image gray scale, we segment the image to get 4-bar place and extract feature vector representing the image characteristic and human detection ability. These feature sets, along with known target visibility, are used to train the ANN (Artificial Neural Networks). Actually it is a nonlinear classification (of input dimensions) of the image series using ANN. Our task is to justify if image is resolvable or uncertainty. Then the trained ANN will emulate observer performance in determining MRTD. This method can reduce the uncertainties between observers and long time dependent factors by standardization. This paper will introduce the feature extraction algorithm, demonstrate the feasibility of the whole process and give the accuracy of MRTD measurement.

  2. Occupancy Analysis of Sports Arenas Using Thermal Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anders; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a system for automatic analysis of the occupancy of sports arenas. By using a thermal camera for image capturing the number of persons and their location on the court are found without violating any privacy issues. The images are binarised with an automatic threshold method....... Reflections due to shiny surfaces are eliminated by analysing symmetric patterns. Occlusions are dealt with through a concavity anal- ysis of the binary regions. The system is tested in five different sports arenas, for more than three full weeks altogether. These tests showed that after a short...

  3. Thermal Quasi-Reflectography: a new imaging tool in art conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, Claudia; Ambrosini, Dario; Pezzati, Luca; Paoletti, Domenica

    2012-06-18

    In the artwork conservation field, non contact diagnostic and imaging methods are widely used and most welcomed. In this work a new imaging tool, called Thermal Quasi-Reflectography (TQR), is proposed and demonstrated. It is based on the recording, by suitable procedures, of reflected infrared radiation in the MWIR band (3-5 μm). The technique, simple to perform, can provide very interesting results in the analysis of the painting surfaces. TQR was demonstrated in situ on two famous artworks: the Zavattari's frescos in the Chapel of Theodelinda (Italy) and the masterpiece by Piero della Francesca "The Resurrection" (Italy).

  4. New imaging techniques: principles, limitations and the question of cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsault, C.; Heran, F.; Brugieres, P.; Le Bras, F.; Castrec-Carpo, A.

    1989-03-01

    The new imaging techniques modify the diagnostic, or even sometimes therapeutic, decision lines. Their efficiency is much greater than that of the old techniques, while pretium doloris and side-effects are considerably reduced. Such advances are not without a major disadvantage: the ever increasing cost of imaging explorations. Radiological guidance (with conventional radiology, ultrasounds and computerized tomography) facilitates percutaneous procedures for diagnostic (biopsy) or therapeutic purposes (emptying of abscesses, chemonucleolysis of herniated lumbar disc, etc.).

  5. An Image Registration Based Technique for Noninvasive Vascular Elastography

    OpenAIRE

    Valizadeh, Sina; Makkiabadi, Bahador; Mirbagheri, Alireza; Soozande, Mehdi; Manwar, Rayyan; Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    Non-invasive vascular elastography is an emerging technique in vascular tissue imaging. During the past decades, several techniques have been suggested to estimate the tissue elasticity by measuring the displacement of the Carotid vessel wall. Cross correlation-based methods are the most prevalent approaches to measure the strain exerted in the wall vessel by the blood pressure. In the case of a low pressure, the displacement is too small to be apparent in ultrasound imaging, especially in th...

  6. 'Hybrid' non-destructive imaging techniques for engineering materials applications

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The combination of X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques provides a unique tool for structural and mechanical analysis of engineering components. A variety of modes can be employed in terms of the spatial resolution (length-scale), time resolution (frequency), and the nature of the physical quantity being interrogated. This thesis describes my contributions towards the development of novel X-ray “rich” imaging experimental techniques and data interpretation. The experiment...

  7. Review of Leaf Unhealthy Region Detection Using Image Processing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    A. Dhole, S; Shaikh, Rukaiyya Pyarelal

    2016-01-01

    - In agricultural field the plants comes to an attack from the various pets bacterial and micro-organism diseases. This diseases attacks on the plant leaves, steams, and fruit part. This present review paper discussed the image processing techniques which is used in performing the early detection of plant diseases through leaf feature inspection. the basic objective of this work is to develop image analysis and classification techniques for extraction and finally classified the diseases pre...

  8. Quantifying radiation from thermal imaging of residential landscape elements★

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loveday Jane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microclimate of a residential landscape can affect both the energy use in your home and the human thermal comfort in your garden, ultimately affecting the heat in the neighbourhood or precinct. A thermal imaging camera provides information about the temperature of surfaces. By using Stefan–Boltzmann’s law and the surface properties, these temperatures can be used to calculate the emission of longwave radiation (radiant exitance in W m−2. A thermal camera was used to determine the amount of radiant exitance from a range of residential landscape elements. A standard procedure for capturing these images was developed, taking into account factors which affect the quality of the radiometric data. A quantitative database comparing this radiation has been compiled for different times of day and different seasons. The sky view factor of these elements was chosen such that it was as close to 1 as possible. For a particular landscape design, areas of each landscape element can be measured and the amount of radiation reduced or emitted at different times can be calculated. This data can be used to improve landscape designs to reduce home energy use and human thermal comfort through shading and reduction of surfaces which emit longwave radiation close to the house.

  9. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity by flash thermal imaging methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, N.; Li, X. L.; Sun, J. G.

    2017-06-01

    Thermal properties are important for material applications involved with temperature. Although many measurement methods are available, they may not be convenient to use or have not been demonstrated suitable for testing of a wide range of materials. To address this issue, we developed a new method for the nondestructive measurement of the thermal effusivity of bulk materials with uniform property. This method is based on the pulsed thermal imaging-multilayer analysis (PTI-MLA) method that has been commonly used for testing of coating materials. Because the test sample for PTI-MLA has to be in a two-layer configuration, we have found a commonly used commercial tape to construct such test samples with the tape as the first-layer material and the bulk material as the substrate. This method was evaluated for testing of six selected solid materials with a wide range of thermal properties covering most engineering materials. To determine both thermal conductivity and heat capacity, we also measured the thermal diffusivity of these six materials by the well-established flash method using the same experimental instruments with a different system setup. This paper provides a description of these methods, presents detailed experimental tests and data analyses, and discusses measurement results and their comparison with literature values.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of thermal conductivity and heat capacity by flash thermal imaging methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, N; Li, X L; Sun, J G

    2017-06-01

    Thermal properties are important for material applications involved with temperature. Although many measurement methods are available, they may not be convenient to use or have not been demonstrated suitable for testing of a wide range of materials. To address this issue, we developed a new method for the nondestructive measurement of the thermal effusivity of bulk materials with uniform property. This method is based on the pulsed thermal imaging-multilayer analysis (PTI-MLA) method that has been commonly used for testing of coating materials. Because the test sample for PTI-MLA has to be in a two-layer configuration, we have found a commonly used commercial tape to construct such test samples with the tape as the first-layer material and the bulk material as the substrate. This method was evaluated for testing of six selected solid materials with a wide range of thermal properties covering most engineering materials. To determine both thermal conductivity and heat capacity, we also measured the thermal diffusivity of these six materials by the well-established flash method using the same experimental instruments with a different system setup. This paper provides a description of these methods, presents detailed experimental tests and data analyses, and discusses measurement results and their comparison with literature values.

  11. Human detection for underground autonomous mine vehicles using thermal imaging

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dickens, JS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Page 1 of 12 26th International Conference on CAD/CAM, Robotics & Factories of the Future, 26-28 July 2011, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia HUMAN DETECTION FOR UNDERGROUND AUTONOMOUS MINE VEHICLES USING THERMAL IMAGING J. S. Dickens1, J. J. Green2.... Dickens Page 2 of 12 26th International Conference on CAD/CAM, Robotics & Factories of the Future, 26-28 July 2011, Kuala Lumpur...

  12. THERMAL AND VISIBLE SATELLITE IMAGE FUSION USING WAVELET IN REMOTE SENSING AND SATELLITE IMAGE PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Ahrari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal remote sensing approach is based on merging different data in different portions of electromagnetic radiation that improves the accuracy in satellite image processing and interpretations. Remote Sensing Visible and thermal infrared bands independently contain valuable spatial and spectral information. Visible bands make enough information spatially and thermal makes more different radiometric and spectral information than visible. However low spatial resolution is the most important limitation in thermal infrared bands. Using satellite image fusion, it is possible to merge them as a single thermal image that contains high spectral and spatial information at the same time. The aim of this study is a performance assessment of thermal and visible image fusion quantitatively and qualitatively with wavelet transform and different filters. In this research, wavelet algorithm (Haar and different decomposition filters (mean.linear,ma,min and rand for thermal and panchromatic bands of Landast8 Satellite were applied as shortwave and longwave fusion method . Finally, quality assessment has been done with quantitative and qualitative approaches. Quantitative parameters such as Entropy, Standard Deviation, Cross Correlation, Q Factor and Mutual Information were used. For thermal and visible image fusion accuracy assessment, all parameters (quantitative and qualitative must be analysed with respect to each other. Among all relevant statistical factors, correlation has the most meaningful result and similarity to the qualitative assessment. Results showed that mean and linear filters make better fused images against the other filters in Haar algorithm. Linear and mean filters have same performance and there is not any difference between their qualitative and quantitative results.

  13. Image enhancement using thermal-visible fusion for human detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaihidee, Ezrinda Mohd; Hawari Ghazali, Kamarul; Zuki Saleh, Mohd

    2017-09-01

    An increased interest in detecting human beings in video surveillance system has emerged in recent years. Multisensory image fusion deserves more research attention due to the capability to improve the visual interpretability of an image. This study proposed fusion techniques for human detection based on multiscale transform using grayscale visual light and infrared images. The samples for this study were taken from online dataset. Both images captured by the two sensors were decomposed into high and low frequency coefficients using Stationary Wavelet Transform (SWT). Hence, the appropriate fusion rule was used to merge the coefficients and finally, the final fused image was obtained by using inverse SWT. From the qualitative and quantitative results, the proposed method is more superior than the two other methods in terms of enhancement of the target region and preservation of details information of the image.

  14. CATEGORICAL IMAGE COMPONENTS IN THE FORMING SYSTEM OF A MARKETING TECHNIQUES MANAGER’S IMAGE CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Borisovna Cherednyakova

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the understanding of the image culture formation of managers of marketing techniques, as a representative of the social and communication interaction of public structures, categorical apparatus of image culture with an emphasis on the etymology of the image, as an integral component of image culture was analyzed. Categorical components of the image are presented from the standpoint of image culture, as personal new formation, an integral part of the professional activity of the marketing techniques manager: object-communicative categorical component, subject-activity categorical component of image, personality-oriented categorical component, value-acmeological categorical component of image.The aim is to identify and justify the image categorical components as a component of image culture of the marketing techniques manager.Method and methodology of work – a general scientific research approach reflecting scientific apparatus of research.Results. Categorical components of the image, as an image culture component of manager of marketing techniques were defined.Practical implication of the results. The theoretical part of «Imageology» course, special course «Image culture of manager of marketing techniques», the theoretical and methodological study and the formation of image culture.

  15. Application of digital-image-correlation techniques in analysing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    experimental results obtained using the digital image correlation analysis is used to demonstrate the crack development ... of applying DIC technique to monitor pipeline cracks is tested in this research by designing and applying a new test to be .... The appropriate sub-image size must be determined in accordance with the ...

  16. Application of ultrasonic pulse velocity technique and image analysis in monitoring of the sintering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terzić A.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete which undergoes a thermal treatment before and during its life-service can be applied in plants operating at high temperature and as thermal insulation. Sintering occurs within a concrete structure in such conditions. Progression of sintering process can be monitored by the change of the porosity parameters determined with a nondestructive test method - ultrasonic pulse velocity and computer program for image analysis. The experiment has been performed on the samples of corundum and bauxite concrete composites. The apparent porosity of the samples thermally treated at 110, 800, 1000, 1300 and 1500ºC was primary investigated with a standard laboratory procedure. Sintering parameters were calculated from the creep testing. The loss of strength and material degradation occurred in concrete when it was subjected to the increased temperature and a compressive load. Mechanical properties indicate and monitor changes within microstructure. The level of surface deterioration after the thermal treatment was determined using Image Pro Plus program. Mechanical strength was estimated using ultrasonic pulse velocity testing. Nondestructive ultrasonic measurement was used as a qualitative description of the porosity change in specimens which is the result of the sintering process. The ultrasonic pulse velocity technique and image analysis proved to be reliable methods for monitoring of microstructural change during the thermal treatment and service life of refractory concrete.

  17. Burn Depth Estimation Using Thermal Excitation and Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Yee, M.L.

    1998-12-17

    Accurate estimation of the depth of partial-thickness burns and the early prediction of a need for surgical intervention are difficult. A non-invasive technique utilizing the difference in thermal relaxation time between burned and normal skin may be useful in this regard. In practice, a thermal camera would record the skin's response to heating or cooling by a small amount-roughly 5{degrees} Celsius for a short duration. The thermal stimulus would be provided by a heat lamp, hot or cold air, or other means. Processing of the thermal transients would reveal areas that returned to equilibrium at different rates, which should correspond to different burn depths. In deeper thickness burns, the outside layer of skin is further removed from the constant-temperature region maintained through blood flow. Deeper thickness areas should thus return to equilibrium more slowly than other areas. Since the technique only records changes in the skin's temperature, it is not sensitive to room temperature, the burn's location, or the state of the patient. Preliminary results are presented for analysis of a simulated burn, formed by applying a patch of biosynthetic wound dressing on top of normal skin tissue.

  18. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Techniques for using image processing in astronomy are identified and developed for the following: (1) geometric and radiometric decalibration of vidicon-acquired spectra, (2) automatic identification and segregation of stars from galaxies; and (3) display of multiband radio maps in compact and meaningful formats. Examples are presented of these techniques applied to a variety of objects.

  19. Muscle perfusion and metabolic heterogeneity: insights from noninvasive imaging techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Kari K; Scheede-Bergdahl, Celena; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments in noninvasive imaging techniques have enabled the study of local changes in perfusion and metabolism in skeletal muscle as well as patterns of heterogeneity in these variables in humans. In this review, the principles of these techniques along with some recent findings...

  20. Cardiovascular Imaging Techniques in Systemic Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Atzeni

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The risk of cardiovascular (CV events and mortality is significantly higher in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases than in the general population. Although CV involvement in such patients is highly heterogeneous and may affect various structures of the heart, it can now be diagnosed earlier and promptly treated. Various types of assessments are employed for the evaluation of CV risk such as transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and computed tomography (CT to investigate valve abnormalities, pericardial disease, and ventricular wall motion defects. The diameter of coronary arteries can be assessed using invasive quantitative coronarography or intravascular ultrasound, and coronary flow reserve can be assessed using non-invasive transesophageal or transthoracic ultrasonography (US, MRI, CT, or positron emission tomography (PET after endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Finally, peripheral circulation can be measured invasively using strain-gauge plethysmography in an arm after the arterial infusion of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator or non-invasively by means of US or MRI measurements of flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery. All of the above are reliable methods of investigating CV involvement, but more recently, introduced use of speckle tracking echocardiography and 3-dimensional US are diagnostically more accurate.

  1. The new techniques of scintigraphic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of scintigraphic imaging is not to explore the morphology of an organ (or its abnormalities) but rather its functional and metabolic characteristics. It is thus important that a molecular structure (e.g., a hormonal receptor or an antigen) closely linked to the functional activity of an organ or tissue be targeted on its cell surface. Such diagnostic targeting requires the synthesis and labeling of a radiopharmaceutical substance specific for the receptor or antigen in question. It also requires a detection system adapted to count rates and signal-to-background ratios (generally moderate). The synthesis of new radiopharmaceutical agents, a critical stage for the future of nuclear medicine, is a long and often risky process in which success is difficult to foresee. Radiolabeling must be stable in vitro and in vivo, and the radiopharmaceutical must subsequently retain its capability of recognizing the targeted molecule. In endocrinology, the exemplary achievement in this direction has been the synthesis of 131 I-6-iodomethylnorcholesterol and 131 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine for functional scintigraphy of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Progress in detection equipment has been marked by the development of monophotonic tomoscintigraphy, using gamma cameras with a revolving head to obtain slices in different spatial planes showing the distribution in the organism of the injected radiopharmaceutical agent [fr

  2. Fine characterization rock thermal damage by acoustic emission technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Biao; Li, Zenghua; Wang, Enyuan

    2018-02-01

    This paper examines the differences in the thermal mechanical properties and acoustic emission (AE) characteristics during the deformation and fracture of rock under the action of continuous heating and after high-temperature treatment. Using AE 3D positioning technology, the development and evolution of the internal thermal cracks and the time domain of AE signals in rock were analyzed. High-temperature treatment causes thermal damage to rock. Under the action of continuous heating, the phase characteristics of AE time series correspond to the five stages of rock thermal deformation and fracture, respectively: the micro-defect development stage, the threshold interval of rock micro-cracks, the crack initiation stage, the crack propagation stage, and the crack multistage propagation evolution. When the initial crack propagates, the crack initiation of the rock causes the AE signal to produce a sudden mutation change. Mechanical fraction characteristics during rock uniaxial compression after temperature treatment indicated that the decrease rate of the rock compressive strength, wave velocity, and elastic modulus are relatively large during uniaxial compression tests after high-temperature treatment. During the deformation and fracture of rock under loading, there is faster growth of AE counts and AE events, indicating an increase in the speed of rock deformation and fracture under loading. AE counts show obvious changes during the latter loading stages, whereas AE events show obvious changes during the loading process. The results obtained are valuable for rock thermal stability detection and evaluation in actual underground engineering.

  3. A Comparison of Speckle Reduction Techniques in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina STOLOJESCU-CRISAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Speckle noise is a multiplicative noise that degrades the visual evaluation in ultrasound imaging. In addition, it limits the efficient application of intelligent image processing algorithms, such as segmentation techniques. Thus, speckle noise reduction is considered an essential pre-processing step. The objective of this paper is to carry out a comparative evaluation of speckle filtering techniques, based on two image quality evaluation metrics, the Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR, and the Structural SIMilarity (SSIM index, and visual evaluation.

  4. A machine vision identification technique from range images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehtarnavaz, N.; Mohan, S.

    1988-01-01

    An orientation-independent identification technique from three-dimensional surface maps or range images is developed. Given the range image of an object, it is decomposed into orientation-independent patches using the sign of Gaussian curvature. A relational graph is then set up such that a node represents a patch and an edge represents the adjacency of two patches. The identification of the object is achieved by matching its graph representation to a number of model graphs. The matching is performed by employing the best-first search strategy. Examples of real range images show the merit of the technique.

  5. A fast iterative technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, Kenji, E-mail: kenji.nakahira.kp@hitachi.com; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Honda, Toshifumi

    2014-12-21

    This paper proposes a fast new technique for restoring scanning electron microscope images to improve their sharpness. The images with our approach are sharpened by deconvolution with the point spread function modeled as the intensity distribution of the electron beam at the specimen's surface. We propose an iterative technique that employs a modified cost function based on the Richardson–Lucy method to achieve faster processing. The empirical results indicate significant improvements in image quality. The proposed approach speeds up deconvolution by about 10–50 times faster than that with the conventional Richardson–Lucy method.

  6. Determining thermal diffusivity and defect attributes in ceramic matrix composites by infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Sanjay; Ellingson, William A.; Stuckey, J. B.; Koehl, E. R.

    1996-03-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are being developed for numerous high temperature applications, including rotors and combustors for advanced turbine engines, heat exchanger and hot-gas filters for coal gasification plants. Among the materials of interest are silicon-carbide-fiber- reinforced-silicon-carbide (SiC(f)/SiC), silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced-silicon-nitride (SiC(f)/Si3N4), aluminum-oxide-reinforced-alumina (Al2O3(f)/Al2O3, etc. In the manufacturing of these ceramic composites, the conditions of the fiber/matrix interface are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component. Defects such as delaminations and non-uniform porosity can directly affect the performance. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method, developed at Argonne National Laboratory has proved beneficial in analyzing as-processed conditions and defect detection created during manufacturing. This NDE method uses infrared thermal imaging for full-field quantitative measurement of the distribution of thermal diffusivity in large components. Intensity transform algorithms have been used for contrast enhancement of the output image. Nonuniformity correction and automatic gain control are used to dynamically optimize video contrast and brightness, providing additional resolution in the acquired images. Digital filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques have been incorporated for noise reduction and data acquisition. The Argonne NDE system has been utilized to determine thermal shock damage, density variations, and variations in fiber coating in a full array of test specimens.

  7. Pedestrian detection from thermal images: A sparse representation based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bin; John, Vijay; Liu, Zheng; Mita, Seiichi

    2016-05-01

    Pedestrian detection, a key technology in computer vision, plays a paramount role in the applications of advanced driver assistant systems (ADASs) and autonomous vehicles. The objective of pedestrian detection is to identify and locate people in a dynamic environment so that accidents can be avoided. With significant variations introduced by illumination, occlusion, articulated pose, and complex background, pedestrian detection is a challenging task for visual perception. Different from visible images, thermal images are captured and presented with intensity maps based objects' emissivity, and thus have an enhanced spectral range to make human beings perceptible from the cool background. In this study, a sparse representation based approach is proposed for pedestrian detection from thermal images. We first adopted the histogram of sparse code to represent image features and then detect pedestrian with the extracted features in an unimodal and a multimodal framework respectively. In the unimodal framework, two types of dictionaries, i.e. joint dictionary and individual dictionary, are built by learning from prepared training samples. In the multimodal framework, a weighted fusion scheme is proposed to further highlight the contributions from features with higher separability. To validate the proposed approach, experiments were conducted to compare with three widely used features: Haar wavelets (HWs), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and histogram of phase congruency (HPC) as well as two classification methods, i.e. AdaBoost and support vector machine (SVM). Experimental results on a publicly available data set demonstrate the superiority of the proposed approach.

  8. Monitoring Thermal Activity of Eastern Anatolian Volcanoes Using MODIS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diker, Caner; Ulusoy, Inan

    2014-05-01

    MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument is used for imaging atmosphere, land and ocean with 36 bands. Both AQUA and TERRA platforms acquire 2 images daily (daytime and nighttime). Low temperature anomalies on volcanoes comprise important clues. Low temperature anomalies on Holocene volcanoes of Eastern Anatolia were investigated for these clues using MODIS Land Surface Temperature (LST) images. A total of 16800 daily LST images dated between 2001 and 2012 have been processed using a code written in IDL (Interactive Data Language). Factors like shadow, ice/snow and clouds that are affecting the reflectance data are masked. The mask is derived from MODIS reflectance data state image. Various LST images are calculated: Two nested region of interest (ROI) windows (square/rectangular) have been selected on the images. First is the bigger window, which covers the whole area of the volcano (Total volcano area). Second one is a smaller window which circumference the summit (crater and/or caldera) of the volcano (Summit cone) where thermal output is generally higher when compared to the flanks. Two data sets have been calculated using the ROI's for each volcano. The first set contains daytime and nighttime raw data without any correction. The second set contains topographically corrected images; daytime images are corrected using Cosine and Minnaert methods and nighttime images are corrected using three step normalization method. Calculated surface temperatures (Tmax, Tmin, Tmean) are plotted annually. On Nemrut Volcano as an example, maximum and minimum temperatures are between 26.31oC and -44.87oC on nighttime data for twelve years period. Temperature difference between total volcano area ROI and summit cone ROI are calculated (ΔT). High ΔT indicates that there is an increase of temperature at the summit cone when compared to the total volcano area. STA/LTA (Short Term Average/Long Term Average) filter was applied to maximum temperature and

  9. A Novel Contrast Enhancement Technique on Palm Bone Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Tsang Chang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Contrast enhancement plays a fundamental role in image processing. Many histogram-based techniques are widely used for contrast enhancement of given images, due to their simple function and effectiveness. However, the conventional histogram equalization (HE methods result in excessive contrast enhancement, which causes natural looking and satisfactory results for a variety of low contrast images. To solve such problems, a novel multi-histogram equalization technique is proposed to enhance the contrast of the palm bone X-ray radiographs in this paper. For images, the mean-variance analysis method is employed to partition the histogram of the original grey scale image into multiple sub-histograms. These histograms are independently equalized. By using this mean-variance partition method, a proposed multi-histogram equalization technique is employed to achieve the contrast enhancement of the palm bone X-ray radiographs. Experimental results show that the multi-histogram equalization technique achieves a lower average absolute mean brightness error (AMBE value. The multi-histogram equalization technique simultaneously preserved the mean brightness and enhanced the local contrast of the original image.

  10. A Blind High-Capacity Wavelet-Based Steganography Technique for Hiding Images into other Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAMAD, S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The flourishing field of Steganography is providing effective techniques to hide data into different types of digital media. In this paper, a novel technique is proposed to hide large amounts of image data into true colored images. The proposed method employs wavelet transforms to decompose images in a way similar to the Human Visual System (HVS for more secure and effective data hiding. The designed model can blindly extract the embedded message without the need to refer to the original cover image. Experimental results showed that the proposed method outperformed all of the existing techniques not only imperceptibility but also in terms of capacity. In fact, the proposed technique showed an outstanding performance on hiding a secret image whose size equals 100% of the cover image while maintaining excellent visual quality of the resultant stego-images.

  11. Nanoscale thermal imaging of dissipation in quantum systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbertal, D; Cuppens, J; Shalom, M Ben; Embon, L; Shadmi, N; Anahory, Y; Naren, H R; Sarkar, J; Uri, A; Ronen, Y; Myasoedov, Y; Levitov, L S; Joselevich, E; Geim, A K; Zeldov, E

    2016-11-17

    Energy dissipation is a fundamental process governing the dynamics of physical, chemical and biological systems. It is also one of the main characteristics that distinguish quantum from classical phenomena. In particular, in condensed matter physics, scattering mechanisms, loss of quantum information or breakdown of topological protection are deeply rooted in the intricate details of how and where the dissipation occurs. Yet the microscopic behaviour of a system is usually not formulated in terms of dissipation because energy dissipation is not a readily measurable quantity on the micrometre scale. Although nanoscale thermometry has gained much recent interest, existing thermal imaging methods are not sensitive enough for the study of quantum systems and are also unsuitable for the low-temperature operation that is required. Here we report a nano-thermometer based on a superconducting quantum interference device with a diameter of less than 50 nanometres that resides at the apex of a sharp pipette: it provides scanning cryogenic thermal sensing that is four orders of magnitude more sensitive than previous devices-below 1 μK Hz -1/2 . This non-contact, non-invasive thermometry allows thermal imaging of very low intensity, nanoscale energy dissipation down to the fundamental Landauer limit of 40 femtowatts for continuous readout of a single qubit at one gigahertz at 4.2 kelvin. These advances enable the observation of changes in dissipation due to single-electron charging of individual quantum dots in carbon nanotubes. They also reveal a dissipation mechanism attributable to resonant localized states in graphene encapsulated within hexagonal boron nitride, opening the door to direct thermal imaging of nanoscale dissipation processes in quantum matter.

  12. A contrast enhancement technique for low light images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ankita; Gupta, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Digital Imagery systems are traditionally bad in low light conditions. In this paper, a new algorithm for contrast improvement is proposed. The algorithm consists of two stages. The first stage is decomposing the input image into four subbands by applying two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform and estimates the singular value matrix of sub band image. The second stage is that it reconstructs the enhanced image by applying the inverse DWT. The technique is compared with conventional image equalization technique such as standard General Histogram Equalization (GHE) and other state-of-the-art techniques such as Quadrant Dynamic Histogram Equalization (QDHE), Singular-Value-Wavelet based image Equalization (SVWE) and Singular Value Equalization (SVE) on the basis of their Peak Signal to Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values. The simulation results indicated that the image contrast enhanced by the purposed method was higher than that of the images enhanced by the other conventional state-of-the-art techniques.

  13. Analysis of imaging quality under the systematic parameters for thermal imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Jin, Weiqi

    2009-07-01

    The integration of thermal imaging system and radar system could increase the range of target identification as well as strengthen the accuracy and reliability of detection, which is a state-of-the-art and mainstream integrated system to search any invasive target and guard homeland security. When it works, there is, however, one defect existing of what the thermal imaging system would produce affected images which could cause serious consequences when searching and detecting. In this paper, we study and reveal the reason why and how the affected images would occur utilizing the principle of lightwave before establishing mathematical imaging model which could meet the course of ray transmitting. In the further analysis, we give special attentions to the systematic parameters of the model, and analyse in detail all parameters which could possibly affect the imaging process and the function how it does respectively. With comprehensive research, we obtain detailed information about the regulation of diffractive phenomena shaped by these parameters. Analytical results have been convinced through the comparison between experimental images and MATLAB simulated images, while simulated images based on the parameters we revised to judge our expectation have good comparability with images acquired in reality.

  14. Introduction to basic molecular biologic techniques for molecular imaging researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2004-01-01

    Molecular imaging is a rapidly growing field due to the advances in molecular biology and imaging technologies. With the introduction of imaging reporter genes into the cell, diverse cellular processes can be monitored, quantified and imaged non-invasively in vivo. These processes include the gene expression, protein-protein interactions, signal transduction pathways, and monitoring of cells such as cancer cells, immune cells, and stem cells. In the near future, molecular imaging analysis will allow us to observe the incipience and progression of the disease. These will make us easier to give a diagnosis in the early stage of intractable diseases such as cancer, neuro-degenerative disease, and immunological disorders. Additionally, molecular imaging method will be a valuable tool for the real-time evaluation of cells in molecular biology and the basic biological studies. As newer and more powerful molecular imaging tools become available, it will be necessary to corporate clinicians, molecular biologists and biochemists for the planning, interpretation, and application of these techniques to their fullest potential. In order for such a multidisciplinary team to be effective, it is essential that a common understanding of basic biochemical and molecular biologic techniques is achieved. Basic molecular techniques for molecular imaging methods are presented in this paper

  15. Imaging of mass distribution in paper by electrography technique, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimasu, Hiroshi; Luner, P.

    1991-01-01

    Four paper imaging techniques (β-radiography, electrography, light transmission, and soft x-radiography) were compared in terms of their process parameters and image characteristics (exposure time, spatial variation, contrast, spatial resolution, correlation with mass, and limitation in basis weight range) with the same newsprint sample and electron microscope film. As far as the imaging conditions chosen here are concerned, electrography gave a higher spatial resolution, shorter exposure time, and the wider basis weight range than β-radiography. Light transmission image could be obtained in a very short time, but gave the poorest spatial resolution and correlation with mass. Soft x-radiography gave the highest spatial resolution, but the poorest spatial variation and contrast. The proper imaging technique and conditions need to be selected depending on the specific paper property in question. (author)

  16. Thermal conductivity of gas by pulse injection techniques using specific thermal conductivity detector (TCD)

    OpenAIRE

    Cataluña, Renato; Silva, Rosângela da; Menezes, Eliana W.; Samios, Dimitrios

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a procedure to determine the thermal conductivity of gases by pulse injection, using a thermal conductivity detector (TCD). The measurements are taken at 323K and atmospheric pressure with a 160 omega tungsten filament sensor. Under well defined approximations the original nonlinear second order equation, which describes the sensors output, as a function of thermal conductivity and constant volume specific heat was transformed into a linear first order equation. According ...

  17. Imaging of laboratory magnetospheric plasmas using coherence imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, Masaki; Takahashi, Noriki; Yoshida, Zensho; Nakamura, Kaori; Kawazura, Yohei; Kenmochi, Naoki; Nakatsuka, Masataka; Sugata, Tetsuya; Katsura, Shotaro; Howard, John

    2017-10-01

    The ring trap 1 (RT-1) device creates a laboratory magnetosphere for the studies on plasma physics and advanced nuclear fusion. A levitated superconducting coil produces magnetic dipole fields that realize a high beta plasma confinement that is motivated by self-organized plasmas in planetary magnetospheres. The electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with 8.2 GHz and 50 kW produces the plasmas with hot electrons in a few ten keV range. The electrons contribute to the local electron beta that exceeded 1 in RT-1. For the ion heating, ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating with 2-4 MHz and 10 kW has been performed in RT-1. The radial profile of ion temperature by a spectroscopic measurement indicates the signature of ion heating. In the holistic point of view, a coherence imaging system has been implemented for imaging the entire ion dynamics in the laboratory magnetosphere. The diagnostic system and obtained results will be presented.

  18. Chest trauma in children: current imaging guidelines and techniques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    Given the heterogeneous nature of pediatric chest trauma, the optimal imaging approach is tailored to the specific patient. Chest radiography remains the most important imaging modality for initial triage. The decision to perform a chest computed tomography scan should be based on the nature of the trauma, the child\\'s clinical condition, and the initial radiographic findings, taking the age-related pretest probabilities of serious injury into account. The principles of as low as reasonably achievable and Image Gently should be followed. The epidemiology and pathophysiology, imaging techniques, characteristic findings, and evidence-based algorithms for pediatric chest trauma are discussed.

  19. An Image Morphing Technique Based on Optimal Mass Preserving Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Yan; Haker, Steven; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2013-01-01

    Image morphing, or image interpolation in the time domain, deals with the metamorphosis of one image into another. In this paper, a new class of image morphing algorithms is proposed based on the theory of optimal mass transport. The L2 mass moving energy functional is modified by adding an intensity penalizing term, in order to reduce the undesired double exposure effect. It is an intensity-based approach and, thus, is parameter free. The optimal warping function is computed using an iterative gradient descent approach. This proposed morphing method is also extended to doubly connected domains using a harmonic parameterization technique, along with finite-element methods. PMID:17547128

  20. Digital signal processing techniques and applications in radar image processing

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Bu-Chin

    2008-01-01

    A self-contained approach to DSP techniques and applications in radar imagingThe processing of radar images, in general, consists of three major fields: Digital Signal Processing (DSP); antenna and radar operation; and algorithms used to process the radar images. This book brings together material from these different areas to allow readers to gain a thorough understanding of how radar images are processed.The book is divided into three main parts and covers:* DSP principles and signal characteristics in both analog and digital domains, advanced signal sampling, and

  1. Algorithm for Analyzing Thermal Images of Laser Irradiated Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toumi, Johnny; Saiof, Fawaz; Bachir, Wesam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Tracking temporal changes of temperature during laser skin treatment plays an important role in improving the process of laser skin treatment itself. There are a number of methods to analyze temperature's temporal dependency during laser skin treatment; some of those methods depend on imaging the skin with thermal cameras. However, the use of thermal cameras exhibits specific problems, including the ability to track laser-skin interaction spot. This paper is dedicated to solve that problem using digital image processing program coded with Matlab. Methods: The measurements were taken for 15 native Syrian subjects of different sex, age and skin tones, the treated ailment was port wine stain. The clinical work (laser exposure) was performed in Damascus University, hospital of dermatology. The treatment was observed by thermal camera and analyzed using the proposed Matlab coded tracking system. Results: For all the subjects, the treatment laser spot was tracked and the curves of skin temperature change with time where calculated by the use of the proposed algorithm, then the active time was calculated for each subject. The algorithm proved practical and robust. Conclusion: The proposed algorithm proved to be efficient and can be used to support future researchers with capability to measure the temperature with high frame rate.

  2. Graphene-Based Thermopile for Thermal Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Allen L; Herring, Patrick K; Gabor, Nathaniel M; Ha, Sungjae; Shin, Yong Cheol; Song, Yi; Chin, Matthew; Dubey, Madan; Chandrakasan, Anantha P; Kong, Jing; Jarillo-Herrero, Pablo; Palacios, Tomás

    2015-11-11

    In this work, we leverage graphene's unique tunable Seebeck coefficient for the demonstration of a graphene-based thermal imaging system. By integrating graphene based photothermo-electric detectors with micromachined silicon nitride membranes, we are able to achieve room temperature responsivities on the order of ~7-9 V/W (at λ = 10.6 μm), with a time constant of ~23 ms. The large responsivities, due to the combination of thermal isolation and broadband infrared absorption from the underlying SiN membrane, have enabled detection as well as stand-off imaging of an incoherent blackbody target (300-500 K). By comparing the fundamental achievable performance of these graphene-based thermopiles with standard thermocouple materials, we extrapolate that graphene's high carrier mobility can enable improved performances with respect to two main figures of merit for infrared detectors: detectivity (>8 × 10(8) cm Hz(1/2) W(-1)) and noise equivalent temperature difference (thermal radiation from a human target.

  3. Nanoscale deformation measurement of microscale interconnection assemblies by a digital image correlation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yaofeng; Pang, John H L; Fan Wei

    2007-01-01

    The continuous miniaturization of microelectronic devices and interconnections demand more and more experimental strain/stress analysis of micro- and nanoscale components for material characterization and structure reliability analysis. The digital image correlation (DIC) technique, with the aid of scanning probe microscopes, has become a very promising tool to meet this demand. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to scan and digitally image micro-interconnection assemblies in a micro-thermoelectric cooler. AFM images of the scan region of interest were obtained separately when the microelectronic device was operated before and after the cooling and heating stages. The AFM images were then used to obtain the in-plane deformation fields in the observed region of the micro-assembly. AFM image correlation is performed for nanoscale deformation analysis using the authors' AFM-DIC program. The results show that the observed region was subjected to cyclic strains when the device worked between its cooling and heating stages, and cyclic strain in the vertical direction was found to be a significant deformation mode. The thermally induced deformation behavior of the micro-assembly device was modeled by finite element analysis (FEA). Both thermal-electric analysis and thermal stress analysis were conducted on a 3D finite element model of the device. It is shown that the experimental results were able to validate the finite element analysis results

  4. Thermally activated state transition technique for femto-Newton-level force measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng-Jung; Wong, Jhih-Sian; Hsu, Ken Y; Hsu, Long

    2012-05-01

    We develop and test a thermally activated state transition technique for ultraweak force measurement. As a force sensor, the technique was demonstrated on a classical Brownian bead immersed in water and restrained by a bistable optical trap. A femto-Newton-level flow force imposed on this sensor was measured by monitoring changes in the transition rates of the bead hopping between two energy states. The treatment of thermal disturbances as a requirement instead of a limiting factor is the major feature of the technique, and provides a new strategy by which to measure other ultraweak forces beyond the thermal noise limit.

  5. A Document Imaging Technique for Implementing Electronic Loan Approval Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manikandan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The image processing is one of the leading technologies of computer applications. Image processing is a type of signal processing, the input for image processor is an image or video frame and the output will be an image or subset of image [1]. Computer graphics and computer vision process uses an image processing techniques. Image processing systems are used in various environments like medical fields, computer-aided design (CAD, research fields, crime investigation fields and military fields. In this paper, we proposed a document image processing technique, for establishing electronic loan approval process (E-LAP [2]. Loan approval process has been tedious process, the E-LAP system attempts to reduce the complexity of loan approval process. Customers have to login to fill the loan application form online with all details and submit the form. The loan department then processes the submitted form and then sends an acknowledgement mail via the E-LAP to the requested customer with the details about list of documents required for the loan approval process [3]. The approaching customer can upload the scanned copies of all required documents. All this interaction between customer and bank take place using an E-LAP system.

  6. Note: Near-field imaging of thermal radiation at low temperatures by passive millimeter-wave microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozokido, T; Ishino, M; Kudo, H; Bae, J

    2013-03-01

    Imaging of thermal radiation with a spatial resolution below the diffraction limit is demonstrated with a passive millimeter-wave microscope. This technique utilizes a sensitive radiometric receiver in combination with a scanning near-field microscope. Experiments were performed at 50 GHz (λ = 6 mm) with sample temperatures ranging from room temperature down to 160 K, and the performance was shown to be superior to that achieved with passive imaging systems in the infrared region. The images are affected by non-uniformities in the transmission of thermal radiation from the sample to the receiver via the near-field probe and the reflection of thermal radiation back to the receiver from the probe. The effects of these non-uniformities were successfully removed using a sample image acquired by active measurements using a vector network analyzer.

  7. Experimental techniques for the characterization and development of thermal barrier coating bond coat alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert J.

    Thermal barrier coatings, commonly used in modern gas turbines and jet engines, are dynamic, multilayered structures consisting of a superalloy substrate, an Al-rich bond coat, a thermally grown oxide, and a ceramic top coat. Knowledge of the disparate material properties for each of the constituents of a thermal barrier coating is crucial to both better understanding and improving the performance of the system. The efforts of this dissertation quantify fundamental aspects of two intrinsic strain mechanisms that arise during thermal cycling. This includes measurement of the thermal expansion behavior for bond coats and superalloys as well as establishing specific ternary compositions associated with a strain-inducing martensitic phase transformation, which is known to occur in Ni-rich bond coat alloys. In order to quantify the coefficient of thermal expansion for a number of actual alloys extracted from contemporary thermal barrier coating systems, this work employs a noncontact high temperature digital image correlation technique to nearly 1100°C. The examined materials include: two commercial superalloys, two as-deposited commercial bond coat alloys, and three experimental bond coat alloys. The as-deposited specimens were created using a diffusion aluminizing and a low pressure plasma spray procedure to thicknesses on the order of 50 and 100 mum, respectively. For the plasma sprayed bond coat, a comparison with a bulk counterpart of identical composition indicated that deposition procedures have little effect on thermal expansion. An analytical model of oxide rumpling is used to show that the importance of thermal expansion mismatch between a commercial bond coat and its superalloy substrate is relatively small. Considerably higher expansion values are noted for a Ni-rich bond coat alloy, however, and modeling which includes this layer suggests that it may have a substantial influence on rumpling. Combinatorial methods based on diffusion multiples are also

  8. Cartilage imaging: motivation, techniques, current and future significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, Thomas M.; Stahl, Robert; Woertler, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage repair techniques and pharmacological therapies are currently areas of major clinical interest and research, in particular to prevent and treat osteoarthritis. MR imaging-based techniques to visualize cartilage are prerequisites to guide and monitor these therapies. In this review article, standard MR imaging sequences are described, including proton density-weighted fast spin echo, spoiled gradient echo and dual echo steady state sequences. In addition, new sequences that have been developed and are currently being investigated are presented, including driven equilibrium Fourier transform and steady-state free precession-based imaging. Using high-field MR imaging at 3.0-T, visualization of cartilage and the related pathology has been improved. Volumetric quantitative cartilage MR imaging was developed as a tool to monitor the progression of osteoarthritis and to evaluate new pharmacological cartilage protective therapies. The most exciting developments, however, are in the field of cartilage matrix assessment with quantitative dGEMRIC, T2 and T1rho mapping techniques. These techniques aim at detecting cartilage damage at a stage when changes are potentially still reversible, before cartilage tissue is lost. There is currently substantial interest in these techniques from rheumatologists and orthopedists; radiologists therefore need to keep up with these developments. (orig.)

  9. Mid-infrared thermal imaging for an effective mapping of surface materials and sub-surface detachments in mural paintings: integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffara, C.; Parisotto, S.; Mariotti, P. I.

    2015-06-01

    Cultural Heritage is discovering how precious is thermal analysis as a tool to improve the restoration, thanks to its ability to inspect hidden details. In this work a novel dual mode imaging approach, based on the integration of thermography and thermal quasi-reflectography (TQR) in the mid-IR is demonstrated for an effective mapping of surface materials and of sub-surface detachments in mural painting. The tool was validated through a unique application: the "Monocromo" by Leonardo da Vinci in Italy. The dual mode acquisition provided two spatially aligned dataset: the TQR image and the thermal sequence. Main steps of the workflow included: 1) TQR analysis to map surface features and 2) to estimate the emissivity; 3) projection of the TQR frame on reference orthophoto and TQR mosaicking; 4) thermography analysis to map detachments; 5) use TQR to solve spatial referencing and mosaicking for the thermal-processed frames. Referencing of thermal images in the visible is a difficult aspect of the thermography technique that the dual mode approach allows to solve in effective way. We finally obtained the TQR and the thermal maps spatially referenced to the mural painting, thus providing the restorer a valuable tool for the restoration of the detachments.

  10. Standard Test Method for Determining Thermal Neutron Reaction Rates and Thermal Neutron Fluence Rates by Radioactivation Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 The purpose of this test method is to define a general procedure for determining an unknown thermal-neutron fluence rate by neutron activation techniques. It is not practicable to describe completely a technique applicable to the large number of experimental situations that require the measurement of a thermal-neutron fluence rate. Therefore, this method is presented so that the user may adapt to his particular situation the fundamental procedures of the following techniques. 1.1.1 Radiometric counting technique using pure cobalt, pure gold, pure indium, cobalt-aluminum, alloy, gold-aluminum alloy, or indium-aluminum alloy. 1.1.2 Standard comparison technique using pure gold, or gold-aluminum alloy, and 1.1.3 Secondary standard comparison techniques using pure indium, indium-aluminum alloy, pure dysprosium, or dysprosium-aluminum alloy. 1.2 The techniques presented are limited to measurements at room temperatures. However, special problems when making thermal-neutron fluence rate measurements in high-...

  11. Pattern recognition software and techniques for biological image analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior Shamir

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of automated image acquisition systems is enabling new types of microscopy experiments that generate large image datasets. However, there is a perceived lack of robust image analysis systems required to process these diverse datasets. Most automated image analysis systems are tailored for specific types of microscopy, contrast methods, probes, and even cell types. This imposes significant constraints on experimental design, limiting their application to the narrow set of imaging methods for which they were designed. One of the approaches to address these limitations is pattern recognition, which was originally developed for remote sensing, and is increasingly being applied to the biology domain. This approach relies on training a computer to recognize patterns in images rather than developing algorithms or tuning parameters for specific image processing tasks. The generality of this approach promises to enable data mining in extensive image repositories, and provide objective and quantitative imaging assays for routine use. Here, we provide a brief overview of the technologies behind pattern recognition and its use in computer vision for biological and biomedical imaging. We list available software tools that can be used by biologists and suggest practical experimental considerations to make the best use of pattern recognition techniques for imaging assays.

  12. Radiation-Based Medical Imaging Techniques: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, John O.; Lecoq, Paul

    This chapter will present an overview of two radiation-based medical imaging techniques using radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine/molecular imaging, namely, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET). The relative merits in terms of radiation sensitivity and image resolution of SPECT and PET will be compared to the main conventional radiologic modalities that are computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Differences in terms of temporal resolution will also be outlined, as well as the other similarities and dissimilarities of these two techniques, including their latest and upcoming multimodality combination. The main clinical applications are briefly described and examples of specific SPECT and PET radiopharmaceuticals are listed. SPECT and PET imaging will be then further detailed in the two subsequent chapters describing in greater depth the basics and future trends of each technique (see Chaps. 37, "SPECT Imaging: Basics and New Trends" 10.1007/978-3-642-13271-1_37 and 38, "PET Imaging: Basics and New Trends" 10.1007/978-3-642-13271-1_38.

  13. Video Multiple Watermarking Technique Based on Image Interlacing Using DWT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital watermarking is one of the important techniques to secure digital media files in the domains of data authentication and copyright protection. In the nonblind watermarking systems, the need of the original host file in the watermark recovery operation makes an overhead over the system resources, doubles memory capacity, and doubles communications bandwidth. In this paper, a robust video multiple watermarking technique is proposed to solve this problem. This technique is based on image interlacing. In this technique, three-level discrete wavelet transform (DWT is used as a watermark embedding/extracting domain, Arnold transform is used as a watermark encryption/decryption method, and different types of media (gray image, color image, and video are used as watermarks. The robustness of this technique is tested by applying different types of attacks such as: geometric, noising, format-compression, and image-processing attacks. The simulation results show the effectiveness and good performance of the proposed technique in saving system resources, memory capacity, and communications bandwidth.

  14. MICROARRAY IMAGE GRIDDING USING GRID LINE REFINEMENT TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Biju

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An important stage in microarray image analysis is gridding. Microarray image gridding is done to locate sub arrays in a microarray image and find co-ordinates of spots within each sub array. For accurate identification of spots, most of the proposed gridding methods require human intervention. In this paper a fully automatic gridding method which enhances spot intensity in the preprocessing step as per a histogram based threshold method is used. The gridding step finds co-ordinates of spots from horizontal and vertical profile of the image. To correct errors due to the grid line placement, a grid line refinement technique is proposed. The algorithm is applied on different image databases and results are compared based on spot detection accuracy and time. An average spot detection accuracy of 95.06% depicts the proposed method’s flexibility and accuracy in finding the spot co-ordinates for different database images.

  15. Spatial Angular Compounding Technique for H-Scan Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairalseed, Mawia; Xiong, Fangyuan; Kim, Jung-Whan; Mattrey, Robert F; Parker, Kevin J; Hoyt, Kenneth

    2018-01-01

    H-Scan is a new ultrasound imaging technique that relies on matching a model of pulse-echo formation to the mathematics of a class of Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials. This technique may be beneficial in the measurement of relative scatterer sizes and in cancer therapy, particularly for early response to drug treatment. Because current H-scan techniques use focused ultrasound data acquisitions, spatial resolution degrades away from the focal region and inherently affects relative scatterer size estimation. Although the resolution of ultrasound plane wave imaging can be inferior to that of traditional focused ultrasound approaches, the former exhibits a homogeneous spatial resolution throughout the image plane. The purpose of this study was to implement H-scan using plane wave imaging and investigate the impact of spatial angular compounding on H-scan image quality. Parallel convolution filters using two different Gaussian-weighted Hermite polynomials that describe ultrasound scattering events are applied to the radiofrequency data. The H-scan processing is done on each radiofrequency image plane before averaging to get the angular compounded image. The relative strength from each convolution is color-coded to represent relative scatterer size. Given results from a series of phantom materials, H-scan imaging with spatial angular compounding more accurately reflects the true scatterer size caused by reductions in the system point spread function and improved signal-to-noise ratio. Preliminary in vivo H-scan imaging of tumor-bearing animals suggests this modality may be useful for monitoring early response to chemotherapeutic treatment. Overall, H-scan imaging using ultrasound plane waves and spatial angular compounding is a promising approach for visualizing the relative size and distribution of acoustic scattering sources. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hot Spots Detection of Operating PV Arrays through IR Thermal Image Using Method Based on Curve Fitting of Gray Histogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall efficiency of PV arrays is affected by hot spots which should be detected and diagnosed by applying responsible monitoring techniques. The method using the IR thermal image to detect hot spots has been studied as a direct, noncontact, nondestructive technique. However, IR thermal images suffer from relatively high stochastic noise and non-uniformity clutter, so the conventional methods of image processing are not effective. The paper proposes a method to detect hotspots based on curve fitting of gray histogram. The result of MATLAB simulation proves the method proposed in the paper is effective to detect the hot spots suppressing the noise generated during the process of image acquisition.

  17. Unsupervised color image segmentation using a lattice algebra clustering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urcid, Gonzalo; Ritter, Gerhard X.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we introduce a lattice algebra clustering technique for segmenting digital images in the Red-Green- Blue (RGB) color space. The proposed technique is a two step procedure. Given an input color image, the first step determines the finite set of its extreme pixel vectors within the color cube by means of the scaled min-W and max-M lattice auto-associative memory matrices, including the minimum and maximum vector bounds. In the second step, maximal rectangular boxes enclosing each extreme color pixel are found using the Chebychev distance between color pixels; afterwards, clustering is performed by assigning each image pixel to its corresponding maximal box. The two steps in our proposed method are completely unsupervised or autonomous. Illustrative examples are provided to demonstrate the color segmentation results including a brief numerical comparison with two other non-maximal variations of the same clustering technique.

  18. Results on plasma temperature measurement using an image processing technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mahdavipour

    Full Text Available Image processing technique (IPT is a computational technique which is a simple, wide and great for many purposes. In this paper, we used IPT to obtain plasma source such as sun and sunspot temperatures. Sun image was taken by a telescope and DSLR camera and imported to MATLAB software. Using the IPT, we cropped two areas and evaluated their RGB values, using a code which was written according to Python software. We computed wavelengths and then by substituting wavelengths in Wien’s law, we obtained sun’s surface and sunspot temperature’s. The temperature errors for surface and sunspot were 0.57% and 13% respectively. Keywords: Image processing technique, Plasma temperature

  19. Imaging of the hip and bony pelvis. Techniques and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A.M. [Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom). MRI Centre; Johnson, K.J. [Princess of Wales Birmingham Children' s Hospital (United Kingdom); Whitehouse, R.W. (eds.) [Manchester Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2006-07-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook on imaging of the bony pelvis and hip joint that provides a detailed description of the techniques and imaging findings relevant to this complex anatomical region. In the first part of the book, the various techniques and procedures employed for imaging the pelvis and hip are discussed in detail. The second part of the book documents the application of these techniques to the diverse clinical problems and diseases encountered. Among the many topics addressed are congenital and developmental disorders including developmental dysplasia of the hip, irritable hip and septic arthritis, Perthes' disease and avascular necrosis, slipped upper femoral epiphysis, bony and soft tissue trauma, arthritis, tumours and hip prostheses. Each chapter is written by an acknowledged expert in the field, and a wealth of illustrative material is included. This book will be of great value to musculoskeletal and general radiologists, orthopaedic surgeons and rheumatologists. (orig.)

  20. Electromagnetic considerations for RF current density imaging [MRI technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, G C; Joy, M G; Armstrong, R L; Henkelman, R M

    1995-01-01

    Radio frequency current density imaging (RF-CDI) is a recent MRI technique that can image a Larmor frequency current density component parallel to B(0). Because the feasibility of the technique was demonstrated only for homogeneous media, the authors' goal here is to clarify the electromagnetic assumptions and field theory to allow imaging RF currents in heterogeneous media. The complete RF field and current density imaging problem is posed. General solutions are given for measuring lab frame magnetic fields from the rotating frame magnetic field measurements. For the general case of elliptically polarized fields, in which current and magnetic field components are not in phase, one can obtain a modified single rotation approximation. Sufficient information exists to image the amplitude and phase of the RF current density parallel to B(0) if the partial derivative in the B(0) direction of the RF magnetic field (amplitude and phase) parallel to B(0) is much smaller than the corresponding current density component. The heterogeneous extension was verified by imaging conduction and displacement currents in a phantom containing saline and pure water compartments. Finally, the issues required to image eddy currents are presented. Eddy currents within a sample will distort both the transmitter coil reference system, and create measurable rotating frame magnetic fields. However, a three-dimensional electro-magnetic analysis will be required to determine how the reference system distortion affects computed eddy current images.

  1. A human visual based binarization technique for histological images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreyas, Kamath K. M.; Rajendran, Rahul; Panetta, Karen; Agaian, Sos

    2017-05-01

    In the field of vision-based systems for object detection and classification, thresholding is a key pre-processing step. Thresholding is a well-known technique for image segmentation. Segmentation of medical images, such as Computed Axial Tomography (CAT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), X-Ray, Phase Contrast Microscopy, and Histological images, present problems like high variability in terms of the human anatomy and variation in modalities. Recent advances made in computer-aided diagnosis of histological images help facilitate detection and classification of diseases. Since most pathology diagnosis depends on the expertise and ability of the pathologist, there is clearly a need for an automated assessment system. Histological images are stained to a specific color to differentiate each component in the tissue. Segmentation and analysis of such images is problematic, as they present high variability in terms of color and cell clusters. This paper presents an adaptive thresholding technique that aims at segmenting cell structures from Haematoxylin and Eosin stained images. The thresholded result can further be used by pathologists to perform effective diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed method is analyzed by visually comparing the results to the state of art thresholding methods such as Otsu, Niblack, Sauvola, Bernsen, and Wolf. Computer simulations demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method in segmenting critical information.

  2. Layout-Driven Post-Placement Techniques for Temperature Reduction and Thermal Gradient Minimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Calimera, Andrea; Macii, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    With the continuing scaling of CMOS technology, on-chip temperature and thermal-induced variations have become a major design concern. To effectively limit the high temperature in a chip equipped with a cost-effective cooling system, thermal specific approaches, besides low power techniques, are ...

  3. Thermal properties of carbon nanowall layers measured by a pulsed photothermal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achour, A.; Belkerk, B. E.; Ait Aissa, K.; Gautron, E.; Carette, M.; Jouan, P.-Y.; Brizoual, L. Le; Scudeller, Y.; Djouadi, M.-A.; Vizireanu, S.; Dinescu, G.

    2013-01-01

    We report the thermal properties of carbon nanowall layers produced by expanding beam radio-frequency plasma. The thermal properties of carbon nanowalls, grown at 600 °C on aluminium nitride thin-film sputtered on fused silica, were measured with a pulsed photo-thermal technique. The apparent thermal conductivity of the carbon at room temperature was found to increase from 20 to 80 Wm −1 K −1 while the thickness varied from 700 to 4300 nm, respectively. The intrinsic thermal conductivity of the carbon nanowalls attained 300 Wm −1 K −1 while the boundary thermal resistance with the aluminium nitride was 3.6 × 10 −8 Km 2 W −1 . These results identify carbon nanowalls as promising material for thermal management applications.

  4. Use of thermal imaging in characterization of ceramic fiber structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Järveläinen, Matti; Keskinen, Lassi; Levänen, Erkki

    2013-01-01

    Fibrous bodies that contain open porosity can have a very heterogeneous structure that is difficult to characterize in terms of local flow resistance changes within the same sample. This article presents a method that is applicable for a quick analysis of flow distribution even with large samples. In this first attempt to understand how our flow distribution thermal imaging works, we present how the measuring parameters and the results correlate with sample's thickness and density. The results indicate that our method can quickly make a distinction between areas that have different flow resistances because of variations in the sample's density or wall thickness

  5. Thermal Conductivity Change Kinetics of Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by the Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A steady-state laser heat flux technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field to obtain critical thermal conductivity data of ceramic thermal barrier coatings under the temperature and thermal gradients that are realistically expected to be encountered in advanced engine systems. In this study, thermal conductivity change kinetics of a plasma-sprayed, 254-mm-thick ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic coating were obtained at high temperatures. During the testing, the temperature gradients across the coating system were carefully measured by the surface and back pyrometers and an embedded miniature thermocouple in the substrate. The actual heat flux passing through the coating system was determined from the metal substrate temperature drop (measured by the embedded miniature thermocouple and the back pyrometer) combined with one-dimensional heat transfer models.

  6. Osteonecrosis of the sesamoid bone: contribution of modern imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leleu, J.P.; Heno, P.; Rispal, P.; Joullie, M.; Laurent, F.

    1990-01-01

    We report a case of osteonecrosis of the sesamoid bone or Renander disease in a young male serviceman. Modern imaging techniques proved useful for identifying the lesion. CT scan and above all magnetic resonance imaging established the accurate diagnosis. The combination of a hypointense signal from the sesamoid bone with an effusion in the first metatarsophalangeal joint should be considered as characteristic of osteonecrosis of the sesamoid bone [fr

  7. Assessment of banana fruit maturity by image processing technique

    OpenAIRE

    Surya Prabha, D.; Satheesh Kumar, J.

    2013-01-01

    Maturity stage of fresh banana fruit is an important factor that affects the fruit quality during ripening and marketability after ripening. The ability to identify maturity of fresh banana fruit will be a great support for farmers to optimize harvesting phase which helps to avoid harvesting either under-matured or over-matured banana. This study attempted to use image processing technique to detect the maturity stage of fresh banana fruit by its color and size value of their images precisely...

  8. Detection of Glaucoma Using Image Processing Techniques: A Critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Naveen; Chauhan, R P; Dahiya, Nidhi

    2018-01-01

    The primary objective of this article is to present a summary of different types of image processing methods employed for the detection of glaucoma, a serious eye disease. Glaucoma affects the optic nerve in which retinal ganglion cells become dead, and this leads to loss of vision. The principal cause is the increase in intraocular pressure, which occurs in open-angle and angle-closure glaucoma, the two major types affecting the optic nerve. In the early stages of glaucoma, no perceptible symptoms appear. As the disease progresses, vision starts to become hazy, leading to blindness. Therefore, early detection of glaucoma is needed for prevention. Manual analysis of ophthalmic images is fairly time-consuming and accuracy depends on the expertise of the professionals. Automatic analysis of retinal images is an important tool. Automation aids in the detection, diagnosis, and prevention of risks associated with the disease. Fundus images obtained from a fundus camera have been used for the analysis. Requisite pre-processing techniques have been applied to the image and, depending upon the technique, various classifiers have been used to detect glaucoma. The techniques mentioned in the present review have certain advantages and disadvantages. Based on this study, one can determine which technique provides an optimum result.

  9. [Application of image processing technique in scoliosis detection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Donghui; Xu, Chaojing; Sun, Jinai

    2012-08-01

    Scoliosis, the abnormal lateral curvature of the spine, is an idiopathic disease often suffered by teenagers. Normally medical doctors use X-rays to measure the Cobb angle, and then assess the severity of scoliosis with it. In this paper, we point out the superiorities of image processing technique through analyzing the existing methods in the diagnosis of scoliosis. Two kinds of image processing technique are mainly introduced for scoliosis detection. The moiré stripe images show an asymmetric deformation pattern between the left-hand side and the right-hand side of human back, and these associate with Cobb angle to detect scoliosis. In order to check scoliosis through accurate three-dimensional surface features of human back, we in the second technique use different optical imaging methods to reconstruct the three-dimensional surface model of the patient's back, and extract the characteristics of the reconstructive human back to diagnose the disease. Both approaches tried to describe symmetry discrimination of human back and correlated it with the Cobb angles. Finally, we look forward to the future development in the application of image processing technique for scoliosis detection.

  10. Investigation of Thermal Interface Materials Using Phase-Sensitive Transient Thermoreflectance Technique: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, X.; King, C.; DeVoto, D.; Mihalic, M.; Narumanchi, S.

    2014-08-01

    With increasing power density in electronics packages/modules, thermal resistances at multiple interfaces are a bottleneck to efficient heat removal from the package. In this work, the performance of thermal interface materials such as grease, thermoplastic adhesives and diffusion-bonded interfaces are characterized using the phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectance technique. A multi-layer heat conduction model was constructed and theoretical solutions were derived to obtain the relation between phase lag and the thermal/physical properties. This technique enables simultaneous extraction of the contact resistance and bulk thermal conductivity of the TIMs. With the measurements, the bulk thermal conductivity of Dow TC-5022 thermal grease (70 to 75 um bondline thickness) was 3 to 5 W/(m-K) and the contact resistance was 5 to 10 mm2-K/W. For the Btech thermoplastic material (45 to 80 μm bondline thickness), the bulk thermal conductivity was 20 to 50 W/(m-K) and the contact resistance was 2 to 5 mm2-K/W. Measurements were also conducted to quantify the thermal performance of diffusion-bonded interface for power electronics applications. Results with the diffusion-bonded sample showed that the interfacial thermal resistance is more than one order of magnitude lower than those of traditional TIMs, suggesting potential pathways to efficient thermal management.

  11. Cherenkov imaging and timing techniques in astroparticle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiering, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cherenkov techniques are widely used in astroparticle physics experiments. Classical ring imaging has been applied in balloon experiments. Underground Cherenkov detectors also yield ring-like patterns of photomultiplier hits, whereas in deep underwater experiments tracks are reconstructed from the light arrival times at photomultipliers spread over a large volume. Cherenkov air shower detectors either analyze the image of extended showers, or sample the arrival times of the Cherenkov light cone at different points at the earth's surface. This report reviews the various techniques and illustrates them by selected physics results. (orig.)

  12. Results on plasma temperature measurement using an image processing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavipour, B.; Hatami, A.; Salar Elahi, A.

    Image processing technique (IPT) is a computational technique which is a simple, wide and great for many purposes. In this paper, we used IPT to obtain plasma source such as sun and sunspot temperatures. Sun image was taken by a telescope and DSLR camera and imported to MATLAB software. Using the IPT, we cropped two areas and evaluated their RGB values, using a code which was written according to Python software. We computed wavelengths and then by substituting wavelengths in Wien's law, we obtained sun's surface and sunspot temperature's. The temperature errors for surface and sunspot were 0.57% and 13% respectively.

  13. Prognostic aspects on the development of imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biehl, H.

    1985-01-01

    The development of imaging techniques designed for medical diagnostics and their application within the health service system are forecast up to the year 2000. The changes in the structure of the imaging methods that are to be expected in the GDR are outlined. Considering the users' needs and demands to be met by the manufacturers, in the long-term forecast it is dealt with more specifically with X-ray techniques, computer tomography, ultrasonic diagnostics, video endoscopy and the use of expert systems. (author)

  14. A radiosonde thermal sensor technique for measurement of atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufton, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new system was developed to measure vertical profiles of microthermal turbulence in the free atmosphere. It combines thermal sensor technology with radiosonde balloon systems. The resultant data set from each thermosonde flight is a profile of the strength and distribution of microthermal fluctuations which act as tracers for turbulence. The optical strength of this turbulence is computed and used to predict optical and laser beam propagation statistics. A description of the flight payload, examples of turbulence profiles, and comparison with simultaneous stellar observations are included.

  15. Terahertz spectroscopy and imaging – Modern techniques and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Cooke, David; Koch, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades a new spectroscopic technique with unique possibilities has emerged. Based on coherent and time-resolved detection of the electric field of ultrashort radiation bursts in the far-infrared, this technique has become known as terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz......-TDS). In this review article the authors describe the technique in its various implementations for static and time-resolved spectroscopy, and illustrate the performance of the technique with recent examples from solid-state physics and physical chemistry as well as aqueous chemistry. Examples from other fields...... of research, where THz spectroscopic techniques have proven to be useful research tools, and the potential for industrial applications of THz spectroscopic and imaging techniques are discussed....

  16. improvement of digital image watermarking techniques based on FPGA implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-Hadedy, M.E

    2006-01-01

    digital watermarking provides the ownership of a piece of digital data by marking the considered data invisibly or visibly. this can be used to protect several types of multimedia objects such as audio, text, image and video. this thesis demonstrates the different types of watermarking techniques such as (discrete cosine transform (DCT) and discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and their characteristics. then, it classifies these techniques declaring their advantages and disadvantages. an improved technique with distinguished features, such as peak signal to noise ratio ( PSNR) and similarity ratio (SR) has been introduced. the modified technique has been compared with the other techniques by measuring heir robustness against differ attacks. finally, field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) based implementation and comparison, for the proposed watermarking technique have been presented and discussed

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part I: Normal anatomy, imaging technique, and osseous abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Part I of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses normal elbow anatomy and the technical factors involved in obtaining high-quality magnetic resonance images of the elbow. Part I also discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with osseous abnormalities of the elbow. With proper patient positioning and imaging technique, magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the osseous structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum and can be used to evaluate the size, location, stability, and viability of the osteochondritis dissecans fragment. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early stress injury to the proximal ulna in athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect radiographically occult fractures of the elbow in both children and adults. Magnetic resonance imaging is also useful in children to further evaluate elbow fractures which are detected on plain-film radiographs. (orig.)

  18. Cerebral cortex classification by conditional random fields applied to intraoperative thermal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Nico

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative thermal neuroimaging is a novel intraoperative imaging technique for the characterization of perfusion disorders, neural activity and other pathological changes of the brain. It bases on the correlation of (sub-cortical metabolism and perfusion with the emitted heat of the cortical surface. In order to minimize required computational resources and prevent unwanted artefacts in subsequent data analysis workflows foreground detection is a important preprocessing technique to differentiate pixels representing the cerebral cortex from background objects. We propose an efficient classification framework that integrates characteristic dynamic thermal behaviour into this classification task to include additional discriminative features. The first stage of our framework consists of learning this representation of characteristic thermal time-frequency behaviour. This representation models latent interconnections in the time-frequency domain that cover specific, yet a priori unknown, thermal properties of the cortex. In a second stage these features are then used to classify each pixel’s state with conditional random fields. We quantitatively evaluate several approaches to learning high-level features and their impact to the overall prediction accuracy. The introduction of high-level features leads to a significant accuracy improvement compared to a baseline classifier.

  19. Thickness measurement by two-sided step-heating thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoli; Tao, Ning; Sun, J. G.; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhao, Yuejin

    2018-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a promising nondestructive technique for thickness prediction. However, it is usually thought to be only appropriate for testing the thickness of thin objects or near-surface structures. In this study, we present a new two-sided step-heating thermal imaging method which employed a low-cost portable halogen lamp as the heating source and verified it with two stainless steel step wedges with thicknesses ranging from 5 mm to 24 mm. We first derived the one-dimensional step-heating thermography theory with the consideration of warm-up time of the lamp, and then applied the nonlinear regression method to fit the experimental data by the derived function to determine the thickness. After evaluating the reliability and accuracy of the experimental results, we concluded that this method is capable of testing thick objects. In addition, we provided the criterions for both the required data length and the applicable thickness range of the testing material. It is evident that this method will broaden the thermal imaging application for thickness measurement.

  20. Image analysis techniques for the study of turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Simone

    In this paper, a brief review of Digital Image Analysis techniques employed in Fluid Mechanics for the study of turbulent flows is given. Particularly the focus is on the techniques developed by the research teams the Author worked in, that can be considered relatively "low cost" techniques. Digital Image Analysis techniques have the advantage, when compared to the traditional techniques employing physical point probes, to be non-intrusive and quasi-continuous in space, as every pixel on the camera sensor works as a single probe: consequently, they allow to obtain two-dimensional or three-dimensional fields of the measured quantity in less time. Traditionally, the disadvantages are related to the frequency of acquisition, but modern high-speed cameras are typically able to acquire at frequencies from the order of 1 KHz to the order of 1 MHz. Digital Image Analysis techniques can be employed to measure concentration, temperature, position, displacement, velocity, acceleration and pressure fields with similar equipment and setups, and can be consequently considered as a flexible and powerful tool for measurements on turbulent flows.

  1. Image analysis techniques for the study of turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrari Simone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a brief review of Digital Image Analysis techniques employed in Fluid Mechanics for the study of turbulent flows is given. Particularly the focus is on the techniques developed by the research teams the Author worked in, that can be considered relatively “low cost” techniques. Digital Image Analysis techniques have the advantage, when compared to the traditional techniques employing physical point probes, to be non-intrusive and quasi-continuous in space, as every pixel on the camera sensor works as a single probe: consequently, they allow to obtain two-dimensional or three-dimensional fields of the measured quantity in less time. Traditionally, the disadvantages are related to the frequency of acquisition, but modern high-speed cameras are typically able to acquire at frequencies from the order of 1 KHz to the order of 1 MHz. Digital Image Analysis techniques can be employed to measure concentration, temperature, position, displacement, velocity, acceleration and pressure fields with similar equipment and setups, and can be consequently considered as a flexible and powerful tool for measurements on turbulent flows.

  2. Atomic Force Microscope Controlled Topographical Imaging and Proximal Probe Thermal Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S [ORNL; Kjoller, Kevin [Anasys Instruments Corporation; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a hybrid atmospheric pressure atomic force microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system utilizing nano-thermal analysis probes for thermal desorption surface sampling with subsequent atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and mass analysis. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to correlate topographic images of a surface with atomic force microscopy and a mass spectral chemical image of the same surface, utilizing the same probe without moving the sample from the system, was demonstrated. Co-registered mass spectral chemical images and atomic force microscopy topographical images were obtained from inked patterns on paper as well as from a living bacterial colony on an agar gel. Spatial resolution of the topography images based on pixel size (0.2 m x 0.8 m) was better than the resolution of the mass spectral images (2.5 m x 2.0 m), which were limited by current mass spectral data acquisition rate and system detection levels.

  3. A Kalman filter technique applied for medical image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goliaei, S.; Ghorshi, S.; Manzuri, M. T.; Mortazavi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Medical images contain information about vital organic tissues inside of human body and are widely used for diagnoses of disease or for surgical purposes. Image reconstruction is essential for medical images for some applications such as suppression of noise or de-blurring the image in order to provide images with better quality and contrast. Due to vital rule of image reconstruction in medical sciences the corresponding algorithms with better efficiency and higher speed is desirable. Most algorithms in image reconstruction are operated on frequency domain such as the most popular one known as filtered back projection. In this paper we introduce a Kalman filter technique which is operated in time domain for medical image reconstruction. Results indicated that as the number of projection increases in both normal collected ray sum and the collected ray sum corrupted by noise the quality of reconstructed image becomes better in terms of contract and transparency. It is also seen that as the number of projection increases the error index decreases.

  4. Receiver Function Imaging of Dipping Structures - Technique and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Niu, F.

    2010-12-01

    CCP Stacking is probably the most common technique in receiver function imaging. In this technique, the conversion points are calculated and binned by assuming horizontal interfaces. However, for dipping structures such as tilted Moho or subducting slab, the horizontal interface assumption breaks down so that the image quality is low and the interfaces are misplaced. In these cases, the CCP stacking is not effective because the true conversion points do not necessarily lie in the vertical planes defined by sources and receivers and the delay time of conversion signals are varying with back azimuth. Although pre-stack time migration is an ideal technique to make correct images, the amount of qualified data it requires is often not available. An alternative way is to gather receiver functions based on conversion points and conversion times calculated from 3D velocity models with dipping structures. A dipping interface is defined by depth (d0) at a fixed geographic location, strike (Φ) and dipping angle (α). For an assumed (d0, Φ, α), we computed the conversion locations and conversion times by 3D ray tracing. We varied the depth (d0) and the dipping geometry (Φ, α) in certain range and determined the optimum value that gives the best coherent stacking signals. Note based on different tectonic setting, one or both of the dipping parameters can be fixed in the grid searching. We applied this technique to the imaging of two different geologic structures. One is a subducting slab case in western Mexico where the Rivera plate is subducting under the North American plate. Receiver functions recorded by fifty broadband seismic stations deployed under the MARS project were used to image the subducting Rivera slab. The second case is a tilted Moho lying underneath the GSN station SDV located at the southern flank of the central Venezuelan Andes. In both cases, we found substantial improvements in the receiver function images using our 3D ray tracing technique.

  5. Imaging thermal conductivity with nanoscale resolution using a scanning spin probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraoui, Abdelghani; Aycock-Rizzo, Halley; Gao, Yang; Lu, Xi; Riedo, Elisa; Meriles, Carlos A

    2015-11-20

    The ability to probe nanoscale heat flow in a material is often limited by lack of spatial resolution. Here, we use a diamond-nanocrystal-hosted nitrogen-vacancy centre attached to the apex of a silicon thermal tip as a local temperature sensor. We apply an electrical current to heat up the tip and rely on the nitrogen vacancy to monitor the thermal changes the tip experiences as it is brought into contact with surfaces of varying thermal conductivity. By combining atomic force and confocal microscopy, we image phantom microstructures with nanoscale resolution, and attain excellent agreement between the thermal conductivity and topographic maps. The small mass and high thermal conductivity of the diamond host make the time response of our technique short, which we demonstrate by monitoring the tip temperature upon application of a heat pulse. Our approach promises multiple applications, from the investigation of phonon dynamics in nanostructures to the characterization of heterogeneous phase transitions and chemical reactions in various solid-state systems.

  6. Kalman filtered MR temperature imaging for laser induced thermal therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, D; Yung, J; Hazle, J D; Weinberg, J S; Stafford, R J

    2012-04-01

    The feasibility of using a stochastic form of Pennes bioheat model within a 3-D finite element based Kalman filter (KF) algorithm is critically evaluated for the ability to provide temperature field estimates in the event of magnetic resonance temperature imaging (MRTI) data loss during laser induced thermal therapy (LITT). The ability to recover missing MRTI data was analyzed by systematically removing spatiotemporal information from a clinical MR-guided LITT procedure in human brain and comparing predictions in these regions to the original measurements. Performance was quantitatively evaluated in terms of a dimensionless L(2) (RMS) norm of the temperature error weighted by acquisition uncertainty. During periods of no data corruption, observed error histories demonstrate that the Kalman algorithm does not alter the high quality temperature measurement provided by MR thermal imaging. The KF-MRTI implementation considered is seen to predict the bioheat transfer with RMS error corruption subsides. In its present form, the KF-MRTI method currently fails to compensate for consecutive for consecutive time periods of data loss ∆t > 10 sec.

  7. Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

  8. Heat as a contrast agent to enhance thermal imaging of blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jason R.; Trammell, Susan R.; Young, Madison A.; Israel, Uriah; Crown, Michael X.

    2013-03-01

    In this study we test the feasibility of using low-cost LEDs to selectivity heat blood for enhanced thermal imaging of vascular structures. Applications of this new imaging technique include mapping blood vessels during surgeries such as tumor removal and vascular repair. In addition, this technique could potentially be used to determine the location of increased vascular density, and thus breast cancer tumors. Porcine blood, skeletal muscle, skin and fat were illuminated with LEDs that emit at 405 nm and 530 nm (near the blood absorption peaks) and the increase in temperature as a function of time was recorded using a thermal camera. In the studies with the 530 nm LED, blood heated more than other tissue types and the heating rate for the blood was significantly faster than other tissues. Illumination of blood with the 530 nm LED at low powers (tissue irradiance tissue. Illumination with the 405 nm LED produced large temperature changes (up to 15°C) at low LED powers (tissue irradiance muscle tissue was dependent on the skeletal muscle type, but most samples showed heating comparable to or larger than blood. This LED was not effective at selectively heating blood relative to the other tissue types. The results of the preliminary studies suggest that the best contrast can be achieved with pulsed 530 nm LED illumination and an image analysis method that highlights rapid changes in temperature.

  9. Sampling-image streak framing technique and its special streak image tube

    CERN Document Server

    Ji Lili; Lan Zhou Jun; Yang, Q L; Zhang, H; Niu, H

    2002-01-01

    We designed a special electrostatic focusing streak image tube (SIT) with large magnification, tiny temporal distortion and large dynamic range for the application of the technique of sampling-image streaking frame (SISF) for plasma diagnostics in ICF. A proof-of-principle experiment of the technique is performed with the SIT, together with a picosecond laser and image reconstruction software. Using the digital image-processing program, the result gives 16 frames with an exposure time of better than 6.3 ps.

  10. Wavelet techniques for reversible data embedding into images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Kamstra; H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe proliferation of digital information in our society has enticed a lot of research into data embedding techniques that add information to digital content like images, audio and video. This additional information can be used for various purposes and different applications place

  11. Applying the digital-image-correlation technique to measure the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has been applied for analysing various structural problems. For exam- ple, French scholars Raffard et ... observe the crack development in masonry wall. One major advantage of DIC technique ... based on the characteristic gray-scale distributions in the image of the structural speckle on the specimen surface. As shown in ...

  12. Assessing clutter reduction in parallel coordinates using image processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhamaydh, Heba; Alzoubi, Hussein; Almasaeid, Hisham

    2018-01-01

    Information visualization has appeared as an important research field for multidimensional data and correlation analysis in recent years. Parallel coordinates (PCs) are one of the popular techniques to visual high-dimensional data. A problem with the PCs technique is that it suffers from crowding, a clutter which hides important data and obfuscates the information. Earlier research has been conducted to reduce clutter without loss in data content. We introduce the use of image processing techniques as an approach for assessing the performance of clutter reduction techniques in PC. We use histogram analysis as our first measure, where the mean feature of the color histograms of the possible alternative orderings of coordinates for the PC images is calculated and compared. The second measure is the extracted contrast feature from the texture of PC images based on gray-level co-occurrence matrices. The results show that the best PC image is the one that has the minimal mean value of the color histogram feature and the maximal contrast value of the texture feature. In addition to its simplicity, the proposed assessment method has the advantage of objectively assessing alternative ordering of PC visualization.

  13. Transportation informatics : advanced image processing techniques automated pavement distress evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The current project, funded by MIOH-UTC for the period 1/1/2009- 4/30/2010, is concerned : with the development of the framework for a transportation facility inspection system using : advanced image processing techniques. The focus of this study is ...

  14. A novel image inpainting technique based on median diffusion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The concept of digital inpainting was introduced by Bertalmio et al. (2000). The proposed algorithm addresses inpainting of images with a homogeneous or heteroge- neous background. The technique is based on diffusing median value of pixels which are exterior to inpainting area into the area to be inpainted. This is a ...

  15. Comparing Generative Adversarial Network Techniques for Image Creation and Modification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Mathijs; Wiering, Marco

    2018-01-01

    Generative adversarial networks (GANs) have demonstrated to be successful at generating realistic real-world images. In this paper we compare various GAN techniques, both supervised and unsupervised. The effects on training stability of different objective functions are compared. We add an encoder

  16. The current role of imaging techniques in faecal incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terra, M. P.; Stoker, J.

    2006-01-01

    Faecal incontinence is a common multifactorial disorder. Major causes of faecal incontinence are related to vaginal delivery and prior anorectal surgery. In addition to medical history and physical examination, several anorectal functional tests and imaging techniques can be used to assess the

  17. Recent Advances in Techniques for Hyperspectral Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Antonio; Benediktsson, Jon Atli; Boardman, Joseph W.; Brazile, Jason; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Camps-Valls, Gustavo; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Fauvel, Mathieu; Gamba, Paolo; Gualtieri, Anthony; hide

    2009-01-01

    Imaging spectroscopy, also known as hyperspectral imaging, has been transformed in less than 30 years from being a sparse research tool into a commodity product available to a broad user community. Currently, there is a need for standardized data processing techniques able to take into account the special properties of hyperspectral data. In this paper, we provide a seminal view on recent advances in techniques for hyperspectral image processing. Our main focus is on the design of techniques able to deal with the highdimensional nature of the data, and to integrate the spatial and spectral information. Performance of the discussed techniques is evaluated in different analysis scenarios. To satisfy time-critical constraints in specific applications, we also develop efficient parallel implementations of some of the discussed algorithms. Combined, these parts provide an excellent snapshot of the state-of-the-art in those areas, and offer a thoughtful perspective on future potentials and emerging challenges in the design of robust hyperspectral imaging algorithms

  18. Application of digital-image-correlation techniques in analysing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    experimental results obtained using the digital image correlation analysis is used to demonstrate the crack ... The analysis procedure of the DIC method is shown in figure 1. The analysis region is divided .... The observation also proves the accuracy of the qualitative analyses by using the DIC technique. However, fig-.

  19. Feminist Pedagogy, Body Image, and the Dance Technique Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sherrie; Oliver, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the evolution of feminist consciousness in dance technique class as related to body image, the myth of the perfect body, and the development of feminist pedagogy. Western concert dance forms have often been taught in a manner where imitating the teacher is primary in the learning process. In this traditional scenario,…

  20. Applying the digital-image-correlation technique to measure the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4.2 Image analysis. The DIC technique is used to analyse the column deformation. After the position of every mark is traced, two parallel observation lines on the surface of column (as shown in figure 8) are cho- sen. There are 181 equal spaced points on each line. The positions of these points are calculated using B-Spline ...

  1. Coronary imaging techniques with emphasis on CT and MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lederlin, Mathieu; Latrabe, Valerie; Corneloup, Olivier; Cochet, Hubert; Montaudon, Michel; Laurent, Francois; Thambo, Jean-Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery imaging in children is challenging, with high demands both on temporal and spatial resolution due to high heart rates and smaller anatomy. Although invasive conventional coronary angiography remains the benchmark technique, over the past 10 years, CT and MRI have emerged in the field of coronary imaging. The choice of hardware is important. For CT, the minimum requirement is a 64-channel scanner. The temporal resolution of the scanner is most important for optimising image quality and minimising radiation dose. Manufacturers have developed several modes of electrocardiographic (ECG) triggering to facilitate dose reduction. Recent technical advances have opened new possibilities in MRI coronary imaging. As a non-ionising radiation technique, MRI is of great interest in paediatric imaging. It is currently recommended in centres with appropriate expertise for the screening of patients with suspected congenital coronary anomalies. However, MRI is still not feasible in infants. This review describes and discusses the technical requirements and the pros and cons of all three techniques. (orig.)

  2. Two- and three-dimensional imaging of multicomponent systems using scanning thermal microscopy and localized thermomechanical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Ljiljana; Wood, John; Reading, Mike; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a novel approach to the spatial characterization of multicomponent samples, based on the emergent technique of microthermal analysis. More specifically, we present an assessment of the use of scanning thermal microscopy as a means of component mapping via thermal conductivity; we include a new statistical approach to data handling, which allows reduction of topographic effects. We also introduce a novel three-dimensional mapping technique based on localized thermomechanical analysis. Tablets of paracetamol and hyproxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) and 50:50 mixes of the two were prepared and the materials characterized in scanning and localized modes using a TA Instruments 2990 microthermal analyzer with a Thermomicroscopes Explorer AFM head and Wollaston wire thermal probe. L-TMA studies of the pure components indicated markedly differing thermal responses, with the paracetamol showing a sharp melting accompanied by a probe pull-in effect, while HPMC showed only thermal expansion over the temperature range studied. Thermal conductivity and topographic images indicated that two-dimensional differentiation between the components was possible in scanning mode. A means of delineating the relative contribution of the topographic and conductivity effects was developed based on a regression analysis of the thermal conductivity measurements on a set of terms representing the local surface curvature. The results of three-dimensional imaging using a grid of L-TMA measurements is presented. This technique utilized the distinct thermal responses of the two components to allow the probe to melt through the paracetamol down to the underlying HPMC. The advantages and limitations of this novel imaging method are discussed in the context of pharmaceutical and broader uses of the approach.

  3. Reducing the absorbed dose in analogue radiography of infant chest images by improving the image quality, using image processing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karimian, A.; Yazdani, S.; Askari, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiographic inspection is one of the most widely employed techniques for medical testing methods. Because of poor contrast and high un-sharpness of radiographic image quality in films, converting radiographs to a digital format and using further digital image processing is the best method of enhancing the image quality and assisting the interpreter in their evaluation. In this research work, radiographic films of 70 infant chest images with different sizes of defects were selected. To digitise the chest images and employ image processing the two algorithms (i) spatial domain and (ii) frequency domain techniques were used. The MATLAB environment was selected for processing in the digital format. Our results showed that by using these two techniques, the defects with small dimensions are detectable. Therefore, these suggested techniques may help medical specialists to diagnose the defects in the primary stages and help to prevent more repeat X-ray examination of paediatric patients. (authors)

  4. Template Matching of Colored Image Based on Quaternion Fourier Transform and Image Pyramid Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. KHALIL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Template matching method is one of the most significant object recognition techniques and it has many applications in the field of digital signal processing and image processing and it is the base for object tracking in computer vision field. The traditional template matching by correlation is performed between gray template image w and the candidate gray image f where the template’s position is to be determined in the candidate image. This task can be achieved by measuring the similarity between the template image and the candidate image to identify and localize the existence of object instances within an image. When applying this method to colored image, the image must be converted to a gray one or decomposed to its RGB components to be processed separately. The current paper aims to apply the template matching technique to colored images via generating the quaternion Fourier transforms of both the template and candidate colored image and hence performing the cross-correlation between those transforms. Moreover, this approach is improved by representing both the image and template as pyramid multi-resolution format to reduce the time of processing. The proposed algorithm is implemented and applied to different images and templates using Matlab functions.

  5. High-performance thermal cutting techniques for underwater use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, F.W.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past few years, the Institute for Materials Research of the University of Hanover developed a new product family (Contact-Arc-Metal-X) of electrothermal techniques for underwater cutting of metal structures. This CAMX technology comprises contact arc metal cutting by means of a sword-shaped electrode, contact arc metal grinding with a rotating electrode, and contact arc metal drilling with an integrated interlocking mechanism. CAMC is characterized by its capability to cut components with complex structures. Undercuts and cavities constitute no obstacles in the process. CAMG is a technique for straight cutting characterized by its high cutting speeds. CAMD is able to produce countersunk boreholes and holes of any geometry. The integrated tensioning mechanism allows parts to be gripped and transported which could not be handled by conventional gripper systems. (orig.) [de

  6. Provisional maps of thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, based on satellite thermal infrared imaging and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Heasler, Henry; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Maps that define the current distribution of geothermally heated ground are useful toward setting a baseline for thermal activity to better detect and understand future anomalous hydrothermal and (or) volcanic activity. Monitoring changes in the dynamic thermal areas also supports decisions regarding the development of Yellowstone National Park infrastructure, preservation and protection of park resources, and ensuring visitor safety. Because of the challenges associated with field-based monitoring of a large, complex geothermal system that is spread out over a large and remote area, satellite-based thermal infrared images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were used to map the location and spatial extent of active thermal areas, to generate thermal anomaly maps, and to quantify the radiative component of the total geothermal heat flux. ASTER thermal infrared data acquired during winter nights were used to minimize the contribution of solar heating of the surface. The ASTER thermal infrared mapping results were compared to maps of thermal areas based on field investigations and high-resolution aerial photos. Field validation of the ASTER thermal mapping is an ongoing task. The purpose of this report is to make available ASTER-based maps of Yellowstone’s thermal areas. We include an appendix containing the names and characteristics of Yellowstone’s thermal areas, georeferenced TIFF files containing ASTER thermal imagery, and several spatial data sets in Esri shapefile format.

  7. Adaptive differential correspondence imaging based on sorting technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We develop an adaptive differential correspondence imaging (CI method using a sorting technique. Different from the conventional CI schemes, the bucket detector signals (BDS are first processed by a differential technique, and then sorted in a descending (or ascending order. Subsequently, according to the front and last several frames of the sorted BDS, the positive and negative subsets (PNS are created by selecting the relative frames from the reference detector signals. Finally, the object image is recovered from the PNS. Besides, an adaptive method based on two-step iteration is designed to select the optimum number of frames. To verify the proposed method, a single-detector computational ghost imaging (GI setup is constructed. We experimentally and numerically compare the performance of the proposed method with different GI algorithms. The results show that our method can improve the reconstruction quality and reduce the computation cost by using fewer measurement data.

  8. Wear Detection of Drill Bit by Image-based Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukeri, Maziyah; Zulhilmi Paiz Ismadi, Mohd; Rahim Othman, Abdul; Kamaruddin, Shahrul

    2018-03-01

    Image processing for computer vision function plays an essential aspect in the manufacturing industries for the tool condition monitoring. This study proposes a dependable direct measurement method to measure the tool wear using image-based analysis. Segmentation and thresholding technique were used as the means to filter and convert the colour image to binary datasets. Then, the edge detection method was applied to characterize the edge of the drill bit. By using cross-correlation method, the edges of original and worn drill bits were correlated to each other. Cross-correlation graphs were able to detect the difference of the worn edge despite small difference between the graphs. Future development will focus on quantifying the worn profile as well as enhancing the sensitivity of the technique.

  9. Thermal Diffusivity Measurement for p-Si and Ag/p-Si by Photoacoustic Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Mohammed Jabbar; Yunus, W. Mahmood Mat; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed; Zakaria, Azmi

    2015-10-01

    Thermal diffusivity (TD) of p-Si and Ag/p-Si samples were measured by photoacoustic technique using open photoacoustic cell (OPC). The samples were annealed by heating them at 960, 1050, 1200, and 1300 °C for 3 h in air. The thermal diffusivity of Ag-coated samples was obtained by fitting the photoacoustic experimental data to the thermally thick equation for Rosencwaig and Gersho (RG) theory. For the single layer samples, the thermal diffusivity can be obtained by fitting as well as by obtaining the critical frequency f c . In this study, the thermal diffusivity of the p-Si samples increased with increasing the annealing temperature. The thermal diffusivity of the Ag/p-Si samples, after reaching the maximum value of about 2.73 cm2/s at a temperature of 1200 °C, decreased due to the silver complete melt in the surface of the silicon.

  10. Imaging and machine learning techniques for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Golrokh; Adeli, Anahita; Adeli, Hojjat

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common health problem in elderly people. There has been considerable research toward the diagnosis and early detection of this disease in the past decade. The sensitivity of biomarkers and the accuracy of the detection techniques have been defined to be the key to an accurate diagnosis. This paper presents a state-of-the-art review of the research performed on the diagnosis of AD based on imaging and machine learning techniques. Different segmentation and machine learning techniques used for the diagnosis of AD are reviewed including thresholding, supervised and unsupervised learning, probabilistic techniques, Atlas-based approaches, and fusion of different image modalities. More recent and powerful classification techniques such as the enhanced probabilistic neural network of Ahmadlou and Adeli should be investigated with the goal of improving the diagnosis accuracy. A combination of different image modalities can help improve the diagnosis accuracy rate. Research is needed on the combination of modalities to discover multi-modal biomarkers.

  11. Image reconstruction technique using projection data from neutron tomography system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed Abd el Bar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neutron tomography is a very powerful technique for nondestructive evaluation of heavy industrial components as well as for soft hydrogenous materials enclosed in heavy metals which are usually difficult to image using X-rays. Due to the properties of the image acquisition system, the projection images are distorted by several artifacts, and these reduce the quality of the reconstruction. In order to eliminate these harmful effects the projection images should be corrected before reconstruction. This paper gives a description of a filter back projection (FBP technique, which is used for reconstruction of projected data obtained from transmission measurements by neutron tomography system We demonstrated the use of spatial Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT and the 2D Inverse DFT in the formulation of the method, and outlined the theory of reconstruction of a 2D neutron image from a sequence of 1D projections taken at different angles between 0 and π in MATLAB environment. Projections are generated by applying the Radon transform to the original image at different angles.

  12. Fluorescence imaging techniques for studying Drosophila embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakis, Manos; Rikhy, Richa; Lilly, Mary; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2008-06-01

    This unit describes fluorescence-based techniques for noninvasive imaging of development in living Drosophila embryos, discussing considerations for fluorescent imaging within living embryos and providing protocols for generation of flies expressing fluorescently tagged proteins and for preparation of embryos for fluorescent imaging. The unit details time-lapse confocal imaging of live embryos and discusses optimizing image acquisition and performing three-dimensional imaging. Finally, the unit provides a variety of specific methods for optical highlighting of specific subsets of fluorescently tagged proteins and organelles in the embryo, including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP), and photoactivation techniques, permitting analysis of specific movements of fluorescently tagged proteins within cells. These protocols, together with the relative ease of generating transgenic animals and the ability to express tagged proteins in specific tissues or at specific developmental times, provide powerful means for examining in vivo behavior of any tagged protein in embryos in myriad mutant backgrounds. Copyright 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. Appropriate electromagnetic techniques for imaging geothermal fracture zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groom, R.; Walker, P. [PetRos EiKon Incorporated, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-05-01

    Electromagnetic surface detection of fracture zones has often been approached by using the magnetotelluric method. This technique suffers greatly from the quantity and scale of the conductive inhomogeneities lying above the fracture zones. Additionally, it suffers from the inherent inability to focus the source on the target. There are no such source focusing capabilities in magnetotellurics. Accordingly, the quantity of magnetotelluric data required to resolve targets in such complex conditions can make the technique inefficient and insufficient from a cost perspective. When attempting to reveal a subsurface structure and image it, the basic physical responses at hand must be kept in mind, and the appropriate source must be utilized, which most effectively illuminates the target. A further advantage to controlled sources is that imaging techniques may be used to accentuate the response due to knowledge and control of the source.

  14. Imaging techniques in clay sciences: a key tool to go a step further

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinet, J.C.; Michau, N.; Schaefer, T.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clay-rocks and clay based materials are greatly considered in nuclear waste geological repository due to their multiple favourable properties (low permeability, low diffusion coefficients, high retention capacity for radionuclides, swelling...). In this context, the study of clays and clay rocks covers a large variety of scientific disciplines such as geology, mineralogy, geomechanics, geochemistry or hydrodynamics. These disciplines are linked together by a common issue which is the understanding and the predicting of clay and clay-rock behaviors and properties under various thermal-hydrological-mechanical- chemical (THMC) conditions. Linking the fundamental forces to macroscopic (from millimeter to several meters) behaviors and properties is nevertheless not straightforward for porous media such as clay-rocks and clay based materials. Currently, it remains a key challenge for the scientific community. Imaging techniques offer solutions to face up this challenge by characterizing the internal microstructure of material and rocks at different levels of resolution. Due to the reactivity of clay minerals with water (swelling, mechanical deformation) or with repository components (mineral transformations at iron, copper or concrete interfaces) and the multi-scale distribution of pore and mineral sizes, classically ranged from nano-meter to millimeter, imaging clay based materials and clay-rocks itself is unanimously recognized as a challenging task. In the 80's, despite several constraints and limits, the microstructure of clays had been intensively imaged using conventional 2D imaging techniques such as optical microscopy, X-ray radiography, scanning electron microscopy or transmission electron microscopy [1]. The images acquired using these techniques have given us a pictorial frame of reference of the internal structures of clay rocks and clay based materials at various resolution levels. They have also highlighted

  15. Hot Views on Cold Crystals: The Application of Thermal Imaging in Cryo-crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, E. H.; vanderWoerd, M. J.; Deacon, A.

    2003-01-01

    In the past we have used thermal imaging techniques to visualize the cryocooling processes of macromolecular crystals. From these images it was clear that a cold wave progresses through a crystal starting at the face closest to the origin of the cold stream and ending at the point furthest away. During these studies we used large volume crystals, which were clearly distinguished from the loop holding them. These large crystals, originally grown for neutron diffraction studies, were chosen deliberately to enhance the imaging. As an extension to this work, we present used thermal imaging to study small crystals, held in a cryo-loop, in the presence of vitrified mother liquor. The different infrared transmission and reflectance properties of the crystal in comparison to the mother liquor surrounding it are thought to be the parameter that produces the contrast that makes the crystal visible. An application of this technology may be the determination of the exact location of small crystals in a cryo-loop. Data from initial tests in support of application development was recorded for lysozyme crystals and for bFGF/dna complex crystals, which were cryo-cooled and imaged in large loops, both with visible light and with infrared radiation. The crystals were clearly distinguished from the vitrified solution in the infrared spectrum, while in the case of the bFGF/dna complex the illumination had to be carefully manipulated to make the crystal visible in the visible spectrum. These results suggest that the thermal imaging may be more sensitive than visual imaging for automated location of small crystals. However, further work on small crystals robotically mounted at SSRL did not clearly visualize those crystals. The depth of field of the camera proved to be limiting and a different cooling geometry was used, compared to the previous, successful experiments. Analysis to exploit multiple images to improve depth of field and experimental work to understand cooling geometry

  16. Hot Views on Cold Crystals: The Application of Thermal Imaging in Cryocrystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Eddie H.

    2003-01-01

    In the past we have used thermal imaging techniques to visualize the cryocooling processes of macromolecular crystals. From these images it was clear that a cold wave progresses through a crystal starting at the face closest to the origin of the cold stream and ending at the point furthest away. During these studies we used large volume crystals, which were clearly distinguished from the loop holding them. These large crystals, originally grown for neutron diffraction studies, were chosen deliberately to enhance the imaging. As an extension to this work, we used thermal imaging to study small crystals, held in a cryo- loop, in the presence of vitrified mother liquor. The different infrared transmission and reflectance properties of the crystal in comparison to the mother liquor surrounding it are thought to be the parameter that produces the contrast that makes the crystal visible. An application of this technology may be the determination of the exact location of small crystals in a cryo-loop. Data from initial tests in support of application development was recorded for lysozyme crystals and for bFGF/dna complex crystals, which were cryo-cooled and imaged in large loops, both with visible light and with infrared radiation. The crystals were clearly distinguished from the vitrified solution in the infrared spectrum, while in the case of the bFGF/dna complex the illumination had to be carefully manipulated to make the crystal visible in the visible spectrum. These results suggest that the thermal imaging may be more sensitive than visual imaging for automated location of small crystals. However, further work on small crystals robotically mounted at SSRL did not clearly visualize those crystals. The depth of field of the camera proved to be limiting and a different cooling geometry was used, compared to the previous, successful experiments. Analysis to exploit multiple images to improve depth of field and experimental work to understand cooling geometry effects is

  17. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ran, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn; Liu, Jing, E-mail: jliubme@tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: liuran@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Jia [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  18. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Wang, Jia; Liu, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures.

  19. Thermal infrared images to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base on target tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ran; Liu, Jing; Wang, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia (42-46°C), treatment of tumor tissue through elevated temperature, offers several advantages including high cost-effectiveness, highly targeted ablation and fewer side effects and hence higher safety level over traditional therapies such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, hyperthermia using heat release through exothermic acid-base neutralization comes into view owing to its relatively safe products of salt and water and highly confined ablation. However, lack of quantitative understanding of the spatial and temporal temperature profiles that are produced by simultaneous diffusion of liquid chemical and its chemical reaction within tumor tissue impedes the application of this method. This article is dedicated to quantify thermal ablation effects of acid and base both individually and as in neutralization via infrared captured thermal images. A theoretical model is used to approximate specific heat absorption rate (SAR) based on experimental measurements that contrast two types of tissue, normal pork and pig liver. According to the computation, both pork and liver tissue has a higher ability in absorbing hydrochloric acid (HCl) than sodium hydroxide, hence suggesting that a reduced dosage for HCl is appropriate in a surgery. The heating effect depends heavily on the properties of tissue types and amount of chemical reagents administered. Given thermal parameters such as SAR for different tissues, a computational model can be made in predicting temperature transitions which will be helpful in planning and optimizing surgical hyperthermia procedures

  20. Scheme for predictive fault diagnosis in photo-voltaic modules using thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffery, Zainul Abdin; Dubey, Ashwani Kumar; Irshad; Haque, Ahteshamul

    2017-06-01

    Degradation of PV modules can cause excessive overheating which results in a reduced power output and eventually failure of solar panel. To maintain the long term reliability of solar modules and maximize the power output, faults in modules need to be diagnosed at an early stage. This paper provides a comprehensive algorithm for fault diagnosis in solar modules using infrared thermography. Infrared Thermography (IRT) is a reliable, non-destructive, fast and cost effective technique which is widely used to identify where and how faults occurred in an electrical installation. Infrared images were used for condition monitoring of solar modules and fuzzy logic have been used to incorporate intelligent classification of faults. An automatic approach has been suggested for fault detection, classification and analysis. IR images were acquired using an IR camera. To have an estimation of thermal condition of PV module, the faulty panel images were compared to a healthy PV module thermal image. A fuzzy rule-base was used to classify faults automatically. Maintenance actions have been advised based on type of faults.

  1. Development of Processing Techniques for Advanced Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaduray, Guna; Cox, Michael; Srinivasan, Vijayakumar

    1997-01-01

    Thermal Protection Materials Branch (TPMB) has been involved in various research programs to improve the properties and structural integrity of the existing aerospace high temperature materials. Specimens from various research programs were brought into the analytical laboratory for the purpose of obtaining and refining the material characterization. The analytical laboratory in TPMB has many different instruments which were utilized to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of materials. Some of the instruments that were utilized by the SJSU students are: Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray Diffraction Spectrometer (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Ultra Violet Spectroscopy/Visible Spectroscopy (UV/VIS), Particle Size Analyzer (PSA), and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). The above mentioned analytical instruments were utilized in the material characterization process of the specimens from research programs such as: aerogel ceramics (I) and (II), X-33 Blankets, ARC-Jet specimens, QUICFIX specimens and gas permeability of lightweight ceramic ablators. In addition to analytical instruments in the analytical laboratory at TPMB, there are several on-going experiments. One particular experiment allows the measurement of permeability of ceramic ablators. From these measurements, physical characteristics of the ceramic ablators can be derived.

  2. System for Thermal Imaging of Hot Moving Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Leonard; Hundley, Jason

    2007-01-01

    The High Altitude/Re-Entry Vehicle Infrared Imaging (HARVII) system is a portable instrumentation system for tracking and thermal imaging of a possibly distant and moving object. The HARVII is designed specifically for measuring the changing temperature distribution on a space shuttle as it reenters the atmosphere. The HARVII system or other systems based on the design of the HARVII system could also be used for such purposes as determining temperature distributions in fires, on volcanoes, and on surfaces of hot models in wind tunnels. In yet another potential application, the HARVII or a similar system would be used to infer atmospheric pollution levels from images of the Sun acquired at multiple wavelengths over regions of interest. The HARVII system includes the Ratio Intensity Thermography System (RITS) and a tracking subsystem that keeps the RITS aimed at the moving object of interest. The subsystem of primary interest here is the RITS (see figure), which acquires and digitizes images of the same scene at different wavelengths in rapid succession. Assuming that the time interval between successive measurements is short enough that temperatures do not change appreciably, the digitized image data at the different wavelengths are processed to extract temperatures according to the principle of ratio-intensity thermography: The temperature at a given location in a scene is inferred from the ratios between or among intensities of infrared radiation from that location at two or more wavelengths. This principle, based on the Stefan-Boltzmann equation for the intensity of electromagnetic radiation as a function of wavelength and temperature, is valid as long as the observed body is a gray or black body and there is minimal atmospheric absorption of radiation.

  3. A dual-view digital tomosynthesis imaging technique for improved chest imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Yuncheng; Lai, Chao-Jen; Wang, Tianpeng; Shaw, Chris C., E-mail: cshaw@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77054 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Purpose: Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) has been shown to be useful for reducing the overlapping of abnormalities with anatomical structures at various depth levels along the posterior–anterior (PA) direction in chest radiography. However, DTS provides crude three-dimensional (3D) images that have poor resolution in the lateral view and can only be displayed with reasonable quality in the PA view. Furthermore, the spillover of high-contrast objects from off-fulcrum planes generates artifacts that may impede the diagnostic use of the DTS images. In this paper, the authors describe and demonstrate the use of a dual-view DTS technique to improve the accuracy of the reconstructed volume image data for more accurate rendition of the anatomy and slice images with improved resolution and reduced artifacts, thus allowing the 3D image data to be viewed in views other than the PA view. Methods: With the dual-view DTS technique, limited angle scans are performed and projection images are acquired in two orthogonal views: PA and lateral. The dual-view projection data are used together to reconstruct 3D images using the maximum likelihood expectation maximization iterative algorithm. In this study, projection images were simulated or experimentally acquired over 360° using the scanning geometry for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). While all projections were used to reconstruct CBCT images, selected projections were extracted and used to reconstruct single- and dual-view DTS images for comparison with the CBCT images. For realistic demonstration and comparison, a digital chest phantom derived from clinical CT images was used for the simulation study. An anthropomorphic chest phantom was imaged for the experimental study. The resultant dual-view DTS images were visually compared with the single-view DTS images and CBCT images for the presence of image artifacts and accuracy of CT numbers and anatomy and quantitatively compared with root-mean-square-deviation (RMSD) values

  4. The molecular imaging approach to image infections and inflammation by nuclear medicine techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Signore, Alberto; Glaudemans, Andor W. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory and infectious diseases are a heterogeneous class of diseases that may be divided into infections, acute inflammation and chronic inflammation. Radiological imaging techniques have, with the exception of functional MRI, high sensitivity but lack in specificity. Nuclear medicine

  5. Thermoreflectance temperature imaging of integrated circuits: calibration technique and quantitative comparison with integrated sensors and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessier, G; Polignano, M-L; Pavageau, S; Filloy, C; Fournier, D; Cerutti, F; Mica, I

    2006-01-01

    Camera-based thermoreflectance microscopy is a unique tool for high spatial resolution thermal imaging of working integrated circuits. However, a calibration is necessary to obtain quantitative temperatures on the complex surface of integrated circuits. The spatial and temperature resolutions reached by thermoreflectance are excellent (360 nm and 2.5 x 10 -2 K in 1 min here), but the precision is more difficult to assess, notably due to the lack of comparable thermal techniques at submicron scales. We propose here a Peltier element control of the whole package temperature in order to obtain calibration coefficients simultaneously on several materials visible on the surface of the circuit. Under high magnifications, movements associated with thermal expansion are corrected using a piezo electric displacement and a software image shift. This calibration method has been validated by comparison with temperatures measured using integrated thermistors and diodes and by a finite volume simulation. We show that thermoreflectance measurements agree within a precision of ±2.3% with the on-chip sensors measurements. The diode temperature is found to underestimate the actual temperature of the active area by almost 70% due to the thermal contact of the diode with the substrate, acting as a heat sink

  6. Status of thermal imaging technology as applied to conservation-update 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, F.J.; Wood, J.T.; Barthle, R.C.

    1980-07-01

    This document updates the 1978 report on the status of thermal imaging technology as applied to energy conservation in buildings. Thermal imaging technology is discussed in terms of airborne surveys, ground survey programs, and application needs such as standards development and lower cost equipment. Information on the various thermal imaging devices was obtained from manufacturer's standard product literature. Listings are provided of infrared projects of the DOE building diagnostics program, of aerial thermographic firms, and of aerial survey programs. (LCL)

  7. High-precision numerical simulation with autoadaptative grid technique in nonlinear thermal diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chambarel, A.; Pumborios, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that many engineering problems concern the determination of a steady state solution in the case with strong thermal gradients, and results obtained using the finite-element technique are sometimes inaccurate, particularly for nonlinear problems with unadapted meshes. Building on previous results in linear problems, we propose an autoadaptive technique for nonlinear cases that uses quasi-Newtonian iterations to reevaluate an interpolation error estimation. The authors perfected an automatic refinement technique to solve the nonlinear thermal problem of temperature calculus in a cast-iron cylinder head of a diesel engine

  8. Quantitative Image Analysis Techniques with High-Speed Schlieren Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Victoria J.; Herron, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Optical flow visualization techniques such as schlieren and shadowgraph photography are essential to understanding fluid flow when interpreting acquired wind tunnel test data. Output of the standard implementations of these visualization techniques in test facilities are often limited only to qualitative interpretation of the resulting images. Although various quantitative optical techniques have been developed, these techniques often require special equipment or are focused on obtaining very precise and accurate data about the visualized flow. These systems are not practical in small, production wind tunnel test facilities. However, high-speed photography capability has become a common upgrade to many test facilities in order to better capture images of unsteady flow phenomena such as oscillating shocks and flow separation. This paper describes novel techniques utilized by the authors to analyze captured high-speed schlieren and shadowgraph imagery from wind tunnel testing for quantification of observed unsteady flow frequency content. Such techniques have applications in parametric geometry studies and in small facilities where more specialized equipment may not be available.

  9. Meat quality evaluation by hyperspectral imaging technique: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmasry, Gamal; Barbin, Douglas F; Sun, Da-Wen; Allen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, a number of methods have been developed to objectively measure meat quality attributes. Hyperspectral imaging technique as one of these methods has been regarded as a smart and promising analytical tool for analyses conducted in research and industries. Recently there has been a renewed interest in using hyperspectral imaging in quality evaluation of different food products. The main inducement for developing the hyperspectral imaging system is to integrate both spectroscopy and imaging techniques in one system to make direct identification of different components and their spatial distribution in the tested product. By combining spatial and spectral details together, hyperspectral imaging has proved to be a promising technology for objective meat quality evaluation. The literature presented in this paper clearly reveals that hyperspectral imaging approaches have a huge potential for gaining rapid information about the chemical structure and related physical properties of all types of meat. In addition to its ability for effectively quantifying and characterizing quality attributes of some important visual features of meat such as color, quality grade, marbling, maturity, and texture, it is able to measure multiple chemical constituents simultaneously without monotonous sample preparation. Although this technology has not yet been sufficiently exploited in meat process and quality assessment, its potential is promising. Developing a quality evaluation system based on hyperspectral imaging technology to assess the meat quality parameters and to ensure its authentication would bring economical benefits to the meat industry by increasing consumer confidence in the quality of the meat products. This paper provides a detailed overview of the recently developed approaches and latest research efforts exerted in hyperspectral imaging technology developed for evaluating the quality of different meat products and the possibility of its widespread

  10. Measurement of Thermal Properties of Triticale Starch Films Using Photothermal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Pacheco, Z. N.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Jiménez-Pérez, J. L.; Solorzano-Ojeda, S. C.; Tramón-Pregnan, C. L.

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, several commercially biodegradable materials have been developed with mechanical properties similar to those of conventional petrochemical-based polymers. These materials are made from renewable sources such as starch, cellulose, corn, and molasses, being very attractive for numerous applications in the plastics, food, and paper industries, among others. Starches from maize, rice, wheat, and potato are used in the food industry. However, other types of starches are not used due to their low protein content, such as triticale. In this study, starch films, processed using a single screw extruder with different compositions, were thermally and structurally characterized. The thermal diffusivity, thermal effusivity, and thermal conductivity of the biodegradable films were determined using photothermal techniques. The thermal diffusivity was measured using the open photoacoustic cell technique, and the thermal effusivity was obtained by the photopyroelectric technique in an inverse configuration. The results showed differences in thermal properties for the films. Also, the films microstructures were observed by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and the crystalline structure determined by X-ray diffraction.

  11. The clinical consequences of advanced imaging techniques in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerwinkel, David F; Swager, Anne-Fré; Curvers, Wouter L; Bergman, Jacques J G H M

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) using dye-based chromoendoscopy, optical chromoendoscopy, autofluorescence imaging, or confocal laser endomicroscopy does not significantly increase the number of patients with a diagnosis of early neoplasia compared with high-definition white light endoscopy (HD-WLE) with random biopsy analysis. These newer imaging techniques are not more effective in standard surveillance of patients with BE because the prevalence of early neoplasia is low and HD-WLE with random biopsy analysis detects most cases of neoplasia. The evaluation and treatment of patients with BE and early-stage neoplasia should be centralized in tertiary referral centers, where procedures are performed under optimal conditions, by expert endoscopists. Lesions that require resection are almost always detected by HD-WLE, although advanced imaging techniques can detect additional flat lesions. However, these are of limited clinical significance because they are effectively eradicated by ablation therapy. No endoscopic imaging technique can reliably assess submucosal or lymphangio-invasion. Endoscopic resection of early-stage neoplasia in patients with BE is important for staging and management. Optical chromoendoscopy can also be used to evaluate lesions before endoscopic resection and in follow-up after successful ablation therapy. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. State-of-the-art imaging techniques in endoscopic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has recently evolved through technological improvement of equipment, with a major clinical impact in digestive and mediastinal diseases. State-of-the-art EUS equipment now includes real-time sono-elastography, which might be useful for a better characterization of lesions and increased accuracy of differential diagnosis (for e.g. lymph nodes or focal pancreatic lesions). Contrast-enhanced EUS imaging is also available, and is already being used for the differential diagnosis of focal pancreatic masses. The recent development of low mechanical index contrast harmonic EUS imaging offers hope for improved diagnosis, staging and monitoring of anti-angiogenic treatment. Tridimensional EUS (3D-EUS) techniques can be applied to enhance the spatial understanding of EUS anatomy, especially for improved staging of tumors, obtained through a better assessment of the relationship with major surrounding vessels. Despite the progress gained through all these imaging techniques, they cannot replace cytological or histological diagnosis. However, real-time optical histological diagnosis can be achieved through the use of single-fiber confocal laser endomicroscopy techniques placed under real-time EUS-guidance through a 22G needle. Last, but not least, EUS-assisted natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) procedures offer a whole new area of imaging applications, used either for combination of NOTES peritoneoscopy and intraperitoneal EUS, but also for access of retroperitoneal organs through posterior EUS guidance. PMID:21390138

  13. Applicability of three-dimensional imaging techniques in fetal medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner Junior, Heron; Daltro, Pedro; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro, E-mail: heronwerner@hotmail.com [Clinica de Diagnostico Por Imagem (CDPI), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Santos, Jorge Lopes dos; Belmonte, Simone; Ribeiro, Gerson [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil); Marchiori, Edson [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-15

    Objective: To generate physical models of fetuses from images obtained with three-dimensional ultrasound (3D-US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and, occasionally, computed tomography (CT), in order to guide additive manufacturing technology. Materials and Methods: We used 3D-US images of 31 pregnant women, including 5 who were carrying twins. If abnormalities were detected by 3D-US, both MRI and in some cases CT scans were then immediately performed. The images were then exported to a workstation in DICOM format. A single observer performed slice-by-slice manual segmentation using a digital high resolution screen. Virtual 3D models were obtained from software that converts medical images into numerical models. Those models were then generated in physical form through the use of additive manufacturing techniques. Results: Physical models based upon 3D-US, MRI, and CT images were successfully generated. The postnatal appearance of either the aborted fetus or the neonate closely resembled the physical models, particularly in cases of malformations. Conclusion: The combined use of 3D-US, MRI, and CT could help improve our understanding of fetal anatomy. These three screening modalities can be used for educational purposes and as tools to enable parents to visualize their unborn baby. The images can be segmented and then applied, separately or jointly, in order to construct virtual and physical 3D models. (author)

  14. Remote measurement of river discharge using thermal particle image velocimetry (PIV) and various sources of bathymetric information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl; Kinzel, Paul J.; Nelson, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    Although river discharge is a fundamental hydrologic quantity, conventional methods of streamgaging are impractical, expensive, and potentially dangerous in remote locations. This study evaluated the potential for measuring discharge via various forms of remote sensing, primarily thermal imaging of flow velocities but also spectrally-based depth retrieval from passive optical image data. We acquired thermal image time series from bridges spanning five streams in Alaska and observed strong agreement between velocities measured in situ and those inferred by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), which quantified advection of thermal features by the flow. The resulting surface velocities were converted to depth-averaged velocities by applying site-specific, calibrated velocity indices. Field spectra from three clear-flowing streams provided strong relationships between depth and reflectance, suggesting that, under favorable conditions, spectrally-based bathymetric mapping could complement thermal PIV in a hybrid approach to remote sensing of river discharge; this strategy would not be applicable to larger, more turbid rivers, however. A more flexible and efficient alternative might involve inferring depth from thermal data based on relationships between depth and integral length scales of turbulent fluctuations in temperature, captured as variations in image brightness. We observed moderately strong correlations for a site-aggregated data set that reduced station-to-station variability but encompassed a broad range of depths. Discharges calculated using thermal PIV-derived velocities were within 15% of in situ measurements when combined with depths measured directly in the field or estimated from field spectra and within 40% when the depth information also was derived from thermal images. The results of this initial, proof-of-concept investigation suggest that remote sensing techniques could facilitate measurement of river discharge.

  15. Fractal Image Compression Based on High Entropy Values Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douaa Younis Abbaas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many attempts tried to improve the encoding stage of FIC because it consumed time. These attempts worked by reducing size of the search pool for pair range-domain matching but most of them led to get a bad quality, or a lower compression ratio of reconstructed image. This paper aims to present a method to improve performance of the full search algorithm by combining FIC (lossy compression and another lossless technique (in this case entropy coding is used. The entropy technique will reduce size of the domain pool (i. e., number of domain blocks based on the entropy value of each range block and domain block and then comparing the results of full search algorithm and proposed algorithm based on entropy technique to see each of which give best results (such as reduced the encoding time with acceptable values in both compression quali-ty parameters which are C. R (Compression Ratio and PSNR (Image Quality. The experimental results of the proposed algorithm proven that using the proposed entropy technique reduces the encoding time while keeping compression rates and reconstruction image quality good as soon as possible.

  16. Dual self-image technique for beam collimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Fernandez, Jose Maria; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Torcal-Milla, Francisco Jose; Morlanes, Tomas; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2016-07-01

    We propose an accurate technique for obtaining highly collimated beams, which also allows testing the collimation degree of a beam. It is based on comparing the period of two different self-images produced by a single diffraction grating. In this way, variations in the period of the diffraction grating do not affect to the measuring procedure. Self-images are acquired by two CMOS cameras and their periods are determined by fitting the variogram function of the self-images to a cosine function with polynomial envelopes. This way, loss of accuracy caused by imperfections of the measured self-images is avoided. As usual, collimation is obtained by displacing the collimation element with respect to the source along the optical axis. When the period of both self-images coincides, collimation is achieved. With this method neither a strict control of the period of the diffraction grating nor a transverse displacement, required in other techniques, are necessary. As an example, a LED considering paraxial approximation and point source illumination is collimated resulting a resolution in the divergence of the beam of δ φ =+/- 1.57 μ {rad}.

  17. Assessment of banana fruit maturity by image processing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surya Prabha, D; Satheesh Kumar, J

    2015-03-01

    Maturity stage of fresh banana fruit is an important factor that affects the fruit quality during ripening and marketability after ripening. The ability to identify maturity of fresh banana fruit will be a great support for farmers to optimize harvesting phase which helps to avoid harvesting either under-matured or over-matured banana. This study attempted to use image processing technique to detect the maturity stage of fresh banana fruit by its color and size value of their images precisely. A total of 120 images comprising 40 images from each stage such as under-mature, mature and over-mature were used for developing algorithm and accuracy prediction. The mean color intensity from histogram; area, perimeter, major axis length and minor axis length from the size values, were extracted from the calibration images. Analysis of variance between each maturity stage on these features indicated that the mean color intensity and area features were more significant in predicting the maturity of banana fruit. Hence, two classifier algorithms namely, mean color intensity algorithm and area algorithm were developed and their accuracy on maturity detection was assessed. The mean color intensity algorithm showed 99.1 % accuracy in classifying the banana fruit maturity. The area algorithm classified the under-mature fruit at 85 % accuracy. Hence the maturity assessment technique proposed in this paper could be used commercially to develop a field based complete automatic detection system to take decision on the right time of harvest by the banana growers.

  18. A real time study on condition monitoring of distribution transformer using thermal imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariprasath, T.; Kirubakaran, V.

    2018-05-01

    The transformer is one of the critical apparatus in the power system. At any cost, a few minutes of outages harshly influence the power system. Hence, prevention-based maintenance technique is very essential. The continuous conditioning and monitoring technology significantly increases the life span of the transformer, as well as reduces the maintenance cost. Hence, conditioning and monitoring of transformer's temperature are very essential. In this paper, a critical review has been made on various conditioning and monitoring techniques. Furthermore, a new method, hot spot indication technique, is discussed. Also, transformer's operating condition is monitored by using thermal imager. From the thermal analysis, it is inferred that major hotspot locations are appearing at connection lead out; also, the bushing of the transformer is the very hottest spot in transformer, so monitoring the level of oil is essential. Alongside, real time power quality analysis has been carried out using the power analyzer. It shows that industrial drives are injecting current harmonics to the distribution network, which causes the power quality problem on the grid. Moreover, the current harmonic limit has exceeded the IEEE standard limit. Hence, the adequate harmonics suppression technique is need an hour.

  19. The Handbook of Medical Image Perception and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samei, Ehsan; Krupinski, Elizabeth

    2014-07-01

    Peter Ayton; Part V. Optimization and Practical Issues: 25. Optimization of 2D and 3D radiographic systems Jeff Siewerdson; 26. Applications of AFC methodology in optimization of CT imaging systems Kent Ogden and Walter Huda; 27. Perceptual issues in reading mammograms Margarita Zuley; 28. Perceptual optimization of display processing techniques Richard Van Metter; 29. Optimization of display systems Elizabeth Krupinski and Hans Roehrig; 30. Ergonomic radiologist workplaces in the PACS environment Carl Zylack; Part VI. Epilogue: 31. Future prospects of medical image perception Ehsan Samei and Elizabeth Krupinski; Index.

  20. Positron imaging techniques for process engineering: recent developments at Birmingham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D. J.; Leadbeater, T. W.; Fan, X.; Hausard, M. N.; Ingram, A.; Yang, Z.

    2008-09-01

    For over 20 years the University of Birmingham has been using positron-emitting radioactive tracers to study engineering processes. The imaging technique of positron emission tomography (PET), widely used for medical applications, has been adapted for these studies, and the complementary technique of positron emission particle tracking (PEPT) has been developed. The radioisotopes are produced using the Birmingham MC40 cyclotron, and a variety of techniques are employed to produce suitable tracers in a wide range of forms. Detectors originally designed for medical use have been modified for engineering applications, allowing measurements to be made on real process equipment, at laboratory or pilot plant scale. This paper briefly reviews the capability of the techniques and introduces a few of the many processes to which they have been applied.

  1. Thermal imaging comparison of Signature, Infiniti, and Stellaris phacoemulsification systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Na Kyung; Kwon, Ji-Won; Wee, Won Ryang; Miller, Kevin M; Han, Young Keun

    2013-10-12

    To compare the heat production of 3 different phacoemulsification machines under strict laboratory test conditions. More specifically, the thermal behavior was analyzed between the torsional modality of the Infiniti system and longitudinal modalities of the Abbot WhiteStar Signature Phacoemulsification system and Bausch and Lomb Stellaris system. Experiments were performed under in-vitro conditions in this study.Three phacoemulsification handpieces (Infiniti, Signature, and Stellaris) were inserted into balanced salt solution-filled silicone test chambers and were imaged side-by-side by using a thermal camera. Incision compression was simulated by suspending 30.66-gram weights from the silicone chambers. The irrigation flow rate was set at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 cc/min and the phacoemulsification power on the instrument consoles was set at 40, 60, 80, and 100%. The highest temperatures generated from each handpiece around the point of compression were measured at 0, 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Under the same displayed phacoemulsification power settings, the peak temperatures measured when using the Infiniti were lower than when using the other two machines, and the Signature was cooler than the Stellaris. At 10 seconds, torsional phacoemulsification with Infiniti at 100% power showed data comparable to that of the Signature at 80% and the Stellaris at 60%. At 30 seconds, the temperature from the Infiniti at 100% power was lower than the Signature at 60% and the Stellaris at 40%. Torsional phacoemulsification with the Infiniti generates less heat than longitudinal phacoemulsification with the Signature and the Stellaris. Lower operating temperatures indicate lower heat generation within the same fluid volume, which may provide additional thermal protection during cataract surgery.

  2. Application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical imagery, 1979

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Several areas of applications of image processing to astronomy were identified and discussed. These areas include: (1) deconvolution for atmospheric seeing compensation; a comparison between maximum entropy and conventional Wiener algorithms; (2) polarization in galaxies from photographic plates; (3) time changes in M87 and methods of displaying these changes; (4) comparing emission line images in planetary nebulae; and (5) log intensity, hue saturation intensity, and principal component color enhancements of M82. Examples are presented of these techniques applied to a variety of objects.

  3. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-01-01

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom

  4. Statistical techniques for noise removal from visual images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Lloyd G.; Kelly, Gary E.

    1992-07-01

    The median operator has been demonstrated to be a very effective method for restoring recognizable images from very noisy image data. The power of the median operator stems from its non-algebraic formulation, which prevents erroneous data corrupting the final color computation. A principal drawback is that the median operator replaces all data, erroneous or not, the result being a net loss of information. This paper presents alternative statistical outlier techniques by which erroneous data is readily recognized, but valid data usually remains unchanged. The result is an effective noise removal algorithm with reduced loss of information.

  5. Reduction and analysis techniques for infrared imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccaughrean, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Infrared detector arrays are becoming increasingly available to the astronomy community, with a number of array cameras already in use at national observatories, and others under development at many institutions. As the detector technology and imaging instruments grow more sophisticated, more attention is focussed on the business of turning raw data into scientifically significant information. Turning pictures into papers, or equivalently, astronomy into astrophysics, both accurately and efficiently, is discussed. Also discussed are some of the factors that can be considered at each of three major stages; acquisition, reduction, and analysis, concentrating in particular on several of the questions most relevant to the techniques currently applied to near infrared imaging.

  6. [Results and indications of imaging techniques in musculoskeletal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hamouda, Mohamed; Bergaoui, Naceur; Douik, Mongi; Ladeb, Fethi

    2002-08-01

    Imaging is necessary in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal diseases and X rays is the first step of this morphological exploration. Ultrasonography is cost effectiveness, without radiation and have to constitute the second step of the exploration of the smooth tissue (tendon, muscle, sheath, synovium and superficial ligaments). Computed tomography with its new technological progress is very effective in the study of the cortical bone. Magnetic resonance imaging, a non irradiating but costly technique, becomes inevitable in several osteo-articular affections. It often makes the examination of last intention to compensate for the inadequacy of ultrasonography and computed tomography.

  7. Thermal Modeling and Analysis of the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRad) is a payload carried by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) at altitudes up to 60,000 ft with the purpose of measuring ocean surface wind speeds and near ocean surface rain rates in hurricanes. The payload includes several components that must maintain steady temperatures throughout the flight. Minimizing the temperature drift of these components allows for accurate data collection and conclusions to be drawn concerning the behavior of hurricanes. HIRad has flown on several different UAVs over the past two years during the fall hurricane season. Based on the data from the 2011 flight, a Thermal Desktop model was created to simulate the payload and reproduce the temperatures. Using this model, recommendations were made to reduce the temperature drift through the use of heaters controlled by resistance temperature detector (RTD) sensors. The suggestions made were implemented for the 2012 hurricane season and further data was collected. The implementation of the heaters reduced the temperature drift for a portion of the flight, but after a period of time, the temperatures rose. With this new flight data, the thermal model was updated and correlated. Detailed analysis was conducted to determine a more effective way to reduce the temperature drift. The final recommendations made were to adjust the set temperatures of the heaters for 2013 flights and implement hardware changes for flights beyond 2013.

  8. A low cost thermal infrared hyperspectral imager for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crites, S. T.; Lucey, P. G.; Wright, R.; Garbeil, H.; Horton, K. A.; Wood, M.

    2012-06-01

    The growth of the small satellite market and launch opportunities for these satellites is creating a new niche for earth observations that contrasts with the long mission durations, high costs, and long development times associated with traditional space-based earth observations. Low-cost, short-lived missions made possible by this new approach provide an experimental platform for testing new sensor technologies that may transition to larger, more long-lived platforms. The low costs and short lifetimes also increase acceptable risk to sensors, enabling large decreases in cost using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and allowing early-career scientists and engineers to gain experience with these projects. We are building a low-cost long-wave infrared spectral sensor, funded by the NASA Experimental Project to Stimulate Competitive Research program (EPSCoR), to demonstrate ways in which a university's scientific and instrument development programs can fit into this niche. The sensor is a low-mass, power-efficient thermal hyperspectral imager with electronics contained in a pressure vessel to enable use of COTS electronics and will be compatible with small satellite platforms. The sensor, called Thermal Hyperspectral Imager (THI), is based on a Sagnac interferometer and uses an uncooled 320x256 microbolometer array. The sensor will collect calibrated radiance data at long-wave infrared (LWIR, 8-14 microns) wavelengths in 230 meter pixels with 20 wavenumber spectral resolution from a 400 km orbit. We are currently in the laboratory and airborne testing stage in order to demonstrate the spectro-radiometric quality of data that the instrument provides.

  9. Characterization of a Hall Effect Thruster Using Thermal Imaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tomaszewski, James W

    2007-01-01

    .... Therefore, thermal information was gathered and analyzed in order to better understand the thermal characteristics of an operating thruster and to provide data applicable to improving the thruster...

  10. Multimodal Registration and Fusion for 3D Thermal Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulay A. Akhloufi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D vision is an area of computer vision that has attracted a lot of research interest and has been widely studied. In recent years we witness an increasing interest from the industrial community. This interest is driven by the recent advances in 3D technologies, which enable high precision measurements at an affordable cost. With 3D vision techniques we can conduct advanced manufactured parts inspections and metrology analysis. However, we are not able to detect subsurface defects. This kind of detection is achieved by other techniques, like infrared thermography. In this work, we present a new registration framework for 3D and thermal infrared multimodal fusion. The resulting fused data can be used for advanced 3D inspection in Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E applications. The fusion permits the simultaneous visible surface and subsurface inspections to be conducted in the same process. Experimental tests were conducted with different materials. The obtained results are promising and show how these new techniques can be used efficiently in a combined NDT&E-Metrology analysis of manufactured parts, in areas such as aerospace and automotive.

  11. Adapting content-based image retrieval techniques for the semantic annotation of medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashnil; Dyer, Shane; Kim, Jinman; Li, Changyang; Leong, Philip H W; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2016-04-01

    The automatic annotation of medical images is a prerequisite for building comprehensive semantic archives that can be used to enhance evidence-based diagnosis, physician education, and biomedical research. Annotation also has important applications in the automatic generation of structured radiology reports. Much of the prior research work has focused on annotating images with properties such as the modality of the image, or the biological system or body region being imaged. However, many challenges remain for the annotation of high-level semantic content in medical images (e.g., presence of calcification, vessel obstruction, etc.) due to the difficulty in discovering relationships and associations between low-level image features and high-level semantic concepts. This difficulty is further compounded by the lack of labelled training data. In this paper, we present a method for the automatic semantic annotation of medical images that leverages techniques from content-based image retrieval (CBIR). CBIR is a well-established image search technology that uses quantifiable low-level image features to represent the high-level semantic content depicted in those images. Our method extends CBIR techniques to identify or retrieve a collection of labelled images that have similar low-level features and then uses this collection to determine the best high-level semantic annotations. We demonstrate our annotation method using retrieval via weighted nearest-neighbour retrieval and multi-class classification to show that our approach is viable regardless of the underlying retrieval strategy. We experimentally compared our method with several well-established baseline techniques (classification and regression) and showed that our method achieved the highest accuracy in the annotation of liver computed tomography (CT) images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative study of linear and nonlinear ultrasonic techniques for evaluation thermal damage of tube like structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Weibin; Cho, Younho; Li, Xianqiang

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic guided wave techniques have been widely used for long range nondestructive detection in tube like structures. The present paper investigates the ultrasonic linear and nonlinear parameters for evaluating the thermal damage in aluminum pipe. Specimens were subjected to thermal loading. Flexible polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) comb transducers were used to generate and receive the ultrasonic waves. The second harmonic wave generation technique was used to check the material nonlinearity change after different heat loadings. The conventional linear ultrasonic approach based on attenuation was also used to evaluate the thermal damages in specimens. The results show that the proposed experimental setup is viable to assess the thermal damage in an aluminum pipe. The ultrasonic nonlinear parameter is a promising candidate for the prediction of micro damages in a tube like structure

  13. Robust tracking of respiratory rate in high-dynamic range scenes using mobile thermal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Youngjun; Julier, Simon J; Marquardt, Nicolai; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-10-01

    The ability to monitor the respiratory rate, one of the vital signs, is extremely important for the medical treatment, healthcare and fitness sectors. In many situations, mobile methods, which allow users to undertake everyday activities, are required. However, current monitoring systems can be obtrusive, requiring users to wear respiration belts or nasal probes. Alternatively, contactless digital image sensor based remote-photoplethysmography (PPG) can be used. However, remote PPG requires an ambient source of light, and does not work properly in dark places or under varying lighting conditions. Recent advances in thermographic systems have shrunk their size, weight and cost, to the point where it is possible to create smart-phone based respiration rate monitoring devices that are not affected by lighting conditions. However, mobile thermal imaging is challenged in scenes with high thermal dynamic ranges (e.g. due to the different environmental temperature distributions indoors and outdoors). This challenge is further amplified by general problems such as motion artifacts and low spatial resolution, leading to unreliable breathing signals. In this paper, we propose a novel and robust approach for respiration tracking which compensates for the negative effects of variations in the ambient temperature and motion artifacts and can accurately extract breathing rates in highly dynamic thermal scenes. The approach is based on tracking the nostril of the user and using local temperature variations to infer inhalation and exhalation cycles. It has three main contributions. The first is a novel Optimal Quantization technique which adaptively constructs a color mapping of absolute temperature to improve segmentation, classification and tracking. The second is the Thermal Gradient Flow method that computes thermal gradient magnitude maps to enhance the accuracy of the nostril region tracking. Finally, we introduce the Thermal Voxel method to increase the reliability of the

  14. Monitoring of civil engineering structures using Digital Image Correlation technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Świercz A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Digital Image Correlation (DIC technique enables full field, noncontact measurements of displacements and strains of a wide variety of objects. An adaptation of the DIC technique for monitoring of civil-engineering structures is presented in the paper. A general concept of the complex, automatic monitoring system, in which the DIC sensor plays an important role is described. Some new software features, which aim to facilitate outdoor measurements and speed up the correlation analysis, is also introduced. As an example of application, measurements of a railway bridge in Nieporet (Poland are presented. The experimental results are compared with displacements of a FEM model of the bridge.

  15. MR imaging of the colon: 'Technique, indications, results and limitations'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajaj, Waleed; Goyen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years virtual colonography using MR imaging has shown a proceeding development regarding detection and quantification of colorectal pathologies. Dark-lumen MR colonography (MRC) has been a leading tool for the diagnosis of the entire colon and their pathologies. This review article describes some of the underlying techniques of MRC concerning data acquisition, the need for intravenously applied paramagnetic contrast agent, as well as indications, results and limitations of MRC for the detection of colorectal pathologies. In addition, new techniques to improve patient acceptance are discussed

  16. Chemical contrast observed in thermal images of blood-stained fabrics exposed to steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Wayne L; Boltin, Nicholas D; Lu, Zhenyu; Cassidy, Brianna M; Belliveau, Raymond G; Straub, Emory J; DeJong, Stephanie A; Morgan, Stephen L; Myrick, M L

    2015-09-21

    Thermal imaging is not ordinarily a good way to visualize chemical contrast. In recent work, however, we observed strong and reproducible images with chemical contrasts on blood-stained fabrics, especially on more hydrophobic fabrics like acrylic and polyester.

  17. Evaluation of the AN/SAY-1 Thermal Imaging Sensor System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, John G; Middlebrook, Christopher T

    2002-01-01

    The AN/SAY-1 Thermal Imaging Sensor System "TISS" was developed to provide surface ships with a day/night imaging capability to detect low radar reflective, small cross-sectional area targets such as floating mines...

  18. Plasma diagnostic techniques in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, E.H.; Clauser, J.F.; Carter, M.R.; Failor, B.H.; Foote, J.H.; Hornady, R.S.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.J.; Perkins, D.E.

    1986-01-01

    We review two classes of plasma diagnostic techniques used in thermal-barrier tandem-mirror fusion experiments. The emphasis of the first class is to study mirror-trapped electrons at the thermal-barrier location. The focus of the second class is to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the plasma space potential at various axial locations. The design and operation of the instruments in these two categories are discussed and data that are representative of their performance is presented

  19. Electropyroelectric technique: A methodology free of fitting procedures for thermal effusivity determination in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, R; Marin, E; Villa, J; Gonzalez, E; Rodríguez, C I; Olvera, J E

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an alternative methodology to determine the thermal effusivity of a liquid sample using the recently proposed electropyroelectric technique, without fitting the experimental data with a theoretical model and without having to know the pyroelectric sensor related parameters, as in most previous reported approaches. The method is not absolute, because a reference liquid with known thermal properties is needed. Experiments have been performed that demonstrate the high reliability and accuracy of the method with measurement uncertainties smaller than 3%.

  20. A novel technique for extracting clouds base height using ground based imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hirsch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The height of a cloud in the atmospheric column is a key parameter in its characterization. Several remote sensing techniques (passive and active, either ground-based or on space-borne platforms and in-situ measurements are routinely used in order to estimate top and base heights of clouds. In this article we present a novel method that combines thermal imaging from the ground and sounded wind profile in order to derive the cloud base height. This method is independent of cloud types, making it efficient for both low boundary layer and high clouds. In addition, using thermal imaging ensures extraction of clouds' features during daytime as well as at nighttime. The proposed technique was validated by comparison to active sounding by ceilometers (which is a standard ground based method, to lifted condensation level (LCL calculations, and to MODIS products obtained from space. As all passive remote sensing techniques, the proposed method extracts only the height of the lowest cloud layer, thus upper cloud layers are not detected. Nevertheless, the information derived from this method can be complementary to space-borne cloud top measurements when deep-convective clouds are present. Unlike techniques such as LCL, this method is not limited to boundary layer clouds, and can extract the cloud base height at any level, as long as sufficient thermal contrast exists between the radiative temperatures of the cloud and its surrounding air parcel. Another advantage of the proposed method is its simplicity and modest power needs, making it particularly suitable for field measurements and deployment at remote locations. Our method can be further simplified for use with visible CCD or CMOS camera (although nighttime clouds will not be observed.

  1. A secure cyclic steganographic technique for color images using randomization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, K.; Ahmad, J.; Rehman, N.U.

    2014-01-01

    Information Security is a major concern in today's modern era. Almost all the communicating bodies want the security, confidentiality and integrity of their personal data. But this security goal cannot be achieved easily when we are using an open network like internet. Steganography provides one of the best solutions to this problem. This paper represents a new Cyclic Steganographic Technique (CST) based on Least Significant Bit (LSB) for true color (RGB) images. The proposed method hides the secret data in the LSBs of cover image pixels in a randomized cyclic manner. The proposed technique is evaluated using both subjective and objective analysis using histograms changeability, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) and Mean Square Error (MSE). Experimentally it is found that the proposed method gives promising results in terms of security, imperceptibility and robustness as compared to some existent methods and vindicates this new algorithm. (author)

  2. Fuzzy logic techniques for blotch feature evaluation in dermoscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Azmath; Gupta, Kapil; Stanley, R J; Stoecker, William V; Moss, Randy H; Argenziano, Giuseppe; Soyer, H Peter; Rabinovitz, Harold S; Cognetta, Armand B

    2009-01-01

    Blotches, also called structureless areas, are critical in differentiating malignant melanoma from benign lesions in dermoscopy skin lesion images. In this paper, fuzzy logic techniques are investigated for the automatic detection of blotch features for malignant melanoma discrimination. Four fuzzy sets representative of blotch size and relative and absolute blotch colors are used to extract blotchy areas from a set of dermoscopy skin lesion images. Five previously reported blotch features are computed from the extracted blotches as well as four new features. Using a neural network classifier, malignant melanoma discrimination results are optimized over the range of possible alpha-cuts and compared with results using crisp blotch features. Features computed from blotches using the fuzzy logic techniques based on three plane relative color and blotch size yield the highest diagnostic accuracy of 81.2%.

  3. Image Techniques for Identifying Sea-Ice Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of ice forces are critical to Dynamic Positioning (DP operations in Arctic waters. Ice conditions are important for the analysis of ice-structure interaction in an ice field. To monitor sea-ice conditions, cameras are used as field observation sensors on mobile sensor platforms in Arctic. Various image processing techniques, such as Otsu thresholding, k-means clustering, distance transform, Gradient Vector Flow (GVF Snake, mathematical morphology, are then applied to obtain ice concentration, ice types, and floe size distribution from sea-ice images to ensure safe operations of structures in ice covered regions. Those techniques yield acceptable results, and their effectiveness are demonstrated in case studies.

  4. A Review On Segmentation Based Image Compression Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Thayammal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract -The storage and transmission of imagery become more challenging task in the current scenario of multimedia applications. Hence, an efficient compression scheme is highly essential for imagery, which reduces the requirement of storage medium and transmission bandwidth. Not only improvement in performance and also the compression techniques must converge quickly in order to apply them for real time applications. There are various algorithms have been done in image compression, but everyone has its own pros and cons. Here, an extensive analysis between existing methods is performed. Also, the use of existing works is highlighted, for developing the novel techniques which face the challenging task of image storage and transmission in multimedia applications.

  5. Study on Efficiency of Fusion Techniques for IKONOS Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yanmei; Yu, Haiyang; Guijun, Yang; Nie, Chenwei; Yang, Xiaodong; Ren, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Many image fusion techniques have been proposed to achieve optimal resolution in the spatial and spectral domains. Six different merging methods were listed in this paper and the efficiency of fusion techniques was assessed in qualitative and quantitative aspect. Both local and global evaluation parameters were used in the spectral quality and a Laplace filter method was used in spatial quality assessment. By simulation, the spectral quality of the images merged by Brovery was demonstrated to be the worst. In contrast, GS and PCA algorithms, especially the Pansharpening provided higher spectral quality than the standard Brovery, wavelet and CN methods. In spatial quality assessment, the CN method represented best compared with that of others, while the Brovery algorithm was worst. The wavelet parameters that performed best achieved acceptable spectral and spatial quality compared to the others

  6. A New Class of Phantom Materials for Poroelastography Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Anuj; Yazdi, Iman K; Kongari, Rohit; Tasciotti, Ennio; Righetti, Raffaella

    2016-05-01

    Poroelastography is an elastographic technique used to image the temporal mechanical behavior of tissues. One of the major challenges in determining experimental potentials and limitations of this technique has been the lack of complex and realistic controlled phantoms that could be used to corroborate the limited number of theoretical and simulation studies available in the literature as well as to predict its performance in complex experimental situations and in a variety of conditions. In the study described here, we propose and analyze a new class of phantom materials for temporal elastography imaging. The results indicate that, by using polyacrylamide, we can generate inhomogeneous elastographic phantoms with controlled fluid content and fluid flow properties, while maintaining mechanical and ultrasonic properties similar to those of soft tissues. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilsky, A V; Lozhkin, V A; Markovich, D M; Tokarev, M P

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART. (paper)

  8. A new approach to electrical impedance imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afroj Quadir, K.; Nasir, F.; Rahman, M.; Rabbani, K.S.

    2004-09-01

    It is possible to obtain a 2 dimensional (2D) image of a volume conductor, to locate a few widely separated objects, by driving ac constant currents through two orthogonal pairs of electrodes and measuring the resulting potential differences between several diagonally placed electrodes at the centre and back-projecting their impedance values along equi-potential lines. This has been termed as Pigeon Hole Imaging (PHI). Experimental verification has been attempted using a small insulating object placed at different locations in a saline filled 2D phantom. For a 6 x 6 matrix, the image in 16 pixels in close proximity of the diagonal along which electrodes are arranged, coincide with the object positions, while they do nt for the remaining 20 pixels. We applied a new technique where image smearing patterns have been used to correct the images in 14 of these pixels while 6 pixels near the two opposite comers still remain uncertain. Thus 30 pixels out of 36 give the right object position which may be termed a success. The concept may be extended further to higher order matrices by increasing the number of diagonal electrodes. The present work mainly concentrates on the feasibility of localization of a single small object in one matrix position of the image. (author)

  9. Photothermal camera port accessory for microscopic thermal diffusivity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escola, Facundo Zaldívar; Kunik, Darío; Mingolo, Nelly; Martínez, Oscar Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    The design of a scanning photothermal accessory is presented, which can be attached to the camera port of commercial microscopes to measure thermal diffusivity maps with micrometer resolution. The device is based on the thermal expansion recovery technique, which measures the defocusing of a probe beam due to the curvature induced by the local heat delivered by a focused pump beam. The beam delivery and collecting optics are built using optical fiber technology, resulting in a robust optical system that provides collinear pump and probe beams without any alignment adjustment necessary. The quasiconfocal configuration for the signal collection using the same optical fiber sets very restrictive conditions on the positioning and alignment of the optical components of the scanning unit, and a detailed discussion of the design equations is presented. The alignment procedure is carefully described, resulting in a system so robust and stable that no further alignment is necessary for the day-to-day use, becoming a tool that can be used for routine quality control, operated by a trained technician.

  10. Heat losses and thermal imaging of ferroic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyashenko, S E; Ivanova, A I; Gasanov, O V; Grechishkin, R M; Tretiakov, S A; Yushkov, K B; Linde, B B J

    2015-01-01

    A study is made of spatial and temporal temperature variations in working devices based on ferroic functional materials. The measurement of the sample's temperature is complemented with direct observation of its distribution over the sample surface. For the latter purpose a thermovision infrared videocamera technique was employed. Specific features of the temperature distribution and its evolution during heating and cooling of a number of piezoelectric, acoustooptic and shape memory components are revealed. Examples of hot spot observations indicative of structural defects in the samples under study are given thus suggesting the use of thermal vision for nondestructive testing. A proposal is made to combine the thermovision method with that of thermomagnetic analysis for the study of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

  11. A patient image-based technique to assess the image quality of clinical chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Samei, Ehsan; Luo, Hui; Dobbins, James T., III; McAdams, H. Page; Wang, Xiaohui; Sehnert, William J.; Barski, Lori; Foos, David H.

    2011-03-01

    Current clinical image quality assessment techniques mainly analyze image quality for the imaging system in terms of factors such as the capture system DQE and MTF, the exposure technique, and the particular image processing method and processing parameters. However, when assessing a clinical image, radiologists seldom refer to these factors, but rather examine several specific regions of the image to see whether the image is suitable for diagnosis. In this work, we developed a new strategy to learn and simulate radiologists' evaluation process on actual clinical chest images. Based on this strategy, a preliminary study was conducted on 254 digital chest radiographs (38 AP without grids, 35 AP with 6:1 ratio grids and 151 PA with 10:1 ratio grids). First, ten regional based perceptual qualities were summarized through an observer study. Each quality was characterized in terms of a physical quantity measured from the image, and as a first step, the three physical quantities in lung region were then implemented algorithmically. A pilot observer study was performed to verify the correlation between image perceptual qualities and physical quantitative qualities. The results demonstrated that our regional based metrics have promising performance for grading perceptual properties of chest radiographs.

  12. Enhanced EDX images by fusion of multimodal SEM images using pansharpening techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, G; Angulo, J; Moreaud, M; Sorbier, L

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the potential interest of image fusion in the context of multimodal scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. In particular, we aim at merging the backscattered electron images that usually have a high spatial resolution but do not provide enough discriminative information to physically classify the nature of the sample, with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) images that have discriminative information but a lower spatial resolution. The produced images are named enhanced EDX. To achieve this goal, we have compared the results obtained with classical pansharpening techniques for image fusion with an original approach tailored for multimodal SEM fusion of information. Quantitative assessment is obtained by means of two SEM images and a simulated dataset produced by a software based on PENELOPE. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. Early Pest Identification in Greenhouse Crops using Image Processing Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mr. S. R. Pokharkar; Dr. Mrs. V. R. Thool

    2012-01-01

    Early disease detection is a major challenge in agriculture field.Hence proper measures has to be taken to fight bioagressors ofcrops while minimizing the use of pesticides. The techniques ofmachine vision are extensively applied to agricultural science,and it has great perspective especially in the plant protectionfield,which ultimately leads to crops management. Our goal isearly detection of bioagressors. The paper describes a softwareprototype system for pest detection on the infected imag...

  14. Investigation progress of imaging techniques monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; An Rui

    2006-01-01

    Recently stem cell therapy has showed potential clinical application in diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, malignant tumor and trauma. Efficient techniques of non-invasively monitoring stem cell transplants will accelerate the development of stem cell therapies. This paper briefly reviews the clinical practice of stem cell, in addition, makes a review of monitoring methods including magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging which have been used in stem cell therapy. (authors)

  15. Synthesis and Thermal Characterization of Hydroxyapatite Powders Obtained by Sol-Gel Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Flores, Y.; Camacho, N.; Rojas-Trigos, J. B.; Suárez, M.

    The development of bioactive materials presents an interesting and an extremely relevant problem to solve, in the development of customized cranial and maxillofacial prosthesis, bioactive coating, and cements, for example. In such areas, one of the more employed materials is the synthetic hydroxyapatite, due to its proved biocompatibility with the human body; however, there are few studies about the thermal affinity with the biological surroundings, and most of them are centered in the thermal stability of the hydroxyapatite instead of its transient thermal response. In the present paper, the synthesis and physical-chemical characterization of hydroxyapatite samples, obtained by the sol-gel technique employing ultrasonic mixing, are reported. Employing X-ray diffraction patterns, XEDS and FTIR spectra, the crystal symmetry, chemical elements, and the present functional groups of the studied samples were determined and found to correspond to those reported in the literature, with a stoichiometry close to the ideal for biological applications. Additionally, by means of the photoacoustic detection and infrared photothermal radiometry (IPTR) techniques, the thermal response of the samples was obtained. Analyzing the photoacoustic data, the synthetized samples show photoacoustic opaqueness, responding in the thermally thick regime in the measurement range, and their thermal effusivity was also determined, having values of 1.47 folds the thermal effusivity of the mandibular human bone. Finally, from the IPTR measurements, the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of the samples were also determined, having good agreement with the reported values for synthetic hydroxyapatite. The structural and thermophysical properties of the here reported samples show that the synthesized samples have good thermal affinity with the mandibular human bone tissue, and are suitable for biomedical applications.

  16. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity of flexible yttria-stabilized zirconia substrate via 3ω technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shivkant; Yarali, Milad; Mavrokefalos, Anastassios [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Shervin, Shahab [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Venkateswaran, Venkat; Olenick, Kathy; Olenick, John A. [ENrG Inc., Buffalo, NY (United States); Ryou, Jae-Hyun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of Houston, Houston, TX (United States); Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston (TcSUH), Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Thermal management in flexible electronic has proven to be challenging thereby limiting the development of flexible devices with high power densities. To truly enable the technological implementation of such devices, it is imperative to develop highly thermally conducting flexible substrates that are fully compatible with large-scale fabrication. Here, we present the thermal conductivity of state-of-the-art flexible yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates measured using the 3ω technique, which is already commercially manufactured via roll-to-roll technique. We observe that increasing the grain size increases the thermal conductivity of the flexible 3 mol.% YSZ, while the flexibility and transparency of the sample are hardly affected by the grain size enlargement. We exhibit thermal conductivity values of up to 4.16 Wm{sup -1}K {sup -1} that is at least 4 times higher than state-of-the-art polymeric flexible substrates. Phonon-hopping model (PHM) for granular material was used to fit the measured thermal conductivity and accurately define the thermal transport mechanism. Our results show that through grain size optimization, YSZ flexible substrates can be realized as flexible substrates, that pave new avenues for future novel application in flexible electronics through the utilization of both their ceramic structural flexibility and high heat dissipating capability. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Extracted image analysis: a technique for deciphering mediated portrayals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, D H; Coutts, L B

    1995-01-01

    A technique for analyzing print media that we have developed as a consequence of our interest in the portrayal of women in menstrual product advertising is reported. The technique, which we call extracted image analysis, involves a unique application of grounded theory and the concomitant heuristic use of the concept of ideal type (Weber, 1958). It provides a means of heuristically conceptualizing the answer to a variant of the "What is going on here?" question asked in analysis of print communication, that is, "Who is being portrayed/addressed here?" Extracted image analysis involves the use of grounded theory to develop ideal typologies. Because the technique re-constructs the ideal types embedded in a communication, it possesses considerable potential as a means of identifying the profiles of members of identifiable groups held by the producers of the directed messages. In addition, the analysis of such portrayals over time would be particularly well suited to extracted image analysis. A number of other possible applications are also suggested.

  18. Radioactive seed localizations from computed tomography imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayyangar, K.M.; Dobelbower, R.R.; Saw, C.B.; Korb, L.J.

    1994-01-01

    A method that combines radiographic localization of seeds in brachytherapy implant with computed tomography (CT) images has been developed to provide accurate seed location and dose distribution data, in relation to the three dimensional localization of target volume and critical organs at risk. The accurate determination of radioactive seed locations in permanent implants from CT scans is limited by the magnitude of the pixel size and the slice thickness. The image of a single seed may appear in more than one consecutive CT image. A method of removing this artifact using a tolerance diameter about a seed center determined in the previous CT slice is described. To improve further the accuracy of defining the seed positions and orientations, the reconstructed seed coordinates derived from the three film technique were transformed into CT coordinates for dose distribution computations. The differences between this technique and the technique of using CT scans to reconstruct seed coordinates directly were assessed. This method has been applied in the case of prostate implants. It allows for the generation of dose volume histograms for the prostate, bladder and the rectum. (author). 9 refs., 8 figs

  19. Speckle noise reduction in ultrasound images using a discrete wavelet transform-based image fusion technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Ho; Lee, Ju Hwan; Kim, Sung Min; Park, Sung Yun

    2015-01-01

    Here, the speckle noise in ultrasonic images is removed using an image fusion-based denoising method. To optimize the denoising performance, each discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and filtering technique was analyzed and compared. In addition, the performances were compared in order to derive the optimal input conditions. To evaluate the speckle noise removal performance, an image fusion algorithm was applied to the ultrasound images, and comparatively analyzed with the original image without the algorithm. As a result, applying DWT and filtering techniques caused information loss and noise characteristics, and did not represent the most significant noise reduction performance. Conversely, an image fusion method applying SRAD-original conditions preserved the key information in the original image, and the speckle noise was removed. Based on such characteristics, the input conditions of SRAD-original had the best denoising performance with the ultrasound images. From this study, the best denoising technique proposed based on the results was confirmed to have a high potential for clinical application.

  20. Comparative study of low-energy neutral atom imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.; Scime, E.E.

    1994-01-01

    Low-energy neutral atom (LENA) imaging promise to be a revolutionary tool for global imaging of space plasmas. The technical challenges of LENA detection include separating them from the intense ambient UV without losing information about their incident trajectories, quantifying their trajectories, and obtaining high-sensitivity measurements. Two techniques that have been proposed for this purpose are based on fundamentally different atomic interaction mechanisms between LENAs and a solid; LENA transmission through an ultra thin foil and LENA reflection from a solid surface. Both of these methods provide LENA ionization (for subsequent removal from the UV by electrostatic deflection) and secondary electron emission (for time-of-flight start pulse generation and/or coincidence). They present a comparative study of the transmission and reflection techniques based on differences in atomic interactions with solids and surfaces. Transmission methods are shown to be superior for secondary electron emission rather than reflection methods. Furthermore, transmission methods are shown to be a sufficient for LENA imaging at LENA energies of approximately 1 keV to greater than 30 keV. A hybrid instrument using reflection from a low work function surface for LENA ionization and transmission for secondary electron emission is optimal for imaging of LENAs with energies less than approximately 1 keV

  1. Peering through the flames: imaging techniques for reacting aluminum powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepper, Ethan T; Pantoya, Michelle L; Bhattacharya, Sukalyan; Marston, Jeremy O; Neuber, Andreas A; Heaps, Ronald J

    2017-03-20

    Combusting metals burn at high temperatures and emit high-intensity radiation in the visible spectrum, which can oversaturate regular imaging sensors and obscure the field of view. Filtering the luminescence can result in limited information and hinder thorough combustion characterization. A method for "seeing through the flames" of a highly luminescent aluminum powder reaction is presented using copper vapor laser (CVL) illumination, synchronized with a high-speed camera. A statistical comparison of combusting aluminum particle agglomerates imaged using various filtration techniques shows the effectiveness of the high-speed camera with a CVL diagnostic approach. When ignited by an electrically induced plasma, aluminum particles are entrained as solid agglomerates that rotate about their centers of mass and are surrounded by emitted, burning gases. The average agglomerate diameter appears to be 160 μm when viewed with standard illumination and a high-speed camera. However, a significantly reduced diameter of 50 μm is recorded when imaged with CVL illumination coupled with a high-speed camera and a 511 nm notch filter. These results indicate alternative imaging techniques are required to resolve the complexities of metal particle combustion.

  2. Clinical Utility of Magnetic Resonance Thermal Imaging (MRTI) For Realtime Guidance of Deep Hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, PR; Craciunescu, OI; Maccarini, P; Wyatt, C; Arunachalam, K; Arabe, O; Stakhursky, V; Li, Z; Soher, B; MacFall, J; Rangarao, S.; Cheng, KS; Das, S; Martins, CD; Charles, C; Dewhirst, MW; Wong, T; Jones, E; Vujaskovic, Z

    2013-01-01

    A critical need has emerged for volumetric thermometry to visualize 3D temperature distributions in real time during deep hyperthermia treatments used as an adjuvant to radiation or chemotherapy for cancer. For the current effort, magnetic resonance thermal imaging (MRTI) is used to measure 2D temperature rise distributions in four cross sections of large extremity soft tissue sarcomas during hyperthermia treatments. Novel hardware and software techniques are described which improve the signal to noise ratio of MR images, minimize motion artifact from circulating coupling fluids, and provide accurate high resolution volumetric thermal dosimetry. For the first 10 extremity sarcoma patients, the mean difference between MRTI region of interest and adjacent interstitial point measurements during the period of steady state temperature was 0.85°C. With 1min temporal resolution of measurements in four image planes, this non-invasive MRTI approach has demonstrated its utility for accurate monitoring and realtime steering of heat into tumors at depth in the body. PMID:24224074

  3. Exploiting Microwave Imaging Methods for Real-Time Monitoring of Thermal Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Scapaticci

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave thermal ablation is a cancer treatment that exploits local heating caused by a microwave electromagnetic field to induce coagulative necrosis of tumor cells. Recently, such a technique has significantly progressed in the clinical practice. However, its effectiveness would dramatically improve if paired with a noninvasive system for the real-time monitoring of the evolving dimension and shape of the thermally ablated area. In this respect, microwave imaging can be a potential candidate to monitor the overall treatment evolution in a noninvasive way, as it takes direct advantage from the dependence of the electromagnetic properties of biological tissues from temperature. This paper explores such a possibility by presenting a proof of concept validation based on accurate simulated imaging experiments, run with respect to a scenario that mimics an ex vivo experimental setup. In particular, two model-based inversion algorithms are exploited to tackle the imaging task. These methods provide independent results in real-time and their integration improves the quality of the overall tracking of the variations occurring in the target and surrounding regions.

  4. Development of Thermal Infrared Sensor to Supplement Operational Land Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Peter; Waczynski, Augustyn; Kan, Emily; Wen, Yiting; Rosenberry, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The thermal infrared sensor (TIRS) is a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP)-based instrument intended to supplement the Operational Land Imager (OLI) for the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The TIRS instrument is a far-infrared imager operating in the pushbroom mode with two IR channels: 10.8 and 12 m. The focal plane will contain three 640 512 QWIP arrays mounted onto a silicon substrate. The readout integrated circuit (ROIC) addresses each pixel on the QWIP arrays and reads out the pixel value (signal). The ROIC is controlled by the focal plane electronics (FPE) by means of clock signals and bias voltage value. The means of how the FPE is designed to control and interact with the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA) is the basis for this work. The technology developed under the FPE is for the TIRS focal plane assembly (FPA). The FPE must interact with the FPA to command and control the FPA, extract analog signals from the FPA, and then convert the analog signals to digital format and send them via a serial link (USB) to a computer. The FPE accomplishes the described functions by converting electrical power from generic power supplies to the required bias power that is needed by the FPA. The FPE also generates digital clocking signals and shifts the typical transistor-to-transistor logic (TTL) to }5 V required by the FPA. The FPE also uses an application- specific integrated circuit (ASIC) named System Image, Digitizing, Enhancing, Controlling, And Retrieving (SIDECAR) from Teledyne Corp. to generate the clocking patterns commanded by the user. The uniqueness of the FPE for TIRS lies in that the TIRS FPA has three QWIP detector arrays, and all three detector arrays must be in synchronization while in operation. This is to avoid data skewing while observing Earth flying in space. The observing scenario may be customized by uploading new control software to the SIDECAR.

  5. Characterization of European sword blades through neutron imaging techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvemini, F.; Grazzi, F.; Peetermans, S.; Gener, M.; Lehmann, E. H.; Zoppi, M.

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, we have studied two European rapier blades, dating back to the period ranging from the Late Renaissance to the Early Modern Age (about 17th to 18th century). In order to determine variation in quality and differences in technology, a study was undertaken with the purpose to observe variations in the blade microstructure (and consequently in the construction processes). The samples, which in the present case were expendable, have been investigated, preliminarily, through standard metallography and then by means of white beam and energy-selective neutron imaging. The comparison of the results, using the two techniques, turned out to be satisfactory, with a substantial quantitative agreement of the results obtained with the two techniques, and show the complementarity of the two methods. Metallography has been considered up to now the method of choice for metal material characterization. The correspondence between the two methods, as well as the non-invasive character of the neutron-based techniques and its possibility to obtain 3D reconstruction, candidate neutron imaging as an important and quantitatively reliable technique for metal characterization.

  6. MAPTIP - Marine Aerosol Properties and Thermal Imager Performance : Summary and initial results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, A.M.J. van; Leeuw, G. de; Jensen, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The marine aerosol properties and thermal imager performance trial (MAPTIP) was conducted by NATO AC/243 Panel 04/RSG.8 and 04/RSG.5 in the Dutch coastal waters during the fall of 1993. The main objectives of the trial were (1) to assess marine boundary layer effects on thermal imaging systems and

  7. Algorithms for Analysis of Television and Thermal Images in Special Purpose Video Devices and Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Boyun, V.; Sabelnikov, P.; Sabelnikov, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Results of the research project «Development of algorithms and program models for the analysis of television and thermal images» (code VC 200.16.13) are presented. The known methods and algorithms for television and thermal imaging video processing were analyzed and new ones that will allow to create more effective devices and systems for special purposes were offered.

  8. Thermal properties of contemporary bipolar systems using infrared imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Sassan; Bolour, Armon; Yarbrough, Chester; Mendez, Karen; Behrouzi, Behzad; Kasasbeh, Aimen S; Levy, Michael L

    2015-03-01

    Bipolar coagulation has enhanced the capabilities and safety profile of contemporary neurosurgery and has become indispensable in the neurosurgical armamentarium. Nevertheless, significant heat transfer issues remain to be resolved before it can achieve the status of minimal risk. The Codman irrigating forceps, Codman ISOCOOL forceps, and Ellman bipolar forceps, powered by either Synergy or Ellman generators set at various power levels, were compared to investigate the combinations that would allow for the lowest rate of heat transfer. Using an infrared camera and ThermaGRAM imaging software, the temperature was calculated and used to estimate the degree of heat transfer. Codman ISOCOOL forceps powered the Ellman Surgitron generator showed the greatest dissipation (at mid-power, the luminance decreased from 250 units to 80 units within 60 seconds) and the least production of heat after activation. Codman ISOCOOL forceps powered by the Codman SYNERGY MALIS generator showed less heat dissipation (at mid-power, the luminance decreased from 250 units to 195 units within 60 seconds) than the Ellman forceps and Ellman Surgitron generator combination (at mid-power, the luminance decreased from 250 units to 125 units within 60 seconds). These data suggest that the incorporation of the Ellman Surgitron Generator can result in the reduction of thermal transfer with conventional bipolar forceps compared with other generators. The combination with Codman ISOCOOL forceps can maximize the potential safety associated with bipolar coagulation. With regard to the use of comarketed pairs of forceps and generators, the combination of Ellman Surgitron Generator and Ellman bipolar forceps provided the best thermal profile. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermal Imaging Systems for Real-Time Applications in Smart Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Nielsen, Søren Zebitz

    2016-01-01

    of thermal imaging in real-time Smart City applications. Thermal cameras operate independently of light and measure the radiated infrared waves representing the temperature of the scene. In order to showcase the possibilities, we present five different applications which use thermal imaging only....... These include both indoor and outdoor scenarios with the purposes of people detection, counting and tracking, as well as one application for traffic safety evaluation....

  10. Advanced techniques in dynamic infrared imaging research and application for cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggio, Esteban F.; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared Imaging for biomedical applications is a non-invasive technique employed to visualize the distribution of infrared radiance coming from the subject under study, either in a static or a dynamic mode. The main difference is that while with the static method basal situations are studied, in the dynamic approach a sequence of thermograms, using thermal stimuli applied onto the patient are acquired, following the temperature evolution throughout the time. Since tumors possess abnormal metabolic activity, a structure and a vascular distribution essentially different from healthy tissue, and a lack of response to homeostatic signals, thermal stresses enhance even more their presence. For this reason, a completely non-invasive system, referred to as Enhancement and Stimulation System (ESS) was constructed, capable of imparting a cool or hot convective air flow onto the surface to examine and permitting to include in the study the time-course of the thermal stress application. In this work, the design of the Dynamic Infrared Imaging-ESS prototype, its characterization and optimization will be presented. In addition, examples of biomedical interest employing small animals will be shown as well. (author)

  11. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe E-mail: philippe.duvauchelle@insa-lyon.fr; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-09-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests.

  12. A computer code to simulate X-ray imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvauchelle, Philippe; Freud, Nicolas; Kaftandjian, Valerie; Babot, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    A computer code was developed to simulate the operation of radiographic, radioscopic or tomographic devices. The simulation is based on ray-tracing techniques and on the X-ray attenuation law. The use of computer-aided drawing (CAD) models enables simulations to be carried out with complex three-dimensional (3D) objects and the geometry of every component of the imaging chain, from the source to the detector, can be defined. Geometric unsharpness, for example, can be easily taken into account, even in complex configurations. Automatic translations or rotations of the object can be performed to simulate radioscopic or tomographic image acquisition. Simulations can be carried out with monochromatic or polychromatic beam spectra. This feature enables, for example, the beam hardening phenomenon to be dealt with or dual energy imaging techniques to be studied. The simulation principle is completely deterministic and consequently the computed images present no photon noise. Nevertheless, the variance of the signal associated with each pixel of the detector can be determined, which enables contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) maps to be computed, in order to predict quantitatively the detectability of defects in the inspected object. The CNR is a relevant indicator for optimizing the experimental parameters. This paper provides several examples of simulated images that illustrate some of the rich possibilities offered by our software. Depending on the simulation type, the computation time order of magnitude can vary from 0.1 s (simple radiographic projection) up to several hours (3D tomography) on a PC, with a 400 MHz microprocessor. Our simulation tool proves to be useful in developing new specific applications, in choosing the most suitable components when designing a new testing chain, and in saving time by reducing the number of experimental tests

  13. Kalman filter techniques for accelerated Cartesian dynamic cardiac imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Salerno, Michael; Kramer, Christopher M; Meyer, Craig H

    2013-05-01

    In dynamic MRI, spatial and temporal parallel imaging can be exploited to reduce scan time. Real-time reconstruction enables immediate visualization during the scan. Commonly used view-sharing techniques suffer from limited temporal resolution, and many of the more advanced reconstruction methods are either retrospective, time-consuming, or both. A Kalman filter model capable of real-time reconstruction can be used to increase the spatial and temporal resolution in dynamic MRI reconstruction. The original study describing the use of the Kalman filter in dynamic MRI was limited to non-Cartesian trajectories because of a limitation intrinsic to the dynamic model used in that study. Here the limitation is overcome, and the model is applied to the more commonly used Cartesian trajectory with fast reconstruction. Furthermore, a combination of the Kalman filter model with Cartesian parallel imaging is presented to further increase the spatial and temporal resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Simulations and experiments were conducted to demonstrate that the Kalman filter model can increase the temporal resolution of the image series compared with view-sharing techniques and decrease the spatial aliasing compared with TGRAPPA. The method requires relatively little computation, and thus is suitable for real-time reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nonlinear plasmonic imaging techniques and their biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Fujita, Katsumasa; Chu, Shi-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear optics, when combined with microscopy, is known to provide advantages including novel contrast, deep tissue observation, and minimal invasiveness. In addition, special nonlinearities, such as switch on/off and saturation, can enhance the spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy. These nonlinear imaging techniques are extremely useful for biological studies on various scales from molecules to cells to tissues. Nevertheless, in most cases, nonlinear optical interaction requires strong illumination, typically at least gigawatts per square centimeter intensity. Such strong illumination can cause significant phototoxicity or even photodamage to fragile biological samples. Therefore, it is highly desirable to find mechanisms that allow the reduction of illumination intensity. Surface plasmon, which is the collective oscillation of electrons in metal under light excitation, is capable of significantly enhancing the local field around the metal nanostructures and thus boosting up the efficiency of nonlinear optical interactions of the surrounding materials or of the metal itself. In this mini-review, we discuss the recent progress of plasmonics in nonlinear optical microscopy with a special focus on biological applications. The advancement of nonlinear imaging modalities (including incoherent/coherent Raman scattering, two/three-photon luminescence, and second/third harmonic generations that have been amalgamated with plasmonics), as well as the novel subdiffraction limit imaging techniques based on nonlinear behaviors of plasmonic scattering, is addressed.

  15. Nonlinear plasmonic imaging techniques and their biological applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deka Gitanjal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear optics, when combined with microscopy, is known to provide advantages including novel contrast, deep tissue observation, and minimal invasiveness. In addition, special nonlinearities, such as switch on/off and saturation, can enhance the spatial resolution below the diffraction limit, revolutionizing the field of optical microscopy. These nonlinear imaging techniques are extremely useful for biological studies on various scales from molecules to cells to tissues. Nevertheless, in most cases, nonlinear optical interaction requires strong illumination, typically at least gigawatts per square centimeter intensity. Such strong illumination can cause significant phototoxicity or even photodamage to fragile biological samples. Therefore, it is highly desirable to find mechanisms that allow the reduction of illumination intensity. Surface plasmon, which is the collective oscillation of electrons in metal under light excitation, is capable of significantly enhancing the local field around the metal nanostructures and thus boosting up the efficiency of nonlinear optical interactions of the surrounding materials or of the metal itself. In this mini-review, we discuss the recent progress of plasmonics in nonlinear optical microscopy with a special focus on biological applications. The advancement of nonlinear imaging modalities (including incoherent/coherent Raman scattering, two/three-photon luminescence, and second/third harmonic generations that have been amalgamated with plasmonics, as well as the novel subdiffraction limit imaging techniques based on nonlinear behaviors of plasmonic scattering, is addressed.

  16. Signal and image processing techniques for functional near-infrared imaging of the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toronov, Vladislav Y.; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele; Webb, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Near-infrared spectro-imaging (NIRSI) is a quickly developing method for the in-vivo imaging of biological tissues. In particular, it is now extensively employed for imaging the human brain. In this non-invasive technique, the information about the brain is obtained from the analysis of spatial light bundles formed by the photons traveling from light sources to detectors placed on the surface of the head. Most significant problems in the functional brain NIRSI are the separation of the brain information from the physiological noise in non-cerebral tissues, and the localization of functional signals. In this paper we describe signal and image processing techniques we developed in order to measure two types of functional cerebral signals: the hemodynamic responses, and neuronal responses. PMID:21738383

  17. Development of a Nondestructive Non-Contact Acousto-Thermal Evaluation Technique for Damage Detection in Materials (Preprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    evaluate incipient thermal damage in composite structures. An aluminum aircraft wheel with a crack was used to show the applicability of the technique...ultrasonic and thermography NDE techniques have been valuable in detecting damage due to sub-surface delamination. Thermal exposure of PMCs can cause...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2011-4366 DEVELOPMENT OF A NONDESTRUCTIVE NON- CONTACT ACOUSTO-THERMAL EVALUATION TECHNIQUE FOR DAMAGE DETECTION IN MATERIALS

  18. Image Analysis Technique for Material Behavior Evaluation in Civil Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Michele; Rossi, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a hybrid monitoring technique for the measurement of the deformation field. The goal is to obtain information about crack propagation in existing structures, for the purpose of monitoring their state of health. The measurement technique is based on the capture and analysis of a digital image set. Special markers were used on the surface of the structures that can be removed without damaging existing structures as the historical masonry. The digital image analysis was done using software specifically designed in Matlab to follow the tracking of the markers and determine the evolution of the deformation state. The method can be used in any type of structure but is particularly suitable when it is necessary not to damage the surface of structures. A series of experiments carried out on masonry walls of the Oliverian Museum (Pesaro, Italy) and Palazzo Silvi (Perugia, Italy) have allowed the validation of the procedure elaborated by comparing the results with those derived from traditional measuring techniques. PMID:28773129

  19. Design and high-volume manufacture of low-cost molded IR aspheres for personal thermal imaging devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelazny, A. L.; Walsh, K. F.; Deegan, J. P.; Bundschuh, B.; Patton, E. K.

    2015-05-01

    The demand for infrared optical elements, particularly those made of chalcogenide materials, is rapidly increasing as thermal imaging becomes affordable to the consumer. The use of these materials in conjunction with established lens manufacturing techniques presents unique challenges relative to the cost sensitive nature of this new market. We explore the process from design to manufacture, and discuss the technical challenges involved. Additionally, facets of the development process including manufacturing logistics, packaging, supply chain management, and qualification are discussed.

  20. Investigation of thermal and optical properties of thin WO3 films by the photothermal Deflection Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaied, I; Yacoubi, N; Dabbous, S; Nasrallah, T Ben

    2010-01-01

    Owing to its novel physical properties, as well as its technological implication in many fields, the thermal and optical properties of WO 3 thin films are studied here. These thin films are prepared from Ammonium Tungstate and deposited on a glass substrate at 400 0 C by the Spray Pyrolysis Technique. The thermal properties (Thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity) were studied by the Photothermal Deflection method in its uniform heating case instead of traditionally a non uniform heating one by comparing the experimental amplitude and phase variations versus square root modulation frequency to the corresponding theoretical ones. The best coincidence between theory and experience is obtained for well-defined values of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity. The optical properties (optical absorption spectrum and gap energy) were measured using the Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) by drawing the amplitude and phase variation versus wavelength in experimental way and versus absorption coefficient in theoretical one at a fixed modulation frequency. By comparing point by point the normalised experimental and corresponding theoretical amplitude variation, one can deduce the optical absorption spectrum. Using the Tauc law for energies above the gap we can deduce the gap energy. We notice that these films show low thermal conductivity and high transparency in the visible range.

  1. Optimization of Thermal Aspects of Friction Stir Welding – Initial Studies Using a Space Mapping Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup; Bendsøe, Martin P.; Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize a thermal model of a friction stir welding process. The optimization is performed using a space mapping technique in which an analytical model is used along with the FEM model to be optimized. The results are compared to traditional gradient based optimization...

  2. Effects of restoration techniques on breeding birds in a thermally-impacted bottomland hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Matthew Buffington; John C. Kilgo; Robert A. Sargent; Karl V. Miller; Brian R. Chapman

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of revegetation techniques on breeding bird communities in a bottomland hardwood forest impacted by thermal effluent. In 1993, sections of the Pen Branch bottomland on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, were herbicide-treated (glyphosate), burned, and planted; other sections were planted only while others were unaltered and served as...

  3. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  4. The role of functional imaging techniques in the dementia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Young Hoon [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-06-01

    Evaluation of dementia in patients with early symptoms of cognitive decline is clinically challenging, but the need for early, accurate diagnosis has become more crucial, since several medication for the treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer' disease are available. Many neurodegenerative diseases produce significant brain function alteration even when structural imaging (CT of MRI) reveal no specific abnormalities. The role of PET and SPECT brain imaging in the initial assessment and differential diagnosis of dementia is beginning to evolve rapidly and growing evidence indicates that appropriate incorporation of PET into the clinical work up can improve diagnostic and prognostic accuracy with respect to Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia in the geriatric population. In the fast few years, studies comparing neuropathologic examination with PET have established reliable and consistent accuracy for diagnostic evaluations using PET - accuracies substantially exceeding those of comparable studies of diagnostic value of SPECT or of both modalities assessed side by side, or of clinical evaluations done without nuclear imaging. This review deals the role of functional brian imaging techniques in the evaluation of dementias and the role of nuclear neuroimaging in the early detection and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. Monitoring Therapeutic Treatments against Burkholderia Infections Using Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany M. Mott

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei, the etiologic agent of glanders, are Category B select agents with biothreat potential, and yet effective therapeutic treatments are lacking. In this study, we showed that CpG administration increased survival, demonstrating protection in the murine glanders model. Bacterial recovery from infected lungs, liver and spleen was significantly reduced in CpG-treated animals as compared with non-treated mice. Reciprocally, lungs of CpG-treated infected animals were infiltrated with higher levels of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, as compared to control animals. Employing the B. mallei bioluminescent strain CSM001 and the Neutrophil-Specific Fluorescent Imaging Agent, bacterial dissemination and neutrophil trafficking were monitored in real-time using multimodal in vivo whole body imaging techniques. CpG-treatment increased recruitment of neutrophils to the lungs and reduced bioluminescent bacteria, correlating with decreased bacterial burden and increased protection against acute murine glanders. Our results indicate that protection of CpG-treated animals was associated with recruitment of neutrophils prior to infection and demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous real time in vivo imaging of neutrophils and bacteria. This study provides experimental evidence supporting the importance of incorporating optimized in vivo imaging methods to monitor disease progression and to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic treatment during bacterial infections.

  6. Inside Out: Modern Imaging Techniques to Reveal Animal Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Hansen, Kasper; Wang, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    allow for creation of three-dimensional representations that can be of considerable value in the dissemination of anatomical studies. In this methodological review, we present our experiences using MRI, CT and mCT to create advanced representation of animal anatomy, including bones, inner organs...... and blood vessels in a variety of animals, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and spiders. The images have a similar quality to most traditional anatomical drawings and are presented together with interactive movies of the anatomical structures, where the object can be viewed from different...... angles. Given that clinical scanners found in the majority of larger hospitals are fully suitable for these purposes, we encourage biologists to take advantage of these imaging techniques in creation of three-dimensional graphical representations of internal structures...

  7. Iterative motion compensation approach for ultrasonic thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Ioana; Hager, Gregory; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad

    2015-03-01

    As thermal imaging attempts to estimate very small tissue motion (on the order of tens of microns), it can be negatively influenced by signal decorrelation. Patient's breathing and cardiac cycle generate shifts in the RF signal patterns. Other sources of movement could be found outside the patient's body, like transducer slippage or small vibrations due to environment factors like electronic noise. Here, we build upon a robust displacement estimation method for ultrasound elastography and we investigate an iterative motion compensation algorithm, which can detect and remove non-heat induced tissue motion at every step of the ablation procedure. The validation experiments are performed on laboratory induced ablation lesions in ex-vivo tissue. The ultrasound probe is either held by the operator's hand or supported by a robotic arm. We demonstrate the ability to detect and remove non-heat induced tissue motion in both settings. We show that removing extraneous motion helps unmask the effects of heating. Our strain estimation curves closely mirror the temperature changes within the tissue. While previous results in the area of motion compensation were reported for experiments lasting less than 10 seconds, our algorithm was tested on experiments that lasted close to 20 minutes.

  8. Two-dimensional Imaging Velocity Interferometry: Technique and Data Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erskine, D J; Smith, R F; Bolme, C; Celliers, P; Collins, G

    2011-03-23

    We describe the data analysis procedures for an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image at a moment in time, i.e. a snapshot 2d-VISAR. Velocity interferometers (VISAR) measuring target motion to high precision have been an important diagnostic in shockwave physics for many years Until recently, this diagnostic has been limited to measuring motion at points or lines across a target. We introduce an emerging interferometric technique for measuring motion across a two-dimensional image, which could be called a snapshot 2d-VISAR. If a sufficiently fast movie camera technology existed, it could be placed behind a traditional VISAR optical system and record a 2d image vs time. But since that technology is not yet available, we use a CCD detector to record a single 2d image, with the pulsed nature of the illumination providing the time resolution. Consequently, since we are using pulsed illumination having a coherence length shorter than the VISAR interferometer delay ({approx}0.1 ns), we must use the white light velocimetry configuration to produce fringes with significant visibility. In this scheme, two interferometers (illuminating, detecting) having nearly identical delays are used in series, with one before the target and one after. This produces fringes with at most 50% visibility, but otherwise has the same fringe shift per target motion of a traditional VISAR. The 2d-VISAR observes a new world of information about shock behavior not readily accessible by traditional point or 1d-VISARS, simultaneously providing both a velocity map and an 'ordinary' snapshot photograph of the target. The 2d-VISAR has been used to observe nonuniformities in NIF related targets (polycrystalline diamond, Be), and in Si and Al.

  9. A comparative analysis of multi-pulse techniques in contrast-enhanced ultrasound medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocco, M; Palmese, M; Sciallero, C; Trucco, A

    2009-01-01

    One of the important issues in the field of ultrasound medical imaging using contrast agents is the development of techniques able to separate the response of the contrast media from that of the biological tissues. In the literature, one can find various solutions involving the use of multiple transmitted signals and the combination of related echoes. However, the quality of these techniques may be reduced due to some undesired effects that are seldom considered, despite the fact that they are always present in real systems. These effects are the signal distortions introduced by the hardware equipment, the thermal noise in the electronic circuitry, and body motion between successive pulses. In this paper we propose a simulation tool that will allow the calculation of the backscattered echo from a population of contrast agents immersed in a biological tissue, considering all the mentioned effects. With this tool, an assessment of the comparative robustness of three well-known multi-pulse techniques has been carried out under realistic working conditions and the performance of the three techniques has been evaluated in terms of contrast-to-tissue ratio and signal-to-noise ratio. The results show that the undesired effects have a strong impact on these techniques and that there are notable differences in their robustness. Finally, some suggestions on the choice of the particular technique to be applied are provided on the basis of the specific work conditions.

  10. A fast image reconstruction technique based on ART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shunli; Zhang Dinghua; Wang Kai; Huang Kuidong; Li Weibin

    2007-01-01

    Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) is an iterative method for image reconstruction. Improving its reconstruction speed has been one of the important researching aspects of ART. For the simplified weight coefficients reconstruction model of ART, a fast grid traverse algorithm is proposed, which can determine the grid index by simple operations such as addition, subtraction and comparison. Since the weight coefficients are calculated at real time during iteration, large amount of storage is saved and the reconstruction speed is greatly increased. Experimental results show that the new algorithm is very effective and the reconstruction speed is improved about 10 times compared with the traditional algorithm. (authors)

  11. Automatic identification of corrosion damage using image processing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bento, Mariana P.; Ramalho, Geraldo L.B.; Medeiros, Fatima N.S. de; Ribeiro, Elvis S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Medeiros, Luiz C.L. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper proposes a Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) method for atmospheric corrosion detection on metallic surfaces using digital images. In this study, the uniform corrosion is characterized by texture attributes extracted from co-occurrence matrix and the Self Organizing Mapping (SOM) clustering algorithm. We present a technique for automatic inspection of oil and gas storage tanks and pipelines of petrochemical industries without disturbing their properties and performance. Experimental results are promising and encourage the possibility of using this methodology in designing trustful and robust early failure detection systems. (author)

  12. Elastography of the Breast: Imaging Techniques and Pitfalls in Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Woo Kyung; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) elastography is a tool that indicates the hardness of a lesion. Recent studies using elastography with freehand compression have shown similar diagnostic performance to conventional US in differentiating benign lesions from malignant breast masses. On the other hand, the acquired information is not quantitative, and the reliability of the imaging technique to correctly compress the tissue depends on the skill of the operator, resulting in substantial interobserver variability during data acquisition and interpretation. To overcome this, shear wave elastography was developed to provide quantitative information on the tissue elasticity. The system works by remotely inducing mechanical vibrations through the acoustic radiation force created by a focused US beam. This review discusses the principles and examination techniques of the two types of elastography systems and provides practical points to reduce the interobserver variability or errors during data acquisition and interpretation

  13. Imaging monitoring techniques applications in the transient gratings detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-ming

    2009-07-01

    Experimental studies of Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) in iodine vapor at atmospheric pressure and 0℃ and 25℃ are reported. The Laser-induced grating (LIG) studies are carried out by generating the thermal grating using a pulsed, narrow bandwidth, dye laser .A new image processing system for detecting forward DFWM spectroscopy on iodine vapor is reported. This system is composed of CCD camera, imaging processing card and the related software. With the help of the detecting system, phase matching can be easily achieved in the optical arrangement by crossing the two pumps and the probe as diagonals linking opposite corners of a rectangular box ,and providing a way to position the PhotoMultiplier Tube (PMT) . Also it is practical to know the effect of the pointing stability on the optical path by monitoring facula changing with the laser beam pointing and disturbs of the environment. Finally the effects of Photostability of dye laser on the ration of signal to noise in DFWM using forward geometries have been investigated in iodine vapor. This system makes it feasible that the potential application of FG-DFWM is used as a diagnostic tool in combustion research and environment monitoring.

  14. Finite Element Determination of Thermal Conductivity of SiAlON Ceramics Using Sem Images

    OpenAIRE

    Uzun, İbrahim; Pehlivanlı, Zühtü; Doğan, Battal

    2009-01-01

    The thermal conductivity for SiAlON ceramics which are used as a cutting tool material in manufacturing industry has been investigated experimentally, theoretically, and finally numerically. In the experiments, the flash technique was used to determine the thermal conductivity by using the measured thermal diffusion coefficient data in the unsteady regime. Using Maxwell’s, serial, and parallel analytical models, the theoretical thermal conductivities have been determined.For the numerical stu...

  15. Radionuclide imaging of parathyroid tumors: historical perspectives and newer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Hydovitz, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    The increasing use of automated blood chemistry screens for serum calcium levels along with improved methods in measuring parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels have made the diagnosis of parathyroid disease a common clinical problem. Parathyroid adenomas account for the majority of primary hyperparathyroidism with diffuse hyperplasia and parathyroid carcinoma occurring less frequently. Early scintigraphic techniques to identify enlarged parathyroids used selenomethionine-75 which was considered to be incorporated into PTH. In general, the sensitivity of scanning the neck using this tracer was related to the size of the enlarged parathyroid, but in large series, the overall sensitivity was less than 50%. Recent work by Ferlin et al, using a Technetium-99m/Thallium-201 subtraction scintigraphic technique has yielded a sensitivity of 92% in identifying pathologically enlarged parathyroid glands. Winzelberg et al modified this technique to allow imaging the mediastinum plus simplifying the subtraction method. In a prospective study with high-resolution sonography, similar sensitivities and specificities were found with sonography and scintigraphy. Tl-201/Tc-99m pertechnetate subtraction scintigraphy appears to be an accurate technique in identifying pathologic parathyroid enlargement. Its ultimate role in the evaluation of patients with suspected hyperparathyroidism still needs to be determined. 37 references.

  16. STUDY OF IMAGE SEGMENTATION TECHNIQUES ON RETINAL IMAGES FOR HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT WITH FAST COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Prabhu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The role of segmentation in image processing is to separate foreground from background. In this process, the features become clearly visible when appropriate filters are applied on the image. In this paper emphasis has been laid on segmentation of biometric retinal images to filter out the vessels explicitly for evaluating the bifurcation points and features for diabetic retinopathy. Segmentation on images is performed by calculating ridges or morphology. Ridges are those areas in the images where there is sharp contrast in features. Morphology targets the features using structuring elements. Structuring elements are of different shapes like disk, line which is used for extracting features of those shapes. When segmentation was performed on retinal images problems were encountered during image pre-processing stage. Also edge detection techniques have been deployed to find out the contours of the retinal images. After the segmentation has been performed, it has been seen that artifacts of the retinal images have been minimal when ridge based segmentation technique was deployed. In the field of Health Care Management, image segmentation has an important role to play as it determines whether a person is normal or having any disease specially diabetes. During the process of segmentation, diseased features are classified as diseased one’s or artifacts. The problem comes when artifacts are classified as diseased ones. This results in misclassification which has been discussed in the analysis Section. We have achieved fast computing with better performance, in terms of speed for non-repeating features, when compared to repeating features.

  17. Automatic DNA Diagnosis for 1D Gel Electrophoresis Images using Bio-image Processing Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intarapanich, Apichart; Kaewkamnerd, Saowaluck; Shaw, Philip J; Ukosakit, Kittipat; Tragoonrung, Somvong; Tongsima, Sissades

    2015-01-01

    DNA gel electrophoresis is a molecular biology technique for separating different sizes of DNA fragments. Applications of DNA gel electrophoresis include DNA fingerprinting (genetic diagnosis), size estimation of DNA, and DNA separation for Southern blotting. Accurate interpretation of DNA banding patterns from electrophoretic images can be laborious and error prone when a large number of bands are interrogated manually. Although many bio-imaging techniques have been proposed, none of them can fully automate the typing of DNA owing to the complexities of migration patterns typically obtained. We developed an image-processing tool that automatically calls genotypes from DNA gel electrophoresis images. The image processing workflow comprises three main steps: 1) lane segmentation, 2) extraction of DNA bands and 3) band genotyping classification. The tool was originally intended to facilitate large-scale genotyping analysis of sugarcane cultivars. We tested the proposed tool on 10 gel images (433 cultivars) obtained from polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of PCR amplicons for detecting intron length polymorphisms (ILP) on one locus of the sugarcanes. These gel images demonstrated many challenges in automated lane/band segmentation in image processing including lane distortion, band deformity, high degree of noise in the background, and bands that are very close together (doublets). Using the proposed bio-imaging workflow, lanes and DNA bands contained within are properly segmented, even for adjacent bands with aberrant migration that cannot be separated by conventional techniques. The software, called GELect, automatically performs genotype calling on each lane by comparing with an all-banding reference, which was created by clustering the existing bands into the non-redundant set of reference bands. The automated genotype calling results were verified by independent manual typing by molecular biologists. This work presents an automated genotyping tool from DNA

  18. Automatic DNA Diagnosis for 1D Gel Electrophoresis Images using Bio-image Processing Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background DNA gel electrophoresis is a molecular biology technique for separating different sizes of DNA fragments. Applications of DNA gel electrophoresis include DNA fingerprinting (genetic diagnosis), size estimation of DNA, and DNA separation for Southern blotting. Accurate interpretation of DNA banding patterns from electrophoretic images can be laborious and error prone when a large number of bands are interrogated manually. Although many bio-imaging techniques have been proposed, none of them can fully automate the typing of DNA owing to the complexities of migration patterns typically obtained. Results We developed an image-processing tool that automatically calls genotypes from DNA gel electrophoresis images. The image processing workflow comprises three main steps: 1) lane segmentation, 2) extraction of DNA bands and 3) band genotyping classification. The tool was originally intended to facilitate large-scale genotyping analysis of sugarcane cultivars. We tested the proposed tool on 10 gel images (433 cultivars) obtained from polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of PCR amplicons for detecting intron length polymorphisms (ILP) on one locus of the sugarcanes. These gel images demonstrated many challenges in automated lane/band segmentation in image processing including lane distortion, band deformity, high degree of noise in the background, and bands that are very close together (doublets). Using the proposed bio-imaging workflow, lanes and DNA bands contained within are properly segmented, even for adjacent bands with aberrant migration that cannot be separated by conventional techniques. The software, called GELect, automatically performs genotype calling on each lane by comparing with an all-banding reference, which was created by clustering the existing bands into the non-redundant set of reference bands. The automated genotype calling results were verified by independent manual typing by molecular biologists. Conclusions This work presents an

  19. Diagnosis Of The Risk For Carotid Artery Stenos Based On Thermal Model In Infrared Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Valipoori Goodarzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Ischemic stroke is the third leading cause of death and a common cause of hospitalization in the United States of America and is also an important factor for Inability of patients and carotid stenos is one of the most important factors in creating it. Now, Imaging studies include: Angiography, MRI, CT scan and Doppler ultrasonography , are used to detect carotid artery stenos that is one of the most important causes of ischemic stroke. However, each method has unique advantages and disadvantages, that many of them will have a compromise between performance and accuracy versus easy usage and cost considerations. In contrast, in this paper, thermography is used as a non-invasive and cost effective to detect carotid artery Stenos and thus the risk of stroke. Materials and methods: This study is done on a series of thermal images obtained from the Clinical Center in California. In this imaging, the automatic detection of carotid artery stenos and thus Risk for stroke was done, based on: (1 the difference of average temperature between the right and left carotid arteries in the neck (2 The presence or absence of internal and external carotid arteries. Results: In this study, with the survey conducted by a specialist brain of patients had been previously, the accuracy of this work is confirmed. the techniques and points that are Experimental and  scientifically based  and obtained in this study, can help to doctors for Early detection of Artery disease, based on analysis of thermal images . Conclusion: The method presented in this paper is considered as a non-invasive and cost-effective method that automatically operates to detect the carotid arteries and prevent the Risk for stroke.

  20. Thermal Analysis of Brazing Seal and Sterilizing Technique to Break Contamination Chain for Mars Sample Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2015-01-01

    The potential to return Martian samples to Earth for extensive analysis is in great interest of the planetary science community. It is important to make sure the mission would securely contain any microbes that may possibly exist on Mars so that they would not be able to cause any adverse effects on Earth's environment. A brazing sealing and sterilizing technique has been proposed to break the Mars-to-Earth contamination chain. Thermal analysis of the brazing process was conducted for several conceptual designs that apply the technique. Control of the increase of the temperature of the Martian samples is a challenge. The temperature profiles of the Martian samples being sealed in the container were predicted by finite element thermal models. The results show that the sealing and sterilization process can be controlled such that the samples' temperature is maintained below the potentially required level, and that the brazing technique is a feasible approach to break the contamination chain.

  1. Imaging Techniques for Clinical Burn Assessment with a Focus on Multispectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Jeffrey E; Squiers, John J; Kanick, Stephen C; King, Darlene R; Lu, Yang; Wang, Yulin; Mohan, Rachit; Sellke, Eric W; DiMaio, J Michael

    2016-08-01

    Significance: Burn assessments, including extent and severity, are some of the most critical diagnoses in burn care, and many recently developed imaging techniques may have the potential to improve the accuracy of these evaluations. Recent Advances: Optical devices, telemedicine, and high-frequency ultrasound are among the highlights in recent burn imaging advancements. We present another promising technology, multispectral imaging (MSI), which also has the potential to impact current medical practice in burn care, among a variety of other specialties. Critical Issues: At this time, it is still a matter of debate as to why there is no consensus on the use of technology to assist burn assessments in the United States. Fortunately, the availability of techniques does not appear to be a limitation. However, the selection of appropriate imaging technology to augment the provision of burn care can be difficult for clinicians to navigate. There are many technologies available, but a comprehensive review summarizing the tissue characteristics measured by each technology in light of aiding clinicians in selecting the proper device is missing. This would be especially valuable for the nonburn specialists who encounter burn injuries. Future Directions: The questions of when burn assessment devices are useful to the burn team, how the various imaging devices work, and where the various burn imaging technologies fit into the spectrum of burn care will continue to be addressed. Technologies that can image a large surface area quickly, such as thermography or laser speckle imaging, may be suitable for initial burn assessment and triage. In the setting of presurgical planning, ultrasound or optical microscopy techniques, including optical coherence tomography, may prove useful. MSI, which actually has origins in burn care, may ultimately meet a high number of requirements for burn assessment in routine clinical use.

  2. Security surveillance challenges and proven thermal imaging capabilities in real-world applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Glen L.; Roberts, Sharon

    2004-09-01

    Uncooled thermal imaging was first introduced to the public in early 1980's by Raytheon (legacy Texas Instruments Defense Segment Electronics Group) as a solution for military applications. Since the introduction of this technology, Raytheon has remained the leader in this market as well as introduced commercial versions of thermal imaging products specifically designed for security, law enforcement, fire fighting, automotive and industrial uses. Today, low cost thermal imaging for commercial use in security applications is a reality. Organizations of all types have begun to understand the advantages of using thermal imaging as a means to solve common surveillance problems where other popular technologies fall short. Thermal imaging has proven to be a successful solution for common security needs such as: ¸ vision at night where lighting is undesired and 24x7 surveillance is needed ¸ surveillance over waterways, lakes and ports where water and lighting options are impractical ¸ surveillance through challenging weather conditions where other technologies will be challenged by atmospheric particulates ¸ low maintenance requirements due to remote or difficult locations ¸ low cost over life of product Thermal imaging is now a common addition to the integrated security package. Companies are relying on thermal imaging for specific applications where no other technology can perform.

  3. Performance evaluation of image enhancement techniques on a digital image-intensifier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, J.; Bijl, P.; Bouma, H.

    2009-01-01

    Recently new techniques for night-vision cameras are developed. Digital image-intensifiers are becoming available on the market. Also, so-called EMCCD cameras are developed, which may even be able to record color information about the scene. However, in low-light situations all night-vision imagery

  4. A fast ramp rate thermally stimulated current technique to quantify electronic charge dynamics in thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Connie; Thompson, Michael O

    2008-04-01

    Thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques have been applied to study thermally activated events in many materials. However, the temperature ramp rates in traditional TSC are typically too slow (few degrees per minute) to monitor materials whose properties are strongly time dependent. A fast ramp rate TSC (FR-TSC) technique was developed with ramp rates of 1-5 K/s. This is up to 100 times faster than traditional TSC, so that material changes can be appropriately quantified in the time scale at which they take place. In this paper, the experimental design and challenges to achieve fast and stable ramp rates and to measure the low-level currents are discussed. The fast ramps were attained using a thermoelectric cooler, controlled by a proportional-integral-derivative feedback loop, for both heating and cooling. FR-TSC measurements (1 K/s and 20-100 degrees C) on poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) ferroelectric thin films are discussed as an example material. From these measurements, thermally activated currents as well as irreversible and reversible charge dynamics were readily distinguished with multiple thermal cycles. These measurements suggest that this technique holds substantial promise in quantifying charge dynamics in fast response materials.

  5. Finite element analysis and experimental verification of multilayered tissue characterization using the thermal technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharalkar, Nachiket M; Valvano, Jonathan W

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop noninvasive techniques to determine thermal properties of layered biologic structures based on measurements from the surface. The self-heated thermistor technique is evaluated both numerically and experimentally. The finite element analyses, which confirm the experimental results, are used to study the temperature profiles occurring in the thermistor-tissue system. An in vitro tissue model was constructed by placing Teflon of varying thickness between the biologic tissue and the self-heated thermistor. The experiments were performed using two different-sized thermistors on six tissue samples. A self-heated thermistor was used to determine the thermal conductivity of tissue covered by a thin layer Teflon. The results from experimental data clearly indicate that this technique can penetrate below the thin layers of Teflon and thus is sensitive to the thermal properties of the underlying tissue. The factors which may introduce error in the experimental data are (i) poor thermal/physical contact between the thermistor probe and tissue sample, and (ii) water loss from tissue during the course of experimentation. The finite element analysis was used to simulate the experimental conditions and to calculate transient temperature profile generated by the thermistor bead. The results of finite element analysis are in accordance with the experimental data.

  6. A post-processing technique for cranial CT image identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Jun; Wang, Jun-Ling; Chen, Yan-Ling; Li, Wen-Sheng

    2012-09-10

    A major challenge in radiographic identification is the inconsistent orientation between clinical (ante-mortem, AM) and post-mortem (PM) radiographs. The objectivity and accuracy of radiological identification would be greatly enhanced by post-processing techniques that allow quantitative comparison of PM CT data in the same orientation as the AM CT data. We applied a post-processing technique to reposition a multislice computed tomography (MSCT) scan for spatial registration with a CT radiograph from the same patient. A second set of MSCT images from different individuals served as the non-matched control group. The consistency in radiographic positioning eliminated subjectivity in the comparison and identification process because the radiograph superposition provided objective evidence that confirmed the identification with fine detail. A quantitative comparison with statistical validation was achieved by measuring a set of 14 landmarks from the images. Discrimination of identity based on logistic regression analysis of the earlier CT patient scans (the AM group) versus subsequent MSCT scans (the PM group) was objective and reliable. This quantitative comparison depends less on subjective judgment and the experience of the examiner, and so may meet legal standards. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Techniques for RNA in vivo imaging in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilsner, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Since the discovery of small RNAs and RNA silencing, RNA biology has taken a centre stage in cell and developmental biology. Small RNAs, but also mRNAs and other types of cellular and viral RNAs are processed at specific subcellular localizations. To fully understand cellular RNA metabolism and the various processes influenced by it, techniques are required that permit the sequence-specific tracking of RNAs in living cells. A variety of methods for RNA visualization have been developed since the 1990s, but plant cells pose particular challenges and not all approaches are applicable to them. On the other hand, plant RNA metabolism is particularly diverse and RNAs are even transported between cells, so RNA imaging can potentially provide many valuable insights into plant function at the cellular and tissue level. This Short Review briefly introduces the currently available techniques for plant RNA in vivo imaging and discusses their suitability for different biological questions. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Wendy; Ren, Lei; Cai, Jing; Zhang, You; Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. Methods and Materials: One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results: Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against

  9. A Technique for Generating Volumetric Cine-Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Wendy [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ren, Lei, E-mail: lei.ren@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Cai, Jing [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Zhang, You [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Chang, Zheng; Yin, Fang-Fang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop a techique to generate on-board volumetric cine-magnetic resonance imaging (VC-MRI) using patient prior images, motion modeling, and on-board 2-dimensional cine MRI. Methods and Materials: One phase of a 4-dimensional MRI acquired during patient simulation is used as patient prior images. Three major respiratory deformation patterns of the patient are extracted from 4-dimensional MRI based on principal-component analysis. The on-board VC-MRI at any instant is considered as a deformation of the prior MRI. The deformation field is represented as a linear combination of the 3 major deformation patterns. The coefficients of the deformation patterns are solved by the data fidelity constraint using the acquired on-board single 2-dimensional cine MRI. The method was evaluated using both digital extended-cardiac torso (XCAT) simulation of lung cancer patients and MRI data from 4 real liver cancer patients. The accuracy of the estimated VC-MRI was quantitatively evaluated using volume-percent-difference (VPD), center-of-mass-shift (COMS), and target tracking errors. Effects of acquisition orientation, region-of-interest (ROI) selection, patient breathing pattern change, and noise on the estimation accuracy were also evaluated. Results: Image subtraction of ground-truth with estimated on-board VC-MRI shows fewer differences than image subtraction of ground-truth with prior image. Agreement between normalized profiles in the estimated and ground-truth VC-MRI was achieved with less than 6% error for both XCAT and patient data. Among all XCAT scenarios, the VPD between ground-truth and estimated lesion volumes was, on average, 8.43 ± 1.52% and the COMS was, on average, 0.93 ± 0.58 mm across all time steps for estimation based on the ROI region in the sagittal cine images. Matching to ROI in the sagittal view achieved better accuracy when there was substantial breathing pattern change. The technique was robust against

  10. Noninvasive determination of burn depth in children by digital infrared thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Preciado, Jose David; Kolosovas-Machuca, Eleazar Samuel; Velez-Gomez, Ezequiel; Miranda-Altamirano, Ariel; González, Francisco Javier

    2013-06-01

    Digital infrared thermal imaging is used to assess noninvasively the severity of burn wounds in 13 pediatric patients. A delta-T (ΔT) parameter obtained by subtracting the temperature of a healthy contralateral region from the temperature of the burn wound is compared with the burn depth measured histopathologically. Thermal imaging results show that superficial dermal burns (IIa) show increased temperature compared with their contralateral healthy region, while deep dermal burns (IIb) show a lower temperature than their contralateral healthy region. This difference in temperature is statistically significant (pburns. These results show that digital infrared thermal imaging could be used as a noninvasive procedure to assess burn wounds. An additional advantage of using thermal imaging, which can image a large skin surface area, is that it can be used to identify regions with different burn depths and estimate the size of the grafts needed for deep dermal burns.

  11. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Henderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast.

  12. Ultrasonic technique for imaging tissue vibrations: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Siddhartha; Beach, Kirk W; Vaezy, Shahram; Kim, Yongmin

    2005-02-01

    We propose an ultrasound (US)-based technique for imaging vibrations in the blood vessel walls and surrounding tissue caused by eddies produced during flow through narrowed or punctured arteries. Our approach is to utilize the clutter signal, normally suppressed in conventional color flow imaging, to detect and characterize local tissue vibrations. We demonstrate the feasibility of visualizing the origin and extent of vibrations relative to the underlying anatomy and blood flow in real-time and their quantitative assessment, including measurements of the amplitude, frequency and spatial distribution. We present two signal-processing algorithms, one based on phase decomposition and the other based on spectral estimation using eigen decomposition for isolating vibrations from clutter, blood flow and noise using an ensemble of US echoes. In simulation studies, the computationally efficient phase-decomposition method achieved 96% sensitivity and 98% specificity for vibration detection and was robust to broadband vibrations. Somewhat higher sensitivity (98%) and specificity (99%) could be achieved using the more computationally intensive eigen decomposition-based algorithm. Vibration amplitudes as low as 1 mum were measured accurately in phantom experiments. Real-time tissue vibration imaging at typical color-flow frame rates was implemented on a software-programmable US system. Vibrations were studied in vivo in a stenosed femoral bypass vein graft in a human subject and in a punctured femoral artery and incised spleen in an animal model.

  13. Inside out: modern imaging techniques to reveal animal anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Hansen, Kasper; Wang, Tobias; Agger, Peter; Andersen, Jonas L; Knudsen, Peter S; Rasmussen, Anne S; Uhrenholt, Lars; Pedersen, Michael

    2011-03-22

    Animal anatomy has traditionally relied on detailed dissections to produce anatomical illustrations, but modern imaging modalities, such as MRI and CT, now represent an enormous resource that allows for fast non-invasive visualizations of animal anatomy in living animals. These modalities also allow for creation of three-dimensional representations that can be of considerable value in the dissemination of anatomical studies. In this methodological review, we present our experiences using MRI, CT and μCT to create advanced representation of animal anatomy, including bones, inner organs and blood vessels in a variety of animals, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and spiders. The images have a similar quality to most traditional anatomical drawings and are presented together with interactive movies of the anatomical structures, where the object can be viewed from different angles. Given that clinical scanners found in the majority of larger hospitals are fully suitable for these purposes, we encourage biologists to take advantage of these imaging techniques in creation of three-dimensional graphical representations of internal structures.

  14. Inside out: modern imaging techniques to reveal animal anatomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Lauridsen

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Animal anatomy has traditionally relied on detailed dissections to produce anatomical illustrations, but modern imaging modalities, such as MRI and CT, now represent an enormous resource that allows for fast non-invasive visualizations of animal anatomy in living animals. These modalities also allow for creation of three-dimensional representations that can be of considerable value in the dissemination of anatomical studies. In this methodological review, we present our experiences using MRI, CT and μCT to create advanced representation of animal anatomy, including bones, inner organs and blood vessels in a variety of animals, including fish, amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and spiders. The images have a similar quality to most traditional anatomical drawings and are presented together with interactive movies of the anatomical structures, where the object can be viewed from different angles. Given that clinical scanners found in the majority of larger hospitals are fully suitable for these purposes, we encourage biologists to take advantage of these imaging techniques in creation of three-dimensional graphical representations of internal structures.

  15. Assessment of tumors of the lung apex by imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueda, J.; Serrano, F.; Pain, M.I.; Rodriguez, F.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the value of MR in the preoperative staging of tumors of the lung apex and detection of local invasion of adjacent structures to determine its influence on the therapeutic approach. We obtained plain X-ray images in two planes, as well as CT and Mr images, in 12 patients with Pan coast tumor in whom there was surgical (n=8) or clinical (n=4) evidence of invasion. The objective was to assess local infiltration of brain stem and chest wall soft tissue, enveloping of the subclavian artery, substantial involvement of the brachial plexus and destruction of the vertebral body. In our series, MR was superior to the other imaging techniques in predicting the involvement of the structures surrounding the tumor. In conclusion, MR should be performed in a patient diagnosed by plain radiography as having an apical tumors to assess local tumor extension, while CT should be done to detect mediastinal lymph node involvement and distant metastases. 19 refs

  16. Distributed Source Coding Techniques for Lossless Compression of Hyperspectral Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Grangetto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the application of distributed source coding (DSC theory to remote sensing image compression. Although DSC exhibits a significant potential in many application fields, up till now the results obtained on real signals fall short of the theoretical bounds, and often impose additional system-level constraints. The objective of this paper is to assess the potential of DSC for lossless image compression carried out onboard a remote platform. We first provide a brief overview of DSC of correlated information sources. We then focus on onboard lossless image compression, and apply DSC techniques in order to reduce the complexity of the onboard encoder, at the expense of the decoder's, by exploiting the correlation of different bands of a hyperspectral dataset. Specifically, we propose two different compression schemes, one based on powerful binary error-correcting codes employed as source codes, and one based on simpler multilevel coset codes. The performance of both schemes is evaluated on a few AVIRIS scenes, and is compared with other state-of-the-art 2D and 3D coders. Both schemes turn out to achieve competitive compression performance, and one of them also has reduced complexity. Based on these results, we highlight the main issues that are still to be solved to further improve the performance of DSC-based remote sensing systems.

  17. Real-time windowing in imaging radar using FPGA technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Escamilla-Hernandez, Enrique

    2005-02-01

    The imaging radar uses the high frequency electromagnetic waves reflected from different objects for estimating of its parameters. Pulse compression is a standard signal processing technique used to minimize the peak transmission power and to maximize SNR, and to get a better resolution. Usually the pulse compression can be achieved using a matched filter. The level of the side-lobes in the imaging radar can be reduced using the special weighting function processing. There are very known different weighting functions: Hamming, Hanning, Blackman, Chebyshev, Blackman-Harris, Kaiser-Bessel, etc., widely used in the signal processing applications. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) offers great benefits like instantaneous implementation, dynamic reconfiguration, design, and field programmability. This reconfiguration makes FPGAs a better solution over custom-made integrated circuits. This work aims at demonstrating a reasonably flexible implementation of FM-linear signal and pulse compression using Matlab, Simulink, and System Generator. Employing FPGA and mentioned software we have proposed the pulse compression design on FPGA using classical and novel windows technique to reduce the side-lobes level. This permits increasing the detection ability of the small or nearly placed targets in imaging radar. The advantage of FPGA that can do parallelism in real time processing permits to realize the proposed algorithms. The paper also presents the experimental results of proposed windowing procedure in the marine radar with such the parameters: signal is linear FM (Chirp); frequency deviation DF is 9.375MHz; the pulse width T is 3.2μs taps number in the matched filter is 800 taps; sampling frequency 253.125*106 MHz. It has been realized the reducing of side-lobes levels in real time permitting better resolution of the small targets.

  18. Real-time thermal imaging of solid oxide fuel cell cathode activity in working condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino; Piccolo, Sebastiano

    2016-01-01

    preserving the electrochemical performance of the device. Infrared images recorded under different working conditions are then processed by means of a dedicated image processing algorithm for quantitative data analysis. Results reported in the paper highlight the effectiveness of infrared thermal imaging...

  19. Factors affecting thermal infrared images at selected field sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisson, J.B.; Ferguson, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    A thermal infrared (TIR) survey was conducted to locate surface ordnance in and around the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, and a thermal anomaly was found. This report documents studies conducted to identify the position of cause of the thermal anomaly. Also included are results of a long path Fourier transform infrared survey, soil sampling activities, soil gas surveys, and buried heater studies. The results of these studies indicated that the thermal anomaly was caused by a gravel pad, which had thermal properties different than those of the surrounding soil. Results from this investigation suggest that TIR is useful for locating surface objects having a high thermal inertia compared to the surrounding terrain, but TIR is of very limited use for characterizing buried waste or other similar buried objects at the INEL

  20. Advances in high-resolution imaging--techniques for three-dimensional imaging of cellular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidke, Diane S; Lidke, Keith A

    2012-06-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to determine how cellular organization is coupled to function. To achieve this goal, a better understanding of organelle composition and structure is needed. Although visualization of cellular organelles using fluorescence or electron microscopy (EM) has become a common tool for the cell biologist, recent advances are providing a clearer picture of the cell than ever before. In particular, advanced light-microscopy techniques are achieving resolutions below the diffraction limit and EM tomography provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) images of cellular structures. The ability to perform both fluorescence and electron microscopy on the same sample (correlative light and electron microscopy, CLEM) makes it possible to identify where a fluorescently labeled protein is located with respect to organelle structures visualized by EM. Here, we review the current state of the art in 3D biological imaging techniques with a focus on recent advances in electron microscopy and fluorescence super-resolution techniques.

  1. Final Project Report: Imaging Fault Zones Using a Novel Elastic Reverse-Time Migration Imaging Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chen, Ting [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tan, Sirui [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lin, Youzuo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gao, Kai [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-10

    Imaging fault zones and fractures is crucial for geothermal operators, providing important information for reservoir evaluation and management strategies. However, there are no existing techniques available for directly and clearly imaging fault zones, particularly for steeply dipping faults and fracture zones. In this project, we developed novel acoustic- and elastic-waveform inversion methods for high-resolution velocity model building. In addition, we developed acoustic and elastic reverse-time migration methods for high-resolution subsurface imaging of complex subsurface structures and steeply-dipping fault/fracture zones. We first evaluated and verified the improved capabilities of our newly developed seismic inversion and migration imaging methods using synthetic seismic data. Our numerical tests verified that our new methods directly image subsurface fracture/fault zones using surface seismic reflection data. We then applied our novel seismic inversion and migration imaging methods to a field 3D surface seismic dataset acquired at the Soda Lake geothermal field using Vibroseis sources. Our migration images of the Soda Lake geothermal field obtained using our seismic inversion and migration imaging algorithms revealed several possible fault/fracture zones. AltaRock Energy, Inc. is working with Cyrq Energy, Inc. to refine the geologic interpretation at the Soda Lake geothermal field. Trenton Cladouhos, Senior Vice President R&D of AltaRock, was very interested in our imaging results of 3D surface seismic data from the Soda Lake geothermal field. He planed to perform detailed interpretation of our images in collaboration with James Faulds and Holly McLachlan of University of Nevada at Reno. Using our high-resolution seismic inversion and migration imaging results can help determine the optimal locations to drill wells for geothermal energy production and reduce the risk of geothermal exploration.

  2. Dual-energy imaging of the chest: optimization of image acquisition techniques for the 'bone-only' image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkumat, N A; Siewerdsen, J H; Richard, S; Paul, N S; Yorkston, J; Van Metter, R

    2008-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine optimal acquisition techniques for bone image decompositions for a prototype dual-energy (DE) imaging system. Technique parameters included kVp pair (denoted [kVp(L)/kVp(H)]) and dose allocation (the proportion of dose in low- and high-energy projections), each optimized to provide maximum signal difference-to-noise ratio in DE images. Experiments involved a chest phantom representing an average patient size and containing simulated ribs and lung nodules. Low- and high-energy kVp were varied from 60-90 and 120-150 kVp, respectively. The optimal kVp pair was determined to be [60/130] kVp, with image quality showing a strong dependence on low-kVp selection. Optimal dose allocation was approximately 0.5-i.e., an equal dose imparted by the low- and high-energy projections. The results complement earlier studies of optimal DE soft-tissue image acquisition, with differences attributed to the specific imaging task. Together, the results help to guide the development and implementation of high-performance DE imaging systems, with applications including lung nodule detection and diagnosis, pneumothorax identification, and musculoskeletal imaging (e.g., discrimination of rib fractures from metastasis).

  3. Radiation exposure to patients from image guidance procedures and techniques to reduce the imaging dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Munro, Peter

    2013-07-01

    To compare imaging doses from MV images, kV radiographs, and kV-CBCT and describe methods to reduce the dose to patient's organs using existing on-board imaging devices. Monte Carlo techniques were used to simulate kV X-ray sources. The kV image doses to a variety of patient anatomies were calculated by using the simulated realistic sources to deposit dose in patient CT images. For MV imaging, the doses for the same patients were calculated using a commercial treatment planning system. Portal imaging results in the largest dose to anatomic structures, followed by Varian OBI CBCT, Varian TrueBeam CBCT and then kV radiographs. The imaging doses for the 50% volume from the DVHs, D50, to the eyes for representative head images are 4.3-4.8cGy; 0.05-0.06cGy; 0.04-0.05cGy; and, 0.12cGy; D50 to the bladder for representative pelvis images are 3.3cGy; 1.6cGy; 1.0cGy; and, 0.07cGy; while D50 to the heart for representative thorax images are 3.5cGy; 0.42cGy; 0.2cGy; and, 0.07cGy; when using portal imaging, OBI kV-CBCT scans, TrueBeam kV-CBCT scans and kV radiographs, respectively. The orientation of the kV beam can affect organ dose. For example, D50 to the eyes can be reduced from 0.12cGy using AP and right lateral radiographs to 0.008-0.017cGy when using PA and right lateral radiographs. In addition, organ exposures can be further reduced to 15-70% of their original values with the use of a full-fan, bow-tie filter for kV radiographs. In contrast, organ doses increase by a factor of ∼2-4 if bow-tie filters are not used during kV-CBCT acquisitions. Current on-board kV imaging devices result in much lower imaging doses compared to MV imagers even taking into account of higher bone dose from kV X-rays. And a variety of approaches are available to significantly reduce the image doses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P.; Kim, Kang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer, and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5-14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13-24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n=10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n=10) with low fat content (4.8± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ~3 s and ~9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (−0.065±0.079%) were significantly (p<0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (−0.124±0

  5. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Kim, Kang; Singh, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using US-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5–14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13–24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n = 10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n = 10) with low fat content (4.8 ± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ∼3 s and ∼9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively, to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (−0.065 ± 0.079%) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (−0.124

  6. Technical study of Germolles’ wall paintings: the inputof imaging technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Degrigny

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The Château de Germolles is one of the rare palace in France dating from the 14th century. The noble floor is decorated with wall paintings that are a unique example of courtly love spirit that infused the princely courts of the time. After being concealed sometime in the 19th century, the paintings were rediscovered and uncovered in the middle of the 20th century and partly restored at the end of the 1990s. No scientific documentation accompanied these interventions and important questions, such as the level of authenticity of the mural decorations and the original painting technique(s used in the medieval times remained unanswered. The combined scientific and financial supports of COSCH Cost Action and DRAC-Burgundy enabled to study Germolles’ wall paintings using some of the most innovative imaging and analytical techniques and to address some of the questions raised. The study provided significant information on the material used in the medieval times and on the conservation condition of the paintings. The data collected is vast and varied and exposed the owners of the property to the challenges of data management.

  7. Thermal diffusivity measurement of focused-ion-beam fabricated sample using photothermal reflectance technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Zilong; Ban, Heng

    2017-05-01

    Focused-Ion-Beam (FIB) can lift-off micrometer-sized samples from bulk materials for structural characterization and property measurement. The ability to determine thermophysical properties of such samples offers unique insight into the local microstructure-property relationship. A photothermal reflectance technique is developed to measure the thermal diffusivity of FIB-fabricated, micrometer-sized samples in this study. An analytic model is established to guide the experimental design and data analysis for the limited sample size and thickness. The thermal diffusivity of the sample can be extracted from a series of spatial-scan measurements at several modulated heating frequencies. To demonstrate the viability of the technique, a FIB-fabricated SiC plate with the size of 42 μm × 31 μm × 8 μm was used to represent high conductivity materials, which pose more challenges for the technique. The result compares favorably with literature values of SiC. The measurement uncertainty is quantified and possible experimental error sources are discussed. This technique is specially promising for thermal property measurements on nuclear fuels and materials.

  8. Application of the thermal plasma technique in the treatment of stone surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez A, Z.I.

    2000-01-01

    The stone materials which form part of the cultural heritage of Mexico, are degraded under the united action of water, atmospheric gases, air pollution, temperature changes and the microorganisms action; provoking on the stone: fissures, crevices, scalings, fragmentations, pulverizations, etc. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to study the possibilities to apply a protective coating on the stone surfaces, previously clean and consolidated, through the thermal plasma technique. The purpose is to analyse the physical and chemical properties of three types of stone materials: quarry, tezontle and chiluca, usually used in constructions of cultural interest such as: historical monuments, churches, sculptures, etc., before and after to be submitted to the action of thermal plasma in order to examine the feasibility in the use of this coating technique in this type of applications. The application of conventional techniques to determine: porosity, density, absorption, low pressure water absorption and crystallization by total immersion of nuclear techniques such as: neutron activation analysis, x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy as well as of instrumental techniques: optical microscopy, mechanical assays of compression, flexure and surface area calculations, allowed to know the chemical and physical properties of the stone material before and after to be treated through the thermal plasma technique, projecting quartz on the stones surface at different distances and current intensity and showing the effect caused by the modifications or surface alterations present by cause of the application of that coating. the obtained results provide a general panorama of the application of this technique as an alternative to the maintenance of the architectural inheritance built in stone. (Author)

  9. Recent developments at JPL in the application of digital image processing techniques to astronomical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.; Lynn, D. J.; Benton, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Several techniques of a digital image-processing nature are illustrated which have proved useful in visual analysis of astronomical pictorial data. Processed digital scans of photographic plates of Stephans Quintet and NGC 4151 are used as examples to show how faint nebulosity is enhanced by high-pass filtering, how foreground stars are suppressed by linear interpolation, and how relative color differences between two images recorded on plates with different spectral sensitivities can be revealed by generating ratio images. Analyses are outlined which are intended to compensate partially for the blurring effects of the atmosphere on images of Stephans Quintet and to obtain more detailed information about Saturn's ring structure from low- and high-resolution scans of the planet and its ring system. The employment of a correlation picture to determine the tilt angle of an average spectral line in a low-quality spectrum is demonstrated for a section of the spectrum of Uranus.

  10. Recent developments and applications for the University of Texas thermal neutron imaging facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorsey, D.J.; Charlton, W.S.

    2001-01-01

    The full text follows. A thermal neutron imaging facility (TNIF) capable of real time neutron radiography and computed tomography was developed for the University of Texas TRIGA Mark II (UT-TRIGA) reactor from 1994-1998. The facility was developed with a through reactor beam port capable of producing a 5.2 x 10 6 n/cm 2 /s thermal neutron flux with a gamma dose rate of less than 1 mR/s after collimation. The original TNIF included the UT-TRIGA reactor, neutron collimation array, sample positioning system, neutron image intensifier tube, video camera, computerized image acquisition system, and a radiation shield. A 0.7 mm slit in cadmium was easily detectable using neutron radiography, and 1.4 mm diameter holes bored in an aluminum block were easily resolved using computed neutron tomography. Precise lower limits of the system resolution have hot been determined. The TNIF is currently being revamped to begin work with the non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of carbon fiber composite materials. To compete with existing NDE techniques, the system resolution must be quantified and will likely need improvement. MCNP calculations are being performed to redesign the radiation shielding with two goals in mind. The first is to reduce neutron scatter into the imaging system. The second is to lower external radiation levels so the TNIF can operate at higher reactor power, thereby increasing the neutron flux. The sample positioning system is also a significant source of neutron scatter and may require redesign as well. A new neutron camera system is also being considered. Recent experiments with borated micro channel plate (MCP) detectors have demonstrated resolutions approaching 10 m. The end goal of the carbon composite imaging experiments is to detect minute imperfections in the composites that could reduce the structure's lifetime. It is also desired to be able to determine the relative strengths and weaknesses of neutron radiographic and tomographic analysis techniques as

  11. Concept Doped-Silicon Thermopile Detectors for Future Planetary Thermal Imaging Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakew, Brook; Barrentine, Emily M.; Aslam, Shahid; Brown, Ari D.

    2016-10-01

    Presently, uncooled thermopiles are the detectors of choice for thermal mapping in the 4.6-100 μm spectral range. Although cooled detectors like Ge or Si thermistor bolometers, and MgB2 or YBCO superconducting bolometers, have much higher sensitivity, the required active or passive cooling mechanisms add prohibitive cost and mass for long duration missions. Other uncooled detectors, likepyroelectrics, require a motor mechanism to chop against a known reference temperature, which adds unnecessary mission risk. Uncooled vanadium oxide or amorphous Si microbolometer arrays with integrated CMOS readout circuits, not only have lower sensitivity, but also have not been proven to be radiation hard >100 krad (Si) total ionizing dose, and barring additional materials and readout development, their performance has reached a plateau.Uncooled and radiation hard thermopiles with D* ~1x109 cm√Hz/W and time constant τ ~100 ms have been integrated into thermal imaging instruments on several past missions and have extensive flight heritage (Mariner, Voyager, Cassini, LRO, MRO). Thermopile arrays are also on the MERTIS instrument payload on-board the soon to be launched BepiColombo Mission.To date, thermopiles used for spaceflight instrumentation have consisted of either hand assembled "one-off" single thermopile pixels or COTS thermopile pixel arrays both using Bi-Sb or Bi-Te thermoelectric materials. For future high performance imagers, thermal detector arrays with higher D*, lower τ, and high efficiency delineated absorbers are desirable. Existing COTS and other flight thermopile designs require highly specialized and nonstandard processing techniques to fabricate both the Bi-Sb or Bi-Te thermocouples and the gold or silver black absorbers, which put limitations on further development.Our detector arrays will have a D* ≥ 3x109 cm√Hz/W and a thermal time constant ≤ 30 ms at 170 K. They will be produced using proven, standard semiconductor and MEMS fabrication techniques

  12. Probabilistic images (PBIS): A concise image representation technique for multiple parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, L.C.; Yeh, S.H.; Chen, Z.; Liu, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Based on m parametric images (PIs) derived from a dynamic series (DS), each pixel of DS is regarded as an m-dimensional vector. Given one set of normal samples (pixels) N and another of abnormal samples A, probability density functions (pdfs) of both sets are estimated. Any unknown sample is classified into N or A by calculating the probability of its being in the abnormal set using the Bayes' theorem. Instead of estimating the multivariate pdfs, a distance ratio transformation is introduced to map the m-dimensional sample space to one dimensional Euclidean space. Consequently, the image that localizes the regional abnormalities is characterized by the probability of being abnormal. This leads to the new representation scheme of PBIs. Tc-99m HIDA study for detecting intrahepatic lithiasis (IL) was chosen as an example of constructing PBI from 3 parameters derived from DS and such a PBI was compared with those 3 PIs, namely, retention ratio image (RRI), peak time image (TNMAX) and excretion mean transit time image (EMTT). 32 normal subjects and 20 patients with proved IL were collected and analyzed. The resultant sensitivity and specificity of PBI were 97% and 98% respectively. They were superior to those of any of the 3 PIs: RRI (94/97), TMAX (86/88) and EMTT (94/97). Furthermore, the contrast of PBI was much better than that of any other image. This new image formation technique, based on multiple parameters, shows the functional abnormalities in a structural way. Its good contrast makes the interpretation easy. This technique is powerful compared to the existing parametric image method.

  13. Probabilistic images (PBIS): A concise image representation technique for multiple parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, L.C.; Yeh, S.H.; Chen, Z.; Liu, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    Based on m parametric images (PIs) derived from a dynamic series (DS), each pixel of DS is regarded as an m-dimensional vector. Given one set of normal samples (pixels) N and another of abnormal samples A, probability density functions (pdfs) of both sets are estimated. Any unknown sample is classified into N or A by calculating the probability of its being in the abnormal set using the Bayes' theorem. Instead of estimating the multivariate pdfs, a distance ratio transformation is introduced to map the m-dimensional sample space to one dimensional Euclidean space. Consequently, the image that localizes the regional abnormalities is characterized by the probability of being abnormal. This leads to the new representation scheme of PBIs. Tc-99m HIDA study for detecting intrahepatic lithiasis (IL) was chosen as an example of constructing PBI from 3 parameters derived from DS and such a PBI was compared with those 3 PIs, namely, retention ratio image (RRI), peak time image (TNMAX) and excretion mean transit time image (EMTT). 32 normal subjects and 20 patients with proved IL were collected and analyzed. The resultant sensitivity and specificity of PBI were 97% and 98% respectively. They were superior to those of any of the 3 PIs: RRI (94/97), TMAX (86/88) and EMTT (94/97). Furthermore, the contrast of PBI was much better than that of any other image. This new image formation technique, based on multiple parameters, shows the functional abnormalities in a structural way. Its good contrast makes the interpretation easy. This technique is powerful compared to the existing parametric image method

  14. Human nail thermal diffusivity obtained using the open photoacoustic cell technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, D. T.; Nuglish, L. E. R.; Sehn, E.; Baesso, M. L.; Medina, A. N.; Bento, A. C.

    2005-06-01

    In this work the open photoacoustic cell technique (OPC) is applied for measuring the thermal diffusivity (α) of human nail tips. Human nails are natural polymers that receive less attention in clinical analysis than other human body parts, although they are very interesting in giving information about some external diseases like dystrophies. Diagnosis and therapy with topic application of anti-fungal creams could be monitored since thermal properties are known. The OPC experiments in the low frequency range were done and through photoacoustic signal decay, the OPC model were used for fitting data in order to obtain the thermal diffusivity of the human nail in vitro. The average value for the nail tips used was found to be α ˜ (8.9 ± 1.3) × 10-4 cm^2/s, when different light source is used for photothermal heating. This average is of the order of that evaluated for the human skin.

  15. Supplier Selection in the Thermal Tourism Enterprises with Using Multi Criteria Decision Making Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Gündüz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Turkey has many natural health resources and the interest in Thermal Tourism has increased. Thermal Tourism Enterprises serve their experienced medical staff, treatment methods and the curative springs for the purpose of care services. On the other hand, these enterprises are also the place to have both a rest and a good time. In this study, the supplier selection application is performed in the Thermal Tourism Enterprise that offers a combination of services as health, recreation and entertainment. The criteria as product quality and performance, product information, product arrival time, price, quality practices, flexibility and the collaboration level have been considered. By using multi-criteria decision making techniques as Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP and TOPSIS then the suggestions on the selecting the best supplier are offered.

  16. Research technique and experimental device for thermal conductivity measurements of refractory compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Petrov, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed is a new axial technique for determining thermal conductivity coefficient of solids at temperatures above 1000 deg C with the use of internal heating of specimens by passing electric current and with experimental determining the thermal flows on the lateral side of the working section of the specimen. This method is usable for investigating the thermal conductivity of materials whose surface radiation characteristics are unknown or unstable and for carrying out experiments not only in vacuum, but also in various atmospheres. The overall fiducial error of the results of the method is evaluated at 4-5 % within the range of temperatures between 1200 and 2300 K. A description of the experimental installation is given

  17. Image processing analysis of nuclear track parameters for CR-39 detector irradiated by thermal neutron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jobouri, Hussain A., E-mail: hahmed54@gmail.com; Rajab, Mustafa Y., E-mail: mostafaheete@gmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science, AL-Nahrain University, Baghdad (Iraq)

    2016-03-25

    CR-39 detector which covered with boric acid (H{sub 3}Bo{sub 3}) pellet was irradiated by thermal neutrons from ({sup 241}Am - {sup 9}Be) source with activity 12Ci and neutron flux 10{sup 5} n. cm{sup −2}. s{sup −1}. The irradiation times -T{sub D} for detector were 4h, 8h, 16h and 24h. Chemical etching solution for detector was sodium hydroxide NaOH, 6.25N with 45 min etching time and 60 C° temperature. Images of CR-39 detector after chemical etching were taken from digital camera which connected from optical microscope. MATLAB software version 7.0 was used to image processing. The outputs of image processing of MATLAB software were analyzed and found the following relationships: (a) The irradiation time -T{sub D} has behavior linear relationships with following nuclear track parameters: i) total track number - N{sub T} ii) maximum track number - MRD (relative to track diameter - D{sub T}) at response region range 2.5 µm to 4 µm iii) maximum track number - M{sub D} (without depending on track diameter - D{sub T}). (b) The irradiation time -T{sub D} has behavior logarithmic relationship with maximum track number - M{sub A} (without depending on track area - A{sub T}). The image processing technique principally track diameter - D{sub T} can be take into account to classification of α-particle emitters, In addition to the contribution of these technique in preparation of nano- filters and nano-membrane in nanotechnology fields.

  18. The simplicity, complexity, and benefits of multi-aperture imaging in the thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Andrew R.; Carles, Guillem; Cowan, Laura; Preciado, Miguel; Ralph, Jason; Babington, James; Wood, Andy

    2017-10-01

    We describe how the use of multiple-camera imaging systems provides an interesting alternative imaging modality to conventional single-aperture imaging, but with a different challenge: to computationally integrate diverse images while demonstrating an overall system benefit. We report the use of super-resolution with arrays of nominally identical longwave infrared cameras to yield high-resolution imaging with reduced track length, while various architectures enable foveal imaging, 4π and 3D imaging through the exploitation of integral imaging techniques. Strikingly, multi-camera spectral imaging using a camera array can uniquely demonstrate video-rate imaging, high performance and low cost.

  19. Phase image encryption of colored images using double random phase encoding technique in HSV color space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Madhusudan; Shakher, Chandra; Singh, Kehar

    2009-09-01

    A double random phase encoding based digital phase encryption technique for colored images is proposed in the Fourier domain. The RGB input image is brought to HSV color space and then converted into phase, prior to the encryption. In the decryption process the HSV image is and converted back to the RGB format. The random phase codes used during encryption are prepared by stacking three two-dimensional random phase masks. These random phase codes serve as keys for encryption and decryption. The proposed technique carries all the advantages of phase encryption and is supposedly three-dimensional in nature. Robustness of the technique is analyzed against the variations in random phase codes and shuffling of the random phase masks of a given phase code. Performance of the scheme is also verified against occlusion of Fourier plane random phase code as well as the encrypted image. Effects of noise attacks and attacks using partial windows of correct random phase codes have also been checked. Digital simulations are presented to support the idea.

  20. In Vivo Imaging of Nitric Oxide by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO biosensors are novel tools for real-time bioimaging of tissue oxygen changes and physiological monitoring of tissue vasculature. Nitric oxide behavior further enhances its role in mapping signal transduction at the molecular level. Spectrometric electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR and fluorometric imaging are well known techniques with the potential for in vivo bioimaging of NO. In tissues, NO is a specific target of nitrosyl compounds for chemical reaction, which provides a unique opportunity for application of newly identified NO biosensors. However, the accuracy and sensitivity of NO biosensors still need to be improved. Another potential magnetic resonance technique based on short term NO effects on proton relaxation enhancement is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and some NO biosensors may be used as potent imaging contrast agents for measurement of tumor size by MRI combined with fluorescent imaging. The present review provides supporting information regarding the possible use of nitrosyl compounds as NO biosensors in MRI and fluorescent bioimaging showing their measurement limitations and quantitative accuracy. These new approaches open a perspective regarding bioimaging of NO and the in vivo elucidation of NO effects by magnetic resonance techniques.