WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal decay time log

  1. Simultaneous thermal neutron decay time and porosity logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1979-01-01

    A simultaneous pulsed neutron porosity and thermal neutron capture cross section logging system is provided for radiological well logging of subsurface earth formations. A logging tool provided with a 14 MeV pulsed neutron source, an epithermal neutron detector, and a combination gamma ray and fast neutron detector is moved through a borehole. Repetitive bursts of neutrons irradiate the earth formations; and, during the bursts, the fast neutron and epithermal neutron populations are sampled. During the interval between bursts the thermal neutron capture gamma ray population is sampled in two or more time intervals. The fast and epithermal neutron population measurements are combined to provide a measurement of formation porosity phi. The capture gamma ray measurements are combined to provide a simultaneous determination of the thermal neutron capture cross section Σ

  2. Simultaneous thermal neutron decay time and porosity logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, W.E.; Smith, H.D.; Smith, M.P.

    1980-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are described for simultaneously measuring the porosity and thermal neutron capture cross section of earth formations in situ in the vicinity of a well borehole using pulsed neutron well logging techniques. The logging tool which is moved through the borehole consists of a 14 MeV pulsed neutron source, an epithermal neutron detector and a combination gamma ray and fast neutron detector. The associated gating systems, counters and combined digital computer are sited above ground. (U.K.)

  3. Simultaneous thermal neutron decay time and porosity logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shultz, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    A method for simultaneously determining the porosity and thermal neutron capture cross-section of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole is claimed. It comprises the following steps: passing a well tool into a cased well borehole. The tool has a pulsed source of fast neutrons, a combination fast neutron and gamma ray detector and an epithermal neutron detector; repetitively irradiating the earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole with bursts of fast neutrons; detecting the fast neutron and epithermal neutron populations in the borehole (during the neutron bursts) and generating first and second measurement signals; detecting for second and third time intervals during the time between the neutron bursts, the gamma radiation present in the borehole due to the capture of thermalized neutrons by the nuclei of elements comprising the earth formations and generating third and fourth measurement signals; and combining the first and second measurement signals according to a predetermined relationship to derive an indication of the porosity of the earth formations and combining the third and fourth measurement signals to derive an indication of the thermal neutron capture cross-section of the earth formations

  4. The use of diffusion theory to compute invasion effects for the pulsed neutron thermal decay time log

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittle, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Diffusion theory has been successfully used to model the effect of fluid invasion into the formation for neutron porosity logs and for the gamma-gamma density log. The purpose of this paper is to present results of computations using a five-group time-dependent diffusion code on invasion effects for the pulsed neutron thermal decay time log. Previous invasion studies by the author involved the use of a three-dimensional three-group steady-state diffusion theory to model the dual-detector thermal neutron porosity log and the gamma-gamma density log. The five-group time-dependent code MGNDE (Multi-Group Neutron Diffusion Equation) used in this work was written by Ferguson. It has been successfully used to compute the intrinsic formation life-time correction for pulsed neutron thermal decay time logs. This application involves the effect of fluid invasion into the formation

  5. Pulsed radiation decay logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    There are provided new and improved well logging processes and systems wherein the detection of secondary radiation is accomplished during a plurality of time windows in a manner to accurately characterize the decay rate of the secondary radiation. The system comprises a well logging tool having a primary pulsed radiation source which emits repetitive time-spaced bursts of primary radiation and detector means for detecting secondary radiation resulting from the primary radiation and producing output signals in response to the detected radiation. A plurality of measuring channels are provided, each of which produces a count rate function representative of signals received from the detector means during successive time windows occurring between the primary radiation bursts. The logging system further comprises means responsive to the measuring channels for producing a plurality of functions representative of the ratios of the radiation count rates measured during adjacent pairs of the time windows. Comparator means function to compare the ratio functions and select at least one of the ratio functions to generate a signal representative of the decay rate of the secondary radiation

  6. Method for determining thermal neutron decay times of earth formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, D.M.

    1976-01-01

    A method is disclosed for measuring the thermal neutron decay time of earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole. A harmonically intensity modulated source of fast neutrons is used to irradiate the earth formations with fast neutrons at three different intensity modulation frequencies. The tangents of the relative phase angles of the fast neutrons and the resulting thermal neutrons at each of the three frequencies of modulation are measured. First and second approximations to the earth formation thermal neutron decay time are derived from the three tangent measurements. These approximations are then combined to derive a value for the true earth formation thermal neutron decay time

  7. Methodology of measurement of thermal neutron time decay constant in Canberra 35+ MCA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdowicz, K.; Gabanska, B.; Igielski, A.; Krynicka, E.; Woznicka, U. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1993-12-31

    A method of the thermal neutron time decay constant measurement in small bounded media is presented. A 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator is the neutron source. The system of recording of a die-away curve of thermal neutrons consists of a {sup 3}He detector and of a multichannel time analyzer based on analyzer Canberra 35+ with multi scaler module MCS 7880 (microsecond range). Optimum parameters for the measuring system are considered. Experimental verification of a dead time of the instrumentation system is made and a count-loss correction is incorporated into the data treatment. An attention is paid to evaluate with a high accuracy the fundamental mode decay constant of the registered decaying curve. A new procedure of the determination of the decay constant by a multiple recording of the die-away curve is presented and results of test measurements are shown. (author). 11 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs.

  8. Methodology of measurement of thermal neutron time decay constant in Canberra 35+ MCA system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdowicz, K.; Gabanska, B.; Igielski, A.; Krynicka, E.; Woznicka, U.

    1993-01-01

    A method of the thermal neutron time decay constant measurement in small bounded media is presented. A 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator is the neutron source. The system of recording of a die-away curve of thermal neutrons consists of a 3 He detector and of a multichannel time analyzer based on analyzer Canberra 35+ with multi scaler module MCS 7880 (microsecond range). Optimum parameters for the measuring system are considered. Experimental verification of a dead time of the instrumentation system is made and a count-loss correction is incorporated into the data treatment. An attention is paid to evaluate with a high accuracy the fundamental mode decay constant of the registered decaying curve. A new procedure of the determination of the decay constant by a multiple recording of the die-away curve is presented and results of test measurements are shown. (author). 11 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs

  9. Methodology of measurement of thermal neutron time decay constant in Canberra 35+ MCA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdowicz, K; Gabanska, B; Igielski, A; Krynicka, E; Woznicka, U [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    A method of the thermal neutron time decay constant measurement in small bounded media is presented. A 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator is the neutron source. The system of recording of a die-away curve of thermal neutrons consists of a {sup 3}He detector and of a multichannel time analyzer based on analyzer Canberra 35+ with multi scaler module MCS 7880 (microsecond range). Optimum parameters for the measuring system are considered. Experimental verification of a dead time of the instrumentation system is made and a count-loss correction is incorporated into the data treatment. An attention is paid to evaluate with a high accuracy the fundamental mode decay constant of the registered decaying curve. A new procedure of the determination of the decay constant by a multiple recording of the die-away curve is presented and results of test measurements are shown. (author). 11 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs.

  10. The potential use of synthetic profiles of thermal neutrons decay time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinoco, Franciso Lopes.

    1994-01-01

    The Time Lapse Technique used for monitoring the water and gas movement in a reservoir needs a PNC - Pulsed Neutron Capture Log - base log to be matched. However, few wells have this base log run in unchanged water saturation conditions. This paper presents two alternatives to be used a a base log: a synthetic PNC log and the initial gamma ray log. Some examples are presented to illustrate these techniques. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Methods and apparatus for environmental correction of thermal neutron logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preeg, W.E.; Scott, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    An on-line environmentally-corrected measurement of the thermal neutron decay time (tau) of an earth formation traversed by a borehole is provided in a two-detector, pulsed neutron logging tool, by measuring tau at each detector and combining the two tau measurements in accordance with a previously established empirical relationship of the general form: tau = tausub(F) +A(tausub(F) + tausub(N)B) + C, where tausub(F) and tausub(N) are the tau measurements at the far-spaced and near-spaced detectors, respectively, A is a correction coefficient for borehole capture cross section effects, B is a correction coefficient for neutron diffusion effects, and C is a constant related to parameters of the logging tool. Preferred numerical values of A, B and C are disclosed, and a relationship for more accurately approximating the A term to specific borehole conditions. (author)

  12. Time derived sigma for pulsed neutron capture logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, R.R.; Fertl, W.F.; Hopkinson, E.C.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review field applications of the Atlas Neutron Lifetime Log service and to examine recent technical advances in the instrumentation and data analysis system. The major improvement to be discussed is a new method for computing /SIGMA/, the thermal neutron capture cross section of an earth formation. In the new method, the time after the neutron burst is measured for each gamma ray pulse detected by the instrumentation system within a gate of fixed width. This ''average pulse time'' is uniquely related to the thermal neutron decay rate observed in a borehole environment. The technique discussed is applicable for any condition where the neutron or gamma ray flux is time dependent. The advantages of this signal processing method, however, are most apparent for cases of rapid flux change with time, as in an exponential decay. 7 refs

  13. Thermal decay of Lennard-Jones clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, I.L.; Avalos-Borja, M.

    1989-01-01

    The decay mechanisms of argon clusters have been studied using molecular dynamics simulations and Lennard-Jones potentials. Heating up processes were applied to Ar 13 up to temperatures in the melting region. In this range of temperatures large fluctuations in the mean kinetic energy of the system are present and a sequential evaporation is observed. The thermal decay of these aggregates occurs in a time scale of nanoseconds. (orig.)

  14. Three frequency modulated combination thermal neutron lifetime log and porosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paap, H.J.; Arnold, D.M.; Smith, M.P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for measuring simultaneously the thermal neutron lifetime of the borehole fluid and earth formations in the vicinity of a well borehole, together with the formation porosity. A harmonically intensity modulated source of fast neutrons is used to irradiate the earth formations with fast neutrons at three different modulation frequencies. Intensity modulated clouds of thermal neutrons at each of the three modulation frequencies are detected by dual spaced detectors and the relative phase shift of the thermal neutrons with respect to the fast neutrons is determined at each of the three modulation frequencies at each detector. These measurements are then combined to determine simultaneously the thermal neutron decay time of the borehole fluid, the thermal neutron decay time of surrounding earth formation media and the porosity of the formation media

  15. Thermal effects on decays of a metastable brane configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Yuichiro, E-mail: ynakai@physics.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ookouchi, Yutaka [Faculty of Arts and Science & Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2016-11-10

    We study thermal effects on a decay process of a false vacuum in type IIA string theory. At finite temperature, the potential of the theory is corrected and also thermally excited modes enhance the decay rate. The false vacuum can accommodate a string-like object. This cosmic string makes the bubble creation rate much larger and causes an inhomogeneous vacuum decay. We investigate thermal corrections to the DBI action for the bubble/string bound state and discuss a thermally assisted tunneling process. We show that thermally excited states enhance the tunneling rate of the decay process, which makes the life-time of the false vacuum much shorter.

  16. Combination thermal and radiation shield for well logging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    A device for providing both thermal protection and radiation shielding for components such as radiation detectors within a well logging instrument comprises a thermally insulative flask containing a weldment filled with a mass of eutectic material which undergoes a change of state e.g. melting at a temperature which will provide an acceptable thermal environment for such components for extended time periods. The eutectic material which is preferably a bismuth (58%)/tin (42%) alloy has a specific gravity (> 8.5) facilitating its use as a radiation shield and is distributed around the radiation detectors so as to selectively impede the impinging of the detectors by radiation. The device is incorporated in a skid of a well logging instrument for measuring γ backscatter. A γ source is located either above or within the protective shielding. (author)

  17. LATTE - Log and Time Tracking for Elections

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — LATTE - Log and Time Tracking for Elections is a time tracking and voucher preparation system used to schedule employees to cover elections, to document their time...

  18. Dynamic Planar Convex Hull with Optimal Query Time and O(log n · log log n ) Update Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Jakob, Riko

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic maintenance of the convex hull of a set of points in the plane is one of the most important problems in computational geometry. We present a data structure supporting point insertions in amortized O(log n · log log log n) time, point deletions in amortized O(log n · log log n) time......, and various queries about the convex hull in optimal O(log n) worst-case time. The data structure requires O(n) space. Applications of the new dynamic convex hull data structure are improved deterministic algorithms for the k-level problem and the red-blue segment intersection problem where all red and all...

  19. Prediction of thermal conductivity of sedimentary rocks from well logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The calculation of heat-flow density in boreholes requires reliable values for the change of temperature and rock thermal conductivity with depth. As rock samples for laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity (TC) are usually rare geophysical well logs are used alternatively to determine TC...... parameters (i.e. thermal conductivity, density, hydrogen index, sonic interval transit time, gamma-ray response, photoelectric factor) of artificial mineral assemblages consisting 15 rock-forming minerals that are used in different combinations to typify sedimentary rocks. The predictive capacity of the new...... equations is evaluated on subsurface data from four boreholes drilled into the Mesozoic sequence of the North German Basin, including more than 1700 laboratory-measured thermal-conductivity values. Results are compared with those from other approaches published in the past. The new approach predicts TC...

  20. Method and apparatus for epithermal neutron decay logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelligan, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    The nature of hydrogenous fluids filling the pore spaces in formations surrounding a well bore are determined by irradiating the formations with bursts of high energy neutrons and using the ratio of time-dependent parameters related to the decay of epithermal neutron populations above two different energy levels to provide values indicative of the kind of fluid present, independent of porosity. The measurement above the higher of these energy levels, appr. 0.4eV, indicates the existence of hydrogenous fluid, water and hydrocarbons in the formations. The lower threshold measurement, above appr. 0.15eV, is indicative of the structure of the molecule in which the hydrogen molecule is bound and of the porosity. A pulsed neutron generator in a sonde irradiates the formations with 14meV neutrons and a pair of detectors, one shielded by cadmium, to establish the 0.4eV threshold energy level and the other, shielded by gadolinium, to establish the 0.15eV threshold energy level. Time related parameters of the count rate information, e.g. the decay constants, provided by each detector are derived. The ratio of the respective parameters is used to identify the type of fluid in the information, independent of porosity. The method and apparatus can determine water saturation, i.e. percentage of water in the formation fluid and can identify specific types of hydrocarbons under 100% hydrocarbon saturation conditions. 8 figs

  1. 'Stutter timing' for charge decay time measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubb, John; Harbour, John; Pavey, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the approach of 'stutter timing' that has been developed to improve the accuracy of measuring charge decay times in the presence of noise in compact and portable charge decay test instrumentation. The approach involves starting and stopping the timing clock as the noisy signal rises above and falls below the target threshold voltage level.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of incipient decay in hardwood logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Jan Wiedenbeck; Robert J. Ross; John W. Forsman; John R. Erickson; Crystal Pilon; Brian K. Brashaw

    2005-01-01

    Decay can cause significant damage to high-value hardwood timber. New nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technologies are urgently needed to effectively detect incipient decay in hardwood timber at the earliest possible stage. Currently, the primary means of inspecting timber relies on visual assessment criteria. When visual inspections are used exclusively, they provide...

  3. Use of pulsed neutron-neutron logging, thermal neutron-neutron logging, and gamma logging methods in classification for sand-clay sediments of Lower Cretaceous in Prikumsk oil-and-gas region according to filtration-capacitance characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimenko, A.N.; Basin, Ya.N.; Novgorodov, V.A.

    1974-01-01

    To isolate reservoirs, the formation and deformation penetration zone parameters are used. They are estimated according to the false oil saturation factor and the time of the penetration zone deformation which are determined from the complex exploration of cased wells using the pulse neutron logging, thermal neutron-neutron logging and gamma logging techniques

  4. Well-log based prediction of thermal conductivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    Rock thermal conductivity (TC) is paramount for the determination of heat flow and the calculation of temperature profiles. Due to the scarcity of drill cores compared to the availability of petrophysical well logs, methods are desired to indirectly predict TC in sedimentary basins. Most...

  5. Determination of the thermal neutron absorption cross section for rock samples by a single measurement of the time decay constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krynicka, E.

    1993-01-01

    A calibration method for the determination of the thermal neutron macroscopic mass absorption cross section for rock samples is presented. The standard deviation of the final results is discussed in detail. A big advantage of the presented method is that the calibration curves have been found using the results obtained for a variety of natural rock samples of different stratigraphies and lithologies measured by Czubek's methods. An important part of the paper is a through analysis of the standard deviation of the final result. (author). 13 refs, 11 figs, 5 tabs

  6. Control of decay in bolts and logs of northern hardwoods during storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore C. Scheffer; T. W. Jones

    1953-01-01

    Many wood-using plants in the Northeast store large quantities of hardwood logs for rather long periods. Sometimes a large volume of the wood is spoiled by decay during the storage period. A number of people have asked: "How can we prevent this loss?"

  7. Seedling regeneration on decayed pine logs after the deforestation events caused by pine wilt disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fukasawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Coarse woody debris (CWD forms an important habitat suitable for tree seedling establishment, and the CWD decay process influences tree seedling community. In Japan, a severe dieback of Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc. caused by pine wilt disease (PWD damaged huge areas of pine stands but creates huge mass of pine CWD. It is important to know the factors influencing seedling colonization on pine CWD and their variations among geographical gradient in Japan to expect forest regeneration in post-PWD stands. I conducted field surveys on the effects of latitude, climates, light condition, decay type of pine logs, and log diameter on tree seedling colonization at ten geographically distinct sites in Japan. In total, 59 tree taxa were recorded as seedlings on pine logs. Among them, 13 species were recorded from more than five sites as adult trees or seedlings and were used for the analyses. A generalized linear model showed that seedling colonization of Pinus densiflora was negatively associated with brown rot in sapwood, while that of Rhus trichocarpa was positively associated with brown rot in heartwood. Regeneration of Ilex macropoda had no relationships with wood decay type but negatively associated with latitude and MAT, while positively with log diameter. These results suggested that wood decay type is a strong determinant of seedling establishment for certain tree species, even at a wide geographical scale; however, the effect is tree species specific.

  8. Log and tree sawing times for hardwood mills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everette D. Rast

    1974-01-01

    Data on 6,850 logs and 1,181 trees were analyzed to predict sawing times. For both logs and trees, regression equations were derived that express (in minutes) sawing time per log or tree and per Mbf. For trees, merchantable height is expressed in number of logs as well as in feet. One of the major uses for the tables of average sawing times is as a bench mark against...

  9. Double beta decay searches with thermal detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirro, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    Double beta decay searches have become more and more important in the last few years. The 'second generation' experiments will allow to explore the inverse hierarchy region but, due to the uncertainties in the nuclear matrix elements, none of them will be able to cover completely the allowed region. Thus the need to investigate different DBD emitters becomes more important. The bolometric technique is only one able to study different nuclei with the proper energy resolution, key point for the future experiments. The possibility to reject the natural background arising from fast neutrons and alpha particles was recently directly proved with thermal bolometers, using the double read out (heat and scintillation). This new technique offers the possibility to reach background levels two orders of magnitude smaller with respect to the ones of the next planned experiments, aiming the possibility to investigate direct hierarchy region. (author)

  10. Wood moisture monitoring during log house thermal insulation mounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavla Kotásková

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The current designs of thermal insulation for buildings concentrate on the achievement of the required heat transmission coefficient. However, another factor that cannot be neglected is the assessment of the possible water vapour condensation inside the construction. The aim of the study was to find out whether the designed modification of the cladding structure of an existing log house will or will not lead to a risk of possible water vapour condensation in the walls after an additional thermal insulation mounting. The condensation could result in the increase in moisture of the walls and consequently the constructional timber, which would lead to the reduction of the timber construction strength, wood degradation by biotic factors – wood-destroying insects, mildew or wood-destroying fungi. The main task was to compare the theoretically established values of moisture of the constructional timber with the values measured inside the construction using a specific example of a thermal insulated log house. Three versions of thermal insulation were explored to find the solution of a log house reconstruction which would be the optimum for living purposes. Two versions deal with the cladding structure with the insulation from the interior, the third version deals with an external insulation.In a calculation model the results can be affected to a great degree by input values (boundary conditions. This especially concerns the factor of vapour barrier diffusion resistance, which is entered in accordance with the producer’s specifications; however, its real value can be lower as it depends on the perfectness and correctness of the technological procedure. That is why the study also includes thermal technical calculations of all designed insulation versions in the most unfavourable situation, which includes the degradation of the vapour barrier down to 10% efficiency, i.e. the reduction of the diffusion resistance factor to 10% of the original value

  11. Real Time Face Quality Assessment for Face Log Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamal, Nasrollahi; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2009-01-01

    Summarizing a long surveillance video to just a few best quality face images of each subject, a face-log, is of great importance in surveillance systems. Face quality assessment is the back-bone for face log generation and improving the quality assessment makes the face logs more reliable....... Developing a real time face quality assessment system using the most important facial features and employing it for face logs generation are the concerns of this paper. Extensive tests using four databases are carried out to validate the usability of the system....

  12. Temporal Decay in Timber Species Composition and Value in Amazonian Logging Concessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Vanessa A; Peres, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    yields of selectively-logged forests is crucial for the long-term integrity of forest biodiversity and financial viability of local industries. The logging history of eastern Amazonian old-growth forests likely mirrors unsustainable patterns of timber depletion over time in Brazil and other tropical countries.

  13. Neutron characteristic and spectroscopy logging methods and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antkiw, S.

    1977-01-01

    Earth formations surrounding a well bore are irradiated with pulses of fast neutrons, and gamma rays resulting from the ensuring thermal neutron capture interactions with nuclei of the formations are detected, from which measurements of the thermal neutron decay times characterizing the respective formations are derived. The gamma ray energy spectra of the respective formations are analyzed. Gating of the gamma ray detection periods is automatically controlled, both for the decay time and the spectroscopy functions, in accrdance with the measured values of the decay times. The duration and repetition rate of the neutron pulses are also controlled as a function of the measured decay times to provide an overall optimized decay time-spectroscopy operating cycle. spectroscopy outputs representative of formation lithology, salinity, porosity and shaliness are developed to supplement and improve decay time log interpretation

  14. Neutron capture in borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, R.R.

    1981-01-01

    The use is described of a pulsed source of fast neutrons and a radiation detector to measure the thermal neutron population decay rate in a well logging instrument. The macroscopic neutron absorption cross-section is calculated by taking the natural logarithm of the ratio of the detected radiation counts occurring within two measurement intervals of fixed duration and starting at a fixed time after a neutron burst. (U.K.)

  15. Dating tree mortality using log decay in the White Mountains of New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Fast; Mark J. Ducey; Jeffrey H. Gove; William B. Leak

    2008-01-01

    Coarse woody material (CWM) is an important component of forest ecosystems. To meet specific CWM management objectives, it is important to understand rates of decay. We present results from a silvicultural trial at the Bartlett Experimental Forest, in which time of death is known for a large sample of trees. Either a simple table or regression equations that use...

  16. Decay time of type III solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F.T.

    1972-01-01

    Sixty-four Type III bursts that drifted to frequencies below 600 kHz between March 1968 and February 1970 were analyzed. Decay times were measured and combined with published data ranging up to about 200 MHz. By fitting power functions to the computed and observed decay times, and using the local plasma hypothesis, it was found that the ratio rho of computed to observed values varies with radiocentric radial distance according to a power function rho = 3r 0 . 7 . (U.S.)

  17. Permeability log using new lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, D.J.; Boyd, J.F.; Fuchs, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    Comparative measurements of thermal neutron decay time are obtained for a formation after irradiation with a pulsed neutron source. Chloride ions in formation fluids are concentrated by the electrosmosis effect using charged poles on a well logging sonde. The formation is irradiated with fast neutrons and a first comparative measure of the thermal neutron decay time or neutron lifetime is taken. The chloride ions are then dispersed by acoustic pumping with a magnetostrictive transducer. The formation is then again irradiated with fast neutrons and a comparative measure of neutron lifetime is taken. The comparison is a function of the variation in chloride concentration between the two measurements which is related to formation permeability

  18. Time correlation in two-photon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrasko, P.

    1979-11-01

    The relative time distribution of the photons emitted in a second order non-cascade process b→a+2γ is investigated under the assumption that only those photon pairs are detected which were emitted a sufficiently long time after the preparation of the decaying state. An anticorrelation between the photons is found and attributed to the propagation of one of the photons backward in time. (author)

  19. Interactions between soil- and dead wood-inhabiting fungal communities during the decay of Norway spruce logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkipää, Raisa; Rajala, Tiina; Schigel, Dmitry; Rinne, Katja T; Pennanen, Taina; Abrego, Nerea; Ovaskainen, Otso

    2017-09-01

    We investigated the interaction between fungal communities of soil and dead wood substrates. For this, we applied molecular species identification and stable isotope tracking to both soil and decaying wood in an unmanaged boreal Norway spruce-dominated stand. Altogether, we recorded 1990 operational taxonomic units, out of which more than 600 were shared by both substrates and 589 were found to exclusively inhabit wood. On average the soil was more species-rich than the decaying wood, but the species richness in dead wood increased monotonically along the decay gradient, reaching the same species richness and community composition as soil in the late stages. Decaying logs at all decay stages locally influenced the fungal communities from soil, some fungal species occurring in soil only under decaying wood. Stable isotope analyses suggest that mycorrhizal species colonising dead wood in the late decay stages actively transfer nitrogen and carbon between soil and host plants. Most importantly, Piloderma sphaerosporum and Tylospora sp. mycorrhizal species were highly abundant in decayed wood. Soil- and wood-inhabiting fungal communities interact at all decay phases of wood that has important implications in fungal community dynamics and thus nutrient transportation.

  20. Time interval approach to the pulsed neutron logging method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingwu; Su Weining

    1994-01-01

    The time interval of neighbouring neutrons emitted from a steady state neutron source can be treated as that from a time-dependent neutron source. In the rock space, the neutron flux is given by the neutron diffusion equation and is composed of an infinite terms. Each term s composed of two die-away curves. The delay action is discussed and used to measure the time interval with only one detector in the experiment. Nuclear reactions with the time distribution due to different types of radiations observed in the neutron well-logging methods are presented with a view to getting the rock nuclear parameters from the time interval technique

  1. Decay times in one-dimensional chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Broeck, C.; Bouten, M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors calculate the average residence time tau for a particle performing a random walk over a chain of N neighboring sites i = 1,..., N, with decay rates λ/sub i/ depending on the location of the particle in the chain. Exact results are given for some particular cases, while bounds on tau are given for specific initial conditions. In the continuum limit, various results from the literature are recovered or improved upon

  2. Static dictionaries on AC0 RAMs: query time (√log n/log log n) is necessary and sufficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Arne; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Riis, Søren

    1996-01-01

    ) on the time for answering membership queries in a set of size n when reasonable space is used for the data structure storing the set; the upper bound can be obtained using O(n) space, and the lower bound holds even if we allow space 2polylog n. Several variations of this result are also obtained. Among others......, we show a tradeoff between time and circuit depth under the unit-cost assumption: any RAM instruction set which permits a linear space, constant query time solution to the static dictionary problem must have an instruction of depth Ω(log w/log log to), where w is the word size of the machine (and log...

  3. Patterns of natural fungal community assembly during initial decay of coniferous and broadleaf tree logs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, A.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Crowther, T.W.; de Boer, W..

    2016-01-01

    Community assembly processes do not only influence community structure, but can also affect ecosystem processes. To understand the effect of initial community development on ecosystem processes, we studied natural fungal community dynamics during initial wood decay. We hypothesize that fungal

  4. Patterns of natural fungal community assembly during initial decay of coniferous and broadleaf tree logs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der Annemieke; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Boer, de Wietse

    2016-01-01

    Community assembly processes do not only influence community structure, but can also affect ecosystem processes. To understand the effect of initial community development on ecosystem processes, we studied natural fungal community dynamics during initial wood decay. We hypothesize that fungal

  5. Estimation of oil reservoir thermal properties through temperature log data using inversion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-Long; Nian, Yong-Le; Li, Tong-Tong; Wang, Chang-Long

    2013-01-01

    Oil reservoir thermal properties not only play an important role in steam injection well heat transfer, but also are the basic parameters for evaluating the oil saturation in reservoir. In this study, for estimating reservoir thermal properties, a novel heat and mass transfer model of steam injection well was established at first, this model made full analysis on the wellbore-reservoir heat and mass transfer as well as the wellbore-formation, and the simulated results by the model were quite consistent with the log data. Then this study presented an effective inversion method for estimating the reservoir thermal properties through temperature log data. This method is based on the heat transfer model in steam injection wells, and can be used to predict the thermal properties as a stochastic approximation method. The inversion method was applied to estimate the reservoir thermal properties of two steam injection wells, it was found that the relative error of thermal conductivity for the two wells were 2.9% and 6.5%, and the relative error of volumetric specific heat capacity were 6.7% and 7.0%,which demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method for estimating the reservoir thermal properties. - Highlights: • An effective inversion method for predicting the oil reservoir thermal properties was presented. • A novel model for steam injection well made full study on the wellbore-reservoir heat and mass transfer. • The wellbore temperature field and steam parameters can be simulated by the model efficiently. • Both reservoirs and formation thermal properties could be estimated simultaneously by the proposed method. • The estimated steam temperature was quite consistent with the field data

  6. Decay and termite resistance, water absorption and swelling of thermally compressed wood panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner Unsal; S. Nami Kartal; Zeki Candan; Rachel A. Arango; Carol A. Clausen; Frederick Green

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated decay and termite resistance of thermally compressed pine wood panels under pressure at either 5 or 7 MPa and either 120 or 150 °C for 1 h. Wood specimens from the panels were exposed to laboratory decay resistance by using the wood degrading fungi, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Trametes versicolor. The thermal compression process caused increases in...

  7. Sorting Real Numbers in $O(n\\sqrt{\\log n})$ Time and Linear Space

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yijie

    2017-01-01

    We present an $O(n\\sqrt{\\log n})$ time and linear space algorithm for sorting real numbers. This breaks the long time illusion that real numbers have to be sorted by comparison sorting and take $\\Omega (n\\log n)$ time to be sorted.

  8. Method for simultaneous measurement of borehole and formation neutron decay-times employing iterative fitting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, W.E.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described of making in situ measurements of the thermal neutron decay time of earth formations in the vicinity of a wellbore. The borehole and earth formations in its vicinity are repetitively irradiated with pulsed fast neutrons and, during the intervals between pulses, capture gamma radiation is measured in at least four, non-overlapping, contiguous time intervals. A background radiation measurement is made between successive pulses and used to correct count-rates representative of thermal neutron populations in the borehole and the formations, the count-rates being generated during each of the time intervals. The background-corrected count-rate measurements are iteratively fitted to exponential curves using a least squares technique to simultaneously derive signals representing borehole component and formation component of the thermal neutron decay time. The signals are recorded as a function of borehole depth. (author)

  9. Method of assaying uranium with prompt fission and thermal neutron borehole logging adjusted by borehole physical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, R.W.; Jensen, D.H.

    1982-01-01

    Uranium formations are assayed by prompt fission neutron logging techniques. The uranium in the formation is proportional to the ratio of epithermal counts to thermal or eqithermal dieaway. Various calibration factors enhance the accuracy of the measurement

  10. Mesospheric temperature estimation from meteor decay times of weak and strong meteor trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Yong Ha; Jee, Geonhwa; Lee, Changsup

    2012-11-01

    Neutral temperatures near the mesopause region were estimated from the decay times of the meteor echoes observed by a VHF meteor radar during a period covering 2007 to 2009 at King Sejong Station (62.22°S, 58.78°W), Antarctica. While some previous studies have used all meteor echoes to determine the slope from a height profile of log inverse decay times for temperature estimation, we have divided meteor echoes into weak and strong groups of underdense meteor trails, depending on the strength of estimated relative electron line densities within meteor trails. We found that the slopes from the strong group are inappropriate for temperature estimation because the decay times of strong meteors are considerably scattered, whereas the slopes from the weak group clearly define the variation of decay times with height. We thus utilize the slopes only from the weak group in the altitude region between 86 km and 96 km to estimate mesospheric temperatures. The meteor estimated temperatures show a typical seasonal variation near the mesopause region and the monthly mean temperatures are in good agreement with SABER temperatures within a mean difference of 4.8 K throughout the year. The meteor temperatures, representing typically the region around the altitude of 91 km, are lower on average by 2.1 K than simultaneously measured SATI OH(6-2) rotational temperatures during winter (March-October).

  11. 'Thermal ghosts': apparent decay of fixed surfaces caused by heat diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livadiotis, George

    2007-01-01

    The behaviour concerning classical heat diffusion on fixed thermal surfaces, studied by observations, still holds surprises. As soon as convective and radiative processes are negligible within the medium, this is considered to be free from energy sources and sinks. Then, the heat diffusion equation is conveniently solved using standard Fourier methods. Some considerations about the contrast effect suggest that the surface boundary would rather be observed to follow specific area decay dynamics than remaining fixed and static. Here it is shown that the apparent boundary lies on a specific isothermal spatiotemporal curve, which depends on the observing device. This is characterized by a slight, though determinative, difference between its radiance and that of the ambient background. Thereafter, the heat diffusion yields apparent boundary shrinkage with the passing of time. This phenomenon is particularly notable for two reasons: its lifetime and final decay rate depend only on the medium thermal properties, while being independent of the apparent boundary spatiotemporal curve. Thus, the former provides a suitable method for measuring the medium thermal properties via the observational data. The latter strongly reveal a kind of universality of some characteristic properties of the phenomenon, common to all observers

  12. Time scales of tunneling decay of a localized state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Yue; Muga, J. G.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Buettiker, M.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent time-domain experiments on ultrafast atom ionization, we analyze the transients and time scales that characterize, aside from the relatively long lifetime, the decay of a localized state by tunneling. While the tunneling starts immediately, some time is required for the outgoing flux to develop. This short-term behavior depends strongly on the initial state. For the initial state, tightly localized so that the initial transients are dominated by over-the-barrier motion, the time scale for flux propagation through the barrier is close to the Buettiker-Landauer traversal time. Then a quasistationary, slow-decay process follows, which sets ideal conditions for observing diffraction in time at longer times and distances. To define operationally a tunneling time at the barrier edge, we extrapolate backward the propagation of the wave packet that escaped from the potential. This extrapolated time is considerably longer than the time scale of the flux and density buildup at the barrier edge.

  13. Time reversal violation in radiative beta decay: experimental plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, J. A.; McNeil, J.; Anholm, M.; Gorelov, A.; Melconian, D.; Ashery, D.

    2017-01-01

    Some explanations for the excess of matter over antimatter in the universe involve sources of time reversal violation (TRV) in addition to the one known in the standard model of particle physics. We plan to search for TRV in a correlation between the momenta of the beta, neutrino, and the radiative gamma sometimes emitted in nuclear beta decay. Correlations involving three (out of four) momenta are sensitive at lowest order to different TRV physics than observables involving spin, such as electric dipole moments and spin-polarized beta decay correlations. Such experiments have been done in radiative kaon decay, but not in systems involving the lightest generation of quarks. An explicit low-energy physics model being tested produces TRV effects in the Fermi beta decay of the neutron, tritium, or some positron-decaying isotopes. We will present plans to measure the TRV asymmetry in radiative beta decay of laser-trapped 38mK at better than 0.01 sensitivity, including suppression of background from positron annihilation. Supported by NSERC, D.O.E., Israel Science Foundation. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  14. Calculation of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and specific heat capacity of sedimentary rocks using petrophysical well logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    properties (density, sonic interval transit time, hydrogen index, volume fraction of shale and photoelectric absorption index) using multivariate statistics. The application of these relations allows computing continuous borehole profiles for each rock thermal property. The uncertainties in the prediction...

  15. Flow-sensitive type recovery in linear-log time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, Michael D.; Keep, Andrew W.; Midtgaard, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The flexibility of dynamically typed languages such as JavaScript, Python, Ruby, and Scheme comes at the cost of run-time type checks. Some of these checks can be eliminated via control-flow analysis. However, traditional control-flow analysis (CFA) is not ideal for this task as it ignores flow...

  16. First insight into dead wood protistan diversity: a molecular sampling of bright-spored Myxomycetes (Amoebozoa, slime-moulds) in decaying beech logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clissmann, Fionn; Fiore-Donno, Anna Maria; Hoppe, Björn; Krüger, Dirk; Kahl, Tiemo; Unterseher, Martin; Schnittler, Martin

    2015-06-01

    Decaying wood hosts a large diversity of seldom investigated protists. Environmental sequencing offers novel insights into communities, but has rarely been applied to saproxylic protists. We investigated the diversity of bright-spored wood-inhabiting Myxomycetes by environmental sequencing. Myxomycetes have a complex life cycle culminating in the formation of mainly macroscopic fruiting bodies, highly variable in shape and colour that are often found on decaying logs. Our hypothesis was that diversity of bright-spored Myxomycetes would increase with decay. DNA was extracted from wood chips collected from 17 beech logs of varying decay stages from the Hainich-Dün region in Central Germany. We obtained 260 partial small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences of bright-spored Myxomycetes that were assembled into 29 OTUs, of which 65% were less than 98% similar to those in the existing database. The OTU richness revealed by molecular analysis surpassed that of a parallel inventory of fruiting bodies. We tested several environmental variables and identified pH, rather than decay stage, as the main structuring factor of myxomycete distribution. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. 'Stutter timing' for charge decay time measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubb, John [Infostatic, 2 Monica Drive, Pittville, Cheltenham, GL50 4NQ (United Kingdom); Harbour, John [Hawthorne Technical Design, The Hawthornes, Startley, Chippenham, SN15 5HG,UK (United Kingdom); Pavey, Ian, E-mail: jchubb@infostatic.co.uk [Chilworth Technology Ltd, Beta House, Southampton Science Park, Southampton, SO16 7NS (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-23

    The paper describes the approach of 'stutter timing' that has been developed to improve the accuracy of measuring charge decay times in the presence of noise in compact and portable charge decay test instrumentation. The approach involves starting and stopping the timing clock as the noisy signal rises above and falls below the target threshold voltage level.

  18. New Limit on Time-Reversal Violation in Beta Decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mumm, H. P.; Chupp, T. E.; Cooper, R. L.; Coulter, K. P.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Garcia, A.; Jones, G. L.; Nico, J. S.; Thompson, A. K.; Trull, C. A.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2011-01-01

    We report the results of an improved determination of the triple correlation DP·(p e xp v ) that can be used to limit possible time-reversal invariance in the beta decay of polarized neutrons and constrain extensions to the standard model. Our result is D=[-0.96±1.89(stat)±1.01(sys)]x10 -4 . The corresponding phase between g A and g V is φ AV =180.013 deg. ±0.028 deg. (68% confidence level). This result represents the most sensitive measurement of D in nuclear β decay.

  19. On the Time-Dependent Analysis of Gamow Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durr, Detlef; Grummt, Robert; Kolb, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Gamow's explanation of the exponential decay law uses complex "eigenvalues" and exponentially growing "eigenfunctions". This raises the question, how Gamow's description fits into the quantum mechanical description of nature, which is based on real eigenvalues and square integrable wavefunctions. Observing that the time evolution of any…

  20. Space-time description of the two-photon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrasko, P.

    1981-09-01

    The time correlation of photons in a two-photon decay is shown to depend on the instantaneous nature of the wave-function collapse in an essential way so the latter hypothesis can be verified by the experimental study of these correlations. (author)

  1. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua [Key Laboratory of Solar Activities, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Tsap, Yuri T., E-mail: huangj@nao.cas.cn [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University, 98409 Crimea, Nauchny (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  2. Thermal decay in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems: Fundamentals and influence on system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Surface heat transfer breakdown for an underfloor air distribution (UFAD) system supply plenum. Highlights: ► Thermal decay of a UFAD system is considerable (annual median = 3.7 K). ► Thermal decay is driven by heat transfer through both the concrete slab and the raised floor. ► Thermal decay may lead to higher airflow rates and increased fan and chiller energy consumption. -- Abstract: Underfloor air distribution (UFAD) is a mechanical ventilation strategy in which the conditioned air is primarily delivered to the zone from a pressurized plenum through floor mounted diffusers. Compared to conventional overhead (OH) mixing systems, UFAD has several potential advantages, such as improved thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ), layout flexibility, reduced life cycle costs and improved energy efficiency in suitable climates. In ducted OH systems designers have reasonably accurate control of the diffuser supply temperature, while in UFAD this temperature is difficult to predict due to the heat gain of the conditioned air in the supply plenum. The increase in temperature between the air entering the plenum and air leaving through a diffuser is known as thermal decay. In this study, the detailed whole-building energy simulation program, EnergyPlus, was used to explain the fundamentals of thermal decay, to investigate its influence on energy consumption and to study the parameters that affect thermal decay. It turns out that the temperature rise is considerable (annual median = 3.7 K, with 50% of the values between 2.4 and 4.7 K based on annual simulations). Compared to an idealized simulated UFAD case with no thermal decay, elevated diffuser air temperatures can lead to higher supply airflow rate and increased fan and chiller energy consumption. The thermal decay in summer is higher than in winter and it also depends on the climate. The ground floor with a slab on grade has less temperature rise compared to middle and top floors. An

  3. Decay heat from products of 235U thermal fission by fast-response boil-off calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarnell, J.L.; Bendt, P.J.

    1977-09-01

    A cryogenic boil-off calorimeter was used to measure the decay heat from the products of thermal-neutron-induced fission of 235 U. Data are presented for cooling times between 10 and 10 5 s following a 2 x 10 4 s irradiation at constant thermal-neutron flux. The experimental uncertainty (1 sigma) in these measurements was approximately 2 percent, except at the shortest cooling times where it rose to approximately 4 percent. The beta and gamma energy from an irradiated 235 U sample was absorbed in a thermally isolated 52-kg copper block that was held at 4 K by an internal liquid helium reservoir. The absorbed energy evaporated liquid helium from the reservoir and a hot-film anemometer flowmeter recorded the evolution rate of the boil-off gas. The decay heat was calculated from the gas-flow rate using the heat of vaporization of helium. The calorimeter had a thermal time constant of 0.85 s. The energy loss caused by gamma leakage from the absorber was less than or equal to 3 percent; a correction was made by Monte Carlo calculations based on experimentally determined gamma spectra. The data agree within the combined uncertainties with summation calculations using the ENDF/B-IV data base. The experimental data were combined with summation calculations to give the decay heat for infinite (10 13 s) irradiation

  4. Late time properties of a decaying false vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanowski, K.

    2014-01-01

    The false vacuum states are unstable and they decay by tunneling. Some of them may survive up to times when their survival probability has a non-exponential form. At times much latter than the transition time, when contributions to the survival probability of its exponential and non-exponential parts are comparable, the survival probability as a function of time t has an inverse power-like form. We show that at this time region the instantaneous energy of the false vacuum states tends to the energy of the true vacuum state as 1/t 2 for t → ∞. (author)

  5. Geophysical logging and thermal imaging near the Hemphill Road TCE National Priorities List Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolino, Dominick J.; Chapman, Melinda J.

    2017-03-27

    Borehole geophysical logs and thermal imaging data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey near the Hemphill Road TCE (trichloroethylene) National Priorities List Superfund site near Gastonia, North Carolina, during August 2014 through February 2015. In an effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, surface geological mapping and borehole geophysical log and thermal imaging data collection, which included the delineation of more than 600 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations), was completed in five open borehole wells and two private supply bedrock wells. In addition, areas of possible groundwater discharge within a nearby creek downgradient of the study site were determined based on temperature differences between the stream and bank seepage using thermal imagery.

  6. A log-Weibull spatial scan statistic for time to event data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Iram; Rosychuk, Rhonda J

    2018-06-13

    Spatial scan statistics have been used for the identification of geographic clusters of elevated numbers of cases of a condition such as disease outbreaks. These statistics accompanied by the appropriate distribution can also identify geographic areas with either longer or shorter time to events. Other authors have proposed the spatial scan statistics based on the exponential and Weibull distributions. We propose the log-Weibull as an alternative distribution for the spatial scan statistic for time to events data and compare and contrast the log-Weibull and Weibull distributions through simulation studies. The effect of type I differential censoring and power have been investigated through simulated data. Methods are also illustrated on time to specialist visit data for discharged patients presenting to emergency departments for atrial fibrillation and flutter in Alberta during 2010-2011. We found northern regions of Alberta had longer times to specialist visit than other areas. We proposed the spatial scan statistic for the log-Weibull distribution as a new approach for detecting spatial clusters for time to event data. The simulation studies suggest that the test performs well for log-Weibull data.

  7. New Technique for TOC Estimation Based on Thermal Core Logging in Low-Permeable Formations (Bazhen fm.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Evgeny; Popov, Yury; Spasennykh, Mikhail; Kozlova, Elena; Chekhonin, Evgeny; Zagranovskaya, Dzhuliya; Belenkaya, Irina; Alekseev, Aleksey

    2016-04-01

    A practical method of organic-rich intervals identifying within the low-permeable dispersive rocks based on thermal conductivity measurements along the core is presented. Non-destructive non-contact thermal core logging was performed with optical scanning technique on 4 685 full size core samples from 7 wells drilled in four low-permeable zones of the Bazhen formation (B.fm.) in the Western Siberia (Russia). The method employs continuous simultaneous measurements of rock anisotropy, volumetric heat capacity, thermal anisotropy coefficient and thermal heterogeneity factor along the cores allowing the high vertical resolution (of up to 1-2 mm). B.fm. rock matrix thermal conductivity was observed to be essentially stable within the range of 2.5-2.7 W/(m*K). However, stable matrix thermal conductivity along with the high thermal anisotropy coefficient is characteristic for B.fm. sediments due to the low rock porosity values. It is shown experimentally that thermal parameters measured relate linearly to organic richness rather than to porosity coefficient deviations. Thus, a new technique employing the transformation of the thermal conductivity profiles into continuous profiles of total organic carbon (TOC) values along the core was developed. Comparison of TOC values, estimated from the thermal conductivity values, with experimental pyrolytic TOC estimations of 665 samples from the cores using the Rock-Eval and HAWK instruments demonstrated high efficiency of the new technique for the organic rich intervals separation. The data obtained with the new technique are essential for the SR hydrocarbon generation potential, for basin and petroleum system modeling application, and estimation of hydrocarbon reserves. The method allows for the TOC richness to be accurately assessed using the thermal well logs. The research work was done with financial support of the Russian Ministry of Education and Science (unique identification number RFMEFI58114X0008).

  8. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Yu; Meng, Xiang-Bing; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method. PMID:24696649

  9. Research on the Compression Algorithm of the Infrared Thermal Image Sequence Based on Differential Evolution and Double Exponential Decay Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Yu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has proposed a new thermal wave image sequence compression algorithm by combining double exponential decay fitting model and differential evolution algorithm. This study benchmarked fitting compression results and precision of the proposed method was benchmarked to that of the traditional methods via experiment; it investigated the fitting compression performance under the long time series and improved model and validated the algorithm by practical thermal image sequence compression and reconstruction. The results show that the proposed algorithm is a fast and highly precise infrared image data processing method.

  10. Temperature dependence of fluorescence decay time and emission spectrum of bismuth germanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melcher, C.L.; Liberman, A.; Schweitzer, J.S.; Simonetti, J.

    1985-01-01

    Bismuth germanate has become an increasingly popular replacement for NaI(Tl) scintillators in recent years, mainly due to its higher detection efficiency. However, its scintillation efficiency and fluorescence decay time are strongly temperature dependent. Optimum performance of detector systems which employ BGO crystals depends on knowledge of the BGO pulse shape and intensity and its emission spectrum at the operating temperature of the detector. Measurements of these quantities are presented over the temperature range -47 0 C to +111 0 C. Although the emission spectrum shifts only slightly over this temperature range, the scintillation efficiency and fluorescence decay time are strongly temperature dependent. In addition to the usefulness of these data for optimizing detector design, the results imply that luminescence quenching in BGO cannot be characterized by a single thermal activation to a radiationless transition but that a more complex model is required to characterize the light output from BGO crystals

  11. Role of collective effects in dominance of scattering off thermal ions over Langmuir wave decay: Analysis, simulations, and space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    Langmuir waves driven to high levels by beam instabilities are subject to nonlinear processes, including the closely related processes of scattering off thermal ions (STI) and a decay process in which the ion response is organized into a product ion acoustic wave. Calculations of the nonlinear growth rates predict that the decay process should always dominate STI, creating two paradoxes. The first is that three independent computer simulation studies show STI proceeding, with no evidence for the decay at all. The second is that observations in space of type III solar radio bursts and Earth's foreshock, which the simulations were intended to model, show evidence for the decay proceeding but no evidence for STI. Resolutions to these paradoxes follow from the realization that a nonlinear process cannot proceed when its growth rate exceeds the minimum frequency of the participating waves, since the required collective response cannot be maintained and the waves cannot respond appropriately, and that a significant number of e-foldings and wave periods must be contained in the time available. It is shown that application of these ''collective'' and ''time scale'' constraints to the simulations explains why the decay does not proceed in them, as well as why STI proceeds in specific simulations. This appears to be the first demonstration that collective constraints are important in understanding nonlinear phenomena. Furthermore, applying these constraints to space observations, it is predicted that the decay should proceed (and dominate STI) in type III sources and the high beam speed regions of Earth's foreshock for a specific range of wave levels, with a possible role for STI alone at slightly higher wave levels. Deeper in the foreshock, for slower beams and weaker wave levels, the decay and STI are predicted to become ineffective. Suggestions are given for future testing of the collective constraint and an explanation for why waves in space are usually much weaker than

  12. Analysis of volatile organic compounds released from the decay of surrogate human models simulating victims of collapsed buildings by thermal desorption-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapiou, A; Zorba, E; Mikedi, K; McGregor, L; Spiliopoulou, C; Statheropoulos, M

    2015-07-09

    Field experiments were devised to mimic the entrapment conditions under the rubble of collapsed buildings aiming to investigate the evolution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the early dead body decomposition stage. Three pig carcasses were placed inside concrete tunnels of a search and rescue (SAR) operational field terrain for simulating the entrapment environment after a building collapse. The experimental campaign employed both laboratory and on-site analytical methods running in parallel. The current work focuses only on the results of the laboratory method using thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOF MS). The flow-modulated TD-GC×GC-TOF MS provided enhanced separation of the VOC profile and served as a reference method for the evaluation of the on-site analytical methods in the current experimental campaign. Bespoke software was used to deconvolve the VOC profile to extract as much information as possible into peak lists. In total, 288 unique VOCs were identified (i.e., not found in blank samples). The majority were aliphatics (172), aromatics (25) and nitrogen compounds (19), followed by ketones (17), esters (13), alcohols (12), aldehydes (11), sulfur (9), miscellaneous (8) and acid compounds (2). The TD-GC×GC-TOF MS proved to be a sensitive and powerful system for resolving the chemical puzzle of above-ground "scent of death". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of an innovative decay heat removal system for lead-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannetti, Fabio; Vitale Di Maio, Damiano; Naviglio, Antonio; Caruso, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • LOOP thermal-hydraulic transient analysis for lead-cooled fast reactors. • Passive decay heat removal system concept to avoid lead freezing. • Solution developed for the diversification of the decay heat removal functions. • RELAP5 vs. RELAP5-3D comparison for lead applications. - Abstract: Improvement of safety requirements in GEN IV reactors needs more reliable safety systems, among which the decay heat removal system (DHR) is one of the most important. Complying with the diversification criteria and based on pure passive and very reliable components, an additional DHR for the ALFRED reactor (Advanced Lead Fast Reactor European Demonstrator) has been proposed and its thermal-hydraulic performances are analyzed. It consists in a coupling of two innovative subsystems: the radiative-based direct heat exchanger (DHX), and the pool heat exchanger (PHX). Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses, by using RELAP5 and RELAP5-3D© computer programs, have been carried out showing that the whole system can safely operate, in natural circulation, for a long term. Sensitivity analyses for: the emissivity of the DHX surfaces, the PHX water heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and the lead HTC have been carried out. In addition, the effects of the density variation uncertainty on the results has been analyzed and compared. It allowed to assess the feasibility of the system and to evaluate the acceptable range of the studied parameters. A comparison of the results obtained with RELAP5 and RELAP5-3D© has been carried out and the analysis of the differences of the two codes for lead is presented. The features of the innovative DHR allow to match the decay heat removal performance with the trend of the reactor decay heat power after shutdown, minimizing at the same time the risk of lead freezing. This system, proposed for the diversification of the DHR in the LFRs, could be applicable in the other pool-type liquid metal fast reactors.

  14. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of an innovative decay heat removal system for lead-cooled fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannetti, Fabio; Vitale Di Maio, Damiano; Naviglio, Antonio; Caruso, Gianfranco, E-mail: gianfranco.caruso@uniroma1.it

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • LOOP thermal-hydraulic transient analysis for lead-cooled fast reactors. • Passive decay heat removal system concept to avoid lead freezing. • Solution developed for the diversification of the decay heat removal functions. • RELAP5 vs. RELAP5-3D comparison for lead applications. - Abstract: Improvement of safety requirements in GEN IV reactors needs more reliable safety systems, among which the decay heat removal system (DHR) is one of the most important. Complying with the diversification criteria and based on pure passive and very reliable components, an additional DHR for the ALFRED reactor (Advanced Lead Fast Reactor European Demonstrator) has been proposed and its thermal-hydraulic performances are analyzed. It consists in a coupling of two innovative subsystems: the radiative-based direct heat exchanger (DHX), and the pool heat exchanger (PHX). Preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses, by using RELAP5 and RELAP5-3D© computer programs, have been carried out showing that the whole system can safely operate, in natural circulation, for a long term. Sensitivity analyses for: the emissivity of the DHX surfaces, the PHX water heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and the lead HTC have been carried out. In addition, the effects of the density variation uncertainty on the results has been analyzed and compared. It allowed to assess the feasibility of the system and to evaluate the acceptable range of the studied parameters. A comparison of the results obtained with RELAP5 and RELAP5-3D© has been carried out and the analysis of the differences of the two codes for lead is presented. The features of the innovative DHR allow to match the decay heat removal performance with the trend of the reactor decay heat power after shutdown, minimizing at the same time the risk of lead freezing. This system, proposed for the diversification of the DHR in the LFRs, could be applicable in the other pool-type liquid metal fast reactors.

  15. Time-dependent asymmetries in Bs decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Blouw, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will search for New Physics in Bs mixing. The Bs mixing phase will be extracted from the measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry in exclusive Bs decays governed by the $b \\to c\\bar{c}s$ quark level transition. Large New Physics effects can be discovered or excluded with the data collected during the very first physics run of LHC. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of the LHCb detector, the expected sensitivity with 2 fb$^{-1}$ on the CP-violation parameter $\\phi_s$, is $\\sigma(\\phi_s)$ = 0.022.

  16. Decay of the cosmological constant: Equivalence of quantum tunneling and thermal activation in two spacetime dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomberoff, Andres; Henneaux, Marc; Teitelboim, Claudio

    2005-01-01

    We study the decay of the cosmological constant in two spacetime dimensions through production of pairs. We show that the same nucleation process looks as quantum-mechanical tunneling (instanton) to one Killing observer and as thermal activation (thermalon) to another. Thus, we find another striking example of the deep interplay between gravity, thermodynamics and quantum mechanics which becomes apparent in presence of horizons

  17. Beta and gamma decay heat evaluation for the thermal fission of 235U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenter, G.K.; Schmittroth, F.

    1979-01-01

    Beta and gamma fission product decay heat curves are evaluated for the thermal fission of 235 U. Experimental data that include beta, gamma, and total measurements are combined with summation calculations based on ENDF/B in a consistent evaluation. Least-squares methods are used that take proper account of data uncertainties and correlations. 4 figures, 2 tables

  18. Method for simultaneous measurement of borehole and formation neutron decay-times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Arnold, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described of making in situ measurements of the thermal neutron decay time of earth formations in the vicinity of a wellbore. The borehole and earth formations are irradiated, with pulsed fast neutrons and, during the interval between neutron pulses, capture gamma radiation is measured in at least four, non-overlapping, contiguous time intervals. Count-rates representative of thermal neutron populations in the borehole and the formations are made during each of the time intervals. A background radiation measurement for correcting the count-rates is preferably also periodically made. The count-rates are combined to derive simultaneously the formation and borehole neutron lifetime components which are recorded as a function of borehole depth. (author)

  19. An Alternative Approach to Non-Log-Linear Thermal Microbial Inactivation: Modelling the Number of Log Cycles Reduction with Respect to Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilis Panagiotis Valdramidis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical approach incorporating the shoulder effect during the quantification of microbial heat inactivation is being developed based on »the number of log cycles of reduction « concept. Hereto, the heat resistance of Escherichia coli K12 in BHI broth has been quantitatively determined in a generic and accurate way by defining the time t for x log reductions in the microbial population, i.e. txD, as a function of the treatment temperature T. Survival data of the examined microorganism are collected in a range of temperatures between 52–60.6 °C. Shoulder length Sl and specific inactivation rate kmax are derived from a mathematical expression that describes a non-log-linear behaviour. The temperature dependencies of Sl and kmax are used for structuring the txD(T function. Estimation of the txD(T parameters through a global identification procedure permits reliable predictions of the time to achieve a pre-decided microbial reduction. One of the parameters of the txD(T function is proposed as »the reference minimum temperature for inactivation«. For the case study considered, a value of 51.80 °C (with a standard error, SE, of 3.47 was identified. Finally, the time to achieve commercial sterilization and pasteurization for the product at hand, i.e. BHI broth, was found to be 11.70 s (SE=5.22, and 5.10 min (SE=1.22, respectively. Accounting for the uncertainty (based on the 90 % confidence intervals, CI a fail-safe treatment of these two processes takes 20.36 s and 7.12 min, respectively.

  20. Estimation of geological formation thermal conductivity by using stochastic approximation method based on well-log temperature data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-Long; Huang, Yong-Hua; Liu, Na; Ma, Ran

    2012-01-01

    Thermal conductivity is a key parameter for evaluating wellbore heat losses which plays an important role in determining the efficiency of steam injection processes. In this study, an unsteady formation heat-transfer model was established and a cost-effective in situ method by using stochastic approximation method based on well-log temperature data was presented. The proposed method was able to estimate the thermal conductivity and the volumetric heat capacity of geological formation simultaneously under the in situ conditions. The feasibility of the present method was assessed by a sample test, the results of which shown that the thermal conductivity and the volumetric heat capacity could be obtained with the relative errors of −0.21% and −0.32%, respectively. In addition, three field tests were conducted based on the easily obtainable well-log temperature data from the steam injection wells. It was found that the relative errors of thermal conductivity for the three field tests were within ±0.6%, demonstrating the excellent performance of the proposed method for calculating thermal conductivity. The relative errors of volumetric heat capacity ranged from −6.1% to −14.2% for the three field tests. Sensitivity analysis indicated that this was due to the low correlation between the volumetric heat capacity and the wellbore temperature, which was used to generate the judgment criterion. -- Highlights: ► A cost-effective in situ method for estimating thermal properties of formation was presented. ► Thermal conductivity and volumetric heat capacity can be estimated simultaneously by the proposed method. ► The relative error of thermal conductivity estimated was within ±0.6%. ► Sensitivity analysis was conducted to study the estimated results of thermal properties.

  1. Thermal decay of the cosmological constant into black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomberoff, Andres; Henneaux, Marc; Teitelboim, Claudio; Wilczek, Frank

    2004-01-01

    We show that the cosmological constant may be reduced by thermal production of membranes by the cosmological horizon, analogous to a particle 'going over the top of the potential barrier', rather than tunneling through it. The membranes are endowed with charge associated with the gauge invariance of an antisymmetric gauge potential. In this new process, the membrane collapses into a black hole; thus, the net effect is to produce black holes out of the vacuum energy associated with the cosmological constant. We study here the corresponding Euclidean configurations ('thermalons') and calculate the probability for the process in the leading semiclassical approximation

  2. Development of response transforms from comparative study of commercial pulsed neutron capture logging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaita, G.N.; Youngblood, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that the absence of a common calibration facility to ascertain the accuracy of commercial pulsed neutron capture logging systems, coupled with the desire for more accurate saturation determination from time-lapse logs, prompted Saudi Aramco to carry out this comparative study. Three generations of Schlumberger's Thermal Decay Time (TDT) logging devices, viz., TDT-K, TDT-M, and TDT-P along with Atlas Wireline PDK-100 system were run in an Aramco well. The wellbore 8-1/2 inch with 7-inch casing-penetrated clean sand, shaly sand, and shale streaks sequence as exhibited by the open hole natural gamma ray log. initially, the wellbore fluid was diesel. The fluid was then changed to brines of 42-kppm and 176-kppm NACl, respectively. Three repeat passes at a logging speed of 900 ft/hr were obtained by each device for each of the three borehole liquids. In the case of PDK-100, a second set of log runs was obtained at 1800 ft/hr. The results of this extensive comparative study have increased the author's understanding of the borehole liquid and the diffusion effects on the response of pulsed neutron capture logging systems and also on the relative accuracy and precision of measured formation thermal neutron capture cross section by each system

  3. Time reversal invariance - a test in free neutron decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lising, Laura Jean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Time reversal invariance violation plays only a small role in the Standard Model, and the existence of a T-violating effect above the predicted level would be an indication of new physics. A sensitive probe of this symmetry in the weak interaction is the measurement of the T-violating ''D''-correlation in the decay of free neutrons. The triple-correlation Dσn∙pe x pv involves three kinematic variables, the neutron spin, electron momentu, and neutrino (or proton) momentum, and changes sign under time reversal. This experiment detects the decay products of a polarized cold neutron beam with an octagonal array of scintillation and solid-state detectors. Data from first run at NIST's Cold Neutron Research Facility give a D-coefficient of -0.1 ± 1.3(stat.) ± 0.7(syst) x 10-3 This measurement has the greatest bearing on extensions to the Standard model that incorporate leptoquarks, although exotic fermion and lift-right symmetric models also allow a D as large as the present limit.

  4. Filtered thermal neutron captured cross sections measurements and decay heat calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Ngoc Son; Vuong Huu Tan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a pure thermal neutron beam has been developed for neutron capture measurements based on the horizontal channel No.2 of the research reactor at the Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat. The original reactor neutron spectrum is transmitted through an optimal composition of Bi and Si single crystals for delivering a thermal neutron beam with Cadmium ratio (R ed ) of 420 and neutron flux (Φ th ) of 1.6*10 6 n/cm 2 .s. This thermal neutron beam has been applied for measurements of capture cross sections for nuclide of 51 V, by the activation method relative to the standard reaction 197 Au(n,γ) 198 Au. In addition to the activities of neutron capture cross sections measurements, the study on nuclear decay heat calculations has been also considered to be developed at the Institute. Some results on calculation procedure and decay heat values calculated with update nuclear database for 235 U are introduced in this report. (author)

  5. Micrometeorological and Thermal Control of Frost Flower Growth and Decay on Young Sea Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, Ryan J.; Else, Brent G. T.; Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier

    2015-01-01

    -wave radiation balance at the surface. The observed crystal habits of the frost flowers were long needles, betraying their origin from the vapour phase at temperatures between -20°C and -30°C. After a night of growth, frost flowers decayed associated with increased solar radiation, a net surface radiation...... and the physical and thermal properties of the sea ice and atmosphere that form, decay and destroy frost flowers on young sea ice. Frost flower formation occurred during a high-pressure system that caused air temperatures to drop to -30°C, with relative humidity of 70% (an under saturated atmosphere), and very...

  6. Localized dryout: An approach for managing the thermal hydrologi-cal effects of decay heat at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Nitao, J.J.; Ramspott, L.D.

    1995-11-01

    For a nuclear waste repository in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, there are two thermal loading approaches to using decay heat constructively -- that is, to substantially reduce relative humidity and liquid flow near waste packages for a considerable time, and thereby limit waste package degradation and radionuclide dissolution and release. ''Extended dryout'' achieves these effects with a thermal load high enough to generate large-scale (coalesced) rock dryout. ''Localized dryout''(which uses wide drift spacing and a thermal load too low for coalesced dryout) achieves them by maintaining a large temperature difference between the waste package and drift wall; this is done with close waste package spacing (generating a high line-heat load) and/or low-thermal-conductivity backfill in the drift. Backfill can greatly reduce relative humidity on the waste package in both the localized and extended dryout approaches. Besides using decay heat constructively, localized dryout reduces the possibility that far-field temperature rise and condensate buildup above the drifts might adversely affect waste isolation

  7. Decay of the pulsed thermal neutron flux in two-zone hydrogenous systems - Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP standard data libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiacek, Urszula; Krynicka, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed neutron experiments in two-zone spherical and cylindrical geometry has been simulated using the MCNP code. The systems are built of hydrogenous materials. The inner zone is filled with aqueous solutions of absorbers (H 3 BO 3 or KCl). It is surrounded by the outer zone built of Plexiglas. The system is irradiated with the pulsed thermal neutron flux and the thermal neutron decay in time is observed. Standard data libraries of the thermal neutron scattering cross-sections of hydrogen in hydrogenous substances have been used to simulate the neutron transport. The time decay constant of the fundamental mode of the thermal neutron flux determined in each simulation has been compared with the corresponding result of the real pulsed neutron experiment

  8. Measurement of the Decay of Thermal Neutrons in Water Poisoned with the Non-1/v Neutron Absorber Cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L G; Moeller, E

    1968-01-15

    Measurements have been made of the decay constant of thermal neutrons in water poisoned with the non-1/v absorber cadmium. An experimental method has been used in which proper spatial integration of the neutron flux enables data, representative of the infinite medium to be accumulated without waiting for the establishment of a fundamental mode distribution. The change in effective cross section with concentration of the dissolved cadmium, d{sigma}{sub eff}/dN. has been determined for infinite medium at 20 deg C. Two- and three parameter fits of the decay constant yield -(0.32 {+-} 0.09) x 10{sup -17} barn cm{sup 3} and -(0.47 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -17} barn cm{sup 3}, respectively. Earlier published measurements have resulted in two to five times larger values, whereas a published calculated value of Nelkin's model is - 0.33 x 10{sup -17} barn cm{sup 3}.

  9. Measurement of the Decay of Thermal Neutrons in Water Poisoned with the Non-1/v Neutron Absorber Cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, L.G.; Moeller, E.

    1968-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the decay constant of thermal neutrons in water poisoned with the non-1/v absorber cadmium. An experimental method has been used in which proper spatial integration of the neutron flux enables data, representative of the infinite medium to be accumulated without waiting for the establishment of a fundamental mode distribution. The change in effective cross section with concentration of the dissolved cadmium, dσ eff /dN. has been determined for infinite medium at 20 deg C. Two- and three parameter fits of the decay constant yield -(0.32 ± 0.09) x 10 -17 barn cm 3 and -(0.47 ± 0.10) x 10 -17 barn cm 3 , respectively. Earlier published measurements have resulted in two to five times larger values, whereas a published calculated value of Nelkin's model is - 0.33 x 10 -17 barn cm 3

  10. Estimativa do tempo de vaporização de toras de Eucalyptus grandis Steaming times estimates for Eucalyptus grandis logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Willians Calonego

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi adequar o modelo geral de determinação do tempo de vaporização de toras, proposto por Steinhagen et al. (1980, para a madeira de Eucalyptus grandis. Para tanto, foram coletadas toras de 20 a The aim this study was to adjust the general model for determining log steaming time, proposed by Steinhagen et al. (1980, for Eucalyptus grandis wood. In order to do so, logs with diameter from 20 to <25, 25 to <30 and 30 to <35 cm were collected from 14 trees of Eucalyptus grandis derived from the `Horto Florestal' nursery, Manduri, São Paulo. A thermocouple was inserted into each log near its center. The logs were steamed during 20 hours at 90ºC and 100% relative humidity. A data logger recorded the temperatures during the thermal treatment. It was concluded that the Steinhagen et al. (1980 model cannot be directly used for this species in study and corrections factors are proposed for the utilization of the general model for log steaming time, developed by Steinhagen et al. (1980, for Eucalyptus grandis wood.

  11. Molecular dynamics calculation of half-lives for thermal decay of Lennard-Jones clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    Molecular dynamics has been used with a Lenard-Jones (6-12) potential in order to study the decay behavior of neutral Argon clusters containing between 12 and 14 atoms. The clusters were heated to temperatures well above their melting points and then tracked in time via molecular dynamics until evaporation of one or more atoms was observed. In each simulation, the mode of evaporation, energy released during evaporation, and cluster lifetime were recorded. Results from roughly 2000 simulation histories were combined in order to compute statistically significant values of cluster half-lives and decay energies. It was found that cluster half-life decreases with increasing energy and that for a given value of excess energy (defined as E=(E tot -E gnd )/n), the 13 atom cluster is more stable against decay than clusters containing either 12 or 14 atoms. The dominant decay mechanism for all clusters was determined to be single atom emission. (orig.)

  12. Real-Time Vehicle Data Logging System Using GPS And GSM

    OpenAIRE

    Win Minn Thet; MyoMaung Maung; Hla Myo Tun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This paper proposes and implements a low cost Vehicle Data Logging System using GPS and GSM. This system allows a user to trace the present and past positions recorded in SD card. This system also reads the current position of the vehicle using GPS the data is sent via GSM service from the GSM network. The vehicles position including the driving speed the UTC time and data are stored in the SD card for live and past tracking. All of that GPS data is sent to PIC 18F4520 by the Uni...

  13. PhilDB: the time series database with built-in change logging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew MacDonald

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available PhilDB is an open-source time series database that supports storage of time series datasets that are dynamic; that is, it records updates to existing values in a log as they occur. PhilDB eases loading of data for the user by utilising an intelligent data write method. It preserves existing values during updates and abstracts the update complexity required to achieve logging of data value changes. It implements fast reads to make it practical to select data for analysis. Recent open-source systems have been developed to indefinitely store long-period high-resolution time series data without change logging. Unfortunately, such systems generally require a large initial installation investment before use because they are designed to operate over a cluster of servers to achieve high-performance writing of static data in real time. In essence, they have a ‘big data’ approach to storage and access. Other open-source projects for handling time series data that avoid the ‘big data’ approach are also relatively new and are complex or incomplete. None of these systems gracefully handle revision of existing data while tracking values that change. Unlike ‘big data’ solutions, PhilDB has been designed for single machine deployment on commodity hardware, reducing the barrier to deployment. PhilDB takes a unique approach to meta-data tracking; optional attribute attachment. This facilitates scaling the complexities of storing a wide variety of data. That is, it allows time series data to be loaded as time series instances with minimal initial meta-data, yet additional attributes can be created and attached to differentiate the time series instances when a wider variety of data is needed. PhilDB was written in Python, leveraging existing libraries. While some existing systems come close to meeting the needs PhilDB addresses, none cover all the needs at once. PhilDB was written to fill this gap in existing solutions. This paper explores existing time

  14. Time-lapse cased hole reservoir evaluation based on the dual-detector neutron lifetime log: the CHES II approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, M.R.; Fertl, W.

    1977-01-01

    A newly developed cased hole analysis technique provides detailed information on (1) reservoir rock properties, such as porosity, shaliness, and formation permeability, (2) reservoir fluid saturation, (3) distinction of oil and gas pays, (4) state of reservoir depletion, such as cumulative hydrocarbon-feet at present time and cumulative hydrocarbon-feet already depleted (e.g., the sum of both values then giving the cumulative hydrocarbon-feet originally present), and (5) monitoring of hydrocarbon/water and gas/oil contacts behind pipe. The basic well log data required for this type of analysis include the Dual-Detector Neutron Lifetime Log, run in casing at any particular time in the life of a reservoir, and the initial open-hole resistivity log. In addition, porosity information from open-hole porosity log(s) or core data is necessary. Field examples from several areas are presented and discussed in the light of formation reservoir and hydrocarbon production characteristics

  15. Search for time reversal violation in neutron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorel, P.

    2006-06-01

    The topic of this thesis is the implementation of an experimental setup designed to measure the R- and N-parameters in polarized neutron decay, together with the data analysis. Four observables are necessary for this measurement: the neutron polarization, the electron momentum and both transverse components of the electron polarization. These last two are measured using a Mott polarimeter. The other observables are determined using the same detectors. The precision to be reached on the R-parameter is 0.5%. A non zero value would sign a time reversal invariance violation and therefore would be a hint of physics beyond the Standard Model. This document presents the work done to prepare and optimize the experimental setup before the data acquisition run performed in 2004. Particular care was taken on the scintillator walls, used to trigger the acquisition and measure the electron energy. The second part concerns the implementation of methods to extract R and N from the data, and the study of the background recorded simultaneously. (author)

  16. Role of collective effects in dominance of scattering off thermal ions over Langmuir wave decay: Analysis, simulations, and space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-12-01

    Langmuir waves driven to high levels by beam instabilities are subject to nonlinear processes, including the closely related processes of scattering off thermal ions (STI) and a decay process in which the ion response is organized into a product ion acoustic wave. Calculations of the nonlinear growth rates predict that the decay process should always dominate STI, creating two paradoxes. The first is that three independent computer simulation studies show STI proceeding, with no evidence for the decay at all. The second is that observations in space of type III solar radio bursts and Earth's foreshock, which the simulations were intended to model, show evidence for the decay proceeding but no evidence for STI. Resolutions to these paradoxes follow from the realization that a nonlinear process cannot proceed when its growth rate exceeds the minimum frequency of the participating waves, since the required collective response cannot be maintained and the waves cannot respond appropriately, and that a significant number of e-foldings and wave periods must be contained in the time available. It is shown that application of these ''collective'' and ''time scale'' constraints to the simulations explains why the decay does not proceed in them, as well as why STI proceeds in specific simulations. This appears to be the first demonstration that collective constraints are important in understanding nonlinear phenomena. Furthermore, applying these constraints to space observations, it is predicted that the decay should proceed (and dominate STI) in type III sources and the high beam speed regions of Earth's foreshock for a specific range of wave levels, with a possible role for STI alone at slightly higher wave levels. Deeper in the foreshock, for slower beams and weaker wave levels, the decay and STI are predicted to become ineffective. Suggestions are given for future testing of the collective constraint and an explanation

  17. Estimating air drying times of small-diameter ponderosa pine and Douglas-fir logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William T. Simpson; Xiping. Wang

    2003-01-01

    Because dense stands of softwood trees are causing forest health problems in the western United States, new ways to use this material need to be found. One option is to use this material as logs rather than sawing it into lumber. For many applications, logs require some degree of drying. Even though these logs may be considered small diameter, they are large compared...

  18. Study of N-13 decay on time using continuous kinetic function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Dai Nghiep; Vu Hoang Lam; Nguyen Ngoc Son; Nguyen Duc Thanh

    1993-01-01

    The decay function from radioisotope 13 N formed in the reaction 14 N(γ,n) 13 N was registered by high resolution gamma spectrometer in multiscanning mode with gamma energy 511 keV. The experimental data was processed by common and kinetic function method. The continuous comparison of the decay function on time permits to determinate possible deviation from purely exponential decay curve. The results were described by several decay theories. The degrees of corresponding between theories and experiment were evaluated by goodness factor. A complex type of decay was considered. (author). 9 refs, 2 tabs, 6 figs

  19. Filtered thermal neutron captured cross-sections measurements and decay heat calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Pham Ngoc; Tan, Vuong Huu

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a pure thermal neutron beam has been developed for neutron capture measurements based on the horizontal channel No.2 of the research reactor at the Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat. The original reactor neutron spectrum is transmitted through an optimal composition of Bi and Si single crystals for delivering a thermal neutron beam with Cadmium ratio (R cd ) of 420 and neutron flux (Φ th ) of 1.6x10 6 n/cm 2 .s. This thermal neutron beam has been applied for measurements of capture cross-sections for nuclide of 51 V, 55 Mn, 180 Hf and 186 W by the activation method relative to the standard reaction 197 Au(n,g) 198 Au. In addition to the activities of neutron capture cross-sections measurements, the study on nuclear decay heat calculations has been also considered to be developed at the Institute. Some results on calculation procedure and decay heat values calculated with update nuclear database for 235 U, 238 U, 239 Pu and 232 Th are introduced in this report. (author)

  20. Summary report of NEPTUN investigations into transient thermal hydraulics of the passive decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, D.; Hoffmann, H.; Rust, K.; Frey, H.H.; Hain, K.; Leiling, W.; Hayafune, H.

    1995-12-01

    The results corroborate the findings of tests with the RAMONA model. With the core power reduction at scram and the start of the decay heat exchangers operation cold fluid is delivered into the prevailing upper plenum. A temperature stratification develops with distinct large temperature gradients. The onset of natural convection is mainly influenced by two effects, namely, the temperature increase on the intermediate heat exchangers primary sides as a result of which the downward pressures are reduced, and the startup of the decay heat exchangers which leads to a decrease of the buoyancy forces in the core. The temperatures of the upper plenum are systematically reduced as soon as the decay heat exchangers are in operation. Then mixed fluid in the hot plenum reaches the intermediate heat exchangers inlet windows and causes an increase in the core flow rate. The primary pump coastdown curve influences the primary system thermal hydraulics only during the first thousand seconds after scram. The longer the pumps operate the more cold fluid is delivered via the core to the upper plenum. The delay of the start of the decay heat exchangers operation separates the two effects which influence the core mass flow, namely the heatup of the intermediate heat exchangers as well as the formation of the stratification in the upper plenum. Increasing the power as well as the operation of only half of the available decay heat exchangers increase the system temperatures. A permeable above core structure produces a temperature stratification along the total upper plenum, and therefore a lower temperature gradient in the region between core outlet and lower edge of the above core structure, in comparison to the impermeable design. A complete flow path blockage of the primary fluid through the intermediate heat exchangers leads to an enhanced cooling effect of the interstitial flow and gives rise to a thermosiphon effect inside the core elements. (orig./GL) [de

  1. Methods for processing of pulsed neutron logging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskenderov, V.G.

    1975-01-01

    Conditions were examined for calculating the lifetime of thermal neutrons in neutron-neutron logging by selecting optimum values for the time lag. The dispersion and mean square error of the calculated lifetime values for thermal neutrons are evaluated

  2. Combination of Well-Logging Temperature and Thermal Remote Sensing for Characterization of Geothermal Resources in Hokkaido, Northern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingwei Tian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Geothermal resources have become an increasingly important source of renewable energy for electrical power generation worldwide. Combined Three Dimension (3D Subsurface Temperature (SST and Land Surface Temperature (LST measurements are essential for accurate assessment of geothermal resources. In this study, subsurface and surface temperature distributions were combined using a dataset comprised of well logs and Thermal Infrared Remote sensing (TIR images from Hokkaido island, northern Japan. Using 28,476 temperature data points from 433 boreholes sites and a method of Kriging with External Drift or trend (KED, SST distribution model from depths of 100 to 1500 m was produced. Regional LST was estimated from 13 scenes of Landsat 8 images. Resultant SST ranged from around 50 °C to 300 °C at a depth of 1500 m. Most of western and part of the eastern Hokkaido are characterized by high temperature gradients, while low temperatures were found in the central region. Higher temperatures in shallower crust imply the western region and part of the eastern region have high geothermal potential. Moreover, several LST zones considered to have high geothermal potential were identified upon clarification of the underground heat distribution according to 3D SST. LST in these zones showed the anomalies, 3 to 9 °C higher than the surrounding areas. These results demonstrate that our combination of TIR and 3D temperature modeling using well logging and geostatistics is an efficient and promising approach to geothermal resource exploration.

  3. The impact of water loading on postglacial decay times in Hudson Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Holly Kyeore; Gomez, Natalya

    2018-05-01

    Ongoing glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) due to surface loading (ice and water) variations during the last glacial cycle has been contributing to sea-level changes globally throughout the Holocene, especially in regions like Canada that were heavily glaciated during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The spatial and temporal distribution of GIA, as manifested in relative sea-level (RSL) change, are sensitive to the ice history and the rheological structure of the solid Earth, both of which are uncertain. It has been shown that RSL curves near the center of previously glaciated regions with no ongoing surface loading follow an exponential-like form, with the postglacial decay times associated with that form having a weak sensitivity to the details of the ice loading history. Postglacial decay time estimates thus provide a powerful datum for constraining the Earth's viscous structure and improving GIA predictions. We explore spatial patterns of postglacial decay time predictions in Hudson Bay by decomposing numerically modeled RSL changes into contributions from water and ice loading effects, and computing their relative impact on the decay times. We demonstrate that ice loading can contribute a strong geographic trend on the decay time estimates if the time window used to compute decay times includes periods that are temporally close to (i.e. contemporaneous with, or soon after) periods of active loading. This variability can be avoided by choosing a suitable starting point for the decay time window. However, more surprisingly, we show that across any adopted time window, water loading effects associated with inundation into, and postglacial flux out of, Hudson Bay and James Bay will impart significant geographic variability onto decay time estimates. We emphasize this issue by considering both maps of predicted decay times across the region and site-specific estimates, and we conclude that variability in observed decay times (whether based on existing or future data

  4. Time-based forgetting in visual working memory reflects temporal distinctiveness, not decay

    OpenAIRE

    Souza Alessandra S.; Oberauer Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Is forgetting from working memory (WM) better explained by decay or interference? The answer to this question is the topic of an ongoing debate. Recently a number of studies showed that performance in tests of visual WM declines with an increasing unfilled retention interval. This finding was interpreted as revealing decay. Alternatively it can be explained by interference theories as an effect of temporal distinctiveness. According to decay theories forgetting depends on the absolute time el...

  5. Determination of residual oil saturation from time-lapse pulsed neutron capture logs in a large sandstone reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, E.V.; Salaita, G.N.; McCaffery, F.G.

    1991-01-01

    Cased hole logging with pulsed neutron tools finds extensive use for identifying zones of water breakthrough and monitoring oil-water contacts in oil reservoirs being depleted by waterflooding or natural water drive. Results of such surveys then find direct use for planning recompletions and water shutoff treatments. Pulsed neutron capture (PNC) logs are useful for estimating water saturation changes behind casing in the presence of a constant, high-salinity environment. PNC log surveys run at different times, i.e., in a time-lapse mode, are particularly amenable to quantitative analysis. The combined use of the original open hole and PNC time-lapse log information can then provide information on remaining or residual oil saturations in a reservoir. This paper reports analyses of historical pulsed neutron capture log data to assess residual oil saturation in naturally water-swept zones for selected wells from a large sandstone reservoir in the Middle East. Quantitative determination of oil saturations was aided by PNC log information obtained from a series of tests conducted in a new well in the same field

  6. A generalized voter model with time-decaying memory on a multilayer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Xu, Wen-Juan; Chen, Rong-Da; Zhong, Chen-Yang; Qiu, Tian; Shi, Yong-Dong; Wang, Li-Liang

    2016-09-01

    By incorporating a multilayer network and time-decaying memory into the original voter model, we investigate the coupled effects of spatial and temporal accumulation of peer pressure on the consensus. Heterogeneity in peer pressure and the time-decaying mechanism are both shown to be detrimental to the consensus. We find the transition points below which a consensus can always be reached and above which two opposed opinions are more likely to coexist. Our mean-field analysis indicates that the phase transitions in the present model are governed by the cumulative influence of peer pressure and the updating threshold. We find a functional relation between the consensus threshold and the decay rate of the influence of peer is found. As to the pressure. The time required to reach a consensus is governed by the coupling of the memory length and the decay rate. An intermediate decay rate may greatly reduce the time required to reach a consensus.

  7. Time dependent black holes and thermal equilibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, Dongsu; Gutperle, Michael; Karch, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    We study aspects of a recently proposed exact time dependent black hole solution of IIB string theory using the AdS/CFT correspondence. The dual field theory is a thermal system in which initially a vacuum density for a non-conserved operator is turned on. We can see that in agreement with general thermal field theory expectation the system equilibrates: the expectation value of the non-conserved operator goes to zero exponentially and the entropy increases. In the field theory the process can be described quantitatively in terms of a thermofield state and exact agreement with the gravity answers is found

  8. Decay of organic free radicals in γ-ray irradiated pepper during thermal treatment as detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Mitsuko; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2004-01-01

    Using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy we analysed the thermal decay process of radicals in γ-Irradiated pepper Upon irradiation, the satellite signals were newly induced and appeared at the symmetric positions of the organic free radical, i.e., the g=2.0 signal. Heat treatment decreased the satellite signals exponentially. The ESR signal of the pepper heated for more than 10 min was essentially the same as that before irradiation. To evaluate the radical decay by heat-treatment, we formulated a time-dependent master equation. We could evaluate the time constant of the radical decay based upon the general solution of the equation together with the nonlinear least-squares method

  9. Mapping the lithotypes using the in-situ measurement of time domain induced polarization: El-log

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auken, Esben; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    This study presents a novel application of the El-log-drilling technique for measurement while drilling of the DC, time domain IP and gamma log. In addition pore water samples can be taken at arbitrary levels. The technique itself is developed in Denmark and has been widely used in the field...... of ground water and environmental studies. The El-log drilling method yields detailed information on small changes in lithology, sediment chemistry and water quality and with data comparable to what can be obtained in the laboratory. . We collected the data at a landfill site located near Grindsted...... in the southern part of Denmark. The purpose of the study was 1) to obtain a direct correlation between the undisturbed geophysical logs and surface measurements, 2) correlation of IP parameters to lithology and grain size distribution and 3) to investigate any correlation with effluent and IP parameters. We...

  10. Radioactive decay of the late-time light curves of GRB-SNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Kuntal; Fruchte, Andrew Steven

    2018-04-01

    We present the late-time Hubble Space Telescope observations of two GRB associated supernovae, GRB 030329/SN 2003dh and XRF 060218/SN 2006aj. Using the multi-color data upto ˜ 320 days after the burst, we constrain the late-time decay nature of these supernovae. The decay rates of SN 2003dh are steeper than SN 2006aj. A comparison with two other GRB supernovae, GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and the supernova associated with XRF 020903, shows that the decay rates of SN 2003dh are similar to XRF 020903 and those of SN 2006aj are similar to SN 1998bw. The late-time decay rates are steeper than the 56Co?56Fe radioactive decay rate (0.0098 mag day-1) indicating that there is some leakage of gamma-rays.

  11. Real-Time Vehicle Data Logging System Using GPS And GSM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Minn Thet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper proposes and implements a low cost Vehicle Data Logging System using GPS and GSM. This system allows a user to trace the present and past positions recorded in SD card. This system also reads the current position of the vehicle using GPS the data is sent via GSM service from the GSM network. The vehicles position including the driving speed the UTC time and data are stored in the SD card for live and past tracking. All of that GPS data is sent to PIC 18F4520 by the Universal Asynchronous ReceiverTransmitter UART and also store in SD card. GSM also uses UART to transmit. To know the position of the vehicle the owner sends a request through a SMS. The SMS sends to the authorized person through the GSM network. The travel history of the vehicle are stored in a file on an SD card in FAT format.This system is very useful for car tracking for adolescent driver being checked by parent speed limit exceeding leaving a specific area. V The developed system is easy to use requires no additional hardware and permits the selection of the amount of data and the time intervals between the data recordings. In addition the collected data can easily be transferred to a computer via a connected serial port.

  12. Noninvasive detection of inhomogeneities in turbid media with time-resolved log-slope analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, S.K.; Guo Zhixiong; Kumar, Sunil; Aber, Janice; Garetz, B.A.

    2004-01-01

    Detecting foreign objects embedded in turbid media using noninvasive optical tomography techniques is of great importance in many practical applications, such as in biomedical imaging and diagnosis, safety inspection on aircrafts and submarines, and LIDAR techniques. In this paper we develop a novel optical tomography approach based on slope analysis of time-resolved back-scattered signals collected at the medium boundaries where the light source is an ultrafast, short-pulse laser. As the optical field induced by the laser-pulse propagates, the detected temporal signals are influenced by the optical properties of the medium traversed. The detected temporal signatures therefore contain information that can indicate the presence of an inhomogeneity as well as its size and location relative to the laser source and detection systems. The log-slope analysis of the time-resolved back-scattered intensity is shown to be an effective method for extracting the information contained in the signal. The technique is validated by experimental results and by Monte Carlo simulations

  13. Computing the Quartet Distance Between Evolutionary Trees in Time O(n log n)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Sølfting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm

    2003-01-01

    Evolutionary trees describing the relationship for a set of species are central in evolutionary biology, and quantifying differences between evolutionary trees is therefore an important task. The quartet distance is a distance measure between trees previously proposed by Estabrook, McMorris, and ...... unrooted evolutionary trees of n species, where all internal nodes have degree three, in time O(n log n. The previous best algorithm for the problem uses time O(n 2).......Evolutionary trees describing the relationship for a set of species are central in evolutionary biology, and quantifying differences between evolutionary trees is therefore an important task. The quartet distance is a distance measure between trees previously proposed by Estabrook, Mc......Morris, and Meacham. The quartet distance between two unrooted evolutionary trees is the number of quartet topology differences between the two trees, where a quartet topology is the topological subtree induced by four species. In this paper we present an algorithm for computing the quartet distance between two...

  14. A note on the time decay of solutions for the linearized Wigner-Poisson system

    KAUST Repository

    Gamba, Irene

    2009-01-01

    We consider the one-dimensional Wigner-Poisson system of plasma physics, linearized around a (spatially homogeneous) Lorentzian distribution and prove that the solution of the corresponding linearized problem decays to zero in time. We also give an explicit algebraic decay rate.

  15. Determine the need to research the time-related stability decay of bord and pillar systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholzer, JW

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available in decisions regarding research work that could be conducted to investigate the time related decay of bord and pillar workings. As the working consist of pillars of varying shapes and sizes the study concentrated mainly on the aspects of pillar decay...

  16. A practical O(n log2 n) time algorithm for computing the triplet distance on binary trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Andreas; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm; Mailund, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    rooted binary trees in time O (n log2 n). The algorithm is related to an algorithm for computing the quartet distance between two unrooted binary trees in time O (n log n). While the quartet distance algorithm has a very severe overhead in the asymptotic time complexity that makes it impractical compared......The triplet distance is a distance measure that compares two rooted trees on the same set of leaves by enumerating all sub-sets of three leaves and counting how often the induced topologies of the tree are equal or different. We present an algorithm that computes the triplet distance between two...

  17. A study on the characteristics of the decay heat removal capacity for a large thermal rated LMR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uh, J. H.; Kim, E. K.; Kim, S. O.

    2003-01-01

    The design characteristics and the decay heat removal capacity according to the type of DHR (Decay Heat Removal) system in LMR are quantitatively analyzed, and the general relationship between the rated core thermal power and decay heat removal capacity is created in this study. Based on these analyses results, a feasibility of designing a larger thermal rating KALIMER plant is investigated in view of decay heat removal capacity, and DRC (Direct Reactor Cooling) type DHR system which rejects heat from the reactor pool to air is proper to satisfy the decay heat removal capacity for a large thermal rating plant above 1,000 MWth. Some defects, however, including the heat loss under normal plant operation and the lack of reliance associated with system operation should be resolved in order to adopt the total passive concept. Therefore, the new concept of DHR system for a larger thermal rating KALIMER design, named as PDRC (passive decay heat removal circuit), is established in this study. In the newly established concept of PDRC, the Na-Na heat exchanger is located above the sodium cold pool and is prevented from the direct sodium contact during normal operation. This total passive feature has the superiority in the aspect of the minimizing the normal heat loss and the increasing the operation reliance of DHR system by removing either any operator action or any external operation signal associated with system operation. From this study, it is confirmed that the new concept of PDRC is useful to the designing of a large thermal rating power plant of KALIMER-600 in view of decay heat removal capability

  18. Determination of In-situ Rock Thermal Properties from Geophysical Log Data of SK-2 East Borehole, Continental Scientific Drilling Project of Songliao Basin, NE China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, C.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, X.; Peng, C.; Zhang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Continental Scientific Drilling Project of Songliao Basin is a drilling project under the framework of ICDP. It aims at detecting Cretaceous environmental/climate changes and exploring potential resources near or beneath the base of the basin. The main hole, SK-2 East Borehole, has been drilled to penetrate through the Cretaceous formation. A variety of geophysical log data were collected from the borehole, which provide a great opportunity to analyze thermal properties of in-situ rock surrounding the borehole.The geothermal gradients were derived directly from temperature logs recorded 41 days after shut-in. The matrix and bulk thermal conductivity of rock were calculated with the geometric-mean model, in which mineral/rock contents and porosity were required as inputs (Fuchs et. al., 2014). Accurate mineral contents were available from the elemental capture spectroscopy logs and porosity data were derived from conventional logs (density, neutron and sonic). The heat production data were calculated by means of the concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium determined from natural gamma-ray spectroscopy logs. Then, the heat flow was determined by using the values of geothermal gradients and thermal conductivity.The thermal parameters of in-situ rock over the depth interval of 0 4500m in the borehole were derived from geophysical logs. Statistically, the numerical ranges of thermal parameters are in good agreement with the measured values from both laboratory and field in this area. The results show that high geothermal gradient and heat flow exist over the whole Cretaceous formation, with anomalously high values in the Qingshankou formation (1372.0 1671.7m) and the Quantou formation (1671.7 2533.5m). It is meaningful for characterization of geothermal regime and exploration of geothermal resources in the basin. Acknowledgment: This work was supported by the "China Continental Scientific Drilling Program of Cretaceous Songliao Basin (CCSD-SK)" of China

  19. Thermal decay of rhodopsin: role of hydrogen bonds in thermal isomerization of 11-cis retinal in the binding site and hydrolysis of protonated Schiff base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Monica Yun; Nguyen, Jennifer B; Bhagat, Aditi; Mooney, Victoria; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2009-07-01

    Although thermal stability of the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is directly related to its extremely low dark noise level and has recently generated considerable interest, the chemistry behind the thermal decay process of rhodopsin has remained unclear. Using UV-vis spectroscopy and HPLC analysis, we have demonstrated that the thermal decay of rhodopsin involves both hydrolysis of the protonated Schiff base and thermal isomerization of 11-cis to all-trans retinal. Examining the unfolding of rhodopsin by circular dichroism spectroscopy and measuring the rate of thermal isomerization of 11-cis retinal in solution, we conclude that the observed thermal isomerization of 11-cis to all-trans retinal happens when 11-cis retinal is in the binding pocket of rhodopsin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that solvent deuterium isotope effects are involved in the thermal decay process by decreasing the rates of thermal isomerization and hydrolysis, suggesting that the rate-determining step of these processes involves breaking hydrogen bonds. These results provide insight into understanding the critical role of an extensive hydrogen-bonding network on stabilizing the inactive state of rhodopsin and contribute to our current understanding of the low dark noise level of rhodopsin, which enables this specialized protein to function as an extremely sensitive biological light detector. Because similar hydrogen-bonding networks have also been suggested by structural analysis of two other GPCRs, beta1 and beta2 adrenergic receptors, our results could reveal a general role of hydrogen bonds in facilitating GPCR function.

  20. Automated four-dimensional Monte Carlo workflow using log files and real-time motion monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Cronholm, R.O.; Heath, E.

    2017-01-01

    been developed in python. The workflow has been tested and verified using an in-house developed dosimetry system comprised of a dynamic thorax phantom constructed for plastic scintillator dosimetry. The workflow is directly compatible with any treatment planning system and can also be triggered...... by the appearance of linac log files. It has minimum user interaction and, with the use of linac log files, it provides a method for verification of the actually delivered dose in the patient geometry....

  1. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Mayumi; Toma, Takashi; Vicente, Avelino

    2015-01-01

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2) L quintuplet and a scalar SU(2) L septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations

  2. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Mayumi [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kanazawa University,Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Toma, Takashi [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS - UMR 8627, Université de Paris-Sud 11,F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Vicente, Avelino [IFPA, Dep. AGO, Université de Liège,Bat B5, Sart-Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Instituto de Física Corpuscular, CSIC-Universitat de València,Apdo. 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2015-09-29

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  3. Non-thermal production of minimal dark matter via right-handed neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Mayumi [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Toma, Takashi [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, CNRS - UMR 8627, Université de Paris-Sud 11, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Vicente, Avelino, E-mail: mayumi@hep.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp, E-mail: takashi.toma@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: Avelino.Vicente@ulg.ac.be [IFPA, Dep. AGO, Université de Liège, Bat B5, Sart-Tilman B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    Minimal Dark Matter (MDM) stands as one of the simplest dark matter scenarios. In MDM models, annihilation and co-annihilation processes among the members of the MDM multiplet are usually very efficient, pushing the dark matter mass above O(10) TeV in order to reproduce the observed dark matter relic density. Motivated by this little drawback, in this paper we consider an extension of the MDM scenario by three right-handed neutrinos. Two specific choices for the MDM multiplet are studied: a fermionic SU(2){sub L} quintuplet and a scalar SU(2){sub L} septuplet. The lightest right-handed neutrino, with tiny Yukawa couplings, never reaches thermal equilibrium in the early universe and is produced by freeze-in. This creates a link between dark matter and neutrino physics: dark matter can be non-thermally produced by the decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino after freeze-out, allowing to lower significantly the dark matter mass. We discuss the phenomenology of the non-thermally produced MDM and, taking into account significant Sommerfeld corrections, we find that the dark matter mass must have some specific values in order not to be in conflict with the current bounds from gamma-ray observations.

  4. Using the thermal diffusion cloud chamber to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yefei.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal diffusion cloud chamber is steady-state device and has been extensively used for nucleation research. In order to study the ion-induced nucleation by radon decay, a new chamber was designed with improved both upper and bottom plates, the system of circulating fluid, the gasketting, the temperature measurement and the insulation. An alternative method of using oxygen as carrier gas was examined. Therefore, the heavy carrier gas including nitrogen, oxygen, neon, argon and air can be used to study radon radiolysis-induced nucleation for the water or organic compounds in the TDCC. The effects of the pressure and temperature ranges on the density, supersaturation, temperature and partial pressure profile for the water-oxygen-helium in the TDCC have been examined. Based on the classical theory, the rate profile of ion-induced nucleation by radon decays was calculated and compared with the homogeneous nucleation. From measured indoor concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), thermodynamic theory models were used to assess the possibility that these compounds will form ultrafine particles in indoor air by ion-induced nucleation. The energy, number of molecules and equilibrium radius of clusters have been calculated based on Such and Thomson theories. These two sets of values have been compared. Ion cluster radii corresponding to 1--3 VOC molecules are in range of 3--5 x 10 -8 cm. 43 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Intraband relaxation and temperature dependence of the fluorescence decay time of one-dimensional Frenkel excitons : The Pauli master equation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bednarz, M.; Malyshev, V.A.; Knoester, J.

    2002-01-01

    In molecular J-aggregates one often observes an increase of the fluorescence decay time when increasing the temperature from 0 K. This phenomenon is usually attributed to the thermal population of the dark Frenkel exciton states that lie above the superradiant bottom state of the exciton band. In

  6. Model wells for nuclear well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittle, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Considerations needed in the design and construction of model wells for nuclear log calibration are covered, with special attention to neutron porosity logging and total γ-ray logging. Pulsed neutron decay-time and spectral γ-ray logging are discussed briefly. The American Petroleum Institute calibration facility for nuclear logs is a good starting point for similar or expanded facilities. A few of its shortcomings are mentioned; they are minor. The problem of fluid saturation is emphasized. Attention is given to models made of consolidated rock and those containing unconsolidated material such as Ottawa sand. Needed precautions are listed. A similarity method is presented for estimating the porosity index of formations that are not fully saturated. (author)

  7. A note on the time decay of solutions for the linearized Wigner-Poisson system

    KAUST Repository

    Gamba, Irene; Gualdani, Maria; Sparber, Christof

    2009-01-01

    We consider the one-dimensional Wigner-Poisson system of plasma physics, linearized around a (spatially homogeneous) Lorentzian distribution and prove that the solution of the corresponding linearized problem decays to zero in time. We also give

  8. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.

    2013-01-01

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (∼7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (∼12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10 −3 cm 2 /s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s 0.5 /cm 2 K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm 3 K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water)

  9. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Bento, A. C.

    2013-11-01

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (˜7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (˜12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10-3 cm2/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s0.5/cm2 K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm3 K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water).

  10. Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C., E-mail: acbento@uem.br [Departamento de Física, Grupo de Espectroscopia Fotoacústica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Maringá – UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, Paraná (Brazil); Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S. [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho – UNESP, Av. Brasil 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-21

    The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (∼7 min) and with similar thermal expansion (∼12 μstrain/ °C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 μm thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) μm, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) μl. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10{sup −3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 μm using 57 μl of distilled water)

  11. Dynamic bridge-finding in õ(log2 n) amortized time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jacob; Rotenberg, Eva; Thorup, Mikkel

    2018-01-01

    2000], which was a bittrick-based improvement on the O((log n)4) amortized time algorithm by Holm et al.[STOC98, JACM2001]. Our approach is based on a different and purely combinatorial improvement of the algorithim of Holm et al., which by itself gives a new combinatorial

  12. Radioluminescence Decay Time Measurements in Silver-Doped Cadmium-Sulphide Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, R.

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-induced radioluminescence decay times of CdS(Ag) crystals have been measured at temperatures ranging from 80 K to 300 K by using single-photon counting technique. These measurements indicate a complex and non-exponential type of decay time profiles, which are in general composed of two decay components, the fast one having about 3 ns and the slow one having about 6 ns. The decay times were found to be almost temperature independent. It was experimentally proved that the fast one is originating from the 594 nm emission line, whereas the slow one is originating from the 576 nm emission line. The whole wavelength-dependences of decay times (t 1 /e and t 1 /e 2 ) were also presented. The observation of fast and non-exponential decay times shows that the recombination mechanisms in CdS(Ag) crystals are not simple, responsible centers are not isolated, and there might be more than one radioluminescence center. This suggests the existence of

  13. Decay kinetics and thermally stimulated luminescence of Mn.sup.4 +./sup. in SrTiO.sub.3./sub

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bryknar, Z.; Potůček, Zdeněk; Trepakov, Vladimír; Shen, M. Y.; Goto, T.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 154, - (2001), s. 341-345 ISSN 1042-0150 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/00/1425 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : thermally stimulated luminescence * decay kinetics * strontium titanate * manganese Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.380, year: 2001

  14. Application of just-in-time manufacturing techniques in radioactive source in well logging industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atma Yudha Prawira

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear logging is one of major areas of logging development. This paper presents an empirical investigation to bring the drilling and completion of wells from an ill-defined art to a refined sci-ence by using radioactive source to “look and measure” such as formation type, formation dip, porosity, fluid type and numerous other important factors. The initial nuclear logging tools rec-ords the radiation emitted by formation as they were crossed by boreholes. Gamma radiation is used in well logging as it is powerful enough to penetrate the formation and steel casing. The ra-dioactive source is reusable so that after engineer finished the job the radioactive source is sent back to bunker. In this case inventory level of radioactive source is relatively high compared with monthly movement and the company must spend large amount of cost just for inventory. After calculating and averaging the monthly movement in 2014 and 2015, we detected a big pos-sibility to cut the inventory level to reduce the inventory cost.

  15. Forensic timber identification: It's time to integrate disciplines to combat illegal logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleanor E. Dormontt; Markus Boner; Birgit Braun; Gerhard Breulmann; Bernd Degen; Edgard Espinoza; Shelley Gardner; Phil Guillery; John C. Hermanson; Gerald Koch; Soon Leong Lee; Milton Kanashiro; Anto Rimbawanto; Darren Thomas; Alex C. Wiedenhoeft; Yafang Yin; Johannes Zahnen; Andrew J. Lowe

    2015-01-01

    The prosecution of illegal logging crimes is hampered by a lack of available forensic timber identification tools, both for screening of suspectmaterial and definitive identification of illegally sourcedwood. Reputable timber traders are also struggling to police their own supply chains and comply with the growing requirement for due diligence with respect to timber...

  16. Corrections for the combined effects of decay and dead time in live-timed counting of short-lived radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, R.

    2016-01-01

    Studies and calibrations of short-lived radionuclides, for example "1"5O, are of particular interest in nuclear medicine. Yet counting experiments on such species are vulnerable to an error due to the combined effect of decay and dead time. Separate decay corrections and dead-time corrections do not account for this issue. Usually counting data are decay-corrected to the start time of the count period, or else instead of correcting the count rate, the mid-time of the measurement is used as the reference time. Correction factors are derived for both those methods, considering both extending and non-extending dead time. Series approximations are derived here and the accuracy of those approximations are discussed. - Highlights: • Derived combined effects of decay and dead time. • Derived for counting systems with extending or non-extending dead times. • Derived series expansions for both midpoint and decay-to-start-time methods. • Useful for counting experiments with short-lived radionuclides. • Examples given for "1"5O, used in PET scanning.

  17. Response transforms from comparative study of commercial pulsed-neutron-capture logging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaita, G.N.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that three generations of Schlumberger's Thermal Decay Time (TDT SM ) logging devices - viz., TDT-K, TDT-M, and TDT-P - along with an Atlas Wireline PDK-100 SM system were run in a Saudi Aramco well. The wellbore (8 1/2 in. with 7-in. casing) penetrated a sequence of clean sand, shaly sand, and shale streaks as exhibited by the openhole natural gamma ray log. The initial wellbore fluid was diesel. The fluid was then changed to brines of 42,000 and 176,000 ppm NaCl, respectively. Three repeat passes at a logging speed of 900 ft/hr were obtained by each device for each borehole liquid. As a result of this extensive comparative study, a set of departure curves and mathematical transforms was developed primarily for standardizing the various Schlumberger tools to a common reference logging system and/or borehole environment. The transforms were used beneficially to determine residual oil saturation (ROS) from time-lapse logs in a Saudi Aramco reservoir

  18. Thermalization Time Bounds for Pauli Stabilizer Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Kristan

    2017-03-01

    We prove a general lower bound to the spectral gap of the Davies generator for Hamiltonians that can be written as the sum of commuting Pauli operators. These Hamiltonians, defined on the Hilbert space of N-qubits, serve as one of the most frequently considered candidates for a self-correcting quantum memory. A spectral gap bound on the Davies generator establishes an upper limit on the life time of such a quantum memory and can be used to estimate the time until the system relaxes to thermal equilibrium when brought into contact with a thermal heat bath. The bound can be shown to behave as {λ ≥ O(N^{-1} exp(-2β overline{ɛ}))}, where {overline{ɛ}} is a generalization of the well known energy barrier for logical operators. Particularly in the low temperature regime we expect this bound to provide the correct asymptotic scaling of the gap with the system size up to a factor of N -1. Furthermore, we discuss conditions and provide scenarios where this factor can be removed and a constant lower bound can be proven.

  19. Time-dependent $CP$ violation measurements with $B$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Perazzini, S

    2016-01-01

    LHCb is one of the four major experiments operating at the Large Hadron Collider, and is specifically dedicated to the measurement of CP violation and rare decays in the beauty and charm quark sectors. In this report we present some of the latest and most relevant measurements of time-dependent CP violation in B hadron decays, performed by LHCb using the data sample collected during 2011 and 2012.

  20. Energy decay of a variable-coefficient wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent localized damping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieqiong Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the energy decay for the Cauchy problem of the wave equation with nonlinear time-dependent and space-dependent damping. The damping is localized in a bounded domain and near infinity, and the principal part of the wave equation has a variable-coefficient. We apply the multiplier method for variable-coefficient equations, and obtain an energy decay that depends on the property of the coefficient of the damping term.

  1. Simultaneous determination of radionuclides separable into natural decay series by use of time-interval analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Sanada, Yukihisa; Uezu, Yasuhiro

    2004-01-01

    A delayed coincidence method, time-interval analysis (TIA), has been applied to successive α-α decay events on the millisecond time-scale. Such decay events are part of the 220 Rn→ 216 Po (T 1/2 145 ms) (Th-series) and 219 Rn→ 215 Po (T 1/2 1.78 ms) (Ac-series). By using TIA in addition to measurement of 226 Ra (U-series) from α-spectrometry by liquid scintillation counting (LSC), two natural decay series could be identified and separated. The TIA detection efficiency was improved by using the pulse-shape discrimination technique (PSD) to reject β-pulses, by solvent extraction of Ra combined with simple chemical separation, and by purging the scintillation solution with dry N 2 gas. The U- and Th-series together with the Ac-series were determined, respectively, from alpha spectra and TIA carried out immediately after Ra-extraction. Using the 221 Fr→ 217 At (T 1/2 32.3 ms) decay process as a tracer, overall yields were estimated from application of TIA to the 225 Ra (Np-decay series) at the time of maximum growth. The present method has proven useful for simultaneous determination of three radioactive decay series in environmental samples. (orig.)

  2. Automated four-dimensional Monte Carlo workflow using log files and real-time motion monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibolt, P; Andersen, C E; Cronholm, R O; Heath, E; Behrens, C F

    2017-01-01

    With emerging techniques for tracking and gating methods in radiotherapy of lung cancer patients, there is an increasing need for efficient four-dimensional Monte Carlo (4DMC) based quality assurance (QA). An automated and flexible workflow for 4DMC QA, based on the 4DdefDOSXYZnrc user code, has been developed in python. The workflow has been tested and verified using an in-house developed dosimetry system comprised of a dynamic thorax phantom constructed for plastic scintillator dosimetry. The workflow is directly compatible with any treatment planning system and can also be triggered by the appearance of linac log files. It has minimum user interaction and, with the use of linac log files, it provides a method for verification of the actually delivered dose in the patient geometry. (paper)

  3. Data processing and case identification in an agricultural and logging morbidity surveillance study: Trends over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Erika; Bell, Erin; Krupa, Nicole; Hirabayashi, Liane; Jenkins, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Agriculture and logging are dangerous industries, and though data on fatal injury exists, less is known about non-fatal injury. Establishing a non-fatal injury surveillance system is a top priority. Pre-hospital care reports and hospitalization data were explored as a low-cost option for ongoing surveillance of occupational injury. Using pre-hospital care report free-text and location codes, along with hospital ICD-9-CM external cause of injury codes, we created a surveillance system that tracked farm and logging injuries. In Maine and New Hampshire, 1585 injury events were identified (2008-2010). The incidence of injuries was 12.4/1000 for agricultural workers, compared to 10.4/1000 to 12.2/1000 for logging workers. These estimates are consistent with other recent estimates. This system is limited to traumatic injury for which medical treatment is administered, and is limited by the accuracy of coding and spelling. This system has the potential to be both sustainable and low cost. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The effect of decaying atomic states on integral and time differential Moessbauer spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kankeleit, E.

    1975-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra for time dependent monopole interaction have been calculated for the case that the nuclear transition feeding the Moessbauer state excites an electric state of the atom. This is assumed to decay in a time comparable with the lifetime of the Moessbauer state. Spectra have been calculated for both time differential and integral experiments. (orig.) [de

  5. Decay Rates of Interactive Hyperbolic-Parabolic PDE Models with Thermal Effects on the Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasiecka, I.; Lebiedzik, C.

    2000-01-01

    We consider coupled PDE systems comprising of a hyperbolic and a parabolic-like equation with an interface on a portion of the boundary. These models are motivated by structural acoustic problems. A specific prototype consists of a wave equation defined on a three-dimensional bounded domain Ω coupled with a thermoelastic plate equation defined on Γ 0 -a flat surface of the boundary Ω. Thus, the coupling between the wave and the plate takes place on the interface Γ 0 . The main issue studied here is that of uniform stability of the overall interactive model. Since the original (uncontrolled) model is only strongly stable, but not uniformly stable, the question becomes: what is the 'minimal amount' of dissipation necessary to obtain uniform decay rates for the energy of the overall system? Our main result states that boundary nonlinear dissipation placed only on a suitable portion of the part of the boundary which is complementary to Γ 0 , suffices for the stabilization of the entire structure. This result is new with respect to the literature on several accounts: (i) thermoelasticity is accounted for in the plate model; (ii) the plate model does not account for any type of mechanical damping, including the structural damping most often considered in the literature; (iii) there is no mechanical damping placed on the interface Γ 0 ; (iv) the boundary damping is nonlinear without a prescribed growth rate at the origin; (v) the undamped portions of the boundary partial Ω are subject to Neumann (rather than Dirichlet) boundary conditions, which is a recognized difficulty in the context of stabilization of wave equations, due to the fact that the strong Lopatinski condition does not hold. The main mathematical challenge is to show how the thermal energy is propagated onto the hyperbolic component of the structure. This is achieved by using a recently developed sharp theory of boundary traces corresponding to wave and plate equations, along with the analytic

  6. Time-dependent CP violation in $B^0_{(s)} \\to h^+h^-$ decays

    CERN Multimedia

    Fazzini, Davide

    2018-01-01

    The direct and mixing-induced CP-violating asymmetries in $B^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $B_s \\to K^+ K^-$ decays have been measured using a sample of pp collisions collected by the LHCb experiment during the Run1 of the LHC and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$.The time-integrated CP asymmetries in $B^0 \\to K^+ \\pi^-$ and $B_s \\to \\pi^+ K^-$ decays have also been measured, using the same data sample.The measurements of the CP-violating asymmetries of the $B^0 \\to \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, $B_s \\to K^+\\pi^-$ and $B_s \\to \\pi^+K^-$ decays are the most precise from a single experiment. The measurements of the CP-violating asymmetries of the Bs->KK decays are compatible with the previous results from LHCb.

  7. Systematics of alpha Q-values. Potential dependence of the alpha decay life time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    It has been considered that the life time of α decay can be explained by calculating the probability of α getting out through the composite field of nuclear force and Coulomb force, that alpha and remaining nuclei make, by tunnel effect. However, when the detailed theoretical calculation was performed, the large difference from the experimental values was found. The researches which, have been carried out before are introduced. In this report, it is shown that when the treatment of Arima and Yoshida's way is carried out by using the realistic field of nuclear force and Coulomb force, the half life of α decay in considerably wide range can be calculated by considering the results of Tonozuka and Arima. The systematics of α Q-values is explained. The method of determining the life time of α decay is examined. The comparison of the calculated values and the experimental values of the α decay of 20 Ne and 212 Po is shown. This method of calculating the half life of α decay can reproduce the experimental values well. The application is considered to the estimation of the life of unstable nuclei, the new approach to heavy particle decay and others. (K.I.)

  8. Decay of surface nanostructures via long-time-scale dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voter, A.F.; Stanciu, N.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have developed a new approach for extending the time scale of molecular dynamics simulations. For infrequent-event systems, the category that includes most diffusive events in the solid phase, this hyperdynamics method can extend the simulation time by a few orders of magnitude compared to direct molecular dynamics. The trajectory is run on a potential surface that has been biased to raise the energy in the potential basins without affecting the transition state region. The method is described and applied to surface and bulk diffusion processes, achieving microsecond and millisecond simulation times. The authors have also developed a new parallel computing method that is efficient for small system sizes. The combination of the hyperdynamics with this parallel replica dynamics looks promising as a general materials simulation tool

  9. Time reversal in polarized neutron decay: the emiT experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, G L; Anaya, J M; Bowles, T J; Chupp, T E; Coulter, K P; Dewey, M S; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; García, A; Greene, G L; Hwang, S R; Lising, L J; Mumm, H P; Nico, J S; Robertson, R G H; Steiger, T D; Teasdale, W A; Thompson, A K; Wasserman, E G; Wietfeldt, F E; Wilkerson, J F

    2000-01-01

    The standard electro-weak model predicts negligible violation of time-reversal invariance in light quark processes. We report on an experimental test of time-reversal invariance in the beta decay of polarized neutrons as a search for physics beyond the standard model. The emiT collaboration has measured the time-reversal-violating triple-correlation in neutron beta decay between the neutron spin, electron momentum, and neutrino momentum often referred to as the D coefficient. The first run of the experiment produced 14 million events which are currently being analyzed. However, a second run with improved detectors should provide greater statistical precision and reduced systematic uncertainties.

  10. Tethered to the EHR: Primary Care Physician Workload Assessment Using EHR Event Log Data and Time-Motion Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Brian G; Beasley, John W; Watkinson, Michelle D; Temte, Jonathan L; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Sinsky, Christine A; Gilchrist, Valerie J

    2017-09-01

    Primary care physicians spend nearly 2 hours on electronic health record (EHR) tasks per hour of direct patient care. Demand for non-face-to-face care, such as communication through a patient portal and administrative tasks, is increasing and contributing to burnout. The goal of this study was to assess time allocated by primary care physicians within the EHR as indicated by EHR user-event log data, both during clinic hours (defined as 8:00 am to 6:00 pm Monday through Friday) and outside clinic hours. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 142 family medicine physicians in a single system in southern Wisconsin. All Epic (Epic Systems Corporation) EHR interactions were captured from "event logging" records over a 3-year period for both direct patient care and non-face-to-face activities, and were validated by direct observation. EHR events were assigned to 1 of 15 EHR task categories and allocated to either during or after clinic hours. Clinicians spent 355 minutes (5.9 hours) of an 11.4-hour workday in the EHR per weekday per 1.0 clinical full-time equivalent: 269 minutes (4.5 hours) during clinic hours and 86 minutes (1.4 hours) after clinic hours. Clerical and administrative tasks including documentation, order entry, billing and coding, and system security accounted for nearly one-half of the total EHR time (157 minutes, 44.2%). Inbox management accounted for another 85 minutes (23.7%). Primary care physicians spend more than one-half of their workday, nearly 6 hours, interacting with the EHR during and after clinic hours. EHR event logs can identify areas of EHR-related work that could be delegated, thus reducing workload, improving professional satisfaction, and decreasing burnout. Direct time-motion observations validated EHR-event log data as a reliable source of information regarding clinician time allocation. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  11. Decay-time measurements on 'pure' CsI scintillators prepared by different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keszthelyi-Landori, S.; Foeldvari, I.; Voszka, R.; Fodor, Z.; Seres, Z.

    1990-05-01

    The discovery of the fast decay time of the pure CsI and the various results of the measured samples led to the investigation of decay time of CsI crystals prepared by different methods. Carefully grown or prepared pure CsI behaves as fast scintillators with well or totally suppressed slow decay component. The estimated fast/slow or fast/total ratio is related to the preparation method and to the remaining built-in contamination of the samples. The fast decay of pure CsI consists of two components with decay times of ≅1 and ≅10 ns - with an intensity ratio of 0.3 and 0.65 for gamma and for alpha radiation, respectively. This new ≅1 ns component and the ≅0.8 fast/total ratio may achieve an important role in many applications where fast timing properties are needed, substituting BaF 2 . (author) 18 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Using NMR decay-time measurements to monitor and characterize DNAPL and moisture in subsurface porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy A. White; Russel C. Hertzog; Christian Straley

    2007-01-01

    Knowing how environmental properties affect dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) solvent flow in the subsurface is essential for developing models of flow and transport in the vadose zone necessary for designing remediation and long-term stewardship strategies. For example, one must know if solvents are flowing in water-wetted or solvent-wetted environments, the pore-size distribution of the region containing DNAPLs, and the impact of contaminated plumes and their transport mechanisms in porous media. Our research investigates the capability and limitations of low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation decay-rate measurements for determining environmental properties affecting DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface. The measurements that can be performed with the laboratory low-field system can also be performed in situ in the field with the current generation of commercial borehole logging tools. The oil and gas industry uses NMR measurements in deep subsurface, consolidated formations to determine porosity and hydrocarbon content and to estimate formation permeability. These determinations rely on the ability of NMR to distinguish between water and hydrocarbons in the pore space and to obtain the distribution of pore sizes from relaxation decay-rate distributions. In this paper we will show how NMR measurement techniques can be used to characterize, monitor, and evaluate the dynamics of mixed-fluids (water-DNAPL) in unconsolidated near-surface porous environments and describe the use of proton NMR T2 (spin-spin relaxation time) measurements in unconsolidated sandy-soil samples to identify and characterize the presence of DNAPLs in these environments. The potential of NMR decay-rate distributions for characterizing DNAPL fluids in the subsurface and understanding their flow mechanisms has not previously been exploited; however, near-surface unsaturated vadose zone environments do provide unique challenges for using NMR measurements. These

  13. Statistical analysis of time-resolved emission from ensembles of semiconductor quantum dots: Interpretation of exponential decay models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Driel, A.F.; Nikolaev, I.S.; Vergeer, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of time-resolved spontaneous emission decay curves from ensembles of emitters, such as semiconductor quantum dots, with the aim of interpreting ubiquitous non-single-exponential decay. Contrary to what is widely assumed, the density of excited emitters...... and the intensity in an emission decay curve are not proportional, but the density is a time integral of the intensity. The integral relation is crucial to correctly interpret non-single-exponential decay. We derive the proper normalization for both a discrete and a continuous distribution of rates, where every...... decay component is multiplied by its radiative decay rate. A central result of our paper is the derivation of the emission decay curve when both radiative and nonradiative decays are independently distributed. In this case, the well-known emission quantum efficiency can no longer be expressed...

  14. Measurement of time-dependent $\\mathcal{CP}$ violation in charmless B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258083

    2013-01-01

    In the following we present the measurements of time-dependent $\\mathcal{CP}$ violation in charmless B meson decays performed by LHCb analyzing the $p-p$ collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV during the 2010 and 2011 LHC runs. In particular we will focus on the analysis of charmless two-body B decays where the direct and mixing-induced CP asymmetry terms of the $B^{0}\\to\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ and $B_{s}^{0}\\to K^{+}K^{-}$ decays have been measured using 0.69 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected during 2011. The measurement of the branching ratio of the $B_{s}^{0}\\to K^{*0}\\bar{K}^{*0}$ decay, using 35 pb$^{-1}$ collected during 2010, is also reported. In the end we show the relative branching ratios of all the decay modes of $B_{(s)}^{0}\\to K_S h^{+}h^{\\prime -}$ decays (where $h^{(\\prime)}=\\pi,K$), measured analyzing 1 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected during 20 11.

  15. Summary report of NEPTUN investigations into the steady state thermal hydraulics of the passive decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, K.; Weinberg, D.; Hoffmann, H.; Frey, H.H.; Baumann, W.; Hain, K.; Leiling, W.; Hayafune, H.; Ohira, H.

    1995-12-01

    During the course of steady state NEPTUN investigations, the effects of different design and operating parameters were studied; in particular: The shell design of the above core sturcture, the core power, the number of decay heat exchangers put in operation, the complete flow path blockage at the primary side of the intermediate heat exchangers, and the fluid level in the primary vessel. The findings of the NEPTUN experiments indicate that the decay heat can be safely removed by natural convection. The interwrapper flow makes an essential contribution to that behavior. The decay heat exchangers installed in the upper plenum cause a thermal stratification associated with a pronounced gradient. The vertical extent of the stratification and the quantity of the gradient are depending on the fact whether a permeable or an impermeable shell covers the above core structure. An increase of the core power or a reduction of the number of decay heat exchangers being in operation leads to a higher temperature level in the primary system but does not alter the global temperature distribution. In the case that no coolant enters the inlet windows at the primary side of the intermediate and decay heat exchangers, the core remains coolable as far as the primary vessel is filled with fluid up to a minimum level. Cold water penetrates from the upper plenum into the core and removes the decay heat. The thermal hydraulic computer code FLUTAN was applied for the three-dimensional numerical simulation of the majority of NEPTUN tests reported here. The comparison of computed against experimental data indicates a qualitatively and quantitatively satisfying agreement of the findings with respect to the field of isotherms as well as the temperature profiles in the upper plenum and within the core region of very complex geometry. (orig./HP) [de

  16. CINDER, Depletion and Decay Chain Calculation for Fission Products in Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Gorrell, T.C.; Hightower, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CINDER is a four-group, one- point depletion and fission product program based on the evaluation of a general analytical solution of nuclides coupled in any linear sequence of radioactive decays and neutron absorptions in a specified neutron flux spectrum. The desired depletion and fission product chains and all physical data are specified by the problem originator. The program computes individual nuclide number densities, activities, nine energy-group disintegration rates, and macroscopic and barns/fission poisons at each time-step as well as selected summaries of these data. 2 - Method of solution: Time-dependent variations in nuclide cross sections and neutron fluxes are approximated by a user-specified sequential set of values which are considered constant during the duration of the user-specified associated time-increments. When a nuclide concentration is independent of the concentration of any of its progeny, it is possible to resolve the couplings so as to obtain nuclides fed by a single parent. These chains are referred to as linear. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program is limited to 500 total nuclides formed in up to 240 chains of 20 or fewer nuclides each. Up to 10 nuclides may act as fission product sources, contributing to power, and as many as 99 time-steps of arbitrary length are permitted. All stable nuclides must have a cross section if zero power time-increments are anticipated

  17. The status of thermal-hydraulic studies on the decay heat removal by natural convection using RAMONA and NEPTUN models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Hain, K.; Marten, K.; Rust, K.; Weinberg, D.; Ohira, H.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic experiments were performed with water in order to simulate the decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool-type sodium-cooled reactor. Two test rigs of different scales were used, namely RAMONA (1:20) and NEPTUN (1:5). RAMONA served to study the transition from nominal operation by forced convection to decay heat removal operation by natural convection. Steady-state similarity tests were carried out in both facilities. The investigations cover nominal and non-nominal operation conditions. These data provide a broad basis for the verification of computer programs. Numerical analyses performed with the three-dimensional FLUTAN code indicated that the thermal-hydraulic processes can be quantitatively simulated even for the very complex geometry of the NEPTUN test rig. (author)

  18. Revisiting the U-238 thermal capture cross section and gamma-raymission probabilities from Np-239 decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trkov, A.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Firestone,R.B.; Pronyaev, V.G.; Nichols, A.L.; Moxon, M.C.

    2005-03-03

    The precise value of the thermal capture cross section of238U is uncertain, and evaluated cross sections from various sourcesdiffer by more than their assigned uncertainties. A number of theoriginal publications have been reviewed to assess the discrepant data,corrections were made for more recent standard cross sections andotherconstants, and one new measurement was analyzed. Due to the strongcorrelations in activation measurements, the gamma-ray emissionprobabilities from the beta decay of 239Np were also analyzed. As aresult of the analysis, a value of 2.683 +- 0.012 barns was derived forthe thermal capture cross section of 238U. A new evaluation of thegamma-ray emission probabilities from 239Np decay was alsoundertaken.

  19. Decay of hollow states in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Wismarsche Str. 43-45, Universitaet Rostock, Rostock-18051 (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Hollow or multiply excited states are inaccessible in time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using adiabatic Kohn-Sham potentials. We determine the exact Kohn Sham (KS) potential for doubly excited states in an exactly solvable model Helium atom. The exact single-particle density corresponds to the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose origin is traced back to phase of the exact KS orbital. The potential controls the barrier height and width in order for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as the doubly excited state in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. Instead, adiabatic KS potentials only show direct photoionization but no autoionization. A frequency-dependent linear response kernel would be necessary in order to capture the decay of autoionizing states.

  20. The LHC Logging Service Capturing, storing and using time-series data for the world's largest scientific instrument

    CERN Document Server

    Billen, R; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2006-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, is well underway in building the most powerful particle accelerator called LHC (Large Hadron Collider), which will probe deeper into matter than ever before. This circular 27-km long superconducting installation is extremely complex, and its functioning has to be closely monitored. The LHC Logging service is aimed to satisfy the requirement of capturing and storing of any relevant piece of information to track its variation over time. Web-deployed tools have been developed to visualize, correlate and export the data into dedicated off-line analysis tools. The quality of the data, the manageability of the service and the overall system performance are key factors for the service. Oracle technology has been used extensively to support this mission-critical service, which has proven already to be useful during the commissioning phase of individual subsystems of the LHC. The architecture, design and implementation of the LHC Logging service, based on Oracle Data...

  1. Borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, H.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous ground water investigations have been accomplished by means of borehole logging. Borehole logging can be applied to establish new water recovery wells, to control the existing water producing wells and source areas and to estimate ground water quality. (EG)

  2. Borehole logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    A radioactive borehole logging tool employs an epithermal neutron detector having a neutron counter surrounded by an inner thermal neutron filter and an outer thermal neutron filter. Located between the inner and outer filters is a neutron moderating material for extending the lifetime of epithermal neutrons to enhance the counting rate of such epithermal neutrons by the neutron counter

  3. Analysis of subnanosecond fluorescence decay curves with a 5GHz real time detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunin, B.; Heisel, F.; Knispel, G.; Miehe, J.A.; Sipp, B.

    1975-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed description and a review on the characteristics of a fast vacuum photoelectric cell associated with a high speed cathode ray tube. In addition, this system is used to measure short-lived fluorescence decay times [fr

  4. Time evolution of the fission-decay width under the influence of dissipation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurado, B.; Schmidt, K.H.; Benlliure, J.

    2002-12-01

    Different analytical approximations to the time-dependent fission-decay width used to extract the influence of dissipation on the fission process are critically examined. Calculations with a new, highly realistic analytical approximation to the exact solution of the Fokker-Planck equation sheds doubts on previous conclusions on the dissipation strength made on the basis of less realistic approximations. (orig.)

  5. Modular High Voltage Pulse Converter for Short Rise and Decay Times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mao, S.

    2018-01-01

    This thesis explores a modular HV pulse converter technology with short rise and decay times. A systematic methodology to derive and classify HV architectures based on a modularization level of power building blocks of the HV pulse converter is developed to summarize existing architectures and

  6. Exact evaluation of the rates of electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-08-15

    Electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir and ion sound waves (L→L′+S) and scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions (L+i→L′+i′, also called “nonlinear Landau damping”) are important nonlinear weak-turbulence processes. The rates for these processes depend on the quadratic longitudinal response function α{sup (2)} (or, equivalently, the quadratic longitudinal susceptibility χ{sup (2)}), which describes the second-order response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. Previous calculations of these rates for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma have relied upon an approximate form for α{sup (2)} that is valid where two of the wave fields are fast (i.e., v{sub φ}=ω/k≫V{sub e} where ω is the angular frequency, k is the wavenumber, and V{sub e} is the electron thermal speed) and one is slow (v{sub φ}≪V{sub e}). Recently, an exact expression was derived for α{sup (2)} that is valid for any phase speeds of the three waves in an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma. Here, this exact α{sup (2)} is applied to the calculation of the three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions, and the resulting exact rates are compared with the approximate rates. The calculations are performed using previously derived three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay given in terms of a general α{sup (2)}, and newly derived three-dimensional rates for scattering off thermal ions; the scattering rate is derived assuming a Maxwellian ion distribution, and both rates are derived assuming arc distributions for the wave spectra. For most space plasma conditions, the approximate rate is found to be accurate to better than 20%; however, for sufficiently low Langmuir phase speeds (v{sub φ}/V{sub e}≈3) appropriate to some spatial domains of the foreshock regions of planetary bow shocks and type II solar radio bursts, the use of the exact rate may be necessary for accurate calculations. The relative rates of electrostatic decay

  7. Decay Time Measurement for Different Energy Depositions of Plastic Scintillator Fabricated by High Temperature Polymerization Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Plastic scintillators are based on organic fluorite. They have many advantages such as fast rise and decay time, high optical transmission, ease of manufacturing, low cost, and large available size. For these reasons they are widely used for particle identification. Also, protection of people against a variety of threats (such as nuclear, radiological, and explosive) represents a true challenge along with the continuing development of science and technology. The plastic scintillator is widely used in various devise, which serves for nuclear, photonics, quantum, and high-energy physics. The plastic scintillator is probably the most widely used organic detector, and polystyrene is one of the most widely used materials in the making of the plastic scintillator detector. Thus, a styrene monomer as a solvent was used to fabricate the plastic scintillator by using high temperature polymerization reaction, and then the emission wavelength and the decay times for different energy depositions were measured by using the fabricated plastic scintillator. A plastic scintillator was fabricated to measure decay time for different energy depositions using the high temperature polymerization. Emission wavelength was measured of 426.05 nm to confirm a scintillator property using the spectrophotometer. Four gamma-ray sources (Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, and Ba-133) were used to evaluate effect for decay time of different energy depositions. The average decay time of the fabricated plastic scintillator was measured to approximately 4.72 ns slightly higher more than commercial plastic scintillator. In future, light output and linearity will be measured to evaluate other property compared with the commercial scintillator.

  8. Decay Time Measurement for Different Energy Depositions of Plastic Scintillator Fabricated by High Temperature Polymerization Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Son, Jaebum; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Yong-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Plastic scintillators are based on organic fluorite. They have many advantages such as fast rise and decay time, high optical transmission, ease of manufacturing, low cost, and large available size. For these reasons they are widely used for particle identification. Also, protection of people against a variety of threats (such as nuclear, radiological, and explosive) represents a true challenge along with the continuing development of science and technology. The plastic scintillator is widely used in various devise, which serves for nuclear, photonics, quantum, and high-energy physics. The plastic scintillator is probably the most widely used organic detector, and polystyrene is one of the most widely used materials in the making of the plastic scintillator detector. Thus, a styrene monomer as a solvent was used to fabricate the plastic scintillator by using high temperature polymerization reaction, and then the emission wavelength and the decay times for different energy depositions were measured by using the fabricated plastic scintillator. A plastic scintillator was fabricated to measure decay time for different energy depositions using the high temperature polymerization. Emission wavelength was measured of 426.05 nm to confirm a scintillator property using the spectrophotometer. Four gamma-ray sources (Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, and Ba-133) were used to evaluate effect for decay time of different energy depositions. The average decay time of the fabricated plastic scintillator was measured to approximately 4.72 ns slightly higher more than commercial plastic scintillator. In future, light output and linearity will be measured to evaluate other property compared with the commercial scintillator

  9. Thermal stress ratcheting analysis of a time-hardening structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hada, Kazuhiko

    1999-01-01

    Thermal stress ratcheting and shakedown is analyzed for a time-hardening structure: the yield stress increases as time goes on under exposure to neutron irradiation or thermal aging. New three modes of ratcheting and shakedown are identified as transition to other deformation modes. Stress regimes and thermal ratchet strains are formulated as a function of time-increasing yield stress. Moreover, a new model of trouble occurrence frequency as a modification to a bath-tube curve is proposed for calculating a time period of a thermal cycle. Application of the proposed formulation tells us a benefit of taking into account the time hardening due to neutron irradiation. (author)

  10. Simulation of decay processes and radiation transport times in radioactivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Toraño, E., E-mail: e.garciatorano@ciemat.es [Laboratorio de Metrología de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Peyres, V. [Laboratorio de Metrología de Radiaciones Ionizantes, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bé, M.-M.; Dulieu, C.; Lépy, M.-C. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB), Bldg 602, PC111, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Salvat, F. [Facultat de Física (FQA and ICC), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-04-01

    The Fortran subroutine package PENNUC, which simulates random decay pathways of radioactive nuclides, is described. The decay scheme of the active nuclide is obtained from the NUCLEIDE database, whose web application has been complemented with the option of exporting nuclear decay data (possible nuclear transitions, branching ratios, type and energy of emitted particles) in a format that is readable by the simulation subroutines. In the case of beta emitters, the initial energy of the electron or positron is sampled from the theoretical Fermi spectrum. De-excitation of the atomic electron cloud following electron capture and internal conversion is described using transition probabilities from the LLNL Evaluated Atomic Data Library and empirical or calculated energies of released X rays and Auger electrons. The time evolution of radiation showers is determined by considering the lifetimes of nuclear and atomic levels, as well as radiation propagation times. Although PENNUC is designed to operate independently, here it is used in conjunction with the electron-photon transport code PENELOPE, and both together allow the simulation of experiments with radioactive sources in complex material structures consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces. The reliability of these simulation tools is demonstrated through comparisons of simulated and measured energy spectra from radionuclides with complex multi-gamma spectra, nuclides with metastable levels in their decay pathways, nuclides with two daughters, and beta plus emitters.

  11. Offline estimation of decay time for an optical cavity with a low pass filter cavity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallapur, Abhijit G; Boyson, Toby K; Petersen, Ian R; Harb, Charles C

    2012-08-01

    This Letter presents offline estimation results for the decay-time constant for an experimental Fabry-Perot optical cavity for cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS). The cavity dynamics are modeled in terms of a low pass filter (LPF) with unity DC gain. This model is used by an extended Kalman filter (EKF) along with the recorded light intensity at the output of the cavity in order to estimate the decay-time constant. The estimation results using the LPF cavity model are compared to those obtained using the quadrature model for the cavity presented in previous work by Kallapur et al. The estimation process derived using the LPF model comprises two states as opposed to three states in the quadrature model. When considering the EKF, this means propagating two states and a (2×2) covariance matrix using the LPF model, as opposed to propagating three states and a (3×3) covariance matrix using the quadrature model. This gives the former model a computational advantage over the latter and leads to faster execution times for the corresponding EKF. It is shown in this Letter that the LPF model for the cavity with two filter states is computationally more efficient, converges faster, and is hence a more suitable method than the three-state quadrature model presented in previous work for real-time estimation of the decay-time constant for the cavity.

  12. Trapped electron decay by the thermally-assisted tunnelling to electron acceptors in glassy matrices. A computer simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feret, B.; Bartczak, W.M.; Kroh, J.

    1991-01-01

    The Redi-Hopefield quantum mechanical model of the thermally-assisted electron transfer has been applied to simulate the decay of trapped electrons by tunnelling to electron acceptor molecules added to the glassy matrix. It was assumed that the electron energy levels in donors and acceptors are statistically distributed and the electron excess energy after transfer is dissipated in the medium by the electron-phonon coupling. The electron decay curves were obtained by the method of computer simulation. It was found that for a given medium there exists a certain preferred value of the electronic excess energy which can be effectively converted into the matrix vibrations. If the mismatch of the electron states on the donor and acceptor coincides with the ''resonance'' energy the overall kinetics of electron transfer is accelerated. (author)

  13. Evaluation of Online Log Variables That Estimate Learners' Time Management in a Korean Online Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Il-Hyun; Park, Yeonjeong; Yoon, Meehyun; Sung, Hanall

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between the psychological variables and online behavioral patterns of students, collected through a learning management system (LMS). As the psychological variable, time and study environment management (TSEM), one of the sub-constructs of MSLQ, was chosen to verify a set of time-related…

  14. Rotor-System Log-Decrement Identification Using Short-Time Fourier-Transform Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qihang; Wang, Weimin; Chen, Lifang; Sun, Dan

    2015-01-01

    With the increase of the centrifugal compressor capability, such as large scale LNG and CO2 reinjection, the stability margin evaluation is crucial to assure the compressor work in the designed operating conditions in field. Improving the precision of parameter identification of stability is essential and necessary as well. Based on the time-varying characteristics of response vibration during the sine-swept process, a short-time Fourier transform (STFT) filter was introduced to increase the ...

  15. Development of long-wavelength-emitting scintillators with improved decay time characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franks, L.A.; Lutz, S.; Lyons, P.B.

    1978-01-01

    Progress is reported from efforts to develop radiation-to-light converters suitable for use with optical fibers as they are applied to the diagnostics of transient nuclear phenomena. Liquid and plastic fluors have been prepared which emit in the 550- to 600-nm region. Ternary liquid systems with decay times as short as 1.3 ns at 560 nm and plastic fluors with decay times less than 3 ns at 560 nm are reported. Other liquid and plastic fluors are reported with improved emission characteristics in the region of 600 nm. Conversion efficiences, on a pulse amplitude basis, are generally lower than that of a commercially available 570 nm-16 ns plastic fluor

  16. Time decay and photoluminescence measurement of PbWO4 crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylac, M.

    1997-09-01

    This report presented the experimental characterization of the PbWO 4 crystals that we will be used for the photon detector of the Compton polarimeter at the Jefferson laboratory. We could draw 3 main features from this study. The transmission rate of the crystals is about 60 % in the scintillation wavelength region. From the decay time analysis, we deduced 3 decay components of the PbWO 4 , predicted by other measurements: τ 1 ∼5 ns, τ 2 ∼20 ns, τ 3 ∼100 ns, taking respectively 26 %, 30 % and 4 % of the total light amplitude emitted by the crystals. Moreover, we showed the existence of a fourth decay constant (τ 4 ∼1μs) taking 40 % of the total quantity of light which is responsible for the bad precision on the third constant determination. We could not characterize this component accurately because of the limited time range of the recordings. To improve the determination of the super-slow component, we need to perform the measurements again on a longer time scale, on the order of a few microseconds. We eventually measured the light yield of the PbWO 4 crystals. With a first analysis, we found about 3.5 photoelectrons per MeV whereas the constructors note gave about 10. We then reduced the light loss in the experimental set up by wrapping the last open end of the crystal. The results were slightly improved. Eventually, we increased the recording time, to take account the super-low decay, and found that the crystals yield about 6 photoelectrons per MeV which is still less than predicted. (author)

  17. The population and decay evolution of a qubit under the time-convolutionless master equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jiang; Fang Mao-Fa; Liu Xiang

    2012-01-01

    We consider the population and decay of a qubit under the electromagnetic environment. Employing the time-convolutionless master equation, we investigate the Markovian and non-Markovian behaviour of the corresponding perturbation expansion. The Jaynes-Cummings model on resonance is investigated. Some figures clearly show the different evolution behaviours. The reasons are interpreted in the paper. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Aligning Event Logs to Task-Time Matrix Clinical Pathways in BPMN for Variance Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Van Gorp, Pieter; Kaymak, Uzay; Lu, Xudong; Ji, Lei; Chiau, Choo Chiap; Korsten, Hendrikus H M; Duan, Huilong

    2018-03-01

    Clinical pathways (CPs) are popular healthcare management tools to standardize care and ensure quality. Analyzing CP compliance levels and variances is known to be useful for training and CP redesign purposes. Flexible semantics of the business process model and notation (BPMN) language has been shown to be useful for the modeling and analysis of complex protocols. However, in practical cases one may want to exploit that CPs often have the form of task-time matrices. This paper presents a new method parsing complex BPMN models and aligning traces to the models heuristically. A case study on variance analysis is undertaken, where a CP from the practice and two large sets of patients data from an electronic medical record (EMR) database are used. The results demonstrate that automated variance analysis between BPMN task-time models and real-life EMR data are feasible, whereas that was not the case for the existing analysis techniques. We also provide meaningful insights for further improvement.

  19. Properties of three-body decay functions derived with time-like jet calculus beyond leading order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiura, Tetsuya

    2002-01-01

    Three-body decay functions in time-like parton branching are calculated using the jet calculus to the next-to-leading logarithmic (NLL) order in perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The phase space contributions from each of the ladder diagrams and interference diagrams are presented. We correct part of the results for the three-body decay functions calculated previously by two groups. Employing our new results, the properties of the three-body decay functions in the regions of soft partons are examined numerically. Furthermore, we examine the contribution of the three-body decay functions modified by the restriction resulting from the kinematical boundary of the phase space for two-body decay in the parton shower model. This restriction leads to some problems for the parton shower model. For this reason, we propose a new restriction introduced by the kinematical boundary of the phase space for two-body decay. (author)

  20. One-Dimensional Time to Explosion (Thermal Sensitivity) of ANPZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hust, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McClelland, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gresshoff, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-12

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (< 100 C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause a significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used for decades to measure times to explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. This report summarizes the recent ODTX experimental data and modeling results for 2,6-diamino-3,5-dintropyrazine (ANPZ).

  1. Rotor-System Log-Decrement Identification Using Short-Time Fourier-Transform Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qihang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increase of the centrifugal compressor capability, such as large scale LNG and CO2 reinjection, the stability margin evaluation is crucial to assure the compressor work in the designed operating conditions in field. Improving the precision of parameter identification of stability is essential and necessary as well. Based on the time-varying characteristics of response vibration during the sine-swept process, a short-time Fourier transform (STFT filter was introduced to increase the signal-noise ratio and improve the accuracy of the estimated stability parameters. A finite element model was established to simulate the sine-swept process, and the simulated vibration signals were used to study the filtering effect and demonstrate the feasibility to identify the stability parameters by using Multiple-Input and Multiple-Output system identification method that combines the prediction error method and instrumental variable method. Simulation results show that the identification method with STFT filter improves the estimated accuracy much well and makes the curves of frequency response function clearer. Experiment was carried out on a test rig as well, which indicates the identification method is feasible in stability identification, and the results of experiment indicate that STFT filter works very well.

  2. High efficiency direct thermal to electric energy conversion from radioisotope decay using selective emitters and spectrally tuned solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Flood, Dennis J.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems are attractive possibilities for direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion, but have typically required the use of black body radiators operating at high temperatures. Recent advances in both the understanding and performance of solid rare-earth oxide selective emitters make possible the use of TPV at temperatures as low as 1200K. Both selective emitter and filter system TPV systems are feasible. However, requirements on the filter system are severe in order to attain high efficiency. A thin-film of a rare-earth oxide is one method for producing an efficient, rugged selective emitter. An efficiency of 0.14 and power density of 9.2 W/KG at 1200K is calculated for a hypothetical thin-film neodymia (Nd2O3) selective emitter TPV system that uses radioisotope decay as the thermal energy source.

  3. High efficiency direct thermal to electric energy conversion from radioisotope decay using selective emitters and spectrally tuned solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubb, D.L.; Flood, D.J.; Lowe, R.A.

    1993-08-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems are attractive possibilities for direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion, but have typically required the use of black body radiators operating at high temperatures. Recent advances in both the understanding and performance of solid rare-earth oxide selective emitters make possible the use of TPV at temperatures as low as 1200K. Both selective emitter and filter system TPV systems are feasible. However, requirements on the filter system are severe in order to attain high efficiency. A thin-film of a rare-earth oxide is one method for producing an efficient, rugged selective emitter. An efficiency of 0.14 and power density of 9.2 W/KG at 1200K is calculated for a hypothetical thin-film neodymia (Nd2O3) selective emitter TPV system that uses radioisotope decay as the thermal energy source

  4. Selective logging: do rates of forest turnover in stems, species composition and functional traits decrease with time since disturbance? - A 45 year perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osazuwa-Peters, Oyomoare L; Jiménez, Iván; Oberle, Brad; Chapman, Colin A; Zanne, Amy E

    2015-12-01

    Selective logging, the targeted harvesting of timber trees in a single cutting cycle, is globally rising in extent and intensity. Short-term impacts of selective logging on tropical forests have been widely investigated, but long-term effects on temporal dynamics of forest structure and composition are largely unknown. Understanding these long-term dynamics will help determine whether tropical forests are resilient to selective logging and inform choices between competing demands of anthropogenic use versus conservation of tropical forests. Forest dynamics can be studied within the framework of succession theory, which predicts that temporal turnover rates should decline with time since disturbance. Here, we investigated the temporal dynamics of a tropical forest in Kibale National Park, Uganda over 45 years following selective logging. We estimated turnover rates in stems, species composition, and functional traits (wood density and diameter at breast height), using observations from four censuses in 1989, 1999, 2006, and 2013, of stems ≥ 10 cm diameter within 17 unlogged and 9 logged 200 × 10 m vegetation plots. We used null models to account for interdependencies among turnover rates in stems, species composition, and functional traits. We tested predictions that turnover rates should be higher and decrease with increasing time since the selective logging event in logged forest, but should be less temporally variable in unlogged forest. Overall, we found higher turnover rates in logged forest for all three attributes, but turnover rates did not decline through time in logged forest and was not less temporally variable in unlogged forest. These results indicate that successional models that assume recovery to pre-disturbance conditions are inadequate for predicting the effects of selective logging on the dynamics of the tropical forest in Kibale. Selective logging resulted in persistently higher turnover rates, which may compromise the carbon storage capacity

  5. Selective logging: do rates of forest turnover in stems, species composition and functional traits decrease with time since disturbance? – A 45 year perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osazuwa-Peters, Oyomoare L.; Jiménez, Iván; Oberle, Brad; Chapman, Colin A.; Zanne, Amy E.

    2015-01-01

    Selective logging, the targeted harvesting of timber trees in a single cutting cycle, is globally rising in extent and intensity. Short-term impacts of selective logging on tropical forests have been widely investigated, but long-term effects on temporal dynamics of forest structure and composition are largely unknown. Understanding these long-term dynamics will help determine whether tropical forests are resilient to selective logging and inform choices between competing demands of anthropogenic use versus conservation of tropical forests. Forest dynamics can be studied within the framework of succession theory, which predicts that temporal turnover rates should decline with time since disturbance. Here, we investigated the temporal dynamics of a tropical forest in Kibale National Park, Uganda over 45 years following selective logging. We estimated turnover rates in stems, species composition, and functional traits (wood density and diameter at breast height), using observations from four censuses in 1989, 1999, 2006, and 2013, of stems ≥ 10 cm diameter within 17 unlogged and 9 logged 200 × 10 m vegetation plots. We used null models to account for interdependencies among turnover rates in stems, species composition, and functional traits. We tested predictions that turnover rates should be higher and decrease with increasing time since the selective logging event in logged forest, but should be less temporally variable in unlogged forest. Overall, we found higher turnover rates in logged forest for all three attributes, but turnover rates did not decline through time in logged forest and was not less temporally variable in unlogged forest. These results indicate that successional models that assume recovery to pre-disturbance conditions are inadequate for predicting the effects of selective logging on the dynamics of the tropical forest in Kibale. Selective logging resulted in persistently higher turnover rates, which may compromise the carbon storage capacity

  6. The loss of short-term visual representations over time: decay or temporal distinctiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Tom

    2014-12-01

    There has been much recent interest in the loss of visual short-term memories over the passage of time. According to decay theory, visual representations are gradually forgotten as time passes, reflecting a slow and steady distortion of the memory trace. However, this is controversial and decay effects can be explained in other ways. The present experiment aimed to reexamine the maintenance and loss of visual information over the short term. Decay and temporal distinctiveness models were tested using a delayed discrimination task, in which participants compared complex and novel objects over unfilled retention intervals of variable length. Experiment 1 found no significant change in the accuracy of visual memory from 2 to 6 s, but the gap separating trials reliably influenced task performance. Experiment 2 found evidence for information loss at a 10-s retention interval, but temporally separating trials restored the fidelity of visual memory, possibly because temporally isolated representations are distinct from older memory traces. In conclusion, visual representations lose accuracy at some point after 6 s, but only within temporally crowded contexts. These findings highlight the importance of temporal distinctiveness within visual short-term memory. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  7. Calibration of environmental monitors operating on time integrating principles for radon/thoron decay products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigu, J.; Grenier, M.

    1982-03-01

    An environmental radiation monitor for radon decay products has been tested under laboratory controlled conditions. The instrument is of a quasi-time-integrating type and was tested in conjunction with a radon 'box' calibration facility. It has been found that the instrument appreciably underestimates the radon daughter Working Level (WL). This is attributed to plate-out of decay products in the monitor sampling head. The difference between monitor reading and the WL by grab-sampling was higher for low aerosol concentrations. Plate-out on the instrument detector and sampling head, and contamination effects have been observed for the thoron case. There is partial agreement between experimental results and theoretical expectation. The monitor is slow to react to sudden changes in radiation level. The instrument should prove quite useful in the routine monitoring of surface and underground environments provided some suggested changes in the instrument are introduced

  8. Evidence for CP violation in time-integrated $D^0 \\rightarrow h^-h^+$ decay rates

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalorav Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    A search for time-integrated $CP$ violation in $D^0 \\rightarrow h^-h^+$ ($h=K$, $\\pi$) decays is presented using 0.62~fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the $D^{*+} \\rightarrow D^0 \\pi^+$ and $D^{*-} \\rightarrow \\overline{D}^0 \\pi^-$ decay chains. The difference in $CP$ asymmetry between $D^0 \\rightarrow K^- K^+$ and $D^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^- \\pi^+$, $\\Delta A_{CP} \\equiv A_{CP}(K^-K^+) \\, - \\, A_{CP}(\\pi^-\\pi^+)$, is measured to be $\\left[ -0.82 \\pm 0.21 (\\mathrm{stat.}) \\pm 0.11 (\\mathrm{syst.}) \\right]\\%$. This differs from the hypothesis of $CP$ conservation by $3.5$ standard deviations.

  9. Charm photoproduction. Decays and time of life of the strange-charm meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magneville, C.

    1988-07-01

    In this thesis, decays and lifetimes of the charmed D +- and F mesons have been studied, using the datas of the NA14-2 experiment at CERN. We have filtered events with two kaons of opposite signs. We have used a silicon vertex detector, which consists of an active target and microstrips planes, in order to reconstruct and separate the interaction vertex from the decay vertex. Cuts on distance of flight have been made. This has allowed a good rejection of combinatorial background and the extraction of clean D +- , F (in KKπ) and Λ c (in pKπ) signals. We measure their times of flight and compare to the theoretical predictions [fr

  10. Application of accelerator sources for pulsed neutron logging of oil and gas wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randall, R.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dresser Atlas introduced the first commercial pulsed neutron oil well log in the early 1960s. This log had the capability of differentiating oil from salt water in a completed well. In the late 1970s the first continuous carbon/oxygen (C/O) log capable of differentiating oil from fresh water was introduced. The sources used in these commercial logs are radial geometry deuterium-tritium reaction devices with Cockcroft-Walton voltage multipliers providing the accelerator voltage. The commercial logging tools using these accelerators are comprised of scintillators detectors, power supplies, line drivers and receivers, and various timing and communication electronics. They are used to measure either the time decay or energy spectra of neutron-induced gamma events. The time decay information is useful in determining the neutron capture cross section, and the energy spectra is used to characterize inelastic neutron events. (orig.)

  11. Application of accelerator sources for pulsed neutron logging of oil and gas wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, R. R.

    1985-05-01

    Dresser Atlas introduced the first commercial pulsed neutron oil well log in the early 1960s. This log had the capability of differentiating oil from salt water in a completed well. In the late 1970s the first continuous carbon/oxygen (C/O) log capable of differentiating oil from fresh water was introduced. The sources used in these commercial logs are radial geometry deuterium-tritium reaction devices with Cockcroft-Walton voltage multipliers providing the accelerator voltage. The commercial logging tools using these accelerators are comprised of scintillators detectors, power supplies, line drivers and receivers, and various timing and communications electronics. They are used to measure either the time decay or energy spectra of neutron-induced gamma events. The time decay information is useful in determining the neutron capture cross section, and the energy spectra is used to characterize inelastic neutron events.

  12. Statistical analysis of time-resolved emission from ensembles of semiconductor quantum dots: interpretations of exponantial decay models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, A.F.; Nikolaev, I.; Vergeer, P.; Lodahl, P.; Vanmaekelbergh, D.; Vos, Willem L.

    2007-01-01

    We present a statistical analysis of time-resolved spontaneous emission decay curves from ensembles of emitters, such as semiconductor quantum dots, with the aim of interpreting ubiquitous non-single-exponential decay. Contrary to what is widely assumed, the density of excited emitters and the

  13. Embedded Real-Time Linux for Instrument Control and Data Logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clanton, Sam; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When I moved to the west. coast to take a job at NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, CA, I was impressed with the variety of equipment and software which scientists at the center use to conduct their research. was happy to find that I was just as likely to see a machine running Lenox as one running Windows in the offices and laboratories of NASA Ames (although many people seem to use Moos around here). I was especially happy to find that the particular group with whom I was going to work, the Atmospheric Physics Branch at Ames, relied almost entirely on Lenox machines for their day-to-day work. So it was no surprise that when it was time to construct a new control system for one of their most important pieces of hardware, a switch from an unpredictable DOS-based platform to an Embedded Linux-based one was a decision easily made. The system I am working on is called the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR), a PC-104 based system custom-built by Dr. Warren Gore at Ames. Dr. Gore, Dr. Peter Pilewskie, Dr. Maura Robberies and Larry Pezzolo use the SSFR in their research. The team working on the controller project consists of Dr. Gore, John Pommier, and myself. The SSFR is used by the ,cities Atmospheric Radiation Group to measure solar spectral irradiance at moderate resolution to determine the radiative effect of clouds, aerosols, and gases on climate, and also to infer the physical properties of aerosols and clouds. Two identical SSFR's have been built and successfully deployed in three field missions: 1) the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) II in February/March, 2000; 2) the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment (PRIDE) in July, 2000; and 3) the South African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI) in August/September, 2000. Additionally, the SSFR was used to acquire water vapor spectra using the Ames Diameter base-path multiple-reflection absorption cell in a laboratory experiment.

  14. Fluorescence decay time imaging using an imaging photon detector with a radio frequency photon correlation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Christopher G.; Mitchell, A. C.; Murray, J. G.

    1990-05-01

    An imaging photon detector has been modified to incorporate fast timing electronics coupled to a custom built photon correlator interfaced to a RISC computer. Using excitation with intensity- muodulated light, fluorescence images can be readily obtained where contrast is determined by the decay time of emission, rather than by intensity. This technology is readily extended to multifrequency phase/demodulation fluorescence imaging or to differential polarised phase fluorometry. The potential use of the correlator for confocal imaging with a laser scanner is also briefly discussed.

  15. New approaches in the indirect quantification of thermal rock properties in sedimentary basins: the well-log perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels; Förster, Andrea

    Numerical temperature models generated for geodynamic studies as well as for geothermal energy solutions heavily depend on rock thermal properties. Best practice for the determination of those parameters is the measurement of rock samples in the laboratory. Given the necessity to enlarge databases...

  16. Well-log based prediction of thermal conductivity of sedimentary successions: a case study from the North German Basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Förster, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Data on rock thermal conductivity (TC) are important for the quantification of the subsurface temperature regime and for the determination of heat flow. If drill core is not retrieved from boreholes and thus no laboratory measurement of TC can be made, other methods are desired to determine TC. One...

  17. Correction of dynamic time-activity curves for gamma-camera dead time, radiotracer delivery, and radioactive decay: special considerations with ultrashort-lived radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, A.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Treves, S.

    1985-01-01

    Time-vs.-activity curves obtained by using ultrashort-lived radioisotopes often need to be corrected for the effects of gamma-camera dead time and physical decay. Count loss due to gamma-camera dead time can be monitored by using an electronic oscillator incorporated into the gamma camera. Two algorithms that use this information to correct time-activity curves are discussed. It is also shown that the effect of physical decay on a time-activity curve is dependent on the time course of delivery of the radioisotope to the organ of interest. A mathematical technique that corrects physical decay is described

  18. Power to the logs!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; MACMAHON, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Are you tired of using grep, vi and emacs to read your logs? Do you feel like you’re missing the big picture? Does the word "statistics" put a smile on your face? Then it’s time to give power to the logs!

  19. Real-time thermal neutron radiographic detection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.; Bracher, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Systems for real-time detection of thermal neutron images are reviewed. Characteristics of one system are presented; the data include contrast, resolution and speed of response over the thermal neutron intensity range 2.5 10 3 n/cm 2 -sec to 10 7 n/cm 2 -sec

  20. Optimization of irradiation decay and counting times in nuclear activation analysis using short-lived nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoernstad, T.

    This work describes a method and outlines a procedure for optim- ization of an activation analysis with respect to the experimental times, irradiation time, t(subi), decay time and counting time. The method is based on the 'minimum relative standard deviation criterion', and specially designed for the use on short-lived nuclides. A computer program, COMB1, is written in the BASIC language in order to make the calculations easier and faster. It is intended to be understandable, and easily applicable on a computer of modest size. Time and cost are important factors, especially for routine analysis on a service basis. In such cases one can often allow a controlled reduction in the analysis quality (through a higher relative standard deviation). The procedure outlined can therefore help find acceptable conditions by calculation of the 'best practical' (or reasonable) experimental time values, and the minimum number of accumulation cycles necessary to fulfil the requirements given. (Auth.)

  1. Inclusive decays of the B meson and possible life-time difference between Bd0 and B± mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Morimitsu

    1992-01-01

    We study branching ratios of the inclusive semileptonic decay and the inclusive anti ccanti s decay of the B meson in the spectator model, focusing on the life-time difference between B d 0 and B + mesons. In the case of τsub(B ± )/τsub(B d 0 )=1, it is impossible to get the branching ratio below 12% for B→eνX without going over 20% for B→anti ccanti s, which is unfavored by the inclusive K - decay of the B meson. It is found that the sizable life-time difference leads to the reasonable inclusive semileptonic decay rate and the inclusive anti ccanti s decay rate. (orig.)

  2. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  3. Kinetic study on non-thermal volumetric plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by a short pulse microwave or laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Wei, E-mail: yangwei861212@126.com; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2016-08-28

    This paper reports a kinetic study on non-thermal plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by short pulse microwave or laser. A global self-consistent model is based on the particle balance of complex plasma chemistry, electron energy equation, and gas thermal balance equation. Electron-ion Coulomb collision is included in the steady state Boltzmann equation solver to accurately describe the electron mobility and other transport coefficients. The model is used to simulate the afterglow of microsecond to nanosecond pulse microwave discharge in N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and air, as well as femtosecond laser filament discharge in dry and humid air. The simulated results for electron density decay are in quantitative agreement with the available measured ones. The evolution of plasma decay under an external electric field is also investigated, and the effect of gas heating is considered. The underlying mechanism of plasma density decay is unveiled through the above kinetic modeling.

  4. Uranium logging in earth formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givens, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    A technique is provided for assaying the formations surrounding a borehole for uranium. A borehole logging tool cyclically irradiates the formations with neutrons and responds to neutron fluxes produced during the period of time that prompt neutrons are being produced by the neutron fission of uranium in the formations. A borehole calibration tool employs a steady-state (continuous output) neutron source, firstly, to produce a response to neutron fluxes in models having known concentrations of uranium and, secondly, to to produce a response to neutron fluxes in the formations surrounding the borehole. The neutron flux responses of the borehole calibration tool in both the model and the formations surrounding the borehole are utilized to correct the neutron flux response of the borehole logging tool for the effects of epithermal/thermal neutron moderation, scattering, and absorption within the borehole itself

  5. A Preliminary Analysis of Keystroke Log Data from a Timed Writing Task. Research Report. ETS RR-12-23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Russell; Deane, Paul; Quinlan, Thomas; Wagner, Michael; Sydorenko, Tetyana

    2012-01-01

    The Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 pilot tests for the "CBAL"™ Writing assessment included experimental keystroke logging capabilities. This report documents the approaches used to capture the keystroke logs and the algorithms used to process the outputs. It also includes some preliminary findings based on the pilot data. In particular, it…

  6. Determination and identification of naturally occurring decay series using milli-second order pulse time interval analysis (TIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Sanada, Y.; Uezu, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A delayed coincidence method, called a time interval analysis (TIA) method, has been successfully applied to selective determination of the correlated α-α decay events in millisecond order life-time. A main decay process applicable to TIA-treatment is 220 Rn → 216 Po(T 1/2 :145ms) → {Th-series}. The TIA is fundamentally based on the difference of time interval distribution between non-correlated decay events and other events such as background or random events when they were compiled the time interval data within a fixed time (for example, a tenth of concerned half lives). The sensitivity of the TIA-analysis due to correlated α-α decay events could be subsequently improved in respect of background elimination using the pulse shape discrimination technique (PSD with PERALS counter) to reject β/γ-pulses, purging of nitrogen gas into extra scintillator, and applying solvent extraction of Ra. (author)

  7. Development of a New Class of Scintillating Fibres with Very Short Decay Time and High Light Yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borshchev, O.; Ponomarenko, S.; Surin, N.; Cavalcante, A.B.R.; Gavardi, L.; Gruber, L.; Joram, C.; Shinji, O.

    2017-01-01

    We present first studies of a new class of scintillating fibres which are characterised by very short decay times and high light yield. The fibres are based on a novel type of luminophores admixed to a polystyrene core matrix. These so-called Nanostructured Organosilicon Luminophores (NOL) have high photoluminescense quantum yield and decay times just above 1 ns. A blue and a green emitting prototype fibre with 250 μm diameter were produced and characterised in terms of attenuation length, ionisation light yield, decay time and tolerance to x-ray irradiation. The well-established Kuraray SCSF-78 and SCSF-3HF fibres were taken as references. Even though the two prototype fibres mark just an intermediate step in an ongoing development, their performance is already on a competitive level. In particular, their decay time constants are about a factor of two shorter than the fastest known fibres, which makes them promising candidates for time critical applications.

  8. Strength loss in decayed wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca E. Ibach; Patricia K. Lebow

    2014-01-01

    Wood is a durable engineering material when used in an appropriate manner, but it is susceptible to biological decay when a log, sawn product, or final product is not stored, handled, or designed properly. Even before the biological decay of wood becomes visually apparent, the decay can cause the wood to become structurally unsound. The progression of decay to that...

  9. Nuclear spectroscopic investigations of the decay of /sup 155/Eu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B H

    1974-01-01

    The investigations carried out on the ..beta..-decay of /sup 155/Eu confirm some decay data of this nucleus and explain a few disagreements on the decay scheme. Using the half-life, the ..beta..-boundary energies and branching ratios, the log ft values of the individual ..beta..-transitions were calculated. Finally, by means of ..beta gamma..-coincidence measurements on the semiconductor spectrometer, the inner partial spectra ..beta../sub 3/ and ..beta../sub 4/ were separated for the first time. Form factor investigations were carried out on these spectra which, despite the high log ft values, confirm the allowed character of these transitions.

  10. Search for Time Reversal Violation in Neutron Decay: A Measurement of the Transverse Polarization of Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodek, K.; Kaczmarek, A.; Kistryn, St.; Kuzniak, M.; Zejma, J.; Pulut, J.; Kirch, K.; Bialek, A.; Kozela, A.; Ban, G.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Gorel, P.; Beck, M.; Lindroth, A.; Severijns, N.; Stephan, E.; Czarnecki, A.

    2006-01-01

    A non-zero value of the R-correlation coefficient due to the e - polarization component, perpendicular to the plane spanned by the spin of the decaying neutron and the electron momentum, would signal a violation of time reversal symmetry and thus physics beyond the Standard Model. The value of the N-correlation coefficient, given by the transverse e - polarization component within that plane, is expected to be finite. The measurement of N serves as an important systematic check of the apparatus for the R-measurement. The first phase of data taking has been completed. Preliminary results from a limited data sample show no deviations from the Standard Model predictions

  11. Time-dependent CP asymmetries $B_s$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Blouw, J

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment will search for New Physics in $b_s$ mixing. The $b_s$ mixing phase will be extracted from the measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry in exclusive $\\mathrm{B}_s$ decays governed by the $b \\rightarrow c\\bar{c} s$ quark-level transition. Large New Physics effects can be discovered or excluded with the data collected during the very first physics run of LHC. Based on Monte Carlo simulations of the LHCb detector, the expected sensitivity with $2~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ on the CP-violation parameter $\\phi_s$, is $\\sigma(\\phi_s) = 0.022$.

  12. Time evolution and decay of an excited atom in a weak electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    A Mathematica notebook for describing the time evolution and decay of the hydrogen n=2 states in the presence of a weak external electric field is presented. The work involves (1) solving a set of differential equations coupled by the Hamiltonian of the external electric field and (2) deriving a set of formulas for a complete description of the polarization state of the emitted photons. It is demonstrated how problems with such complexity can be treated with ease and in an error-free manner by using symbolic software such as Mathematica. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  13. Computer-based system for acquisition of nuclear well log data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    There is described a computer-based well logging system, for acquiring nuclear well log data, including gamma ray energy spectrum and neutron population decay rate data, and providing a real-time presentation of the data on an operator's display based on a traversal by a downhole instrument of a prescribed borehole depth interval. The system has a multichannel analyzer including a pulse height analyzer and a memory. After a spectral gamma ray pulse signal coming from a downhole instrument over a logging cable is amplified and conditioned, the pulse height analyzer converts the pulse height into a digital code by peak detection, sample-and-hold action, and analog-to-digital conversion. The digital code defines the address of a memory location or channel, corresponding to a particular gamma ray energy and having a count value to be incremented. The spectrum data is then accessed by the system central processing unit (CPU) for analysis, and routed to the operator's display for presentation as a plot of relative gamma ray emissions activity versus energy level. For acquiring neutron decay rate data, the system has a multichannel scaling unit including a memory and a memory address generator. After a burst of neutrons downhole, thermal and epithermal neutron detector pulses build up and die away. Using the neutron source trigger as an initializing reference, the address generator produces a sequence of memory address codes, each code addressing the memory for a prescribed period of time, so as to define a series of time slots. A detector pulse signal produced during a time slot results in the incrementing of the count value in an address memory location. (author)

  14. Field study of charitable giving reveals that reciprocity decays over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Amanda; Kessler, Judd B.

    2018-01-01

    We examine how reciprocity changes over time by studying a large quasiexperiment in the field. Specifically, we analyze administrative data from a university hospital system. The data include information about over 18,000 donation requests made by the hospital system via mail to a set of its former patients in the 4 months after their first hospital visit. We exploit quasiexperimental variation in the timing of solicitation mailings relative to patient hospital visits and find that an extra 30-day delay between the provision of medical care and a donation solicitation decreases the likelihood of a donation by 30%. Our findings have important implications for models of economic behavior, which currently fail to incorporate reciprocity’s sensitivity to time. The fact that reciprocal behavior decays rapidly as time passes also suggests the importance of capitalizing quickly on opportunities to benefit from a quid pro quo. PMID:29437955

  15. Thermal hydraulic parametric investigation of decay heat removal from degraded core of a sodium cooled fast Breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Lokesh [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kumar Sharma, Anil, E-mail: aksharma@igcar.gov.in [Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI, Kalpakkam (India); Velusamy, K. [Reactor Design Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, HBNI, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-03-15

    established that a single plate core catcher can safely accommodate decay heat arising due to ∼70% of the core debris by establishing natural circulation in the lower sodium pool. The influence of heat removal rate by natural circulation on availability of the number of decay heat exchangers (DHX) dipped in the upper pool is also analyzed. It is seen that the temperatures in the inner vessel, source plate and the maximum debris temperature do not increase significantly even when the DHXs are deployed 5 h after the accident, demonstrating the benefit of large thermal inertia of the pool.

  16. Observation of relaxation on time scale of core hole decay by coincidence photoelectron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    It is shown by a many-body theory that when the relaxation time of a metastable core hole state(s) to the most stable one is comparable to or shorter than core hole decay time of the former state(s), a comparison between the singles (noncoincidence) photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) spectrum and the coincidence one provides a direct evidence of the relaxation. In principle the variation with photoelectron kinetic energy of relaxation (or charge transfer (CT)) time can be determined. By singles measurement the correlation of a photoelectron generated by creation of the metastable states not only with an Auger electron generated by annihilation of the same core hole state but also with an Auger electron generated by annihilation of the stable state via relaxation of the metastable state, is completely lost, unless only the metastable state is observed by PES, whereas the correlation often manifests directly in the coincidence spectra. Thus, compared to the coincidence spectroscopy the singles one is often much less capable of elucidating the competition between relaxation and core hole decay of a metastable state. Such examples are discussed

  17. In-pile Thermal Conductivity Characterization with Time Resolved Raman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Hurley, David H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2018-03-19

    The project is designed to achieve three objectives: (1) Develop a novel time resolved Raman technology for direct measurement of fuel and cladding thermal conductivity. (2) Validate and improve the technology development by measuring ceramic materials germane to the nuclear industry. (3) Conduct instrumentation development to integrate optical fiber into our sensing system for eventual in-pile measurement. We have developed three new techniques: time-domain differential Raman (TD-Raman), frequency-resolved Raman (FR-Raman), and energy transport state-resolved Raman (ET-Raman). The TD-Raman varies the laser heating time and does simultaneous Raman thermal probing, the FR-Raman probes the material’s thermal response under periodical laser heating of different frequencies, and the ET-Raman probes the thermal response under steady and pulsed laser heating. The measurement capacity of these techniques have been fully assessed and verified by measuring micro/nanoscale materials. All these techniques do not need the data of laser absorption and absolute material temperature rise, yet still be able to measure the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity with unprecedented accuracy. It is expected they will have broad applications for in-pile thermal characterization of nuclear materials based on pure optical heating and sensing.

  18. Radiolytic production and thermal decay kinetics of free radicals in n-alkoxyazoxybenzenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tria, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Free radical production and decay over several temperature ranges have been studied by ESR for three members of the series of n-alkoxyazoxybenzenes, those with one, two and seven carbon atoms respectively in the alkoxy chain: p,p'-azoxydianisole (PAA), p,p'-azoxydiphenetole (PAP) and 4,4'-bis-heptyloxyazoxybenzene (HAB). Radical yields per 100 ev absorbed at room temperature were: PAA 0.018, 0.019; PAP 0.033, 0.046; HAB 0.10, 0.14 for powder and single crystal samples respectively. Radicals present at room temperature and above are believed to be formed by loss of hydrogen from the benzene rings and the alkoxy groups, with more of the latter (probably α-alkoxy radicals) occurring as the alkoxy group becomes longer, based on the poorly resolved powder spectra. No cyclohexadienyl radicals or alkoxy radicals were seen. Decay of radicals between room temperature and the first liquid crystal phase transition occurred in a ''stepwise'' manner without radical conversions and was analyzed according to a model due to Waite (Phys. Rev., 107, 463 (1957) for diffusion-controlled reaction of randomly distributed reactants with a significant activation energy for the reaction step. Thermodynamic data are included for PAA powder samples and for toluene-grown single crystals. Reactions are postulated for the higher radical yields in powder samples of the three compounds irradiated at 77 0 K

  19. Non-thermal production of neutralino cold dark matter from cosmic string decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeannerot, R.; Zhang, X.; Brandenberger, R.

    1998-12-01

    We propose a mechanism of nonthermal production of a neutralino cold dark matter particle, χ, from the decay of cosmic strings which form from the spontaneous breaking of a U(1) gauge symmetry, such as U B-L (1), in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). By explicit calculation, we point out that with a symmetry breaking scale η of around 10 8 GeV, the decay of cosmic strings can give rise to Ω χ ≅ 1. This gives a new constraint on supersymmetric models. For example, the dark matter produced from strings will over close the universe if η is near the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. To be consistent with Ω χ ≤ 1, the mass of the new U(1) gauge boson must be much larger than the Fermi scale which makes it unobservable in upcoming accelerator experiments. In a supersymmetric model with an extra U B-L (1) symmetry, the requirement of Ω χ ≤ 1 puts an upper bound on the neutrino mass of about 30eV provided neutrino masses are generated by the see-saw mechanisms. (author)

  20. Decay of Complex-Time Determinantal and Pfaffian Correlation Functionals in Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aza, N. J. B.; Bru, J.-B.; de Siqueira Pedra, W.

    2018-06-01

    We supplement the determinantal and Pfaffian bounds of Sims and Warzel (Commun Math Phys 347:903-931, 2016) for many-body localization of quasi-free fermions, by considering the high dimensional case and complex-time correlations. Our proof uses the analyticity of correlation functions via the Hadamard three-line theorem. We show that the dynamical localization for the one-particle system yields the dynamical localization for the many-point fermionic correlation functions, with respect to the Hausdorff distance in the determinantal case. In Sims and Warzel (2016), a stronger notion of decay for many-particle configurations was used but only at dimension one and for real times. Considering determinantal and Pfaffian correlation functionals for complex times is important in the study of weakly interacting fermions.

  1. Decay of Complex-Time Determinantal and Pfaffian Correlation Functionals in Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aza, N. J. B.; Bru, J.-B.; de Siqueira Pedra, W.

    2018-04-01

    We supplement the determinantal and Pfaffian bounds of Sims and Warzel (Commun Math Phys 347:903-931, 2016) for many-body localization of quasi-free fermions, by considering the high dimensional case and complex-time correlations. Our proof uses the analyticity of correlation functions via the Hadamard three-line theorem. We show that the dynamical localization for the one-particle system yields the dynamical localization for the many-point fermionic correlation functions, with respect to the Hausdorff distance in the determinantal case. In Sims and Warzel (2016), a stronger notion of decay for many-particle configurations was used but only at dimension one and for real times. Considering determinantal and Pfaffian correlation functionals for complex times is important in the study of weakly interacting fermions.

  2. Localization in nonuniform media: Exponential decay of the late-time Ginzburg-Landau impulse response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.

    1998-01-01

    Instanton methods have been used, in the context of a classical Ginzburg-Landau field theory, to compute the averaged density of states and probability Green close-quote s function for electrons scattered by statistically uniform site energy perturbations. At tree level, all states below some critical energy appear localized, and all states above extended. The same methods are applied here to macroscopically nonuniform systems, for which it is shown that localized and extended states can be coupled through a tunneling barrier created by the instanton background. Both electronic and acoustic systems are considered. An incoherent exponential decay is predicted for the late-time impulse response in both cases, valid for long-wavelength nonuniformity, and scaling relations are derived for the decay time constant as a function of energy or frequency and spatial dimension. The acoustic results are found to lie within a range of scaling relations obtained empirically from measurements of seismic coda, suggesting a connection between the universal properties of localization and the robustness of the observed scaling. The relation of instantons to the acoustic coherent-potential approximation is demonstrated in the recovery of the uniform limit. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  3. Mammalian evolution: timing and implications from using the LogDeterminant transform for proteins of differing amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, D; Hasegawa, M; Waddell, P J; Hendy, M D

    1999-03-01

    We explore the tree of mammalian mtDNA sequences, using particularly the LogDet transform on amino acid sequences, the distance Hadamard transform, and the Closest Tree selection criterion. The amino acid composition of different species show significant differences, even within mammals. After compensating for these differences, nearest-neighbor bootstrap results suggest that the tree is locally stable, though a few groups show slightly greater rearrangements when a large proportion of the constant sites are removed. Many parts of the trees we obtain agree with those on published protein ML trees. Interesting results include a preference for rodent monophyly. The detection of a few alternative signals to those on the optimal tree were obtained using the distance Hadamard transform (with results expressed as a Lento plot). One rearrangement suggested was the interchange of the position of primates and rodents on the optimal tree. The basic stability of the tree, combined with two calibration points (whale/cow and horse/rhinoceros), together with a distant secondary calibration from the mammal/bird divergence, allows inferences of the times of divergence of putative clades. Allowing for sampling variances due to finite sequence length, most major divergences amongst lineages leading to modern orders, appear to occur well before the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary. Implications arising from these early divergences are discussed, particularly the possibility of competition between the small dinosaurs and the new mammal clades.

  4. Diametric growth and time of passage of Minquartia guianensis after logging at Tapajós National Forest, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinthia Grazielle Carvalho Andrade

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Minquartia guianensis Aubl. (acariquara occurs at Acre, Amazonas, Roraima, Pará and Amapá states, with a great market demand and utility in the Amazon region. It is used mainly in civil construction due to its high durability and singular beauty, because of reentrances in its trunk, resulting in high market value. Most of used trees present small diameters, what is a critical factor for their management and commercialization. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate M. guianensis diametric growth and cutting cycle through the analysis of time of passage among diameter classes, 31 years after logging, at Tapajós National Forest, Pará State, Brazil. Five treatments were established and in each one 12 permanent sample plots of 0.25 ha were installed. All trees with diameter at 1.3 m above ground level (DBH ≥ 5 cm were measured from 1981 to 2012. Trees with DBH ≤ 50 cm have potential to be managed, due to the growth stagnation presented in larger diameter classes. These results may support silvicultural decisions to sustainable management.

  5. Thermal algebraic-decay charge liquid driven by competing short-range Coulomb repulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Ryui; Nonomura, Yoshihiko; Kohno, Masanori

    2018-05-01

    We explore the possibility of a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-like critical phase for the charge degrees of freedom in the intermediate-temperature regime between the charge-ordered and disordered phases in two-dimensional systems with competing short-range Coulomb repulsion. As the simplest example, we investigate the extended Hubbard model with on-site and nearest-neighbor Coulomb interactions on a triangular lattice at half filling in the atomic limit by using a classical Monte Carlo method, and find a critical phase, characterized by algebraic decay of the charge correlation function, belonging to the universality class of the two-dimensional XY model with a Z6 anisotropy. Based on the results, we discuss possible conditions for the critical phase in materials.

  6. The thermal regime in the resurgent dome of Long Valley Caldera, California: Inferences from precision temperature logs in deep wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, S.; Farrar, C.D.; Williams, C.F.

    2010-01-01

    Long Valley Caldera in eastern California formed 0.76Ma ago in a cataclysmic eruption that resulted in the deposition of 600km3 of Bishop Tuff. The total current heat flow from the caldera floor is estimated to be ~290MW, and a geothermal power plant in Casa Diablo on the flanks of the resurgent dome (RD) generates ~40MWe. The RD in the center of the caldera was uplifted by ~80cm between 1980 and 1999 and was explained by most models as a response to magma intrusion into the shallow crust. This unrest has led to extensive research on geothermal resources and volcanic hazards in the caldera. Here we present results from precise, high-resolution, temperature-depth profiles in five deep boreholes (327-1,158m) on the RD to assess its thermal state, and more specifically 1) to provide bounds on the advective heat transport as a guide for future geothermal exploration, 2) to provide constraints on the occurrence of magma at shallow crustal depths, and 3) to provide a baseline for future transient thermal phenomena in response to large earthquakes, volcanic activity, or geothermal production. The temperature profiles display substantial non-linearity within each profile and variability between the different profiles. All profiles display significant temperature reversals with depth and temperature gradients <50??C/km at their bottom. The maximum temperature in the individual boreholes ranges between 124.7??C and 129.5??C and bottom hole temperatures range between 99.4??C and 129.5??C. The high-temperature units in the three Fumarole Valley boreholes are at the approximate same elevation as the high-temperature unit in borehole M-1 in Casa Diablo indicating lateral or sub-lateral hydrothermal flow through the resurgent dome. Small differences in temperature between measurements in consecutive years in three of the wells suggest slow cooling of the shallow hydrothermal flow system. By matching theoretical curves to segments of the measured temperature profiles, we calculate

  7. Measuring the scintillation decay time for different energy deposited by γ-rays and neutrons in a Cs{sub 2}LiYCl{sub 6}:Ce{sup 3+} detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Xianfei, E-mail: wenxianfei@ufl.edu; Enqvist, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    In nuclear safeguards and homeland security applications, it is greatly beneficial to simultaneously detect γ-rays, thermal neutrons, and fast neutrons using a single detector with reasonable pulse shape discrimination capability, energy resolution comparable with or even better than NaI(Tl) detectors, and high detection efficiency. Cs{sub 2}LiYCl{sub 6}:Ce{sup 3+}(CLYC) scintillation detectors have been proven to be one promising candidate to meet these requirements. In this work, the decay time and fraction of each scintillation component for different energy deposition and incident particle type (γ-ray, thermal neutron, and fast neutron) were investigated based on fitting the PMT anode output with exponential functions. For γ-rays, four components were determined with ultrafast decay time of less than one nanosecond and slow time in the order of magnitude of microsecond. It was found that the dependence on the energy deposited by γ-rays of the fraction as well as the decay time of the three slow components was small. However, significant dependence was observed for the ultrafast component. Two or three components were determined for thermal neutrons and fast neutrons without observing a component with fast decay time. To verify the approach used it was first applied to scintillation pulses induced by γ-rays in a NaI(Tl) detector. The results were consistent with well-known data already published in the literature.

  8. Commissioning of the IDS Neutron Detector and $\\beta$-decay fast-timing studies at IDS

    CERN Document Server

    Piersa, Monika

    2016-01-01

    The following report describes my scientific activities performed during the Summer Student Programme at ISOLDE. The main part of my project was focused on commissioning the neutron detector dedicated to nuclear decay studies at ISOLDE Decay Station (IDS). I have participated in all the steps needed to make it operational for the IS609 experiment. In the testing phase, we obtained expected detector response and calibrations confirmed its successful commissioning. The detector was mounted in the desired geometry at IDS and used in measurements of the beta-delayed neutron emission of $^8$He. After completing aforementioned part of my project, I became familiar with the fast-timing method. This technique was applied at IDS in the IS610 experiment performed in June 2016 to explore the structure of neutron-rich $^{130-134}$Sn nuclei. Since the main part of my PhD studies will be the analysis of data collected in this experiment, the second part of my project was dedicated to acquiring knowledge about technical de...

  9. Studies of time-dependent $CP$ violation in charm decays of $B_s^0$ mesons

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081466; Gligorov, Vladimir

    The thesis describes the world-first, time-dependent measurement of charge-parity ($CP$) violation in $B_s^0 \\to D_s^\\mp K^\\pm$ decays. The study is performed at the LHCb experiment using data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} =7$ TeV, recorded in 2011. The $CP$ violating observables are found to be: $C = 0.52 \\pm 0.25 \\pm 0.04$, $D_{f} = 0.29 \\pm 0.42 \\pm 0.17$, $D_{\\overline{f}} = 0.14 \\pm 0.41 \\pm 0.18$, $S_{f} = -0.90 \\pm 0.31 \\pm 0.06$, $S_{\\overline{f}} = -0.36 \\pm 0.34 \\pm 0.06$, where the first (second) uncertainty is statistical (systematic). These observables are used to perform the first measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle $\\gamma$ in $B_s^0 \\to D_s^\\mp K^\\pm$ decays, finding $\\gamma = (113_{-44}^{+30})^\\circ$~modulo $180^\\circ$ at 68% CL, where the error contains both statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  10. Determination of the ion thermal diffusivity from neutron emission profiles in decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasao, M. (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)); Adams, J.M. (AEA Industrial Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)); Conroy, S.; Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van (Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking)

    1994-01-01

    Spatial profiles of the neutron emission from deuterium plasmas are routinely obtained at the Joint European Torus (JET) using the line-integrated signals measured with a multichannel instrument. It is shown that the manner in which these profiles relax following the termination of strong heating with neutral beam injection (NBI) permits the local thermal diffusivity ([chi][sub i]) to be obtained with an accuracy of about 20%. (author).

  11. Determination of the ion thermal diffusivity from neutron emission profiles in decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasao, M.; Adams, J.M.; Conroy, S.; Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van

    1994-01-01

    Spatial profiles of the neutron emission from deuterium plasmas are routinely obtained at the Joint European Torus (JET) using the line-integrated signals measured with a multichannel instrument. It is shown that the manner in which these profiles relax following the termination of strong heating with neutral beam injection (NBI) permits the local thermal diffusivity (χ i ) to be obtained with an accuracy of about 20%. (author)

  12. Daily Thermal Predictions of the AGR-1 Experiment with Gas Gaps Varying with Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant Hawkes; James Sterbentz; John Maki; Binh Pham

    2012-06-01

    A new daily as-run thermal analysis was performed at the Idaho National Laboratory on the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) test experiment number one at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This thermal analysis incorporates gas gaps changing with time during the irradiation experiment. The purpose of this analysis was to calculate the daily average temperatures of each compact to compare with experimental results. Post irradiation examination (PIE) measurements of the graphite holder and fuel compacts showed the gas gaps varying from the beginning of life. The control temperature gas gap and the fuel compact – graphite holder gas gaps were linearly changed from the original fabrication dimensions, to the end of irradiation measurements. A steady-state thermal analysis was performed for each daily calculation. These new thermal predictions more closely match the experimental data taken during the experiment than previous analyses. Results are presented comparing normalized compact average temperatures to normalized log(R/B) Kr-85m. The R/B term is the measured release rate divided by the predicted birth rate for the isotope Kr-85m. Correlations between these two normalized values are presented.

  13. Time Reversibility, Correlation Decay and the Steady State Fluctuation Relation for Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis J. Evans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluctuation relations for nonequilibrium systems are under intense investigation because of their important practical implications in nanotechnology and biology. However the precise conditions under which they hold need clarification. Using the dissipation function, which is related to the entropy production of linear irreversible thermodynamics, we show time reversibility, ergodic consistency and a recently introduced form of correlation decay, called T-mixing, are sufficient conditions for steady state fluctuation relations to hold. Our results are not restricted to a particular model and show that the steady state fluctuation relation for the dissipation function holds near or far from equilibrium subject to these conditions. The dissipation function thus plays a comparable role in nonequilibrium systems to thermodynamic potentials in equilibrium systems.

  14. Neutron--neutron logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.S.

    1977-01-01

    A borehole logging tool includes a steady-state source of fast neutrons, two epithermal neutron detectors, and two thermal neutron detectors. A count rate meter is connected to each neutron detector. A first ratio detector provides an indication of the porosity of the formation surrounding the borehole by determining the ratio of the outputs of the two count rate meters connected to the two epithermal neutron detectors. A second ratio detector provides an indication of both porosity and macroscopic absorption cross section of the formation surrounding the borehole by determining the ratio of the outputs of the two count rate meters connected to the two thermal neutron detectors. By comparing the signals of the two ratio detectors, oil bearing zones and salt water bearing zones within the formation being logged can be distinguished and the amount of oil saturation can be determined. 6 claims, 2 figures

  15. Architecture of polyglutamine-containing fibrils from time-resolved fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlein, Christoph; Miettinen, Markus S; Borwankar, Tejas; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Kumke, Michael U; Ignatova, Zoya

    2014-09-26

    The disease risk and age of onset of Huntington disease (HD) and nine other repeat disorders strongly depend on the expansion of CAG repeats encoding consecutive polyglutamines (polyQ) in the corresponding disease protein. PolyQ length-dependent misfolding and aggregation are the hallmarks of CAG pathologies. Despite intense effort, the overall structure of these aggregates remains poorly understood. Here, we used sensitive time-dependent fluorescent decay measurements to assess the architecture of mature fibrils of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 implicated in HD pathology. Varying the position of the fluorescent labels in the Htt monomer with expanded 51Q (Htt51Q) and using structural models of putative fibril structures, we generated distance distributions between donors and acceptors covering all possible distances between the monomers or monomer dimensions within the polyQ amyloid fibril. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we systematically scanned all possible monomer conformations that fit the experimentally measured decay times. Monomers with four-stranded 51Q stretches organized into five-layered β-sheets with alternating N termini of the monomers perpendicular to the fibril axis gave the best fit to our data. Alternatively, the core structure of the polyQ fibrils might also be a zipper layer with antiparallel four-stranded stretches as this structure showed the next best fit. All other remaining arrangements are clearly excluded by the data. Furthermore, the assessed dimensions of the polyQ stretch of each monomer provide structural evidence for the observed polyQ length threshold in HD pathology. Our approach can be used to validate the effect of pharmacological substances that inhibit or alter amyloid growth and structure. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. The real-time fitting of radioactive decay curves. Pt. 3. Counting during sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of a least-squares method for the real-time fitting of the theoretical total count function to the actual total count from radioactive decays has been given previously for the case where counting takes place after a sample is taken. The counting may be done in a number of different counting systems which distinguish between different types or energies of radiation emitted from the sample. The method would allow real-time determination of the numbers of atoms and hence activities of the individual isotopes present and has been designated the Time Evolved Least-Squares method (TELS). If the radioactivity which is to be measured exists as an aerosol or in a form where a sample is taken at a constant rate it may be possible to count during sampling and by so doing reduce the total time required to determine the activity of the individual isotopes present. The TELS method is extended here to the case where counting and the evaluation of the activity takes place concurrently with the sampling. The functions which need to be evaluated are derived and the calculations required to implement the method are discussed. As with the TELS method of counting after sampling the technique of counting during sampling and the simultaneous evaluation of activity could be achieved in real-time. Results of testing the method by computer simulation for two counting schemes for the descendants of radon are presented. ((orig.))

  17. Upcoversion performance improvement of NaYF4:Yb, Er by Sn codoping: Enhanced emission intensity and reduced decay time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Han; Cao, Wenbing; Huang, Qingming; Ma, En; Zhang, Xinqi; Yu, Jianchang

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript we report a phenomenon that upconversion emission intensity of Er 3+ was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased obviously by Sn codoping with Yb/Er into hexagonal NaYF 4 synchronously. X-ray powder diffiraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron spin-resonance spectroscopy and upconversion emission spectra were employed to explore the relation of crystal structure and properties. From these characterizations we found that symmetry of the rare earth ion local crystal field could be tuned by different Sn codoping concentration. For the variable valence property of Sn the local crystal field asymmetry and emission intensity of NaYF 4 :Yb, Er arrived to the maximum when 3 mol% Sn was codoped, while decay time was reduced. The study of this changing tends of upconversion emission intensity and decay time constant may be helpful for design and fabrication of high performance upconversion materials. - Graphical abstract: Variable-valenced Sn is introduced with Yb/Er into NaFY 4 to tune structure and local crystal field. Upconversion emission intensity of Er 3+ was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased. Display Omitted - Highlights: • NaYF 4 : Yb, Er was codoped with different concentration Sn. • Upconversion emission intensity was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased. • Introduction of variable-valenced Sn is effective to tune structure and crystal field of NaFY 4

  18. Pulse neutron logging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bespalov, D.F.; Dylyuk, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    A new method of neutron-burst logging is proposed, residing in irradiating rocks with fast neutron bursts and registering the integrated flux burst of thermal and/or epithermal neutrons, from the moment of its initiation to that of full absorption. The obtaained value is representative of the rock properties (porosity, hydrogen content). The integrated flux in a burst of thermal and epithermal neutrons can be measured both by way of activation of a reference sample of a known chemical composition during the neutron burst and by recording the radiation of induced activity of the sample within an interval between two bursts. The proposed method features high informative value, accuracy and efficiency

  19. Determination of the ion thermal diffusivity from neutron emission profiles in decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasao, M.; Adam, J.M.; Conroy, S.; Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van

    1992-01-01

    Spatial profiles of neutron emission are routinely obtained at the Joint European Torus (JET) from line-integrated emissivities measured with a multi-channel instrument. It is shown that the manner in which the emission profiles relax following termination of strong heating with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) permits the local thermal diffusivity (χ i ) to be obtained with an accuracy of about 20%. The radial profiles of χ i for small minor radius (r/a 2 /s for H-mode plasmas with plasma current I p = 3.1 MA and toroidal field B T = 2.3T. The experimental value of χ i is smallest for Z eff = 2.2 and increases weakly with increasing Z eff . The experimental results disagree by two orders of magnitude with predictions from an ion temperature gradient driven turbulence model. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs

  20. Photoluminescence decay dynamics in γ-Ga2O3 nanocrystals: The role of exclusion distance at short time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Brian; Hegde, Manu; Stanish, Paul C.; Mišković, Zoran L.; Radovanovic, Pavle V.

    2017-09-01

    We developed a comprehensive theoretical model describing the photoluminescence decay dynamics at short and long time scales based on the donor-acceptor defect interactions in γ-Ga2O3 nanocrystals, and quantitatively determined the importance of exclusion distance and spatial distribution of defects. We allowed for donors and acceptors to be adjacent to each other or separated by different exclusion distances. The optimal exclusion distance was found to be comparable to the donor Bohr radius and have a strong effect on the photoluminescence decay curve at short times. The importance of the exclusion distance at short time scales was confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. The photoluminescence decay time of self-assembled InAs quantum dots covered by InGaAs layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shu, G W; Wang, C K; Wang, J S; Shen, J L; Hsiao, R S; Chou, W C; Chen, J F; Lin, T Y; Ko, C H; Lai, C M

    2006-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) of self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) with InGaAs covering layers was investigated. The PL decay time increases with temperature from 50 to 170 K, and then decreases as the temperature increases further above 170 K. A model based on the phonon-assisted transition between the QD ground state and the continuum state is used to explain the temperature dependence of the PL decay time. This result suggests that the continuum states are important in the carrier capture in self-assembled InAs QDs

  2. Brazilian logistics: a time for transition Logística brasileira: momento de transição

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J. Bowersox

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the logistics dimensions that World Class Firms use to differentiate their capabilities from their more average counterparts. These dimensions, which have been identified through international research, yield logistically excellent firms. The dimensions are documented and described. Using these dimensions as a foundation, the article then develops the implications for Brazilian logistics managers as they are required to transition to a World Class level of logistical performance.Este artigo descreve as dimensões da logística usadas por empresas de classe mundial para diferenciar suas capacidades em relação aos concorrentes. Estas dimensões, que têm sido identificadas por meio de pesquisa internacional, produzem empresas com excelência logística. Tais dimensões são aqui apontadas e descritas. Usando estas dimensões como base, o artigo desenvolve as implicações para os gerentes de logística brasileiros ao serem requisitados para a transição a um nível de classe mundial de desempenho logístico.

  3. Thermal state of the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Taking advantage of dynamical invariant operator, we derived quantum mechanical solution of general time-dependent harmonic oscillator. The uncertainty relation of the system is always larger than ħ=2 not only in number but also in the thermal state as expected. We used the diagonal elements of density operator ...

  4. Unusual kinetics of thermal decay of dim-light photoreceptors in vertebrate vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ying; Sekharan, Sivakumar; Liu, Jian; Batista, Victor S; Tully, John C; Yan, Elsa C Y

    2014-07-22

    We present measurements of rate constants for thermal-induced reactions of the 11-cis retinyl chromophore in vertebrate visual pigment rhodopsin, a process that produces noise and limits the sensitivity of vision in dim light. At temperatures of 52.0-64.6 °C, the rate constants fit well to an Arrhenius straight line with, however, an unexpectedly large activation energy of 114 ± 8 kcal/mol, which is much larger than the 60-kcal/mol photoactivation energy at 500 nm. Moreover, we obtain an unprecedentedly large prefactor of 10(72±5) s(-1), which is roughly 60 orders of magnitude larger than typical frequencies of molecular motions! At lower temperatures, the measured Arrhenius parameters become more normal: Ea = 22 ± 2 kcal/mol and Apref = 10(9±1) s(-1) in the range of 37.0-44.5 °C. We present a theoretical framework and supporting calculations that attribute this unusual temperature-dependent kinetics of rhodopsin to a lowering of the reaction barrier at higher temperatures due to entropy-driven partial breakup of the rigid hydrogen-bonding network that hinders the reaction at lower temperatures.

  5. Determination of the ion thermal diffusivity from neutron emission profiles in decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasao, M. (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)); Adam, J.M. (AEA Industrial Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)); Conroy, S.; Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Belle, P. van (Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking)

    1992-01-01

    Spatial profiles of neutron emission are routinely obtained at the Joint European Torus (JET) from line-integrated emissivities measured with a multi-channel instrument. It is shown that the manner in which the emission profiles relax following termination of strong heating with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) permits the local thermal diffusivity ([chi][sub i]) to be obtained with an accuracy of about 20%. The radial profiles of [chi][sub i] for small minor radius (r/a < 0.6) were found to be flat and to take values between 0.3 and 1.1 m[sup 2]/s for H-mode plasmas with plasma current I[sub p] = 3.1 MA and toroidal field B[sub T] = 2.3T. The experimental value of [chi][sub i] is smallest for Z[sub eff] = 2.2 and increases weakly with increasing Z[sub eff]. The experimental results disagree by two orders of magnitude with predictions from an ion temperature gradient driven turbulence model. (author) 6 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  7. Setting time and thermal expansion of two endodontic cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Alailson D; Araújo, Eudes B; Yukimitu, Keizo; Barbosa, José C; Moraes, João C S

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the setting time and the thermal expansion coefficient of 2 endodontic cements, MTA-Angelus and a novel cement called CER. The setting time was determined in accordance to ANSI/ADA specifications no. 57. Three samples of 10 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness were prepared for each cement. The thermal expansion measurements were performed by strain gauge technique. Four samples of each cement were prepared using silicone rings of 5 mm diameter and 2 mm thickness. The data were analyzed statistically using the Student t test. The setting time obtained for the MTA-Angelus and CER cements was 15 (SD 1) min and 7 (SD 1) min, respectively. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion was 8.86 (SD 0.28) microstrain/ degrees C for MTA-Angelus and 11.76 (SD 1.20) microstrain/ degrees C for CER. The statistical analysis showed significant difference (P linear coefficient of thermal expansion between the 2 cements. The CER cement has a coefficient of expansion similar to dentin, which could contribute to a decrease of microleakage degree.

  8. A Study of Neutral B Meson Time Evolution Using Exclusively Reconstructed Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T

    2003-11-05

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes the fundamental building blocks of the Universe and their basic interactions. The model naturally describes the time evolution of the basic particles, of which lifetime and mixing are two examples. The neutral B meson, consisting of a bottom quark and an oppositely charged down quark, enjoys a lifetime of about 1.5 ps and the special property of mixing with its antiparticle partner, the {bar B}{sup 0}. That is, due to second order weak interactions, the B{sup 0} meson can change into a {bar B}{sup 0} meson and back again as it evolves through time. The details of this behavior offer an opportunity to closely examine the Standard Model. In this dissertation, I report on a measurement of the lifetime and mixing frequency of the neutral B meson. Using the semileptonic decay channel B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}, we select more than 68,000 signal and background candidates from about 23 million B{bar B} pairs collected in 1999-2000 with the BABAR detector located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The other B in the event is reconstructed inclusively. By constructing a master probability density function that describes the distribution of decay time differences in the sample, we use a maximum likelihood technique to simultaneously extract the B{sup 0} lifetime and mixing parameters with precision comparable to the year 2000 world average. The results are {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = (1.523{sub -0.023}{sup +0.024} {+-} 0.022) ps and {Delta}m{sub d} = (0.492 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.013) ps{sup -1}. The statistical correlation coefficient between {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} and {Delta}m{sub d} is -0.22. I describe in detail several cutting-edge strategies this analysis uses to study these phenomena, laying important groundwork for the future. I also discuss several extensions of this work to include possible measurements of higher order parameters such as {Delta}{Lambda}{sub d}.

  9. Precise discussion of time-reversal asymmetries in B-meson decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozumi, Takuya; Okane, Hideaki; Umeeda, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    BaBar collaboration announced that they observed time reversal (T) asymmetry through B meson system. In the experiment, time dependencies of two distinctive processes, B_−→ (B"0)-bar and (B"0)-bar →B_− (− expresses CP value) are compared with each other. In our study, we examine event number difference of these two processes. In contrast to the BaBar asymmetry, the asymmetry of events number includes the overall normalization difference for rates. Time dependence of the asymmetry is more general and it includes terms absent in one used by BaBar collaboration. Both of the BaBar asymmetry and ours are naively thought to be T-odd since two processes compared are related with flipping time direction. We investigate the time reversal transformation property of our asymmetry. Using our notation, one can see that the asymmetry is not precisely a T-odd quantity, taking into account indirect CP and CPT violation of K meson systems. The effect of ϵ_K is extracted and gives rise to O(10"−"3) contribution. The introduced parameters are invariant under rephasing of quarks so that the coefficients of our asymmetry are expressed as phase convention independent quantities. Some combinations of the asymmetry enable us to extract parameters for wrong sign decays of B_d meson, CPT violation, etc. We also study the reason why the T-even terms are allowed to contribute to the asymmetry, and find that several conditions are needed for the asymmetry to be a T-odd quantity.

  10. Sizing protein-templated gold nanoclusters by time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleilhac, Antonin; Bertorelle, Franck; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-03-01

    Protein-templated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are very attractive due to their unique fluorescence properties. A major problem however may arise due to protein structure changes upon the nucleation of an AuNC within the protein for any future use as in vivo probes, for instance. In this work, we propose a simple and reliable fluorescence based technique measuring the hydrodynamic size of protein-templated gold nanoclusters. This technique uses the relation between the time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and the hydrodynamic volume, through the rotational correlation time. We determine the molecular size of protein-directed AuNCs, with protein templates of increasing sizes, e.g. insulin, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The comparison of sizes obtained by other techniques (e.g. dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering) between bare and gold clusters containing proteins allows us to address the volume changes induced either by conformational changes (for BSA) or the formation of protein dimers (for insulin and lysozyme) during cluster formation and incorporation.

  11. Sizing protein-templated gold nanoclusters by time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleilhac, Antonin; Bertorelle, Franck; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-03-15

    Protein-templated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are very attractive due to their unique fluorescence properties. A major problem however may arise due to protein structure changes upon the nucleation of an AuNC within the protein for any future use as in vivo probes, for instance. In this work, we propose a simple and reliable fluorescence based technique measuring the hydrodynamic size of protein-templated gold nanoclusters. This technique uses the relation between the time resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay and the hydrodynamic volume, through the rotational correlation time. We determine the molecular size of protein-directed AuNCs, with protein templates of increasing sizes, e.g. insulin, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The comparison of sizes obtained by other techniques (e.g. dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering) between bare and gold clusters containing proteins allows us to address the volume changes induced either by conformational changes (for BSA) or the formation of protein dimers (for insulin and lysozyme) during cluster formation and incorporation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Search for time modulations in the decay constant of 40K and 226Ra at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellotti, E.; Broggini, C.; Di Carlo, G.; Laubenstein, M.; Menegazzo, R.

    2018-05-01

    Time modulations at per mil level have been reported to take place in the decay constant of several nuclei with period of one year (most cases) but also of about one month or one day. On the other hand, experiments with similar or better sensitivity have been unable to detect any modulation. In this letter we give the results of the activity study of two different sources: 40K and 226Ra. The two gamma spectrometry experiments have been performed underground at the Gran Sasso Laboratory, this way suppressing the time dependent cosmic ray background. Briefly, our measurements reached the sensitivity of 3.4 and 3.5 parts over 106 for 40K and 226Ra, respectively (1 sigma) and they do not show any statistically significant evidence of time dependence in the decay constant. We also give the results of the activity measurement at the time of the two strong X-class solar flares which took place in September 2017. Our data do not show any unexpected time dependence in the decay rate of 40K in correspondence with the two flares. To the best of our knowledge, these are the most precise and accurate results on the stability of the decay constant as function of time.

  13. Development of the conductivity thermal logs based on electrical profiles; Desenvolvimento de perfil de condutividade termica a partir de perfis eletricos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Carlos Luciano C. de; Lima, Olivar A.L. de; Argollo, Roberto M.; Romero, Pedro A. [Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa em Geologia e Geofisica

    2004-07-01

    The thermal conductivity of the rocks is a necessary physical parameter for the calculation of the flow of heat in the terrestrial surface. The conventional methods to measure the thermal conductivity are developed in laboratory having used sample of certifications. However, these nor always are disposable by the industry of the oil, either because of difficulty operational either for its high cost. However, all the constructed wells of oil are stood geophysically, and, in the majority of the times the geophysical profiles are the only petrophysics registers of the wells, mainly when the same ones are not testified. A viable alternative for sedimentary rocks would be to determine the thermal conductivity through the electric conductivity, being this normally gotten in electric profiles of wells. As the electric conductivity and the thermal conductivity they depend on the porosity and of the texture of the rocks and these mathematically equivalents satisfy equations constituent, are intuitive to think that the same largeness can directly be correlated. Applying the same analytical theoretical procedure considered by Lima and Sharma (1990 and 1992) to describe the electric conductivity of clay-sand, we develop an expression to determine the thermal conductivity of clay-sandstone rocks. To test the applicability of this equation they had been used given of electric profile of five explore wells of the regions of Aracas and Miranga, both of the basin of Reconcavo. The results of the conversions are comparable with the ones of effected measures of thermal conductivity with the method of the bar for Carvalho (1981) in the terrigenous sequences of the Reconcavo. (author)

  14. Thermal decay rate of a metastable state with two degrees of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I I Gontchar

    2017-06-01

    Jun 1, 2017 ... expected to agree with the long time limit of the escape rate obtained using ..... distribution with zero averages and variances equal to 2. Although in the fission ... Here (t) is the probability that the metastable state has ..... the (kt)−1/2 dependence and has been adjusted to εR at some intermediate points.

  15. CFD modeling and thermal-hydraulic analysis for the passive decay heat removal of a sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, T.C.; Dhir, V.K.; Chang, J.C.; Wang, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The COOLOD/N2 and PARET/ANL codes were used for a steady-state thermal-hydraulic and safety analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II reactor located at the Nuclear Studies Center of Maamora (CENM), Morocco. → The main objective of this study is to ensure the safety margins of different safety related parameters by steady-state calculations at full power level (2 MW). → The most important conclusion is that all obtained values of DNBR, fuel center and surface temperature, cladding surface temperature and coolant temperature across the hottest channel are largely far to compromise safety of the reactor. - Abstract: In this study, a pool-typed design similar to sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) of the fourth generation reactors has been modeled using CFD simulations to investigate the characteristics of a passive mechanism of Shutdown Heat Removal System (SHRS). The main aim is to refine the reactor pool design in terms of temperature safety margin of the sodium pool. Thus, an appropriate protection mechanism is maintained in order to ensure the safety and integrity of the reactor system during a shutdown mode without using any active heat removal system. The impacts on the pool temperature are evaluated based on the following considerations: (1) the aspect ratio of pool diameter to depth, (2) the values of thermal emissivity of the surface materials of reactor and guard vessels, and (3) innerpool liner and core periphery structures. The computational results show that an optimal pool design in geometry can reduce the maximum pool temperature down to ∼551 o C which is substantially lower than ∼627 o C as calculated for the reference case. It is also concluded that the passive Reactor Air Cooling System (RACS) is effective in removing decay heat after shutdown. Furthermore, thermal radiation from the surface of the reactor vessel is found to be important; and thus, the selection of the vessel surface materials with a high emissivity would be a

  16. Measurement of time-dependent $CP$ violation in charmless two-body $B$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Using an integrated luminosity of 0.69~fb$^{-1}$ collected by LHCb in 2011, we report measurements of direct and mixing-induced $C\\!P$ violation in $B^0\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B^0_s\\to K^+K^-$ decays. We obtain \\begin{equation*} \\begin{split} A^{\\rm dir}_{\\pi\\pi} = 0.11 \\pm 0.21 \\pm 0.03,\\\\ A^{\\rm mix}_{\\pi\\pi} = -0.56 \\pm 0.17 \\pm 0.03,\\\\ A^{\\rm dir}_{KK} = 0.02 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.04,\\\\ A^{\\rm mix}_{KK} = 0.17 \\pm 0.18 \\pm 0.05, \\end{split} \\end{equation*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The correlations are found to be $\\rho (A^{\\rm dir}_{\\pi\\pi},\\,A^{\\rm mix}_{\\pi\\pi})=-0.34$ and $\\rho(A^{\\rm dir}_{KK},\\,A^{\\rm mix}_{KK})=-0.10$. The measurements of $A^{\\rm dir}_{\\pi\\pi}$ and $A^{\\rm mix}_{\\pi\\pi}$ are compatible with those from the $B$ factories and yield 3.2$\\sigma$ evidence of mixing-induced $C\\!P$ violation, whereas $A^{\\rm dir}_{KK}$ and $A^{\\rm mix}_{KK}$ are measured for the first time ever.

  17. Time dependent rise and decay of photocurrent in zinc oxide nanoparticles in ambient and vacuum medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    C, Rajkumar; Srivastava, Rajneesh K.

    2018-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle has been synthesized by cost effective Co-precipitation method and studied its photo-response activity. The synthesized ZnO nanomaterial was characterized by using various analytical techniques such as x-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the XRD results, it is confirmed that synthesized ZnO nanomaterial possess hexagonal wurtzite phase structure with an average crystallite size of ∼16–17 nm. The UV-Visible absorption spectrum shows that it has blue shift compared to their bulk counterparts. Photoluminescence spectra of ZnO nanoparticles have a strong violet band at 423 nm and three weak bands at 485 nm (blue), 506 nm (green), and 529 nm (green). The presence of hydroxyl group was confirmed by FTIR. The photo-response analysis was studied by the time-dependent rise and decay photocurrent of ZnO nanoparticle was tested in the air as well as vacuum medium.

  18. Computational micromagnetics: prediction of time dependent and thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrefl, T.; Scholz, W.; Suess, Dieter; Fidler, J.

    2001-01-01

    Finite element modeling treats magnetization processes on a length scale of several nanometers and thus gives a quantitative correlation between the microstructure and the magnetic properties of ferromagnetic materials. This work presents a novel finite element/boundary element micro-magnetics solver that combines a wavelet-based matrix compression technique for magnetostatic field calculations with a BDF/GMRES method for the time integration of the Gilbert equation of motion. The simulations show that metastable energy minima and nonuniform magnetic states within the grains are important factors in the reversal dynamics at finite temperature. The numerical solution of the Gilbert equation shows how reversed domains nucleate and expand. The switching time of submicron magnetic elements depends on the shape of the elements. Elements with slanted ends decrease the overall reversal time, as a transverse demagnetizing field suppresses oscillations of the magnetization. Thermal activated processes can be included adding a random thermal field to the effective magnetic field. Thermally assisted reversal was studied for CoCrPtTa thin-film media

  19. Assessment of decay in standing timber using stress wave timing nondestructive evaluation tools : a guide for use and interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiping Wang; Ferenc Divos; Crystal Pilon; Brian K. Brashaw; Robert J. Ross; Roy F. Pellerin

    2004-01-01

    This guide was prepared to assist field foresters in the use of stress wave timing instruments to locate and define areas of decay in standing timber. The first three sections provide background information, the principles of stress wave nondestructive testing, and measurement techniques for stress wave nondestructive testing. The last section is a detailed description...

  20. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogens, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure-Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manure-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green...

  1. Decay Of Bacterial Pathogen, Fecal Indicators, And Real-Time Quantitative PCR Genetic Markers In Manure Amended Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined persistence and decay of bacterial pathogens, fecal indicator bacteria, and emerging real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) genetic markers for rapid detection of fecal pollution in manre-amended agricultural soils. Known concentrations of transformed green fluore...

  2. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report

  3. TOLERANCE TIME OF EXPERIMENTAL THERMAL PAIN (COLD INDUCED) IN VOLUNTEERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, V N; Wilkhoo, N S; Jain, A K

    1998-10-01

    Perception of thermal pain (cold induced) was studied in 106 volunteers from troops and civilians deployed in J & K. Thermal stimulus devised was "holding ice". Tolerance time of holding ice was taken to be a measure of thermal sensitivity, volunteers were classified based on their native areas, addiction habits and socio-economic status, out of 106 volunteers, 81 could & 25 could not hold ice over 10 min. Sixteen out of 40 from coastline States and 9 out of 66 from non-coast line States failed to hold ice over 10 min. In "below average" "average" and "high average" socio-economic groups, three out of 27, 19 out of 73 and 03 out of 6 failed to hold ice over 10 min respectively. Fifteen out of 64 from "addiction habit group" and 10 out of 42 from "no addiction habit group" failed to hold ice over 10 min. Statistically no classification used in the study revealed significant difference in "tolerance times" of volunteers except the one based on coastline and non-coastline States.

  4. Estimating envelope thermal characteristics from single point in time thermal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatshati, Salahaldin Faraj

    Energy efficiency programs implemented nationally in the U.S. by utilities have rendered savings which have cost on average 0.03/kWh. This cost is still well below generation costs. However, as the lowest cost energy efficiency measures are adopted, this the cost effectiveness of further investment declines. Thus there is a need to more effectively find the most opportunities for savings regionally and nationally, so that the greatest cost effectiveness in implementing energy efficiency can be achieved. Integral to this process. are at scale energy audits. However, on-site building energy audits process are expensive, in the range of US1.29/m2-$5.37/m2 and there are an insufficient number of professionals to perform the audits. Energy audits that can be conducted at-scale and at low cost are needed. Research is presented that addresses at community-wide scales characterization of building envelope thermal characteristics via drive-by and fly-over GPS linked thermal imaging. A central question drives this research: Can single point-in-time thermal images be used to infer U-values and thermal capacitances of walls and roofs? Previous efforts to use thermal images to estimate U-values have been limited to rare steady exterior weather conditions. The approaches posed here are based upon the development two models first is a dynamic model of a building envelope component with unknown U-value and thermal capacitance. The weather conditions prior to the thermal image are used as inputs to the model. The model is solved to determine the exterior surface temperature, ultimately predicted the temperature at the thermal measurement time. The model U-value and thermal capacitance are tuned in order to force the error between the predicted surface temperature and the measured surface temperature from thermal imaging to be near zero. This model is developed simply to show that such a model cannot be relied upon to accurately estimate the U-value. The second is a data

  5. Log of Apollo 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The major events of the first manned moon landing mission, Apollo 11, are presented in chronological order from launch time until arrival of the astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet. The log is descriptive, non-technical, and includes numerous color photographs of the astronauts on the moon. (PR)

  6. Core-power and decay-time limits for disabled automatic-actuation of LOFT ECCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    The Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) for the LOFT reactor may need to be disabled for modifications or repairs of hardware or instrumentation or for component testing during periods when the reactor system is hot and pressurized, or it may be desirable to enable the ECCS to be disabled without the necessity of cooling down and depressurizing the reactor. A policy involves disabling the automatic-actuation of the LOFT ECCS, but still retaining the manual actuation capability. Disabling of the automatic actuation can be safely utilized, without subjecting the fuel cladding to unacceptable temperatures, when the LOFT power decays to 33 kW; this power level permits a maximum delay of 20 minutes following a LOCA for the manual actuation of ECCS. For the operating power of the L2-2 Experiment, the required decay-periods (with operating periods of 40 and 2000 hours) are about 21 and 389 hours, respectively. With operating periods of 40 and 2000 hours at Core-I full power, the required decay-periods are about 42 and 973 hours, respectively. After these decay periods the automatic actuation of the LOFT ECCS can be disabled assuming a maximum delay of 20 minutes following a LOCA for the manual actuation of ECCS. The automatic and manual lineup of the ECCS may be waived if decay power is less than 11 kW

  7. Log4J

    CERN Document Server

    Perry, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Log4j has been around for a while now, and it seems like so many applications use it. I've used it in my applications for years now, and I'll bet you have too. But every time I need to do something with log4j I've never done before I find myself searching for examples of how to do whatever that is, and I don't usually have much luck. I believe the reason for this is that there is a not a great deal of useful information about log4j, either in print or on the Internet. The information is too simple to be of real-world use, too complicated to be distilled quickly (which is what most developers

  8. A Mott polarimeter for the search of time reversal violation in the decay of free neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, G.; Beck, M.; Bialek, A.; Bodek, K.; Gorel, P.; Kirch, K.; Kistryn, St.; Kozela, A.; Kuzniak, M.; Lindroth, A.; Naviliat-Cuncic, O.; Pulut, J.; Severijns, N.; Stephan, E.; Zejma, J.

    2006-01-01

    A new polarimeter for low-energy electrons has been built and tested. The device was developed for the measurement of the transverse polarization of beta particles emitted in the decay of polarized cold neutrons. The decay electrons are identified by multi-wire proportional chambers made of low-Z materials and are detected with plastic scintillator hodoscopes. The transverse polarization is analyzed by means of large angle Mott scattering on a thin Pb foil. We describe here the elements of the apparatus and present the results of test measurements which illustrate its performance

  9. A Mott polarimeter for the search of time reversal violation in the decay of free neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, G. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen (France); Beck, M. [Catholic University, Leuven (Belgium); Bialek, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland); Bodek, K. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)]. E-mail: ufbodek@if.uj.edu.pl; Gorel, P. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen (France); Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Kirch, K. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Kistryn, St. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Kozela, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland); Kuzniak, M. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Lindroth, A. [Catholic University, Leuven (Belgium); Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen (France); Pulut, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland); Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Catholic University, Leuven (Belgium); Severijns, N. [Catholic University, Leuven (Belgium); Stephan, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Katowice (Poland); Zejma, J. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland)

    2006-09-15

    A new polarimeter for low-energy electrons has been built and tested. The device was developed for the measurement of the transverse polarization of beta particles emitted in the decay of polarized cold neutrons. The decay electrons are identified by multi-wire proportional chambers made of low-Z materials and are detected with plastic scintillator hodoscopes. The transverse polarization is analyzed by means of large angle Mott scattering on a thin Pb foil. We describe here the elements of the apparatus and present the results of test measurements which illustrate its performance.

  10. Finite upper bound for the Hawking decay time of an arbitrarily large black hole in anti-de Sitter spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Don N.

    2018-01-01

    In an asymptotically flat spacetime of dimension d >3 and with the Newtonian gravitational constant G , a spherical black hole of initial horizon radius rh and mass M ˜rhd -3/G has a total decay time to Hawking emission of td˜rhd -1/G ˜G2 /(d -3 )M(d -1 )/(d -3 ) which grows without bound as the radius rh and mass M are taken to infinity. However, in asymptotically anti-de Sitter spacetime with a length scale ℓ and with absorbing boundary conditions at infinity, the total Hawking decay time does not diverge as the mass and radius go to infinity but instead remains bounded by a time of the order of ℓd-1/G .

  11. Using open hole and cased-hole resistivity logs to monitor gas hydrate dissociation during a thermal test in the mallik 5L-38 research well, Mackenzie Delta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.I.; Collett, T.S.; Lewis, R.E.; Dubourg, I.

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates, which are naturally occurring ice-like combinations of gas and water, have the potential to provide vast amounts of natural gas from the world's oceans and polar regions. However, producing gas economically from hydrates entails major technical challenges. Proposed recovery methods such as dissociating or melting gas hydrates by heating or depressurization are currently being tested. One such test was conducted in northern Canada by the partners in the Mallik 2002 Gas Hydrate Production Research Well Program. This paper describes how resistivity logs were used to determine the size of the annular region of gas hydrate dissociation that occurred around the wellbore during the thermal test in the Mallik 5L-38 well. An open-hole logging suite, run prior to the thermal test, included array induction, array laterolog, nuclear magnetic resonance and 1.1-GHz electromagnetic propagation logs. The reservoir saturation tool was run both before and after the thermal test to monitor formation changes. A cased-hole formation resistivity log was run after the test.Baseline resistivity values in each formation layer (Rt) were established from the deep laterolog data. The resistivity in the region of gas hydrate dissociation near the wellbore (Rxo) was determined from electromagnetic propagation and reservoir saturation tool measurements. The radius of hydrate dissociation as a function of depth was then determined by means of iterative forward modeling of cased-hole formation resistivity tool response. The solution was obtained by varying the modeled dissociation radius until the modeled log overlaid the field log. Pretest gas hydrate production computer simulations had predicted that dissociation would take place at a uniform radius over the 13-ft test interval. However, the post-test resistivity modeling showed that this was not the case. The resistivity-derived dissociation radius was greatest near the outlet of the pipe that circulated hot water in the wellbore

  12. Spin current relaxation time in thermally evaporated pentacene films

    OpenAIRE

    Tani, Yasuo; Kondo, Takuya; Teki, Yoshio; Shikoh, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    The spin current relaxation time [tau] in thermally evaporated pentacene films was evaluated with the spin-pump-induced spin transport properties and the charge current transport properties in pentacene films. Under an assumption of a diffusive transport of the spin current in pentacene films, the zero-field mobility and the diffusion constant of holes in pentacene films were experimentally obtained to be ~8.0x10^-7 m^2/Vs and ~2.0x10^-8 m^2/s, respectively. Using those values and the previou...

  13. Accuracy, reliability, and timing of visual evaluations of decay in fresh-cut lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visual assessments are used for evaluating the quality of food products, such as fresh-cut lettuce packaged in bags with modified atmosphere. We have compared the accuracy and the reliability of visual evaluations of decay on fresh-cut lettuce performed with experienced and inexperienced raters. In ...

  14. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence of fluorescein derivative for time-resolved and confocal fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoqing; Song, Fengling; Wang, Jingyun; Zhang, Yukang; Xue, Yingying; Sun, Liangliang; Jiang, Na; Gao, Pan; Tian, Lu; Peng, Xiaojun

    2014-07-09

    Compared with fluorescence imaging utilizing fluorophores whose lifetimes are in the order of nanoseconds, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy has more advantages in monitoring target fluorescence. In this work, compound DCF-MPYM, which is based on a fluorescein derivative, showed long-lived luminescence (22.11 μs in deaerated ethanol) and was used in time-resolved fluorescence imaging in living cells. Both nanosecond time-resolved transient difference absorption spectra and time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) were employed to explain the long lifetime of the compound, which is rare in pure organic fluorophores without rare earth metals and heavy atoms. A mechanism of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) that considers the long wavelength fluorescence, large Stokes shift, and long-lived triplet state of DCF-MPYM was proposed. The energy gap (ΔEST) of DCF-MPYM between the singlet and triplet state was determined to be 28.36 meV by the decay rate of DF as a function of temperature. The ΔE(ST) was small enough to allow efficient intersystem crossing (ISC) and reverse ISC, leading to efficient TADF at room temperature. The straightforward synthesis of DCF-MPYM and wide availability of its starting materials contribute to the excellent potential of the compound to replace luminescent lanthanide complexes in future time-resolved imaging technologies.

  15. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases. This work was partly presented at the 58th Annual meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-21

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases.

  17. Time-dependent CP violation measurements in neutral B meson to double-charm decays at the Japanese Belle experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrken, Markus

    2012-07-13

    The Belle and BaBar Collaborations experimentally established the existence of CP violating phenomena in the B meson system. In this PhD thesis, the measurements of the branching fraction and the time-dependent CP violation in B{sup 0}→D{sup +}D{sup -} decays based on the final data set of the Belle experiment are presented. Furthermore, the thesis comprises the corresponding measurements in B{sup 0}→D{sup *±}D{sup -+} decays to provide a direct comparison to a related decay. The final Belle data set contains 772 x 10{sup 6} B anti B pairs recorded on the Υ(4S)-resonance at the asymmetric-energy KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider. The measurement of the time evolution allows the experimental determination of time-dependent CP violating asymmetries. The results of the measurements of branching fractions are B(B{sup 0}→D{sup +}D{sup -})=(2.12±0.16(stat.)±0.18(syst.)) x 10{sup -4}; B(B{sup 0}→D{sup *±}D{sup -+})=(6.14±0.29(stat.)±0.50(syst.)) x 10{sup -4}. The results of the measurement of time-dependent CP violation in B{sup 0}→D{sup +}D{sup -} decays are S{sub D{sup +}D{sup -}}=-1.06{sup +0.21}{sub -0.14}(stat.)±0.08(syst.); C{sub D{sup +}D{sup -}}=-0.43±0.16(stat.)±0.05(syst.). This measurement excludes the conservation of CP symmetry in B{sup 0}→D{sup +}D{sup -} decays, equivalent to S{sub D{sup +}D{sup -}}=C{sub D{sup +}D{sup -}}=0, at a confidence level of 1-2.7 x 10{sup -5} corresponding to a significance of 4.2σ. The results of the measurement of time-dependent CP violation in B{sup 0}→D{sup *±}D{sup -+} decays are A{sub D{sup *}D}=+0.06±0.05(stat.)±0.02(syst.); S{sub D{sup *}D}=-0.78±0.15(stat.)±0.05(syst.); C{sub D{sup *}D}=-0.01±0.11(stat.)±0.04(syst.); ΔS{sub D{sup *}D}=-0.13±0.15(stat.)±0.04(syst.); ΔC{sub D{sup *}D}=+0.12±0.11(stat.)±0.03(syst.). This measurement excludes the conservation of CP symmetry in B{sup 0}→D{sup *±}D{sup -+} decays, equivalent to A{sub D{sup *}D}=S{sub D{sup *}D}=C{sub D{sup *}D}=0, at a

  18. Nuclide transport of decay chain in the fractured rock medium: a model using continuous time Markov process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younmyoung Lee; Kunjai Lee

    1995-01-01

    A model using continuous time Markov process for nuclide transport of decay chain of arbitrary length in the fractured rock medium has been developed. Considering the fracture in the rock matrix as a finite number of compartments, the transition probability for nuclide from the transition intensity between and out of the compartments is represented utilizing Chapman-Kolmogorov equation, with which the expectation and the variance of nuclide distribution for the fractured rock medium could be obtained. A comparison between continuous time Markov process model and available analytical solutions for the nuclide transport of three decay chains without rock matrix diffusion has been made showing comparatively good agreement. Fittings with experimental breakthrough curves obtained with nonsorbing materials such as NaLS and uranine in the artificial fractured rock are also made. (author)

  19. Radiolytic unsaturation decay in polyethylene. Part II--the effect of irradiation temperature, thermal history and orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, Bernard J.

    2004-01-01

    The decay rate of vinyl unsaturation in high-density polyethylenes irradiated at temperatures from about 310 to 450 K, changes significantly in the melting range up to the crystalline melting point as does free radical mobility and the polymer crystallinity. However, orienting the polymer, or slow cooling or quenching from the melt, prior to irradiation, do not alter the decay process or its rate, although they do alter the rate of increase of insoluble gel and of elastic modulus in the molten state. It is suggested that, below ∼340 K, the marked deviations from a first-order decay result from the limited mobility of polymeric free radicals in the crystalline phase and from scavenging, by vinyl groups, segregated into the amorphous phase, of radiolytic hydrogen atoms (H). In the melting range, the mobility of polymeric free radicals increases as the crystallinity decreases, reducing the importance of scavenging, so vinyl decay approximates more closely to a first-order relation. In the melt, the vinyl decay relation is not changed qualitatively by H atom scavenging, but the effective vinyl concentration is lower, so the decay rate drops sharply

  20. Specific features of well logging of boreholes drilled on electrical nonconducting solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchkin, A.F.; Fomenko, V.G.

    1978-01-01

    Methods for identification of permeable strata and determination of their porosity and oil-gas saturation using standard combination of geophysical investigations in the boreholes drilled with nonaqueous and inert drilling fluids are considered. Geophysical combination consists of the methods indications of which are independent on electrical conductivity of drilling fluids. They are all modifications of radioactivity logging (gamma logging, neutron logging, neutron-gamma logging, gamma-gamma logging, pulsed neutron logging, nuclear-magnetic logging), acoustic logging and thermal logging

  1. Temperature of thermal plasma jets: A time resolved approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahasrabudhe, S N; Joshi, N K; Barve, D N; Ghorui, S; Tiwari, N; Das, A K, E-mail: sns@barc.gov.i [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai - 400 094 (India)

    2010-02-01

    Boltzmann Plot method is routinely used for temperature measurement of thermal plasma jets emanating from plasma torches. Here, it is implicitly assumed that the plasma jet is 'steady' in time. However, most of the experimenters do not take into account the variations due to ripple in the high current DC power supplies used to run plasma torches. If a 3-phase transductor type of power supply is used, then the ripple frequency is 150 Hz and if 3- phase SCR based power supply is used, then the ripple frequency is 300 Hz. The electrical power fed to plasma torch varies at ripple frequency. In time scale, it is about 3.3 to 6.7 ms for one cycle of ripple and it is much larger than the arc root movement times which are within 0.2 ms. Fast photography of plasma jets shows that the luminosity of plasma jet also varies exactly like the ripple in the power supply voltage and thus with the power. Intensity of line radiations varies nonlinearly with the instantaneous power fed to the torch and the simple time average of line intensities taken for calculation of temperature is not appropriate. In this paper, these variations and their effect on temperature determination are discussed and a method to get appropriate data is suggested. With a small adaptation discussed here, this method can be used to get temperature profile of plasma jet within a short time.

  2. Time evolution of damage in thermally induced creep rupture

    KAUST Repository

    Yoshioka, N.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a bundle of fibers subject to a constant external load. Breaking events are initiated by thermally induced stress fluctuations followed by load redistribution which subsequently leads to an avalanche of breakings. We compare analytic results obtained in the mean-field limit to the computer simulations of localized load redistribution to reveal the effect of the range of interaction on the time evolution. Focusing on the waiting times between consecutive bursts we show that the time evolution has two distinct forms: at high load values the breaking process continuously accelerates towards macroscopic failure, however, for low loads and high enough temperatures the acceleration is preceded by a slow-down. Analyzing the structural entropy and the location of consecutive bursts we show that in the presence of stress concentration the early acceleration is the consequence of damage localization. The distribution of waiting times has a power law form with an exponent switching between 1 and 2 as the load and temperature are varied.

  3. First measurement of time-dependent $C\\!P$ violation in $B^0_s \\to K^+K^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Cowie, E; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Direct and mixing-induced $C\\!P$-violating asymmetries in $B^0_s \\to K^+K^-$ decays are measured for the first time using a data sample of $pp$ collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$, collected with the LHCb detector at a centre-of-mass energy of $7~\\mathrm{TeV}$. The results are $C_{KK} = 0.14 \\pm 0.11 \\pm 0.03$ and $S_{KK} = 0.30 \\pm 0.12 \\pm 0.04$, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The corresponding quantities are also determined for $B^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays to be $C_{\\pi\\pi} = -0.38 \\pm 0.15 \\pm 0.02$ and $S_{\\pi\\pi} = -0.71 \\pm 0.13 \\pm 0.02$, in good agreement with existing measurements.

  4. Development of windows based software to analyze fluorescence decay with time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallick, M.B.; Ravindranath, S.V.G.; Das, N.C.

    2002-07-01

    A VUV spectroscopic facility for studies in photophysics and photochemistry is being set up at INDUS-I synchrotron source, CAT, Indore. For this purpose, a data acquisition system based on time-correlated single photon counting method is being developed for fluorescence lifetime measurement. To estimate fluorescence lifetime from the data collected with this sytem, a Windows based program has been developed using Visual Basic 5.0. It uses instrument response function (IRF) and observed decay curve and estimates parameters of single exponential decay by least square analysis and Marquardt method as convergence mechanism. Estimation of parameters was performed using data collected with a commercial setup. Goodness of fit was judged by evaluating χR 2 , weighted residuals and autocorrelation function. Performance is compared with two commercial software packages and found to be satisfactory. (author)

  5. Measurement of the time-integrated $CP$ asymmetry in $D^0 \\to K^0_S K^0_S$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Ninci, Daniele; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skillicorn, Ian; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-10-08

    The time-integrated $CP$ asymmetry in the decay $D^0 \\to K^0_S K^0_S$ is measured using $3 fb^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The flavour of the $D^0$ meson is determined by use of the decay $D^{*+} \\to D^0 \\pi^+$ and its charge conjugate mode. The result is \\[ {\\cal A}_{CP} = -0.029 \\pm 0.052 \\pm 0.022, \\] where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The result is consistent with Standard Model expectations and improves the uncertainty with respect to the only previous measurement of this quantity by more than a factor of three.

  6. Decay heat measurement of 235U in the time region from 10 to 1,000 seconds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumung, K.

    1976-01-01

    In order to provide a good cooling of the fuel samples during irradiation in the thermal column of the FR2 reactor, vehicles for a pneumatic transfer system were developed and constructed which keep the fuel temperature at about 10 K above the temperature of the cooling gas (N 2 at 1 atm and about 300 K). For these 'rabbits' a new transport system has to be designed. Together with the mechanical system inside the vacuum vessel, which contains the calorimeter, the samples can be transfered from the irradiation position into the adiabatic jacket automatically within 2 to 3 seconds. For the measurement of the decay energy escaping the samples as γ-radiation, a MOXON-RAE-type detector was constructed. As its sensitivity increases linearly with the energy of the γ-quanta detected, this counter directly measures the energy flux of an unknown γ-spectrum. (orig./RW) [de

  7. Critical evaluation of a simple retention time predictor based on LogKow as a complementary tool in the identification of emerging contaminants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Felix

    2015-07-01

    There has been great interest in environmental analytical chemistry in developing screening methods based on liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) for emerging contaminants. Using HRMS, compound identification relies on the high mass resolving power and mass accuracy attainable by these analyzers. When dealing with wide-scope screening, retention time prediction can be a complementary tool for the identification of compounds, and can also reduce tedious data processing when several peaks appear in the extracted ion chromatograms. There are many in silico, Quantitative Structure-Retention Relationship methods available for the prediction of retention time for LC. However, most of these methods use commercial software to predict retention time based on various molecular descriptors. This paper explores the applicability and makes a critical discussion on a far simpler and cheaper approach to predict retention times by using LogKow. The predictor was based on a database of 595 compounds, their respective LogKow values and a chromatographic run time of 18min. Approximately 95% of the compounds were found within 4.0min of their actual retention times, and 70% within 2.0min. A predictor based purely on pesticides was also made, enabling 80% of these compounds to be found within 2.0min of their actual retention times. To demonstrate the utility of the predictors, they were successfully used as an additional tool in the identification of 30 commonly found emerging contaminants in water. Furthermore, a comparison was made by using different mass extraction windows to minimize the number of false positives obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Time-dependent CP-violation measurements in $B^0 \\to D^+D^–$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Bel, Lennaert

    2016-01-01

    Overconstraining the unitarity triangle is a key goal of LHCb. The excellent time resolution of the detector lends itself to high precision time dependent CP violation measurements. CP observables in $B^0 \\to D^{+}D^{‐}$ decays are of great interest as they have the potential to be sensitive to new physics contributions. There is a long¬‐existing tension between results from BaBar and Belle on $B^0 \\to D^{+}D^{‐}$. We present results on these CP observables with the full Run 1 dataset.

  9. Deadwood Decay in a Burnt Mediterranean Pine Reforestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Molinas-González

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dead wood remaining after wildfires represents a biological legacy for forest regeneration, and its decay is both cause and consequence of a large set of ecological processes. However, the rate of wood decomposition after fires is still poorly understood, particularly for Mediterranean-type ecosystems. In this study, we analyzed deadwood decomposition following a wildfire in a Mediterranean pine plantation in the Sierra Nevada Natural and National Park (southeast Spain. Three plots were established over an elevational/species gradient spanning from 1477 to 2053 m above sea level, in which burnt logs of three species of pines were experimentally laid out and wood densities were estimated five times over ten years. The logs lost an overall 23% of their density, although this value ranged from an average 11% at the highest-elevation plot (dominated by Pinus sylvestris to 32% at an intermediate elevation (with P. nigra. Contrary to studies in other climates, large-diameter logs decomposed faster than small-diameter logs. Our results provide one of the longest time series for wood decomposition in Mediterranean ecosystems and suggest that this process provides spatial variability in the post-fire ecosystem at the scale of stands due to variable speeds of decay. Common management practices such as salvage logging diminish burnt wood and influence the rich ecological processes related to its decay.

  10. Measurement of the time-integrated $CP$ asymmetry in $D^0 \\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Aidala, Christine Angela; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albicocco, Pietro; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Arzymatov, Kenenbek; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bian, Lingzhu; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blusk, Steven; Bobulska, Dana; Bocci, Valerio; Boente Garcia, Oscar; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brodski, Michael; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Buonaura, Annarita; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Chapman, Matthew George; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chekalina, Viktoriia; Chen, Chen; Chen, Shanzhen; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Da Silva, Cesar Luiz; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Danilina, Anna; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Delaney, Blaise; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Didenko, Sergey; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Durham, John Matthew; Dutta, Deepanwita; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Ene, Alexandru; Escher, Stephan; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Lopes, Lino; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Färber, Christian; Féo Pereira Rivello Carvalho, Mauricio; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; Garcia Plana, Beatriz; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gu, Chenxi; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hilton, Martha; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Hu, Wenhua; Huang, Wenqian; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Ibis, Philipp; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Ivshin, Kuzma; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kazeev, Nikita; Kecke, Matthieu; Keizer, Floris; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kim, Kyung Eun; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Kress, Felix Johannes; Krokovny, Pavel; Krupa, Wojciech; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lancierini, Davide; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Zhuoming; Liang, Xixin; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malecki, Bartosz; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Mead, James Vincent; Meadows, Brian; Meaux, Cedric; Meier, Frank; Meinert, Nis; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Millard, Edward James; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Minzoni, Luca; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Mombächer, Titus; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Gianfranco; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nanut, Tara; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nogay, Alla; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Panshin, Gennady; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Pereima, Dmitrii; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pietrzyk, Guillaume; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pinzino, Jacopo; Pisani, Flavio; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plews, Jonathan; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polukhina, Natalia; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Qin, Jia-Jia; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Reiss, Florian; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Ren, Zan; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rinnert, Kurt; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gras, Cristina; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saur, Miroslav; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shmanin, Evgenii; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Mark; Soares, Marcelo; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Strokov, Sergey; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tang, Zhipeng; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Tou, Da Yu; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tuci, Giulia; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitkovskiy, Arseniy; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Wang, Mengzhen; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Zhenzi; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Weisser, Constantin; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xiao, Dong; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Ao; Xu, Menglin; Xu, Qingnian; Xu, Zehua; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    A measurement of the time-integrated $CP$ asymmetry in $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S$ decays is reported. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about $2$ fb$^{-1}$ collected in 2015--2016 by the LHCb collaboration in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $13$ TeV. The $D^0$ candidate is required to originate from a $D^{\\ast +} \\rightarrow D^0 \\pi^+$ decay, allowing the determination of the flavour of the $D^0$ meson using the pion charge. The $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$ decay, which has a well measured $CP$ asymmetry, is used as a calibration channel. The $CP$ asymmetry for $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S$ is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\mathcal{A}^{CP}(D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S) = (4.2\\pm 3.4\\pm 1.0)\\%, \\end{equation*} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This result is combined with the previous LHCb measurement at lower centre-of-mass energies to obtain \\begin{equation*} \\mathcal{A}^{CP}(D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S) = (2.0\\pm 2.9\\pm 1.0)\\%. \\end{equa...

  11. The long-term stability of self-esteem: its time-dependent decay and nonzero asymptote.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Farah; Orth, Ulrich

    2013-05-01

    How stable are individual differences in self-esteem? We examined the time-dependent decay of rank-order stability of self-esteem and tested whether stability asymptotically approaches zero or a nonzero value across long test-retest intervals. Analyses were based on 6 assessments across a 29-year period of a sample of 3,180 individuals aged 14 to 102 years. The results indicated that, as test-retest intervals increased, stability exponentially decayed and asymptotically approached a nonzero value (estimated as .43). The exponential decay function explained a large proportion of variance in observed stability coefficients, provided a better fit than alternative functions, and held across gender and for all age groups from adolescence to old age. Moreover, structural equation modeling of the individual-level data suggested that a perfectly stable trait component underlies stability of self-esteem. The findings suggest that the stability of self-esteem is relatively large, even across very long periods, and that self-esteem is a trait-like characteristic.

  12. Thermal-hydraulic simulation of natural convection decay heat removal in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using RELAP5 and TEMPEST: Part 2, Interpretation and validation of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggles, A.E.; Morris, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    The RELAP5/MOD2 code was used to predict the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the HFIR core during decay heat removal through boiling natural circulation. The low system pressure and low mass flux values associated with boiling natural circulation are far from conditions for which RELAP5 is well exercised. Therefore, some simple hand calculations are used herein to establish the physics of the results. The interpretation and validation effort is divided between the time average flow conditions and the time varying flow conditions. The time average flow conditions are evaluated using a lumped parameter model and heat balance. The Martinelli-Nelson correlations are used to model the two-phase pressure drop and void fraction vs flow quality relationship within the core region. Systems of parallel channels are susceptible to both density wave oscillations and pressure drop oscillations. Periodic variations in the mass flux and exit flow quality of individual core channels are predicted by RELAP5. These oscillations are consistent with those observed experimentally and are of the density wave type. The impact of the time varying flow properties on local wall superheat is bounded herein. The conditions necessary for Ledinegg flow excursions are identified. These conditions do not fall within the envelope of decay heat levels relevant to HFIR in boiling natural circulation. 14 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Pulsed neutron porosity logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved pulsed neutron porosity logging system is provided in the present invention. A logging tool provided with a 14 MeV pulsed neutron source, an epithermal neutron detector, and a fast neutron detector is moved through a borehole. Repetitive bursts of neutrons irradiate the earth formations and, during the bursts, the fast neutron population is sampled. During the interval between bursts the epithermal neutron population is sampled along with background gamma radiation due to lingering thermal neutrons. The fast and epithermal neutron population measurements are combined to provide a measurement of formation porosity

  14. Response and recovery of water yield and timing, stream sediment, abiotic parameters, and stream chemistry following logging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne Swank; Jennifer Knoepp; James Vose; Stephanie Laseter; Jackson Webster

    2014-01-01

    Watershed ecosystem analysis provides a scientific approach to quantify and integrate resource responses to management (Hornbeck and Swank 1992) and also to address issues of resource sustainability (Christensen et. al. 1996). Philosophical components of the research approach at Coweeta are 1) the quantity, timing, and quality of streamflow provides an integrated...

  15. Core-power and decay-time limits for disabled automatic-actuation of LOFT ECCS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.H.

    1978-01-01

    The Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) for the LOFT reactor may need to be disabled for modifications or repairs of hardware or instrumentation or for component testing during periods when the reactor system is hot and pressurized, or it may be desirable to enable the ECCS to be disabled without the necessity of cooling down and depressurizing the reactor. LTR 113-47 has shown that the LOFT ECCS can be safely bypassed or disabled when the total core power does not exceed 25 kW. A modified policy involves disabling the automatic actuation of the LOFT ECCS, but still retaining the manual activation capability. Disabling of the automatic actuation can be safely utilized, without subjecting the fuel cladding to unacceptable temperatures, when the LOFT power decays to 70 kW; this power level permits a maximum delay of 20 minutes following a LOCA for the manual actuation of ECCS

  16. Why older adults spend time sedentary and break their sedentary behaviour: a mixed methods approach using life-logging equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manon L Dontje

    2015-10-01

    It can be concluded that a mixed methods approach, by combining objective data of an activity monitor with contextual information from time-lapse photos and subjective information from people regarding their own behaviour, is an useful method to provide indepth information about (breaking sedentary behaviour in older adults. The results of this study showed that there is a difference in what older adults believe that are reasons for them to remain sedentary or break their sedentary time and what their actual reasons are. A personal story board based on objective measurements of sedentary behaviour can be a useful method to raise awareness and find individual and tailored ways to reduce sedentary behaviour and to increase the number of breaks in sedentary behaviour without much interference in daily routine.

  17. Adoption of social media technology: the effect of always logged-in, return on time and fear of missing out

    OpenAIRE

    Eiesland, Ingrid; Mangrud, Martine Sandvik

    2017-01-01

    Masteroppgave(MSc) in Master of Science in Strategic Marketing Management - Handelshøyskolen BI, 2017 Adoption of new technologies have been of importance for researchers for a long time, and constructs are continuously being analyzed to better understand what makes consumers more likely to adopt. The use of social media technologies are still increasing, and consumers adopt and use more platforms simultaneously now than before. This paper seeks to provide new content to the li...

  18. Encyclopedia of well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbrandes, R.

    1985-01-01

    The 16 chapters of this book aim to provide students, trainees and engineers with a manual covering all well-logging measurements ranging from drilling to productions, from oil to minerals going by way of geothermal energy. Each chapter is a summary but a bibliography is given at the end of each chapter. Well-logging during drilling, wireline logging equipment and techniques, petroleum logging, data processing of borehole data, interpretation of well-logging, sampling tools, completion and production logging, logging in relief wells to kill off uncontrolled blowouts, techniques for high temperature geothermal energy, small-scale mining and hydrology, logging with oil-base mud and finally recommended logging programs are all topics covered. There is one chapter on nuclear well-logging which is indexed separately. (UK)

  19. Comparative response time and fault logging with a PLC and supervisory software and a standalone unit developed for recording

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldaconi, Ricardo H.; Costa, Fabio E. da

    2017-01-01

    The Cobalt-60 irradiator of IPEN / CNEN, a category IV facility, has a security system for inter locking doors or exposure of radioactive sources made simultaneously by a programmable logic controller (PLC) model S7-200 from Siemens and a relay logic. From a set of information, both systems work together opening doors or exposing the sources. All incoming and outgoing information are sent serially via EIA232 communication to a personal computer with Windows® platform for a supervisory program which provides the monitoring of the entire process by a synoptic table on the computer screen and is also intended to keep records of all events on the computer's hard drive. A deficiency was found for the process of sending events via serial communication (EIA232) from PLC to the supervisory program. When failure occurred in a very short time, the PLC always took the right decision, but the registration process that had to go through the Windows® timeshare lost the information. In the previous work developed a standalone electronics unit connected to the inputs and outputs of the security system, fully optocoupled to avoid any interference to the security system that records each event on a memory card. In this work, for checking the unit developed record time ability, transients incoming signals for simulating failures, were injected at security system inputs and the response time of security system, supervisory program and the autonomous unity were measured and compared. (author)

  20. Comparative response time and fault logging with a PLC and supervisory software and a standalone unit developed for recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldaconi, Ricardo H., E-mail: ricardohovacker@hotmail.com [Escola Senai Roberto Simonsen, Educação e Tecnologia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Costa, Fabio E. da, E-mail: fecosta@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Cobalt-60 irradiator of IPEN / CNEN, a category IV facility, has a security system for inter locking doors or exposure of radioactive sources made simultaneously by a programmable logic controller (PLC) model S7-200 from Siemens and a relay logic. From a set of information, both systems work together opening doors or exposing the sources. All incoming and outgoing information are sent serially via EIA232 communication to a personal computer with Windows® platform for a supervisory program which provides the monitoring of the entire process by a synoptic table on the computer screen and is also intended to keep records of all events on the computer's hard drive. A deficiency was found for the process of sending events via serial communication (EIA232) from PLC to the supervisory program. When failure occurred in a very short time, the PLC always took the right decision, but the registration process that had to go through the Windows® timeshare lost the information. In the previous work developed a standalone electronics unit connected to the inputs and outputs of the security system, fully optocoupled to avoid any interference to the security system that records each event on a memory card. In this work, for checking the unit developed record time ability, transients incoming signals for simulating failures, were injected at security system inputs and the response time of security system, supervisory program and the autonomous unity were measured and compared. (author)

  1. Time integrated ratio of wrong-sign to right-sign $D^0 \\rightarrow K\\pi$ decays in 2010 data at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    First results of the measurement on wrong-sign $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+} \\pi^{-}$ decays based on the 2010 dataset taken with the LHCb detector are presented. The ratio of wrong-sign to right-sign ($D^0 \\rightarrow K^{-} \\pi^{+}$) $D^0$ decays corrected for the decay time acceptance is determined to be $R_{{\\rm corr}}=(0.409 \\pm 0.031 ({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.039 ({\\rm sys.})) \\% $. This analysis is the first step towards a measurement of the time-dependent wrong-sign to right-sign ratio from which the $D^0$ mixing parameters can be extracted.

  2. Seasonal variation of meteor decay times observed at King Sejong Station (62.22°S, 58.78°W), Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Yong Ha; Lee, Chang-Sup; Jee, Geonhwa

    2010-07-01

    We analyzed meteor decay times measured by a VHF radar at King Sejong Station by classifying strong and weak meteors according to their estimated electron line densities. The height profiles of monthly averaged decay times show a peak whose altitude varies with season at altitudes of 80-85 km. The higher peak during summer is consistent with colder temperatures that cause faster chemical reactions of electron removal. By adopting temperature dependent empirical recombination rates from rocket experiments and meteor electron densities of 2×105-2×106 cm-3 in a decay time model, we are able to account for decreasing decay times below the peak for all seasons without invoking meteor electron removal by hypothetical icy particles.

  3. Method and apparatus for producing a porosity log of a subsurface formation corrected for detector standoff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L.S.; Leland, F.P.; Lyle, W.D. Jr.; Stromswold, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    A borehole logging tool with a pulsed source of fast neutrons is lowered into a borehole traversing a subsurface formation, and a neutron detector measures the die-away of nuclear radiation in the formation. A model of the die-away is produced using exponential terms varying as the sum of borehole, formation and thermal neutron background components. Exponentially weighted moments of both the die-away measurements and a model are determined and equated. The formation decay constant is determined from the formation and thermal neutron background. An epithermal neutron lifetime is determined from the formation decay constant and is used with the amplitude ratio by a trained neural network to determine a lifetime correction. A standoff corrected lifetime is determined from the epithermal neutron lifetime and the lifetime correction. (author)

  4. Engineering aspects of radiometric logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, P.

    1982-01-01

    Engineering problems encountered in the development of nuclear borehole logging techniques are discussed. Spectrometric techniques require electronic stability of the equipment. In addition the electronics must be capable of handling high count rates of randomly distributed pulses of fast rise time from the detector and the systems must be designed so that precise calibration is possible under field operating conditions. Components of a logging system are discussed in detail. They include the logging probe (electronics, detector, high voltage supply, preamplifier), electronic instrumentation for data collection and processing and auxiliary equipment

  5. Extracting rephase-invariant CP and CPT violating parameters from asymmetries of time-ordered integrated rates of correlated decays of entangled mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Zhijie; Shi, Yu.

    2012-01-01

    We present a general model-independent formalism of measuring CP and CPT violating parameters through time-ordered integrated rates of correlated decays of C=±1 entangled states of neutral pseudoscalar mesons. We give the general formulae of CP and CPT violating parameters in terms of four measurable asymmetries defined for the time-ordered integrated rates, applicable to all kinds of decay product. Two special cases which are often realized in experiments are discussed specifically. (orig.)

  6. Log quality enhancement: A systematic assessment of logging company wellsite performance and log quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnan, R.A.; Mc Hattie, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    To improve the monitoring of logging company performance, computer programs were developed to assess information en masse from log quality check lists completed on wellsite by the service company engineer and Phillips representative. A study of all logging jobs performed by different service companies for Phillips in Oklahoma (panhandle excepted) during 1982 enabled several pertinent and beneficial interpretations to be made. Company A provided the best tool and crew service. Company B incurred an excessive amount of lost time related to tool failure, in particular the neutron-density tool combination. Company C, although used only three times, incurred no lost time. With a reasonable data base valid conclusions were made pertaining, for example, to repeated tool malfunctions. The actual logs were then assessed for quality

  7. Time consumption and productivity of skidding Silver fir (Abies alba Mill. round wood in reduced accessibility conditions: a case study in windthrow salvage logging form Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Alexandru Borz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural calamities (especially windthrows may generate difficultwork conditions in timber harvesting operations. When associated with the reduced accessibility conditions, the work conditions become even harder. This study investigates the time consumptions on specific work elements in timber skidding, develops time prediction models for timber skidding work elements and assesses the production rates for timber skidding in reduced accessibility stands where windthrow salvage cuttings were applied.Following a time study done for two skidders (TAF 690 OP and TAF 657operating simultaneously in the same felling area, it has been found that, in average, in a delay free skidding cycle time, lateral winching accounted for a share of 26-33%, on-trail skidding accounted for a share of 64-71% and landing operations accounted for a share of 3%. Total delays accounted for 51% and 43% of the total work time in the case of TAF 690 OP skidder and TAF 657 skidder, respectively. Regression models for lateral winching(both skidders revealed that the winching distance and the number of logs were the relevant predictors for the time consumption estimation (p<0.01, whereas in the case of on-trail skidding only the skidding distance was relevant (p <0.01. For the overall skidding operation (excluding landingoperations winching and skidding distances were found as relevantpredictors (p <0.01 for 690 OP, whereas the number of logs became anadditional relevant predictor for 657. In conditions of an average winching distance of 19.90 m and an average on-trail skidding distance of 980.32 m, the time study yielded a net production rate of 7.70 m3 h-1 and a gross production rate of 3.75 m3 h-1 in the case of TAF 690 OP skidder. By comparison, in the case of TAF 657 skidder, for an average winching distance of 22.86 m and an average on-trail skidding distance of 871.00 m, the net and gross production rates were of 5.61 m3 h-1 and 3.20 m3 h-1 respectively.

  8. Time consumption and productivity of skidding Silver fir (Abies alba Mill. round wood in reduced accessibility conditions: a case study in windthrow salvage logging form Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelian Alexandru Borz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural calamities (especially windthrows may generate difficult work conditions in timber harvesting operations. When associated with the reduced accessibility conditions, the work conditions become even harder. This study investigates the time consumptions on specific work elements in timber skidding, develops time prediction models for timber skidding work elements and assesses the production rates for timber skidding in reduced accessibility stands where windthrow salvage cuttings were applied. Following a time study done for two skidders (TAF 690 OP and TAF 657 operating simultaneously in the same felling area, it has been found that, in average, in a delay free skidding cycle time, lateral winching accounted for a share of 26-33%, on-trail skidding accounted for a share of 64-71% and landing operations accounted for a share of 3%.Total delays accounted for 51% and 43% of the total work time in the case of TAF 690 OP skidder and TAF 657skidder respectively. Regression models for lateral winching (both skidders revealed that the winching distance and the number of logs were the relevant predictors for the time consumption estimation (p<0.01, whereas in the case of on-trail skidding only the skidding distance was relevant (p<0.01. For the overall skidding operation (excluding landing operations winching and skidding distances were found as relevant predictors (p<0.01 in case of TAF 690 OP, whereas the number of logs became an additional relevant predictor in case of TAF 657.In conditions of an average winching distance of 19.90 m and an average on-trail skidding distance of 980.32 m, the time study yielded a net production rate of 7.70 m3h-1 and a gross production rate of 3.75 m3h-1 in the case of TAF 690 OP skidder. By comparison, in the case of TAF 657 skidder, for an average winching distance of 22.86 m and an average on-trail skidding distance of 871.00 m, the net and gross production rates were of 5.61 m3h-1 and 3.20 m3h-1 respectively.

  9. The determination of kinetic parameters of LiF : Mg,Ti from thermal decaying curves of optical absorption bands

    CERN Document Server

    Yazici, A N

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the thermal bleaching curves (TBCs) of specific optical absorption bands of LiF : Mg,Ti were measured as a function of temperature. The TBCs obtained were analysed to extract the kinetic parameters (the thermal activation energy (E) and the frequency factor (s)) of some TL glow peaks of LiF : Mg,Ti on the basis of the developed first-order kinetic model over a specified temperature region.

  10. Thermal Imaging Systems for Real-Time Applications in Smart Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Rikke; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Nielsen, Søren Zebitz

    2016-01-01

    of thermal imaging in real-time Smart City applications. Thermal cameras operate independently of light and measure the radiated infrared waves representing the temperature of the scene. In order to showcase the possibilities, we present five different applications which use thermal imaging only...

  11. Global Regularity and Time Decay for the 2D Magnetohydrodynamic Equations with Fractional Dissipation and Partial Magnetic Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bo-Qing; Jia, Yan; Li, Jingna; Wu, Jiahong

    2018-05-01

    This paper focuses on a system of the 2D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with the kinematic dissipation given by the fractional operator (-Δ )^α and the magnetic diffusion by partial Laplacian. We are able to show that this system with any α >0 always possesses a unique global smooth solution when the initial data is sufficiently smooth. In addition, we make a detailed study on the large-time behavior of these smooth solutions and obtain optimal large-time decay rates. Since the magnetic diffusion is only partial here, some classical tools such as the maximal regularity property for the 2D heat operator can no longer be applied. A key observation on the structure of the MHD equations allows us to get around the difficulties due to the lack of full Laplacian magnetic diffusion. The results presented here are the sharpest on the global regularity problem for the 2D MHD equations with only partial magnetic diffusion.

  12. http Log Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøving, Kristian Billeskov; Simonsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    This article documents how log analysis can inform qualitative studies concerning the usage of web-based information systems (WIS). No prior research has used http log files as data to study collaboration between multiple users in organisational settings. We investigate how to perform http log...... analysis; what http log analysis says about the nature of collaborative WIS use; and how results from http log analysis may support other data collection methods such as surveys, interviews, and observation. The analysis of log files initially lends itself to research designs, which serve to test...... hypotheses using a quantitative methodology. We show that http log analysis can also be valuable in qualitative research such as case studies. The results from http log analysis can be triangulated with other data sources and for example serve as a means of supporting the interpretation of interview data...

  13. Seasonal Variation in Meteor Decay Time Profiles Measured by a Meteor Radar at King Sejong Station (62°S, 58°W), Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, J.; Lee, C.; Jee, G.

    2008-12-01

    A VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station (62°S, 58°W), Antarctica has been detecting echoes from more than 20,000 meteors per day since March 2007. Meteor echoes are decayed typically within seconds as meteor trail plasma spread away or are neutralized. Assuming that diffusion is the only process for decay of meteor echo signals, the atmospheric temperatures and pressures have been inferred from the measured meteor decay times at the peak meteor altitudes around 90 km. In this study, we analyze altitude profiles of meteor decay times in each month, which clearly show a maximum at 80 ~ 85 km. The maximum appears at higher altitude during austral summer than winter. The fast decay of meteor signals below the maximum cannot be explained by atmospheric diffusion which decreases with increasing atmospheric densities. We find that the measured meteor decay time profiles can be fitted with a loss rate profile, in addition to diffusion, with a peak altitude of 55 ~ 73 km and a peak rate of 4 ~ 15 sec- 1. The additional loss of meteor plasma may be due to electron absorption by icy particles in the mesosphere, but the estimated peak altitudes are much lower than the layers of NLC or PME. The estimated peak loss rates seem to be too large to be accounted by absorption by icy or dust particles. We will discuss other processes to explain the fast meteor times and their variation over season.

  14. Logging technique for assaying for uranium in earth formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givens, W.W.; Mills, W.R. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A borehole logging tool includes a source of fast neutrons, an epithermal neutron flux detector, and a thermal neutron flux detector. A count rate meter is connected to each detector. A ratio detector provides a signal indicative of the ratio of the count rates of the two detectors obtained during the time that prompt neutrons are emitted from neutron fission of uranium in the formation

  15. Log N-log S in inconclusive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebesadel, R. W.; Fenimore, E. E.; Laros, J.

    1983-01-01

    The log N-log S data acquired by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Gamma Burst Detector (PVO) are presented and compared to similar data from the Soviet KONUS experiment. Although the PVO data are consistent with and suggestive of a -3/2 power law distribution, the results are not adequate at this state of observations to differentiate between a -3/2 and a -1 power law slope.

  16. The Meaning of Logs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etalle, Sandro; Massacci, Fabio; Yautsiukhin, Artsiom

    2007-01-01

    While logging events is becoming increasingly common in computing, in communication and in collaborative work, log systems need to satisfy increasingly challenging (if not conflicting) requirements.Despite the growing pervasiveness of log systems, to date there is no high-level framework which

  17. The Meaning of Logs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etalle, Sandro; Massacci, Fabio; Yautsiukhin, Artsiom; Lambrinoudakis, Costas; Pernul, Günther; Tjoa, A Min

    While logging events is becoming increasingly common in computing, in communication and in collaborative environments, log systems need to satisfy increasingly challenging (if not conflicting) requirements. In this paper we propose a high-level framework for modeling log systems, and reasoning about

  18. Three-Phased Wake Vortex Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; Switzer, George S.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed parametric study is conducted that examines vortex decay within turbulent and stratified atmospheres. The study uses a large eddy simulation model to simulate the out-of-ground effect behavior of wake vortices due to their interaction with atmospheric turbulence and thermal stratification. This paper presents results from a parametric investigation and suggests improvements for existing fast-time wake prediction models. This paper also describes a three-phased decay for wake vortices. The third phase is characterized by a relatively slow rate of circulation decay, and is associated with the ringvortex stage that occurs following vortex linking. The three-phased decay is most prevalent for wakes imbedded within environments having low-turbulence and near-neutral stratification.

  19. Fission-product energy release for times following thermal-neutron fission of 235U between 2 and 14000 seconds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickens, J.K.; Emery, J.F.; Love, T.A.; McConnell, J.W.; Northcutt, K.J.; Peelle, R.W.; Weaver, H.

    1977-10-01

    Fission-product decay energy-releases rates were measured for thermal-neutron fission of 235 U. Samples of mass 1 to 10 μg were irradiated for 1 to 100 sec by use of the fast pneumatic-tube facility at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The resulting beta- and gamma-ray emissions were counted for times-after-fission between 2 and 14,000 seconds. The data were obtained for beta and gamma rays separately as spectral distributions, N(E/sub γ/) vs E/sub γ/ and N(E/sub beta/) vs E/sub β/. For the gamma-ray data the spectra were obtained by using a NaI detector, while for the beta-ray data the spectra were obtained by using an NE-110 detector with an anticoincidence mantle. The raw data were unfolded to provide spectral distributions of modest resolution. These were integrated over E/sub γ/ and E/sub β/ to provide total yield and energy integrals as a function of time after fission. Results are low compared to the present 1973 ANS Decay-heat standard. A complete description of the experimental apparatus and data-reduction techniques is presented. The final integral data are given in tabular and graphical form and are compared with published data. 41 figures, 13 tables

  20. A simple, practical and complete O(n3/log n)-time algorithm for RNA folding using the Four-Russians speedup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Yelena; Gusfield, Dan

    2010-01-04

    The problem of computationally predicting the secondary structure (or folding) of RNA molecules was first introduced more than thirty years ago and yet continues to be an area of active research and development. The basic RNA-folding problem of finding a maximum cardinality, non-crossing, matching of complimentary nucleotides in an RNA sequence of length n, has an O(n3)-time dynamic programming solution that is widely applied. It is known that an o(n3) worst-case time solution is possible, but the published and suggested methods are complex and have not been established to be practical. Significant practical improvements to the original dynamic programming method have been introduced, but they retain the O(n3) worst-case time bound when n is the only problem-parameter used in the bound. Surprisingly, the most widely-used, general technique to achieve a worst-case (and often practical) speed up of dynamic programming, the Four-Russians technique, has not been previously applied to the RNA-folding problem. This is perhaps due to technical issues in adapting the technique to RNA-folding. In this paper, we give a simple, complete, and practical Four-Russians algorithm for the basic RNA-folding problem, achieving a worst-case time-bound of O(n3/log(n)). We show that this time-bound can also be obtained for richer nucleotide matching scoring-schemes, and that the method achieves consistent speed-ups in practice. The contribution is both theoretical and practical, since the basic RNA-folding problem is often solved multiple times in the inner-loop of more complex algorithms, and for long RNA molecules in the study of RNA virus genomes.

  1. Has Ebbinghaus Decayed with Time? The Growth of Recall (Hypermnesia) over Days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, Matthew Hugh; Kleinbard, Jeff

    1978-01-01

    Recent laboratory work on the recall of pictures has produced a pattern suggesting that memory for certain classes of stimuli may be hypermnesiac rather than amnesiac (Ebbinghaus, 1885/1964), increasing over time and recall attempts. This research tries to determine the magnitude of memory growth over significant time intervals, e.g., a week…

  2. 103Pd decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyavenko, V.S.; Borozenets, G.P.; Vishnevskij, I.N.; Zheltonozhskij, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    103 Pd decay in different chemical states has been investigated. The change of the partial half-life period equal to 0.67±0.15% has been detected. The γ-spectrum has been measured to a high precision. The new data have been obtained on population probabilities of 103 Rh excited states and the total energy of decay for 103 Pd has been determined to a high precision (543.0±0.8). The values of log ft have been determined

  3. Constraining dark matter late-time energy injection: decays and p-wave annihilations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamanti, Roberta; Mena, Olga; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Vincent, Aaron C. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de València, Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Lopez-Honorez, Laura, E-mail: R.Diamanti@uva.nl, E-mail: llopezho@vub.ac.be, E-mail: omena@ific.uv.es, E-mail: sergio.palomares.ruiz@ific.uv.es, E-mail: vincent@ific.uv.es [Theoretische Natuurkunde Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-02-01

    We use the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations to provide updated constraints on the dark matter lifetime as well as on p-wave suppressed annihilation cross sections in the 1 MeV to 1 TeV mass range. In contrast to scenarios with an s-wave dominated annihilation cross section, which mainly affect the CMB close to the last scattering surface, signatures associated with these scenarios essentially appear at low redshifts (z∼<50) when structure began to form, and thus manifest at lower multipoles in the CMB power spectrum. We use data from Planck, WMAP9, SPT and ACT, as well as Lyman–α measurements of the matter temperature at z ∼ 4 to set a 95% confidence level lower bound on the dark matter lifetime of ∼ 4 × 10{sup 25} s for m{sub χ} = 100 MeV. This bound becomes lower by an order of magnitude at m{sub χ} = 1 TeV due to inefficient energy deposition into the intergalactic medium. We also show that structure formation can enhance the effect of p-wave suppressed annihilation cross sections by many orders of magnitude with respect to the background cosmological rate, although even with this enhancement, CMB constraints are not yet strong enough to reach the thermal relic value of the cross section.

  4. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  5. Modeling decay rates of dead wood in a neotropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hérault, Bruno; Beauchêne, Jacques; Muller, Félix; Wagner, Fabien; Baraloto, Christopher; Blanc, Lilian; Martin, Jean-Michel

    2010-09-01

    Variation of dead wood decay rates among tropical trees remains one source of uncertainty in global models of the carbon cycle. Taking advantage of a broad forest plot network surveyed for tree mortality over a 23-year period, we measured the remaining fraction of boles from 367 dead trees from 26 neotropical species widely varying in wood density (0.23-1.24 g cm(-3)) and tree circumference at death time (31.5-272.0 cm). We modeled decay rates within a Bayesian framework assuming a first order differential equation to model the decomposition process and tested for the effects of forest management (selective logging vs. unexploited), of mode of death (standing vs. downed) and of topographical levels (bottomlands vs. hillsides vs. hilltops) on wood decay rates. The general decay model predicts the observed remaining fraction of dead wood (R2 = 60%) with only two biological predictors: tree circumference at death time and wood specific density. Neither selective logging nor local topography had a differential effect on wood decay rates. Including the mode of death into the model revealed that standing dead trees decomposed faster than downed dead trees, but the gain of model accuracy remains rather marginal. Overall, these results suggest that the release of carbon from tropical dead trees to the atmosphere can be simply estimated using tree circumference at death time and wood density.

  6. A Study of Electron Decay in Nitrogen Time After-glow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veis, P.; Coitout, H.; Magne, L.; Cernogora, G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with electron density measurements in nitrogen time after-glow using hyper frequency resonant cavity. The studied pressures are from the range 9-530 Pa and discharge currents from 20 mA up to 500 mA. Electrons decreases up to the time of 1,4 ms in after-glow depending on pressure, pulse current and pulse duration (Authors)

  7. Time-dependent Dalitz-Plot Analysis of the Charmless Decay B^0 -> K^0S Pi Pi- at BABAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilic, J

    2009-10-17

    A time-dependent amplitude analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays is performed in order to extract the CP violation parameters of f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} and direct CP asymmetries of K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -}. The results are obtained from the final BABAR data sample of (465 {+-} 5)10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The time dependent CP asymmetry for f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0} and {rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0} are measured to be S(f{sub 0}(980)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = -0.97 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.01, and S({rho}{sup 0}(770)K{sub S}{sup 0}) = 0.67 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04, respectively. In decays to K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} the direct CP asymmetry is found to be A{sub CP}(K*{sup {+-}}(892){pi}{sup {-+}}) = -0.18 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.00. The relative phases between B{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}(892){pi}{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup -}(892){pi}{sup +}, relevant for the extraction of the unitarity triangle angle {gamma}, is measured to be {Delta}{phi}(K*(892){pi}) = (34.9 {+-} 23.1 {+-} 7.5 {+-} 4.7){sup o}, where uncertainties are statistical, systematic and model-dependent, respectively. Fit fractions, direct CP asymmetries and the relative phases of different other resonant modes have also been measured. A new method for extracting longitudinal shower development information from longitudinally unsegmented calorimeters is also presented. This method has been implemented as a part of the BABAR final particle identification algorithm. A significant improvement in low momenta muon identification at BABAR is obtained.

  8. LogScope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havelund, Klaus; Smith, Margaret H.; Barringer, Howard; Groce, Alex

    2012-01-01

    LogScope is a software package for analyzing log files. The intended use is for offline post-processing of such logs, after the execution of the system under test. LogScope can, however, in principle, also be used to monitor systems online during their execution. Logs are checked against requirements formulated as monitors expressed in a rule-based specification language. This language has similarities to a state machine language, but is more expressive, for example, in its handling of data parameters. The specification language is user friendly, simple, and yet expressive enough for many practical scenarios. The LogScope software was initially developed to specifically assist in testing JPL s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) flight software, but it is very generic in nature and can be applied to any application that produces some form of logging information (which almost any software does).

  9. Time-Separating Heating and Sensor Functions of Thermistors in Precision Thermal Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyung J.; Sukhatme, Kalyani G.; Mahoney, John C.; Penanen, Konstantin Penanen; Vargas, Rudolph, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A method allows combining the functions of a heater and a thermometer in a single device, a thermistor, with minimal temperature read errors. Because thermistors typically have a much smaller thermal mass than the objects they monitor, the thermal time to equilibrate the thermometer to the temperature of the object is typically much shorter than the thermal time of the object to change its temperature in response to an external perturbation.

  10. Semi-automatic logarithmic converter of logs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'dman, Z.A.; Bondar's, V.V.

    1974-01-01

    Semi-automatic logarithmic converter of logging charts. An original semi-automatic converter was developed for use in converting BK resistance logging charts and the time interval, ΔT, of acoustic logs from a linear to a logarithmic scale with a specific ratio for subsequent combining of them with neutron-gamma logging charts in operative interpretation of logging materials by a normalization method. The converter can be used to increase productivity by giving curves different from those obtained in manual, pointwise processing. The equipment operates reliably and is simple in use. (author)

  11. 3D CFD simulations to study the effect of inclination of condenser tube on natural convection and thermal stratification in a passive decay heat removal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minocha, Nitin [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Nayak, Arun K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of three-dimensional natural convection and thermal stratification inside large water pool. • Effect of inclination (α) of condenser tube on fluid flow and heat transfer. • The heat transfer was found to be maximum for α = 90° and minimum for α = 15°. • Laminar-turbulent natural convection and heat transfer in the presence of longitudinal vortices. - Abstract: Many advanced nuclear reactors adopt methodologies of passive safety systems based on natural forces such as gravity. In one of such system, the decay heat generated from a reactor is removed by isolation condenser (ICs) submerged in a large water pool called the Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP). The objective of the present study was to design an IC for the passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS) for advanced nuclear reactor. First, the effect of inclination of IC tube on three dimensional temperature and flow fields was investigated inside a pilot scale (10 L) GDWP. Further, the knowledge of these fields has been used for the quantification of heat transfer and thermal stratification phenomenon. In a next step, the knowledge gained from the pilot scale GDWP has been extended to design an IC for real size GDWP (∼10,000 m{sup 3}). Single phase CFD simulation using open source CFD code [OpenFOAM-2.2] was performed for different tube inclination angles (α) (w.r.t. to vertical direction) in the range 0° ⩽ α ⩽ 90°. The results indicate that the heat transfer coefficient increases with increase in tube inclination angle. The heat transfer was found to be maximum for α = 90° and minimum for α = 15°. This behavior is due to the interaction between the primary flow (due to pressure gradient) and secondary flow (due to buoyancy force). The primary flow enhanced the fluid sliding motion at the tube top whereas the secondary flow resulted in enhancement in fluid motion along the circumference of tube. As the angle of inclination (α) of the tube was increased, the

  12. Time dependent auto-correlation, autospectrum and decay ratio estimation of transient signals in JET soft X-ray records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Por, G.

    1999-08-01

    A program package was developed to estimate the time dependent auto-correlation function (ACF) from the time signals of soft X-ray records taken along the various lines-of-sights in JET-SHOTS, and also to estimate the time dependent Decay Ratio (DR) from that. On the basis of ACF the time dependent auto-power spectral density (APSD) was also calculated. The steps and objectives of this work were: eliminating the white detection noise, trends and slow variation from the time signals, since ordinary methods can give good estimate of the time dependent ACF and DR only for 'nearly' stationary signals, developing an automatic algorithm for finding the maxima and minima of ACF, since they are the basis for DR estimation, evaluating and testing different DR estimators for JET-SHOT, with the aim of finding parts of the signals, where the oscillating character is strong, estimating time dependent ACF and APSD that can follow the relatively fast variation in the time signal. The methods that we have developed for data processing of transient signals are: White detection noise removal and preparation for trend removal - weak components, white detection noise and high frequency components are filtered from the signal using the so-called soft-threshold wavelet filter. Removal of trends and slow variation - Three-point differentiation of the pre-filtered signal is used to remove trends and slow variation. Here we made use of the DERIV function of IDL program language. This leads to a filtered signal that has zero mean value in each time step. Calculation of the time dependent ACF - The signal treated by the two previous steps is used as the input. Calculated ACF value is added in each new time step, but the previously accumulated ACF value is multiplied by a weighting factor. Thus the new sample has 100% contribution, while the contributions from the previous samples are forgotten quickly. DR calculation - DR is a measure of the decay of oscillating ACF. This parameter was shown

  13. The many facets of pulsed neutron cased-hole logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albertin, I.; Darling, H.; Mahdavi, M.; Plasek, R. [Schlumberger Houston Product Center, Sugarland, TX (United States); Cedeno, I. [City Investing Company Ltd., Quito (Ecuador); Hemingway, J.; Richter, P. [GeoQuest, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Markley, M. [Schlumberger, Bogota (Colombia); Olesen, J.R. [Schlumberger, Beijing (China); Roscoe, B. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (United States); Zeng, Wenchong [Shengli Petroleum Administration Bureau, China Petroleum Corporation, Beijing (China)

    1996-12-31

    The RST Reservoir Saturation Tool, which bombards formations with neutrons and detects gamma rays from the resulting interactions, is rapidly becoming a complete stand-alone, cased-hole evaluation service. Measurements like elemental analysis, thermal decay times, porosity evaluation and production analysis help reservoir engineers locate bypassed oil, detect waterflood fronts, fine-tune formation evaluations and monitor production profiles. 19 figs., 12 refs.

  14. Upcoversion performance improvement of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb, Er by Sn codoping: Enhanced emission intensity and reduced decay time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Han, E-mail: fjfzyh@fzu.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Cao, Wenbing [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China); Huang, Qingming [Instrumentation Analysis and Research Center, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Ma, En [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Zhang, Xinqi [Instrumentation Analysis and Research Center, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Yu, Jianchang [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350108 (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this manuscript we report a phenomenon that upconversion emission intensity of Er{sup 3+} was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased obviously by Sn codoping with Yb/Er into hexagonal NaYF{sub 4} synchronously. X-ray powder diffiraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron spin-resonance spectroscopy and upconversion emission spectra were employed to explore the relation of crystal structure and properties. From these characterizations we found that symmetry of the rare earth ion local crystal field could be tuned by different Sn codoping concentration. For the variable valence property of Sn the local crystal field asymmetry and emission intensity of NaYF{sub 4}:Yb, Er arrived to the maximum when 3 mol% Sn was codoped, while decay time was reduced. The study of this changing tends of upconversion emission intensity and decay time constant may be helpful for design and fabrication of high performance upconversion materials. - Graphical abstract: Variable-valenced Sn is introduced with Yb/Er into NaFY{sub 4} to tune structure and local crystal field. Upconversion emission intensity of Er{sup 3+} was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased. Display Omitted - Highlights: • NaYF{sub 4}: Yb, Er was codoped with different concentration Sn. • Upconversion emission intensity was enhanced while decay time constant was decreased. • Introduction of variable-valenced Sn is effective to tune structure and crystal field of NaFY{sub 4}.

  15. On time-periodic Navier-Stokes flows with fast spatial decay in the whole space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nakatsuka, Tomoyuki

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2018), s. 51-67 ISSN 2296-9020 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equation * time-periodic solution * asymptotic property Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics https://link.springer.com/article/10. 1007 %2Fs41808-018-0011-8

  16. On time-periodic Navier-Stokes flows with fast spatial decay in the whole space

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nakatsuka, Tomoyuki

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2018), s. 51-67 ISSN 2296-9020 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : Navier-Stokes equation * time-periodic solution * asymptotic property Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs41808-018-0011-8

  17. Using temperature and time criteria to control the effectiveness of continuous thermal sanitation of piggery effluent in terms of set microbial indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunault, C; Pourcher, A M; Burton, C H

    2011-12-01

    To determine the minimal conditions (temperature-time), necessary to achieve set sanitation targets for selected microbial indicators during the continuous thermal treatment of pig slurry. The effectiveness of thermal treatment between 55 and 96°C was studied using Escherichia coli, enterococci, sulfite-reducing Clostridia (SRC), mesophilic culturable bacteria (MCB), F+-specific and somatic phages. Identification of SRC and MCB was performed using 16S rRNA gene analysis. Ten minutes at 70°C or 1 h at 60°C was sufficient to reduce the vegetative bacteria by 4-5 log(10), but it had little effect on somatic phages nor on spore formers, dominated by Clostridium sp. At 96°C, somatic phages were still detected, but there was a reduction of 3.1 log(10) for SRC and of 1.4 log(10) for MCB. At 96°C, Clostridium botulinum was identified among the thermotolerant MCB. Only those hygienic risks relating to mesophilic vegetative bacteria can be totally eliminated from pig slurry treated at 60°C (60 min) or 70°C (cost treatment using heat recovery). However, even at 96°C, certain pathogens may persist. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology. No claim to French Government works.

  18. Decay of 83Sr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiaohan; Shi Shuanghui; Gu Jiahui

    1997-01-01

    The decay of 83 Sr was reinvestigated using γ singles and γ-γ-t coincidence measurement. A new level scheme of Rb, which contains 41 excited levels and about 180 transitions, is constructed. 19 new levels were added to the old level scheme and 8 formerly adopted levels were denied. A new data set of branching ratio, log(ft) value and spin parity was obtained

  19. A search for transit timing variations and orbital decay in WASP-46b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, R.; Jofré, E.; Ferrero, L. V.; Cúneo, V.; Saker, L.; Lovos, F.; Gómez, M.; Mauas, P.

    2018-02-01

    We present 12 new transit observations of the exoplanet WASP-46b obtained with the 1.54-m telescope at Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre (EABA, Argentina) and the 0.40-m Horacio Ghielmetti and 2.15-m Jorge Sahade telescopes at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO, Argentina). We analyse them together with 37 light curves from the literature to re-determine the physical parameters and search for additional planets via transit timing variations (TTVs). We consider the 31 transits with uncertainties in their mid-transit times (e_T0) activity could be affecting the measured mid-transit times. This value of dispersion allows us to rule out the presence of additional bodies with masses larger than 2.3, 4.6, 7 and 9.3 M_{\\oplus} at the first-order mean-motion resonances 2:1, 3:2, 4:3 and 5:4 with the transiting planet, respectively. Despite the 6 yr baseline and a typical light-curve precision of 2 × 10-3, we find that we cannot significantly demonstrate a slow decrease of the orbital period of WASP-46b. We place a lower limit of Q⋆ > 7 × 103 on the tidal quality factor and determine that an additional 6 yr baseline is required to rule out Q⋆ < 105.

  20. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  1. Real-time positioning in logging: Effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and line-of-sight obstructions on GNSS-RF transponder accuracy and radio signal propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloise G Zimbelman

    Full Text Available Real-time positioning on mobile devices using global navigation satellite system (GNSS technology paired with radio frequency (RF transmission (GNSS-RF may help to improve safety on logging operations by increasing situational awareness. However, GNSS positional accuracy for ground workers in motion may be reduced by multipath error, satellite signal obstruction, or other factors. Radio propagation of GNSS locations may also be impacted due to line-of-sight (LOS obstruction in remote, forested areas. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and other LOS obstructions on the GNSS accuracy and radio signal propagation quality of multiple Raveon Atlas PT GNSS-RF transponders functioning as a network in a range of forest conditions. Because most previous research with GNSS in forestry has focused on stationary units, we chose to analyze units in motion by evaluating the time-to-signal accuracy of geofence crossings in 21 randomly-selected stands on the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. Specifically, we studied the effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and LOS obstructions on (1 the odds of missed GNSS-RF signals, (2 the root mean squared error (RMSE of Atlas PTs, and (3 the time-to-signal accuracy of safety geofence crossings in forested environments. Mixed-effects models used to analyze the data showed that stand characteristics, topography, and obstructions in the LOS affected the odds of missed radio signals while stand variables alone affected RMSE. Both stand characteristics and topography affected the accuracy of geofence alerts.

  2. Real-time positioning in logging: Effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and line-of-sight obstructions on GNSS-RF transponder accuracy and radio signal propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbelman, Eloise G; Keefe, Robert F

    2018-01-01

    Real-time positioning on mobile devices using global navigation satellite system (GNSS) technology paired with radio frequency (RF) transmission (GNSS-RF) may help to improve safety on logging operations by increasing situational awareness. However, GNSS positional accuracy for ground workers in motion may be reduced by multipath error, satellite signal obstruction, or other factors. Radio propagation of GNSS locations may also be impacted due to line-of-sight (LOS) obstruction in remote, forested areas. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and other LOS obstructions on the GNSS accuracy and radio signal propagation quality of multiple Raveon Atlas PT GNSS-RF transponders functioning as a network in a range of forest conditions. Because most previous research with GNSS in forestry has focused on stationary units, we chose to analyze units in motion by evaluating the time-to-signal accuracy of geofence crossings in 21 randomly-selected stands on the University of Idaho Experimental Forest. Specifically, we studied the effects of forest stand characteristics, topography, and LOS obstructions on (1) the odds of missed GNSS-RF signals, (2) the root mean squared error (RMSE) of Atlas PTs, and (3) the time-to-signal accuracy of safety geofence crossings in forested environments. Mixed-effects models used to analyze the data showed that stand characteristics, topography, and obstructions in the LOS affected the odds of missed radio signals while stand variables alone affected RMSE. Both stand characteristics and topography affected the accuracy of geofence alerts.

  3. Measurements of branching fractions and time-dependent CP violating asymmetries in B0 → D*±D#-+# decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of branching fractions and time-dependent CP asymmetries in B 0 → D + D - and B 0 → D* ± D # -+# decays using a data sample that contains (772 ± 11) x 10 6 BB - pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e + e - collider. We determine the branching fractions to be Β(B 0 → D + D - ) = (2.12 ± 0.16 ± 0.18) x 10 -4 and Β(B 0 → D* ± D # -+#) = (6.14 ± 0.29 ± 0.50) x 10 -4 . We measure CP asymmetry parameters S D# sup +# D# sup -# = -1.06 -0.14 +0.21 ± 0.08 and C D# sup +# D# sup -# = -0.43 ± 0.16 ± 0.05 in B 0 → D + D - and A D*D = +0.06 ± 0.05 ± 0.02, S D*D = -0.78 ± 0.15 ± 0.05, C D*D = -0.01 ± 0.11 ± 0.04, ΔS D*D = -0.13 ± 0.15 ± 0.04 and ΔC D*D = +0.12 ± 0.11 ± 0.03 in B 0 → D* ± D # -+#, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. We exclude the conservation of CP symmetry in both decays at equal to or greater than 4σ significance.

  4. Calibration of the DELPHI Time Projection chamber (TPC) and measurement of the Z0 parameters through its hadronic decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gros, M.H.

    1990-05-01

    The work presented in this thesis has been performed on the DELPHI experiment, at the CERN large electron-positron collider: LEP. At first, a review of the apparatus, the data taking and the trigger used in 1989 is done, and their performances are shown. Then a detailed presentation of the main charged detector, the Time Projection Chamber is done. Its reliability lies on a precise monitoring of the electric field and on a very good knowledge of the electron drift velocity in the gas (80% argon-20% methan). These two goals are achieved using ultraviolet nitrogen lasers which simulate the crossing of particles through the detector. The complete sequence of operations is described, from the data taking up to the computation of the drift velocity (66.67 mm per microsecond). The second part of this work deals with the determination of the Z 0 resonance parameters. At first are described the theoretical expectations of the Standard Model and the radiative corrections which have to be taken into account in the hadronic Z 0 decays. Then the methods used for the computation of the luminosity and the selection of the hadronic Z 0 decays are presented. By combining these two informations the experimental hadronic cross section is derived. A fit of the theoretical line shape allows us to determine the mass, the width and the Born cross section of the Z 0 resonance. Using constants given by the Standard Model one can exclude at fourth neutrino lighter than 37 GeV/c 2 at the 95% confidence level [fr

  5. Nova Event Logging System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calliger, R.J.; Suski, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Nova is a 200 terawatt, 10-beam High Energy Glass Laser currently under construction at LLNL. This facility, designed to demonstrate the feasibility of laser driven inertial confinement fusion, contains over 5000 elements requiring coordinated control, data acquisition, and analysis functions. The large amounts of data that will be generated must be maintained over the life of the facility. Often the most useful but inaccessible data is that related to time dependent events associated with, for example, operator actions or experiment activity. We have developed an Event Logging System to synchronously record, maintain, and analyze, in part, this data. We see the system as being particularly useful to the physics and engineering staffs of medium and large facilities in that it is entirely separate from experimental apparatus and control devices. The design criteria, implementation, use, and benefits of such a system will be discussed

  6. Survey of some natural decay-series isotopes in the Wairakei geothermal area and possible residence-time applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.K.; Burnett, W.C.; Whitehead, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    Concentrations of selected isotopes in the uranium decay series were determined for samples collected from the Wairakei, Broadlands/Ohaaki and Waiotapu areas. /sup 226/Ra concentrations were found to be low (0.05-0.22 dpm/l), similar to values reported in neutral hot springs at Tatun geothermal area, Taiwan, but lower than other geothermal systems (Yellowstone, USA, and Latera, Central Italy) (up to 25 dpm/l). The potential of /sup 226/Ra//sup 228/Ra ratios for indicating water residence times could not be explored because /sup 228/Ra data was not available. /sup 222/Rn concentrations are higher and related to steam fractions and CO/sub 2/ concentrations. The short half-life (3.8 days) makes /sup 222/Rn suitable for estimating residence times of radon in steam, and therefore the distance of travel of steam from its source (e.g., wells WK9 and 52). /sup 210/Pb and /sup 210/Po concentrations were very low and less than detection limits in many of the Wairakei waters; no residence time applications are apparent for these isotopes. (author). 11 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. The Effect of Time on Word Learning: An Examination of Decay of the Memory Trace and Vocal Rehearsal in Children with and without Specific Language Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Mary; Spaulding, Tammie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the effect of time to response in a fast-mapping word learning task for children with specific language impairment (SLI) and children with typically developing language skills (TD). Manipulating time to response allows us to examine decay of the memory trace, the use of vocal rehearsal, and their…

  8. Does increasing pressure always accelerate the condensed material decay initiated through bimolecular reactions? A case of the thermal decomposition of TKX-50 at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhipeng; Zeng, Qun; Xue, Xianggui; Zhang, Zengming; Nie, Fude; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2017-08-30

    Performances and behaviors under high temperature-high pressure conditions are fundamentals for many materials. We study in the present work the pressure effect on the thermal decomposition of a new energetic ionic salt (EIS), TKX-50, by confining samples in a diamond anvil cell, using Raman spectroscopy measurements and ab initio simulations. As a result, we find a quadratic increase in decomposition temperature (T d ) of TKX-50 with increasing pressure (P) (T d = 6.28P 2 + 12.94P + 493.33, T d and P in K and GPa, respectively, and R 2 = 0.995) and the decomposition under various pressures initiated by an intermolecular H-transfer reaction (a bimolecular reaction). Surprisingly, this finding is contrary to a general observation about the pressure effect on the decomposition of common energetic materials (EMs) composed of neutral molecules: increasing pressure will impede the decomposition if it starts from a bimolecular reaction. Our results also demonstrate that increasing pressure impedes the H-transfer via the enhanced long-range electrostatic repulsion of H +δ H +δ of neighboring NH 3 OH + , with blue shifts of the intermolecular H-bonds. And the subsequent decomposition of the H-transferred intermediates is also suppressed, because the decomposition proceeds from a bimolecular reaction to a unimolecular one, which is generally prevented by compression. These two factors are the basic root for which the decomposition retarded with increasing pressure of TKX-50. Therefore, our finding breaks through the previously proposed concept that, for the condensed materials, increasing pressure will accelerate the thermal decomposition initiated by bimolecular reactions, and reveals a distinct mechanism of the pressure effect on thermal decomposition. That is to say, increasing pressure does not always promote the condensed material decay initiated through bimolecular reactions. Moreover, such a mechanism may be feasible to other EISs due to the similar intermolecular

  9. Pulsed neutron logging - a modern approach to petroleum exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navalkar, M.P.

    1978-01-01

    As hydrocarbons have strikingly different properties for neutrons as compared with rocks, neutronic methods are useful to prepare logs of bore holes drilled for petroleum exploration. The earlier neutron logs were based on steady neutron sources, but the superior logs, namely, neutron life time log and neutron induced spectral log are based on pulsed neutron sources. The methods of obtaining these logs, their limitations and the field equipment required are described briefly. As the two logs are complementary, a plea has been made to develop field equipment which can obtain two logs in a single run. (M.G.B.)

  10. Time evolution of damage in thermally induced creep rupture

    KAUST Repository

    Yoshioka, N.; Kun, F.; Ito, N.

    2012-01-01

    . We compare analytic results obtained in the mean-field limit to the computer simulations of localized load redistribution to reveal the effect of the range of interaction on the time evolution. Focusing on the waiting times between consecutive bursts

  11. The effect of k-cubic Dresselhaus spin—orbit coupling on the decay time of persistent spin helix states in semiconductor two-dimensional electron gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Zheng; Hu Mao-Jin; Wang Rui-Qiang; Hu Liang-Bin

    2014-01-01

    We study the theoretical effect of k-cubic (i.e. cubic-in-momentum) Dresselhaus spin—orbit coupling on the decay time of persistent spin helix states in semiconductor two-dimensional electron gases. We show that the decay time of persistent spin helix states may be suppressed substantially by k-cubic Dresselhaus spin—orbit coupling, and after taking the effect of k-cubic Dresselhaus spin—orbit interaction into account, the theoretical results obtained accord both qualitatively and quantitatively with other recent experimental results. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  12. MODVOLC2: A Hybrid Time Series Analysis for Detecting Thermal Anomalies Applied to Thermal Infrared Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppen, W. C.; Wright, R.; Pilger, E.

    2009-12-01

    We developed and tested a new, automated algorithm, MODVOLC2, which analyzes thermal infrared satellite time series data to detect and quantify the excess energy radiated from thermal anomalies such as active volcanoes, fires, and gas flares. MODVOLC2 combines two previously developed algorithms, a simple point operation algorithm (MODVOLC) and a more complex time series analysis (Robust AVHRR Techniques, or RAT) to overcome the limitations of using each approach alone. MODVOLC2 has four main steps: (1) it uses the original MODVOLC algorithm to process the satellite data on a pixel-by-pixel basis and remove thermal outliers, (2) it uses the remaining data to calculate reference and variability images for each calendar month, (3) it compares the original satellite data and any newly acquired data to the reference images normalized by their variability, and it detects pixels that fall outside the envelope of normal thermal behavior, (4) it adds any pixels detected by MODVOLC to those detected in the time series analysis. Using test sites at Anatahan and Kilauea volcanoes, we show that MODVOLC2 was able to detect ~15% more thermal anomalies than using MODVOLC alone, with very few, if any, known false detections. Using gas flares from the Cantarell oil field in the Gulf of Mexico, we show that MODVOLC2 provided results that were unattainable using a time series-only approach. Some thermal anomalies (e.g., Cantarell oil field flares) are so persistent that an additional, semi-automated 12-µm correction must be applied in order to correctly estimate both the number of anomalies and the total excess radiance being emitted by them. Although all available data should be included to make the best possible reference and variability images necessary for the MODVOLC2, we estimate that at least 80 images per calendar month are required to generate relatively good statistics from which to run MODVOLC2, a condition now globally met by a decade of MODIS observations. We also found

  13. Population decay time and distribution of exciton states analyzed by rate equations based on theoretical phononic and electron-collisional rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kensuke; Ma, Bei; Ishitani, Yoshihiro

    2017-11-01

    Population distributions and transition fluxes of the A exciton in bulk GaN are theoretically analyzed using rate equations of states of the principal quantum number n up to 5 and the continuum. These rate equations consist of the terms of radiative, electron-collisional, and phononic processes. The dependence of the rate coefficients on temperature is revealed on the basis of the collisional-radiative model of hydrogen plasma for the electron-collisional processes and theoretical formulation using Fermi's "golden rule" for the phononic processes. The respective effects of the variations in electron, exciton, and lattice temperatures are exhibited. This analysis is a base of the discussion on nonthermal equilibrium states of carrier-exciton-phonon dynamics. It is found that the exciton dissociation is enhanced even below 150 K mainly by the increase in the lattice temperature. When the thermal-equilibrium temperature increases, the population fluxes between the states of n >1 and the continuum become more dominant. Below 20 K, the severe deviation from the Saha-Boltzmann distribution occurs owing to the interband excitation flux being higher than the excitation flux from the 1 S state. The population decay time of the 1 S state at 300 K is more than ten times longer than the recombination lifetime of excitons with kinetic energy but without the upper levels (n >1 and the continuum). This phenomenon is caused by a shift of population distribution to the upper levels. This phonon-exciton-radiation model gives insights into the limitations of conventional analyses such as the ABC model, the Arrhenius plot, the two-level model (n =1 and the continuum), and the neglect of the upper levels.

  14. Measurement of the Time-Dependent CP Asymmetry of Partially Reconstructed B0 to D*+D*- Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J. P.

    2012-08-13

    We present a new measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B{sup 0} {yields}D*{sup +}D*{sup -} decays using (471 {+-} 5) million B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Using the technique of partial reconstruction, we measure the time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters S = -0.34 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05 and C = +0:15 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04. Using the value for the CP-odd fraction R{perpendicular} = 0.158 {+-} 0.028 {+-} 0.006, previously measured by BABAR with fully reconstructed B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup *+}D{sup *-} events, we extract the CP-even components S{sub +} = -0.49 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.07 {+-} 0.04 and C{sub +} = +0.15 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04. In each case, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic; the third uncertainty on S{sub +} is the contribution from the uncertainty on R{perpendicular}. The measured value of the CP-even component S{sub +} is consistent with the value of sin 2{beta} measured in b {yields} (c{bar c})s transitions, and with the Standard Model expectation of small penguin contributions.

  15. Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  16. Effect of Residence Time of Graphitisation on Thermal Conductivity of Molded Graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedy Artsanti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of residence time of graphitisation on thermal conductivity of molded graphite has been examined. The examination has been conducted by varying residence time of graphitisation of molded carbon with petroleum coke as raw material and coal tar pitch. Graphitisation has been conducted by heating molded graphite at 2500 °C in argon atmosphere with residention time of 10, 30 and 90 minutes. Graphitisation degree, density, shrinking mass and porosity of molded graphite were examined and so was its thermal conductivity. The result showed that the decrease of porosity and the increase of graphitisation degree due to the increasing of residention time of graphitisation will increase the thermal conductivity of graphite. Molded graphite graphitisized with residence time for 90 minutes residention time gave thermal conductivity of 2.134 Watt/mK and graphitization degree 0.718.

  17. Measurement of the time-integrated CP asymmetry in $D^0 \\to K_S^0 K_S^0$ decays with LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Tuci, Giulia

    2018-01-01

    CP violation in charm has not yet been observed, although measurements of time-integrated CP asymmetries in $D^0 \\to K^+K^-$ and $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^- decays$ have reached a remarkable precision, O(0.1%). The $D^0 \\to K_S^0 K_S^0$ decay is a promising discovery channel for CP violation in charm. A prediction based on Standard Model gives an upper limit for the CP asymmetry of 1.1% (C.L. 95%). Further enhancements could result from contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model. We present a measurement of the time-integrated CP asymmetry in prompt $D^0 \\to K_S^0 K_S^0$ decays, performed using data collected with LHCb experiment in 2015 and 2016 at a 13 TeV pp center-of-mass energy (Run-2). This result improves the sensitivity obtained by LHCb in Run-1.

  18. Decay time shortening of fluorescence from donor-acceptor pair proteins using ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Motoyoshi; Suzuki, Masayuki; Ganeev, Rashid A.; Kuroda, Hiroto; Ozaki, Tsuneyuki; Hamakubo, Takao; Masuda, Kazuyuki; Hayashi, Masahiro; Sakihama, Toshiko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Kozasa, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    We improved an ultrafast time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy system and measured directly the decrease in the fluorescence decay time of the FRET signal, without any entanglement of components in the picosecond time scale from the donor-acceptor protein pairs (such as cameleon protein for calcium ion indicator, and ligand-activated GRIN-Go proteins pair). The drastic decrease in lifetime of the donor protein fluorescence under the FRET condition (e.g. a 47.8% decrease for a GRIN-Go protein pair) proves the deformation dynamics between donor and acceptor fluorescent proteins in an activated state of a mixed donor-acceptor protein pair. This study is the first clear evidence of physical contact of the GRIN-Go proteins pair using time-resolved FRET system. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most important protein family for the recognition of many chemical substances at the cell surface. They are the targets of many drugs. Simultaneously, we were able to observe the time-resolved spectra of luminous proteins at the initial stage under the FRET condition, within 10 ns from excitation. This new FRET system allows us to trace the dynamics of the interaction between proteins at the ligand-induced activated state, molecular structure change and combination or dissociation. It will be a key technology for the development of protein chip technology

  19. Gaseous time projection chambers for rare event detection: results from the T-REX project. I. Double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irastorza, I.G.; Aznar, F.; Castel, J., E-mail: igor.irastorza@cern.ch, E-mail: faznar@unizar.es, E-mail: jfcastel@unizar.es [Grupo de Física Nuclear y Astropartículas, Departamento de Física Teórica, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/ P. Cerbuna 12, Zaragoza, 50009 (Spain); and others

    2016-01-01

    As part of the T-REX project, a number of R and D and prototyping activities have been carried out during the last years to explore the applicability of gaseous Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) with Micromesh Gas Structures (Micromegas) in rare event searches like double beta decay, axion research and low-mass WIMP searches. In both this and its companion paper, we compile the main results of the project and give an outlook of application prospects for this detection technique. While in the companion paper we focus on axions and WIMPs, in this paper we focus on the results regarding the measurement of the double beta decay (DBD) of {sup 136}Xe in a high pressure Xe (HPXe) TPC. Micromegas of the microbulk type have been extensively studied in high pressure Xe and Xe mixtures. Particularly relevant are the results obtained in Xe + trimethylamine (TMA) mixtures, showing very promising results in terms of gain, stability of operation, and energy resolution at high pressures up to 10 bar. The addition of TMA at levels of ∼ 1% reduces electron diffusion by up to a factor of 10 with respect to pure Xe, improving the quality of the topological pattern, with a positive impact on the discrimination capability. Operation with a medium size prototype of 30 cm diameter and 38 cm of drift (holding about 1 kg of Xe at 10 bar in the fiducial volume, enough to contain high energy electron tracks in the detector volume) has allowed to test the detection concept in realistic experimental conditions. Microbulk Micromegas are able to image the DBD ionization signature with high quality while, at the same time, measuring its energy deposition with a resolution of at least a ∼ 3% FWHM @ Q{sub ββ}. This value was experimentally demonstrated for high-energy extended tracks at 10 bar, and is probably improvable down to the ∼ 1% FWHM levels as extrapolated from low energy events. In addition, first results on the topological signature information (one straggling track ending in two

  20. Amplitude Analysis and Measurement of the Time-dependent CP Asymmetry of B0 to KsKsKs Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-04-11

    We present the first results on the Dalitz-plot structure and improved measurements of the time-dependent CP-violation parameters of the process B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} obtained using 468 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at SLAC. The Dalitz-plot structure is probed by a time-integrated amplitude analysis that does not distinguish between B{sup 0} and {bar B}{sup 0} decays. We measure the total inclusive branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = (6.19 {+-} 0.48 {+-} 0.15 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third represents the Dalitz-plot signal model dependence. We also observe evidence for the intermediate resonant states f{sub 0}(980), f{sub 0}(1710), and f{sub 2}(2010). Their respective product branching fractions are measured to be (2.70{sub -1.19}{sup +1.25} {+-} 0.36 {+-} 1.17) x 10{sup -6}, (0.50{sub -0.24}{sup +0.46} {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.10) x 10{sup -6}, and (0.54{sub -0.20}{sup +0.21} {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.52) x 10{sup -6}. Additionally, we determine the mixing-induced CP-violation parameters to be S = -0.94{sub -0.21}{sup +0.24} {+-} 0.06 and C = -0.17 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These values are in agreement with the standard model expectation.

  1. Finite-difference time-domain simulation of thermal noise in open cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreasen, Jonathan; Cao Hui; Taflove, Allen; Kumar, Prem; Cao Changqi

    2008-01-01

    A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is developed to simulate thermal noise in open cavities owing to output coupling. The absorbing boundary of the FDTD grid is treated as a blackbody, whose thermal radiation penetrates the cavity in the grid. The calculated amount of thermal noise in a one-dimensional dielectric cavity recovers the standard result of the quantum Langevin equation in the Markovian regime. Our FDTD simulation also demonstrates that in the non-Markovian regime the buildup of the intracavity noise field depends on the ratio of the cavity photon lifetime to the coherence time of thermal radiation. The advantage of our numerical method is that the thermal noise is introduced in the time domain without prior knowledge of cavity modes

  2. Logging Work Injuries in Appalachia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Wolf; Gilbert P. Dempsey

    1978-01-01

    Logging accidents are costly. They may bring pain to injured workers, hardship to their families, and higher insurance premiums and lower productivity to their employers. Our analysis of 1,172 injuries in central Appalachia reveals that nearly half of all time lost-and almost all fatalities-resulted from accidents during felling and unloading. The largest proportion of...

  3. Radiometric well logging instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, A.V.

    1975-01-01

    The technical properties of well instruments for radioactive logging used in the radiometric logging complexes PKS-1000-1 (''Sond-1'') and PRKS-2 (''Vitok-2'') are described. The main features of the electric circuit of the measuring channels are given

  4. Optimization of thermal systems based on finite-time thermodynamics and thermoeconomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmayaz, A. [Istanbul Technical University (Turkey). Department of Mechanical Engineering; Sogut, O.S. [Istanbul Technical University, Maslak (Turkey). Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering; Sahin, B. [Yildiz Technical University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey). Department of Naval Architecture; Yavuz, H. [Istanbul Technical University, Maslak (Turkey). Institute of Energy

    2004-07-01

    The irreversibilities originating from finite-time and finite-size constraints are important in the real thermal system optimization. Since classical thermodynamic analysis based on thermodynamic equilibrium do not consider these constraints directly, it is necessary to consider the energy transfer between the system and its surroundings in the rate form. Finite-time thermodynamics provides a fundamental starting point for the optimization of real thermal systems including the fundamental concepts of heat transfer and fluid mechanics to classical thermodynamics. In this study, optimization studies of thermal systems, that consider various objective functions, based on finite-time thermodynamics and thermoeconomics are reviewed. (author)

  5. Evaluating an Automated Approach for Monitoring Forest Disturbances in the Pacific Northwest from Logging, Fire and Insect Outbreaks with Landsat Time Series Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    R.Neigh, Christopher S.; Bolton, Douglas K.; Williams, Jennifer J.; Diabate, Mouhamad

    2014-01-01

    Forests are the largest aboveground sink for atmospheric carbon (C), and understanding how they change through time is critical to reduce our C-cycle uncertainties. We investigated a strong decline in Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from 1982 to 1991 in Pacific Northwest forests, observed with the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) series of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRRs). To understand the causal factors of this decline, we evaluated an automated classification method developed for Landsat time series stacks (LTSS) to map forest change. This method included: (1) multiple disturbance index thresholds; and (2) a spectral trajectory-based image analysis with multiple confidence thresholds. We produced 48 maps and verified their accuracy with air photos, monitoring trends in burn severity data and insect aerial detection survey data. Area-based accuracy estimates for change in forest cover resulted in producer's and user's accuracies of 0.21 +/- 0.06 to 0.38 +/- 0.05 for insect disturbance, 0.23 +/- 0.07 to 1 +/- 0 for burned area and 0.74 +/- 0.03 to 0.76 +/- 0.03 for logging. We believe that accuracy was low for insect disturbance because air photo reference data were temporally sparse, hence missing some outbreaks, and the annual anniversary time step is not dense enough to track defoliation and progressive stand mortality. Producer's and user's accuracy for burned area was low due to the temporally abrupt nature of fire and harvest with a similar response of spectral indices between the disturbance index and normalized burn ratio. We conclude that the spectral trajectory approach also captures multi-year stress that could be caused by climate, acid deposition, pathogens, partial harvest, thinning, etc. Our study focused on understanding the transferability of previously successful methods to new ecosystems and found that this automated method does not perform with the same accuracy in Pacific Northwest forests

  6. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for fission product decay heat calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebah, J.; Lee, Y.K.; Nimal, J.C.; Nimal, B.; Luneville, L.; Duchemin, B.

    1994-01-01

    The calculated uncertainty in decay heat due to the uncertainty in basic nuclear data given in the CEA86 Library, is presented. Uncertainties in summation calculation arise from several sources: fission product yields, half-lives and average decay energies. The correlation between basic data is taken into account. The uncertainty analysis were obtained for thermal-neutron-induced fission of U235 and Pu239 in the case of burst fission and irradiation time. The calculated decay heat in this study is compared with experimental results and with new calculation using the JEF2 Library. (from authors) 6 figs., 19 refs

  7. Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1979-02-01

    Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

  8. Weak decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  9. PandaX-III: Searching for neutrinoless double beta decay with high pressure 136Xe gas time projection chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Fu, ChangBo; Galan, Javier; Giboni, Karl; Giuliani, Franco; Gu, LingHui; Han, Ke; Ji, XiangDong; Lin, Heng; Liu, JiangLai; Ni, KaiXiang; Kusano, Hiroki; Ren, XiangXiang; Wang, ShaoBo; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Tao; Zhao, Li; Sun, XiangMing; Hu, ShouYang; Jian, SiYu; Li, XingLong; Li, XiaoMei; Liang, Hao; Zhang, HuanQiao; Zhao, MingRui; Zhou, Jing; Mao, YaJun; Qiao, Hao; Wang, SiGuang; Yuan, Ying; Wang, Meng; Khan, Amir N.; Raper, Neill; Tang, Jian; Wang, Wei; Dong, JiaNing; Feng, ChangQing; Li, Cheng; Liu, JianBei; Liu, ShuBin; Wang, XiaoLian; Zhu, DanYang; Castel, Juan F.; Cebrián, Susana; Dafni, Theopisti; Garza, Javier G.; Irastorza, Igor G.; Iguaz, Francisco J.; Luzón, Gloria; Mirallas, Hector; Aune, Stephan; Berthoumieux, Eric; Bedfer, Yann; Calvet, Denis; d'Hose, Nicole; Delbart, Alain; Diakaki, Maria; Ferrer-Ribas, Esther; Ferrero, Andrea; Kunne, Fabienne; Neyret, Damien; Papaevangelou, Thomas; Sabatié, Franck; Vanderbroucke, Maxence; Tan, AnDi; Haxton, Wick; Mei, Yuan; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Yan, Yu-Peng

    2017-06-01

    Searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay (NLDBD) is now regarded as the topmost promising technique to explore the nature of neutrinos after the discovery of neutrino masses in oscillation experiments. PandaX-III (particle and astrophysical xenon experiment III) will search for the NLDBD of 136Xe at the China Jin Ping Underground Laboratory (CJPL). In the first phase of the experiment, a high pressure gas Time Projection Chamber (TPC) will contain 200 kg, 90% 136Xe enriched gas operated at 10 bar. Fine pitch micro-pattern gas detector (Microbulk Micromegas) will be used at both ends of the TPC for the charge readout with a cathode in the middle. Charge signals can be used to reconstruct the electron tracks of the NLDBD events and provide good energy and spatial resolution. The detector will be immersed in a large water tank to ensure 5 m of water shielding in all directions. The second phase, a ton-scale experiment, will consist of five TPCs in the same water tank, with improved energy resolution and better control over backgrounds.

  10. Evaluating the coefficient of thermal expansion using time periods of minimal thermal gradient for a temperature driven structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J.; Abdel-Jaber, H.; Yarnold, M.; Glisic, B.

    2017-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring aims to characterize the performance of a structure from a combination of recorded sensor data and analytic techniques. Many methods are concerned with quantifying the elastic response of the structure, treating temperature changes as noise in the analysis. While these elastic profiles do demonstrate a portion of structural behavior, thermal loads on a structure can induce comparable strains to elastic loads. Understanding this relationship between the temperature of the structure and the resultant strain and displacement can provide in depth knowledge of the structural condition. A necessary parameter for this form of analysis is the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE). The CTE of a material relates the amount of expansion or contraction a material undergoes per degree change in temperature, and can be determined from temperature-strain relationship given that the thermal strain can be isolated. Many times with concrete, the actual amount of expansion with temperature in situ varies from the given values for the CTE due to thermally generated elastic strain, which complicates evaluation of the CTE. To accurately characterize the relationship between temperature and strain on a structure, the actual thermal behavior of the structure needs to be analyzed. This rate can vary for different parts of a structure, depending on boundary conditions. In a case of unrestrained structures, the strain in the structure should be linearly related to the temperature change. Thermal gradients in a structure can affect this relationship, as they induce curvature and deplanations in the cross section. This paper proposes a method that addresses these challenges in evaluating the CTE.

  11. Two dimensional numerical simulations of carrier dynamics during time-resolved photoluminescence decays in two-photon microscopy measurements in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanevce, Ana; Kuciauskas, Darius; Levi, Dean H.; Johnston, Steven W.; Allende Motz, Alyssa M.

    2015-01-01

    We use two-dimensional numerical simulations to analyze high spatial resolution time-resolved spectroscopy data. This analysis is applied to two-photon excitation time-resolved photoluminescence (2PE-TRPL) but is broadly applicable to all microscopic time-resolved techniques. By solving time-dependent drift-diffusion equations, we gain insight into carrier dynamics and transport characteristics. Accurate understanding of measurement results establishes the limits and potential of the measurement and enhances its value as a characterization method. Diffusion of carriers outside of the collection volume can have a significant impact on the measured decay but can also provide an estimate of carrier mobility as well as lifetime. In addition to material parameters, the experimental conditions, such as spot size and injection level, can impact the measurement results. Although small spot size provides better resolution, it also increases the impact of diffusion on the decay; if the spot size is much smaller than the diffusion length, it impacts the entire decay. By reproducing experimental 2PE-TRPL decays, the simulations determine the bulk carrier lifetime from the data. The analysis is applied to single-crystal and heteroepitaxial CdTe, material important for solar cells, but it is also applicable to other semiconductors where carrier diffusion from the excitation volume could affect experimental measurements

  12. Fluorescence from gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a near-UV dye laser. [Decay time,quenching rate,room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetti, P [Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cubeddu, R; Sacchi, C A; Svelto, O; Zaraga, F [Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    1976-06-01

    Preliminary data are reported on the visible fluorescence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a dye laser at 374 nm. A decay time of 500 ns at p = 0 and a quenching rate of 5.7 x 10/sup -12/cm/sup 3/molec/sup -1/s/sup -1/ have been measured at room temperature.

  13. Computations of concentration of radon and its decay products against time. Computer program; Obliczanie koncentracji radonu i jego produktow rozpadu w funkcji czasu. Program komputerowy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaj, B. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    This research is aimed to develop a device for continuous monitoring of radon in the air, by measuring alpha activity of radon and its short lived decay products. The influence of alpha activity variation of radon and its daughters on the measured results is of importance and requires a knowledge of this variation with time. Employing the measurement of alpha radiation of radon and of its short lived decay products, require knowledge of radon concentration variation and its decay products against the time. A computer program in Turbo Pascal language was therefore developed performing the computations employing the known relations involved, the program being adapted for IBM PC computers. The presented program enables computation of activity of {sup 222}Rn and its daughter products: {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Po every 1 min within the period of 0-255 min for any state of radiation equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products. The program permits also to compute alpha activity of {sup 222}Rn + {sup 218}Po + {sup 214}Po against time and the total alpha activity at selected interval of time. The results of computations are stored on the computer hard disk in ASCII format and are used a graphic program e.g. by DrawPerfect program to make diagrams. Equations employed for computation of the alpha activity of radon and its decay products as well as the description of program functions are given. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs.

  14. Measurement of the Difference of Time-Integrated CP Asymmetries in D^{0}→K^{-}K^{+} and D^{0}→π^{-}π^{+} Decays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borgheresi, A; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; 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    2016-05-13

    A search for CP violation in D^{0}→K^{-}K^{+} and D^{0}→π^{-}π^{+} decays is performed using pp collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3  fb^{-1}, collected using the LHCb detector at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The flavor of the charm meson is inferred from the charge of the pion in D^{*+}→D^{0}π^{+} and D^{*-}→D[over ¯]^{0}π^{-} decays. The difference between the CP asymmetries in D^{0}→K^{-}K^{+} and D^{0}→π^{-}π^{+} decays, ΔA_{CP}≡A_{CP}(K^{-}K^{+})-A_{CP}(π^{-}π^{+}), is measured to be [-0.10±0.08(stat)±0.03(syst)]%. This is the most precise measurement of a time-integrated CP asymmetry in the charm sector from a single experiment.

  15. Measurement of the difference of time-integrated CP asymmetries in $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{-} K^{+} $ and $D^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} $ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; 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Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-05-09

    A search for CP violation in $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{-} K^{+} $ and $D^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} $ decays is performed using $pp$ collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3~fb^{-1}$, collected using the LHCb detector at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8$~$TeV. The flavour of the charm meson is inferred from the charge of the pion in $D^{*+}\\rightarrow D^0\\pi^+$ and $D^{*-}\\rightarrow \\bar{D^0}\\pi^{-}$ decays. The difference between the CP asymmetries in $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{-} K^{+} $ and $D^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^{-} \\pi^{+} $ decays, $\\Delta A_{CP} \\equiv A_{CP}(K^{-} K^{+}) - A_{CP}(\\pi^{-} \\pi^{+})$, is measured to be $\\left( -0.10 \\pm 0.08(stat) \\pm 0.03(syst) \\right) \\%$. This is the most precise measurement of a time-integrated CP asymmetry in the charm sector from a single experiment.

  16. Digital mineral logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    A digital mineral logging system acquires data from a mineral logging tool passing through a borehole and transmits the data uphole to an electronic digital signal processor. A predetermined combination of sensors, including a deviometer, is located in a logging tool for the acquisition of the desired data as the logging tool is raised from the borehole. Sensor data in analog format is converted in the logging tool to a digital format and periodically batch transmitted to the surface at a predetermined sampling rate. An identification code is provided for each mineral logging tool, and the code is transmitted to the surface along with the sensor data. The self-identifying tool code is transmitted to the digital signal processor to identify the code against a stored list of the range of numbers assigned to that type of tool. The data is transmitted up the d-c power lines of the tool by a frequency shift key transmission technique. At the surface, a frequency shift key demodulation unit transmits the decoupled data to an asynchronous receiver interfaced to the electronic digital signal processor. During a recording phase, the signals from the logging tool are read by the electronic digital signal processor and stored for later processing. During a calculating phase, the stored data is processed by the digital signal processor and the results are outputted to a printer or plotter, or both

  17. Background subtraction system for pulsed neutron logging of earth boreholes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkinson, E.C.

    1977-01-01

    A neutron generator in well logging instrument is pulsed 100 times having a time between pulses of 1400 microseconds. This is followed by an off period of four cycles wherein 2800 microseconds is allowed for capture radiation to decay to an insignificant level and the remaining 2800 microseconds is used to measure background radiation. This results in the neutron source being disabled four pulses after every hundred pulses of operation, or approximately a 4 percent loss of neutron output. A first detector gate is open from 400 to 680 microseconds and a second detector gate is open from 700 to 980 microseconds. During the 100 cycles, each of the gates is thus open for 280 microseconds times 100 for a total of 28,000 microseconds. By scaling the gate count rate by a factor of 10, the background is subtracted directly

  18. Analysis of RIA standard curve by log-logistic and cubic log-logit models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hideo; Kuroda, Akira; Yatabe, Tami; Inaba, Taeko; Chiba, Kazuo

    1981-01-01

    In order to improve goodness-of-fit in RIA standard analysis, programs for computing log-logistic and cubic log-logit were written in BASIC using personal computer P-6060 (Olivetti). Iterative least square method of Taylor series was applied for non-linear estimation of logistic and log-logistic. Hear ''log-logistic'' represents Y = (a - d)/(1 + (log(X)/c)sup(b)) + d As weights either 1, 1/var(Y) or 1/σ 2 were used in logistic or log-logistic and either Y 2 (1 - Y) 2 , Y 2 (1 - Y) 2 /var(Y), or Y 2 (1 - Y) 2 /σ 2 were used in quadratic or cubic log-logit. The term var(Y) represents squares of pure error and σ 2 represents estimated variance calculated using a following equation log(σ 2 + 1) = log(A) + J log(y). As indicators for goodness-of-fit, MSL/S sub(e)sup(2), CMD% and WRV (see text) were used. Better regression was obtained in case of alpha-fetoprotein by log-logistic than by logistic. Cortisol standard curve was much better fitted with cubic log-logit than quadratic log-logit. Predicted precision of AFP standard curve was below 5% in log-logistic in stead of 8% in logistic analysis. Predicted precision obtained using cubic log-logit was about five times lower than that with quadratic log-logit. Importance of selecting good models in RIA data processing was stressed in conjunction with intrinsic precision of radioimmunoassay system indicated by predicted precision. (author)

  19. Thermally-aware composite run-time CPU power models

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Matthew J.; Diestelhorst, Stephan; Hansson, Andreas; Balsamo, Domenico; Merrett, Geoff V.; Al-Hashimi, Bashir M.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and stable CPU power modelling is fundamental in modern system-on-chips (SoCs) for two main reasons: 1) they enable significant online energy savings by providing a run-time manager with reliable power consumption data for controlling CPU energy-saving techniques; 2) they can be used as accurate and trusted reference models for system design and exploration. We begin by showing the limitations in typical performance monitoring counter (PMC) based power modelling approaches and illust...

  20. Dynamic thermal signature prediction for real-time scene generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Chad L.; Gouthas, Efthimios (Themie); Williams, Owen M.; Swierkowski, Leszek

    2013-05-01

    At DSTO, a real-time scene generation framework, VIRSuite, has been developed in recent years, within which trials data are predominantly used for modelling the radiometric properties of the simulated objects. Since in many cases the data are insufficient, a physics-based simulator capable of predicting the infrared signatures of objects and their backgrounds has been developed as a new VIRSuite module. It includes transient heat conduction within the materials, and boundary conditions that take into account the heat fluxes due to solar radiation, wind convection and radiative transfer. In this paper, an overview is presented, covering both the steady-state and transient performance.

  1. Quantum corrections in thermal states of fermions on anti-de Sitter space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambruş, Victor E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    We study the energy density and pressure of a relativistic thermal gas of massless fermions on four-dimensional Minkowski and anti-de Sitter space-times using relativistic kinetic theory. The corresponding quantum field theory quantities are given by components of the renormalized expectation value of the stress-energy tensor operator acting on a thermal state. On Minkowski space-time, the renormalized vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor is by definition zero, while on anti-de Sitter space-time the vacuum contribution to this expectation value is in general nonzero. We compare the properties of the vacuum and thermal expectation values of the energy density and pressure for massless fermions and discuss the circumstances in which the thermal contribution dominates over the vacuum one.

  2. Mariners Weather Log

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Mariners Weather Log (MWL) is a publication containing articles, news and information about marine weather events and phenomena, worldwide environmental impact...

  3. Log-inject-log in sand consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, R.P.; Spurlock, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for gathering information for the determination of the adequacy of placement of sand consolidating plastic for sand control in oil and gas wells. The method uses a high neutron cross-section tracer which becomes part of the plastic and uses pulsed neutron logging before and after injection of the plastic. Preferably, the method uses lithium, boron, indium, and/or cadmium tracers. Boron oxide is especially useful and can be dissolved in alcohol and mixed with the plastic ingredients

  4. Time-optimal thermalization of single-mode Gaussian states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Alberto; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2014-11-01

    We consider the problem of time-optimal control of a continuous bosonic quantum system subject to the action of a Markovian dissipation. In particular, we consider the case of a one-mode Gaussian quantum system prepared in an arbitrary initial state and which relaxes to the steady state due to the action of the dissipative channel. We assume that the unitary part of the dynamics is represented by Gaussian operations which preserve the Gaussian nature of the quantum state, i.e., arbitrary phase rotations, bounded squeezing, and unlimited displacements. In the ideal ansatz of unconstrained quantum control (i.e., when the unitary phase rotations, squeezing, and displacement of the mode can be performed instantaneously), we study how control can be optimized for speeding up the relaxation towards the fixed point of the dynamics and we analytically derive the optimal relaxation time. Our model has potential and interesting applications to the control of modes of electromagnetic radiation and of trapped levitated nanospheres.

  5. Early detection of metabolic and energy disorders by thermal time series stochastic complexity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutaif, N.A. [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Palazzo, R. Jr [Departamento de Telemática, Faculdade de Engenharia Elétrica e Computação, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Gontijo, J.A.R. [Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-17

    Maintenance of thermal homeostasis in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with changes in their thermal balance. The thermodynamic relationship between heat dissipation and energy storage is altered by the ingestion of high-energy diet content. Observation of thermal registers of core temperature behavior, in humans and rodents, permits identification of some characteristics of time series, such as autoreference and stationarity that fit adequately to a stochastic analysis. To identify this change, we used, for the first time, a stochastic autoregressive model, the concepts of which match those associated with physiological systems involved and applied in male HFD rats compared with their appropriate standard food intake age-matched male controls (n=7 per group). By analyzing a recorded temperature time series, we were able to identify when thermal homeostasis would be affected by a new diet. The autoregressive time series model (AR model) was used to predict the occurrence of thermal homeostasis, and this model proved to be very effective in distinguishing such a physiological disorder. Thus, we infer from the results of our study that maximum entropy distribution as a means for stochastic characterization of temperature time series registers may be established as an important and early tool to aid in the diagnosis and prevention of metabolic diseases due to their ability to detect small variations in thermal profile.

  6. Early detection of metabolic and energy disorders by thermal time series stochastic complexity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutaif, N.A.; Palazzo, R. Jr; Gontijo, J.A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of thermal homeostasis in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) is associated with changes in their thermal balance. The thermodynamic relationship between heat dissipation and energy storage is altered by the ingestion of high-energy diet content. Observation of thermal registers of core temperature behavior, in humans and rodents, permits identification of some characteristics of time series, such as autoreference and stationarity that fit adequately to a stochastic analysis. To identify this change, we used, for the first time, a stochastic autoregressive model, the concepts of which match those associated with physiological systems involved and applied in male HFD rats compared with their appropriate standard food intake age-matched male controls (n=7 per group). By analyzing a recorded temperature time series, we were able to identify when thermal homeostasis would be affected by a new diet. The autoregressive time series model (AR model) was used to predict the occurrence of thermal homeostasis, and this model proved to be very effective in distinguishing such a physiological disorder. Thus, we infer from the results of our study that maximum entropy distribution as a means for stochastic characterization of temperature time series registers may be established as an important and early tool to aid in the diagnosis and prevention of metabolic diseases due to their ability to detect small variations in thermal profile

  7. Comparison of Thermal Creep Strain Calculation Results Using Time Hardening and Strain Hardening Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Junehyung; Cheon, Jinsik; Lee, Byoungoon; Lee, Chanbock

    2014-01-01

    One of the design criteria for the fuel rod in PGSFR is the thermal creep strain of the cladding, because the cladding is exposed to a high temperature for a long time during reactor operation period. In general, there are two kind of calculation scheme for thermal creep strain: time hardening and strain hardening rules. In this work, thermal creep strain calculation results for HT9 cladding by using time hardening and strain hardening rules are compared by employing KAERI's current metallic fuel performance analysis code, MACSIS. Also, thermal creep strain calculation results by using ANL's metallic fuel performance analysis code, LIFE-METAL which adopts strain hardening rule are compared with those by using MACSIS. Thermal creep strain calculation results for HT9 cladding by using time hardening and strain hardening rules were compared by employing KAERI's current metallic fuel performance analysis code, MACSIS. Also, thermal creep strain calculation results by using ANL's metallic fuel performance analysis code, LIFE-METAL which adopts strain hardening rule were compared with those by using MACSIS. Tertiary creep started earlier in time hardening rule than in strain hardening rule. Also, calculation results by MACSIS with strain hardening and those obtained by using LIFE-METAL were almost identical to each other

  8. Elephant logging and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin-Aung-Hla

    1995-01-01

    The natural environment comprises non-biological elements such as air, water, light, heat and biological elements of animal and plant life; all interact with each other to create an ecosystem. Human activities like over-exploitation of forest results in deforestation and desertification. This consequently changes ecological balance. Topics on: (1) history of elephants utilization; (2) elephant logging; (3) classification of elephants; (4) dragging gear; (5) elephant power; (6) elephant logging and environment, are discussed

  9. Thermal Neutron Die-Way-Time Studies for P and DGNAA of Radioactive Waste Drums at the MEDINA Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mildenberger, Frank; Mauerhofer, Eric [Institute of Energy and Climate Research - Nuclear Waste Management and Reactor Safety, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In Germany, radioactive waste with negligible heat production has to pass through a process of quality checking in order to check its conformance with national regulations prior to its transport, intermediate storage and final disposal. Additionally to its radioactive components, the waste may contain non-radioactive chemically toxic substances that can adversely affect human health and pollute the environment, especially the ground water. After an adequate decay time, the waste radioactivity will become harmless but the non-radioactive substances will persist over time. In principle, these hazardous substances may be quantified from traceability and quality controls performed during the production of the waste packages. As a consequence, a research and development program was initiated in 2007 with the aim to develop a nondestructive analytical technique for radioactive waste packages based on prompt and delayed gamma neutron activation analysis (P and DGNAA) employing a DT-neutron generator in pulsed mode. In a preliminary study it was experimentally demonstrated that P and DGNAA is suitable to determine the chemical composition of large samples. In 2010 a facility called MEDINA (Multi Element Detection based on Instrumental Neutron Activation) was developed for the qualitative and quantitative determination of nonradioactive, toxic elements and substances in 200-l steel drums. The determination of hazardous substances and elements is generally achieved measuring the prompt gamma-rays induced by thermal neutrons. Additional information about the composition of the waste matrix could be derived measuring the delayed gamma-rays from short life activation products. However a sensitive detection of these delayed gamma-rays requires that thermal neutrons have almost vanished. Therefore, the thermal neutron die-away-time has to be known in order to achieve an optimal discrimination between prompt and delayed gamma-ray spectra acquisition. Measurements Thermal neutron

  10. Nuclear grade cable thermal life model by time temperature superposition algorithm based on Matlab GUI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Yanyun; Gu Shenjie; Lou Tianyang

    2014-01-01

    Background: As nuclear grade cable must endure harsh environment within design life, it is critical to predict cable thermal life accurately owing to thermal aging, which is one of dominant factors of aging mechanism. Purpose: Using time temperature superposition (TTS) method, the aim is to construct nuclear grade cable thermal life model, predict cable residual life and develop life model interactive interface under Matlab GUI. Methods: According to TTS, nuclear grade cable thermal life model can be constructed by shifting data groups at various temperatures to preset reference temperature with translation factor which is determined by non linear programming optimization. Interactive interface of cable thermal life model developed under Matlab GUI consists of superposition mode and standard mode which include features such as optimization of translation factor, calculation of activation energy, construction of thermal aging curve and analysis of aging mechanism., Results: With calculation result comparison between superposition and standard method, the result with TTS has better accuracy than that with standard method. Furthermore, confidence level of nuclear grade cable thermal life with TTS is higher than that with standard method. Conclusion: The results show that TTS methodology is applicable to thermal life prediction of nuclear grade cable. Interactive Interface under Matlab GUI achieves anticipated functionalities. (authors)

  11. Time series analysis of infrared satellite data for detecting thermal anomalies: a hybrid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppen, W. C.; Pilger, E.; Wright, R.

    2011-07-01

    We developed and tested an automated algorithm that analyzes thermal infrared satellite time series data to detect and quantify the excess energy radiated from thermal anomalies such as active volcanoes. Our algorithm enhances the previously developed MODVOLC approach, a simple point operation, by adding a more complex time series component based on the methods of the Robust Satellite Techniques (RST) algorithm. Using test sites at Anatahan and Kīlauea volcanoes, the hybrid time series approach detected ~15% more thermal anomalies than MODVOLC with very few, if any, known false detections. We also tested gas flares in the Cantarell oil field in the Gulf of Mexico as an end-member scenario representing very persistent thermal anomalies. At Cantarell, the hybrid algorithm showed only a slight improvement, but it did identify flares that were undetected by MODVOLC. We estimate that at least 80 MODIS images for each calendar month are required to create good reference images necessary for the time series analysis of the hybrid algorithm. The improved performance of the new algorithm over MODVOLC will result in the detection of low temperature thermal anomalies that will be useful in improving our ability to document Earth's volcanic eruptions, as well as detecting low temperature thermal precursors to larger eruptions.

  12. Time and Temperature Test Results for PFP Thermal Stabilization Furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The national standard for plutonium storage acceptability (standard DOE-STD-3013-99, generally known as ''the 3013 standard'') has been revised to clarify the requirement for processes that will produce acceptable storage materials. The 3013 standard (Reference 1) now states that ''Oxides shall be stabilized by heating the material in an oxidizing atmosphere to a Material Temperature of at least 950 C (1742 F) for not less than 2 hours.'' The process currently in use for producing stable oxides for storage at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) heats a furnace atmosphere to 1000 C and holds it there for 2 hours. The temperature of the material being stabilized is not measured directly during this process. The Plutonium Process Support Laboratories (PPSL) were requested to demonstrate that the process currently in use at PFP is an acceptable method of producing stable plutonium dioxide consistently. A spare furnace identical to the production furnaces was set up and tested under varying conditions with non-radioactive surrogate materials. Reference 2 was issued to guide the testing program. The process currently in use at the PFP for stabilizing plutonium-bearing powders was shown to heat all the material in the furnace to at least 950 C for at least 2 hours. The current process will work for (1) relatively pure plutonium dioxide, (2) dioxide powders mixed with up to 20 weight percent magnesium oxide, and (3) dioxide powders with up to 11 weight percent magnesium oxide and 20 weight percent magnesium nitrate hexahydrate. Time and temperature data were also consistent with a successful demonstration for a mixture containing 10 weight percent each of sodium and potassium chloride; however, the molten chloride salts destroyed the thermocouples in the powder and temperature data were unavailable for part of that run. These results assume that the current operating limits of no more than 2500 grams per furnace charge and a powder height of no more than 1.5 inches remain

  13. Thermal Loss of High-Q Antennas in Time Domain vs. Frequency Domain Solver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahramzy, Pevand; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2014-01-01

    High-Q structures pose great challenges to their loss simulations in Time Domain Solvers (TDS). Therefore, in this work the thermal loss of high-Q antennas is calculated both in TDS and Frequency Domain Solver (FDS), which are then compared with each other and with the actual measurements....... The thermal loss calculation in FDS is shown to be more accurate for high-Q antennas....

  14. Fast-timing studies of nuclei below $^{68}$Ni populated in the $\\beta$-decay of Mn isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Jokinen, A; Simpson, G S; Garcia borge, M J; Koester, U H; Georgiev, G P; Fraile prieto, L M; Aprahamian, A

    2008-01-01

    We intend to investigate structure of nuclei populated in the $\\beta$-decay of Mn isotopes via the ATD $\\beta\\gamma\\gamma$(t) technique. With this method we will measure dynamic moments in Fe isotopes and their daughters in order to characterize the role of particle-hole excitation across the ${N}$=40 sub-shell closure and the development of collectivity.

  15. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reilly

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc. and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc. to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature–deformation–displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  16. Identifying Time Periods of Minimal Thermal Gradient for Temperature-Driven Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, John; Glisic, Branko

    2018-03-01

    Temperature changes play a large role in the day to day structural behavior of structures, but a smaller direct role in most contemporary Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) analyses. Temperature-Driven SHM will consider temperature as the principal driving force in SHM, relating a measurable input temperature to measurable output generalized strain (strain, curvature, etc.) and generalized displacement (deflection, rotation, etc.) to create three-dimensional signatures descriptive of the structural behavior. Identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient provides the foundation for the formulation of the temperature-deformation-displacement model. Thermal gradients in a structure can cause curvature in multiple directions, as well as non-linear strain and stress distributions within the cross-sections, which significantly complicates data analysis and interpretation, distorts the signatures, and may lead to unreliable conclusions regarding structural behavior and condition. These adverse effects can be minimized if the signatures are evaluated at times when thermal gradients in the structure are minimal. This paper proposes two classes of methods based on the following two metrics: (i) the range of raw temperatures on the structure, and (ii) the distribution of the local thermal gradients, for identifying time periods of minimal thermal gradient on a structure with the ability to vary the tolerance of acceptable thermal gradients. The methods are tested and validated with data collected from the Streicker Bridge on campus at Princeton University.

  17. Thermalization time scales for WIMP capture by the Sun in effective theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmark, A., E-mail: axel.widmark@fysik.su.se [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-05-01

    I study the process of dark matter capture by the Sun, under the assumption of a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), in the framework of non-relativistic effective field theory. Hypothetically, WIMPs from the galactic halo can scatter against atomic nuclei in the solar interior, settle to thermal equilibrium with the solar core and annihilate to produce an observable flux of neutrinos. In particular, I examine the thermalization process using Monte-Carlo integration of WIMP trajectories. I consider WIMPs in a mass range of 10–1000 GeV and WIMP-nucleon interaction operators with different dependence on spin and transferred momentum. I find that the density profiles of captured WIMPs are in accordance with a thermal profile described by the Sun's gravitational potential and core temperature. Depending on the operator that governs the interaction, the majority of the thermalization time is spent in either the solar interior or exterior. If normalizing the WIMP-nuclei interaction strength to a specific capture rate, I find that the thermalization time differs at most by 3 orders of magnitude between operators. In most cases of interest, the thermalization time is many orders of magnitude shorter than the age of the solar system.

  18. Tau decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, A.

    1994-09-01

    The most recent experimental results of τ physics are reviewed. The covered topics include precision measurements of semihadronic τ decay and their impact on tau branching ratio budget, the current status of the tau consistency test, a determination of Michel parameters and τ neutrino helicity, and upper limits on lepton-number violating τ decays. (orig.)

  19. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP-Violating Asymmetriesand Constraints on sin(2 beta+gamma) withPartial Reconstruction of B to D*-+pi+- Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.

    2005-04-19

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP-violating asymmetries in decays of neutral B mesons to the final states D*{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, using approximately 232 million B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Events containing these decays are selected with a partial reconstruction technique, in which only the high-momentum {pi}{sup {+-}} from the B decay and the low-momentum {pi}{sup {-+}} from the D*{sup {-+}} decay are used. We measure the parameters related to 2{beta} + {gamma} to be a{sub D*{pi}} = -0.034 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.009 and c{sub D*{pi}}{sup {ell}} = -0.019 {+-} 0.022 {+-} 0.013. With some theoretical assumptions, we interpret our results in terms of the lower limits |sin(2{beta} + {gamma})| > 0.62 (0.35) at 68% (90%) confidence level.

  20. LHCb Online Log Analysis and Maintenance System

    CERN Document Server

    Garnier, J-C

    2011-01-01

    History has shown, many times computer logs are the only information an administrator may have for an incident, which could be caused either by a malfunction or an attack. Due to the huge amount of logs that are produced from large-scale IT infrastructures, such as LHCb Online, critical information may be overlooked or simply be drowned in a sea of other messages. This clearly demonstrates the need for an automatic system for long-term maintenance and real time analysis of the logs. We have constructed a low cost, fault tolerant centralized logging system which is able to do in-depth analysis and cross-correlation of every log. This system is capable of handling O(10000) different log sources and numerous formats, while trying to keep the overhead as low as possible. It provides log gathering and management, Offline analysis and online analysis. We call Offline analysis the procedure of analyzing old logs for critical information, while Online analysis refer to the procedure of early alerting and reacting. ...

  1. Use of thermal time constant concept in the analysis of reactivity induced accidents with feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, R.

    1981-01-01

    A simple heat transfer model based on the thermal time constant concept which leads to significant reduction in fuel temperature computing time and gives a physical insight of the phenomena is presented. The fuel temperatures can be used to estimate the reactivity feedback using the measured or calculated Doppler coefficients. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Occupant Time Period of Thermal Adaption to Change of Outdoor Air Temperature in Naturally Ventilated Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    liu, weiwei; Wargocki, Pawel; Xiong, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The present work proposed a method to determine time period of thermal adaption of occupants in naturally ventilated building, based on the relationship between their neutral temperatures and running mean outdoor air temperature. Based on the data of the field investigation, the subjects’ time...

  3. Aspects of B decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-01-01

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B → D (*) l anti ν decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B → D (*) l anti ν decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B 0 s →J/ψφ and B 0 →J/ψK S,L decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B 0 - anti B 0 mixing phase. (orig.)

  4. Value of NMR logging for heavy oil characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.; Chen, J.; Georgi, D. [Baker Hughes, Calgary, AB (Canada); Sun, B. [Chevron Energy Technology Co., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    Non-conventional, heavy oil fields are becoming increasingly important to the security of energy supplies and are becoming economically profitable to produce. Heavy oil reservoirs are difficult to evaluate since they are typically shallow and the connate waters are very fresh. Other heavy oil reservoirs are oil-wet where the resistivities are not indicative of saturation. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) detects molecular level interactions. As such, it responds distinctively to different hydrocarbon molecules, thereby opening a new avenue for constituent analysis. This feature makes NMR a more powerful technique than bulk oil density or viscosity measurements for characterizing oils, and is the basis for detecting gas in heavy oil fields. NMR logging, which measures fluid in pore space directly, is capable of separating oil from water. It is possible to discern movable from bound water by analyzing NMR logs. The oil viscosity can be also quantified from NMR logs, NMR relaxation time and diffusivity estimates. The unique challenges for heavy oil reservoir characterization for the NMR technique were discussed with reference to the extra-fast decay of the NMR signal in response to extra-heavy oil/tars, and the lack of sensitivity in measuring very slow diffusion of heavy oil molecules. This paper presented various methods for analyzing heavy oil reservoirs in different viscosity ranges. Heavy oil fields in Venezuela, Kazakhstan, Canada, Alaska and the Middle East were analyzed using different data interpretation approaches based on the reservoir formation characteristics and the heavy oil type. NMR direct fluid typing was adequate for clean sands and carbonate reservoirs while integrated approaches were used to interpret extra heavy oils and tars. It was concluded that NMR logs can provide quantitative measures for heavy oil saturation, identify sweet spots or tar streaks, and quantify heavy oil viscosity within reasonable accuracy. 14 refs., 16 figs.

  5. Classification of decays involving variable decay chains with convolutional architectures

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Vidyo contribution We present a technique to perform classification of decays that exhibit decay chains involving a variable number of particles, which include a broad class of $B$ meson decays sensitive to new physics. The utility of such decays as a probe of the Standard Model is dependent upon accurate determination of the decay rate, which is challenged by the combinatorial background arising in high-multiplicity decay modes. In our model, each particle in the decay event is represented as a fixed-dimensional vector of feature attributes, forming an $n \\times k$ representation of the event, where $n$ is the number of particles in the event and $k$ is the dimensionality of the feature vector. A convolutional architecture is used to capture dependencies between the embedded particle representations and perform the final classification. The proposed model performs outperforms standard machine learning approaches based on Monte Carlo studies across a range of variable final-state decays with the Belle II det...

  6. Effect of resistivity profile on current decay time of initial phase of current quench in neon-gas-puff inducing disruptions of JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, S.; Ohno, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shibata, Y.; Isayama, A.; Kawano, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Watanabe, K. Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Takizuka, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Okamoto, M. [Ishikawa National College of Technology, Ishikawa 929-0392 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    According to an early work [Y. Shibata et al., Nucl. Fusion 50, 025015 (2010)] on the behavior of the plasma current decay in the JT-60U disruptive discharges caused by the radiative collapse with a massive neon-gas-puff, the increase of the internal inductance mainly determined the current decay time of plasma current during the initial phase of current quench. To investigate what determines the increase of the internal inductance, we focus attention on the relationship between the electron temperature (or the resistivity) profile and the time evolution of the current density profile and carry out numerical calculations. As a result, we find the reason of the increase of the internal inductance: The current density profile at the start of the current quench is broader than an expected current density profile in the steady state, which is determined by the temperature (or resistivity) profile. The current density profile evolves into peaked one and the internal inductance is increasing.

  7. Simultaneous measurement of the maximum oscillation amplitude and the transient decay time constant of the QCM reveals stiffness changes of the adlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxer, C Galli; Coen, M Collaud; Bissig, H; Greber, U F; Schlapbach, L

    2003-10-01

    Interpretation of adsorption kinetics measured with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) can be difficult for adlayers undergoing modification of their mechanical properties. We have studied the behavior of the oscillation amplitude, A(0), and the decay time constant, tau, of quartz during adsorption of proteins and cells, by use of a home-made QCM. We are able to measure simultaneously the frequency, f, the dissipation factor, D, the maximum amplitude, A(0), and the transient decay time constant, tau, every 300 ms in liquid, gaseous, or vacuum environments. This analysis enables adsorption and modification of liquid/mass properties to be distinguished. Moreover the surface coverage and the stiffness of the adlayer can be estimated. These improvements promise to increase the appeal of QCM methodology for any applications measuring intimate contact of a dynamic material with a solid surface.

  8. Mechanics of log calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, W.C.; Cram, M.E.; Hall, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    For any measurement to have meaning, it must be related to generally accepted standard units by a valid and specified system of comparison. To calibrate well-logging tools, sensing systems are designed which produce consistent and repeatable indications over the range for which the tool was intended. The basics of calibration theory, procedures, and calibration record presentations are reviewed. Calibrations for induction, electrical, radioactivity, and sonic logging tools will be discussed. The authors' intent is to provide an understanding of the sources of errors, of the way errors are minimized in the calibration process, and of the significance of changes in recorded calibration data

  9. Real-Time Monitoring of Occupants’ Thermal Comfort through Infrared Imaging: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Pavlin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermally comfortable indoor environments are of great importance, as modern lifestyles often require people to spend more than 20 h per day indoors. Since most of the thermal comfort models use a variety of different environmental and personal factors that need to be measured or estimated, real-time and continuous assessment of thermal comfort is often not practically feasible. This work presents a cheap and non-invasive approach based on infrared imaging for monitoring the occupants’ thermal sensation and comfort in real time. Thanks to a mechatronic device developed by the authors, the imaging is performed on the forehead skin, selected because it is always exposed to the environment and, thus, facilitating the monitoring activity in a non-invasive manner. Tests have been performed in controlled conditions on ten subjects to assess the hypothesis that the forehead temperature is correlated with subjects’ thermal sensation. This allows the exploitation of this quantity as a base for a simple monitoring of thermal comfort, which could later be tuned with an extensive experimental campaign.

  10. Tagged time-dependent angular analysis of $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi\\phi$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The interference between $B_s^0$ decays to $J/\\psi \\phi$ either directly or via $B_s^0-\\bar{B}_s^0$ oscillation gives rise to a $CP$ violating phase $\\phi_s$. Using a sample of about $21,200$ $B_s^0\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ events extracted from 1$fb^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions collected during the 2011 LHC run at a center of mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV, we fit for nine physics parameters, including the phase $\\phi_s$, the mean decay width difference $\\Delta\\Gamma_s$ and the decay width $\\Gamma_s$. We find the following result: \\begin{align} \\phi_s \\, \\, = \\, \\, -0.001 \\, \\, \\pm \\, \\, 0.101 \\, \\, \\text{(stat)} \\, \\, \\pm \\, \\, 0.027 \\, \\, \\text{(syst)} \\, \\, \\text{rad}, \\\\ \\, \\, \\Gamma_s \\, \\, = \\, \\, 0.6580 \\, \\, \\pm \\, \\, 0.0054 \\, \\, \\text{(stat)} \\, \\, \\pm \\, \\, 0.0066 \\, \\, \\text{(syst)} \\text{ps} ^{-1}, \\\\ \\Delta\\Gamma_s \\, \\, = \\, \\, 0.116 \\, \\, \\pm \\, \\, 0.018 \\, \\, \\text{(stat)} \\, \\, \\pm \\, \\, 0.006 \\text{(syst)} \\, \\, \\text{ps} ^{-1...

  11. Measurement of time dependent CP asymmetries in charged charmless hadronic two-body B decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Pennazzi, S

    2008-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four experiments that are installed at the protonproton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, Geneva. The experiment is at the latest stage of its setting-up. The first collisions at high energy in LHC are planned to mid-2008, with the first results on the experiments soon after. The LHCb detector is a single-arm spectrometer conceived to pursue an extensive study of CP violation in the B meson system, over-constraining the Standard Model predictions and looking for any possible effect beyond this theory, and to look for rare phenomena in the b quark sector with very high precision. The subject of the present work is the study of the non-leptonic B meson decays into charged charmless two-body final states. This class of decays has been extensively studied and it is still matter of great interest at the B-factories and at Tevatron. In fact the current knowledge of this class of decays in the Bd/Bu sector starts to be quite constrained, but the Bs still remains a field where a r...

  12. Electron-phonon thermalization in a scalable method for real-time quantum dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Valerio; Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Kohanoff, Jorge J.; Correa, Alfredo A.

    2016-01-01

    We present a quantum simulation method that follows the dynamics of out-of-equilibrium many-body systems of electrons and oscillators in real time. Its cost is linear in the number of oscillators and it can probe time scales from attoseconds to hundreds of picoseconds. Contrary to Ehrenfest dynamics, it can thermalize starting from a variety of initial conditions, including electronic population inversion. While an electronic temperature can be defined in terms of a nonequilibrium entropy, a Fermi-Dirac distribution in general emerges only after thermalization. These results can be used to construct a kinetic model of electron-phonon equilibration based on the explicit quantum dynamics.

  13. Thermal diffusivity of a metallic thin layer using the time-domain thermo reflectance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battaglia, J-L; Kusiak, A; Rossignol, C; Chigarev, N

    2007-01-01

    The time domain thermo reflectance (TDTR) is widely used in the field of acoustic and thermal characterization of thin layers at the nano and micro scale. In this paper, we propose to derive a simple analytical expression of the thermal diffusivity of the layer. This relation is based on the analytical solution of one-dimensional heat transfer in the medium using integral transforms. For metals, the two-temperature model shows that the capacitance effect at the short times is essentially governed by the electronic contribution

  14. Analysis of cavity effect on space- and time-dependent fast and thermal neutron energy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudo, Katsuhisa; Narita, Masakuni; Ozawa, Yasutomo.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of the presence of a central cavity on the space- and time-dependent neutron energy spectra in both thermal and fast neutron systems are analyzed theoretically with use made of the multi-group one-dimensional time-dependent Ssub(n) method. The thermal neutron field is also analyzed for the case of a fundamental time eigenvalue problem with the time-dependent P 1 approximation. The cavity radius is variable, and the system radius for graphite is 120 cm and for the other materials 7 cm. From the analysis of the time-dependent Ssub(n) calculations in the non-multiplying systems of polythene, light water and graphite, cavity heating is the dominant effect for the slowing-down spectrum in the initial period following fast neutron burst, and when the slowing-down spectrum comes into the thermal energy region, cavity heating shifts to cavity cooling. In the multiplying system of 235 U, cavity cooling also takes place as the spectrum approaches equilibrium after the fast neutron burst is injected. The mechanism of cavity cooling is explained analytically for the case of thermal neutron field to illustrate its physical aspects, using the time-dependent P 1 approximation. An example is given for the case of light water. (auth.)

  15. Logging Concessions Enable Illegal Logging Crisis in the Peruvian Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Finer, Matt; Jenkins, Clinton N.; Sky, Melissa A. Blue; Pine, Justin

    2014-01-01

    The Peruvian Amazon is an important arena in global efforts to promote sustainable logging in the tropics. Despite recent efforts to achieve sustainability, such as provisions in the US?Peru Trade Promotion Agreement, illegal logging continues to plague the region. We present evidence that Peru's legal logging concession system is enabling the widespread illegal logging via the regulatory documents designed to ensure sustainable logging. Analyzing official government data, we found that 68.3%...

  16. Data logging system upgrade for Indus accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, R.; Merh, B.N.; Agrawal, R.K.; Fatnani, P.; Navathe, C.P.; Pal, S.

    2012-01-01

    An accelerator has various subsystems like Magnet Power Supply, Beam Diagnostics and Vacuum etc. which are required to work in a stable manner to ensure required machine performance. Logging of system parameters at a faster rate plays a crucial role in analysing and understanding machine behaviour. Logging all the machine parameters consistently at the rate of typically more than 1 Hz has been the aim of a recent data logging system upgrade. Nearly ten thousand parameters are being logged at varying intervals of one second to one minute in Indus accelerator complex. The present logging scheme is augmented to log all these parameters at a rate equal to or more than 1 Hz. The database schema is designed according to the data type of the parameter. The data is distributed into historical table and intermediate table which comprises of recent data. Machine control applications read the parameter values from the control system and store them into the text files of finite time duration for each sub-system. The logging application of each sub-system passes these text files to database for bulk insertion. The detail design of database, logging scheme and its architecture is presented in the paper. (author)

  17. Well logging, atom and geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serra, O.

    1994-01-01

    Well logging techniques exploit interactions of gamma photons and neutrons with atoms. Interactions of neutrons of different energies with atoms allow the detection and evaluation of the weight percentage of several elements composing the rocks (C, O, Si, Ca, Fe, S); spectrometry of gamma rays produced by thermal neutron absorption allows for the weight percentage determination of Si, Ca, Fe, S, Cl, H, Ti and Gd, etc. High resolution detectors (germanium doped by Li, at liquid nitrogen temperature) allow the recognition of more elements. Other techniques involving neutrons consist in determining the population in epithermal neutrons at a certain distance of the neutron source (measurement of the hydrogen index). By analyzing the intensity of the gamma flux produced by Compton scattering, the electronic and bulk densities of the rocks are measured. All these data lead to the detection and evaluation of ore deposits (uranium and potassium) and coal, and determination of the lithology, the main minerals composing the rocks, petrophysical properties... 1 fig

  18. Benchmark neutron porosity log calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, R.C.; Michael, M.; Verghese, K.; Gardner, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    Calculations have been made for a benchmark neutron porosity log problem with the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP and the specific purpose Monte Carlo code McDNL. For accuracy and timing comparison purposes the CRAY XMP and MicroVax II computers have been used with these codes. The CRAY has been used for an analog version of the MCNP code while the MicroVax II has been used for the optimized variance reduction versions of both codes. Results indicate that the two codes give the same results within calculated standard deviations. Comparisons are given and discussed for accuracy (precision) and computation times for the two codes

  19. Measurements of the Branching Fraction and Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries of B0 to J/Psi pi0 Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, K

    2006-03-10

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0} decays based on (231.8 {+-} 2.6) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. We obtain a branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}) = (1.94 {+-} 0.22 (stat) {+-} 0.17 (syst)) x 10{sup -5}. We also measure the CP asymmetry parameters C = -0.21 {+-} 0.26 (stat) {+-} 0.06 (syst) and S = -0.68 {+-} 0.30 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst).

  20. Measurement of the time-integrated C P asymmetry in D"0→K_S"0K_S"0 decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.

    2015-01-01

    The time-integrated C P asymmetry in the decay D"0→K_S"0K_S"0 is measured using 3 fb"−"1 of proton-proton collision data collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The flavour of the D"0 meson is determined by use of the decay D"∗"+→D"0π"+ and its charge conjugate mode. The result is A_C _P=−0.029±0.052±0.022, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The result is consistent with Standard Model expectations and improves the uncertainty with respect to the only previous measurement of this quantity by more than a factor of three.

  1. Time evolution of tunneling in a thermal medium: Environment-driven excited tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Sh.; Yoshimura, M.

    2004-01-01

    Time evolution of tunneling phenomena proceeding in a thermal medium is studied using a standard model of environmental interaction. A semiclassical probability formula for the particle motion in a metastable state of a one-dimensional system put in a thermal medium is combined with the formula of the quantum penetration factor through a potential barrier to derive the tunneling rate in the medium. The effect of environment, its influence on time evolution in particular, is clarified in our real-time formalism. A nonlinear resonance effect is shown to enhance the tunneling rate at finite times of order 2/η, with η the friction coefficient unless η is too small. In the linear approximation this effect has relevance to the parametric resonance. This effect enhances the possibility of early termination of the cosmological phase transition much prior to the typical Hubble time

  2. Effect of cooking time on the physical, chemical and thermal properties of acha seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akeem O. Raji

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acha is a less utilized cereal grain in Africa. Scaling up of the processing technology of acha seeds is desirable if accurate information on effect of processing on its properties is available. This study investigated the effect of cooking duration on the chemical and physical properties of acha seeds. Cooking times (2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 minutes at 100oC were used. The volume, length, breadth, thickness, porosity, density, sphericity, aspect ratio, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, moisture, protein, fat, ash, crude fibre and carbohydrate were determined using standard methods. Data were analysed using ANOVA at p = 0.05. The results obtained revealed that varietal difference had a significant effect on volume, length, breadth, thickness, true density, bulk density, porosity, sphericity and aspect ratio. The moisture content, ash, protein, crude fibre, fat, carbohydrate, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity varied from 8.80 - 56.17 %, 0.32 - 1.87%, 1.92 - 11.50%, 0.29 - 1.58%, 0.32 - 2.81%, 40.94 - 76.26%, 1.66 -2.97 kJkg-1K-1, 0.26 -0.43 Wm-1K-1 and 0.85 x 10-7 - 1.17 x 10-7 ms-2 respectively, as significantly influenced by cooking time. Cooking for 7.5 minutes was appropriate using the moisture uptakes and thermal properties as criteria. 

  3. An economic alternative to conventional open hole logging in horizontal wells; Eine oekonomische Alternative zu konventionellen Bohrlochmessungen in Horizontalbohrungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, G.P.; Kater, H.; Ball, S.; Preiss, F. [Precision Drilling-Computalog, Edemissen (Germany)

    2003-04-01

    Horizontal drilling has become a routine method of field development over the past several years as a means to maximise recoverable reserves. As such, horizontal drilling has impacted the way that petrophysical data is obtained in order to evaluate the reservoir during and after drilling. In horizontal wells, conventional open hole logging methods must be combined with either pipe conveyed logging techniques or coiled tubing conveyed techniques. In many cases, these procedures are time consuming and cost prohibitive based on the economics of the project. Additionally, formation evaluation data may be obtained in horizontal wells by using Logging While Drilling (LWD) technology, but this may also be cost prohibitive in many areas. In the Girkaliai and Nausodis Fields in Lithuania, two wells were drilled to reach oil producing reservoir sandstones at depths of over 1,800 m TVD with horizontal sections of approximately 270 m and 385 m. Based on an economic and petrophysical analysis, neither open hole pipe conveyed logging nor LSW were considered since neither were regarded as cost effective to obtain the petrophysical data required to evaluate the reservoir. An alternative method to obtain critical formation evaluation data was employed utilizing a cased hole pulsed neutron decay logging tool run in the open hole. In one case this was done immediately after drilling. The pulsed neutron decay logging tool was conveyed to TD by a specially modified wireline tractor system. The obtained logs provided critical information to evaluate the reservoir including determining density porosity, neutron porosity, sigma (formation capture cross section) and gamma ray. The data was used to calculate required petrophysical information including lithology, water saturation, and bulk volumes. (orig.)

  4. Method and apparatus for epithermal neutron porosity well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertzog, R.C.; Loomis, W.A.; Wraight, P.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for investigating the porosity of a subsurface earth formation surrounding a borehole. It comprises repetitively irradiating the borehole and earth formation with discrete bursts of high energy neutrons from a neutron source, which neutrons interact with nuclei of the materials in the borehole and the formation to produce therein populations of epithermal neutrons; detecting the populations of epithermal neutrons at near and far locations in the borehole spaced apart longitudinally by different distances from the neutron source; generating count signals indicative of the magnitudes of the detected epithermal neutron populations at the respective near and far locations; detecting the decay of the epithermal neutron populations following the neutron bursts at least at one location in the borehole and generating signals representative thereof; deriving from the decay signals a signal indicative of the slowing down time of epithermal neutrons in the formation of the at least one location; and deriving from the near and far count signals and the slowing down time signal a measurement signal representative of the porosity of the formation surrounding the borehole inherently compensated for the effects of tool standoff on the responses of the logging tool

  5. LHCb: Tagged time-dependent angular analysis of $B^0_s \\to J/\\psi\\phi$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Dupertuis, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The determination of the CP-violating phase $\\phi_s$ in $B^0_s \\to J/\\psi\\phi$ decays is one of the key goals of the LHCb experiment. Its value is predicted to be very small in the Standard Model but can be significantly enhanced in many models of new physics. We present the world’s best measurement of $\\phi_s$ and the first observation of a non-zero $\\Delta\\Gamma_s$ based upon 1 fb$^{−1}$ of data collected at LHCb during 2011.

  6. A history of nuclear well logging in the oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittle, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Spurred by an interest in logging through steel casing γ-ray logging began in the late 1930s followed soon by neutron logging for porosity. These were the first two nuclear well logs. Gamma-gamma density logging was developed during the 1950s. Pulsed neutron lifetime logging appeared in the 1960s; the slim tools came in the early 1970s. Developments since then have included dual detector devices of several types which offered improved measurements or interpretation, γ-ray spectrometry logging (natural and neutron-induced) which identifies certain chemical elements, induced radioactivity logging, and the photoelectric absorption log, which, combined with the density log in a single tool, is known as litho-density logging. A combination of several γ-ray spectrometers in one tool, designed to determine 10 formation elements, was recently introduced, and a new neutron porosity tool measuring epithermal neutron die-away time has been developed. Digital transmission of logging data was a step forward in about 1975. Also, log interpretation techniques have greatly expanded since the advent of digital computers, and the microcomputer has had a distinct impact. It is now practical and economical to do iterative analysis on a suite of logs to obtain an optimum overall interpretation. (author)

  7. Ecological Factors Influencing Norway Spruce Regeneration on Nurse Logs in a Subalpine Virgin Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Stroheker

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Regeneration of Picea abies in high-elevation mountain forests often depends on the presence of coarse woody debris (CWD, as logs provide sites with more favorable conditions for spruce regeneration compared to the forest floor. However, there is little quantitative knowledge on the factors that are conducive to or hindering spruce establishment on CWD. We examined spruce regeneration on CWD by sampling 303 plots (50 cm × 50 cm each on 56 downed logs in a virgin forest in the Swiss Alps. Variables describing microsite conditions were measured, and fungi were isolated from wood samples. To investigate the relationship between the ecological factors and establishment success, two models were fitted with seedling and sapling density as response variables, respectively. Besides log diameter, the models identified different ecological factors as significant for seedling and sapling establishment, i.e., regeneration depends on different factors in different development stages. Seedling density depended on the type of rot, log inclination, and decay stage. Sapling density depended mainly on light availability, cover by bark and moss, the time of tree fall, and the distance between the log surface and the forest floor. A total of 22 polypore fungi were isolated from the wood samples, four of them being threatened species. White- and brown-rot fungi were found in all decay stages. The visual assessment of the type of rot in the field corresponded in only 15% of cases to the type of rot caused by the isolated fungi; hence caution is needed when making field assessments of rot types.

  8. Modal Identification of a Time-Invariant 6-Storey Model Test RC-Frame from Free Decay Tests using Multi-Variate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1997-01-01

    in the comparison. The data investigated are sampled from a laboratory model of a plane 6-storey, 2-bay RC-frame. The laboratory model is excited at the top storey where two different types of excitation where considered. In the first case the structure was excited in the first mode and in the second case......The scope of the paper is to apply multi-variate time-domain models for identification of eginfrequencies and mode shapes of a time- invariant model test Reinforced Concrete (RC) frame from measured decays. The frequencies and mode shapes of interest are the two lowest ones since they are normally...

  9. Modal Identification of a Time-Invariant 6-Storey Model Test RC-Frame from Free Decay Tests using Multi-Variate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    in the comparison. The data investigated are sampled from a laboratory model of a plane 6-storey, 2-bay RC-frame. The laboratory model is excited at the top storey where two different types of excitation where considered. In the first case the structure was excited in the first mode and in the second case......The scope of the paper is to apply multi-variate time-domain models for identification of eginfrequencies and mode shapes of a time- invariant model test Reinforced Concrete (RC) frame from measured decays. The frequencies and mode shapes of interest are the two lowest ones since they are normally...

  10. Supply of Rubber Wood Log in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Noraida, A. W.; Abdul-Rahim, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Issue on shortage of raw material for wood processing solved by discovery of rubber wood log as one of the substitutes the natural log. This paper examines the supply of rubber wood log in Malaysia. We employ ARDL Bound Approach Test and time series data from 1980 to 2010 which represented the whole Malaysia are used to achieve the established objectives. The result shown, in the long run harvested area and wages have 1% and 10% significant level respectively. While in the short run, there wa...

  11. In-situ real time measurements of thermal comfort and comparison with the adaptive comfort theory in Dutch residential dwellings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ioannou, A.; Itard, L.C.M.; Agarwal, Tushar

    2018-01-01

    Indoor thermal comfort is generally assessed using the PMV or the adaptive model. This research presents the results obtained by in-situ real time measurements of thermal comfort and thermal comfort perception in 17 residential dwellings in the Netherlands. The study demonstrates the new

  12. Sensitivity of control times in function of core parameters and oscillations control in thermal nuclear systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, E.S. do; D'Oliveira, A.B.; Galvao, O.B.; Oyama, K.

    1981-03-01

    Sensitivity of control times to variation of a thermal reactor core parameters is defined by suitable changes in the power coefficient, core size and fuel enrichment. A control strategy is developed based on control theory concepts and on considerations of the physics of the problem. Digital diffusion theory simulation is described which tends to verify the control concepts considered, face dumped oscillations introduced in one thermal nuclear power system. The effectivity of the control actions, in terms of eliminating oscillations, provided guidelines for the working-group engaged in the analysis of the control rods and its optimal performance. (Author) [pt

  13. Thermal ambience of expanding event horizon in Minkowski space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerlach, U.H.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that in flat space-time the thermal ambience of accelerated observers is not associated exclusively with flat event horizons, but arises also with (observer-dependent) event horizons that are light cones. The quanta of this ambience are characterized by a generalized frequency which identifies the representation of the Lorentz group. Global and local model detectors capable of responding to quanta of any given generalized frequency are exhibited. The discussion of the thermal ambience is implemented in terms of a partial-wave analysis using a set of harmonics on the hyperboloid x 2 +y 2 +z 2 -t 2 = 1

  14. Geophysical borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, D.; Barton, K.J.; Hearn, K.

    1981-08-01

    Most of the available literature on geophysical borehole logging refers to studies carried out in sedimentary rocks. It is only in recent years that any great interest has been shown in geophysical logging in boreholes in metamorphic and igneous rocks following the development of research programmes associated with geothermal energy and nuclear waste disposal. This report is concerned with the programme of geophysical logging carried out on the three deep boreholes at Altnabreac, Caithness, to examine the effectiveness of these methods in crystalline rock. Of particular importance is the assessment of the performance of the various geophysical sondes run in the boreholes in relation to the rock mass properties. The geophysical data can be used to provide additional in-situ information on the geological, hydrogeological and engineering properties of the rock mass. Fracturing and weathering in the rock mass have a considerable effect on both the design parameters for an engineering structure and the flow of water through the rock mass; hence, the relation between the geophysical properties and the degree of fracturing and weathering is examined in some detail. (author)

  15. Measurement of the time-integrated $CP$ asymmetry in $D^0 \\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S$ decays arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Aidala, Christine Angela; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albicocco, Pietro; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Arzymatov, Kenenbek; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bian, Lingzhu; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blusk, Steven; Bobulska, Dana; Bocci, Valerio; Boente Garcia, Oscar; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brodski, Michael; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Buonaura, Annarita; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; 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Da Silva, Cesar Luiz; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Danilina, Anna; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Delaney, Blaise; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Didenko, Sergey; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Durham, John Matthew; Dutta, Deepanwita; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Ene, Alexandru; Escher, Stephan; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Lopes, Lino; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Färber, Christian; Féo Pereira Rivello Carvalho, Mauricio; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; Garcia Plana, Beatriz; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gu, Chenxi; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hilton, Martha; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; 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Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lancierini, Davide; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Zhuoming; Liang, Xixin; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malecki, Bartosz; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Mead, James Vincent; Meadows, Brian; Meaux, Cedric; Meier, Frank; Meinert, Nis; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Millard, Edward James; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Minzoni, Luca; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Mombächer, Titus; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Gianfranco; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nanut, Tara; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nogay, Alla; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Panshin, Gennady; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Pereima, Dmitrii; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pietrzyk, Guillaume; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pinzino, Jacopo; Pisani, Flavio; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plews, Jonathan; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polukhina, Natalia; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Qin, Jia-Jia; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Reiss, Florian; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Ren, Zan; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rinnert, Kurt; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gras, Cristina; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saur, Miroslav; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shmanin, Evgenii; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Mark; Soares, Marcelo; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Strokov, Sergey; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tang, Zhipeng; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Tou, Da Yu; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tuci, Giulia; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitkovskiy, Arseniy; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Wang, Mengzhen; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Zhenzi; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Weisser, Constantin; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xiao, Dong; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Ao; Xu, Menglin; Xu, Qingnian; Xu, Zehua; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    A measurement of the time-integrated $CP$ asymmetry in $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S$ decays is reported. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about $2$ fb$^{-1}$ collected in 2015--2016 by the LHCb collaboration in $pp$ collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of $13$ TeV. The $D^0$ candidate is required to originate from a $D^{\\ast +} \\rightarrow D^0 \\pi^+$ decay, allowing the determination of the flavour of the $D^0$ meson using the pion charge. The $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-}$ decay, which has a well measured $CP$ asymmetry, is used as a calibration channel. The $CP$ asymmetry for $D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S$ is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\mathcal{A}^{CP}(D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S) = (4.2\\pm 3.4\\pm 1.0)\\%, \\end{equation*} where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This result is combined with the previous LHCb measurement at lower centre-of-mass energies to obtain \\begin{equation*} \\mathcal{A}^{CP}(D^0\\rightarrow K^0_S K^0_S) = (2.0\\pm 2.9\\pm 1.0)\\%. \\end{equa...

  16. Thermal time constant: optimising the skin temperature predictive modelling in lower limb prostheses using Gaussian processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Neha; Glesk, Ivan; Buis, Arjan

    2016-06-01

    Elevated skin temperature at the body/device interface of lower-limb prostheses is one of the major factors that affect tissue health. The heat dissipation in prosthetic sockets is greatly influenced by the thermal conductive properties of the hard socket and liner material employed. However, monitoring of the interface temperature at skin level in lower-limb prosthesis is notoriously complicated. This is due to the flexible nature of the interface liners used which requires consistent positioning of sensors during donning and doffing. Predicting the residual limb temperature by monitoring the temperature between socket and liner rather than skin and liner could be an important step in alleviating complaints on increased temperature and perspiration in prosthetic sockets. To predict the residual limb temperature, a machine learning algorithm - Gaussian processes is employed, which utilizes the thermal time constant values of commonly used socket and liner materials. This Letter highlights the relevance of thermal time constant of prosthetic materials in Gaussian processes technique which would be useful in addressing the challenge of non-invasively monitoring the residual limb skin temperature. With the introduction of thermal time constant, the model can be optimised and generalised for a given prosthetic setup, thereby making the predictions more reliable.

  17. CMLOG: A common message logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.; Akers, W.; Bickley, M.; Wu, D.; Watson, W. III

    1997-01-01

    The Common Message Logging (CMLOG) system is an object-oriented and distributed system that not only allows applications and systems to log data (messages) of any type into a centralized database but also lets applications view incoming messages in real-time or retrieve stored data from the database according to selection rules. It consists of a concurrent Unix server that handles incoming logging or searching messages, a Motif browser that can view incoming messages in real-time or display stored data in the database, a client daemon that buffers and sends logging messages to the server, and libraries that can be used by applications to send data to or retrieve data from the database via the server. This paper presents the design and implementation of the CMLOG system meanwhile it will also address the issue of integration of CMLOG into existing control systems. CMLOG into existing control systems

  18. The beta(+) decay and cosmic-ray half-life of Mn-54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacruz, M. T. F.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Garcia, A.; Larimer, R. M.; Lesko, K. T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Wietfeldt, F. E.

    1993-03-01

    We performed a search for the beta(+) branch of Mn-54 decay. As a cosmic ray, Mn-54, deprived of its atomic electrons, can decay only via beta(+) and beta(-) decay, with a half-life of the order of 106 yr. This turns Mn-54 into a suitable cosmic chronometer for the study of cosmic-ray confinement times. We searched for coincident back-to-back 511-keV gamma-rays using two germanium detectors inside a Nal(Tl) annulus. An upper limit of 2 x 10-8 was found for the beta(+) decay branch, corresponding to a lower limit of 13.7 for the log ft value.

  19. Measurement of the Slowing-Down and Thermalization Time of Neutrons in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, E [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden); Sjoestrand, N G [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1963-11-15

    The experimental equipment for the study of the time behaviour of neutrons during slowing-down and thermalization in a moderator by the use of a pulsed van de Graaff accelerator as a neutron source is described. Information on the change with time of the neutron spectrum is obtained from its reaction with spectrum indicators, the reaction rate being observed by the detection of capture gamma rays. The time resolution may be chosen in the range 0.01 to 5 {mu}s. Measurements have been made for water with cadmium, gadolinium and samarium as indicators dissolved in the medium. A slowing- down time to 0.2 eV of 2.7 {+-} 0.4 {mu}s and a total thermalization time of 25 - 30 {mu}s were obtained. From 9 {mu}s after the injection, the results are well described by the assumption of the flux as a Maxwell distribution cooling down to the moderator temperature with a thermalization time constant of 4.1 {+-} 0.4 {mu}s.

  20. Quasiperiodicity in time evolution of the Bloch vector under the thermal Jaynes-Cummings model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Hiroo; Ban, Masashi

    2014-07-01

    We study a quasiperiodic structure in the time evolution of the Bloch vector, whose dynamics is governed by the thermal Jaynes-Cummings model (JCM). Putting the two-level atom into a certain pure state and the cavity field into a mixed state in thermal equilibrium at initial time, we let the whole system evolve according to the JCM Hamiltonian. During this time evolution, motion of the Bloch vector seems to be in disorder. Because of the thermal photon distribution, both a norm and a direction of the Bloch vector change hard at random. In this paper, taking a different viewpoint compared with ones that we have been used to, we investigate quasiperiodicity of the Bloch vector’s trajectories. Introducing the concept of the quasiperiodic motion, we can explain the confused behaviour of the system as an intermediate state between periodic and chaotic motions. More specifically, we discuss the following two facts: (1) If we adjust the time interval Δt properly, figures consisting of plotted dots at the constant time interval acquire scale invariance under replacement of Δt by sΔt, where s(>1) is an arbitrary real but not transcendental number. (2) We can compute values of the time variable t, which let |Sz(t)| (the absolute value of the z-component of the Bloch vector) be very small, with the Diophantine approximation (a rational approximation of an irrational number).

  1. Measurements of time-dependent CP violation in B0→ωKS0, f0(980)KS0, KS0π0 and K+K-KS0 decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Y.; Chen, K.-F.; Miyake, H.; Tajima, O.; Trabelsi, K.; Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Anipko, D.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bitenc, U.; Bizjak, I.; Blyth, S.; Bondar, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chang, P.; Chen, A.; Chen, W. T.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Cole, S.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Dragic, J.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Fratina, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hastings, N. C.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Higuchi, T.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, K.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kaji, H.; Kang, J. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kulasiri, R.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, M. J.; Lesiak, T.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S.-W.; Liventsev, D.; Matsumoto, T.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mohapatra, D.; Moloney, G. R.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Pestotnik, R.; Piilonen, L. E.; Sakai, Y.; Satoyama, N.; Schietinger, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibuya, H.; Singh, J. B.; Somov, A.; Soni, N.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stoeck, H.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tian, X. C.; Tikhomirov, I.; Tsukamoto, T.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Ushiroda, Y.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Villa, S.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yusa, Y.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2007-11-01

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B0→ωKS0, f0(980)KS0, KS0π0 and K+K-KS0 decays based on a sample of 535×106 BB¯ pairs collected at the Υ(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy-asymmetric e+e- collider. One neutral B meson is fully reconstructed in one of the specified decay channels, and the flavor of the accompanying B meson is identified from its decay products. CP-violation parameters for each of the decay modes are obtained from the asymmetries in the distributions of the proper-time intervals between the two B decays.

  2. Time-resolved probing of electron thermal conduction in femtosecond-laser-pulse-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vue, B.T.V.

    1993-06-01

    We present time-resolved measurements of reflectivity, transmissivity and frequency shifts of probe light interacting with the rear of a disk-like plasma produced by irradiation of a transparent solid target with 0.1ps FWHM laser pulses at peak intensity 5 x 10 l4 W/CM 2 . Experimental results show a large increase in reflection, revealing rapid formation of a steep gradient and overdense surface plasma layer during the first picosecond after irradiation. Frequency shifts due to a moving ionization created by thermal conduction into the solid target are recorded. Calculations using a nonlinear thermal heat wave model show good agreement with the measured frequency shifts, further confining the strong thermal transport effect

  3. Utilization and cost of log production from animal loging operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraj P. Shrestha; Bobby L. Lanford; Robert B. Rummer; Mark Dubois

    2006-01-01

    Forest harvesting with animals is a labor-intensive operation. It is expensive to use machines on smaller woodlots, which require frequent moves if mechanically logged. So, small logging systems using animals may be more cost effective. In this study, work sampling was used for five animal logging operations in Alabama to measure productive and non-productive time...

  4. Development of regional stump-to-mill logging cost estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris B. LeDoux; John E. Baumgras

    1989-01-01

    Planning logging operations requires estimating the logging costs for the sale or tract being harvested. Decisions need to be made on equipment selection and its application to terrain. In this paper a methodology is described that has been developed and implemented to solve the problem of accurately estimating logging costs by region. The methodology blends field time...

  5. Ultrafast CT scanning of an oak log for internal defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis G. Wagner; Fred W. Taylor; Douglas S. Ladd; Charles W. McMillin; Fredrick L. Roder

    1989-01-01

    Detecting internal defects in sawlogs and veneer logs with computerized tomographic (CT) scanning is possible, but has been impractical due to the long scanning time required. This research investigated a new scanner able to acquire 34 cross-sectional log scans per second. This scanning rate translates to a linear log feed rate of 85 feet (25.91 m) per minute at one...

  6. Study on thermal neutron spectra in reactor moderators by time-of-flight method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1982-12-01

    Prediction of thermal neutron spectra in a reactor core plays very important role in the neutronic design of the reactor for obtaining the accurate thermal group constants. It is well known that the neutron scattering properties of the moderator materials markedly influence the thermal neutron spectra. Therefore, 0 0 angular dependent thermal neutron spectra were measured by the time-of-flight method in the following moderator bulks 1) Graphite bulk poisoned with boron at the temperatures from 20 to 800 0 C, 2) Light water bulk poisoned with Cadmium and/or Indium, 3) Light water-natural uranium heterogeneous bulk. The measured results were compared with calculation utilizing Young-Koppel and Haywood scattering model for graphite and light water respectively. On the other hand, a variety of 20% enriched uranium loaded and graphite moderated cores consisting of the different lattice cell in a wide range of the carbon to uranium atomic ratio have been built at Semi-Homogeneous Critical Experimental Assembly (SHE) to perform the critical experiments related to Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The experimental data were for the critical masses in 235 U, reactivity worths of experimental burnable poison rods, thorium rods, natural-uranium rods and experimental control rods and kinetic parameters. It is made clear from comparison between measurement and calculation that the accurate thermal group constants can be obtained by use of the Young-Koppel and Haywood neutron scattering models if heterogeneity of reactor core lattices is taken into account precisely. (author)

  7. Utilizing the slowing-down-time technique for benchmarking neutron thermalization in graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, T.; Hawari, A. I.; Wehring, B. W.

    2007-01-01

    Graphite is the moderator/reflector in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept of Generation IV reactors. As a thermal reactor, the prediction of the thermal neutron spectrum in the VHTR is directly dependent on the accuracy of the thermal neutron scattering libraries of graphite. In recent years, work has been on-going to benchmark and validate neutron thermalization in 'reactor grade' graphite. Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP5 code were used to design a pulsed neutron slowing-down-time experiment and to investigate neutron slowing down and thermalization in graphite at temperatures relevant to VHTR operation. The unique aspect of this experiment is its ability to observe the behavior of neutrons throughout an energy range extending from the source energy to energies below 0.1 eV. In its current form, the experiment is designed and implemented at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Consequently, ORELA neutron pulses are injected into a 70 cm x 70 cm x 70 cm graphite pile. A furnace system that surrounds the pile and is capable of heating the graphite to a centerline temperature of 1200 K has been designed and built. A system based on U-235 fission chambers and Li-6 scintillation detectors surrounds the pile. This system is coupled to multichannel scaling instrumentation and is designed for the detection of leakage neutrons as a function of the slowing-down-time (i.e., time after the pulse). To ensure the accuracy of the experiment, careful assessment was performed of the impact of background noise (due to room return neutrons) and pulse-to-pulse overlap on the measurement. Therefore, the entire setup is surrounded by borated polyethylene shields and the experiment is performed using a source pulse frequency of nearly 130 Hz. As the basis for the benchmark, the calculated time dependent reaction rates in the detectors (using the MCNP code and its associated ENDF-B/VI thermal neutron scattering libraries) are compared to measured

  8. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  9. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  10. Measurement of the time-dependent $CP$ asymmetry in $B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^0_{\\rm S}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, V; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Maino, M; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the $CP$ violation observables $S_{J/\\psi K^0_{\\rm S}}$ and $C_{J/\\psi K^0_{\\rm S}}$ in the decay channel $B^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi K^0_{\\rm S}$ performed with 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV collected by the LHCb experiment. The fit to the data yields $S_{J/\\psi K^0_{\\rm S}}= 0.73 \\pm 0.07 {\\rm (stat)} \\pm 0.04 {\\rm (syst)}$ and $C_{J/\\psi K^0_{\\rm S}}= 0.03 \\pm 0.09 {\\rm (stat)} \\pm 0.01 {\\rm (syst)}$. Both values are consistent with the current world averages and within expectations from the Standard Model.

  11. HELIOSEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY OF SIMULATED SUNSPOTS: MAGNETIC AND THERMAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO TRAVEL TIMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe, T. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Braun, D. C.; Crouch, A. D. [NorthWest Research Associates, Colorado Research Associates, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Birch, A. C., E-mail: tobias@iac.es [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-10-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level in the simulations) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it would suggest a path toward inversions for sunspot structure.

  12. HELIOSEISMIC HOLOGRAPHY OF SIMULATED SUNSPOTS: MAGNETIC AND THERMAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO TRAVEL TIMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felipe, T.; Braun, D. C.; Crouch, A. D.; Birch, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Wave propagation through sunspots involves conversion between waves of acoustic and magnetic character. In addition, the thermal structure of sunspots is very different than that of the quiet Sun. As a consequence, the interpretation of local helioseismic measurements of sunspots has long been a challenge. With the aim of understanding these measurements, we carry out numerical simulations of wave propagation through sunspots. Helioseismic holography measurements made from the resulting simulated wavefields show qualitative agreement with observations of real sunspots. We use additional numerical experiments to determine, separately, the influence of the thermal structure of the sunspot and the direct effect of the sunspot magnetic field. We use the ray approximation to show that the travel-time shifts in the thermal (non-magnetic) sunspot model are primarily produced by changes in the wave path due to the Wilson depression rather than variations in the wave speed. This shows that inversions for the subsurface structure of sunspots must account for local changes in the density. In some ranges of horizontal phase speed and frequency there is agreement (within the noise level in the simulations) between the travel times measured in the full magnetic sunspot model and the thermal model. If this conclusion proves to be robust for a wide range of models, it would suggest a path toward inversions for sunspot structure.

  13. Measurement of decay time of K→π0π0 and tagging the KL and KS in the NA48 experiment at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crepe, Sabine

    1998-05-01

    The NA48 experiment aims to measure, in the neutral kaon system and with a precision of 0.0002, the real part of the ratio between the amplitudes of the direct and indirect breaking of the CP symmetry. To reach the requested precision NA48 has to minimize systematic uncertainties and thus has chosen to detect simultaneously and in the same fiducial region the long and short-lived (K L and K S ) decays into two charged or neutral pions. Consequently, kaon tagging is necessary. It is done using the time coincidences between these decays and the protons at the origin of the K S beam. As mis-tagging leads to large bias for the NA48 measurement, it has to be carefully evaluated and understood. It could be due either to detectors inefficiencies or to random coincidences between K L and protons. The detector used for the tagging of the neutral modes is the liquid krypton calorimeter. Its time performances, studied with 1996 and 1997 data, appear to be very good: for two neutral pion decays its resolution is 250 ps and its inefficiency smaller than 0.0001. Moreover, the amount of random coincidences between protons and K L is directly related to the instantaneous rate of the proton beam. The time structures of this beam have been studied, Several frequencies have been found and the effective spill length has been measured to be only 75 per cent of the total one. Finally, the uncertainties on the real part of the ratio between direct and indirect CP breaking due to mis-tagging have been evaluated for the 1997 data. They are smaller than the statistical one. (author)

  14. LHCb: Time-dependent amplitude analysis of semileptonically-tagged $D^0 \\to K^0_S \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Reichert, S

    2013-01-01

    The self-conjugate hadronic decay $D^0 \\to K^0_S \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ provides access to the measurement of the mixing parameters of the neutral $D$-meson system and allows to test for CP violation. A measurement of the mixing parameters $x_D$ and $y_D$ as well as of the parameters $|q/p|$ and $\\phi$, which govern indirect CP violation, will be performed based on a time-dependent amplitude-model analysis of the full LHCb dataset of 2011 and 2012 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3fb$^{-1}$.

  15. LHCb: Time-dependent CP violation in $B^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B^0_s \\to K^+ K^-$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Perazzini, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Using an integrated luminosity of 0.69 fb$^{-1}$ collected by LHCb in 2011, we report measurements of direct and mixing-induced CP violation in $B^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $B_s^0 \\to K^+K^-$ decays. The measurements of the $B^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-$ asymmetries are compatible with those from the B factories and yield 3.2$\\sigma$ evidence of mixing-induced CP violation, whereas the $B^0_s \\to K^+ K^-$ asymmetries are measured for the first time ever.

  16. Flavour-tagged time-dependent angular analysis of the $B_s^0 \\rightarrow J/\\psi(\\mu^+\\mu^-)\\Phi(K^+K^-)$ decay with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Jakoubek, Tomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    We present a flavour tagged time dependent angular analysis of the $B_s \\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi$ decay, using 4.9 fb$^{−1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector from 7 TeV proton-proton collisions recorded in 2011. CP violation in this channel is described by a weak phase $\\phi_s$, which is sensitive to new physics contributions. The measured value is $\\phi_s$ = 0.12 $\\pm$ 0.25 (stat.) $\\pm$ 0.05 (syst.) rad, which is in good agreement with Standard Model expectations. Also other measured parameters are consistent with the world average.

  17. Time-dependent amplitude analysis of semileptonically-tagged $D^0 \\to K_S^0 \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00392459

    2013-01-01

    The hadronic decay $D^0 \\to K_S^0 \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ provides access to the measurement of the mixing parameters of the neutral D-meson system and allows to test for CP violation. A measurement of the mixing parameters $x_D$ and $y_D$ as well as of the parameters $|q/p|$ and $\\phi=arg(q,p)$, which govern indirect CP violation, will be performed based on a time-dependent amplitude-model analysis of the full LHCb dataset of 2011 and 2012 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3/fb.

  18. Determinants and time to blood transfusion among thermal burn patients admitted to Mulago Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilyewala, C; Alenyo, R; Ssentongo, R

    2017-07-06

    Blood transfusion, a practice under re-evaluation in general, remains common among thermal burn patients due to the hematological alterations associated with burns that manifest as anemia. Today advocacy is for restrictive blood transfusion taking into account individual patient characteristics. We went out to identify the parameters that may determine transfusion requirement and the time to blood transfusion for thermal burn patients in Mulago Hospital in order to build statistics and a basis to standardize future practice and Hospital protocol. 112 patients with thermal burns were enrolled into a prospective cohort study conducted in the Surgical Unit of the Accidents and Emergency Department and Burns Unit of Mulago Hospital. Relevant data on pre-injury, injury and post-injury factors was collected including relevant laboratory investigations and treatment modalities like surgical intervention. Patients were clinically followed up for a maximum period of 28 days and we identified those that were transfused. 22.3% of patients were transfused. The median time to transfusion was 17 days from time of injury and varied with different patient characteristics. The median pre-transfusion hemoglobin (Hb) level was 8.2 g/dL. Transfusion was significantly related to; admission to the intensive care unit (p = 0.001), a body mass index (BMI) burn surface area (TBSA) >20 (p = 0.049), pre-existing illness (p = 0.046), and white blood cell (WBC) count 12,000/μL (p = 0.05). Pre-existing illnesses, a low BMI, TBSA of >20%, admission to the intensive care unit and abnormalities in the WBC count are useful predictors of blood transfusion among thermal burns patients admitted to Mulago Hospital. The precise time to transfusion from time of burns injury cannot be generalized. With close monitoring of each individual patient lies the appropriateness and timeliness of their management.

  19. Estimation of leaf area index in the sunflower as a function of thermal time1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dioneia Daiane Pitol Lucas

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to obtain a mathematical model for estimating the leaf area index (LAI of a sunflower crop as a function of accumulated thermal time. Generating the models and testing their coefficients was carried out using data obtained from experiments carried out for different sowing dates in the crop years of 2007/08, 2008/09, 2009/10 and 2010/11 with two sunflower hybrids, Aguará 03 and Hélio 358. Linear leaf dimensions were used for the non-destructive measurement of the leaf area, and thermal time was used to quantify the biological time. With the data for accumulated thermal time (TTa and LAI known for any one day after emergence, mathematical models were generated for estimating the LAI. The following models were obtained, as they presented the best fit (lowest rootmean- square error, RMSE: gaussian peak, cubic polynomial, sigmoidal and an adjusted compound model, the modified sigmoidal. The modified sigmoidal model had the best fit to the generation data and the highest value for the coefficient of determination (R2. In testing the models, the lowest values for root-mean-square error, and the highest R2 between the observed and estimated values were obtained with the modified sigmoidal model.

  20. Well logging. Acquisition and applications; Diagraphies. Acquisition et applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, O.; Serra, L.

    2001-07-01

    This reference book on wire-line and LWD well logging covers all geophysical methods of underground survey in a synthetic, visual and dynamical way. It treats of: the physical principle of well logging measurements, the different types of existing probes, the factors that can influence the measurements, and the applications of these measurements. The following well-logging methods are reviewed: resistivity; electromagnetic wave propagation; magnetic susceptibility and magnetic field; spontaneous potential; nuclear logging: natural gamma radioactivity, density logging, photoelectric index, neutron emission probes, hydrogen index or neutron porosity, neutron induced gamma spectroscopy, neutron relaxation time, NMR; acoustic measurements: sonic logging, seismic profiles; texture, structure and stratigraphy data acquisition; borehole diameter measurement; temperature measurement; wire sampling methods; place and role of well-logging in petroleum exploration; well-logging programs. (J.S.)

  1. New definition of the decay law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, M.I.

    1977-01-01

    Time evolution of unstable states is considered. The usual definition of the decay law is shown to be of a limited application. A more general definition is proposed. The decay law behaviour at long and short times is discussed

  2. The Dynamic Method for Time-of-Flight Measurement of Thermal Neutron Spectra from Pulsed Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.; Tulaev, A.B.; Bobrakov, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    The time-of-flight method for a measurement of thermal neutron spectra in the pulsed neutron sources with high efficiency of neutron registration, more than 10 5 times higher in comparison with traditional one, is described. The main problems connected with the electric current technique for time-of-flight spectra measurement are examined. The methodical errors, problems of a special neutron detector design and other questions are discussed. Some experimental results, spectra from surfaces of the water and solid methane moderators, obtained in the pulsed reactor IBR-2 (Dubna, Russia) are presented. 4 refs., 5 figs

  3. The dynamic method for time-of-flight measurement of thermal neutron spectra from pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepyolyshev, Yu.N.; Chuklyaev, S.V.; Tulaev, A.B.; Bobrakov, V.F.

    1995-01-01

    A time-of-flight method for measurement of thermal neutron spectra in pulsed neutron sources with an efficiency more than 10 5 times higher than the standard method is described. The main problems associated with the electric current technique for time-of-flight spectra measurement are examined. The methodical errors, problems of special neutron detector design and other questions are discussed. Some experimental results for spectra from the surfaces of water and solid methane moderators obtained at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor (Dubna, Russia) are presented. (orig.)

  4. Decays of supernova neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Ohlsson, Tommy; Winter, Walter

    2002-01-01

    Supernova neutrinos could be well-suited for probing neutrino decay, since decay may be observed even for very small decay rates or coupling constants. We will introduce an effective operator framework for the combined description of neutrino decay and neutrino oscillations for supernova neutrinos, which can especially take into account two properties: one is the radially symmetric neutrino flux, allowing a decay product to be re-directed towards the observer even if the parent neutrino had a different original direction of propagation. The other is decoherence because of the long baselines for coherently produced neutrinos. We will demonstrate how to use this effective theory to calculate the time-dependent fluxes at the detector. In addition, we will show the implications of a Majoron-like decay model. As a result, we will demonstrate that for certain parameter values one may observe some effects which could also mimic signals similar to the ones expected from supernova models, making it in general harder to separate neutrino and supernova properties

  5. Aspects of B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-03-04

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing phase. (orig.)

  6. Thermal Performance Characterization using Time Series Data - IEA EBC Annex 58 Guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Bacher, Peder; Bauwens, Geert

    -dynamical) steady state models where the parameters are found using classical methods for linear regression. Such steady state techniques provide sub-optimal use of the information embedded in the data and provides information only about the HLC and gA-values. Next the guidelines consider dynamical models. Firstly......, linear input-output models are considered. More specifically we will consider the class of AutoRegressive with eXogenous input (ARX) (p) models. These models provides information about the HLC and gA-values, and information about the dynamics (most frequently described as time-constants for the system......This document presents guidelines for using time series analysis methods, models and tools for estimating the thermal performance of buildings and building components. The thermal performance is measured as estimated parameters of a model, or parameters derived from estimated parameters of a model...

  7. Expression for the thermal H-mode energy confinement time under ELM-free conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryter, F.; Gruber, O.; Kardaun, O.J.W.F.; Menzler, H.P.; Wagner, F.; Schissel, D.P.; DeBoo, J.C.; Kaye, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The design of future tokamaks, which are supposed to reach ignition with the H-mode, requires a reliable scaling expression for the H-mode energy confinement time. In the present work, an H-mode scaling expression for the thermal plasma energy confinement time has been developed by combining data from four existing divertor tokamaks, ASDEX, DIII-D, JET and PBX-M. The plasma conditions, which were as similar as possible to ensure a coherent set of data, were ELM-free deuterium discharges heated by deuterium neutral beam injection. By combining four tokamaks, the parametric dependence of the thermal energy confinement on the main plasma parameters, including the three main geometrical variables, was determined. (orig./WL)

  8. Effect of anomalous transport coefficients on the thermal structure of the storm time auroral ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontheim, E.G.; Ong, R.S.B.; Roble, R.G.; Mayr, H.G.; Hoegy, W.H.; Baron, M.J.; Wickwar, V.B.

    1978-01-01

    By analyzing an observed storm time auroral electron temperature profile it is shown that anomalous transport effects strongly influence the thermal structure of the disturbed auroral ionosphere. Such anomalous transport effects are a consequence of plasma turbulence, the existence of which has been established by a large number of observations in the auroral ionosphere. The electron and composite ion energy equations are solved with anomalous electron thermal conductivity and parallel electrical resistivity coefficients. The solutions are parameterized with respect to a phenomenological altitude-dependent anomaly coefficient A and are compared with an observed storm time electron temperature profile above Chatanika. The calculated temperature profile for the classical case (A=1)disagrees considerably with the measured profile over most of the altitude range up to 450km. It is shown that an anomaly coefficient with a sharp peak of the order of 10 4 centered aroung the F 2 peak is consistent with observations

  9. Time-dependent analytical thermal model to investigate thermally induced stresses in quasi-CW-pumped laser rods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bernhardi, EH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available that determines the temperature and the thermally induced stresses in isotropic rods is presented. Even though the model is developed for isotropic rods, it is shown that it can also be used to accurately estimate the thermal effects in anisotropic rods...

  10. Time- and Space-Domain Measurements of the Thermal Conductivity in Diamond Anvil Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, A. F.

    2011-12-01

    I will give an overview of recent developments of experimental techniques to measure the thermal conductivity in diamond anvil cell (DAC) under conditions of high pressure and high temperature (P-T) which are relevant for the planetary interiors. To measure the lattice contributions to the thermal conductivity, we developed a transient heating technique (THT) in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) [1]. This technique utilizes a periodic front surface temperature variation (measured by the spectroradiometry) of a metallic absorber surrounded by the material of interest and exposed to a pulsed laser radiation (10 nanoseconds pulses). We extract the thermal diffusivity of minerals by fitting the experimental results to the model finite element (FE) calculations. We have recently modified this technique for microseconds laser pulses as this allows avoiding nonequilibrium heat transfer processes. We have measured the thermal conductivity of Ar up to 50 GPa and 2500 K; the results are in agreement with the theoretical calculations [2] in the limit of high temperatures. In collaboration with a group from the University of Illinois we have utilized a time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR)- ultrafast (femtosecond) laser pump-probe technique for measurement of the lattice thermal conductivity at high P-T conditions. We have measured the thermal conductivity of MgO up to 60 GPa and 300 K and up to 45 GPa at 600 K. The detailed results of this study will be presented in a separate paper at this Meeting. Finally, we have combined static and pulsed laser techniques to determine the thermal conductivity of Fe and its temperature dependence at high pressures up to 70 GPa and 2000 K [3]. A thin plate of Fe was positioned in an Ar medium, laser heated from one side and the temperature is being measured from both sides of the sample radiometrically. The thermal conductivity has been determined by fitting the results of FE calculations to the experimental results. These examples demonstrate

  11. Energy Payback Time Calculation for a Building Integrated Semitransparent Thermal (BISPVT) System with Air Duct

    OpenAIRE

    Kanchan Mudgil; Deepali Kamthania

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates the energy payback time (EPBT) of building integrated photovoltaic thermal (BISPVT) system for Srinagar, India. Three different photovoltaic (PV) modules namely mono crystalline silicon (m-Si), poly crystalline silicon (p-Si), and amorphous silicon (a-Si) have been considered for calculation of EPBT. It is found that, the EPBT is lowest in m-Si. Hence, integration of m-Si PV modules on the roof of a room is economical.

  12. Assessment of Time-Lapse in Visible and Thermal Face Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farokhi, Sajad; Shamsuddin, Siti Mariyam; Flusser, Jan; Sheikh, Usman Ullah

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1 (2012), s. 181-186 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : face recognition * moment invariants * Zernike moments Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/ZOI/flusser-assessment of time-lapse in visible and thermal face recognition -j.pdf

  13. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethe, Martin; Rubi, J. Miguel; Fita, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  14. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethe, Martin, E-mail: martingoethe@ub.edu; Rubi, J. Miguel [Departament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fita, Ignacio [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  15. 2-D CFD time-dependent thermal-hydraulic simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi Zadeh, Foad [Department of Engineering Physics/Polytechnique Montréal, Montréal, QC (Canada); Étienne, Stéphane [Department of Mechanical Engineering/Polytechnique Montréal, Montréal, QC (Canada); Teyssedou, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.teyssedou@polymtl.ca [Department of Engineering Physics/Polytechnique Montréal, Montréal, QC (Canada)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • 2-D time-dependent CFD simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flows are presented. • A thermal-hydraulic code using thermal physical fluid properties is used. • The numerical approach and convergence is validated against available data. • Flow configurations are correlated using Richardson’s number. • Frequency components indicate moderator flow oscillations vs. Richardson numbers. - Abstract: The distribution of the fluid temperature and mass density of the moderator flow in CANDU-6 nuclear power reactors may affect the reactivity coefficient. For this reason, any possible moderator flow configuration and consequently the corresponding temperature distributions must be studied. In particular, the variations of the reactivity may result in major safety issues. For instance, excessive temperature excursions in the vicinity of the calandria tubes nearby local flow stagnation zones, may bring about partial boiling. Moreover, steady-state simulations have shown that for operating condition, intense buoyancy forces may be dominant, which can trigger a thermal stratification. Therefore, the numerical study of the time-dependent flow transition to such a condition, is of fundamental safety concern. Within this framework, this paper presents detailed time-dependent numerical simulations of CANDU-6 moderator flow for a wide range of flow conditions. To get a better insight of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, the simulations were performed by covering long physical-time periods using an open-source code (Code-Saturne V3) developed by Électricité de France. The results show not only a region where the flow is characterized by coherent structures of flow fluctuations but also the existence of two limit cases where fluid oscillations disappear almost completely.

  16. Thermal comfort. Individual and time-dependent?; Thermisch comfort. Individueel en tijdafhankelijk?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noom, P.; Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G. [Unit Building Physics and Systems, Faculteit Bouwkunde, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven TUE, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Haan, J.F.B.C.; Van der Velden, J. [Kropman Installatietechniek, Rijswijk (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    With respect to the perceived thermal comfort there are large individual differences, which also change during daytime. Therefore is worthwhile to determine the individual thermal comfort profiles during the day. The perceived thermal comfort level follows an individual day profile. By using these profiles as a leading principal to control the indoor temperatures an improvement of the perceived comfort is possible while at the same time it can reduce energy consumption. [Dutch] Nieuwe optimalisatiemogelijkheden voor energiegebruik voor het comfort zijn mogelijk door vanuit de actuele en toekomstige individuele behoefte aan comfort van de gebruiker de installatie optimaal aan te sturen. Dit artikel geeft inzicht in de efficiente afstemming van vraag en aanbod van energie voor thermisch comfort. In een kantoorgebouw zijn metingen gedaan, conform NEN-EN-ISO 7726 (Ergonomics of the thermal environment. Instruments for measuring physical quantities), en er is een enquete gehouden om het thermisch comfort individueel te kunnen bepalen gedurende de werkdag. Het doel van de metingen was de verschillen tussen de individuele beleving en de werkelijke klimaat omstandigheden te kunnen bepalen.

  17. Global convergence in leaf respiration from estimates of thermal acclimation across time and space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwel, Mark C; Slot, Martijn; Lichstein, Jeremy W; Reich, Peter B; Kattge, Jens; Atkin, Owen K; Bloomfield, Keith J; Tjoelker, Mark G; Kitajima, Kaoru

    2015-09-01

    Recent compilations of experimental and observational data have documented global temperature-dependent patterns of variation in leaf dark respiration (R), but it remains unclear whether local adjustments in respiration over time (through thermal acclimation) are consistent with the patterns in R found across geographical temperature gradients. We integrated results from two global empirical syntheses into a simple temperature-dependent respiration framework to compare the measured effects of respiration acclimation-over-time and variation-across-space to one another, and to a null model in which acclimation is ignored. Using these models, we projected the influence of thermal acclimation on: seasonal variation in R; spatial variation in mean annual R across a global temperature gradient; and future increases in R under climate change. The measured strength of acclimation-over-time produces differences in annual R across spatial temperature gradients that agree well with global variation-across-space. Our models further project that acclimation effects could potentially halve increases in R (compared with the null model) as the climate warms over the 21st Century. Convergence in global temperature-dependent patterns of R indicates that physiological adjustments arising from thermal acclimation are capable of explaining observed variation in leaf respiration at ambient growth temperatures across the globe. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. A time-of-flight detector for thermal neutrons from radiotherapy Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, V. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN di Milano (Italy)], E-mail: conti.Valentina@gmail.com; Bartesaghi, G. [Universita degli Studi di Milano and INFN di Milano (Italy); Bolognini, D.; Mascagna, V.; Perboni, C.; Prest, M.; Scazzi, S. [Universita dell' Insubria, Como and INFN di Milano (Italy); Mozzanica, A. [Universita degli Studi di Brescia and INFN sezione di Pavia (Italy); Cappelletti, P.; Frigerio, M.; Gelosa, S.; Monti, A.; Ostinelli, A. [Fisica Sanitaria, Ospedale S. Anna di Como (Italy); Giannini, G.; Vallazza, E. [INFN, sezione di Trieste and Universita degli Studi di Trieste (Italy)

    2007-10-21

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a therapeutic technique exploiting the release of dose inside the tumour cell after a fission of a {sup 10}B nucleus following the capture of a thermal neutron. BNCT could be the treatment for extended tumors (liver, stomach, lung), radio-resistant ones (melanoma) or tumours surrounded by vital organs (brain). The application of BNCT requires a high thermal neutron flux (>5x10{sup 8}ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}) with the correct energy spectrum (neutron energy <10keV), two requirements that for the moment are fulfilled only by nuclear reactors. The INFN PhoNeS (Photo Neutron Source) project is trying to produce such a neutron beam with standard radiotherapy Linacs, maximizing with a dedicated photo-neutron converter the neutrons produced by Giant Dipole Resonance by a high energy (>8MeV) photon beam. In this framework, we have developed a real-time detector to measure the thermal neutron time-of -flight to compute the flux and the energy spectrum. Given the pulsed nature of Linac beams, the detector is a single neutron counting system made of a scintillator detecting the photon emitted after the neutron capture by the hydrogen nuclei. The scintillator signal is sampled by a dedicated FPGA clock thus obtaining the exact arrival time of the neutron itself. The paper will present the detector and its electronics, the feasibility measurements with a Varian Clinac 1800/2100CD and comparison with a Monte Carlo simulation.

  19. Time-resolved photoluminescence of Ga(NAsP) multiple quantum wells grown on Si substrate: Effects of rapid thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woscholski, R., E-mail: ronja.woscholski@physik.uni-marburg.de; Shakfa, M.K.; Gies, S.; Wiemer, M.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Zimprich, M.; Reinhard, S.; Jandieri, K.; Baranovskii, S.D.; Heimbrodt, W.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W.; Koch, M.

    2016-08-31

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) spectroscopy has been used to study the impact of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on the optical properties and carrier dynamics in Ga(NAsP) multiple quantum well heterostructures (MQWHs) grown on silicon substrates. TR-PL measurements reveal an enhancement in the PL efficiency when the RTA temperature is increased up to 925 °C. Then, the PL intensity dramatically decreases with the annealing temperature. This behavior is explained by the variation of the disorder degree in the studied structures. The analysis of the low-temperature emission-energy-dependent PL decay time enables us to characterize the disorder in the Ga(NAsP) MQWHs. The theoretically extracted energy-scales of disorder confirm the experimental observations. - Highlights: • Ga(NAsP) multiple quantum well heterostructures (MQWHs) grown on silicon substrates • Impact of rapid thermal annealing on the optical properties and carrier dynamics • Time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy was applied. • PL transients became continuously faster with increasing annealing temperature. • Enhancement in the PL efficiency with increasing annealing temperature up to 925 °C.

  20. Time-resolved photoluminescence of Ga(NAsP) multiple quantum wells grown on Si substrate: Effects of rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woscholski, R.; Shakfa, M.K.; Gies, S.; Wiemer, M.; Rahimi-Iman, A.; Zimprich, M.; Reinhard, S.; Jandieri, K.; Baranovskii, S.D.; Heimbrodt, W.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W.; Koch, M.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) spectroscopy has been used to study the impact of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on the optical properties and carrier dynamics in Ga(NAsP) multiple quantum well heterostructures (MQWHs) grown on silicon substrates. TR-PL measurements reveal an enhancement in the PL efficiency when the RTA temperature is increased up to 925 °C. Then, the PL intensity dramatically decreases with the annealing temperature. This behavior is explained by the variation of the disorder degree in the studied structures. The analysis of the low-temperature emission-energy-dependent PL decay time enables us to characterize the disorder in the Ga(NAsP) MQWHs. The theoretically extracted energy-scales of disorder confirm the experimental observations. - Highlights: • Ga(NAsP) multiple quantum well heterostructures (MQWHs) grown on silicon substrates • Impact of rapid thermal annealing on the optical properties and carrier dynamics • Time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy was applied. • PL transients became continuously faster with increasing annealing temperature. • Enhancement in the PL efficiency with increasing annealing temperature up to 925 °C

  1. Thermal Time Evolution of Non-Flaring Active Regions Determined by SDO/AIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Paul James; Hannah, Iain; Viall, Nicholeen; MacKinnon, Alexander; Ireland, Jack; Bradshaw, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    We present the pixel-level time evolution of DEM maps from SDO/AIA data using two different methods (Hannah et al. 2012; Cheung et al. 2015). These sets of Differential Emission Measure (DEM) maps allow us to determine the slopes of the DEM throughout non-flaring structures, and investigate how this changes with time, a crucial parameter in terms of how these flux tubes are being heated. We present this analysis on both real and synthetic data allowing us to understand how robustly we can recover the thermal time evolution. As this analysis also produces the time series in different temperature bands we can further investigate the underlying heating mechanisms by applying a variety of techniques to probe the frequency and nature of the heating, such as time-lag analysis (Viall & Klimchuck 2012; 2016), power spectrum analysis (Ireland et al. 2015), and Local Intermittency Measure (Dinkelaker & MacKinnon 2013a,b).

  2. Time-resolved observation of thermally activated rupture of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, Wan; Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Kwon, Soyoung; Kim, Bongsu; Jhe, Wonho

    2015-01-01

    The capillary-condensed liquid bridge is one of the most ubiquitous forms of liquid in nature and contributes significantly to adhesion and friction of biological molecules as well as microscopic objects. Despite its important role in nanoscience and technology, the rupture process of the bridge is not well understood and needs more experimental works. Here, we report real-time observation of rupture of a capillary-condensed water nanobridge in ambient condition. During slow and stepwise stretch of the nanobridge, we measured the activation time for rupture, or the latency time required for the bridge breakup. By statistical analysis of the time-resolved distribution of activation time, we show that rupture is a thermally activated stochastic process and follows the Poisson statistics. In particular, from the Arrhenius law that the rupture rate satisfies, we estimate the position-dependent activation energies for the capillary-bridge rupture

  3. Querying Workflow Logs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A business process or workflow is an assembly of tasks that accomplishes a business goal. Business process management is the study of the design, configuration/implementation, enactment and monitoring, analysis, and re-design of workflows. The traditional methodology for the re-design and improvement of workflows relies on the well-known sequence of extract, transform, and load (ETL, data/process warehousing, and online analytical processing (OLAP tools. In this paper, we study the ad hoc queryiny of process enactments for (data-centric business processes, bypassing the traditional methodology for more flexibility in querying. We develop an algebraic query language based on “incident patterns” with four operators inspired from Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN representation, allowing the user to formulate ad hoc queries directly over workflow logs. A formal semantics of this query language, a preliminary query evaluation algorithm, and a group of elementary properties of the operators are provided.

  4. A neutron well logging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A pulsed neutron well logging system using a sealed off neutron generator tube is provided with a programmable digital neutron output control system. The control system monitors the target beam current and compares a function of this current with a pre-programmed control function to develop a control signal for the neutron generator. The control signal is used in a series regulator to control the average replenisher current of the neutron generator tube. The programmable digital control system of the invention also provides digital control signals as a function of time to provide ion source voltages. This arrangement may be utilized to control neutron pulses durations and repetition rates or to produce other modulated wave forms for intensity modulating the output of the neutron generator as a function of time. (Auth.)

  5. Apple detection using infrared thermal image, 3: Real-time temperature measurement of apple tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.H.; Takahashi, T.; Fukuchi, H.; Sun, M.; Terao, H.

    1998-01-01

    In Part 1, we reported the thermal distribution characteristics and the identification methods of apples, leaves and branches by using the infrared thermal image at the specific time. This paper reports the temperature changing characteristics and the relationships among apples, leaves and air temperature based on the information measured by the infrared thermal image equipment in the real-time for 24 hours. As a result, it was confirmed that the average temperature of apples was 1 degree C or more higher than the one of the leaves, and the average temperature of the leaves was almost same as the air temperature within daytime and about 3 hours period after sunset. It was also clarified for a remarkable temperature difference not to exist for midnight and the early morning between the apples and the leaves, and both became almost as well as the air temperature. Moreover, a binary image was easily obtained and the apples could be detected by using this temperature difference informat

  6. Real time thermal hydraulic model for high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sui Zhe; Sun Jun; Ma Yuanle; Zhang Ruipeng

    2013-01-01

    A real-time thermal hydraulic model of the reactor core was described and integrated into the simulation system for the high temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor nuclear power plant, which was developed in the vPower platform, a new simulation environment for nuclear and fossil power plants. In the thermal hydraulic model, the helium flow paths were established by the flow network tools in order to obtain the flow rates and pressure distributions. Meanwhile, the heat structures, representing all the solid heat transfer elements in the pebble bed, graphite reflectors and carbon bricks, were connected by the heat transfer network in order to solve the temperature distributions in the reactor core. The flow network and heat transfer network were coupled and calculated in real time. Two steady states (100% and 50% full power) and two transients (inlet temperature step and flow step) were tested that the quantitative comparisons of the steady results with design data and qualitative analysis of the transients showed the good applicability of the present thermal hydraulic model. (authors)

  7. TRSM-a thermal-hydraulic real-time simulation model for PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Weichang

    1997-01-01

    TRSM (a Thermal-hydraulic Real-time Simulation Model) has been developed for PWR real-time simulation and best-estimate prediction of normal operating and abnormal accident conditions. It is a non-equilibrium two phase flow thermal-hydraulic model based on five basic conservation equations. A drift flux model is used to account for the unequal velocities of liquid and gaseous mixture, with or without the presence of the noncondensibles. Critical flow models are applied for break flow and valve flow calculations. A 5-regime two phase heat convection model is applied for clad-to-coolant as well as fluid-to-tubing heat transfer. A rigorous reactor coolant pump model is used to calculate the pressure drop and rise for the suction and discharge ends with complete pump characteristics curves included. The TRSM model has been adapted in the full-scale training simulator of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant 300 MW unit to simulate the thermal-hydraulic performance of the NSSS. The simulation results of a cold leg LOCA and a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident are presented

  8. Experimental setup and commissioning baseline study in search of time-variations in beta-decay half-lives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goddard, Braden, E-mail: goddard.braden@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Hitt, George W. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Department of Applied Mathematics and Science, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Solodov, Alexander A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Bridi, Dorian; Isakovic, A.F. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Science, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); El-Khazali, Reyad [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Abulail, Ayman, E-mail: aabulail@pi.ac.ae [Department of Applied Mathematics and Science, Khalifa University of Science, Technology & Research, P.O. Box 127788, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2016-03-11

    Recently there have been a number of investigations into whether the decay constant of a radioactive isotope can be influenced by external factors, such as the Earth–Sun distance or Solar flare activity. Positive claims suggest that annual oscillations of ~0.1% and accelerations of ~0.4% in the relative activity of beta-emitters coincide with the Earth–Sun distance and solar flare activity, respectively. Results from replication experiments have so far been conflicting. The main criticism of the measurements used to trace and quantify these effects is that the data is of poor quality or limited in scope. Data have often been collected as part of short duration weekly calibration measurements, measured with a single type of low precision detector, only using one isotope, and having no environmental conditions information (temperature, pressure, humidity) accompanying the radiation measurements. This paper describes the setup of a series of counting experiments commissioned for addressing these criticisms. Six dedicated detector systems (four different types) measuring six different isotopes ({sup 14}C, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 204}Tl, and {sup 226}Ra) have been continuously collecting source activity synchronously with environmental data for a period of one month (April 2014). The results of this baseline commissioning study show that there are correlations between activity and environmental conditions for some detector types which are then quantified. The results also show that the one sigma counting uncertainties in all the detectors are less than 0.024% for a given 24 h period. After accounting for propagated uncertainties from corrections against correlations with environmental data, the ability to resolve 0.1% activity changes varies, from 8 min to 1.6 days, depending on the specific detector. All six experiments therefore, will have sufficient precision over the upcoming year to scrutinize claims of both annual activity oscillations and

  9. Vessel thermal map real-time system for the JET tokamak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Alves

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The installation of international thermonuclear experimental reactor-relevant materials for the plasma facing components (PFCs in the Joint European Torus (JET is expected to have a strong impact on the operation and protection of the experiment. In particular, the use of all-beryllium tiles, which deteriorate at a substantially lower temperature than the formerly installed carbon fiber composite tiles, imposes strict thermal restrictions on the PFCs during operation. Prompt and precise responses are therefore required whenever anomalous temperatures are detected. The new vessel thermal map real-time application collects the temperature measurements provided by dedicated pyrometers and infrared cameras, groups them according to spatial location and probable offending heat source, and raises alarms that will trigger appropriate protective responses. In the context of the JET global scheme for the protection of the new wall, the system is required to run on a 10 ms cycle communicating with other systems through the real-time data network. In order to meet these requirements a commercial off-the-shelf solution has been adopted based on standard x86 multicore technology. Linux and the multithreaded application real-time executor (MARTe software framework were respectively the operating system of choice and the real-time framework used to build the application. This paper presents an overview of the system with particular technical focus on the configuration of its real-time capability and the benefits of the modular development approach and advanced tools provided by the MARTe framework.

  10. Neural-net based real-time economic dispatch for thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M.; Milosevic, B. [Inst. Nikola Tesla, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Power Systems; Calovic, M. [Univ. of Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Sobajic, D.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    This paper proposes the application of artificial neural networks to real-time optimal generation dispatch of thermal units. The approach can take into account the operational requirements and network losses. The proposed economic dispatch uses an artificial neural network (ANN) for generation of penalty factors, depending on the input generator powers and identified system load change. Then, a few additional iterations are performed within an iterative computation procedure for the solution of coordination equations, by using reference-bus penalty-factors derived from the Newton-Raphson load flow. A coordination technique for environmental and economic dispatch of pure thermal systems, based on the neural-net theory for simplified solution algorithms and improved man-machine interface is introduced. Numerical results on two test examples show that the proposed algorithm can efficiently and accurately develop optimal and feasible generator output trajectories, by applying neural-net forecasts of system load patterns.

  11. Nambu-Goldstone mechanism in real-time thermal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Bangrong

    1998-08-01

    In a one-generation fermion condensate scheme of electroweak symmetry breaking, it is proven that at finite temperature T below the symmetry restoration temperature T c , a massive Higgs boson and three massless Nambu-Goldstone bosons could emerge from the spontaneous breaking of electroweak group SU L (2)xU Y (1)→U Q (1) if the two fermion flavors in the one generation are mass-degenerate, thus the Goldstone Theorem is rigorously valid in this case. However, if the two fermion flavors have unequal masses, owing to 'thermal fluctuation', the Goldstone Theorem will be true only approximately for a very large momentum cut-off Λ in zero temperature fermion loop or for low energy scales. All possible pinch singularities are proven to cancel each other, as is expected in a real-time thermal field theory. (author)

  12. Trees and logs important to wildlife in the interior Columbia River basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn L. Bull; Catherine G. Parks; Torolf R. Torgersen

    1997-01-01

    This publication provides qualitative and quantitative information on five distinct structures: living trees with decayed parts, trees with hollow chambers, trees with brooms, dead trees, and logs. Information is provided on the value of these structures to wildlife, the decay or infection processes involved in the formation of these structures, and the principles to...

  13. Why Older Adults Spend Time Sedentary and Break Their Sedentary Behavior: A Mixed-Methods Approach Using Life-Logging Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontje, Manon L; Leask, Calum F; Harvey, Juliet; Skelton, Dawn A; Chastin, Sebastien F M

    2018-04-01

    Older adults are recommended to reduce their sedentary time to promote healthy ageing. To develop effective interventions identifying when, why, and how older adults are able to change their sitting habits is important. The aim of this mixed-method study was to improve our understanding of reasons for (breaking) sedentary behavior in older adults. Thirty older adults (74.0 [±5.3] years old, 73% women) were asked about their believed reasons for (breaking) sedentary behavior, and about their actual reasons when looking at a personal storyboard with objective records of activPAL monitor data and time-lapse camera pictures showing all their periods of sedentary time in a day. The most often mentioned believed reason for remaining sedentary was television/radio (mentioned by 48.3%), while eating/drinking was most often mentioned as actual reason (96.6%). Only 17.2% believed that food/tea preparation was a reason to break up sitting, while this was an actual reason for 82.8% of the study sample. Results of this study show that there is a discrepancy between believed and actual reasons for (breaking) sedentary behavior. These findings suggest developing interventions utilizing the actual reasons for breaking sedentary behavior to reduce sedentary time in older adults.

  14. Interpretation of horizontal well production logs: influence of logging tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkan, E. [Colorado School of Mines, Boulder, CO (United States); Sarica, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., College Park, PA (United States); Haci, M. [Drilling Measurements, Inc (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The influence of a production-logging tool on wellbore flow rate and pressure measurements was investigated, focusing on the disturbence caused by the production-logging tool and the coiled tubing on the original flow conditions in the wellbore. The investigation was carried out using an analytical model and single-phase liquid flow was assumed. Results showed that the production-logging tool influenced the measurements as shown by the deviation of the original flow-rate, pressure profiles and low-conductivity wellbores. High production rates increase the effect of the production-logging tool. Recovering or inferring the original flow conditions in the wellbore from the production-logging data is a very complex process which cannot be solved easily. For this reason, the conditions under which the information obtained by production-logging is meaningful is of considerable practical interest. 7 refs., 2 tabs., 15 figs.

  15. Decay dynamics of blue-green luminescence in meso-porous MCM-41 nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.C.; Liu, Y.L.; Wang, C.K.; Shen, J.L.; Cheng, P.W.; Cheng, C.F.; Ko, C.-H.; Lin, T.Y.

    2005-01-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) was performed to investigate the decay of blue-green luminescence in MCM-41 nanotubes. The PL decay exhibits a clear nonexponential profile, which can be fitted by a stretched exponential function. In the temperature range from 50 to 300 K the photogenerated carriers become thermally activated with a characteristic energy of 29 meV, which is an indication of the phonon-assisted nonradiative process. The temperature dependence of the lifetime of PL decay has been explained using a model based on the radiative recombination of localized carriers and the phonon-assisted nonradiative recombination

  16. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natur