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Sample records for thermal convection loop

  1. Active Control of Thermal Convection in a Rectangular Loop by Changing its Spatial Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsun, Dmitry A.; Krasnyakov, Ivan V.; Zyuzgin, Alexey V.

    2017-12-01

    The problem of the automatic control of the fluid flow in a rectangular convective loop heated from below is studied theoretically and experimentally. The control is performed by using a feedback subsystem which changes the convection regimes by introducing small discrete changes in the spatial orientation of the loop with respect to gravity. We focus on effects that arise when the feedback controller operates with an unavoidable time delay, which is cause by the thermal inertia of the medium. The mathematical model of the phenomenon is developed. The dynamic regimes of the convection in the thermosyphon loop under control are studied. It is shown that the proposed control method can successfully stabilize not only a no-motion state of the fluid, but also time-dependent modes of convection including the irregular fluid flow at high values of the Rayleigh number. It is shown that the excessive gain of the proportional feedback can result in oscillations in the loop orientation exciting the unsteady convection modes. The comparison of the experimental data obtained for dielectric oil and dodecane with theory is given, and their good agreement is demonstrated.

  2. Behavior of deuterium and rare gases in thermal convection loops with molten Pb-17Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerstein, H.; Graebner, H.; Horn, S.; Oschinski, J. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.))

    1991-04-01

    The behaviour of deuterium in thermal convection loops with molten Pb-17Li{sup *} was investigated in the temperature range from 300 to 610deg C, and in the range of deuterium partial pressures from 0.05 to 1000 mbar. Dissolution and desorption are controlled by diffusion through a 0.002 mm thick LM boundary layer at the interface, no chemical reactions are involved in the rate determining step. This boundary layer is also effective in case of permeation through membranes, if one side is covered by the LM. The permeation through 0.6 mm iron was reduced by a factor of 100. However in case of a fusion reactor blanket this boundary layer will not be important, because the wall thickness of the components is much larger. For the 2 mm stainless steel of the thermal convection loops with a downstream oxide layer, no effect of the boundary layer could be seen. The amount of oxides in the loop had no influence on the results. Furthermore an excess of H{sub 2} at low pressures did not change transfer rates of deuterium. The solubility of deuterium in the LM was determined from the kinetics of loading and degassing. The found values are one order of magnitude smaller than the lowest values so far published. The transport behavior of the rare gases He, Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe was investigated. The solubility of helium was found five orders of magnitude lower than that of deuterium, those for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe even lower than that for helium. Helium-bubble formation has to be considered if the flow rate of the LM in a blanket is small, or in case of static irradiation experiments. On the other hand argon can be used as covergas for a fusion reactor blanket. Because of the low solubility in the LM, the Ar-41 activity will be much smaller than in sodium cooled reactors. (orig.).

  3. Mass transfer in a 1370 C (2500 F) lithium thermal convection loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuermann, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental results from a test to evaluate interstitial element mass transfer effects on T-111, ASTAR 811C, and ASTAR 1211C after 5000 hours in flowing lithium at 1370 C (2500 F) are presented. No gross corrosion effects were observed. However, hafnium and nitrogen transfer to cooler regions within the loop were noted. Oxygen was in general removed from test specimens, but there was no evidence to indicate that it was a major factor in the mass transfer process. Carbon and hydrogen transfer were not detected.

  4. Compatibility of an FeCrAl alloy with flowing Pb-Li in a thermal convection loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawel, Steven J.; Unocic, Kinga A.

    2017-08-01

    A mono-metallic thermal convection loop (TCL) fabricated from alloy APMT (Fe21Cr5Al3Mo) tubing and filled with 0.025 m long tensile specimens of the same alloy was operated continuously for 1000 h with commercially pure Pb-17 at.%Li (Pb-Li) at a peak temperature of 550 ± 1.5 °C and a temperature gradient of ∼116 °C. The resulting Pb-Li flow rate was ∼0.0067 m/s. A 1050 °C pre-oxidation treatment (to form an external alumina scale) given to most specimens exposed within the TCL decreased total mass loss by a factor of 3-30 compared to adjacent specimens that were not pre-oxidized. However, all specimens exposed above 500 °C lost mass suggesting that the alumina scale was not entirely stable in flowing Pb-Li at these temperatures. Post-exposure room temperature tensile tests indicated that the mechanical properties of APMT were substantially influenced by extended exposures in the range of 435-490 °C, which caused an increase in yield strength (∼65%) and a corresponding decrease in ductility associated with α‧ embrittlement. Specimens annealed in argon at the same temperature exhibited identical changes without exposure to Pb-Li. Scanning transmission electron microscopy revealed Cr-clusters within the microstructure in specimens exposed in the low temperature regions (<490 °C) of the TCL, indicating the formation of α‧ consistent with the mechanism of α‧ embrittlement.

  5. Thermal Efficiency of Natural Convection Solar Dryer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetapong, N.; Chulok, S.; Khoonphunnarai, P.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the thermal efficiency of natural convection. The working principle of natural convection solar dryer is, once the air in the solar dryer is heated by solar energy, the air relative humidity will drop and floating up through the drying. This air will take moisture out of the product and flow out to the ambient air. It was found from the experiment that, in the duration of 8.00 am - 4.00 pm on a clear sky day, an all-day average ambient air and inside the chamber temperature were 38.34°C and 63.19°C respectively. At the solar radiation intensity of 759.53W/m2, mass flow rate of air was 0.023 kg/s and the thermal efficiency of the solar dryer was 2.59%.

  6. Thermal coupling within LTP dynamics control loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nofrarias, M; Garcia Marin, A F; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Danzmann, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert Einstein Institut (AEI), Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Lobo, A; Sanjuan, J [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (ICE-CSIC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ramos-Castro, J, E-mail: miquel.nofrarias@aei.mpg.d [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Edifici C4, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The Diagnostic Subsytem in the LISA Technology Package (LTP) on board the LISA Pathfinder mission (LPF) will characterise those external disturbances with a potential impact on the performance of the experiment coming from either thermal, magnetic or charged particles perturbations. A correct design of the experiments to measure these effects in flight requires a closed loop analysis that takes into account the dynamics of the test masses, the force applied by the controllers and those noisy terms (coming from sensing or force noise) that enters into the loop. We describe this analysis in the thermal case and we give a first numerical example of the instrument response to controlled thermal inputs.

  7. Comparison of numerical results with experimental data for single-phase natural convection in an experimental sodium loop. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribando, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison is made between computed results and experimental data for a single-phase natural convection test in an experimental sodium loop. The test was conducted in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) facility, an engineering-scale high temperature sodium loop at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) used for thermal-hydraulic testing of simulated Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) subassemblies at normal and off-normal operating conditions. Heat generation in the 19 pin assembly during the test was typical of decay heat levels. The test chosen for analysis in this paper was one of seven natural convection runs conducted in the facility using a variety of initial conditions and testing parameters. Specifically, in this test the bypass line was open to simulate a parallel heated assembly and the test was begun with a pump coastdown from a small initial forced flow. The computer program used to analyze the test, LONAC (LOw flow and NAtural Convection) is an ORNL-developed, fast-running, one-dimensional, single-phase, finite-difference model used for simulating forced and free convection transients in the THORS loop.

  8. Natural thermal convection in fractured porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Mezon, C.; Mourzenko, V.; Thovert, J. F.; Antoine, R.; Finizola, A.

    2015-12-01

    In the crust, fractures/faults can provide preferential pathways for fluid flow or act as barriers preventing the flow across these structures. In hydrothermal systems (usually found in fractured rock masses), these discontinuities may play a critical role at various scales, controlling fluid flows and heat transfer. The thermal convection is numerically computed in 3D fluid satured fractured porous media. Fractures are inserted as discrete objects, randomly distributed over a damaged volume, which is a fraction of the total volume. The fluid is assumed to satisfy Darcy's law in the fractures and in the porous medium with exchanges between them. All simulations were made for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) fracture aperture (or fracture transmissivity), fracture density and fracture length is studied. Moreover, these models are compared to porous media with the same macroscopic permeability. Preliminary results show that the non-uniqueness associated with initial conditions which makes possible either 2D or 3D convection in porous media (Schubert & Straus 1979) is no longer true for fractured porous media (at least for 50fracture density and fracture aperture on the Nusselt number (Nu) is highly Ra dependent. The effect of the damaged zone on Nu is roughly proportional to its size. All these models also allows us to determine for which range of fracture density the fractured porous medium is in good agreement with an unfractured porous medium of the same bulk permeability.

  9. Transient performance and temperature field of a natural convection air dehumidifier loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazilati, Mohammad Ali; Sedaghat, Ahmad; Alemrajabi, Ali-Akbar

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, transient performance of the previously introduced natural convection heat and mass transfer loop is investigated for an air dehumidifier system. The performance of the loop is studied in different conditions of heat source/heat sink temperature and different startup desiccant concentrations. Unlike conventional loops, it is observed that natural convection of the fluid originates from the heat sink towards the heat source. The proper operation of the cycle is highly dependent on the heat sink/heat source temperatures. To reduce the time constant of the system, a proper desiccant concentration should be adopted for charge of the loop.

  10. Spatially modulated thermal convection of viscoelastic fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayodé, Séliatou; Khayat, Roger E

    2004-06-01

    The thermal convection of modulated viscoelastic flow is examined in this study. The modulation is assumed to be weak enough for a regular perturbation solution to be implemented. In addition to being more accurate, the second-order perturbation results reveal new physical phenomena that could not be predicted by the first-order analysis. Inertia was found to enhance globally the discrepancies between the first- and the second-order perturbation solution. A comparison between the Newtonian and the non-Newtonian solution is carried out and the influences of inertia, modulation amplitude, and wave number are emphasized. The present results show that elasticity has a marked effect on fluid patterns, especially regarding the roll structure and symmetry. The influence of elasticity is greater for larger Rayleigh number and aspect ratio.

  11. Turbulent thermal convection over rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringano, G.; Verzicco, R.; Pascazio, G.

    2005-05-01

    Convective heat transport has important applications in engineering and meteorology and a better understanding of heat transport phenomena would lead to improvements in technological applications such as cooling of thermal machines and micro-electronic components or cooling during a metallurgical fusion. It would also improve the prediction of geophysical motions in oceans and atmosphere. The use of rough surfaces is a way to enhance the heat flux. The interaction between the main shear flow and the rough surface creates secondary vortices that enhance the detachment of thermal plumes from the tip of the rough elements. In this work numerical simulations are conducted in a cylindrical cell heated from below and cooled from above in presence of rough surfaces. A comparison of Rayleigh versus Nusselt number scaling between rough surfaces and smooth ones shows enhanced heat fluxes. The flow is solved using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the three dimensional unsteady Navier Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and an immersed boundary approach is used for the treatment of rough surfaces.

  12. Convection with local thermal non-equilibrium and microfluidic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Straughan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This book is one of the first devoted to an account of theories of thermal convection which involve local thermal non-equilibrium effects, including a concentration on microfluidic effects. The text introduces convection with local thermal non-equilibrium effects in extraordinary detail, making it easy for readers newer to the subject area to understand. This book is unique in the fact that it addresses a large number of convection theories and provides many new results which are not available elsewhere. This book will be useful to researchers from engineering, fluid mechanics, and applied mathematics, particularly those interested in microfluidics and porous media.

  13. Thermal Convection and Emergence of Isolated Vortices in Soap Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seychelles, F.; Amarouchene, Y.; Bessafi, M.; Kellay, H.

    2008-04-01

    A novel thermal convection cell consisting of half a soap bubble heated at the equator is introduced to study thermal convection and the movement of isolated vortices. The soap bubble, subject to stratification, develops thermal convection at its equator. A particular feature of this cell is the emergence of isolated vortices. These vortices resemble hurricanes or cyclones and similarities between our observed structures and these natural objects are found. This is brought forth through a study of the mean square displacement of these objects showing signs of superdiffusion.

  14. Thermal convection and emergence of isolated vortices in soap bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seychelles, F; Amarouchene, Y; Bessafi, M; Kellay, H

    2008-04-11

    A novel thermal convection cell consisting of half a soap bubble heated at the equator is introduced to study thermal convection and the movement of isolated vortices. The soap bubble, subject to stratification, develops thermal convection at its equator. A particular feature of this cell is the emergence of isolated vortices. These vortices resemble hurricanes or cyclones and similarities between our observed structures and these natural objects are found. This is brought forth through a study of the mean square displacement of these objects showing signs of superdiffusion.

  15. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 81; Issue 4. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod ... The transient analytical solutions of temperature distribution, stress, strain and optical path difference in convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod are derived.

  16. Cooling of High Heat Flux Flat Surface with Nanofluid Assisted Convective Loop: Experimental Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Amir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation was conducted on the thermal performance and pressure drop of a convective cooling loop working with ZnO aqueous nanofluids. The loop was used to cool a flat heater connected to an AC autotransformer. Influence of different operating parameters, such as fluid flow rate and mass concentration of nanofluid on surface temperature of heater, pressure drop, friction factor and overall heat transfer coefficient was investigated and briefly discussed. Results of this study showed that, despite a penalty for pressure drop, ZnO/water nanofluid was a promising coolant for cooling the micro-electronic devices and chipsets. It was also found that there is an optimum for concentration of nanofluid so that the heat transfer coefficient is maximum, which was wt. % = 0.3 for ZnO/water used in this research. In addition, presence of nanoparticles enhanced the friction factor and pressure drop as well; however, it is not very significant in comparison with those of registered for the base fluid.

  17. Mercury Thermal Hydraulic Loop (MTHL) Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, David K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Crye, Jason Michael [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wendel, Mark W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Farquharson, George [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jallouk, Philip A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFee, Marshall T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pointer, William David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ruggles, Art E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power linear accelerator built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) which incorporates the use of a flowing liquid mercury target. The Mercury Thermal Hydraulic Loop (MTHL) was constructed to investigate and verify the heat transfer characteristics of liquid mercury in a rectangular channel. This report provides a compilation of previously reported results from the water-cooled and electrically heated straight and curved test sections that simulate the geometry of the window cooling channel in the target nose region.

  18. Complex Convective Thermal Fluxes and Vorticity Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Tellez, Jackson; Sotillos, Laura; Lopez Gonzalez-Nieto, Pilar; Sanchez, Jesus M.; Furmanek, Petr; Diez, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Local Diffusion and the topological structure of vorticity and velocity fields is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of convective cooling and/or heating[1,2]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by an array of Thermoelectric devices (Peltier/Seebeck cells) these are controlled by thermal PID generating a buoyant heat flux [2]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine and fresh water in order to form density interfaces and low Prandtl number mixing with temperature gradients. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [3,4]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. Using ESS and selfsimilarity structures in the velocity and vorticity fieds and intermittency [3,5] that forms in the non-homogeneous flow is related to mixing and stiring. The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or nonmixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [6]and gravitational acceleration are analyzed considering the fractal and spectral structure of the fronts like in removable plate experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor flows. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied

  19. Thermal computations for electronics conductive, radiative, and convective air cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Ellison, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    IntroductionPrimary mechanisms of heat flowConductionApplication example: Silicon chip resistance calculationConvectionApplication example: Chassis panel cooled by natural convectionRadiationApplication example: Chassis panel cooled only by radiation 7Illustrative example: Simple thermal network model for a heat sinked power transistorIllustrative example: Thermal network circuit for a printed circuit boardCompact component modelsIllustrative example: Pressure and thermal circuits for a forced air cooled enclosureIllustrative example: A single chip package on a printed circuit board-the proble

  20. Convective Concrete : Additive Manufacturing to facilitate activation of thermal mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, D.; de Klijn-Chevalerias, M.L.; Loonen, R.C.G.M.; Hensen, JLM; Knaack, U.; Zimmermann, G

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on the research-driven design process of an innovative thermal mass concept: Convective Concrete. The goal is to improve building energy efficiency and comfort levels by addressing some of the shortcomings of conventional building slabs with high thermal storage capacity. Such

  1. TRITEX, a forced convection loop with Pb-17Li

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feuerstein, H.; Graebner, H.; Kieser, G.

    1988-07-01

    The loop TRITEX is a pumped loop with circulating Pb-17Li. It is designed to study the behaviour of tritium in a liquid metal blanket. Tritium will be simulated by deuterium. Start of operation is scheduled for the end of 1987. In a number of experiments some other problems were studied. Evaporation tests showed very low evaporation rates even in vacuum. The loss of Li in case of air ingress into the system will be very important. If this happens during loop operation, 25% of Li can be lost to the oxides within one hour, while only 0.3% of Pb oxidizes. Permeation rates of deuterium through steel 1.4922 were determined. Permeation losses of deuterium will be small, and the dissolution of this gas in the structural materials will not influence the experiments.

  2. Thermal turbulent convection: thermal plumes and fluctuations; Convection thermique turbulente: panaches et fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibert, M

    2007-10-15

    In this study we investigate the phenomenon of thermal turbulent convection in new and unprecedented ways. The first system we studied experimentally is an infinite vertical channel, where a constant vertical mean gradient of temperature exists. Inside this channel the average mass flux is null. The results obtained from our measurements reveal that the flow is mainly inertial; indeed the dissipative coefficients (here the viscosity) play a role only to define a coherence length L. This length is the distance over which the thermal plumes can be considered as 'free falling' objects. The horizontal transport, of heat and momentum, is entirely due to fluctuations. The associated 'mixing length' is small compared to the channel width. In the other hand, the vertical heat transport is due to coherent structures: the heat plumes. Those objects were also investigated in a Lagrangian study of the flow in the bulk of a Rayleigh-Benard cell. The probe, which has the same density as the fluid used in this experiment, is a sphere of 2 cm in diameter with embarked thermometers and radio-emitter. The heat plumes transport it, which allows a statistical study of such objects. (author)

  3. Thermal instabilities in magnetically confined plasmas - Solar coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbal, S. R.; Rosner, R.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal stability of confined solar coronal structures ('loops') is investigated, following both normal mode and a new, global instability analysis. It is demonstrated that: (1) normal mode analysis shows modes with size scales comparable to that of loops to be unstable, but to be strongly affected by the loop boundary conditions; (2) a global analysis, based upon variation of the total loop energy losses and gains, yields loop stability conditions for global modes dependent upon the coronal loop heating process, with magnetically coupled heating processes giving marginal stability. The connection between the present analysis and the minimum flux corona of Hearn is also discussed.

  4. Natural convection in rectangular enclosures with one thermally ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural convective fluid flow and heat transfer in rectangular enclosures bounded by three adiabatic walls and one thermally active and differentially heated vertical side were predicted by using the finite difference method. The effects of different temperature functions, aspect ratio and Rayleigh numbers on the natural ...

  5. A micro-convection model for thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Increase in the specific surface area as well as Brownian motion are supposed to be the most significant reasons for the anomalous enhancement in thermal conductivity of nanofluids. This work presents a semi-empirical approach for the same by emphasizing the above two effects through micro-convection. A new way of ...

  6. Three-dimensional mixed convection flow of viscoelastic fluid with thermal radiation and convective conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Ashraf, Muhammad Bilal; Alsulami, Hamed H; Alhuthali, Muhammad Shahab

    2014-01-01

    The objective of present research is to examine the thermal radiation effect in three-dimensional mixed convection flow of viscoelastic fluid. The boundary layer analysis has been discussed for flow by an exponentially stretching surface with convective conditions. The resulting partial differential equations are reduced into a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using appropriate transformations. The series solutions are developed through a modern technique known as the homotopy analysis method. The convergent expressions of velocity components and temperature are derived. The solutions obtained are dependent on seven sundry parameters including the viscoelastic parameter, mixed convection parameter, ratio parameter, temperature exponent, Prandtl number, Biot number and radiation parameter. A systematic study is performed to analyze the impacts of these influential parameters on the velocity and temperature, the skin friction coefficients and the local Nusselt number. It is observed that mixed convection parameter in momentum and thermal boundary layers has opposite role. Thermal boundary layer is found to decrease when ratio parameter, Prandtl number and temperature exponent are increased. Local Nusselt number is increasing function of viscoelastic parameter and Biot number. Radiation parameter on the Nusselt number has opposite effects when compared with viscoelastic parameter.

  7. Finite element thermal analysis of convectively-cooled aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, A. R.; Thornton, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The design complexity and size of convectively-cooled engine and airframe structures for hypersonic transports necessitate the use of large general purpose computer programs for both thermal and structural analyses. Generally thermal analyses are based on the lumped-parameter finite difference technique, and structural analyses are based on the finite element technique. Differences in these techniques make it difficult to achieve an efficient interface. It appears, therefore, desirable to conduct an integrated analysis based on a common technique. A summary is provided of efforts by NASA concerned with the development of an integrated thermal structural analysis capability using the finite element method. Particular attention is given to the development of conduction/forced-convection finite element methodology and applications which illustrate the capabilities of the developed concepts.

  8. Non-linear thermal convection in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Shaw

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Casson fluid flow has many practical applications such as food processing, metallurgy, drilling operations and bio-engineering operations. In this paper, we study Casson fluid flow through a plate with a convective boundary condition at the surface and quantify the effects of suction/injection, velocity ratio, and Soret and Dufour effects. Firstly we used a similarity transformation to change the governing equations to ordinary differential equations which were then solved numerically. The effect of the rheological parameters on the velocity, temperature, and concentration with skin friction, and heat and mass transfer are shown graphically and discussed briefly. It is observed that the velocity of the fluid at the surface decreases with increase of the velocity ratio while the nature of the flow is in opposite characteristics. The local Nusselt number decreases with increase in the velocity ratio. Skin friction at the surface is enhanced by buoyancy ratio and Casson number. Due to injection of the fluid in the system, the mass transfer rate at the surface increases while it decreases with the velocity ratio parameter.

  9. Development of Capillary Loop Convective Polymerase Chain Reaction Platform with Real-Time Fluorescence Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Pin Chou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymerase chain reaction (PCR has been one of the principal techniques of molecular biology and diagnosis for decades. Conventional PCR platforms, which work by rapidly heating and cooling the whole vessel, need complicated hardware designs, and cause energy waste and high cost. On the other hand, partial heating on the various locations of vessels to induce convective solution flows by buoyancy have been used for DNA amplification in recent years. In this research, we develop a new convective PCR platform, capillary loop convective polymerase chain reaction (clcPCR, which can generate one direction flow and make the PCR reaction more stable. The U-shaped loop capillaries with 1.6 mm inner diameter are designed as PCR reagent containers. The clcPCR platform utilizes one isothermal heater for heating the bottom of the loop capillary and a CCD device for detecting real-time amplifying fluorescence signals. The stable flow was generated in the U-shaped container and the amplification process could be finished in 25 min. Our experiments with different initial concentrations of DNA templates demonstrate that clcPCR can be applied for precise quantification. Multiple sample testing and real-time quantification will be achieved in future studies.

  10. Thermal convection in colloidal suspensions with negative separation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryskin, Andrey; Pleiner, Harald

    2005-05-01

    Thermal convection in colloidal suspensions of nanosized particles is investigated. Representative examples for such materials are ferrofluids, but since we do not imply any external magnetic field, the description applies to nonmagnetic suspensions as well. With the grain size being large on molecular length scales, the particle mobility is extremely small, allowing to disregard the concentration dynamics in most cases. However, due to the pronounced Soret effect of these materials in combination with a considerable solutal expansion, this cannot be done when thermal convection is under consideration. Here we consider the case when the separation ratio (the Soret coefficient) is negative. This case reveals a much richer variety of phenomena than that of positive separation ratio. In particular, for heating from below we find a linear oscillatory instability, whose amplitude, however, relaxes to zero on the long turn and is thus transient only and, at higher Rayleigh numbers, a finite amplitude stationary instability coexistent with the linearly stable convection-free state. By heating from above short-length-scale convective structures occur, whose wavelength depends on the Rayleigh number.

  11. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianwen Ning

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal control system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the normal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indicate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection performance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 °C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large spacecraft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  12. Thermal convection in a nonlinear non-Newtonian magnetic fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Laroze, D.; Pleiner, H.

    2015-01-01

    We report theoretical and numerical results on thermal convection of a magnetic fluid in a viscoelastic carrier liquid. The viscoelastic properties are described by a general nonlinear viscoelastic model that contains as special cases the standard phenomenological constitutive equations for the stress tensor. In order to explore numerically the system we perform a truncated Galerkin expansion obtaining a generalized Lorenz system with ten modes. We find numerically that the system has station...

  13. Onset of fractional-order thermal convection in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karani, Hamid; Rashtbehesht, Majid; Huber, Christian; Magin, Richard L.

    2017-12-01

    The macroscopic description of buoyancy-driven thermal convection in porous media is governed by advection-diffusion processes, which in the presence of thermophysical heterogeneities fail to predict the onset of thermal convection and the average rate of heat transfer. This work extends the classical model of heat transfer in porous media by including a fractional-order advective-dispersive term to account for the role of thermophysical heterogeneities in shifting the thermal instability point. The proposed fractional-order model overcomes limitations of the common closure approaches for the thermal dispersion term by replacing the diffusive assumption with a fractional-order model. Through a linear stability analysis and Galerkin procedure, we derive an analytical formula for the critical Rayleigh number as a function of the fractional model parameters. The resulting critical Rayleigh number reduces to the classical value in the absence of thermophysical heterogeneities when solid and fluid phases have similar thermal conductivities. Numerical simulations of the coupled flow equation with the fractional-order energy model near the primary bifurcation point confirm our analytical results. Moreover, data from pore-scale simulations are used to examine the potential of the proposed fractional-order model in predicting the amount of heat transfer across the porous enclosure. The linear stability and numerical results show that, unlike the classical thermal advection-dispersion models, the fractional-order model captures the advance and delay in the onset of convection in porous media and provides correct scalings for the average heat transfer in a thermophysically heterogeneous medium.

  14. Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

    2010-09-01

    This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will

  15. A Thermal Plume Model for the Martian Convective Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Colaïtis, Arnaud; Hourdin, Frédéric; Rio, Catherine; Forget, François; Millour, Ehouarn

    2013-01-01

    The Martian Planetary Boundary Layer [PBL] is a crucial component of the Martian climate system. Global Climate Models [GCMs] and Mesoscale Models [MMs] lack the resolution to predict PBL mixing which is therefore parameterized. Here we propose to adapt the "thermal plume" model, recently developed for Earth climate modeling, to Martian GCMs, MMs, and single-column models. The aim of this physically-based parameterization is to represent the effect of organized turbulent structures (updrafts and downdrafts) on the daytime PBL transport, as it is resolved in Large-Eddy Simulations [LESs]. We find that the terrestrial thermal plume model needs to be modified to satisfyingly account for deep turbulent plumes found in the Martian convective PBL. Our Martian thermal plume model qualitatively and quantitatively reproduces the thermal structure of the daytime PBL on Mars: superadiabatic near-surface layer, mixing layer, and overshoot region at PBL top. This model is coupled to surface layer parameterizations taking ...

  16. Rotating thermal convection at very large Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Stephan; van Gils, Dennis; Ahlers, Guenter; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2016-11-01

    The large scale thermal convection systems in geo- and astrophysics are usually influenced by Coriolis forces caused by the rotation of their celestial bodies. To better understand the influence of rotation on the convective flow field and the heat transport at these conditions, we study Rayleigh-Bénard convection, using pressurized sulfur hexaflouride (SF6) at up to 19 bars in a cylinder of diameter D=1.12 m and a height of L=2.24 m. The gas is heated from below and cooled from above and the convection cell sits on a rotating table inside a large pressure vessel (the "Uboot of Göttingen"). With this setup Rayleigh numbers of up to Ra =1015 can be reached, while Ekman numbers as low as Ek =10-8 are possible. The Prandtl number in these experiment is kept constant at Pr = 0 . 8 . We report on heat flux measurements (expressed by the Nusselt number Nu) as well as measurements from more than 150 temperature probes inside the flow. We thank the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) for financial support through SFB963: "Astrophysical Flow Instabilities and Turbulence". The work of GA was supported in part by the US National Science Foundation through Grant DMR11-58514.

  17. Phenomenological Nusselt-Rayleigh Scaling of Turbulent Thermal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Chia

    2017-12-01

    Natural convection between the hot floor and the cool ceiling, so called Rayleigh-Bénard convection, is pervasive and of both fundamental and industrial interests. One key issue is how heat transfer varies with increasing thermal potential, or equivalently how the Nusselt number (Nu) scales with the Rayleigh number (Ra). The overview of experimental findings remains to show the need of extra explanation complemental to the current theories. Here we present a model based on the phenomenological theory of turbulence, where the power-law spectral exponent of the energy spectrum is the only input parameter required. The goal aims to elucidate the unexplained aspect in the Nu-Ra scaling. We find that Kolmogorov turbulence in the current model leads to Nu ˜ Ra0.3, in good agreement with the modern experimental results. We hope that this model could stimulate the discussion as to the effects of the spectral phenomena on the Nu-Ra scaling, and thus augment our understanding of buoyancy-driven thermal convection.

  18. Mixed Convection in Technological Reservoir of Thermal Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Geniy V.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of mixed convection of a viscous incompressible fluid in an open rectangular reservoir with inlet and outlet of mass with considering nonuniform heat sink at the external borders of the solution domain is solved. The region of the solution was limited by two vertical and by one horizontal walls of finite thickness and one free surface. The flat nonstationary mixed convection within the framework of Navier-Stokes model is examined for liquid and thermal conductivity for solid walls. Distributions of hydrodynamic parameters and temperatures with different intensity of heat sink on the outer contour of the cavity show a change in the intensity of heat sink on the region boundaries of the solution leads to scale changes in the structure of flow and temperature fields of the liquids.

  19. Thermal vibrational convection in a two-phase stratified liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qingming; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    2007-05-01

    The response of a two-phase stratified liquid system subject to a vibration parallel to an imposed temperature gradient is analyzed using a hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann method (HTLB). The vibrations considered correspond to sinusoidal translations of a rigid cavity at a fixed frequency. The layers are thermally and mechanically coupled. Interaction between gravity-induced and vibration-induced thermal convection is studied. The ability of the applied vibration to enhance the flow, heat transfer and interface distortion is investigated. For the range of conditions investigated, the results reveal that the effect of the vibrational Rayleigh number and vibrational frequency on a two-phase stratified fluid system is much different from that for a single-phase fluid system. Comparisons of the response of a two-phase stratified fluid system with a single-phase fluid system are discussed. To cite this article: Q. Chang, J.I.D. Alexander, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  20. Thermal convection in a nonlinear non-Newtonian magnetic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroze, D.; Pleiner, H.

    2015-09-01

    We report theoretical and numerical results on thermal convection of a magnetic fluid in a viscoelastic carrier liquid. The viscoelastic properties are described by a general nonlinear viscoelastic model that contains as special cases the standard phenomenological constitutive equations for the stress tensor. In order to explore numerically the system we perform a truncated Galerkin expansion obtaining a generalized Lorenz system with ten modes. We find numerically that the system has stationary, periodic and chaotic regimes. We establish phase diagrams to identify the different dynamical regimes as a function of the Rayleigh number and the viscoelastic material parameters.

  1. Effective action for hard thermal loops in gravitational fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.R. Francisco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We examine, through a Boltzmann equation approach, the generating action of hard thermal loops in the background of gravitational fields. Using the gauge and Weyl invariance of the theory at high temperature, we derive an explicit closed-form expression for the effective action.

  2. Aircraft Thermal Management Using Loop Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Conversion Engineering Conference. Portsmouth, VA: AIAA, 2003. AIAA 2003- 6082. Incropera , F., DeWitt, D. Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer . New...m/s2 h Heat transfer coefficient, W/(m2-K) H Altitude, m k Thermal conductivity, W/(m-K) L Length, m m Mass , kg Ma Mach number, aU / n Number...Since the mass flow rate was kept constant at cpm& = 0.0077 kg/s, the uncertainty associated with that setting was 4.0%. The heat transferred

  3. Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Control Valve for Passive Variable Thermal Link Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Loop heat pipes (LHPs) can provide variable thermal conductance needed to maintain electronics and batteries on Lunar/Martian rovers/landers within desired...

  4. Numerical Simulations of Thermal Convection in Rapidly Rotating Spherical Shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenkov, Constantine; Peltier, Richard, E-mail: nenkov@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca, E-mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca [Department of Physics, University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, M5S 1A7 (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    We present a novel numerical model used to simulate convection in the atmospheres of the Gas Giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. Nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependant solutions of the anelastic hydrodynamic equations are presented for a stratified, rotating spherical fluid shell heated from below. This new model is specified in terms of a grid-point based methodology which employs a hierarchy of tessellations of the regular icosahedron onto the sphere through the process of recurrent dyadic refinements of the spherical surface. We describe discretizations of the governing equations in which all calculations are performed in Cartesian coordinates in the local neighborhoods of the almost uniform icosahedral grid, a methodology which avoids the potential mathematical and numerical difficulties associated with the pole problem in spherical geometry. Using this methodology we have built our model in primitive equations formulation, whereas the three-dimensional vector velocity field and temperature are directly advanced in time. We show results of thermal convection in rapidly rotating spherical shell which leads to the formation of well pronounced prograde zonal jets at the equator, results which previous experiments with two-dimensional models in the limit of freely evolving turbulence were not able to achieve.

  5. Theory of transformation thermal convection for creeping flow in porous media: Cloaking, concentrating, and camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Gaole; Shang, Jin; Huang, Jiping

    2018-02-01

    Heat can transfer via thermal conduction, thermal radiation, and thermal convection. All the existing theories of transformation thermotics and optics can treat thermal conduction and thermal radiation, respectively. Unfortunately, thermal convection has seldom been touched in transformation theories due to the lack of a suitable theory, thus limiting applications associated with heat transfer through fluids (liquid or gas). Here, we develop a theory of transformation thermal convection by considering the convection-diffusion equation, the equation of continuity, and the Darcy law. By introducing porous media, we get a set of equations keeping their forms under coordinate transformation. As model applications, the theory helps to show the effects of cloaking, concentrating, and camouflage. Our finite-element simulations confirm the theoretical findings. This work offers a transformation theory for thermal convection, thus revealing novel behaviors associated with potential applications; it not only provides different hints on how to control heat transfer by combining thermal conduction, thermal convection, and thermal radiation, but also benefits mass diffusion and other related fields that contain a set of equations and need to transform velocities at the same time.

  6. Mixed thermal convection: fundamental issues and analysis of the planar case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JACQUES PADET

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to renew interest on mixed thermal convection research and to emphasize three issues that arise from the present analysis: (i a clear definition of the reference temperature in the Boussinesq approximation; (ii a practical delimitation of the three convective modes, which are the forced convection (FC, mixed convection (MC and natural (or free convection (NC; (iii and, finally, a uniform description of the set FC/MC/NC in the similarity framework. The planar case, for which analytical solutions are available, allows a detailed illustration of the answers here advanced to the above issues.

  7. Kinetic thermal structure in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yin, Ze-Xia; She, Zhen-Su; Bao, Yun

    2017-11-01

    Plumes are believed to be the most important heat carrier in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC). However, a physically sound and clear definition of plume is still absent. We report here the investigation of a definition of plume called kinetic thermal structure (KTS), based on the analysis of vertical velocity gradient (Λ = ∂w / ∂z), using direct numerical simulation (DNS) data of the three-dimensional RBC in a rectangular cell for Pr = 0.7 and Ra = 1 ×108 5 ×109 . It is shown that the conditional average of temperature on Λ exhibits such a behavior that when Λ is larger than a threshold, the volume carries a constant temperature of fluid, hence defines an unambiguous thermal structure, KTS. The DNS show that the KTS behaves in a sheet-like shape near the conducting plate, and becomes slender and smaller with increasing Ra . The heat flux carried by KTS displays a scaling law, with an exponent larger than the global- Nu - Ra scaling, indicating stronger heat transport than the turbulent background. An advantage of the KTS is its connection to the balance equation allowing, for the first time, a prediction of the Ra -dependence of its vertical velocity and the characteristic Λ threshold, validated by DNS. Supported by NSFC (11172006, 11221062, 11452002), and by MOST (China) 973 project (2009CB724100).

  8. Convection induced by thermal gradients on thin reaction fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelas Paredes, David R. A.; Vasquez, Desiderio A.

    2017-09-01

    We present a thin front model for the propagation of chemical reaction fronts in liquids inside a Hele-Shaw cell or porous media. In this model we take into account density gradients due to thermal and compositional changes across a thin interface. The front separating reacted from unreacted fluids evolves following an eikonal relation between the normal speed and the curvature. We carry out a linear stability analysis of convectionless flat fronts confined in a two-dimensional rectangular domain. We find that all fronts are stable to perturbations of short wavelength, but they become unstable for some wavelengths depending on the values of compositional and thermal gradients. If the effects of these gradients oppose each other, we observe a range of wavelengths that make the flat front unstable. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear model show curved fronts of steady shape with convection propagating faster than flat fronts. Exothermic fronts increase the temperature of the fluid as they propagate through the domain. This increment in temperature decreases with increasing speed.

  9. A numerical study of thermals as the prototype of moist convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Deckers, Daniel; Sherwood, Steven C.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the fact that thermals'small, transient air bubbles'are known to be the main convective elements of atmospheric moist convection, current parameterizations are typically based on the steady-plume concept, mostly due to practical and historical reasons. Within the current need for new parameterizations, the thermal conceptual model for convection is one promising path. For example, thermals are highly entraining, albeit weakly damped. This would hardly fit within the typical entraining plume model, but could aid to improve key issues of current convection parameterizations, such as the lack of sensitivity to ambient humidity and the excess of condensate carried to upper levels. Furthermore, the transient nature of thermals would bring an entirely new physical ingredient to convection parameterizations. The first step towards developing such new parameterizations is to understand the dynamics of thermals. Here we will describe their dynamics based on 2D and 3D cloud resolving simulations of sea-breeze initiated convection using WRF. We analize a large sample of thermals from which we can describe statistics about their size, ascent rate, momentum budget and mixing properties. We will show how these properties define their transient nature, how they are related to each other, and how they evolve as convection deepens. Furthermore we will provide simple relations between buoyancy, vertical velocity and drag forces, which would be crucial for new parameterizations.

  10. Vertical natural convection: application of the unifying theory of thermal convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, C.S.; Ooi, A.; Lohse, Detlef; Chung, D.

    2015-01-01

    Results from direct numerical simulations of vertical natural convection at Rayleigh numbers 1.0×10 5 –1.0×10 9 and Prandtl number 0.709 support a generalised applicability of the Grossmann–Lohse (GL) theory, which was originally developed for horizontal natural (Rayleigh–Bénard) convection. In

  11. From conduction to convection of thermally relativistic fluids between two parallel walls under gravitational force

    CERN Document Server

    Yano, Ryosuke

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the thermal conduction and convection of thermally relativistic fluids between two parallel walls under the gravitational force, both theoretically and numerically. In the theoretical discussion, we assume that the Lorentz contraction is ignored and spacetime is flat. For understanding of the thermal conduction and convection of thermally relativistic fluids between two parallel walls under the gravitational force, we solve the relativistic Boltzmann equation using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Numerical results indicate that strongly nonequilibrium states are formed in vicinities of two walls, which do not allow us to discuss the transition of the thermal conduction to the thermal convection of thermally relativistic fluids under the gravitational force in the framework of the relativistic Navier-Stokes-Fourier equation, when the flow-field is under the transition regime between the rarefied and continuum regimes, whereas such strongly nonequilibrium states are not formed in vicinities...

  12. Thermal convection in three-dimensional fractured porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezon, C.; Mourzenko, V. V.; Thovert, J.-F.; Antoine, R.; Fontaine, F.; Finizola, A.; Adler, P. M.

    2018-01-01

    Thermal convection is numerically computed in three-dimensional (3D) fluid saturated isotropically fractured porous media. Fractures are randomly inserted as two-dimensional (2D) convex polygons. Flow is governed by Darcy's 2D and 3D laws in the fractures and in the porous medium, respectively; exchanges take place between these two structures. Results for unfractured porous media are in agreement with known theoretical predictions. The influence of parameters such as the fracture aperture (or fracture transmissivity) and the fracture density on the heat released by the whole system is studied for Rayleigh numbers up to 150 in cubic boxes with closed-top conditions. Then, fractured media are compared to homogeneous porous media with the same macroscopic properties. Three major results could be derived from this study. The behavior of the system, in terms of heat release, is determined as a function of fracture density and fracture transmissivity. First, the increase in the output flux with fracture density is linear over the range of fracture density tested. Second, the increase in output flux as a function of fracture transmissivity shows the importance of percolation. Third, results show that the effective approach is not always valid, and that the mismatch between the full calculations and the effective medium approach depends on the fracture density in a crucial way.

  13. Transient two-phase heat transfer in a capillary-pumped-loop reservoir for spacecraft thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, Wei; Gingrich, William K.; Krotiuk, William J.; Fredley, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    A computational method for predicting the two-phase transient fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics within a reservoir of the capillary-pumped-loop, intended to be used for spacecraft thermal management, has been developed. The model is based on the enthalpy formulation in an axisymmetric configuration. The reservoir operates under a constant thermodynamic pressure by allowing mass exchange between the reservoir and the outside loop. Both 1-G and 0-G environments have been considered to assess the effects of gravity on the reservoir performance. Depending on the gravity level, the power input and the reservoir orientation, three different convection modes have been identified, namely, the thermocapillary mode, the buoyancy mode and the rapid-expansion mode (caused by interface movement). Depending on the operating environment, these modes affect the performance of the reservoir and the effectiveness of the overall thermal management capability of the system studied.

  14. Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management - Combining Fluid Loops in Electric Drive Vehicles (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rugh, J. P.

    2013-07-01

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and electric vehicles have increased vehicle thermal management complexity, using separate coolant loop for advanced power electronics and electric motors. Additional thermal components result in higher costs. Multiple cooling loops lead to reduced range due to increased weight. Energy is required to meet thermal requirements. This presentation for the 2013 Annual Merit Review discusses integrated vehicle thermal management by combining fluid loops in electric drive vehicles.

  15. Quasiparticles in leptogenesis. A hard-thermal-loop study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessig, Clemens Paul

    2011-06-29

    We analyse the effects of thermal quasiparticles in leptogenesis using hard-thermal-loop-resummed propagators in the imaginary time formalism of thermal field theory. We perform our analysis in a leptogenesis toy model with three right-handed heavy neutrinos N{sub 1}, N{sub 2} and N{sub 3}. We consider decays and inverse decays and work in the hierarchical limit where the mass of N{sub 2} is assumed to be much larger than the mass of N{sub 1}, that is M{sub 2} >> M{sub 1}. We neglect flavour effects and assume that the temperatures are much smaller than M{sub 2} and M{sub 3}. We pay special attention to the influence of fermionic quasiparticles. We allow for the leptons to be either decoupled from each other, except for the interactions with neutrinos, or to be in chemical equilibrium by some strong interaction, for example via gauge bosons. In two additional cases, we approximate the full hard-thermal-loop lepton propagators with zero-temperature propagators, where we replace the zero-temperature mass by the thermal mass of the leptons m{sub l}(T) in one case and the asymptotic mass of the positive-helicity mode {radical}(2)m{sub l}(T) in the other case. We calculate all relevant decay rates and CP-asymmetries and solve the corresponding Boltzmann equations we derived. We compare the final lepton asymmetry of the four thermal cases and the vacuum case for three different initial neutrino abundances; zero, thermal and dominant abundance. The final asymmetries of the thermal cases differ considerably from the vacuum case and from each other in the weak washout regime for zero abundance and in the intermediate regime for dominant abundance. In the strong washout regime, where no influences from thermal corrections are commonly expected, the final lepton asymmetry can be enhanced by a factor of two by hiding part of the lepton asymmetry in the quasi-sterile minus-mode in the case of strongly interacting lepton modes. (orig.)

  16. Parallel measurement of conductive and convective thermal transport of micro/nanowires based on Raman mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Man; Li, Changzheng; Wang, Jianmei; Xiao, Xiangheng; Yue, Yanan

    2015-06-01

    Heat conduction and convection are coupled effects in thermal transport of low-dimensional materials especially at micro/nanoscale. However, the parallel measurement is a challenge due to the limitation of characterization pathways. In this work, we report a method to study conductive and convective thermal transport of micro/nanowires simultaneously by using steady-state Joule-heating and Raman mapping. To examine this method, the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fiber (36 μm in diameter) is characterized and its temperature dependence of thermal properties including thermal conductivity and convection coefficient in ambient air is studied. Preliminary results show that thermal conductivity of the CNTs fiber increases from 26 W/m K to 34 W/m K and convection coefficient decreases from 1143 W/m2 K to 1039 W/m2 K with temperature ranging from 312 to 444 K. The convective heat dissipation to the air could be as high as 60% of the total Joule heating power. Uncertainty analysis is performed to reveal that fitting errors can be further reduced by increasing sampling points along the fiber. This method features a fast/convenient way for parallel measurement of both heat conduction and convection of micro/nanowires which is beneficial to comprehensively understanding the coupled effect of micro/nanoscale heat conduction and convection.

  17. Subcritical Thermal Convection of Liquid Metals in a Rapidly Rotating Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, E. J.; Schaeffer, N.; Vidal, J.; Cardin, P.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary cores consist of liquid metals (low Prandtl number Pr) that convect as the core cools. Here, we study nonlinear convection in a rotating (low Ekman number Ek) planetary core using a fully 3D direct numerical simulation. Near the critical thermal forcing (Rayleigh number Ra), convection onsets as thermal Rossby waves, but as Ra increases, this state is superseded by one dominated by advection. At moderate rotation, these states (here called the weak branch and strong branch, respectively) are smoothly connected. As the planetary core rotates faster, the smooth transition is replaced by hysteresis cycles and subcriticality until the weak branch disappears entirely and the strong branch onsets in a turbulent state at Ek <10-6. Here, the strong branch persists even as the thermal forcing drops well below the linear onset of convection (Ra =0.7 Racrit in this study). We highlight the importance of the Reynolds stress, which is required for convection to subsist below the linear onset. In addition, the Péclet number is consistently above 10 in the strong branch. We further note the presence of a strong zonal flow that is nonetheless unimportant to the convective state. Our study suggests that, in the asymptotic regime of rapid rotation relevant for planetary interiors, thermal convection of liquid metals in a sphere onsets through a subcritical bifurcation.

  18. Understanding Thermal Convection Effects of Venus Surface Atmosphere on the Design and Performance of Venus Mission Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, S. P.

    2017-05-01

    Work focuses on transient effects of thermal convection in Venus surface atmosphere on exposed mission hardware. Review of accurate and efficient state equation options for CFD modeling is presented. Convective heat transfer experiment plan presented.

  19. Numerical experiments on thermal convection of highly compressible fluids with variable viscosity and thermal conductivity: Implications for mantle convection of super-Earths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Mayumi

    2018-01-01

    We conduct a series of numerical experiments of thermal convection of highly compressible fluids in a two-dimensional rectangular box, in order to study the mantle convection on super-Earths. The thermal conductivity and viscosity are assumed to exponentially depend on depth and temperature, respectively, while the variations in thermodynamic properties (thermal expansivity and reference density) with depth are taken to be relevant for the super-Earths with 10 times the Earth's. From our experiments we identified a distinct regime of convecting flow patterns induced by the interplay between the adiabatic temperature change and the spatial variations in viscosity and thermal conductivity. That is, for the cases with strong temperature-dependent viscosity and depth-dependent thermal conductivity, a "deep stratosphere" of stable thermal stratification is formed at the base of the mantle, in addition to thick stagnant lids at their top surfaces. In the "deep stratosphere", the fluid motion is insignificant particularly in the vertical direction in spite of smallest viscosity owing to its strong dependence on temperature. Our finding may further imply that some of super-Earths which are lacking in mobile tectonic plates on their top surfaces may have "deep stratospheres" at the base of their mantles.

  20. Numerical Modelling of Thermal Convection Related to Fracture Permeability - Implications for Geothermal Exploration and Basin Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsey, Lindsay; van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Pluymaekers, Maarten; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-04-01

    Thermal anomalies in deep sedimentary settings are largely controlled by fluid circulation within permeable zones. Convection is of particular interest in geothermal exploration, as it creates areas with anomalously high temperatures at shallow depths. Recent work on the temperature distribution in the Dutch subsurface revealed a thermal anomaly at the Luttelgeest-01 (LTG-01) at 4-5 km depth, which could be explained by thermal convection. Temperature measurements show a shift to higher temperatures at depths greater than 4000 m, corresponding the Dinantian carbonates. In order for convective heat transport to explain the anomaly, there must also be sufficient permeability. Rayleigh number calculations show that convection may be possible within the Dinantian carbonate layer, depending on its thickness, permeability and geothermal gradient. For example, an average permeability of 60 mD permits convection in a 600 m aquifer, given a geothermal gradient of 31°C/km. If the permeability is reduced to 20 mD, convection can only occur where the thickness of the aquifer is greater than 900 m. Interestingly, numerical simulations were able to come within 5-10 mD of the theoretical minimum permeability values calculated for each scenario. 3D numerical simulations provide insight on possible flow and thermal structures within the fractured carbonate interval, as well as illustrate the role of permeability on the timing of convection onset, convection cell structure development and the resulting temperature patterns. The development and number of convection cells is very much a time dependent process. Many cells may develop in the beginning of simulations, but they seem to gradually converge until steady state is reached. The shape of convective upwellings varies from roughly circular or hexagonal to more elongated upwellings and downwellings. Furthermore, the geometric aspects of the carbonate platform itself likely control the shape and location of upwellings, as well as

  1. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The transient analytical solutions of temperature distribution, stress, strain and optical path difference in convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod are derived. The results are compared with other works and good agreements are found. The effects of increasing the edge cooling and face cooling are studied.

  2. Effect of permeability anisotropy on forced convection thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Forced convective flow through anisotropic porous saturated circular tube was analysed to determine the entrance length to the hydrodynamic flow. The porous medium saturated with an incompressible viscous fluid was characterized by anisotropy permeability ratio, inclination angle of the principal axes and Prandtl ...

  3. Heat Transfer and Flows of Thermal Convection in a Fluid-Saturated Rotating Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal convection at the steady state for high Rayleigh number in a rotating porous half space is investigated. Taking into account the effect of rotation, Darcy equation is extended to incorporate the Coriolis force term in a rotating reference frame. The velocity and temperature fields of thermal convection are obtained by using the homotopy analysis method. The influences of Taylor number and Rayleigh number on the Nusselt number, velocity profile, and temperature distribution are discussed in detail. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases rapidly with the increase of Taylor number but tends to have an asymptotic value. Besides, the rotation can give rise to downward flow in contrast with the upward thermal convection.

  4. Numerical simulations of thermal convection in rapidly rotating spherical fluid shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Z.P.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of thermal convection in rapidly rotating spherical shells of Boussinesq fluid have been carried out with a nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependent spectral-transform code. The basic state is hydrostatic, spherically symmetric, and independent of time. The numerical methods, the numerical stability, and the adequacy of the spatial resolution were examined by a benchmarking study. A sequence of bifurcations from the onset of a steadily propagating convective state, to a periodic state, to a quasi-periodic state and thence a chaotic state has been found. Convective solutions at each stage along the route to chaos have been studied. The emphases are on the three-dimensional and time-dependent convective structures and associated mean zonal flow. The spherical shell is heated from both below and within. The boundaries are isothermal and stress-free. The author has also explored the consequences of imposing a spatially varying temperature anomaly on the upper surface of a spherical shell on thermal convection in the shell. The spherical shell is heated from below and cooled from above. The lower boundary is isothermal and both boundaries are rigid and impermeable. The results show that the patterns and amplitudes of the convective motions and associated mean zonal and meridional flows depend largely on the pattern and amplitude of the imposted thermal anomaly. The purpose of this study is to illustrate the influence of thermal conditions in the lower mantle on motions in the Earth's liquid outer core. The author has carried out numerical simulations at both high Taylor and Rayleigh numbers. The spherical shell is heated from below and cooled from above. The boundaries are isothermal and stress-free. Columnar rolls that are quasi-layered in cylindrical radius and associated banded mean zonal flow are obtained. The quasi-layered convective structure and the banded zonal wind are consequent upon both the high Taylor and Rayleigh numbers.

  5. Thermal Vacuum/Balance Test Results of Swift BAT with Loop Heat Pipe Thermal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2004-01-01

    The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Detector Array is thermally well coupled to eight constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) embedded in the Detector Array Plate PAP), and two loop heat pipes (LHPs) transport heat from the CCHPs to a radiator. The CCHPs have ammonia as the working fluid and the LHPs have propylene as the working fluid. Precision heater controllers, which have adjustable set points in flight, are used to control the LHP compensation chamber and Detector Array xA1 ASIC temperatures. The radiator has AZ-Tek's AZW-LA-II low solar absorptance white paint as the thermal coating, and is located on the anti-sun side of the spacecraft. A thermal balance (T/B) test on the BAT was successfully completed. It validated that the thermal design satisfies the temperature requirements of the BAT in the flight thermal environments. Instrument level and observatory level thermal vacuum (TN) cycling tests of the BAT Detector Array by using the LHP thermal system were successfully completed. This paper presents the results of the T/B test and T N cycling tests.

  6. Numerical simulations of thermal convection at high Prandtl numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Silano, Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    2007/2008 In this thesis we present the results of an extensive campaign of direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection at high Prandtl numbers ($10^{-1}\\leq Pr \\leq 10^4$) and moderate Rayleigh numbers ($10^{5}\\leq Pr \\leq 10^9$). The computational domain is a cylindrical cell of aspect-ratio (diameter over cell height) $\\Gamma=1/2$, with the no-slip condition imposed to the boundaries. By scaling the results, we find a $1/\\sqrt{Pr}$ correction to apply to the free-...

  7. Thermal convection of viscoelastic shear-thinning fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Khayat, Roger E.; Ahmed, Zahir U.

    2016-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Bénard convection for non-Newtonian fluids possessing both viscoelastic and shear-thinning behaviours is examined. The Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation is implemented to model the non-Newtonian character of the fluid. It is found that while the shear-thinning and viscoelastic effects could annihilate one another for the steady roll flow, presence of both behaviours restricts the roll stability limit significantly compared to the cases when the fluid is either inelastic shear-thinning or purely viscoelastic with constant viscosity.

  8. On the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Frost Considering Mass Diffusion and Eddy Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2010-01-01

    A physical model for the effective thermal conductivity of water frost is proposed for application to the full range of frost density. The proposed model builds on the Zehner-Schlunder one-dimensional formulation for porous media appropriate for solid-to-fluid thermal conductivity ratios less than about 1000. By superposing the effects of mass diffusion and eddy convection on stagnant conduction in the fluid, the total effective thermal conductivity of frost is shown to be satisfactorily described. It is shown that the effects of vapor diffusion and eddy convection on the frost conductivity are of the same order. The results also point out that idealization of the frost structure by cylindrical inclusions offers a better representation of the effective conductivity of frost as compared to spherical inclusions. Satisfactory agreement between the theory and the measurements for the effective thermal conductivity of frost is demonstrated for a wide range of frost density and frost temperature.

  9. A community benchmark for viscoplastic thermal convection in a 2-D square box

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tosi, N.; Stein, C.; Noack, L.; Hüttig, C.; Samuel, H.; Maierová, P.; Davies, D. R.; Wilson, C.R.; Kramer, S. C.; Thieulot, C.A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270177493; Glerum, A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372696414; Fraters, M.R.T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412516667; Spakman, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074103164; Rozel, A.; Tackley, P.J.

    Numerical simulations of thermal convection in the Earth's mantle often employ a pseudoplastic rheology in order to mimic the plate-like behavior of the lithosphere. Yet the benchmark tests available in the literature are largely based on simple linear rheologies in which the viscosity is either

  10. Numerical modelling of thermal convection in the Luttelgeest carbonate platform, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsey, L.; Pluymaekers, M.; Goldberg, T.; Oversteeg, K. van; Ghazaryan, L.; Cloetingh, S.; van Wees, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of convective fluid flow in permeable layers can create zones of anomalously high temperature which can be exploited for geothermal energy. Temperature measurements from the Luttelgeest-01 (LTG-01) well in the northern onshore region of the Netherlands indicate variations in the thermal

  11. Convection's enhancement in thermal micro pipes using extra fluid and shape memory material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Ioan; Sprinceana, Siviu

    2016-12-01

    Up to now, there have been developed various applications of thermal micro pipes[1-3], such as refrigerating systems, high heat flux electronics cooling, and biological devices etc., based on vacuum vaporization followed by a convective phenomenon that allows vapor transfer from the vaporization area to the condensation one. This article presents studies carried out on the enhancement of the convective phenomenon taking place in flat thermal micro pipes. The proposed method[4] is aimed at the cooling of power electronics components, such as microprocessors. The conducted research focused on the use of shape memory materials that allow, by a semi-active method, to bring extra fluid in the vaporization area of the thermal micro pipe. The conducted investigations analyzed the variation of the liquid layer thickness in the trapezoidal micro channels and the thermal flow change over time. The modification of liquid flow was studied in correlation with the capacity of the polysynthetic material to retain the most extra fluid in its pores. The enhancement of the convective heat transfer phenomenon in flat thermal micro pipes was investigated in correspondence to the increase of liquid quantity in the vaporization zone. The charts obtained by aid of Mathcad[5] allowed to represent the evolution during a period of time (or with the pipe's length) of the liquid film thickness, the flow and the thermal flow, as a function of the liquid supply variation due to the shape memory materials and the modification of the working temperature.

  12. Thermal Interface Evaluation of Heat Transfer from a Pumped Loop to Titanium-Water Thermosyphons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Sanzi, James L.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sechkar, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium-water thermosyphons are being considered for use in the heat rejection system for lunar outpost fission surface power. Key to their use is heat transfer between a closed loop heat source and the heat pipe evaporators. This work describes laboratory testing of several interfaces that were evaluated for their thermal performance characteristics, in the temperature range of 350 to 400 K, utilizing a water closed loop heat source and multiple thermosyphon evaporator geometries. A gas gap calorimeter was used to measure heat flow at steady state. Thermocouples in the closed loop heat source and on the evaporator were used to measure thermal conductance. The interfaces were in two generic categories, those immersed in the water closed loop heat source and those clamped to the water closed loop heat source with differing thermal conductive agents. In general, immersed evaporators showed better overall performance than their clamped counterparts. Selected clamped evaporator geometries offered promise.

  13. Cubic Spline Collocation Method for the Simulation of Turbulent Thermal Convection in Compressible Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Victor Manuel [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A collocation method using cubic splines is developed and applied to simulate steady and time-dependent, including turbulent, thermally convecting flows for two-dimensional compressible fluids. The state variables and the fluxes of the conserved quantities are approximated by cubic splines in both space direction. This method is shown to be numerically conservative and to have a local truncation error proportional to the fourth power of the grid spacing. A ''dual-staggered'' Cartesian grid, where energy and momentum are updated on one grid and mass density on the other, is used to discretize the flux form of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Each grid-line is staggered so that the fluxes, in each direction, are calculated at the grid midpoints. This numerical method is validated by simulating thermally convecting flows, from steady to turbulent, reproducing known results. Once validated, the method is used to investigate many aspects of thermal convection with high numerical accuracy. Simulations demonstrate that multiple steady solutions can coexist at the same Rayleigh number for compressible convection. As a system is driven further from equilibrium, a drop in the time-averaged dimensionless heat flux (and the dimensionless internal entropy production rate) occurs at the transition from laminar-periodic to chaotic flow. This observation is consistent with experiments of real convecting fluids. Near this transition, both harmonic and chaotic solutions may exist for the same Rayleigh number. The chaotic flow loses phase-space information at a greater rate, while the periodic flow transports heat (produces entropy) more effectively. A linear sum of the dimensionless forms of these rates connects the two flow morphologies over the entire range for which they coexist. For simulations of systems with higher Rayleigh numbers, a scaling relation exists relating the dimensionless heat flux to the two-seventh's power of the Rayleigh number

  14. Long Duration Life Test of Propylene Glycol Water Based Thermal Fluid Within Thermal Control Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hung; Hill, Charles; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluations of thermal properties and resistance to microbial growth concluded that 50% Propylene Glycol (PG)-based fluid and 50% de-ionized water mixture was desirable for use as a fluid within a vehicle s thermal control loop. However, previous testing with a commercial mixture of PG and water containing phosphate corrosion inhibitors resulted in corrosion of aluminum within the test system and instability of the test fluid. This paper describes a follow-on long duration testing and analysis of 50% Propylene Glycol (PG)-based fluid and 50% de-ionized water mixture with inorganic corrosion inhibitors used in place of phosphates. The test evaluates the long-term fluid stability and resistance to microbial and chemical changes

  15. Magneto-thermal convection of low concentration nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roszko Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper was to analyze possible utilization of the low concentration nanofluids and the magnetic field to enhance heat transfer. The studied fluids were based on water with an addition of copper particles (40-60 nm diameter. They belonged to the diamagnetic group of materials. As a first attempt to stated target the analysis of enclosure placed in the maximal value of square magnetic induction gradient was carried out. The maximum was in the centre of investigated cavity and it caused the most complex system of gravitational and magnetic buoyancy forces. In the lower part of cavity both forces acted in the same direction, while in the upper part they counteracted. Therefore an enhancement and attenuation of heat transfer could be observed. Due to the particle concentration and magnetic field action the character of flow was changed. In the case of 50 ppm nanofluid the flow was steady end the strong magnetic field didn’t change much in its structure except for the suppression of some vortices. In the case of 500 ppm nanofluid the flow was not steady even without magnetic field, but increasing magnetic induction caused change of its structure towards the inertial-convective regime of turbulent flow.

  16. Thermal structure of intense convective clouds derived from GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Randel, W. J.; Ho, S.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal structure associated with deep convective clouds is investigated using Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation measurements. GPS data are insensitive to the presence of clouds, and provide high vertical resolution and high accuracy measurements to identify associated temperature...... behavior. Deep convective systems are identified using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) satellite data, and cloud tops are accurately measured using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIPSO) lidar observations; we focus on 53 cases of near-coincident GPS...... occultations with CALIPSO profiles over deep convection. Results show a sharp spike in GPS bending angle highly correlated to the top of the clouds, corresponding to anomalously cold temperatures within the clouds. Above the clouds the temperatures return to background conditions, and there is a strong...

  17. Thermal structure of intense convective clouds derived from GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Randel, W. J.; Ho, S. -P.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal structure associated with deep convective clouds is investigated using Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation measurements. GPS data are insensitive to the presence of clouds, and provide high vertical resolution and high accuracy measurements to identify associated temperature...... behavior. Deep convective systems are identified using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) satellite data, and cloud tops are accurately measured using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIPSO) lidar observations; we focus on 53 cases of near-coincident GPS...... occultations with CALIPSO profiles over deep convection. Results show a sharp spike in GPS bending angle highly correlated to the top of the clouds, corresponding to anomalously cold temperatures within the clouds. Above the clouds the temperatures return to background conditions, and there is a strong...

  18. Role of critical points of the skin friction field in formation of plumes in thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Padberg-Gehle, Kathrin; Schumacher, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics in the thin boundary layers of temperature and velocity is the key to a deeper understanding of turbulent transport of heat and momentum in thermal convection. The velocity gradient at the hot and cold plates of a Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection cell forms the two-dimensional skin friction field and is related to the formation of thermal plumes in the respective boundary layers. Our analysis is based on a direct numerical simulation of Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection in a closed cylindrical cell of aspect ratio $\\Gamma=1$ and focused on the critical points of the skin friction field. We identify triplets of critical points, which are composed of two unstable nodes and a saddle between them, as the characteristic building block of the skin friction field. Isolated triplets as well as networks of triplets are detected. The majority of the ridges of line-like thermal plumes coincide with the unstable manifolds of the saddles. From a dynamical Lagrangian perspective, thermal plumes are formed together ...

  19. Thermal effects on the diffusive layer convection instability of an exothermic acid-base reaction front.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almarcha, C; Trevelyan, P M J; Grosfils, P; De Wit, A

    2013-09-01

    A buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instability appearing when an aqueous acid solution of HCl overlies a denser alkaline aqueous solution of NaOH in a vertically oriented Hele-Shaw cell is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The peculiarity of this reactive convection pattern is its asymmetry with regard to the initial contact line between the two solutions as convective plumes develop in the acidic solution only. We investigate here by a linear stability analysis (LSA) of a reaction-diffusion-convection model of a simple A+B→C reaction the relative role of solutal versus thermal effects in the origin and location of this instability. We show that heat effects are much weaker than concentration-related ones such that the heat of reaction only plays a minor role on the dynamics. Computation of density profiles and of the stability analysis eigenfunctions confirm that the convective motions result from a diffusive layer convection mechanism whereby a locally unstable density stratification develops in the upper acidic layer because of the difference in the diffusion coefficients of the chemical species. The growth rate and wavelength of the pattern are determined experimentally as a function of the Brinkman parameter of the problem and compare favorably with the theoretical predictions of both LSA and nonlinear simulations.

  20. The effect of external heat transfer on thermal explosion in a spherical vessel with natural convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A N

    2015-07-14

    When any exothermic reaction proceeds in an unstirred vessel, natural convection may develop. This flow can significantly alter the heat transfer from the reacting fluid to the environment and hence alter the balance between heat generation and heat loss, which determines whether or not the system will explode. Previous studies of the effects of natural convection on thermal explosion have considered reactors where the temperature of the wall of the reactor is held constant. This implies that there is infinitely fast heat transfer between the wall of the vessel and the surrounding environment. In reality, there will be heat transfer resistances associated with conduction through the wall of the reactor and from the wall to the environment. The existence of these additional heat transfer resistances may alter the rate of heat transfer from the hot region of the reactor to the environment and hence the stability of the reaction. This work presents an initial numerical study of thermal explosion in a spherical reactor under the influence of natural convection and external heat transfer, which neglects the effects of consumption of reactant. Simulations were performed to examine the changing behaviour of the system as the intensity of convection and the importance of external heat transfer were varied. It was shown that the temporal development of the maximum temperature in the reactor was qualitatively similar as the Rayleigh and Biot numbers were varied. Importantly, the maximum temperature in a stable system was shown to vary with Biot number. This has important consequences for the definitions used for thermal explosion in systems with significant reactant consumption. Additionally, regions of parameter space where explosions occurred were identified. It was shown that reducing the Biot number increases the likelihood of explosion and reduces the stabilising effect of natural convection. Finally, the results of the simulations were shown to compare favourably with

  1. A community benchmark for viscoplastic thermal convection in a 2-D square box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, N.; Stein, C.; Noack, L.; Hüttig, C.; Maierová, P.; Samuel, H.; Davies, D. R.; Wilson, C. R.; Kramer, S. C.; Thieulot, C.; Glerum, A.; Fraters, M.; Spakman, W.; Rozel, A.; Tackley, P. J.

    2015-07-01

    Numerical simulations of thermal convection in the Earth's mantle often employ a pseudoplastic rheology in order to mimic the plate-like behavior of the lithosphere. Yet the benchmark tests available in the literature are largely based on simple linear rheologies in which the viscosity is either assumed to be constant or weakly dependent on temperature. Here we present a suite of simple tests based on nonlinear rheologies featuring temperature, pressure, and strain rate-dependent viscosity. Eleven different codes based on the finite volume, finite element, or spectral methods have been used to run five benchmark cases leading to stagnant lid, mobile lid, and periodic convection in a 2-D square box. For two of these cases, we also show resolution tests from all contributing codes. In addition, we present a bifurcation analysis, describing the transition from a mobile lid regime to a periodic regime, and from a periodic regime to a stagnant lid regime, as a function of the yield stress. At a resolution of around 100 cells or elements in both vertical and horizontal directions, all codes reproduce the required diagnostic quantities with a discrepancy of at most ˜3% in the presence of both linear and nonlinear rheologies. Furthermore, they consistently predict the critical value of the yield stress at which the transition between different regimes occurs. As the most recent mantle convection codes can handle a number of different geometries within a single solution framework, this benchmark will also prove useful when validating viscoplastic thermal convection simulations in such geometries.

  2. Thermal Coupling Between the Ocean and Mantle of Europa: Implications for Ocean Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Krista M.; Schmidt, Britney E.; Wicht, Johannes; Blankenship, Donald D.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic induction signatures at Europa indicate the presence of a subsurface ocean beneath the cold icy crust. The underlying mantle is heated by radioactive decay and tidal dissipation, leading to a thermal contrast sufficient to drive convection and active dynamics within the ocean. Radiogenic heat sources may be distributed uniformly in the interior, while tidal heating varies spatially with a pattern that depends on whether eccentricity or obliquity tides are dominant. The distribution of mantle heat flow along the seafloor may therefore be heterogeneous and impact the regional vigor of ocean convection. Here, we use numerical simulations of thermal convection in a global, Europa-like ocean to test the sensitivity of ocean dynamics to variations in mantle heat flow patterns. Towards this end, three end-member cases are considered: an isothermal seafloor associated with dominant radiogenic heating, enhanced seafloor temperatures at high latitudes associated with eccentricity tides, and enhanced equatorial seafloor temperatures associated with obliquity tides. Our analyses will focus on convective heat transfer since the heat flux pattern along the ice-ocean interface can directly impact the ice shell and the potential for geologic activity within it.

  3. Study of the fast photoswitching of spin crossover nanoparticles outside and inside their thermal hysteresis loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallé, G.; Etrillard, C.; Degert, J.; Guillaume, F.; Létard, J.-F.; Freysz, E.

    2013-02-01

    We have studied the low spin to high spin phase transition induced by nanosecond laser pulses outside and within the thermal hysteresis loop of the [Fe(Htrz)2 trz](BF4)2-H2O spin crossover nanoparticles. We demonstrate that, whatever the temperature of the compound, the photo-switching is achieved in less than 12.5 ns. Outside the hysteresis loop, the photo-induced high spin state remains up to 100 μs and then relaxes. Within the thermal hysteresis loop, the photo-induced high spin state remains as long as the temperature of the sample is kept within the thermal loop. A Raman study indicates that the photo-switching can be completed using single laser pulse excitation.

  4. Thermal convection in Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid in porous medium in hydromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R. C.; Kango, S. K.

    1999-02-01

    The thermal instability of a layer of Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid in porous medium acted on by a uniform magnetic field is considered. For stationary convection, Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid behaves like a Newtonian fluid. The magnetic field is found to have stabilizing effect whereas medium permeability has destabilizing effect. The magnetic field introduces oscillatory modes in the system, A sufficient condition for the non-existence of overstability is also obtained.

  5. Thermal performance of a porus radial fin with natural convection and radiative heat losses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darvishi M.T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytic (series solution is developed to describe the thermal performance of a porous radial fin with natural convection in the fluid saturating the fin and radiation heat loss from the top and bottom surfaces of the fin. The HAM results for the temperature distribution and base heat flux are compared with the direct numerical results and found to be very accurate.

  6. Corrosion and precipitation effects in a forced-convection Pb–15.7Li loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konys, J., E-mail: juergen.konys@kit.edu; Krauss, W.

    2013-11-15

    The helium-cooled lithium lead (HCLL) concept for blankets is based on the application of the liquid breeder Pb–15.7Li, which is in direct contact with the structural components, e.g., RAFM steels. Corrosion attack of the structural material is always present and is mainly governed by the operation temperature and flow velocity of the liquid breeder. At high flow velocities, high dissolution rates of ca. 400 μm/year were evaluated at 823 K (550 °C) and showed a high amount of corrosion products in the Pb–15.7Li. In a test blanket module (TBM) system or also in a testing loop, e.g., the PICOLO loop of KIT, these components are transported with the breeder flow to sections with cooler temperature and will form precipitates due to oversaturation. Effects such as deposition, precipitate formation and transport were less considered in former compatibility testing of RAFM steels (Eurofer) in flowing Pb–15.7Li and test evaluation. However, such formed particles may seriously affect safe and reliable operation of TBM systems. Analytical and modeling work concerning the impact of corrosion products was started and results obtained during PICOLO operation will be presented. Effects observed will also be discussed with respect to further testing needs for model development including their validation as predictive tools for TBMs with a view to DEMO and testing/qualification in ITER.

  7. Thermal phase transition with full 2-loop effective potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, M.; Meyer, M.; Nardini, G.

    2017-07-01

    Theories with extended Higgs sectors constructed in view of cosmological ramifications (gravitational wave signal, baryogenesis, dark matter) are often faced with conflicting requirements for their couplings; in particular those influencing the strength of a phase transition may be large. Large couplings compromise perturbative studies, as well as the high-temperature expansion that is invoked in dimensionally reduced lattice investigations. With the example of the inert doublet extension of the Standard Model (IDM), we show how a resummed 2-loop effective potential can be computed without a high-T expansion, and use the result to scrutinize its accuracy. With the exception of Tc, which is sensitive to contributions from heavy modes, the high-T expansion is found to perform well. 2-loop corrections weaken the transition in IDM, but they are moderate, whereby a strong transition remains an option.

  8. Thermal phase transition with full 2-loop effective potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Laine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Theories with extended Higgs sectors constructed in view of cosmological ramifications (gravitational wave signal, baryogenesis, dark matter are often faced with conflicting requirements for their couplings; in particular those influencing the strength of a phase transition may be large. Large couplings compromise perturbative studies, as well as the high-temperature expansion that is invoked in dimensionally reduced lattice investigations. With the example of the inert doublet extension of the Standard Model (IDM, we show how a resummed 2-loop effective potential can be computed without a high-T expansion, and use the result to scrutinize its accuracy. With the exception of Tc, which is sensitive to contributions from heavy modes, the high-T expansion is found to perform well. 2-loop corrections weaken the transition in IDM, but they are moderate, whereby a strong transition remains an option.

  9. A numerical study of the thermal stability of low-lying coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Mariska, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of loops that are subjected to a variety of small but finite perturbations was studied. Only the low-lying loops are considered. The analysis was performed numerically using a one-dimensional hydrodynamical model developed at the Naval Research Laboratory. The computer codes solve the time-dependent equations for mass, momentum, and energy transport. The primary interest is the active region filaments, hence a geometry appropriate to those structures was considered. The static solutions were subjected to a moderate sized perturbation and allowed to evolve. The results suggest that both hot and cool loops of the geometry considered are thermally stable against amplitude perturbations of all kinds.

  10. A new technique for marginal linear stability analysis of thermal convection using propagator matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2011-12-01

    Critical Rayleigh number, Ra_c, is the Rayleigh number at the onset of thermal convection. Classic linear analysis provides a way to solve for Ra_c, but this method is mostly used for incompressible fluid with uniform properties. Here we report a new technique for linear stability analysis using propagator matrix method. This new technique can solve for Ra_c for both incompressible and compressible fluids, with depth dependent viscosity, thermal expansion and thermal diffusivity. This technique determines Ra_c for fundamental mode as well as higher modes. We found that results from this new technique agree well with those from the classic analysis for incompressible fluid with uniform properties. We have compared results of Ra_c from the new method with that of finite element code Citcom( Leng and Zhong, 2008 ). For incompressible fluid, they agree with each other very well, including fundamental and higher modes. For compressible fluid, the agreement is not as good, but relative difference remains less than a couple of percent, especially for fundamental mode at small dissipation number Di (e.g., less than 1). Our results show that Ra_c for compressible fluid are similar to that of incompressible fluid, but are significantly different from that of Jarvis & Mckenzie (1981). Given that much higher Rayleigh number is needed in compressible fluid to generate a given heat flux, our results from the new method have implications for the Nusselt-Rayleigh number relation for compressible thermal convection.

  11. Finite element methodology for transient conduction/forced-convection thermal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, E. A.; Wieting, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    Finite element methodology for steady state thermal analysis of convectively cooled structures has been extended for transient analysis. The finite elements are based on representing the fluid passages by fluid bulk-temperature nodes and fluid-solid interface nodes. The formulation of the finite element equations for a typical flow passage is based on the weighted residual method with upwind weighting functions. Computer implementation of the convective finite element methodology using explicit and implicit time integration algorithms is described. Accuracy and efficiency of the methodology is evaluated by comparisons with analytical solutions and finite-difference lumped-parameter analyses. The comparative analyses demonstrate that finite element conduction/conduction methodology may be used to predict transient temperatures with an accuracy equal or superior to the lumped-parameter finite-difference method.

  12. The Effect of NEXRAD Image Looping and National Convective Weather Forecast Product on Pilot Decision Making in the Use of a Cockpit Weather Information Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Malcolm A.; Thomas, Rickey P.

    2004-01-01

    This experiment investigated improvements to cockpit weather displays to better support the hazardous weather avoidance decision-making of general aviation pilots. Forty-eight general aviation pilots were divided into three equal groups and presented with a simulated flight scenario involving embedded convective activity. The control group had access to conventional sources of pre-flight and in-flight weather products. The two treatment groups were provided with a weather display that presented NEXRAD mosaic images, graphic depiction of METARs, and text METARs. One treatment group used a NEXRAD image looping feature and the second group used the National Convective Weather Forecast (NCWF) product overlaid on the NEXRAD display. Both of the treatment displays provided a significant increase in situation awareness but, they provided incomplete information required to deal with hazardous convective weather conditions, and would require substantial pilot training to permit their safe and effective use.

  13. Influence of Thermal Contact Resistance of Aluminum Foams in Forced Convection: Experimental Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Stefano; Di Ilio, Giovanni; Venettacci, Simone

    2017-08-05

    In this paper, the heat transfer performances of aluminum metal foams, placed on horizontal plane surface, was evaluated in forced convection conditions. Three different types of contacts between the sample and the heated base plate have been investigated: simple contact, brazed contact and grease paste contact. First, in order to perform the study, an ad hoc experimental set-up was built. Second, the value of thermal contact resistance was estimated. The results show that both the use of a conductive paste and the brazing contact, realized by means of a copper electro-deposition, allows a great reduction of the global thermal resistance, increasing de facto the global heat transfer coefficient of almost 80%, compared to the simple contact case. Finally, it was shown that, while the contribution of thermal resistance is negligible for the cases of brazed and grease paste contact, it is significantly high for the case of simple contact.

  14. Influence of Thermal Contact Resistance of Aluminum Foams in Forced Convection: Experimental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Guarino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the heat transfer performances of aluminum metal foams, placed on horizontal plane surface, was evaluated in forced convection conditions. Three different types of contacts between the sample and the heated base plate have been investigated: simple contact, brazed contact and grease paste contact. First, in order to perform the study, an ad hoc experimental set-up was built. Second, the value of thermal contact resistance was estimated. The results show that both the use of a conductive paste and the brazing contact, realized by means of a copper electro-deposition, allows a great reduction of the global thermal resistance, increasing de facto the global heat transfer coefficient of almost 80%, compared to the simple contact case. Finally, it was shown that, while the contribution of thermal resistance is negligible for the cases of brazed and grease paste contact, it is significantly high for the case of simple contact.

  15. Effects of polymer additives in the bulk of turbulent thermal convection

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Yi-Chao; Funfschilling, Denis; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that a minute amount of polymer additives can significantly enhance heat transport in the bulk region of turbulent thermal convection. The effects of polymer additives are found to be the \\textit{suppression} of turbulent background fluctuations that give rise to incoherent heat fluxes that make no net contribution to heat transport, and at the same time to \\textit{increase} the coherency of temperature and velocity fields. The suppression of small-scale turbulent fluctuations leads to more coherent thermal plumes that result in the heat transport enhancement. The fact that polymer additives can increase the coherency of thermal plumes is supported by the measurements of a number of local quantities, such as the extracted plume amplitude and width, the velocity autocorrelation functions and the velocity-temperature cross-correlation coefficient. The results from local measurements also suggest the existence of a threshold value for the polymer concentration, only above which c...

  16. Propagation of thermally induced oscillation in the KSTAR cryogenic loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jung, E-mail: yaeban@nfri.re.kr; Oh, Sang Jun; Joo, J.J.; Kim, N.W.; Moon, K.M.

    2016-11-01

    Thermo-acoustic oscillation is well-known phenomena which can generate quite a heat load to a cryogenic system. Here we report that thermally induced oscillation has been occurred in the KSTAR cryogenic system and furthermore that oscillation propagates the cryogenic circuit, affects strongly the overall supercritical helium flow and generates severe mechanical vibration on the system. Additional vibration sensors were attached on the cryogenic circuit to trace the origin of that abrupt thermal leak and detailed hydraulic data analyses have been carried out. It was found that test heaters of flange type inserted in directly the by-pass lines are the origin of the thermally induced unexpected oscillation and thereby by the dismantle of the heaters the oscillation can be permanently eradicated.

  17. Investigation of the role of thermal boundary layer processes in initiating convection under the NASA SPACE Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnider, Richard T.; Song, Aaron; Casey, Dan; Crosson, William; Wetzel, Peter

    1993-01-01

    The current NWS ground based network is not sufficient to capture the dynamic or thermodynamic structure leading to the initiation and organization of air mass moist convective events. Under this investigation we intend to use boundary layer mesoscale models (McNider and Pielke, 1981) to examine the dynamic triggering of convection due to topography and surface thermal contrasts. VAS and MAN's estimates of moisture will be coupled with the dynamic solution to provide an estimate of the total convective potential. Visible GOES images will be used to specify incoming insolation which may lead to surface thermal contrasts and JR skin temperatures will be used to estimate surface moisture (via the surface thermal inertia) (Weizel and Chang, 1988) which can also induce surface thermal contrasts. We will use the SPACE-COHMEX data base to evaluate the ability of the joint mesoscale model satellite products to show skill in predicting the development of air mass convection. We will develop images of model vertical velocity and satellite thermodynamic measures to derive images of predicted convective potential. We will then after suitable geographic registration carry out a pixel by pixel correlation between the model/satellite convective potential and the 'truth' which are the visible images. During the first half of the first year of this investigation we have concentrated on two aspects of the project. The first has been in generating vertical velocity fields from the model for COHMEX case days. We have taken June 19 as the first case and have run the mesoscale model at several different grid resolutions. We are currently developing the composite model/satellite convective image. The second aspect has been the attempted calibration of the surface energy budget to provide the proper horizontal thermal contrasts for convective initiation. We have made extensive progress on this aspect using the FIFE data as a test data set. The calibration technique looks very promising.

  18. Thermal radiation effect on a mixed convection flow and heat transfer of the Williamson fluid past an exponentially shrinking permeable sheet with a convective boundary condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaib, A.; Bhattacharyya, K.; Khalid, M.; Shafie, S.

    2017-05-01

    The thermal radiation effect on a steady mixed convective flow with heat transfer of a nonlinear (non-Newtonian) Williamson fluid past an exponentially shrinking porous sheet with a convective boundary condition is investigated numerically. In this study, both an assisting flow and an opposing flow are considered. The governing equations are converted into nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using a suitable transformation. A numerical solution of the problem is obtained by using the Matlab software package for different values of the governing parameters. The results show that dual nonsimilar solutions exist for the opposing flow, whereas the solution for the assisting flow is unique. It is also observed that the dual nonsimilar solutions exist only if a certain amount of mass suction is applied through the porous sheet, which depends on the Williamson parameter, convective parameter, and radiation parameter.

  19. Statistical and geometrical properties of thermal plumes in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Quan

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic experimental study of geometric and statistical properties of thermal plumes in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection using the thermochromic-liquid-crystal (TLC) technique. The experiments were performed in three water-filled cylindrical convection cells with aspect ratios 2, 1, and 0.5 and over the Rayleigh-number range $5\\times10^7 \\leq Ra \\leq 10^{11}$. TLC thermal images of horizontal plane cuts at various depths below the top plate were acquired. Three-dimensional images of thermal plumes were then reconstructed from the two-dimensional slices of the temperature field. The results show that the often-called sheetlike plumes are really one-dimensional structures and may be called rodlike plumes. We find that the number densities for both sheetlike/rodlike and mushroomlike plumes have power-law dependence on $Ra$ with scaling exponents of $\\sim 0.3$, which is close to that between the Nusselt number $Nu$ and $Ra$. This result suggests that it is the plume number that primarily d...

  20. Simulating the swelling and deformation behaviour in soft tissues using a convective thermal analogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzog Walter

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is generally accepted that cartilage adaptation and degeneration are mechanically mediated. Investigating the swelling behaviour of cartilage is important because the stress and strain state of cartilage is associated with the swelling and deformation behaviour. It is well accepted that the swelling of soft tissues is associated with mechanical, chemical, and electrical events. Method The purpose of the present study was to implement the triphasic theory into a commercial finite element tool (ABAQUS to solve practical problems in cartilage mechanics. Because of the mathematical identity between thermal and mass diffusion processes, the triphasic model was transferred into a convective thermal diffusion process in the commercial finite element software. The problem was solved using an iterative procedure. Results The proposed approach was validated using the one-dimensional numerical solutions and the experimental results of confined compression of articular cartilage described in the literature. The time-history of the force response of a cartilage specimen in confined compression, which was subjected to swelling caused by a sudden change of saline concentration, was predicted using the proposed approach and compared with the published experimental data. Conclusion The advantage of the proposed thermal analogy technique over previous studies is that it accounts for the convective diffusion of ion concentrations and the Donnan osmotic pressure in the interstitial fluid.

  1. Active control of convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, H.H. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Using stability theory, numerical simulations, and in some instances experiments, it is demonstrated that the critical Rayleigh number for the bifurcation (1) from the no-motion (conduction) state to the motion state and (2) from time-independent convection to time-dependent, oscillatory convection in the thermal convection loop and Rayleigh-Benard problems can be significantly increased or decreased. This is accomplished through the use of a feedback controller effectuating small perturbations in the boundary data. The controller consists of sensors which detect deviations in the fluid`s temperature from the motionless, conductive values and then direct actuators to respond to these deviations in such a way as to suppress the naturally occurring flow instabilities. Actuators which modify the boundary`s temperature/heat flux are considered. The feedback controller can also be used to control flow patterns and generate complex dynamic behavior at relatively low Rayleigh numbers.

  2. Successive Bifurcation Conditions of a Lorenz-Type Equation for the Fluid Convection Due to the Transient Thermal Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling He

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the convection flow between the two parallel plates in a fluid cell subject to the transient thermal field. We use the modal approximations similar to that of the original Lorenz model to obtain a generalized Lorenz-type model for the flow induced by the transient thermal field at the bottom plate. This study examines the convection flow bifurcation conditions in relation to the transient temperature variations and the flow properties. We formulated successive bifurcation conditions and illustrated the various flow behaviors and their steady-state attractors affected by the thermal field functions and fluid properties.

  3. From intermittent to nonintermittent behavior in two dimensional thermal convection in a soap bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seychelles, F; Ingremeau, F; Pradere, C; Kellay, H

    2010-12-31

    Turbulent thermal convection in half a soap bubble heated from below displays a new and surprising transition from intermittent to nonintermittent behavior for the temperature field. This transition is observed here by studying the high order moments of temperature increments. For high temperature gradients, these structure functions display Bolgiano-like scaling predicted some 60 years ago with no observable deviations. The probability distribution functions of these increments are Gaussian throughout the scaling range. These measurements are corroborated with additional velocity structure function measurements.

  4. Transient natural convection in a vertical channel filled with nanofluids in the presence of thermal radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The transient natural convection in a vertical channel filled with nanofluids has been studied when thermal radiation is taken into consideration. The equations governing the flow are solved by employing the Laplace transform technique. Exact solutions for the velocity and temperature of nanofluid are obtained in cases of both prescribed surface temperature (PST and prescribed heat flux (PHF. The numerical results for the velocity and temperature of nanofluid are presented graphically for the pertinent parameters and discussed in detail. The fluid velocity is greater in the case of PST than that of PHF.

  5. Free Convective Nonaligned Non-Newtonian Flow with Non-linear Thermal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, S.; Mehmood, R.; Narayana, PV S.; Akbar, N. S.

    2016-12-01

    The present study explores the free convective oblique Casson fluid over a stretching surface with non-linear thermal radiation effects. The governing physical problem is modelled and transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations by suitable similarity transformation, which are solved numerically with the help of shooting method keeping the convergence control of 10-5 in computations. Influence of pertinent physical parameters on normal, tangential velocity profiles and temperature are expressed through graphs. Physical quantities of interest such as skin friction coefficients and local heat flux are investigated numerically.

  6. Thermal diffusion effects on free convection and mass transfer flow for an infinite vertical plate

    CERN Document Server

    Abdel-Khalek, M M

    2003-01-01

    A theoretical study is performed to examine the effects of thermal diffusion on free convection and mass transfer flow for an infinite vertical plate. The governing equations for the fluid flow and the heat transfer are solved subject to the relevant boundary conditions. A perturbation technique is used to obtain expressions for the velocity field and skin friction. An analysis of the effects of the parameters on the concentration, velocity and temperature profiles as well as skin friction and the rate of mass and heat transfer is done with the aid of graphs.

  7. Strategic need for a multi-purpose thermal hydraulic loop for support of advanced reactor technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yoon, Su -Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Housley, Gregory K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design for a new high-temperature multi fluid, multi loop test facility for the INL to support thermal hydraulic, materials, and thermal energy storage research for nuclear and nuclear-hybrid applications. In its initial configuration, the facility will include a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed with this facility include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions, flow and heat transfer issues related to core thermal hydraulics in advanced helium-cooled and salt-cooled reactors, and evaluation of corrosion behavior of new cladding materials and accident-tolerant fuels for LWRs at prototypical conditions. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) facility. Research performed in this facility will advance the state of the art and technology readiness level of high temperature intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) for nuclear applications while establishing the INL as a center of excellence for the development and certification of this technology. The thermal energy storage capability will support research and demonstration activities related to process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will assist in development of reliable predictive models for thermal hydraulic design and safety codes over the range of expected advanced reactor operating conditions. Proposed/existing IHX heat transfer and friction correlations and criteria will be assessed with information on materials compatibility and instrumentation

  8. Simulation of regimes of convection and plume dynamics by the thermal Lattice Boltzmann Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Peter; Yuen, David A.

    2018-02-01

    We present 2D simulations using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) of a fluid in a rectangular box being heated from below, and cooled from above. We observe plumes, hot narrow upwellings from the base, and down-going cold chutes from the top. We have varied both the Rayleigh numbers and the Prandtl numbers respectively from Ra = 1000 to Ra =1010 , and Pr = 1 through Pr = 5 ×104 , leading to Rayleigh-Bénard convection cells at low Rayleigh numbers through to vigorous convection and unstable plumes with pronounced vortices and eddies at high Rayleigh numbers. We conduct simulations with high Prandtl numbers up to Pr = 50, 000 to simulate in the inertial regime. We find for cases when Pr ⩾ 100 that we obtain a series of narrow plumes of upwelling fluid with mushroom heads and chutes of downwelling fluid. We also present simulations at a Prandtl number of 0.7 for Rayleigh numbers varying from Ra =104 through Ra =107.5 . We demonstrate that the Nusselt number follows power law scaling of form Nu ∼Raγ where γ = 0.279 ± 0.002 , which is consistent with published results of γ = 0.281 in the literature. These results show that the LBM is capable of reproducing results obtained with classical macroscopic methods such as spectral methods, and demonstrate the great potential of the LBM for studying thermal convection and plume dynamics relevant to geodynamics.

  9. Numerical study of combined convection heat transfer for thermally developing upward flow in a vertical cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Hussein A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the laminar upward mixed convection heat transfer for thermally developing air flow in the entrance region of a vertical circular cylinder under buoyancy effect and wall heat flux boundary condition has been numerically investigated. An implicit finite difference method and the Gauss elimination technique have been used to solve the governing partial differential equations of motion (Navier Stocks equations for two-dimensional model. This investigation covers Reynolds number range from 400 to 1600, heat flux is varied from 70 W/m2 to 400 W/m2. The results present the dimensionless temperature profile, dimensionless velocity profile, dimensionless surface temperature along the cylinder, and the local Nusselt number variation with the dimensionless axial distance Z+. The dimensionless velocity and temperature profile results have revealed that the secondary flow created by natural convection have a significant effect on the heat transfer process. The results have also shown an increase in the Nusselt number values as the heat flux increases. The results have been compared with the available experimental study and with the available analytical solution for pure forced convection in terms of the local Nusselt number. The comparison has shown satisfactory agreement. .

  10. Mixed convective flow of immiscible fluids in a vertical corrugated channel with traveling thermal waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Umavathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fully developed laminar mixed convection in a corrugated vertical channel filled with two immiscible viscous fluids has been investigated. By using a perturbation technique, the coupled nonlinear equations governing the flow and heat transfer are solved. The fluids are assumed to have different viscosities and thermal conductivities. Separate solutions are matched at the interface using suitable matching conditions. The velocity, the temperature, the Nusselt number and the shear stress are analyzed for variations of the governing parameters such as Grashof number, viscosity ratio, width ratio, conductivity ratio, frequency parameter, traveling thermal temperature and are shown graphically. It is found that the Grashof number, viscosity ratio, width ratio and conductivity ratio enhance the velocity parallel to the flow direction and reduce the velocity perpendicular to the flow direction.

  11. Mixed Convection Flow along a Stretching Cylinder in a Thermally Stratified Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Mukhopadhyay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis for the axisymmetric laminar boundary layer mixed convection flow of a viscous and incompressible fluid towards a stretching cylinder immersed in a thermally stratified medium is presented in this paper. Similarity transformation is employed to convert the governing partial differential equations into highly nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by a shooting method. It is found that the heat transfer rate at the surface is lower for flow in a thermally stratified medium compared to that of an unstratified medium. Moreover, both the skin friction coefficient and the heat transfer rate at the surface are larger for a cylinder compared to that for a flat plate.

  12. Thermal convection of dusty compressible Rivlin-Ericksen viscoelastic fluid with hall currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Urvashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation is made on the effect of Hall currents and suspended particles on the hydromagnetic stability of a compressible, electrically conducting Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid. The perturbation equations are analyzed in terms of normal modes after linearizing the relevant set of hydromagnetic equations. A dispersion relation governing the effects of viscoelasticity, magnetic field, Hall currents, compressibility and suspended particles is derived. For the stationary convection Rivlin-Ericksen fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid due to the vanishing of the viscoelastic parameter. Compressibility and magnetic field are found to have a stabilizing effect on the system whereas Hall currents and suspended particles hasten the onset of thermal instability. These analytic results are confirmed numerically and the effects of various parameters on the stability parameter are depicted graphically. The critical Rayleigh numbers and the wavenumbers of the associated disturbances for the onset of instability as stationary convection are obtained and the behavior of various parameters on critical thermal Rayleigh numbers has been depicted graphically. It has been observed that oscillatory modes are introduced due to the presence of viscoelasticity, suspended particles and Hall currents which were not existing in the absence of these parameters.

  13. Impacts of convection on high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Christof; Hintze, Meike; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Seasonal subsurface heat storage is increasingly used in order to overcome the temporal disparities between heat production from renewable sources like solar thermal installations or from industrial surplus heat and the heat demand for building climatisation or hot water supply. In this context, high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is a technology to efficiently store and retrieve large amounts of heat using groundwater wells in an aquifer to inject or withdraw hot or cold water. Depending on the local hydrogeology and temperature amplitudes during high-temperature ATES, density differences between the injected hot water and the ambient groundwater may induce significant convective flow components in the groundwater flow field. As a consequence, stored heat may accumulate at the top of the storage aquifer which reduces the heat recovery efficiency of the ATES system. Also, an accumulation of heat at the aquifer top will induce increased emissions of heat to overlying formations with potential impacts on groundwater quality outside of the storage. This work investigates the impacts of convective heat transport on the storage efficiency of a hypothetical high-temperature ATES system for seasonal heat storage as well as heat emissions to neighboring formations by numerical scenario simulations. The coupled groundwater flow and heat transport code OpenGeoSys is used to simulate a medium scale ATES system operating in a sandy aquifer of 20 m thickness with an average groundwater temperature of 10°C and confining aquicludes at top and bottom. Seasonal heat storage by a well doublet (i.e. one fully screened "hot" and "cold" well, respectively) is simulated over a period of 10 years with biannual injection / withdrawal cycles at pumping rates of 15 m³/h and for different scenarios of the temperature of the injected water (20, 35, 60 and 90 °C). Simulation results show, that for the simulated system significant convective heat transport sets in when

  14. Thermal measurements and flow visualization of heat convection in a tilted channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisserand, Jean-Christophe; Creyssels, Mathieu; Riedinger, Xavier; Castaing, Bernard; Chillà, Francesca

    2010-05-01

    Convection is the most important heat transport mechanism. We can find it not only in many natural situations such as stars, planet's atmosphere but also in half-natural situations such as industrial plants. Furthermore, the Rayleigh-Benard system, in which a fluid is cooled from above and heated from below, is one of the most studied systems in thermal convection. Nevertheless, in this configuration, the neighborhood of the plates controls the heat transfer. Therefore, we have to make a system in which the flow forgets the cold and the hot plate. We have built a vertical long channel which links two chambers : the hot one at the lower end and the cold one at the upper end. Moreover, this channel, which is hanged to a structure, can be tilted from an angle of 0 degree to 90 degrees. The experimental facility used for this purpose is a square channel with an inner area of 5*5 cm² m and with a height of 20 cm. The cell is filled with water and is heated at the bottom by Joule effect. At the top, the temperature is regulated by a thermal bath and the mean temperature of the bulk is 25°C . It is worth noticing that this configuration could correspond to heat pipes (without phase transformation) used in thermalisation systems or could model a vertical access pit of an underground carry. In this paper, we want to highlight how the thermal convection in the bulk of the channel is. In the first part, the paper will be focused on the visualization of the flow into the channel thanks to particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. We look at the mean velocity field (transverse and axial components) , the fluctuations of the mean velocity field and the shear Reynolds stress. Besides, we analyze how the influence of the power supply and the dependance of the tilt angle are. At last, we will interpret the PIV measurements in terms of turbulent viscosity and effective heat conduction and we will deduce from the PIV measurements the axial mean profile of temperature. Then, in a

  15. OSEFT or how to go beyond hard thermal loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We show that effective field theory techniques can be applied in the high temperature T regime of plasmas to improve the accuracy of the physics of the hard scales (or scales of order T, and as a by-product, also that of the soft scales (or scales of order gT. At leading order in the coupling constant the hard scales of the plasma can be viewed as on-shell classical particles. Based on this observation, and without any reference to the state of the system, we derive an effective field theory describing the quantum fluctuations around an on-shell fermion with energy p, described as a set of high dimension operators over the on-shell energy p. When applied to systems close to thermal equilibrium, where for most on-shell particles p ~ T, we show that the on-shell effective field theory (OSEFT properly describes the HTL photon polarization tensor of QED, and its 1/T corrections. For the soft scales the first non-vanishing power correction turns out to be a perturbative correction to the HTL result.

  16. The asymptotic equivalence of fixed heat flux and fixed temperature thermal boundary conditions for rapidly rotating convection

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Julien, Keith; Nieves, David; Driggs, Derek; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The influence of fixed temperature and fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions on rapidly rotating convection in the plane layer geometry is investigated for the case of stress-free mechanical boundary conditions. It is shown that whereas the leading order system satisfies fixed temperature boundary conditions implicitly, a double boundary layer structure is necessary to satisfy the fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions. The boundary layers consist of a classical Ekman layer adjacent to the solid boundaries that adjust viscous stresses to zero, and a layer in thermal wind balance just outside the Ekman layers adjusts the temperature such that the fixed heat flux thermal boundary conditions are satisfied. The influence of these boundary layers on the interior geostrophically balanced convection is shown to be asymptotically weak, however. Upon defining a simple rescaling of the thermal variables, the leading order reduced system of governing equations are therefore equivalent for both boundary condit...

  17. One-Dimensional Convective Thermal Evolution Calculation Using a Modified Mixing Length Theory: Application to Saturnian Icy Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamata, Shunichi

    2018-01-01

    Solid-state thermal convection plays a major role in the thermal evolution of solid planetary bodies. Solving the equation system for thermal evolution considering convection requires 2-D or 3-D modeling, resulting in large calculation costs. A 1-D calculation scheme based on mixing length theory (MLT) requires a much lower calculation cost and is suitable for parameter studies. A major concern for the MLT scheme is its accuracy due to a lack of detailed comparisons with higher dimensional schemes. In this study, I quantify its accuracy via comparisons of thermal profiles obtained by 1-D MLT and 3-D numerical schemes. To improve the accuracy, I propose a new definition of the mixing length (l), which is a parameter controlling the efficiency of heat transportation due to convection, for a bottom-heated convective layer. Adopting this new definition of l, I investigate the thermal evolution of Saturnian icy satellites, Dione and Enceladus, under a wide variety of parameter conditions. Calculation results indicate that each satellite requires several tens of GW of heat to possess a thick global subsurface ocean suggested from geophysical analyses. Dynamical tides may be able to account for such an amount of heat, though the reference viscosity of Dione's ice and the ammonia content of Dione's ocean need to be very high. Otherwise, a thick global ocean in Dione cannot be maintained, implying that its shell is not in a minimum stress state.

  18. New methodology for the walls design in buildings by numerical simulation of the thermal convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benachour, Elhadj; Draoui, Belkacem; Imine, Bachir; Asnoune, Khadidja; Mohamed, Elmir

    Buildings are complex systems composed of several elements, which are assembled to respond to a number of needs functional and symbolic according to set of legal and environmental requirements and potentially accommodate users with different levels of demand. Predicting the conception of the external wall is beneficial in the design of house and building structures.in this study, an analogy was used for the functions which are discretized by the finite difference method and integrated in the CFD code which is based on the finite volume method. The CFD software is used as a technique to modelling the behaviour of fluid and the thermal convection in the external wall of the house with different Rayleigh numbers [103≤ Ra ≤105]. In the second phase, we change the thickness of the wall several times and calculate the Nusselt number and exchange coefficient of heat transfer aims to find a cloud point respectively for the thicknesses e = 0, L /40, L /20 and L /10. After, we developed a relationship that helps us to know the exchange ratio for each thickness ( e ) belongs to the interval [0, L /10] by the Lagrange polynomial interpolation method for Rayleigh number equal 104 , and then we developed a FORTRAN program to control the nonlinear equation of order three. This method for predicting exchange coefficient of convection for to optimize the design of walls in buildings.

  19. Ubiquitous transient stagnant domain formation during thermal convection in a well-mixed two component fluid with large viscosity difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kazuya U; Kurita, Rei

    2017-10-11

    The formation of a transient stagnant domain in the presence of thermal convection was previously reported near the sol-gel transition temperature of a gelatin solution. The transient stagnant domain is observed near a critical Rayleigh number where a "roll" pattern is usually stable. It is important to understand the origin of the transient stagnant domain formation since it induces a large deformation of convection patterns; the nature of the formation of the transient stagnant domain remains unclear. Here, we observe thermal convection using several different fluids and find that stagnant domain formation is ubiquitous in two component mixtures. In addition, we find that difference in viscosity between the two components is crucial for transient stagnant domain formation, more so than the concentration gradient induced by the temperature gradient.

  20. Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops: II. Improvements to the Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.; Klimchuk, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper further develops the zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic coronal loop model "Enthalpy-based Thermal Evolution of Loops" (EBTEL) originally proposed by Klimchuk et al (2008), which studies the plasma response to evolving coronal heating. It has typically been applied to impulsive heating events. The basis of EBTEL is the modelling of mass exchange between the corona and transition region and chromosphere in response to heating variations, with the key parameter being the ratio of transition region to coronal radiation. We develop new models for this parameter that now include gravitational stratification and a physically motivated approach to radiative cooling. A number of examples are presented, including nanoflares in short and long loops, and a small flare. It is found that while the evolution of the loop temperature is rather insensitive to the details of the model, accurate tracking of the density requires the inclusion of our new features. In particular, we are able to now obtain highly over-dense loops in the late cooling phase and decreases to the coronal density arising due to stratification. The 0D results are compared to a 1D hydro code (Hydrad). The agreement is acceptable, with the exception of the flare case where some versions of Hydrad can give significantly lower densities. This is attributed to the method used to model the chromosphere in a flare. EBTEL is suitable for general use as a tool for (a) quick-look results of loop evolution in response to a given heating function and (b) situations where the modelling of hundreds or thousands of elemental loops is needed. A single run takes a few seconds on a contemporary laptop.

  1. Numerical study of thermal performance of perforated circular pin fin heat sinks in forced convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Mao-Yu; Yeh, Cheng-Hsiung

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation of the heat transfer performance under forced convection for two different types of circular pin fin heat sinks with (Type A) and without (Type B) a hollow in the heated base. COMSOL Multiphysics, which is used for the thermal hydraulic analyses, has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. The standard κ - \\varepsilon two-equations turbulence model is employed to describe the turbulent structure and behavior. The numerical results are validated with the experimental results, and are shown to be in good agreement. The effects of the Reynolds number, height of the fin, finning factor and the perforated base plate on the heat-transfer coefficient are investigated and evaluated. The present study strongly recommends the use of a small hollow ( (Dh /Db ) heat sink.

  2. THERMAL CONVECTION OF RIVLIN-ERICKSEN FLUID IN THE PRESENCE OF VERTICAL ROTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Banyal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermal instability of a Rivlin-Ericksen viscoelastic fluid, acted upon by uniform vertical rotation and heated from below, is investigated. Following linearized stability theory and normal mode analysis, the mathematical analysis of the governing equations of Rivlin-Ericksen viscoelastic fluid convection with a uniform vertical rotation is performed. It is shown that for the cases of rigid boundaries the complex growth rate of oscillatory perturbations, neutral or unstable for all wave numbers, must lie inside a semi-circle, in the right-hand half of a complex -plane with the center at the origin. This prescribes the upper limits to the complex growth rate of arbitrary oscillatory motions of growing amplitude in a rotatory Rivlin-Ericksen viscoelastic fluid heated from below. Furthermore, the conditions necessary for the existence of oscillatory motions of growing amplitude in the present configuration and the sufficient condition for the validity of the Principle of Exchange of Stabilities are established.

  3. Numerical study of steady dissipative mixed convection optically-thick micropolar flow with thermal radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Diksha; Kumar, Lokendra; Bég, O. Anwar; Singh, Bani

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to study theoretically and numerically the effect of thermal radiation on mixed convection boundary layer flow of a dissipative micropolar non-Newtonian fluid from a continuously moving vertical porous sheet. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a set of non-linear differential equations by using similarity transformations. These equations are solved iteratively with the Bellman-Kalaba quasi-linearization algorithm. This method converges quadratically and the solution is valid for a large range of parameters. The effects of transpiration (suction or injection) parameter, buoyancy parameter, radiation parameter and Eckert number on velocity, microrotation and temperature functions have been studied. Under a special case comparison of the present numerical results is made with the results available in the literature and an excellent agreement is found. Additionally skin friction and rate of heat transfer have also been computed. The study has applications in polymer processing.

  4. Nonlinear thermal convection in a layer of nanofluid under G-jitter and internal heating effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhadauria B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a mathematical model of controlling heat transfer in nanofluids. The time-periodic vertical vibrations of the system are considered to effect an external control of heat transport along with internal heating effects. A weakly non-linear stability analysis is based on the five-mode Lorenz model using which the Nusselt number is obtained as a function of the thermal Rayleigh number, nano-particle concentration based Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, Lewis number, modified diffusivity ratio, amplitude and frequency of modulation. It is shown that modulation can be effectively used to control convection and thereby heat transport. Further, it is found that the effect of internal Rayleigh number is to enhance the heat and nano-particles transport.

  5. Mixed Convection Boundary Layer Flow Embedded in a Thermally Stratified Porous Medium Saturated by a Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hafizi Mat Yasin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the numerical investigation of the steady mixed convection boundary layer flow over a vertical surface embedded in a thermally stratified porous medium saturated by a nanofluid. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to the ordinary differential equations, using the similarity transformations. The similarity equations are solved numerically for three types of metallic or nonmetallic nanoparticles, namely, copper (Cu, alumina (Al2O3, and titania (TiO2, in a water-based fluid to investigate the effect of the solid volume fraction or nanoparticle volume fraction parameter φ of the nanofluid on the flow and heat transfer characteristics. The skin friction coefficient and the velocity and temperature profiles are presented and discussed.

  6. Thermal Aggregation of Calcium-Fortified Skim Milk Enhances Probiotic Protection during Convective Droplet Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Huang, Song; Fu, Nan; Jeantet, Romain; Chen, Xiao Dong

    2016-08-03

    Probiotic bacteria have been reported to confer benefits on hosts when delivered in an adequate dose. Spray-drying is expected to produce dried and microencapsulated probiotic products due to its low production cost and high energy efficiency. The bottleneck in probiotic application addresses the thermal and dehydration-related inactivation of bacteria during process. A protective drying matrix was designed by modifying skim milk with the principle of calcium-induced protein thermal aggregation. The well-defined single-droplet drying technique was used to monitor the droplet-particle conversion and the protective effect of this modified Ca-aggregated milk on Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. The Ca-aggregated milk exhibited a higher drying efficiency and superior protection on L. rhamnosus GG during thermal convective drying. The mechanism was explained by the aggregation in milk, causing the lower binding of water in the serum phase and, conversely, local concentrated milk aggregates involved in bacteria entrapment in the course of drying. This work may open new avenues for the development of probiotic products with high bacterial viability and calcium enrichment.

  7. Constraints on core-mantle boundary topography from models of thermal and thermochemical convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Frédéric; Rogister, Yves; Tackley, Paul J.

    2018-01-01

    Mantle flow induces dynamic topography at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), with distribution and amplitude that depend on details of the flow. To assess whether observations of CMB topography can give constraints on deep mantle structure, we determine CMB dynamic topography associated with different models of mantle convection, including thermochemical and purely thermal models. We investigate the influence of key controlling parameters, specifically the thermal viscosity ratio (ΔηT) and, for thermochemical models, the density contrast (ΔρC) and viscosity ratio (ΔηC) between primordial and regular materials. In purely thermal models, plume clusters induce positive topography with an amplitude that decreases with increasing ΔηT. In thermochemical models with moderate density contrasts, around 100-200 kg m-3, reservoirs of dense material induce depressions in CMB topography, surrounded by a ridge of positive topography. The average depression depth and ridge height increase with increasing ΔρC and ΔηC, but decrease with increasing ΔηT. We find that for purely thermal models or thermochemical models with ΔρC ˜ 90 kg m-3 and less, the long-wavelength (spherical harmonic degrees up to l = 4) dynamic topography and shear wave velocity anomalies predicted by thermochemical distributions anticorrelate. By contrast, for models with ΔρC ≥ 100 kg m-3 and ΔηC > 1, long-wavelength dynamic topography and shear wave velocity anomalies correlate well. This potentially provides a test to infer the nature, that is, either purely or mostly thermal (ΔρC ≤ 100 kg m-3 m-3) or strongly thermochemical (ΔρC ≥ 100 kg m-3), of the low shear wave velocity provinces observed by global tomographic images. The presence of post-perovskite, provided that its viscosity is similar to that of bridgmanite, does not alter these conclusions.

  8. Multipathing within LLSVPs in models of thermal and thermochemical mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, A.; Walpole, J.; Davies, R.; Heck, H. V.; Wookey, J. M.; Davies, H.

    2016-12-01

    Two regions at the base of Earth's mantle (the Large Low Shear Velocity Provinces, or LLSVPs) are seismically slow and comprise a large proportion of the lowermost few hundred km of the mantle. It is debated whether these regions might be the remnants of a basal magma ocean or other Earth-forming processes, in which case the regions may provide information about Earth's history. However, it is still uncertain what the current physical properties of the LLSVPs are. Is the cause of the LLSVPs' seismic signature primarily thermal or chemical? One argument for a largely chemical origin is that seismically `sharp sides' can be inferred from waves which exhibit `multipathing' (the arrival of more than one wave due to refraction) when traversing these regions. This implies strong gradients in velocity which are seemingly unlikely to be sustained in a purely thermal situation, where diffusive processes and convection would act to equilibrate temperatures over short length scales (of a few tens of km). We address this by simulating mantle convection with Earth-like parameters in a 3D spherical geometry for two end-member cases: an isochemical (T) mantle, and a thermochemical (TC) case where a global, dense layer exists initially at the base of the mantle. We impose 200 Ma of plate motion history, track the location of the dense material, and convert both models to seismic velocity using a thermodynamical database (Stixrude & Lithgow-Bertelloni, GJI, 2005, 2011). Previous work has shown the cases are not easily distinguishable tomographically, so we seek to reproduce observations of `sharp sides' by creating finite-frequency synthetics at relatively high frequencies ( 0.2 Hz), using the spectral element method. We find that in a number of regions in both T and TC models, we observe multipathing in Sdiff waves which traverse the LLSVPs. Events beneath Tonga recorded in southern Africa yield strongly azimuth-dependent arrival times, as expected by features in the convection

  9. Unsteady Casson nanofluid flow over a stretching sheet with thermal radiation, convective and slip boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibukun Sarah Oyelakin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on combined Dufour and Soret effects on the heat and mass transfer in a Casson nanofluid flow over an unsteady stretching sheet with thermal radiation and heat generation. The effects of partial slip on the velocity at the boundary, convective thermal boundary condition, Brownian and thermophoresis diffusion coefficients on the concentration boundary condition are investigated. The model equations are solved using the spectral relaxation method. The results indicate that the fluid flow, temperature and concentration profiles are significantly influenced by the fluid unsteadiness, the Casson parameter, magnetic parameter and the velocity slip. The effect of increasing the Casson parameter is to suppress the velocity and temperature growth. An increase in the Dufour parameter reduces the flow temperature, while an increase in the value of the Soret parameter causes increase in the concentration of the fluid. Again, increasing the velocity slip parameter reduces the velocity profile whereas increasing the heat generation parameter increases the temperature profile. A validation of the work is presented by comparing the current results with existing literature.

  10. Thermal environment in simulated offices with convective and radiant cooling systems under cooling (summer) mode of operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal environment in a double office room and in a six-person meeting room obtained with chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and four desk partition-mounted local radiant cooling panels with mixing...... ventilation (MVRC) under summer (cooling) condition was compared. MVRC system was measured only for the office room case. CB provided convective cooling while the remaining three systems (CBR, CCMV and MVRC) provided combined radiant and convective cooling. Solar radiation, office equipment, lighting...

  11. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    fresh water in order to form density interfaces. The Reynolds number can be reduced adding Glicerine the set of dimensionless parameters define different conditions of both numeric and small scale laboratory applied often in modeling environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients are computed using advanced visualization [8 9]. Visualizations are performed by PIV, Particle tracking and shadowgraph. When convective heating and cooling takes place the patterns depend on the parameter space region of the initial conditions We also map the different transitions between two and three dimensional convection in an enclosure with several complex driven flows. The size of the water tank is of 0.2 x 0.2 x 0.1 m and the heat sources or sinks can be regulated both in power and sign [2-4]. The thermal convective driven flows are generated by Seebeck and Peltier effects in 4 wall extended positions of 0.05 x 0.05 cm each. The parameter range of convective cell array varies strongly with the Topology of the boundary conditions. At present side heat fluxes are considered and estimated as a function of Rayleigh, Peclet and Nusselt numbers, [4-6] The evolution of the mixing fronts are compared and the topological characteristics of the merging of plumes and jets in different configurations presenting detailed comparison of the evolution of RM and RT, Jets and Plumes in overall mixing. The relation between structure functions, fractal analysis and spectral analysis can be very useful to determine the evolution of scales. Experimental and numerical results on the advance of a mixing or non-mixing front occurring at a density interface due to body forces [12] can be compared with the convective fronts. The evolution of the turbulent mixing layer and its complex configuration is studied taking into account the dependence on the initial modes at the early stages, Self-similar information [13]. Spectral and Fractal analysis on the images seems very useful in order to

  12. Loop Heat Pipe with Thermal Control Valve for Passive Variable Thermal Link Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future Lunar Landers and Rovers will require variable thermal links that can reject heat during daytime, and passively shut-off during lunar night. During the long...

  13. Effect of wind, thermal convection, and variation in flight strategies on the daily rhythm and flight paths of migrating raptors at Georgia's Black Sea coast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vansteelant, W.M.G.; Verhelst, B.; Shamoun-Baranes, J.; Bouten, W.; van Loon, E.E.; Bildstein, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    Every autumn, large numbers of raptors migrate through geographical convergence zones to avoid crossing large bodies of water. At coastal convergence zones, raptors may aggregate along coastlines because of convective or wind conditions. However, the effect of wind and thermal convection on

  14. Thermal Marangoni convection in two-phase flow of dusty Casson fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanthesh, B.; Gireesha, B. J.

    2018-03-01

    This paper deals with the thermal Marangoni convection effects in magneto-Casson liquid flow through suspension of dust particles. The transpiration cooling aspect is accounted. The surface tension is assumed to be fluctuating linearly with temperature. The fluid and dust particle's temperature of the interface is chosen as a quadratic function of interface arc length. The governing problem is modelled by conservation laws of mass, momentum and energy for fluid and dust particle phase. Stretching transformation technique is utilized to form ordinary differential equations from the partial differential equations. Later, the numerical solutions based on Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method are established. The momentum and heat transport distributions are focused on the outcome of distinct governing parameters. The results of Nusselt number is also presented and discussed. It is established that the heat transfer rate is higher in the case of dusty non-Newtonian fluid than dusty Newtonian fluid. The rate of heat transfer can be enhanced by suspending dust particles in a base liquid.

  15. Natural Convection Flow of Fractional Nanofluids Over an Isothermal Vertical Plate with Thermal Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Fetecau

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The studies of classical nanofluids are restricted to models described by partial differential equations of integer order, and the memory effects are ignored. Fractional nanofluids, modeled by differential equations with Caputo time derivatives, are able to describe the influence of memory on the nanofluid behavior. In the present paper, heat and mass transfer characteristics of two water-based fractional nanofluids, containing nanoparticles of CuO and Ag, over an infinite vertical plate with a uniform temperature and thermal radiation, are analytically and graphically studied. Closed form solutions are determined for the dimensionless temperature and velocity fields, and the corresponding Nusselt number and skin friction coefficient. These solutions, presented in equivalent forms in terms of the Wright function or its fractional derivatives, have also been reduced to the known solutions of ordinary nanofluids. The influence of the fractional parameter on the temperature, velocity, Nusselt number, and skin friction coefficient, is graphically underlined and discussed. The enhancement of heat transfer in the natural convection flows is lower for fractional nanofluids, in comparison to ordinary nanofluids. In both cases, the fluid temperature increases for increasing values of the nanoparticle volume fraction.

  16. Natural convection air flow in vertical upright-angled triangular cavities under realistic thermal boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieres Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analytical and numerical computation of laminar natural convection in a collection of vertical upright-angled triangular cavities filled with air. The vertical wall is heated with a uniform heat flux; the inclined wall is cooled with a uniform temperature; while the upper horizontal wall is assumed thermally insulated. The defining aperture angle φ is located at the lower vertex between the vertical and inclined walls. The finite element method is implemented to perform the computational analysis of the conservation equations for three aperture angles φ (= 15º, 30º and 45º and height-based modified Rayleigh numbers ranging from a low Ra = 0 (pure conduction to a high 109. Numerical results are reported for the velocity and temperature fields as well as the Nusselt numbers at the heated vertical wall. The numerical computations are also focused on the determination of the value of the maximum or critical temperature along the hot vertical wall and its dependence with the modified Rayleigh number and the aperture angle.

  17. Thermal Convection in a Fluid Layer Heated From Below and From Within - Implication for Planetary Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choblet, G.; Parmentier, M.; Sotin, C.

    2002-12-01

    Solid-state thermal convection in terrestrial planets interiors is generated by both volumetric heating (radiogenic elements, secular cooling) and heating from below (cooling of the metallic core). However, the relative importance of plumes emanating from both boundary layers and their interaction is still poorly understood. The aim of the present study is to propose a precise scaling for heat transfer in this heating configuration. Our initial numerical experiments have examined an isoviscous fluid in a Cartesian geometry (both 2D and 3D), since this allows well resolved results to be obtained with modest-scale computation. A relationship assuming that the top and bottom boundary layers are of equal thickness so that the ratio of temperature differences across them varies in a simple way with the fraction of heating from below produces a correct first order scaling. This leads to the prediction that the temperature of the well mixed interior does not vary with the fraction of heat supplied from below. However, in our numerical experiments, horizontally averaged temperature within the well mixed interior for a given amount of heat sources (basal plus internal) varies with the way heat is distributed between the bottom surface and the interior of the layer by an amount that can be significant on scales of interest for planetary evolution. In addition, systematic differences are observed between 2D and 3D numerical experiments ; other variations appear according on the basal heating mode (either flux or temperature can be prescribed). This reflects the dynamics of the interaction of plumes with thermal boundary layers and with each other. We thus propose a more complete scaling based on the influence of a plume on both the boundary layer where it forms and the opposite boundary layer where it produces a stagnation point. This leads to a scaling which predicts that the two boundary layers are of different thickness and allows a more accurate description of temperature

  18. Influence of the angle between the wind and the isothermal surfaces on the boundary layer structures in turbulent thermal convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkina, Olga; Wagner, Sebastian; Horn, Susanne

    2014-03-01

    We derive the asymptotes for the ratio of the thermal to viscous boundary layer thicknesses for infinite and infinitesimal Prandtl numbers Pr as functions of the angle β between the large-scale circulation and an isothermal heated or cooled surface for the case of turbulent thermal convection with laminar-like boundary layers. For this purpose, we apply the Falkner-Skan ansatz, which is a generalization of the Prandtl-Blasius one to a nonhorizontal free-stream flow above the viscous boundary layer. Based on our direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection for Pr=0.1, 1, and 10 and moderate Rayleigh numbers up to 108 we evaluate the value of β that is found to be around 0.7π for all investigated cases. Our theoretical predictions for the boundary layer thicknesses for this β and the considered Pr are in good agreement with the DNS results.

  19. MANTLE: A finite element program for the thermal-mechanical analysis of mantle convection. A user's manual with examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E.

    1979-01-01

    A finite element computer code for the analysis of mantle convection is described. The coupled equations for creeping viscous flow and heat transfer can be solved for either a transient analysis or steady-state analysis. For transient analyses, either a control volume or a control mass approach can be used. Non-Newtonian fluids with viscosities which have thermal and spacial dependencies can be easily incorporated. All material parameters may be written as function statements by the user or simply specified as constants. A wide range of boundary conditions, both for the thermal analysis and the viscous flow analysis can be specified. For steady-state analyses, elastic strain rates can be included. Although this manual was specifically written for users interested in mantle convection, the code is equally well suited for analysis in a number of other areas including metal forming, glacial flows, and creep of rock and soil.

  20. Natural convection and thermal radiation influence on nanofluid flow over a stretching cylinder in a porous medium with viscous dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar Pandey

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present work is to examine the collective influence of thermal radiation and convection flow of Cu-water nanofluid due to a stretching cylinder in a porous medium along with viscous dissipation and slip boundary conditions. The governing non-linear ODEs and auxiliary boundary conditions those obtained by applying assisting similarity transformations have been handled numerically with shooting scheme through Runge-Kutta-integration procedure of fourth-fifth order. The non-dimensional velocity and temperature distribution are designed and also skin friction coefficient as well as heat transfer rate are tabulated for various values of relatable parameters. The results explain that Nusselt number depreciates with boost in radiation parameter, thermal slip parameter and Eckert number. Moreover, it is accelerated with increase in velocity slip parameter and natural convection parameter. The results are distinguished via published ones and excellent accord has been detected.

  1. The effects of convection and oxygen presence on thermal testing of thin-shelled Celotex{trademark}-based packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, M.R.

    1994-06-01

    Several experiments were performed in an attempt to determine the effects of both convection and oxygen levels during hypothetical thermal accident testing of thin-shelled Celotex{trademark}-based packages in furnaces. Obsolete DT-22 packages were used and experiments were performed in two separate fumaces, one gas-fired and one electric, each of which has previously been used for this type of testing. Oxygen levels were varied and measured in the gas-fired furnace while the electric fumace was operated in a standard manner. The gas-fired fumace is constructed so as to induce a very strong convective field within. After testing, the packages were evaluated by several methods to determine the effects of the thermal testing on the package. In general, there were no differences found for the packages tested in the two different furnaces or for packages tested in the same furnace under different conditions. Therefore, after careful consideration, it is concluded that thermal testing can still be performed in electric furnaces in which the oxygen supply is not refurbished and there is no forced convection heat transfer.

  2. Thermal-Hydraulic Sensitivity Study of Intermediate Loop Parameters for Nuclear Hydrogen Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Hwa; Lee, Heung Nae; Park, Jea Ho [KONES Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Il; Yoo, Yeon Jae [Hyundai Engineering Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The heat generated from the VHTR is transferred to the intermediate loop through Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX). It is further passed on to the Sulfur-Iodine (SI) hydrogen production system (HPS) through Process Heat Exchanger (PHX). The IL provides the safety distance between the VHTR and HPS. Since the IL performance affects the overall nuclear HPS efficiency, it is required to optimize its design and operation parameters. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic sensitivity of IL parameters with various coolant options has been examined by using MARS-GCR code, which was already applied for the case of steam generator. Sensitivity study of the IL and PHX parameters has been carried out based on their thermal-hydraulic performance. Several parameters for design and operation, such as the pipe diameter, safety distance and surface area, are considered for different coolant options, He, CO{sub 2} and He-CO{sub 2} (2:8). It was found that the circulator work is the major factor affecting on the overall nuclear hydrogen production system efficiency. Circulator work increases with the safety distance, and decreases with the operation pressure and loop pipe diameter. Sensitivity results obtained from this study will contribute to the optimization of the IL design and operation parameters and the optimal coolant selection.

  3. The feasibility of thermal and compositional convection in Earth’s inner core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.; Deuss, A.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412396610

    Inner core convection, and the corresponding variations in grain size and alignment, has been proposed to explain the complex seismic structure of the inner core, including its anisotropy, lateral variations and the F-layer at the base of the outer core. We develop a parametrized convection model to

  4. The influence of local effects on thermal sensation under non-uniform environmental conditions — Gender differences in thermophysiology, thermal comfort and productivity during convective and radiant cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, L.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; de Wit, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    , thermal comfort and productivity in response to thermal non-uniform environmental conditions. Twenty healthy subjects (10 males and 10 females, age 20–29years) were exposed to two different experimental conditions: a convective cooling situation (CC) and a radiant cooling situation (RC). During...... the experiments physiological responses, thermal comfort and productivity were measured. The results show that under both experimental conditions the actual mean thermal sensation votes significantly differ from the PMV-index; the subjects are feeling colder than predicted. Furthermore, the females are more...... uncomfortable and dissatisfied compared to the males. For females, the local sensations and skin temperatures of the extremities have a significant influence on whole body thermal sensation and are therefore important to consider under non-uniform environmental conditions....

  5. Influence of nonlinear thermal radiation and Magnetic field on upper-convected Maxwell fluid flow due to a convectively heated stretching sheet in the presence of dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koneri L. Krupalakshmi

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of two-dimensional MHD boundary layer flow and thermal characteristics of an electrically conducting dusty non-Newtonian fluid over a convectively heated stretching sheet has been considered. The effects of nonlinear thermal radiation, heat source or sink and viscous dissipation are also taken into the account. The Rosseland approximation is used to model the nonlinear thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are used to transform the flow governing equations into a set of nonlinear differential equations of one independent variable. The Shooting method is adopted to solve transformed equations. The effects of various material parameters on the flow and heat transfer in terms of velocity and temperature distributions are drawn in the form of graphs and are briefly discussed. The numerical computations for the Nusselt number and skin friction drag are also carried out for the emerging parameters of interest in the problem. The obtained numerical results show the good agreement with the existing one for limiting case.

  6. Studies of natural convection heat transfer in dry spent fuel storage casks using the cobra-SFS thermal-hydraulic computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michener, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA (United States); Guttmann, J.; Bajwa, C. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, One White Flin North, Rockville MD (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the importance of natural convection cooling within a nuclear dry spent fuel storage system. In the past, applicants submitting requests to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for a license for a dry spent fuel storage system design did not rigorously treat natural convection within the fuel package of the dry storage system. Typically, the applicant applies heat transfer correlations that raise the thermal conductivity of the materials (gas and solid structures) to account for the impact of convection on the thermal performance of the system. (author)

  7. Inhibition of ordinary and diffusive convection in the water condensation zone of the ice giants and implications for their thermal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedson, A. James; Gonzales, Erica J.

    2017-11-01

    We explore the conditions under which ordinary and double-diffusive thermal convection may be inhibited by water condensation in the hydrogen atmospheres of the ice giants and examine the consequences. The saturation of vapor in the condensation layer induces a vertical gradient in the mean molecular weight that stabilizes the layer against convective instability when the abundance of vapor exceeds a critical value. In this instance, the layer temperature gradient can become superadiabatic and heat must be transported vertically by another mechanism. On Uranus and Neptune, water is inferred to be sufficiently abundant for inhibition of ordinary convection to take place in their respective condensation zones. We find that suppression of double-diffusive convection is sensitive to the ratio of the sedimentation time scale of the condensates to the buoyancy period in the condensation layer. In the limit of rapid sedimentation, the layer is found to be stable to diffusive convection. In the opposite limit, diffusive convection can occur. However, if the fluid remains saturated, then layered convection is generally suppressed and the motion is restricted in form to weak, homogeneous, oscillatory turbulence. This form of diffusive convection is a relatively inefficient mechanism for transporting heat, characterized by low Nusselt numbers. When both ordinary and layered convection are suppressed, the condensation zone acts effectively as a thermal insulator, with the heat flux transported across it only slightly greater than the small value that can be supported by radiative diffusion. This may allow a large superadiabatic temperature gradient to develop in the layer over time. Once the layer has formed, however, it is vulnerable to persistent erosion by entrainment of fluid into the overlying convective envelope of the cooling planet, potentially leading to its collapse. We discuss the implications of our results for thermal evolution models of the ice giants, for

  8. Large-scale thermal convection of viscous fluids in a faulted system: 3D test case for numerical codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Cacace, Mauro; Fischer, Thomas; Kolditz, Olaf; Wang, Wenqing; Watanabe, Norihiro

    2017-04-01

    In contrast to simple homogeneous 1D and 2D systems, no appropriate analytical solutions exist to test onset of thermal convection against numerical models of complex 3D systems that account for variable fluid density and viscosity as well as permeability heterogeneity (e.g. presence of faults). Owing to the importance of thermal convection for the transport of energy and minerals, the development of a benchmark test for density/viscosity driven flow is crucial to ensure that the applied numerical models accurately simulate the physical processes at hands. The presented study proposes a 3D test case for the simulation of thermal convection in a faulted system that accounts for temperature dependent fluid density and viscosity. The linear stability analysis recently developed by Malkovsky and Magri (2016) is used to estimate the critical Rayleigh number above which thermal convection of viscous fluids is triggered. The numerical simulations are carried out using the finite element technique. OpenGeoSys (Kolditz et al., 2012) and Moose (Gaston et al., 2009) results are compared to those obtained using the commercial software FEFLOW (Diersch, 2014) to test the ability of widely applied codes in matching both the critical Rayleigh number and the dynamical features of convective processes. The methodology and Rayleigh expressions given in this study can be applied to any numerical model that deals with 3D geothermal processes in faulted basins as by example the Tiberas Basin (Magri et al., 2016). References Kolditz, O., Bauer, S., Bilke, L., Böttcher, N., Delfs, J. O., Fischer, T., U. J. Görke, T. Kalbacher, G. Kosakowski, McDermott, C. I., Park, C. H., Radu, F., Rink, K., Shao, H., Shao, H.B., Sun, F., Sun, Y., Sun, A., Singh, K., Taron, J., Walther, M., Wang,W., Watanabe, N., Wu, Y., Xie, M., Xu, W., Zehner, B., 2012. OpenGeoSys: an open-source initiative for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical/chemical (THM/C) processes in porous media. Environmental

  9. Mixed Convective Fully Developed Flow in a Vertical Channel in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Viscous Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad K.V.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation on a combined free and forced convective flow in a vertical channel is investigated for a fully developed flow regime. Boussinesq and Roseseland approximations are considered in the modeling of the conduction radiation heat transfer with thermal boundary conditions (isothermal-thermal, isoflux-thermal, and isothermal-flux. The coupled nonlinear governing equations are also solved analytically using the Differential Transform Method (DTM and regular perturbation method (PM. The results are analyzed graphically for various governing parameters such as the mixed convection parameter, radiation parameter, Brinkman number and perturbation parameter for equal and different wall temperatures. It is found that the viscous dissipation enhances the flow reversal in the case of a downward flow while it counters the flow in the case of an upward flow. A comparison of the Differential Transform Method (DTM and regular perturbation method (PM methods shows the versatility of the Differential Transform Method (DTM. The skin friction and the wall temperature gradient are presented for different values of the physical parameters and the salient features are analyzed.

  10. Mixed Convective Fully Developed Flow in a Vertical Channel in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Viscous Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, K. V.; Mallikarjun, P.; Vaidya, H.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation on a combined free and forced convective flow in a vertical channel is investigated for a fully developed flow regime. Boussinesq and Roseseland approximations are considered in the modeling of the conduction radiation heat transfer with thermal boundary conditions (isothermal-thermal, isoflux-thermal, and isothermal-flux). The coupled nonlinear governing equations are also solved analytically using the Differential Transform Method (DTM) and regular perturbation method (PM). The results are analyzed graphically for various governing parameters such as the mixed convection parameter, radiation parameter, Brinkman number and perturbation parameter for equal and different wall temperatures. It is found that the viscous dissipation enhances the flow reversal in the case of a downward flow while it counters the flow in the case of an upward flow. A comparison of the Differential Transform Method (DTM) and regular perturbation method (PM) methods shows the versatility of the Differential Transform Method (DTM). The skin friction and the wall temperature gradient are presented for different values of the physical parameters and the salient features are analyzed.

  11. The effect of rowing headgear on forced convective heat loss and radiant heat gain on a thermal manikin headform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogerd, Cornelis P; Brühwiler, Paul A; Heus, Ronald

    2008-05-01

    Both radiant and forced convective heat flow were measured for a prototype rowing headgear and white and black cotton caps. The measurements were performed on a thermal manikin headform at a wind speed of 4.0 m . s(-1) (s = 0.1) in a climate chamber at 22.0 degrees C (s = 0.05), with and without radiant heat flow from a heat lamp, coming from either directly above (90 degrees ) or from above at an angle of 55 degrees . The effects of hair were studied by repeating selected measurements with a wig. All headgear reduced the radiant heat gain compared with the nude headform: about 80% for the caps and 95% for the prototype rowing headgear (P headgear (9%) (P headgear, showing that forced convective heat loss is the dominant heat transfer parameter under the chosen conditions. The results of the headgear - wig combinations were qualitatively similar, with lower absolute heat transfer.

  12. EFFECT OF SUSPENDED PARTICLES ON THERMAL CONVECTION IN RIVLIN-ERICKSEN FLUID IN A DARCY-BRINKMAN POROUS MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.C. Rana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of suspended particles on thermal convection in an incompressible Rivlin-Ericksen elastico-viscous fluid in a porous medium is considered. For the porous medium, the Brinkman model is employed. By applying a normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation has been derived and solved analytically. It is observed that the medium permeability, suspended particles, gravity field and viscoelasticity introduce oscillatory modes. For stationary convection, it is observed that the Darcy number has a stabilising effect, whereas the suspended particles and medium permeability have destabilising effects on the system. The effects of suspended particles, the Darcy number and the medium permeability have been presented graphically to depict the stability characteristics, which are in good agreement with the results derived analytically.

  13. Adaptable Single Active Loop Thermal Control System (TCS) for Future Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudawar, Issam; Lee, Seunghyun; Hasan, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will examine the development of a thermal control system (TCS) for future space missions utilizing a single active cooling loop. The system architecture enables the TCS to be reconfigured during the various mission phases to respond, not only to varying heat load, but to heat rejection temperature as well. The system will consist of an accumulator, pump, cold plates (evaporators), condenser radiator, and compressor, in addition to control, bypass and throttling valves. For cold environments, the heat will be rejected by radiation, during which the compressor will be bypassed, reducing the system to a simple pumped loop that, depending on heat load, can operate in either a single-phase liquid mode or two-phase mode. For warmer environments, the pump will be bypassed, enabling the TCS to operate as a heat pump. This presentation will focus on recent findings concerning two-phase flow regimes, pressure drop, and heat transfer coefficient trends in the cabin and avionics micro-channel heat exchangers when using the heat pump mode. Also discussed will be practical implications of using micro-channel evaporators for the heat pump.

  14. The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

    1991-10-01

    Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

  15. Thermal resistance of steam-generator tube deposits under single-phase forced convection and flow-boiling heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.W.; Klimas, S.J.; Brideau, M.G

    2000-02-01

    Degradation of the thermal performance of steam generators(SGs) is a serious problem in nuclear power stations throughout the world (Lovett and Dow, 1991). In pressurized-heavy-water reactors (PWHRs), the reduced thermal performance of the SGs is manifested by an increase of the primary coolant reactor inlet header temperature (RIHT). In pressurized-light-water reactors(PWRs), which operate with fixed primary coolant temperature, the loss of thermal performance is manifested by a reduction of the steam pressure. Degradation mechanisms that may contribute to the loss of SG thermal performance include: fouling of the boiler tube inner surfaces (primary-side fouling); fouling of the boiler tube outer surfaces (secondary-side fouling); divider and thermal plate leakage that causes the coolant to bypass either the SG or the integral preheater and fouling of the steam separators. The relative contribution of these various degradation mechanisms to the overall loss of thermal performance is still under investigation. Soulard et al. (1990) examined the relative contributions of tube bundle fouling, divider plate leakage, and thermal plate leakage to the increase in RIHT at the Point Lepreau Generating Station, and concluded that tube fouling contributes to a significant fraction of the loss of thermal performance. Corrosion products deposit on both the inner and outer surfaces of the boiler tubes. Thus a complete understanding of the reasons fro the loss of thermal performance and the development of strategies to mitigate this loss requires a knowledge of the thermal resistance of tube deposits under primary and secondary side heat transfer conditions. We present here the results of measurements of the thermal resistance of primary-side and secondary-side boiler tube deposits performed under single-phase forced convection and flow-boiling conditions, respectively. The results are discussed in terms of the physical properties of the deposit and the mode of heat transfer.

  16. Analysis of thermally coupled chemical looping combustion-based power plants with carbon capture

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike

    2015-04-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. A number of CO2 capture-enabled power generation technologies have been proposed to address the negative environmental impact of CO2 emission. One important barrier to adopting these technologies is the associated energy penalty. Chemical-looping Combustion (CLC) is an oxy-combustion technology that can significantly lower this penalty. It utilizes an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from air/oxidizing stream in an oxidation reactor to the fuel in a reduction reactor. Conventional CLC reactor designs employ two separate reactors, with metal/metal oxide particles circulating pneumatically in-between. One of the key limitations of these designs is the entropy generation due to reactor temperature difference, which lowers the cycle efficiency. Zhao et al. (Zhao et al., 2014; Zhao and Ghoniem, 2014) proposed a new CLC rotary reactor design, which overcomes this limitation. This reactor consists of a single rotating wheel with micro-channels designed to maintain thermal equilibrium between the fuel and air sides. This study uses three thermodynamic models of increasing fidelity to demonstrate that the internal thermal coupling in the rotary CLC reactor creates the potential for improved cycle efficiency. A theoretical availability model and an ideal thermodynamic cycle model are used to define the efficiency limits of CLC systems, illustrate the impact of reactor thermal coupling and discuss relevant criteria. An Aspen Plus® model of a regenerative CLC cycle is then used to show that this thermal coupling raises the cycle efficiency by up to 2% points. A parametric study shows that efficiency varies inversely with pressure, with a maximum of 51% at 3bar, 1000C and 60% at 4bar, 1400C. The efficiency increases with CO2 fraction at high pressure ratios but exhibits a slight inverse dependence at low pressure ratios. The parametric study shows that for low purge steam demand, steam generation improves exhaust heat recovery and increases efficiency

  17. Heat transfer within hydrodissection fluids: An analysis of thermal conduction and convection using liquid and gel materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alexander; Brace, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Interventional oncology procedures such as thermal ablation are becoming widely used for many tumours in the liver, kidney and lung. Thermal ablation refers to the focal destruction of tissue by generating cytotoxic temperatures in the treatment zone. Hydrodissection - separating tissues with fluids - protects healthy tissues adjacent to the ablation treatment zone to improve procedural safety, and facilitate more aggressive power application or applicator placement. However, fluids such as normal saline and 5% dextrose in water (D5W) can migrate into the peritoneum, reducing their protective efficacy. As an alternative, a thermo-gelable poloxamer 407 (P407) solution has been recently developed to facilitate hydrodissection procedures. We hypothesise that the P407 gel material does not provide convective heat dissipation from the ablation site, and therefore may alter the heat transfer dynamics compared to liquid materials during hydrodissection-assisted thermal ablation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the heat dissipation mechanics within D5W, liquid P407 and gel P407 hydrodissection barriers. Overall it was shown that the gel P407 dissipated heat primarily through conduction, whereas the liquid P407 and D5W dissipated heat through convection. Furthermore, the rate of temperature change within the gel P407 was greater than liquid P407 and D5W. Testing to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of the fluids with different modes of heat dissipation seems warranted for further study.

  18. Different motion modes of a mobile plate on top of a thermally convecting fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yadan; Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Zhang, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Numerical simulations are conducted to model the dynamics of a mobile, insulating plate floating on top of a Rayleigh-Benard convecting fluid with infinite Prandtl number in a two dimensional rectangular domain, which is roughly analogues to the geological model of continent drift over mantle. We focus on the effect of plate size on the dynamic feedback between the plate and the underlying convection. Four different modes of coupling are revealed as plate size varies. Among them, two transient stable modes are identified: 1. a very small plate tends to linger for long time over a cold downwelling bordering two counter-rotating convection cells; 2. a relatively small plate sometimes lingers over an upwelling plume bordering two convection cells with cold downwellings on the edges of the plate. A relatively large plate rides on a moving convection cell and oscillates periodically between the two ends walls. A very large plate executes only small excursions in response to the competition between the two neighbouring cells underneath and no longer touches the end walls. These modes are well related to different continent motions since the breakup of the Pangaea supercontinent.

  19. On Nonperturbative Techniques for Thermal Radiation Effect on Natural Convection past a Vertical Plate Embedded in a Saturated Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Moitsheki

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the heat transfer characteristics of natural convection about a vertical permeable flat surface embedded in a saturated porous medium are studied by taking into account the thermal radiation effect. The plate is assumed to have a power-law temperature distribution. Similarity variables are employed in order to transform the governing partial differential equations into a nonlinear ordinary differential equation. Both Adomian decomposition method (ADM and He's variational iteration method (VIM coupled with Padé approximation technique are implemented to solve the reduced system. Comparisons with previously published works are performed, and excellent agreement between the results is obtained.

  20. Thermal-diffusion effects on mixed convection flow in a heat absorbing fluid with Newtonian heating and chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussanan, Abid; Salleh, Mohd Zuki; Tahar, Razman Mat; Khan, Ilyas

    2015-02-01

    Thermal-diffusion and chemical reaction effects on mixed convection heat and mass transfer flow past an infinite oscillating vertical plate with Newtonian heating is investigated. The governing equations are transformed to a system of linear partial differential equations using appropriate non-dimensional variables. Using Laplace transform method the resulting equations are solved analytically and the expression for velocity, temperature and concentration are obtained. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions. Numerical results for temperature and concentration are shown in various graphs for embedded flow parameters and discussed in details.

  1. THE EFFECT OF ENGINEERING SURFACE LOOPS ON THE THERMAL-STABILITY OF BACILLUS-SUBTILIS NEUTRAL PROTEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HARDY, F; VRIEND, G; VANDERVINNE, B; FRIGERIO, F; GRANDI, G; VENEMA, G; EIJSINK, VGH

    Using genetic techniques the contribution of surface loops to the thermal stability of Bacillus subtilis neutral protease (NP-sub) was studied. Mutations were designed to make the surface of NP-sub more similar to the surface of more thermostable neutral proteases such as thermolysin (TLN). The

  2. Thin films of spin-crossover coordination polymers with large thermal hysteresis loops prepared by nanoparticle spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Daisuke; Aketa, Naoki; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tamaki, Takashi; Inose, Tomoko; Akai, Tomoki; Toyama, Hirotaka; Sakata, Osami; Tajiri, Hiroo; Ogawa, Takuji

    2014-09-11

    This communication describes the synthesis of spin-crossover nanoparticles, which can disperse in various organic solvents without an excess amount of surfactants. The nanoparticles form homogeneous thin films on substrates by spin coating. The films show abrupt spin transitions with large thermal hysteresis loops.

  3. Thermal convection in a spherical shell with melting/freezing at either or both of its boundaries

    CERN Document Server

    Deguen, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    In a number of geophysical or planetological settings (Earth's inner core, a silicate mantle crystallizing from a magma ocean, or an ice shell surrounding a deep water ocean) a convecting crystalline layer is in contact with a layer of its melt. Allowing for melting/freezing at one or both of the boundaries of the solid layer is likely to affect the pattern of convection in the layer. We study here the onset of thermal convection in a viscous spherical shell with dynamically induced melting/freezing at either or both of its boundaries. It is shown that the behavior of each interface depends on the value of a dimensional number P, which is the ratio of a melting/freezing timescale over a viscous relaxation timescale. A small value of P corresponds to permeable boundary conditions, while a large value of P corresponds to impermeable boundary conditions. The linear stability analysis predicts a significant effect of semi-permeable boundaries when the number P characterizing either of the boundary is small enough...

  4. 3D features of delayed thermal convection in fault zones: consequences for deep fluid processes in the Tiberias Basin, Jordan Rift Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Fabien; Möller, Sebastian; Inbar, Nimrod; Siebert, Christian; Möller, Peter; Rosenthal, Eliyahu; Kühn, Michael

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that thermal convection in faults can also occur for subcritical Rayleigh conditions. This type of convection develops after a certain period and is referred to as "delayed convection" (Murphy, 1979). The delay in the onset is due to the heat exchange between the damage zone and the surrounding units that adds a thermal buffer along the fault walls. Few numerical studies investigated delayed thermal convection in fractured zones, despite it has the potential to transport energy and minerals over large spatial scales (Tournier, 2000). Here 3D numerical simulations of thermally driven flow in faults are presented in order to investigate the impact of delayed convection on deep fluid processes at basin-scale. The Tiberias Basin (TB), in the Jordan Rift Valley, serves as study area. The TB is characterized by upsurge of deep-seated hot waters along the faulted shores of Lake Tiberias and high temperature gradient that can locally reach 46 °C/km, as in the Lower Yarmouk Gorge (LYG). 3D simulations show that buoyant flow ascend in permeable faults which hydraulic conductivity is estimated to vary between 30 m/yr and 140 m/yr. Delayed convection starts respectively at 46 and 200 kyrs and generate temperature anomalies in agreement with observations. It turned out that delayed convective cells are transient. Cellular patterns that initially develop in permeable units surrounding the faults can trigger convection also within the fault plane. The combination of these two convective modes lead to helicoidal-like flow patterns. This complex flow can explain the location of springs along different fault traces of the TB. Besides being of importance for understanding the hydrogeological processes of the TB (Magri et al., 2015), the presented simulations provide a scenario illustrating fault-induced 3D cells that could develop in any geothermal system. References Magri, F., Inbar, N., Siebert, C., Rosenthal, E., Guttman, J., Möller, P., 2015. Transient

  5. Sensitivity analysis of the thermal performance of radiant and convective terminals for cooling buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Dréau, J.; Heiselberg, P.

    2014-01-01

    on both radiation and convection. In order to characterise the advantages and drawbacks of the different terminals, steady-state simulations of a typical office room have been performed using four types of terminals (active chilled beam, radiant floor, wall and ceiling). A sensitivity analysis has been...

  6. Prandtl and Rayleigh number dependence of heat transport in high Rayleigh number thermal convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Lohse, Detlef; Verzicco, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Results from direct numerical simulation for three-dimensional Rayleigh–Bénard convection in samples of aspect ratio and up to Rayleigh number are presented. The broad range of Prandtl numbers is considered. In contrast to some experiments, we do not see any increase in with increasing , neither due

  7. Use of local convective and radiant cooling at warm environment: effect on thermal comfort and perceived air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Duszyk, Marcin; Krejcirikova, Barbora

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four local cooling devices (convective, radiant and combined) on thermal comfort and perceived air quality reported by 24 subjects at 28 ˚C and 50% RH was studied. The devices studied were: (1) desk cooling fan, (2) personalized ventilation providing clean air, (3) two radiant panels...... and (4) two radiant panels with one panel equipped with small fans. A reference condition without cooling was tested as well. The response of the subjects to the exposed conditions was collected by computerized questionnaires. The cooling devices significantly (pthermal comfort...... compared to without cooling. The acceptability of the thermal environment was similar for all cooling devices. The acceptability of air movement and PAQ increased when the local cooling methods were used. The best results were achieved with personalized ventilation and cooling fan. The improvement in PAQ...

  8. Combined effect of thermal dispersion and variable viscosity of non-darcy convection heat transfer in a fluidsaturated porous medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of thermal dispersion and variable viscosity on the non-Darcy free, mixed, and forced convection heat transfer along a vertical flat plate embedded in a fluid-saturated porous medium are investigated. Forchheimer extension is employed in the flow equation to express the non-Darcy model. The fluid viscosity varies as an inverse linear function of temperature. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. Similarity solutions of the governing equations, for an isothermally heated plate, are obtained. Effects of the physical parameters, which govern the problem, on the rate of heat transfer in terms of Nusselt number, the slip velocity, and the boundary layer thickness, for the two cases Darcy and non-Darcy, are shown on graphs or entered in tables. © 2013 by Begell House, Inc.

  9. Computational modelling of internally cooled wet (ICW) electrodes for radiofrequency ablation: impact of rehydration, thermal convection and electrical conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Macarena; Bon, Jose; Berjano, Enrique

    2017-09-01

    (1) To analyse rehydration, thermal convection and increased electrical conductivity as the three phenomena which distinguish the performance of internally cooled electrodes (IC) and internally cooled wet (ICW) electrodes during radiofrequency ablation (RFA), (2) Implement a RFA computer model with an ICW which includes these phenomena and (3) Assess their relative influence on the thermal and electrical tissue response and on the coagulation zone size. A 12-min RFA in liver was modelled using an ICW electrode (17 G, 3 cm tip) by an impedance-control pulsing protocol with a constant current of 1.5 A. A model of an IC electrode was used to compare the ICW electrode performance and the computational results with the experimental results. Rehydration and increased electrical conductivity were responsible for an increase in coagulation zone size and a delay (or absence) in the occurrence of abrupt increases in electrical impedance (roll-off). While the increased electrical conductivity had a remarkable effect on enlarging the coagulation zone (an increase of 0.74 cm for differences in electrical conductivity of 0.31 S/m), rehydration considerably affected the delay in roll-off, which, in fact, was absent with a sufficiently high rehydration level. In contrast, thermal convection had an insignificant effect for the flow rates considered (0.05 and 1 mL/min). Computer results suggest that rehydration and increased electrical conductivity were mainly responsible for the absence of roll-off and increased size of the coagulation zone, respectively, and in combination allow the thermal and electrical performance of ICW electrodes to be modelled during RFA.

  10. Forced-convection boiling tests performed in parallel simulated LMR fuel assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, S.D.; Carbajo, J.J.; Levin, A.E.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Wantland, J.L.

    1985-04-21

    Forced-convection tests have been carried out using parallel simulated Liquid Metal Reactor fuel assemblies in an engineering-scale sodium loop, the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety facility. The tests, performed under single- and two-phase conditions, have shown that for low forced-convection flow there is significant flow augmentation by thermal convection, an important phenomenon under degraded shutdown heat removal conditions in an LMR. The power and flows required for boiling and dryout to occur are much higher than decay heat levels. The experimental evidence supports analytical results that heat removal from an LMR is possible with a degraded shutdown heat removal system.

  11. Numerical simulations of thermal convection in a rotating spherical fluid shell at high Taylor and Rayleigh numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Z. [Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Schubert, G. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    1995-11-01

    In this study, we carry out numerical simulations of thermal convection in a rapidly rotating spherical fluid shell at high Taylor number {ital Ta} and Rayleigh number {ital R} with a nonlinear, three-dimensional, time-dependent, spectral-transform code. The parameters used in the simulations are chosen to be in a range which allows us to study two different types of convection, i.e., single column and multi-layered types, and the transition between them. Numerical solutions feature highly time-dependent north--south open columnar convective cells. The cells occur irregularly in longitude, are quasi-layered in cylindrical radius, and maintain alternating bands of mean zonal flow. The complex convective structure and the banded mean zonal flow are results of the high Taylor and Rayleigh numbers. The transition between the two types of convection appears to occur gradually with increasing Rayleigh and Taylor numbers. At a Taylor number of 10{sup 7} the differential rotation pattern consists of an inner cylindrical region of subrotation and an outer cylindrical shell of superrotation manifest at the outer boundary as an equatorial superrotation and a high latitude subrotation. The differential rotation pattern is similar at {ital Ta}=10{sup 8} and low Rayleigh number. Cylindrical shells of alternately directed mean zonal flow begin to develop at {ital Ta}=10{sup 8} and {ital R}=50{ital R}{sub {ital c}} and at {ital Ta}=10{sup 9} and {ital R}=25{ital R}{sub {ital c}}. This pattern is seen on the outer surface as a latitudinally-banded zonal flow consisting of an equatorial superrotation, a middle and high latitude subrotation, and a polar superrotation. At {ital Ta}=10{sup 9} and {ital R}=50{ital R}{sub {ital c}} the differential rotation appears at the surface as a broad eastward flow in the equatorial region with alternating bands of westward and eastward flow at high latitudes. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  12. Closed-loop high-speed 3D thermal probe nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, A. W.; Zientek, M.; Cheong, L. L.; Rawlings, C.; Paul, P.; Holzner, F.; Hedrick, J. L.; Coady, D. J.; Allen, R.; Dürig, U.

    2014-03-01

    Thermal Scanning Probe Lithography (tSPL) is an AFM based patterning technique, which uses heated tips to locally evaporate organic resists such as molecular glasses [1] or thermally sensitive polymers.[2][3] Organic resists offer the versatility of the lithography process known from the CMOS environment and simultaneously ensure a highly stable and low wear tip-sample contact due to the soft nature of the resists. Patterning quality is excellent up to a resolution of sub 15 nm,[1] at linear speeds of up to 20 mm/s and pixel rates of up to 500 kHz.[4] The patterning depth is proportional to the applied force which allows for the creation of 3-D profiles in a single patterning run.[2] In addition, non-destructive imaging can be done at pixel rates of more than 500 kHz.[4] If the thermal stimulus for writing the pattern is switched off the same tip can be used to record the written topography with Angstrom depth resolution. We utilize this unique feature of SPL to implement an efficient control system for reliable patterning at high speed and high resolution. We combine the writing and imaging process in a single raster scan of the surface. In this closed loop lithography (CLL) approach, we use the acquired data to optimize the writing parameters on the fly. Excellent control is in particular important for an accurate reproduction of complex 3D patterns. These novel patterning capabilities are equally important for a high quality transfer of two-dimensional patterns into the underlying substrate. We utilize an only 3-4 nm thick SiOx hardmask to amplify the 8±0.5 nm deep patterns created by tSPL into a 50 nm thick transfer polymer. The structures in the transfer polymer can be used to create metallic lines by a lift-off process or to further process the pattern into the substrate. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of 27 nm wide lines and trenches 60 nm deep into the Silicon substrate.[5] In addition, the combined read and write approach ensures that the lateral

  13. Unravelling the Components of a Multi-Thermal Coronal Loop Using Magnetohydrodynamic Seismology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Jess, D. B.; Klimchuk, James Andrew; Banerjee, D.

    2017-01-01

    Coronal loops, constituting the basic building blocks of the active Sun, serve as primary targets to help understand the mechanisms responsible for maintaining multi-million Kelvin temperatures in the solar and stellar coronae. Despite significant advances in observations and theory, our knowledge on the fundamental properties of these structures is limited. Here, we present unprecedented observations of accelerating slow magnetoacoustic waves along a coronal loop that show differential propagation speeds in two distinct temperature channels, revealing the multi-stranded and multithermal nature of the loop. Utilizing the observed speeds and employing nonlinear force free magnetic field extrapolations, we derive the actual temperature variation along the loop in both channels, and thus are able to resolve two individual components of the multithermal loop for the first time. The obtained positive temperature gradients indicate uniform heating along the loop, rather than isolated foot point heating.

  14. UNRAVELLING THE COMPONENTS OF A MULTI-THERMAL CORONAL LOOP USING MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SEISMOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Jess, D. B. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, J. A. [Heliophysics Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Banerjee, D., E-mail: krishna.prasad@qub.ac.uk [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block Koramangala, Bengaluru 560034 (India)

    2017-01-10

    Coronal loops, constituting the basic building blocks of the active Sun, serve as primary targets to help understand the mechanisms responsible for maintaining multi-million Kelvin temperatures in the solar and stellar coronae. Despite significant advances in observations and theory, our knowledge on the fundamental properties of these structures is limited. Here, we present unprecedented observations of accelerating slow magnetoacoustic waves along a coronal loop that show differential propagation speeds in two distinct temperature channels, revealing the multi-stranded and multithermal nature of the loop. Utilizing the observed speeds and employing nonlinear force-free magnetic field extrapolations, we derive the actual temperature variation along the loop in both channels, and thus are able to resolve two individual components of the multithermal loop for the first time. The obtained positive temperature gradients indicate uniform heating along the loop, rather than isolated footpoint heating.

  15. A hybrid radial basis function-pseudospectral method for thermal convection in a 3-D spherical shell

    KAUST Repository

    Wright, G. B.

    2010-07-01

    A novel hybrid spectral method that combines radial basis function (RBF) and Chebyshev pseudospectral methods in a "2 + 1" approach is presented for numerically simulating thermal convection in a 3-D spherical shell. This is the first study to apply RBFs to a full 3-D physical model in spherical geometry. In addition to being spectrally accurate, RBFs are not defined in terms of any surface-based coordinate system such as spherical coordinates. As a result, when used in the lateral directions, as in this study, they completely circumvent the pole issue with the further advantage that nodes can be "scattered" over the surface of a sphere. In the radial direction, Chebyshev polynomials are used, which are also spectrally accurate and provide the necessary clustering near the boundaries to resolve boundary layers. Applications of this new hybrid methodology are given to the problem of convection in the Earth\\'s mantle, which is modeled by a Boussinesq fluid at infinite Prandtl number. To see whether this numerical technique warrants further investigation, the study limits itself to an isoviscous mantle. Benchmark comparisons are presented with other currently used mantle convection codes for Rayleigh number (Ra) 7 × 103 and 105. Results from a Ra = 106 simulation are also given. The algorithmic simplicity of the code (mostly due to RBFs) allows it to be written in less than 400 lines of MATLAB and run on a single workstation. We find that our method is very competitive with those currently used in the literature. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. MHD Natural Convection Flow of Casson Nanofluid over Nonlinearly Stretching Sheet Through Porous Medium with Chemical Reaction and Thermal Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Imran; Khan, Ilyas; Shafie, Sharidan

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, the effects of chemical reaction on hydromagnetic natural convection flow of Casson nanofluid induced due to nonlinearly stretching sheet immersed in a porous medium under the influence of thermal radiation and convective boundary condition are performed numerically. Moreover, the effects of velocity slip at stretching sheet wall are also examined in this study. The highly nonlinear-coupled governing equations are converted to nonlinear ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations. The transformed governing equations are then solved numerically using the Keller box method and graphical results for velocity, temperature, and nanoparticle concentration as well as wall shear stress, heat, and mass transfer rate are achieved through MATLAB software. Numerical results for the wall shear stress and heat transfer rate are presented in tabular form and compared with previously published work. Comparison reveals that the results are in good agreement. Findings of this work demonstrate that Casson fluids are better to control the temperature and nanoparticle concentration as compared to Newtonian fluid when the sheet is stretched in a nonlinear way. Also, the presence of suspended nanoparticles effectively promotes the heat transfer mechanism in the base fluid.

  17. Analytical solution to convection-radiation of a continuously moving fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moradi Amir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the simultaneous convection-radiation heat transfer of a moving fin of variable thermal conductivity is studied. The differential transformation method (DTM is applied for an analytic solution for heat transfer in fin with two different profiles. Fin profiles are rectangular and exponential. The accuracy of analytic solution is validated by comparing it with the numerical solution that is obtained by fourth-order Runge-Kutta method. The analytical and numerical results are shown for different values of the embedding parameters. DTM results show that series converge rapidly with high accuracy. The results indicate that the fin tip temperature increases when ambient temperature increases. Conversely, the fin tip temperature decreases with an increase in the Peclet number, convection-conduction and radiation-conduction parameters. It is shown that the fin tip temperature of the exponential profile is higher than the rectangular one. The results indicate that the numerical data and analytical method are in a good agreement with each other.

  18. Attempts of Thermal Imaging Camera Usage in Estimations of the Convective Heat Loss From a Vertical Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denda Hubert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new method for determining heat transfer coefficients using a gradient method has been developed. To verify accuracy of the proposed method vertical isothermal heating plate with natural convection mechanism has been examined. This configuration was deliberately chosen, because of the fact that such case is historically the earliest and most thoroughly studied and its rich scientific documentation – the most reliable. New method is based on temperature field visualization made in perpendicular plane to the heating surface of the plate using infrared camera. Because the camera does not record temperature of air itself but the surface only, therefore plastic mesh with low thermal conductivity has been used as a detector. Temperature of each mesh cell, placed perpendicular to the vertical heating surface and rinsed with convection stream of heated air could be already recorded by infrared camera. In the same time using IR camera surface of heating plate has been measured. By numerical processing of the results matrix temperature gradient on the surface ∂T/∂x │ x=0, local heat transfer coefficients αy, and local values of Nusselt number Nuy, can be calculated. After integration the average Nusselt number for entire plate can be calculated. Obtained relation characteristic numbers Nu = 0.647 Ra 0.236 (R2 = 0.943, has a good correlation with literature reports and proves usefulness of the method.

  19. Roughness-Facilitated Local 1 /2 Scaling Does Not Imply the Onset of the Ultimate Regime of Thermal Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojue; Stevens, Richard J. A. M.; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-10-01

    In thermal convection, roughness is often used as a means to enhance heat transport, expressed in Nusselt number. Yet there is no consensus on whether the Nusselt vs Rayleigh number scaling exponent (Nu ˜Raβ ) increases or remains unchanged. Here we numerically investigate turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection over rough plates in two dimensions, up to Ra ≈1012 . Varying the height and wavelength of the roughness elements with over 200 combinations, we reveal the existence of two universal regimes. In the first regime, the local effective scaling exponent can reach up to 1 /2 . However, this cannot be explained as the attainment of the so-called ultimate regime as suggested in previous studies, because a further increase in Ra leads to the second regime, in which the scaling saturates back to a value close to the smooth wall case. Counterintuitively, the transition from the first to the second regime corresponds to the competition between bulk and boundary layer flow: from the bulk-dominated regime back to the classical boundary-layer-controlled regime. Our study demonstrates that the local 1 /2 scaling does not necessarily signal the onset of ultimate turbulence.

  20. A Linear Stability Analysis of Thermal Convection in a Fluid Layer with Simultaneous Rotation and Magnetic Field Acting in Different Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Avila

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The onset of thermal convection of a Boussinesq fluid located in an unbounded layer heated from below and subject simultaneously to rotation and magnetic field, whose vectors act in different directions, is presented. To the knowledge of the authors, the convective thermal instability analysis for this complex problem has not been previously reported. In this paper, we use the Tau Chebyshev spectral method to calculate the value of the critical parameters (wave number and Rayleigh number at the onset of convection as a function of (i different kinds of boundaries, (ii angle between the three vectors, and (iii different values of the Taylor number T (rate of rotation and magnetic parameter Q (strength of the magnetic force. For the classical problems previously reported in the literature, we compare our calculations with Chandrasekhar’s variational method results and show that the present method is applicable.

  1. Time Dependent MHD Nano-Second Grade Fluid Flow Induced by Permeable Vertical Sheet with Mixed Convection and Thermal Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Muhammad; Bilal, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The aim of present paper is to study the series solution of time dependent MHD second grade incompressible nanofluid towards a stretching sheet. The effects of mixed convection and thermal radiation are also taken into account. Because of nanofluid model, effects Brownian motion and thermophoresis are encountered. The resulting nonlinear momentum, heat and concentration equations are simplified using appropriate transformations. Series solutions have been obtained for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle fraction profiles using Homotopy Analysis Method (HAM). Convergence of the acquired solution is discussed critically. Behavior of velocity, temperature and concentration profiles on the prominent parameters is depicted and argued graphically. It is observed that temperature and concentration profiles show similar behavior for thermophoresis parameter Νt but opposite tendency is noted in case of Brownian motion parameter Νb. It is further analyzed that suction parameter S and Hartman number Μ depict decreasing behavior on velocity profile.

  2. Thermal radiation and mass transfer effects on unsteady MHD free convection flow past a vertical oscillating plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, B. M. Jewel; Ahmed, Rubel; Ahmmed, S. F.

    2017-06-01

    Unsteady MHD free convection flow past a vertical porous plate in porous medium with radiation, diffusion thermo, thermal diffusion and heat source are analyzed. The governing non-linear, partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless by using non-dimensional quantities. Then the resultant dimensionless equations are solved numerically by applying an efficient, accurate and conditionally stable finite difference scheme of explicit type with the help of a computer programming language Compaq Visual Fortran. The stability and convergence analysis has been carried out to establish the effect of velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, Nusselt number, Sherwood number, stream lines and isotherms line. Finally, the effects of various parameters are presented graphically and discussed qualitatively.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic Free Convection Flow with Thermal Radiation and Chemical Reaction Effects in the Presence of Variable Suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Halima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of flow parameters on the free convection and mass transfer of an unsteady magnetohydrodynamic flow of an electrically conducting, viscous and incompressible fluid past an infinite vertical porous plate in the presence of variable suction. The thermal radiation and chemical reaction effects are assumed to exist within the channel. Non dimensional partial differential equations of governing equations of flow are solved numerically using Crank Nicolson finite difference method. The skin friction, heat and mass transfer rates as well as the effects of various parameters on velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are analyzed. The signifiant results from this study are that an increase in the values of radiation parameter and chemical reaction parameter causes a reduction in the velocity, temperature and concentration.

  4. Quantitative Temperature Imaging in Gas-Phase Turbulent Thermal Convection by Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Acetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KEARNEY,SEAN P.; REYES,FELIPE V.

    2000-12-13

    In this paper, an acetone planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique for nonintrusive, temperature imaging is demonstrated in gas-phase (Pr = 0.72) turbulent Rayleigh-Benard convection at Rayleigh number, Ra = 1.3 x 10{sup 5}. The PLIF technique provides quantitative, spatially correlated temperature data without the flow intrusion or time lag associated with physical probes and without the significant path averaging that plagues most optical heat-transfer diagnostic tools, such as the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, thus making PLIF an attractive choice for quantitative thermal imaging in easily perturbed, complex three-dimensional flow fields. The instantaneous (20-ns integration time) thermal images presented have a spatial resolution of 176 x 176 x 500 {micro}m and a single-pulse temperature measurement precision of {+-}5.5 K, or 5.4 % of the total temperature difference. These images represent a 2-D slice through a complex, 3-D flow allowing for the thermal structure of the turbulence to be quantified. Statistics such as the horizontally averaged temperature profile, rms temperature fluctuation, two-point spatial correlations, and conditionally averaged plume structures are computed from an ensemble of 100 temperature images. The profiles of the mean temperature and rms temperature fluctuation are in good agreement with previously published data, and the results obtained from the two-point spatial correlations and conditionally averaged temperature fields show the importance of large-scale coherent structures in this turbulent flow.

  5. Multiple equilibria, bifurcations and selection scenarios in cosymmetric problem of thermal convection in porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govorukhin, Vasily N.; Shevchenko, Igor V.

    2017-12-01

    We study convection in a two-dimensional container of porous material saturated with fluid and heated from below. This problem belongs to the class of dynamical systems with nontrivial cosymmetry. The cosymmetry gives rise to a hidden parameter in the system and continuous families of infinitely many equilibria, and leads to non-trivial bifurcations. In this article we present our numerical studies that demonstrate nonlinear phenomena resulting from the existence of cosymmetry. We give a comprehensive picture of different bifurcations which occur in cosymmetric dynamical systems and in the convection problem. It includes internal and external (as an invariant set) bifurcations of one-parameter families of equilibria, as well as bifurcations leading to periodic, quasiperiodic and chaotic behaviour. The existence of infinite number of stable steady-state regimes begs the important question as to which of them can realize in physical experiments. In this paper, this question (known as the selection problem) is studied in detail. In particular, we show that the selection scenarios strongly depend on the initial temperature distribution of the fluid. The calculations are carried out by the global cosymmetry-preserving Galerkin method, and numerical methods used to analyse cosymmetric systems are also described.

  6. Parameter-free numerical method for modeling thermal convection in square cavities in a wide range of Rayleigh numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goloviznin, V. M.; Korotkin, I. A.; Finogenov, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Some numerical results for the two- and three-dimensional de Vahl Davis benchmark are presented. This benchmark describes thermal convection in a square (cubic) cavity with vertical heated walls in a wide range of Rayleigh numbers (104 to 1014), which covers both laminar and highly turbulent f lows. Turbulent f lows are usually described using a turbulence model with parameters that depend on the Rayleigh number and require adjustment. An alternative is Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) methods, but they demand extremely large computational grids. Recently, there has been an increasing interest in DNS methods with an incomplete resolution, which, in some cases, are able to provide acceptable results without resolving Kolmogorov scales. On the basis of this approach, the so-called parameter-free computational techniques have been developed. These methods cover a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and allow computing various integral properties of heat transport on relatively coarse computational grids. In this paper, a new numerical method based on the CABARET scheme is proposed for solving the Navier-Stokes equations in the Boussinesq approximation. This technique does not involve a turbulence model or any tuning parameters and has a second-order approximation scheme in time and space on uniform and nonuniform grids with a minimal computational stencil. Testing the technique on the de Vahl Davis benchmark and a sequence of refined grids shows that the method yields integral heat f luxes with a high degree of accuracy for both laminar and highly turbulent f lows. For Rayleigh numbers up to 1014, a several percent accuracy is achieved on an extremely coarse grid consisting of 20 × 20 cells refined toward the boundary. No definite or comprehensive explanation of this computational phenomenon has been given. Cautious optimism is expressed regarding the perspectives of using the new method for thermal convection computations at low Prandtl numbers typical of liquid metals.

  7. Experimental investigations with a carbonate looping test facility with 1 MW thermal power; Experimentelle Untersuchungen an einer Carbonate Looping Versuchsanlage mit 1 MW thermischer Leistung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galloy, Alexander

    2014-02-20

    Carbonate looping is a process for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gases of fossil-fired power plants. For further examination of this process a test facility with a thermal power of 1 MW has been designed, erected, commissioned and operated. This plant was operated for several hundred hours in different modes. CO{sub 2} could be separated from a synthetic flue gas. Separation was possible within continuous and discontinuous mode of operation. Within this work the state of the art, the test facility and measurement results e.g. temperature curves, pressure curves and gas concentrations are presented. Additionally, the influence of these parameters on the CO{sub 2} separation is discussed.

  8. Influence of thermal boundary conditions on convection and dynamos in early and present earth-like cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, K.; Wicht, J.; Dietrich, W.; Christensen, U. R.

    2012-12-01

    The early dynamos of Earth and Mars probably operated without an inner core being present. They were thus exclusively driven by secular cooling and radiogenic heating, whereas the present geodynamo is thought to be predominantly driven by buoyancy fluxes which arise from the release of latent heat and the compositional enrichment associated with inner core solidification. Dynamo simulations model the secular cooling by volumetric internal buoyancy sources and the inner core-related driving by bottom sources. The impact of the inner core growth on the ancient geodynamo has been discussed extensively but is still controversial. As for Mars, the Mars Global Surveyor detected a strong northern-southern dichotomy in the crustal magnetization. A scenario proposed so far is due to such an ancient dynamo, where thermal heterogeneities at the core mantle boundary (CMB) were imposed by the lower mantle structure. A key issue here is how easily influence of the boundary anomalies emerges. Here we show that the dynamos without inner core solidification are much more sensitive to the CMB heat flows imposed by the lower mantle structure. We compare three-dimensional convection-driven MHD dynamo simulations either driven by homogeneously distributed internal heat sources or by buoyancy sources at the inner core boundary (ICB). Several different boundary heat-flux patterns are used. The effects are found even when boundaries are homogeneous. The impact of the outer boundary condition, fixed temperature or fixed heat flux, is large when convection is predominantly driven by volumetric internal heating. In the dynamos driven by ICB buoyancy sources, the lower boundary condition becomes more important. In both cases, a fixed flux condition promotes larger convective scales than a fixed temperature condition. A dipolar magnetic field can further increase the flow scale. This different sensitivity may also extend to cases when CMB heat flows are laterally inhomogeneous. In the dynamos

  9. A mathematical and numerical framework for the analysis of compressible thermal convection in gases at very high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappa, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    The relevance of non-equilibrium phenomena, nonlinear behavior, gravitational effects and fluid compressibility in a wide range of problems related to high-temperature gas-dynamics, especially in thermal, mechanical and nuclear engineering, calls for a concerted approach using the tools of the kinetic theory of gases, statistical physics, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and mathematical modeling in synergy with advanced numerical strategies for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. The reason behind such a need is that in many instances of relevance in this field one witnesses a departure from canonical models and the resulting inadequacy of standard CFD approaches, especially those traditionally used to deal with thermal (buoyancy) convection problems. Starting from microscopic considerations and typical concepts of molecular dynamics, passing through the Boltzmann equation and its known solutions, we show how it is possible to remove past assumptions and elaborate an algorithm capable of targeting the broadest range of applications. Moving beyond the Boussinesq approximation, the Sutherland law and the principle of energy equipartition, the resulting method allows most of the fluid properties (density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat capacity and diffusivity, etc.) to be derived in a rational and natural way while keeping empirical contamination to the minimum. Special attention is deserved as well to the well-known pressure issue. With the application of the socalled multiple pressure variables concept and a projection-like numerical approach, difficulties with such a term in the momentum equation are circumvented by allowing the hydrodynamic pressure to decouple from its thermodynamic counterpart. The final result is a flexible and modular framework that on the one hand is able to account for all the molecule (translational, rotational and vibrational) degrees of freedom and their effective excitation, and on the other hand can guarantee adequate

  10. Thermal convection in a horizontal duct with strong axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zikanov, Oleg

    2015-11-01

    The work is motivated by design of liquid metal blankets of nuclear fusion reactors. The effect of convection on the flow within a toroidally oriented duct is analyzed. Non-uniform strong heating arising from capture of high-speed neutrons is imposed internally, while the walls are assumed to be isothermal. Very strong heating (the Grashof number up to 1011) and strong magnetic field (the Hartmann number up to 104) corresponding to the realistic fusion reactor conditions are considered. Stability of two-dimensional flow states is analyzed using numerical simulations. The unstable modes at high Hartmann and Grashof number are found to have large wavelengths. The integral properties of developed three-dimensional flows are close to those of two-dimensional flows at the typical parameters of a fusion reactor. We also consider the effect of the weak transverse component of the magnetic field on the flow. Financial support was provided by the US NSF (Grant CBET 1232851).

  11. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30

    on Cr-carbide on the graphite surface. Ni-electroplating dramatically reduced corrosion of alloys, although some diffusion of Fe and Cr were observed occur through the Ni plating. A pyrolytic carbon and SiC (PyC/SiC) CVD coating was also investigated and found to be effective in mitigating corrosion. The KCl-MgCl2 molten salt was less corrosive than FLiNaK fluoride salts for corrosion tests performed at 850oC. Cr dissolution in the molten chloride salt was still observed and consequently Ni-201 and Hastelloy N exhibited the least depth of attack. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (as measured by weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. Because Cr dissolution is an important mechanism of corrosion, molten salt electrochemistry experiments were initiated. These experiments were performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Using this technique, the reduction potential of Cr was determined against a Pt quasi-reference electrode as well as against a Ni(II)-Ni reference electrode in molten FLiNaK at 650 oC. The integrated current increased linearly with Cr-content in the salt, providing for a direct assessment of the Cr concentration in a given salt of unknown Cr concentration. To study heat transfer mechanisms in these molten salts over the forced and mixed convection regimes, a forced convective loop was constructed to measure heat transfer coefficients, friction factors and corrosion rates in different diameter tubes in a vertical up flow configuration in the laminar flow regime. Equipment and instrumentation for the forced convective loop was designed, constructed, and tested. These include a high temperature centrifugal pump, mass flow meter, and differential pressure sensing capabilities to an uncertainty of < 2 Pa. The heat transfer coefficient for the KCl-MgCl2 salt was measured in two different diameter channels (0.083 and 0.370Ã). In the 0

  12. Analysis of convective longitudinal fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G. Sobamowo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, analysis of heat transfer in a longitudinal rectangular fin with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity and internal heat generation was carried out using finite difference method. The developed systems of non-linear equations that resulted from the discretization using finite difference scheme were solved with the aid of MATLAB using fsolve. The numerical solution was validated with the exact solution for the linear problem. The developed heat transfer models were used to investigate the effects of thermo-geometric parameters, coefficient of heat transfer and thermal conductivity (non-linear parameters on the temperature distribution, heat transfer and thermal performance of the longitudinal rectangular fin. From the results, it shows that the fin temperature distribution, the total heat transfer, and the fin efficiency are significantly affected by the thermo-geometric parameters of the fin. Also, for the solution to be thermally stable, the fin thermo-geometric parameter must not exceed a specific value. However, it was established that the increase in temperature-dependent properties and internal heat generation values increases the thermal stability range of the thermo-geometric parameter. The results obtained in this analysis serve as basis for comparison of any other method of analysis of the problem.

  13. Thermal Performance Analysis and Empirical Correlations for Laminar Forced Convection over 30° V-Baffled Square Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnart Boonloi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Thermal performance analysis for laminar forced convection in an isothermal wall square channel with 30° V-baffle is presented numerically. The parameters of the V-baffle, blockage ratio (b/H, BR, pitch ratio (P/H, PR, flow direction (V-Downstream and V-Upstream, and arrangement (in-line and staggered, are studied and compared with the previous works, 20° and 45° V-baffle. The Reynolds number based on the hydraulic diameter of the channel (Dh, Re = 100–2000, is used in range study. The results show that the flow configurations of 30° V-baffle are found similar as 20° and 45° V-baffle. The fully developed periodic flow and heat transfer are created around 7th-8th module, while the periodic flow and heat transfer profiles are found at 2nd module in all cases. Except for the periodic concept, the 30° V-baffle can help to reduce the pressure loss around 2.3 times in comparison with the 45° V-baffle at the maximum f/f0 value (BR = 0.3, PR = 1, V-Downstream. The optimum thermal enhancement factor for the 30° V-baffle is found around 4.25 at BR = 0.15, PR = 1, and Re = 2000 for V-Downstream case with in-line arrangement.

  14. Investigation of Transient, Turbulent Natural Convection in Vertical Tubes for Thermal Energy Storage in Supercritical CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghaei Lakeh, Reza; Lavine, Adrienne S.; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Wirz, Richard E.

    2013-11-01

    Heat transfer can be a limiting factor in the operation of thermal energy storage, including sensible heat and latent heat storage systems. Poor heat transfer between the energy storage medium and the container walls impairs the functionality of the thermal storage unit by requiring excessively long times to charge or discharge the system. In this study, the effect of turbulent, unsteady buoyancy-driven flow on heat transfer in vertical storage tubes containing supercritical CO2 as the storage medium is investigated computationally. The heat transfer from a constant-temperature wall to the storage fluid is studied during the charge cycle. The results of this study show that turbulent natural convection dominates the heat transfer mechanism and significantly reduces the required time for charging compared to pure conduction. Changing the L/D ratio of the storage tube has a major impact on the charge time. The charge time shows a decreasing trend with RaL. The non-dimensional model of the problem shows that Nusselt number and non-dimensional mean temperature of the storage fluid in different configurations of the tube is a function Buoyancy-Fourier number defined as of FoL * RaLm* L/D. This study was supported by award No. DE-AR0000140 granted by U.S. Department of Energy under Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) and by award No. 5660021607 granted by Southern California Gas Company.

  15. On the Onset of Thermal Convection in a Layer of Oldroydian Visco-Elastic Fluid Saturated by Brinkman–Darcy Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chand Ramesh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal instability in a horizontal layer of Oldroydian visco-elastic fluid in a porous medium is investigated. For porous medium the Brinkman–Darcy model is considered. A linear stability analysis based upon perturbation method and normal mode technique is used to find solution of the fluid layer confined between two free-free boundaries. The onset criterion for stationary and oscillatory convection is derived analytically. The influence of the Brinkman–Darcy, Prandtl–Darcy number, stress relaxation parameter on the stationary and oscillatory convection is studied both analytically and graphically. The sufficient condition for the validity of PES has also been derived.

  16. Combined effect of magnetic field and thermal dispersion on a non-darcy mixed convection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-21

    This paper is devoted to investigate the influences of thermal dispersion and magnetic field on a hot semi-infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a saturated Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman porous medium. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The effects of transverse magnetic field parameter (Hartmann number Ha), Reynolds number Re (different velocities), Prandtl number Pr (different types of fluids) and dispersion parameter on the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate are discussed. © 2011 Science Press, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  17. Effects of thermal conduction and convection on temperature profile in a water calorimeter for proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gargioni, E.; Manfredotti, C. [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Laitano, R.F.; Guerra, A.S. [Ist. Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA, Roma (Italy)

    1997-09-01

    In water calorimetry, in addition to the temperature increase due to beam energy deposition in water, unwanted thermal effects occur during and after calorimeter irradiation. This should be accounted for by applying proper corrections to the experimental results. In order to determine such corrections heat flow calculations were performed using the `finite element` method. This method applies even to complex 3D geometries with not necessarily symmetric conditions. Some preliminary results of these calculations are presented together with a description of the analytical method for the evaluation of the correction factors that should be applied to the experimental results to account for the above thermal effects. (orig.)

  18. Potential Effects of Surface Temperature Variations and Disturbances and Thermal Convection on the Mars InSight HP3 Heat-Flow Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Paul; Smrekar, Suzanne E.; Lorenz, Ralph; Grott, Matthias; Kroemer, Olaf; Müller, Nils

    2017-10-01

    The HP3 instrument on the InSight lander mission will measure subsurface temperatures and thermal conductivities from which heat flow in the upper few meters of the regolith at the landing site will be calculated. The parameter to be determined is steady-state conductive heat flow, but temperatures may have transient perturbations resulting from surface temperature changes and there could be a component of thermal convection associated with heat transport by vertical flow of atmospheric gases over the depth interval of measurement. The experiment is designed so that it should penetrate to a depth below which surface temperature perturbations are smaller than the required measurement precision by the time the measurements are made. However, if the measurements are delayed after landing, and/or the probe does not penetrate to the desired depth, corrections may be necessary for the transient perturbations. Thermal convection is calculated to be negligible, but these calculations are based on unknown physical properties of the Mars regolith. The effects of thermal convection should be apparent at shallow depths where transient thermal perturbations would be observed to deviate from conductive theory. These calculations were required during proposal review and their probability of predicting a successful measurement a prerequisite for mission approval. However, their uncertainties lies in unmeasured physical parameters of the Mars regolith.

  19. Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer in a thermally linearly stratified non-darcy porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Murthy, P.V.S.N.

    2011-12-26

    Thermo-diffusion effect on free convection heat and mass transfer from a vertical surface embedded in a liquid saturated thermally stratified non - Darcy porous medium has been analyzed using a local non-similar procedure. The wall temperature and concentration are constant and the medium is linearly stratified in the vertical direction with respect to the thermal conditions. The fluid flow, temperature and concentration fields are affected by the complex interactions among the diffusion ratio Le, buoyancy ratio N, thermo-diffusion parameter Sr and stratification parameter ?. Non-linear interactions of all these parameters on the convective transport has been analyzed and variation of heat and mass transfer coefficients with thermo-diffusion parameter in the thermally stratified non-Darcy porous media is presented through computer generated plots.

  20. Thermal Conditions in a Simulated Office Environment with Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Kostov, Kalin

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conditions in a two person office room were measured with four air conditioning systems: chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and four desk partition mounted local radiant cooling panels with mixing...

  1. Effects of thermal stratification on transient free convective flow of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-22

    Sep 22, 2016 ... as well as average skin friction and the rate of heat transfer of nanofluids are discussed and represented graphically. The results are found to be in good agreement with the existing results in literature. Keywords. Nanofluid; thermal stratification; transient; isothermal vertical plate. PACS Nos 44.20.+b; 47; 44.

  2. Numerical modeling of thermal performance: Natural convection and radiation of solid state lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.; Gielen, A.W.J.; Zeijl, H.W. van; Werkhoven, R.J.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    The increased electrical currents used to drive light emitting diode (LED) cause significant heat generation in the solid state lighting (SSL) system. As the temperature will directly affect the maximum light output, quality, reliability and the life time of the SSL system, thermal management is a

  3. Characterizing Thermal Augmentation of Convection-Enhanced Drug Delivery with the Fiberoptic Microneedle Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lyle Hood

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Convection-enhanced delivery (CED is a promising technique leveraging pressure-driven flow to increase penetration of infused drugs into interstitial spaces. We have developed a fiberoptic microneedle device for inducing local sub-lethal hyperthermia to further improve CED drug distribution volumes, and this study seeks to quantitatively characterize this approach in agarose tissue phantoms. Infusions of dye were conducted in 0.6% (w/w agarose tissue phantoms with isothermal conditions at 15 °C, 20 °C, 25 °C, and 30 °C. Infusion metrics were quantified using a custom shadowgraphy setup and image-processing algorithm. These data were used to build an empirical predictive temporal model of distribution volume as a function of phantom temperature. A second set of proof-of-concept experiments was conducted to evaluate a novel fiberoptic device capable of generating local photothermal heating during fluid infusion. The isothermal infusions showed a positive correlation between temperature and distribution volume, with the volume at 30 °C showing a 7-fold increase at 100 min over the 15 °C isothermal case. Infusions during photothermal heating (1064 nm at 500 mW showed a similar effect with a 3.5-fold increase at 4 h over the control (0 mW. These results and analyses serve to provide insight into and characterization of heat-mediated enhancement of volumetric dispersal.

  4. Gyrostatic extensions of the Howard-Krishnamurti model of thermal convection with shear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tong

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Howard & Krishnamurti (1986 low-order model (LOM of Rayleigh-Bénard convection with spontaneous vertical shear can be extended to incorporate various additional physical effects, such as externally forced vertical shear and magnetic field. Designing such extended LOMs so that their mathematical structure is isomorphic to those of systems of coupled gyrostats, with damping and forcing, allows for a modular approach while respecting conservation laws. Energy conservation (in the limit of no damping and forcing prevents solutions that diverge to infinity, which are present in the original Howard & Krishnamurti LOM. The first LOM developed here (as a candidate model of transverse rolls involves adding a new Couette mode to represent externally forced vertical shear. The second LOM is a modification of the Lantz (1995 model for magnetoconvection with shear. The modification eliminates an invariant manifold in the original model that leads to potentially unphysical behavior, namely solutions that diverge to infinity, in violation of energy conservation. This paper reports the first extension of the coupled gyrostats modeling framework to incorporate externally forced vertical shear and magnetoconvection with shear. Its aim is to demonstrate better model building techniques that avoid pathologies present in earlier models; consequently we do not focus here on analysis of dynamics or model validation.

  5. Thermal hydraulic tests for developing two-phase thermo-siphon loop of CARR-CNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shejiao; Bi, Qincheng; Chen, Tingkuan; Feng, Quanke

    2005-04-01

    The China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) is now constructing the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR: 60 MW), and designing the cold neutron source (CNS) with a two-phase hydrogen thermo-siphon loop consisting of a condenser, a single-moderator transfer tube and a cylindrical annulus moderator cell. The mockup tests reported here were carried out on a full-scale loop using Freon-113 as the working fluid in order to validate the self-regulating characteristics of the loop, with a void fraction less than 20% in the liquid of the moderator cell and requirements for establishing the condition under which the inner shell of the cell has only vapor and the outer shell liquid. During these mockup tests, the density ratio of liquid to vapor and the vapor volumetric evaporation rate due to heat load were kept the same as those in normal operation of the CARR-CNS. The results show that the loop has the required self-regulating characteristics and the inner shell of the moderator cell contains only vapor, the outer shell liquid. The local void fractions in the liquid increase with an increase in loop pressure under the condition of a constant vapor volumetric evaporation rate.

  6. Unsteady Radiative-Convective Boundary-Layer Flow of a Casson Fluid with Variable Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. Gnaneswara

    2015-01-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional flow of a non-Newtonian fluid over a stretching surface with the effects of thermal radiation and variable thermal conductivity is investigated. The Casson fluid model is used to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. First, using a similarity transformation, the governing time-dependent partial differential equations are transformed into coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations with variable coefficients. Then the transformed equations are solved numerically under appropriate boundary conditions by the shooting method. An exact solution corresponding to the momentum equation for a steady case is found. The obtained numerical results are analyzed as to the effect of the pertinent parameters on the flow and heat transfer characteristics.

  7. Thermal environment in a simulated double office room with convective and radiant cooling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustakallio, Panu; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Rezgals, Lauris

    2017-01-01

    The thermal environment in a double office room obtained with chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with ceiling installed mixing ventilation (CCMV) and overhead mixing total volume ventilation (MTVV) under summer (cooling) condition was compared. Design (peak......) and usual (average) heat load from solar radiation, office equipment, lighting and occupants was simulated, respectively at 62 W/m2 and 38 W/m2 under four different workstation layouts. Air temperature, globe (operative) temperature, radiant asymmetry, air velocity and turbulent intensity were measured...

  8. Status of Kilowatt-Class Stirling Power Conversion Using a Pumped NaK Loop for Thermal Input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Geng, Steven M.; Robbie, Malcolm G.

    2010-01-01

    Free-piston Stirling power conversion has been identified as a viable option for potential Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems on the Moon and Mars. Proposed systems consist of two or more Stirling convertors, in a dual-opposed configuration, coupled to a low-temperature uranium-dioxide-fueled, liquid-metal-cooled reactor. To reduce developmental risks associated with liquid-metal loop integration, a test rig has been built to evaluate the performance of a pair of 1-kW free-piston Stirling convertors using a pumped sodium-potassium (NaK) loop for thermal energy input. Baseline performance maps have been generated at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) for these 1-kW convertors operating with an electric heat source. Each convertor was then retrofitted with a custom-made NaK heater head and integrated into a pumped NaK system at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This paper documents baseline testing at GRC as well as the progress made in integrating the Stirling convertors into the pumped NaK loop.

  9. Thermal convection of magneto compressible couple-stress fluid saturated in a porous medium with Hall current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, C. B.; Singh, M.; Kumar, S.

    2016-02-01

    An investigation is made on the effect of Hall currents on thermal instability of a compressible couple-stress fluid in the presence of a horizontal magnetic field saturated in a porous medium. The analysis is carried out within the framework of the linear stability theory and normal mode technique. A dispersion relation governing the effects of viscoelasticity, Hall currents, compressibility, magnetic field and porous medium is derived. For the stationary convection a couple-stress fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid due to the vanishing of the viscoelastic parameter. Compressibility, the magnetic filed and couple-stress parameter have stabilizing effects on the system whereas Hall currents and medium permeability have a destabilizing effect on the system, but in the absence of Hall current couple-stress has a destabilizing effect on the system. It has been observed that oscillatory modes are introduced due to the presence of viscoelasticity, magnetic field porous medium and Hall currents which were non-existent in their absence.

  10. Forced convection heat transfer of power law non-Newtonian fluids between two semi-infinite plates with variable thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Botong; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Liangliang

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation of forced convection heat transfer in power-law non-Newtonian fluids between two semi-infinite plates with variable thermal conductivity. Three cases of different thermal conductivity models are considered: (i) thermal conductivity is a constant, (ii) thermal conductivity is a linear function of temperature, (iii) thermal conductivity is a power-law function of temperature gradient (Zheng's model). Governing equations are solved using the finite element method with the ‘ghost’ time introduced to the control equations, which does not affect the results because the velocity and temperature will remain unchanged when the steady state is reached. Results for the solutions of different variable models are presented as well as the analysis of the associated heat transfer characteristics. It is shown that the heat transfer behaviours are strongly dependent on the power-law index (n) in all models. For example, when n 1.

  11. Analysis of Convective Straight and Radial Fins with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity Using Variational Iteration Method with Comparison with Respect to Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safa Bozkurt Coşkun

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance heat transfer between primary surface and the environment, radiating extended surfaces are commonly utilized. Especially in the case of large temperature differences, variable thermal conductivity has a strong effect on performance of such a surface. In this paper, variational iteration method is used to analyze convective straight and radial fins with temperature-dependent thermal conductivity. In order to show the efficiency of variational iteration method (VIM, the results obtained from VIM analysis are compared with previously obtained results using Adomian decomposition method (ADM and the results from finite element analysis. VIM produces analytical expressions for the solution of nonlinear differential equations. However, these expressions obtained from VIM must be tested with respect to the results obtained from a reliable numerical method or analytical solution. This work assures that VIM is a promising method for the analysis of convective straight and radial fin problems.

  12. Application of shooting method on MHD thermally stratified mixed convection flow of non-Newtonian fluid over an inclined stretching cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil-Ur-Rehman; Malik, M. Y.

    2017-04-01

    An analysis is made to examine the magnetohydrodynamic mixed convection boundary layer flow of Eyring-Powell fluid brought by an inclined stretching cylinder. Flow field analysis is accounted by thermal stratification phenomena. The temperature is assumed to be higher across the surface of cylinder as compared to ambient fluid. The arising mathematical model regarding Eyring-Powell fluid is governed by interesting physical parameters which includes mixed convection parameter, thermal stratification parameter, heat generation/absorption parameter, curvature parameter, fluid parameters, magnetic field parameter and Prandtl number. The numerical solutions are computed through the application of shooting technique conjunction with fifth order Runge-Kutta algorithm. In addition, numeric values for two unlike geometries namely, plate and cylinder for skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number are presented with the aid graphs and some particular cases are discussed. The present study is validated by establishing comparison with previously published works, which sets a benchmark of quality of shooting method.

  13. Rectified Continuous Flow Loop for Thermal Control of Large Deployable Structures and Distributed Loads Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future instruments and platforms for NASA's Earth Science Enterprises will require increasingly sophisticated thermal control technology, and cryogenic applications...

  14. Control of the Free Convection Flow within the Breathing Zone by Confluent Jets for Improved Performance of Personalized Ventilation: Part 1 – Thermal influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagano, H.; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2009-01-01

    A new method for improvement the performance of personalized ventilation (PV) by control of the free convection flow based of confluent plane jets was studied. The confluent upward plane jets were generated close to the front of human body by openings at the front edge of a desk. The inner jet...... under the condition with this PV method and there was no thermal influence by the flow except for the back of neck....

  15. New Numerical Approaches To thermal Convection In A Compositionally Stratified Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, E. G.; Turcotte, D. L.; Kellogg, L. H.; Lokavarapu, H. V.; He, Y.; Robey, J.

    2016-12-01

    Seismic imaging of the mantle has revealed large and small scale heterogeneities in the lower mantle; specifically structures known as large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVP) below Africa and the South Pacific. Most interpretations propose that the heterogeneities are compositional in nature, differing from the overlying mantle, an interpretation that would be consistent with chemical geodynamic models. The LLSVP's are thought to be very old, meaning they have persisted thoughout much of Earth's history. Numerical modeling of persistent compositional interfaces present challenges to even state-of-the-art numerical methodology. It is extremely difficult to maintain sharp composition boundaries which migrate and distort with time dependent fingering without compositional diffusion and / or artificial diffusion. The compositional boundary must persist indefinitely. In this work we present computations of an initial compositionally stratified fluid that is subject to a thermal gradient ΔT = T1 - T0 across the height D of a rectangular domain over a range of buoyancy numbers B and Rayleigh numbers Ra. In these computations we compare three numerical approaches to modeling the movement of two distinct, thermally driven, compositional fields; namely, a high-order Finte Element Method (FEM) that employs artifical viscosity to preserve the maximum and minimum values of the compositional field, a Discontinous Galerkin (DG) method with a Bound Preserving (BP) limiter, and a Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) interface tracking algorithm. Our computations demonstrate that the FEM approach has far too much numerical diffusion to yield meaningful results, the DGBP method yields much better resuts but with small amounts of each compositional field being (numerically) entrained within the other compositional field, while the VOF method maintains a sharp interface between the two compositions throughout the computation. In the figure we show a comparison of between the three methods for a

  16. Unsteady MHD Mixed Convection Slip Flow of Casson Fluid over Nonlinearly Stretching Sheet Embedded in a Porous Medium with Chemical Reaction, Thermal Radiation, Heat Generation/Absorption and Convective Boundary Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Imran; Bhattacharyya, Krishnendu; Shafie, Sharidan; Khan, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    Numerical results are presented for the effect of first order chemical reaction and thermal radiation on mixed convection flow of Casson fluid in the presence of magnetic field. The flow is generated due to unsteady nonlinearly stretching sheet placed inside a porous medium. Convective conditions on wall temperature and wall concentration are also employed in the investigation. The governing partial differential equations are converted to ordinary differential equations using suitable transformations and then solved numerically via Keller-box method. It is noticed that fluid velocity rises with increase in radiation parameter in the case of assisting flow and is opposite in the case of opposing fluid while radiation parameter has no effect on fluid velocity in the forced convection. It is also seen that fluid velocity and concentration enhances in the case of generative chemical reaction whereas both profiles reduces in the case of destructive chemical reaction. Further, increase in local unsteadiness parameter reduces fluid velocity, temperature and concentration. Over all the effects of physical parameters on fluid velocity, temperature and concentration distribution as well as on the wall shear stress, heat and mass transfer rates are discussed in detail.

  17. Unsteady MHD Mixed Convection Slip Flow of Casson Fluid over Nonlinearly Stretching Sheet Embedded in a Porous Medium with Chemical Reaction, Thermal Radiation, Heat Generation/Absorption and Convective Boundary Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ullah

    Full Text Available Numerical results are presented for the effect of first order chemical reaction and thermal radiation on mixed convection flow of Casson fluid in the presence of magnetic field. The flow is generated due to unsteady nonlinearly stretching sheet placed inside a porous medium. Convective conditions on wall temperature and wall concentration are also employed in the investigation. The governing partial differential equations are converted to ordinary differential equations using suitable transformations and then solved numerically via Keller-box method. It is noticed that fluid velocity rises with increase in radiation parameter in the case of assisting flow and is opposite in the case of opposing fluid while radiation parameter has no effect on fluid velocity in the forced convection. It is also seen that fluid velocity and concentration enhances in the case of generative chemical reaction whereas both profiles reduces in the case of destructive chemical reaction. Further, increase in local unsteadiness parameter reduces fluid velocity, temperature and concentration. Over all the effects of physical parameters on fluid velocity, temperature and concentration distribution as well as on the wall shear stress, heat and mass transfer rates are discussed in detail.

  18. Thermal Comfort in Simulated Office Environment with Four Convective and Radiant Cooling Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Mustakallio, Panu; Kolencíková, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Experiments with 24 human subjects in a simulated office with four cooling systems were performed. The systems were: chilled beam (CB), chilled beam with integrated radiant panel (CBR), chilled ceiling with overhead mixing ventilation (CCMV) and four desk partition mounted radiant cooling panels...... with overhead mixing ventilation (MVRC). Whole body thermal sensation (TS) and whole body TS acceptability under the four systems in a simulated office room for one hour exposure were collected. The simulated two-man office (4.12 x 4.20 x 2.89 m, L x W x H) was kept at 26 oC room air temperature. Moderate heat...... load of 64 W/m2 was generated by simulated solar heat load, 2 laptops and 2 occupants, giving in total 1104 W. The supplied outdoor air temperature was kept at 16 oC. The supply air flow rate for CB, CBR and CCMV was set to 26 L/s (category II low-polluting building, EN 15251-2007). For MVRC supply...

  19. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  20. EVIDENCE OF THERMAL CONDUCTION SUPPRESSION IN A SOLAR FLARING LOOP BY CORONAL SEISMOLOGY OF SLOW-MODE WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tongjiang; Ofman, Leon; Provornikova, Elena [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Sun, Xudong [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: tongjiang.wang@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States)

    2015-09-20

    Analysis of a longitudinal wave event observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is presented. A time sequence of 131 Å images reveals that a C-class flare occurred at one footpoint of a large loop and triggered an intensity disturbance (enhancement) propagating along it. The spatial features and temporal evolution suggest that a fundamental standing slow-mode wave could be set up quickly after meeting of two initial disturbances from the opposite footpoints. The oscillations have a period of ∼12 minutes and a decay time of ∼9 minutes. The measured phase speed of 500 ± 50 km s{sup −1} matches the sound speed in the heated loop of ∼10 MK, confirming that the observed waves are of slow mode. We derive the time-dependent temperature and electron density wave signals from six AIA extreme-ultraviolet channels, and find that they are nearly in phase. The measured polytropic index from the temperature and density perturbations is 1.64 ± 0.08 close to the adiabatic index of 5/3 for an ideal monatomic gas. The interpretation based on a 1D linear MHD model suggests that the thermal conductivity is suppressed by at least a factor of 3 in the hot flare loop at 9 MK and above. The viscosity coefficient is determined by coronal seismology from the observed wave when only considering the compressive viscosity dissipation. We find that to interpret the rapid wave damping, the classical compressive viscosity coefficient needs to be enhanced by a factor of 15 as the upper limit.

  1. Numeral analysis for Prandtl number dependency on natural convection in an enclosure having a vertical thermal gradient with a square insulator inside

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Ryong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Il Seouk [School of Mechanical Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    The natural convection in a horizontal enclosure heated from the bottom wall, cooled at the top wall, and having a square adiabatic body in the center is studied. Three different Prandtl numbers (0.01, 0.7 and 7) are considered for the investigation of the effect of the Prandtl number on natural convection. Adiabatic boundary conditions are employed for the side walls. A two dimensional solution for unsteady natural convection is obtained, using an accurate and efficient Chebyshev spectral methodology for different Rayleigh numbers varying over the range of 103 to 106. It had been experimentally reported that the heat transfer mode becomes oscillatory when Pr is out of a specific Pr band beyond the critical Ra. In this study, we reproduced this phenomenon numerically. It was found that when Ra=106, only the case for intermediate Pr (=0.7) reached a non-changing steady state and the low and high Pr number cases (Pr=0.01 and 7) showed a periodically oscillatory fashion hydro dynamically and thermally. The variation of time- and surface-averaged Nusselt numbers on the hot and cold walls for different Rayleigh numbers and Prandtl numbers are presented to show the overall heat transfer characteristics in the system. Further, the isotherms and streamline distributions are presented in detail to compare the physics related to their thermal behavior.

  2. Investigation of thermal-fluid mechanical characteristics of the capillary pump and the pumped two-phase loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiper, Ali M.

    1987-01-01

    This first semi-annual report summarized progress made on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Grant NAG 5-834 during the period September 1, 1986 to February 28, 1987. The goal of the project is to gain a better understanding of the transient behavior of the Capillary Pump Loop (CPL) developed and tested by the GSFC. The investigation is directed toward development of analytical models to represent the transient thermal-fluid mechanic processes occurring in different parts of the CPL engineering model. Evaluation of the available test data has been the starting point for the investigation. Based on results of this evaluation, supplementary tests will be conducted by using a CPL test system already operational in the Heat Transfer laboratory of the university. Of particular interest is the oscillatory behavior of the CPL engineering model exhibited during some of the earlier test runs conducted at NASA-GSFC and Johnson Space Center (JSC).

  3. Rise time reduction of thermal actuators operated in air and water through optimized pre-shaped open-loop driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, T.; Doll, J. C.; Loizeau, F.; Hosseini, N.; Peng, A. W.; Fantner, G. E.; Ricci, A. J.; Pruitt, B. L.

    2017-04-01

    Electrothermal actuators have many advantages compared to other actuators used in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). They are simple to design, easy to fabricate and provide large displacements at low voltages. Low voltages enable less stringent passivation requirements for operation in liquid. Despite these advantages, thermal actuation is typically limited to a few kHz bandwidth when using step inputs due to its intrinsic thermal time constant. However, the use of pre-shaped input signals offers a route for reducing the rise time of these actuators by orders of magnitude. We started with an electrothermally actuated cantilever having an initial 10-90% rise time of 85 μs in air and 234 μs in water for a standard open-loop step input. We experimentally characterized the linearity and frequency response of the cantilever when operated in air and water, allowing us to obtain transfer functions for the two cases. We used these transfer functions, along with functions describing desired reduced rise-time system responses, to numerically simulate the required input signals. Using these pre-shaped input signals, we improved the open-loop 10-90% rise time from 85 μs to 3 μs in air and from 234 μs to 5 μs in water, an improvement by a factor of 28 and 47, respectively. Using this simple control strategy for MEMS electrothermal actuators makes them an attractive alternative to other high speed micromechanical actuators such as piezoelectric stacks or electrostatic comb structures which are more complex to design, fabricate, or operate.

  4. Investigation of thermal-fluid mechanical characteristics of the Capillary Pump Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiper, Ali M.

    1991-01-01

    The main purpose is the experimental and analytical study of behavior of the Capillary Pump Loop (CPL) heat pipe system during the transient mode of operating by applying a step heat pulse to one or more evaporators. Prediction of the CPL behavior when subjected to pulse heat loading requires further study before the transient response of CPL system can be fully understood. The following tasks are discussed: (1) exploratory testing of a CPL heat pipe for transient operational conditions which could generate the type of oscillatory inlet temperature behavior observed in an earlier testing of NASA/GSFC CPL-2 heat pipe system; (2) analytical investigation of the CPL inlet section temperature oscillations; (3) design, construction and testing of a bench-top CPL test system for study of the CPL transient operation; and (4) transient analysis of a CPL heat pipe by applying a step power input to the evaporators.

  5. The influence of thermophoretic particle deposition on fully developed MHD mixed convective flow in a vertical channel with thermal-diffusion and diffusion-thermo effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lourdu Immaculate

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the influence of thermophoretic particle deposition on the MHD mixed convective heat and mass transfer flow in a vertical channel in the presence of radiative heat flux with thermal-diffusion and diffusion-thermo effects. The resulting nonlinear coupled equations are solved under appropriate boundary conditions using the homotopy analysis method. The influence of involved parameters on heat and mass transfer characteristics of the fluid flow is presented graphically. It is noted that fluid velocity is an increasing function of radiation parameter, Dufour number, Buoyancy ratio parameter and mixed convection parameter whereas the magnetic parameter, thermophoresis constant, Soret number and Schimidt number lead to suppress the velocity. The fluid temperature increases with increasing radiation parameter and Dufour number. The convergence of homotopy analysis method (HAM solutions is discussed and a good agreement is found between the analytical and the numerical solution.

  6. Mixed convection in thermally anisotropic non-Darcy porous medium in double lid-driven cavity using Bejan’s heatlines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh E. Ahmed

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the problem of mixed convection in two-sided lid-driven enclosures saturated non-Darcy porous medium. The vertical walls of the cavity were kept thermally insulated. The bottom wall is cooled while the top wall is uniformly heated. The bottom and the top walls are moving in opposite direction. The governing equations were solved using finite volume method with SIMPLE algorithm. A new form for the heat function was derived. The obtained results were presented in contours maps for the streamlines, the isotherms and the heat function. The profiles of the horizontal velocity component and the maximum values of vertical velocity components as well as the mean Nusselt number were presented graphically. It is found that, for the low values of the Richardson number, the forced convection plays a dominant role in the flow region. The increase in inverse Darcy number leads to decrease the mean Nusselt number.

  7. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordovskyy, M.; Kontar, E. P.; Browning, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Observation of coronal extreme ultra-violet (EUV) spectral lines sensitive to different temperatures offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Aims: Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10 000 km) velocity distributions to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. Methods: We use ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes thermal conduction and radiative losses in the continuum into account. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity dispersions, which would be interpreted as non-thermal velocities in observations, at different temperatures for different parts of the models. Results: Our models show qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. Thus, the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersions demonstrate substantial correlation with the temperature, increasing from about 20-30 km s-1 around 1 MK to about 200-400 km s-1 near 10-20 MK. The average LOS velocities also correlate with velocity dispersions, although they demonstrate a very strong scattering compared to the observations. We also note that near footpoints the velocity dispersions across the magnetic field are systematically lower than those along the field. We conclude that the correlation between the flow velocities, velocity dispersions, and temperatures are likely to indicate that the same heating

  8. Impact of generalized Fourier's and Fick's laws on MHD 3D second grade nanofluid flow with variable thermal conductivity and convective heat and mass conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, M.; Bilal, M.; Chung, Jae Dong; Lu, Dian Chen; Farooq, Umer

    2017-09-01

    A mathematical model has been established to study the magnetohydrodynamic second grade nanofluid flow past a bidirectional stretched surface. The flow is induced by Cattaneo-Christov thermal and concentration diffusion fluxes. Novel characteristics of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are accompanied by temperature dependent thermal conductivity and convective heat and mass boundary conditions. Apposite transformations are betrothed to transform a system of nonlinear partial differential equations to nonlinear ordinary differential equations. Analytic solutions of the obtained nonlinear system are obtained via a convergent method. Graphs are plotted to examine how velocity, temperature, and concentration distributions are affected by varied physical involved parameters. Effects of skin friction coefficients along the x- and y-direction versus various parameters are also shown through graphs and are well debated. Our findings show that velocities along both the x and y axes exhibit a decreasing trend for the Hartmann number. Moreover, temperature and concentration distributions are decreasing functions of thermal and concentration relaxation parameters.

  9. On the performance of heat absorption/generation and thermal stratification in mixed convective flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This investigation explores the thermally stratified stretchable flow of an Oldroyd-B material bounded by a linear stretched surface. Heat transfer characteristics are addressed through thermal stratification and heat generation/absorption. Formulation is arranged for mixed convection. Application of suitable transformations provides ordinary differential systems through partial differential systems. The homotopy concept is adopted for the solution of nonlinear differential systems. The influence of several arising variables on velocity and temperature is addressed. Besides this, the rate of heat transfer is calculated and presented in tabular form. It is noticed that velocity and Nusselt number increase when the thermal buoyancy parameter is enhanced. Moreover, temperature is found to decrease for larger values of Prandtl number and heat absorption parameter. Comparative analysis for limiting study is performed and excellent agreement is found.

  10. Effect of thermal radiation and suction on convective heat transfer of nanofluid along a wedge in the presence of heat generation/absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasmani, Ruhaila Md; Bhuvaneswari, M. [Centre for Foundation Studies in Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Sivasankaran, S.; Siri, Zailan [Institute of Mathematical Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-10-22

    An analysis is presented to find the effects of thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption on convection heat transfer of nanofluid past a wedge in the presence of wall suction. The governing partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. The resulting system is solved numerically using a fourth-order Runge–Kutta method with shooting technique. Numerical computations are carried out for different values of dimensionless parameters to predict the effects of wedge angle, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, heat generation/absorption, thermal radiation and suction. It is found that the temperature increases significantly when the value of the heat generation/absorption parameter increases. But the opposite observation is found for the effect of thermal radiation.

  11. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Radiation and Viscous Effects on Entropy Generation in Forced Convection Blood Flow over an Axisymmetric Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Yaghoub Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerical and analytical investigation of the effects of thermal radiation and viscous heating on a convective flow of a non-Newtonian, incompressible fluid in an axisymmetric stretching sheet with constant temperature wall is performed. The power law model of the blood is used for the non-Newtonian model of the fluid and the Rosseland model for the thermal radiative heat transfer in an absorbing medium and viscous heating are considered as the heat sources. The non-dimensional governing equations are transformed to similarity form and solved numerically. A parameter study on entropy generation in medium is presented based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics by considering various parameters such as the thermal radiation parameter, the Brinkman number, Prandtl number, Eckert number.

  12. Effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on a boundary layer over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition

    OpenAIRE

    Tasawar Hayat; Awatif A. Hendi; Jacob A. Gbadeyan; Philip O. Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on the laminar boundary layer about a vertical plate in a uniform stream of fluid under a convective surface boundary condition. In the analysis, we assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid whilst a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the right surface; the heat source decays exponentially outwards from the surface of the plate. The similarity variable m...

  13. Mixed Convective Flow of an Elastico-Viscous Fluid Past a Vertical Plate in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Chemical Reaction with an Induced Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Utpal Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the steady, two-dimensional, hydromagnetic, mixed convection heat and mass transfer of a conducting, optically thin, incompressible, elastico-viscous fluid (characterized by the Walters' B' model) past a permeable, stationary, vertical, infinite plate in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction with account for an induced magnetic field. The governing equations of the flow are solved by the series method, and expressions for the velocity field, induced magnetic field, temperature field, and the skin friction are obtained.

  14. Effect of thermal radiation on free convection flow and heat transfer over a truncated cone in the presence of pressure work and heat generation/absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbashbeshy E.M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of heat generation or absorption and thermal radiation on free convection flow and heat transfer over a truncated cone in the presence of pressure work is considered. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced to non-similarity boundary layer equations and solved numerically by using Mathematica technique. Comparisons with previously published work on special cases of the problem are performed and the results are found to be in excellent agreement. The solutions are presented in terms of local skin friction, local Nusselt number, velocity and temperature profiles for values of Prandtl number, pressure work parameter, radiation parameter and heat generation or absorption parameter.

  15. A sapphire fibre thermal probe based on fast Fourier transform and phase-lock loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Tian; Wang, Dong-Sheng; Ge, Wen-Qian; Cui, Li-Chao

    2006-05-01

    A sapphire fibre thermal probe with Cr3+ ion-doped end is developed by using the laser heated pedestal growth method. The fluorescence thermal probe offers advantages of compact structure, high performance and ability to withstand high temperature in a detection range from room temperature to 450°C. Based on the fast Fourier transform (FFT), the fluorescence lifetime is obtained from the tangent function of phase angle of the non-zeroth terms in the FFT result. This method has advantages such as quick calculation, high accuracy and immunity to the background noise. This FFT method is compared with other traditional fitting methods, indicating that the standard deviation of the FFT method is about half of that of the Prony method and about 1/6 of that of the log-fit method. And the FFT method is immune to the background noise involved in a signal. So, the FFT method is an excellent way of processing signals. In addition, a phase-lock amplifier can effectively suppress the noise.

  16. Closing the Loop - Utilization of Secondary Resources by Low Temperature Thermal Gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Tobias Pape

    application of low temperature thermal gasification could be applied to reduce the environmental impact of such management systems and increase the value and positive awareness of the resources in question. In the first part of this study, the Low Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed (LT‐CFB gasifier......) is described.The LT‐CFB gasifier is a technology originally developed for pre‐processing of biomass fuels like cereal straw. In popular terms, the LT‐CFB gasification process separates the inorganic and organic fractions of the straw. The majority of the inorganic material is extracted in one or several...... different ash fractions and the organic material is converted into a hot combustible gas product, which is subsequently combusted in an adjacent boiler. This substantially reduces the influence of the fuels inorganic composition on thecombustion properties. When combining LT‐CFB gasification with existing...

  17. Assessment of thermal conductivity, viscosity and specific heat of nanofluids in single phase laminar indernal forced convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Nanofluids are considered for improving the heat exchange in forced convective flow. In literature, the benefit of nanofluids compared to the corresponding base fluid is represented by several figures-of-merit in which the heat transfer benefit and the cost of pumping the fluid are considered. These

  18. Thermal regulation in terrestrial environment using a two-phase fluid loop with capillary pumping; Regulation thermique en environnement terrestre par boucle fluide diphasique a pompage capillaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butto, C. [Universite Paul Sabatier, LESETH, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    1996-12-31

    Two-phase fluid loops with capillary pumping are particularly interesting silent devices which allow energy savings and do not create any noise pollution (no mechanical vibrations). In terrestrial environment, the gravity field, when judiciously used, allows to improve their performances and thus, their use in thermal regulation of big computers, power electronic components, transformers, etc, is particularly interesting. In this study, the main results concerning the functioning of such a loop in the gravity field are presented and used to highlight the conditions that allow to take advantage of this field and the improvements obtained. (J.S.) 5 refs.

  19. Development of a thermal-hydraulic code for reflood analysis in a PWR experimental loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Sabrina P.; Mesquita, Amir Z.; Rezende, Hugo C., E-mail: sabrinapral@gmail.com, E-mail: amir@cdtn.brm, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br, E-mail: hcr@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.br [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    A process of fundamental importance in the event of Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Pressurized Water nuclear Reactors (PWR) is the reflood of the core or rewetting of nuclear fuels. The Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) has been developing since the 70’s programs to allow Brazil to become independent in the field of reactor safety analysis. To that end, in the 80’s was designed, assembled and commissioned one Rewetting Test Facility (ITR in Portuguese). This facility aims to investigate the phenomena involved in the thermal hydraulic reflood phase of a Loss of Coolant Accident in a PWR nuclear reactor. This work aim is the analysis of physical and mathematical models governing the rewetting phenomenon, and the development a thermo-hydraulic simulation code of a representative experimental circuit of the PWR reactors core cooling channels. It was possible to elaborate and develop a code called REWET. The results obtained with REWET were compared with the experimental results of the ITR, and with the results of the Hydroflut code, that was the old program previously used. An analysis was made of the evolution of the wall temperature of the test section as well as the evolution of the front for two typical tests using the two codes calculation, and experimental results. The result simulated by REWET code for the rewetting time also came closer to the experimental results more than those calculated by Hydroflut code. (author)

  20. Multi-boiling Heat Transfer Analysis of a Convective Straight Fin with Temperature-Dependent Thermal Properties and Internal Heat Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gbeminiyi Sobamowo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by using the finite volume method, the heat transfer in a convective straight fin with temperature-dependent thermal properties and an internal heat generation under multi-boiling heat transfer modes are analyzed. In this regard, the local heat transfer coefficient is considered to vary within a power-law function of temperature. In the present study, the coexistence of all the boiling modes is taken into consideration. The developed heat transfer models and the corresponding numerical solutions are used to investigate the effects of various thermo-geometric parameters on the thermal performance of the longitudinal rectangular fin. The results shows that the fin temperature distribution, the total heat transfer, and the fin efficiency are significantly affected by the thermo-geometric parameters of the fin and the internal heat generation within the fin. The obtained results can provide a platform for improvements in the design of the fin in the heat transfer equipment.

  1. Non-Darcy free convection flow over a horizontal cylinder in a saturated porous medium with variable viscosity, thermal conductivity and mass diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, I. A.; Rashed, Z. Z.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of variable viscosity and thermal conductivity on coupled heat and mass transfer by free convection about a permeable horizontal cylinder embedded in porous media using Ergun mode are studied. The fluid viscosity and thermal conductivity and are assumed to vary as a linear function of temperature while the mass diffusion is assumed to vary as linear function of concentration. The surface of the horizontal cylinder is maintained at a uniform wall temperature and a uniform wall concentration. The transformed governing equations are obtained and solved by using the implicit finite difference method. Numerical results for dimensionless temperature and concentration profiles as well as Nusselt and Sherwood numbers are presented for various values of parameters namely, Ergun number, transpiration parameter, Rayleigh and Lewis numbers and buoyancy ratio parameter.

  2. Thermal radiation and heat generation/absorption effects on viscoelastic double-diffusive convection from an isothermal sphere in porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdul Gaffar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Buoyancy-driven convective heat and mass transfer in boundary layer flow of a viscoelastic Jeffrey fluid from a permeable isothermal sphere embedded in a porous medium is studied. Thermal radiation flux and heat generation/absorption are also incorporated in the model. A non-Darcy drag force model is employed to simulate the effects of linear porous media drag and second order Forchheimer drag. The Rosseland diffusion algebraic approximation is utilized to simulate thermal radiation effects. The non-dimensionalized boundary layer equations are solved using implicit, finite-difference scheme. The influence of Darcy number (Da, Deborah number (De, ratio of relaxation to retardation times (λ, radiation parameter (F, Forchheimer inertial parameter (Λ and heat generation/absorption parameter (Δ, on normalized velocity, temperature, concentration, skin friction, heat and mass transfer rates are also studied. The present study has applications in the storage of nuclear waste materials.

  3. Optimal Design of Magnetohydrodynamic Mixed Convection Flow in a Vertical Channel with Slip Boundary Conditions and Thermal Radiation Effects by Using an Entropy Generation Minimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Yaghoub Abdollahzadeh Jamalabadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the effect of thermal radiation on a fully developed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD convective flow of a Newtonian, incompressible and electrically conducting fluid in a vertical microchannel bounded by two infinite vertical parallel plates with constant temperature walls through a lateral magnetic field of uniform strength is presented. The Rosseland model for the conduction radiation heat transfer in an absorbing medium and two plates with slip-flow and no-slip conditions are assumed. In addition, the induced magnetic field is neglected due to the assumption of a small magnetic Reynolds number. The non-dimensional governing equations are solved numerically using Runge–Kutta–Fehlberg method with a shooting technique. The channel is optimized based on the Second Law of Thermodynamics by changing various parameters such as the thermal radiation parameter, the temperature parameter, Hartmann number, Grashof to Reynolds ratio, velocity slip length, and temperature jump.

  4. An experimental study of unsteady natural convection in a reservoir model subject to periodic thermal forcing using combined PIV and PIT techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Tomasz Piotr; Lei, Chengwang; Patterson, John C.

    2009-07-01

    The present experimental investigation is concerned with the transient flow response in a reservoir model to periodic heating and cooling at the water surface. The experiment reveals a stable stratification of the water body during the heating phase and an unsteady mixing flow in the reservoir during the cooling phase. It is shown that thermal instabilities play an important role in breaking up the residual circulation and initiating a reverse flow circulation in deep waters after the switch of thermal forcing from heating to cooling. Moreover, the heating from the water surface results in a stable large-scale convective roll that is clearly observed in the experiment. The present flow visualization is carried out with the application of thermo-chromic liquid crystals. Quantitative temperature and velocity fields are extracted using Particle Image Thermometry and Particle Image Velocimetry techniques. Understanding of the flow mechanisms pertinent to this problem is important for predicting the transport of nutrients and pollutants across reservoirs.

  5. Thermal convection in a cylinder and the problem of planform selection in an internally heated fluid layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmychkov, V. V.; Shcheritsa, O. V.; Mazhorova, O. S.

    2016-12-01

    The paper deals with the hexagonal convective flow near the stability threshold in an internally heated fluid layer. In our previous numerical study of convection near the stability threshold in a square box with internal heat generation [Phys. Lett. A 377, 2111 (2013)], 10.1016/j.physleta.2013.06.013 for a region of large horizontal extent, it has been shown that at small values of Prandtl number (Pr), convection sets in as a pattern of hexagonal cells with upward motion in the center (up-hexagons), whereas at large Pr, a stable flow pattern is formed by hexagonal cells with a downward motion in the center (down-hexagons). Here, we study axisymmetric convection in a cylinder as a model of motion in a single hexagonal cell. The radius of the cylinder matches the size of hexagons observed in our three-dimensional simulation. The lateral boundary of the cylinder is free and heat insulated. Horizontal bounding surfaces are rigid. The upper boundary is maintained at a constant temperature; the lower one is insulated. Two stable, steady-state motions with the upward and downward flow at the cylinder axis have been attained in calculations, irrespective of Pr. Cylindrical motion with the same direction of circulation as in the stable hexagons has a maximum temperature drop measured along the radius at the bottom of the cell. We suggest maximization of the temperature drop as a selection criterion, which determines the preferred state of motion in an internally heated fluid layer. This new selection principle is validated by the comparative analysis of the dominant nonlinear effects in low- and high-Prandtl number convection.

  6. The Effect of MHD on Free Convection with Periodic Temperature and Concentration in the Presence of Thermal Radiation and Chemical Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigta, B.; Koya, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    This paper studies the effect of magneto hydrodynamics on unsteady free convection between a pair of infinite vertical Couette plates. The temperature of the plates and concentration between the plates vary with time. Convection between the plates is considered in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction. The solution is obtained using perturbation techniques. These techniques are used to transform nonlinear coupled partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations. The resulting equations are solved analytically. The solution is expressed in terms of power series with some small parameter. The effect of various parameters, viz., velocity, temperature and concentration, has been discussed. Mat lab code simulation study is carried out to support the theoretical results. The result shows that as the thermal radiation parameter R increases, the temperature decreases near the moving porous plate while it approaches to a zero in the region close to the boundary layer of the stationary plate. Moreover, as the modified Grashof number, i.e., based on concentration difference, increases, the velocity of the fluid flow increases hence the concentration decreases. An increase in both the chemical reaction parameter and Schmidt number results in decreased concentration.

  7. Development of a model for the thermal-hydraulic characterization of the He-FUS3 loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, G., E-mail: gianluca.barone@for.unipi.it [University of Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI), Pisa (Italy); Coscarelli, E.; Forgione, N.; Martelli, D. [University of Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering (DICI), Pisa (Italy); Del Nevo, A.; Tarantino, M.; Utili, M. [ENEA UTIS-TCI, CR Brasimone, Camugnano (Italy); Ricapito, I.; Calderoni, P. [TBM& MD Project, Fusion for Energy, EU Commission, Carrer J. Pla, 2, Building B3, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • RELAP5-3D model of He-FUS3 facility and turbo circulator (TC). • Cold and hot facility T/H numerical analysis for the TC operanting range. • Effect of the cold by-pass opening on the facility performances. - Abstract: He-FUS3 is a helium facility designed and realized by ENEA in order to test the thermal-mechanical properties of prototypical breeding blanket module assemblies of a DEMO reactor. The actual facility has been upgraded with a high performance turbo circulator and a water heat exchanger integrating the pre-existent air cooler. In addition, a new test section located in the loop hot zone has been settled down with the objective of investigating safety relevant transient conditions of “In-TBM” LOCA scenarios. A RELAP5-3D{sup ©} model has been developed to perform a set of preliminary simulations on the new He-FUS3 layout. Both cold and hot stationary conditions have been analyzed evaluating the turbo circulator performances for a wide range of helium flow rate. Outcomes have shown that RELAP5-3D{sup ©} is an effective tool in reproducing the most significant phenomena of He-FUS3 system, providing relevant insight supporting future experimental campaigns. The post-test analysis phase will be, of course, fundamental for the qualification of a consistent numerical model.

  8. Experimental investigation on thermal performance of a closed loop pulsating heat pipe (CLPHP) using methanol and distilled water at different filling ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Lutfor; Swarna, Anindita Dhar; Ahmed, Syed Nasif Uddin; Perven, Sanjida; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    Pulsating Heat Pipes, the new two-phase heat transfer devices, with no counter current flow between liquid and vapor have become a modern topic for research in the field of thermal management. This paper focuses on the performance of methanol and distilled water as working fluid in a closed loop pulsating heat pipe (CLPHP). This performances are compared in terms of thermal resistance, heat transfer co-efficient, and evaporator and condenser wall temperature with variable heat inputs. Methanol and Distilled water are selected for their lower surface tension, dynamic viscosity and sensible heat. A closed loop PHP made of copper with 2mm ID and 2.5mm OD having total 8 loops are supplied with power input varied from 10W to 60W. During the experiment the PHP is kept vertical, while the filling ratio (FR) is increased gradually from 40% to 70% with 10% increment. The optimum filling ratio for a minimum thermal resistance is found to be 60% and 40% for distilled water and methanol respectively and methanol is found to be the better working fluid compared to distilled water in terms of its lower thermal resistance and higher heat transfer coefficient.

  9. The role of the thermal convection of fluids in the formation of unconformity-type uranium deposits: the Athabasca Basin, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pek, A. A.; Malkovsky, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    In the global production of uranium, 18% belong to the unconformity-type Canadian deposits localized in the Athabasca Basin. These deposits, which are unique in terms of their ore quality, were primarily studied by Canadian and French scientists. They have elaborated the diagenetic-hydrothermal hypothesis of ore formation, which suggests that (1) the deposits were formed within a sedimentary basin near an unconformity surface dividing the folded Archean-Proterozoic metamorphic basement and a gently dipping sedimentary cover, which is not affected by metamorphism; (2) the spatial accommodation of the deposits is controlled by the rejuvenated faults in the basement at their exit into the overlying sedimentary sequence; the ore bodies are localized above and below the unconformity surface; (3) the occurrence of graphite-bearing rocks is an important factor in controlling the local structural mineralization; (4) the ore bodies are the products of uranium precipitation on a reducing barrier. The mechanism that drives the circulation of ore-forming hydrothermal solutions has remained one of the main unclear questions in the general genetic concept. The ore was deposited above the surface of the unconformity due to the upflow discharge of the solution from the fault zones into the overlying conglomerate and sandstone. The ore formation below this surface is a result of the downflow migration of the solutions along the fault zones from sandstone into the basement rocks. A thermal convective system with the conjugated convection cells in the basement and sedimentary fill of the basin may be a possible explanation of why the hydrotherms circulate in the opposite directions. The results of our computations in the model setting of the free thermal convection of fluids are consistent with the conceptual reasoning about the conditions of the formation of unique uranium deposits in the Athabasca Basin. The calculated rates of the focused solution circulation through the fault

  10. System design description of forced-convection molten-salt corrosion loops MSR-FCL-3 and MSR-FCL-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huntley, W.R.; Silverman, M.D.

    1976-11-01

    Molten-salt corrosion loops MSR-FCL-3 and MSR-FCL-4 are high-temperature test facilities designed to evaluate corrosion and mass transfer of modified Hastelloy N alloys for future use in Molten-Salt Breeder Reactors. Salt is circulated by a centrifugal sump pump to evaluate material compatibility with LiF-BeF/sub 2/-ThF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ fuel salt at velocities up to 6 m/s (20 fps) and at salt temperatures from 566 to 705/sup 0/C (1050 to 1300/sup 0/F). The report presents the design description of the various components and systems that make up each corrosion facility, such as the salt pump, corrosion specimens, salt piping, main heaters, salt coolers, salt sampling equipment, and helium cover-gas system, etc. The electrical systems and instrumentation and controls are described, and operational procedures, system limitations, and maintenance philosophy are discussed.

  11. Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Jentung

    2015-01-01

    This is the presentation file for the short course Introduction to Loop Heat Pipes, to be conducted at the 2015 Thermal Fluids and Analysis Workshop, August 3-7, 2015, Silver Spring, Maryland. This course will discuss operating principles and performance characteristics of a loop heat pipe. Topics include: 1) pressure profiles in the loop; 2) loop operating temperature; 3) operating temperature control; 4) loop startup; 4) loop shutdown; 5) loop transient behaviors; 6) sizing of loop components and determination of fluid inventory; 7) analytical modeling; 8) examples of flight applications; and 9) recent LHP developments.

  12. Topology Optimization for Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    2011-01-01

    This report deals with the topology optimization of convection problems.That is, the aim of the project is to develop, implement and examine topology optimization of purely thermal and coupled thermomechanical problems,when the design-dependent eects of convection are taken into consideration...... problems, steady-state thermal problems and coupled thermomechanical problems, for a range of objective functions subjected to a volume-fraction constraint. The programme utilises the GCMMA algorithm, by K. Svanberg, to optimize the given problems. Design-dependent side convection has been formulated...... and implemented, where the convection is interpolated into the design-domain and applied upon the boundaries of the design using a density-based interpolation function.The implementation has been tested for both pure thermal analysis, along with thermal and thermomechanical optimization. The solutions to the test...

  13. Interaction effects of radiation and convection measured by a thermal manikin wearing protective clothing with different radiant properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenith, G.; Wang, X.; Candas, V.; Hartog, E. den; Griefahn, B.; Holmér, I.; Meinander, H.; Richards, M.

    2005-01-01

    As part of the EU funded research project THERMPROTECT ('Thermal properties of protective clothing and their use') this paper deals with manikin experiments on the effects of heat radiation at different wind speeds, considering aspects related to the reflectivity of the clothing. A heated thermal

  14. Effects of Thermal Radiation on Mixed Convection Flow of a Micropolar Fluid from an Unsteady Stretching Surface with Viscous Dissipation and Heat Generation/Absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khilap Singh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model is developed to examine the effects of thermal radiation on unsteady mixed convection flow of a viscous dissipating incompressible micropolar fluid adjacent to a heated vertical stretching surface in the presence of the buoyancy force and heat generation/absorption. The Rosseland approximation is used to describe the radiative heat flux in the energy equation. The model contains nonlinear coupled partial differential equations which have been converted into ordinary differential equation by using the similarity transformations. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation are solved by Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth fifth-order method with shooting technique. Numerical solutions are then obtained and investigated in detail for different interesting parameters such as the local skin-friction coefficient, wall couple stress, and Nusselt number as well as other parametric values such as the velocity, angular velocity, and temperature.

  15. Influence of fluctuating thermal and mass diffusion on unsteady MHD buoyancy-driven convection past a vertical surface with chemical reaction and Soret effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dulal; Talukdar, Babulal

    2012-04-01

    The influence of thermal radiation and first-order chemical reaction on unsteady MHD convective flow, heat and mass transfer of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past a semi-infinite vertical flat plate in the presence of transverse magnetic field under oscillatory suction and heat source in slip-flow regime is studied. The dimensionless governing equations for this investigation are formulated and solved analytically using two-term harmonic and non-harmonic functions. Comparisons with previously published work on special cases of the problem are performed and results are found to be in excellent agreement. A parametric study illustrating the effects of various physical parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature and concentration fields as well as skin-friction coefficient, the Nusselt and Sherwood numbers in terms of amplitude and phase is conducted. The numerical results of this parametric study are presented graphically and in tabular form to highlight the physical aspects of the problem.

  16. Effects of Exothermic/Endothermic Chemical Reactions with Arrhenius Activation Energy on MHD Free Convection and Mass Transfer Flow in Presence of Thermal Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh. Abdul Maleque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A local similarity solution of unsteady MHD natural convection heat and mass transfer boundary layer flow past a flat porous plate within the presence of thermal radiation is investigated. The effects of exothermic and endothermic chemical reactions with Arrhenius activation energy on the velocity, temperature, and concentration are also studied in this paper. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to ordinary differential equations by introducing locally similarity transformation (Maleque (2010. Numerical solutions to the reduced nonlinear similarity equations are then obtained by adopting Runge-Kutta and shooting methods using the Nachtsheim-Swigert iteration technique. The results of the numerical solution are obtained for both steady and unsteady cases then presented graphically in the form of velocity, temperature, and concentration profiles. Comparison has been made for steady flow ( and shows excellent agreement with Bestman (1990, hence encouragement for the use of the present computations.

  17. The Earth's mantle in a microwave oven: thermal convection driven by a heterogeneous distribution of heat sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourel, Loïc; Limare, Angela; Jaupart, Claude; Surducan, Emanoil; Farnetani, Cinzia G.; Kaminski, Edouard C.; Neamtu, Camelia; Surducan, Vasile

    2017-08-01

    Convective motions in silicate planets are largely driven by internal heat sources and secular cooling. The exact amount and distribution of heat sources in the Earth are poorly constrained and the latter is likely to change with time due to mixing and to the deformation of boundaries that separate different reservoirs. To improve our understanding of planetary-scale convection in these conditions, we have designed a new laboratory setup allowing a large range of heat source distributions. We illustrate the potential of our new technique with a study of an initially stratified fluid involving two layers with different physical properties and internal heat production rates. A modified microwave oven is used to generate a uniform radiation propagating through the fluids. Experimental fluids are solutions of hydroxyethyl cellulose and salt in water, such that salt increases both the density and the volumetric heating rate. We determine temperature and composition fields in 3D with non-invasive techniques. Two fluorescent dyes are used to determine temperature. A Nd:YAG planar laser beam excites fluorescence, and an optical system, involving a beam splitter and a set of colour filters, captures the fluorescence intensity distribution on two separate spectral bands. The ratio between the two intensities provides an instantaneous determination of temperature with an uncertainty of 5% (typically 1K). We quantify mixing processes by precisely tracking the interfaces separating the two fluids. These novel techniques allow new insights on the generation, morphology and evolution of large-scale heterogeneities in the Earth's lower mantle.

  18. Phenomenology of turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra; Chatterjee, Anando; Kumar, Abhishek; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    We simulate Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in which a fluid is confined between two thermally conducting plates. We report results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of RBC turbulence on 40963 grid, the highest resolution hitherto reported, on 65536 cores of Cray XC40, Shaheen II, at KAUST. The non-dimensional parameters of our simulation are: the Rayleigh number Ra = 1 . 1 ×1011 (the highest ever for a pseudo-spectral simulation) and Prandtl number of unity. We present energy flux diagnostics of shell-to-shell (in wave number space) transfer. Furthermore, noting that convective flows are anisotropic due to buoyancy, we quantify anisotropy by subdividing each wavenumber shell into rings and quantify ring energy spectrum. An outstanding question in convective turbulence is the wavenumber scaling of the energy spectrum. Our pseudo-spectral simulations of turbulent thermal convection coupled with novel energy transfer diagnostics have provided a definitive answer to this question. We conclude that convective turbulence exhibits behavior similar to fluid turbulence, that is, Kolmogorov's k - 5 / 3 spectrum with forward and local energy transfers, along with a nearly isotropic energy distribution. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  19. 3D CFD simulations to study the effect of inclination of condenser tube on natural convection and thermal stratification in a passive decay heat removal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minocha, Nitin [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B., E-mail: jbjoshi@gmail.com [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushaktinagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India); Nayak, Arun K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Vijayan, Pallippattu K., E-mail: vijayanp@barc.gov.in [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of three-dimensional natural convection and thermal stratification inside large water pool. • Effect of inclination (α) of condenser tube on fluid flow and heat transfer. • The heat transfer was found to be maximum for α = 90° and minimum for α = 15°. • Laminar-turbulent natural convection and heat transfer in the presence of longitudinal vortices. - Abstract: Many advanced nuclear reactors adopt methodologies of passive safety systems based on natural forces such as gravity. In one of such system, the decay heat generated from a reactor is removed by isolation condenser (ICs) submerged in a large water pool called the Gravity Driven Water Pool (GDWP). The objective of the present study was to design an IC for the passive decay heat removal system (PDHRS) for advanced nuclear reactor. First, the effect of inclination of IC tube on three dimensional temperature and flow fields was investigated inside a pilot scale (10 L) GDWP. Further, the knowledge of these fields has been used for the quantification of heat transfer and thermal stratification phenomenon. In a next step, the knowledge gained from the pilot scale GDWP has been extended to design an IC for real size GDWP (∼10,000 m{sup 3}). Single phase CFD simulation using open source CFD code [OpenFOAM-2.2] was performed for different tube inclination angles (α) (w.r.t. to vertical direction) in the range 0° ⩽ α ⩽ 90°. The results indicate that the heat transfer coefficient increases with increase in tube inclination angle. The heat transfer was found to be maximum for α = 90° and minimum for α = 15°. This behavior is due to the interaction between the primary flow (due to pressure gradient) and secondary flow (due to buoyancy force). The primary flow enhanced the fluid sliding motion at the tube top whereas the secondary flow resulted in enhancement in fluid motion along the circumference of tube. As the angle of inclination (α) of the tube was increased, the

  20. Hydrogen production from urea wastewater using a combination of urea thermal hydrolyser-desorber loop and a hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahimpour, M.R.; Mottaghi, H.R.; Barmaki, M.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz71345 (Iran)

    2010-06-15

    This work presents novel application of palladium-based membrane in a wastewater treatment loop of urea plant for hydrogen production. Urea wastewater treatment loop is based on combined thermal hydrolysis-desorption operations. The wastewater of urea plant includes ammonia and urea which in the current treatment loop; urea decomposes to ammonia and carbon dioxide. The catalytic hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor is proposed for hydrogen production from desorbed ammonia of urea wastewater which much of it discharges to air and causes environmental pollution. Therefore hydrogen is produced from decomposition of ammonia on nickel-alumina catalyst bed simultaneously and permeates from reaction side to shell side through thin layer of palladium-silver membrane. Also a sweep gas is used in the shell side for increasing driving force. In this way, 4588 tons/yr hydrogen is produced and environmental problem of urea plant is solved. The membrane reactor and urea wastewater treatment loop are modeled mathematically and the predicted data of the model are consistent with the experimental and plant data that show validity of the model. Also the effects of key parameters on the performance of catalytic hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor such as the temperature, pressure, thickness of Pd-Ag layer, configuration of flow and sweep gas flow ratio were examined. (author)

  1. Numerical comparison of thermal hydraulic aspects of supercritical carbon dioxide and subcritical water-based natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Milan Krishna Singhar; Basu, Dipankar Narayan [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati (India)

    2017-02-15

    Application of the supercritical condition in reactor core cooling needs to be properly justified based on the extreme level of parameters involved. Therefore, a numerical study is presented to compare the thermalhydraulic performance of supercritical and single-phase natural circulation loops under low-to-intermediate power levels. Carbon dioxide and water are selected as respective working fluids, operating under an identical set of conditions. Accordingly, a three-dimensional computational model was developed, and solved with an appropriate turbulence model and equations of state. Large asymmetry in velocity and temperature profiles was observed in a single cross section due to local buoyancy effect, which is more prominent for supercritical fluids. Mass flow rate in a supercritical loop increases with power until a maximum is reached, which subsequently corresponds to a rapid deterioration in heat transfer coefficient. That can be identified as the limit of operation for such loops to avoid a high temperature, and therefore, the use of a supercritical loop is suggested only until the appearance of such maxima. Flow-induced heat transfer deterioration can be delayed by increasing system pressure or lowering sink temperature. Bulk temperature level throughout the loop with water as working fluid is higher than supercritical carbon dioxide. This is until the heat transfer deterioration, and hence the use of a single-phase loop is prescribed beyond that limit.

  2. In-Space technology experiments program. A high efficiency thermal interface (using condensation heat transfer) between a 2-phase fluid loop and heatpipe radiator: Experiment definition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohner, John A.; Dempsey, Brian P.; Herold, Leroy M.

    1990-01-01

    Space Station elements and advanced military spacecraft will require rejection of tens of kilowatts of waste heat. Large space radiators and two-phase heat transport loops will be required. To minimize radiator size and weight, it is critical to minimize the temperature drop between the heat source and sink. Under an Air Force contract, a unique, high-performance heat exchanger is developed for coupling the radiator to the transport loop. Since fluid flow through the heat exchanger is driven by capillary forces which are easily dominated by gravity forces in ground testing, it is necessary to perform microgravity thermal testing to verify the design. This contract consists of an experiment definition phase leading to a preliminary design and cost estimate for a shuttle-based flight experiment of this heat exchanger design. This program will utilize modified hardware from a ground test program for the heat exchanger.

  3. Effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on a boundary layer over a vertical plate with a convective surface boundary condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the effects of internal heat generation, thermal radiation and buoyancy force on the laminar boundary layer about a vertical plate in a uniform stream of fluid under a convective surface boundary condition. In the analysis, we assumed that the left surface of the plate is in contact with a hot fluid whilst a stream of cold fluid flows steadily over the right surface; the heat source decays exponentially outwards from the surface of the plate. The similarity variable method was applied to the steady state governing non-linear partial differential equations, which were transformed into a set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations and were solved numerically by applying a shooting iteration technique together with a sixth-order Runge–Kutta integration scheme for better accuracy. The effects of the Prandtl number, the local Biot number, the internal heat generation parameter, thermal radiation and the local Grashof number on the velocity and temperature profiles are illustrated and interpreted in physical terms. A comparison with previously published results on similar special cases showed excellent agreement.

  4. Modeling and simulation for 3D magneto Eyring–Powell nanomaterial subject to nonlinear thermal radiation and convective heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khan

    Full Text Available The present article scrutinizes the steady three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD flow of Powell-Eyring nanofluid with convective and the nanoparticles mass flux conditions. Additionally, the features of heat transfer phenomena’s are carried out by utilizing the non-linear thermal radiation. Suitable transformations convert the nonlinear PDEs to the nonlinear ODEs and then tackled numerically by bvp4c technique. The properties of numerous amending parameters to the heat and mass transfer features are portrayed graphically and deliberated in detail. The achieved results reveal that amassed values of magnetic parameter M and Biot number γ enhance the temperature distribution and its thickness of boundary layer. Also, it is identified that the impact of Brownian motion parameter Nb and thermophoresis parameter Nt on concentration field are relatively conflicting. In order to recognize the validity of the current effort, the influence of pertinent fluid parameters are conferred in details. Furthermore, to comprehend the legitimacy of numerical computation a comparison between Matlab package bvp4c and shooting technique with RK Fehlberg method is presented in this scrutiny and alleged a tremendous agreement. Keywords: Three-dimensional flow, Eyring–Powell model fluid, Nanoparticles, Non-linear thermal radiation, New mass flux boundary conditions

  5. Numerical investigation of MHD free convection flow of a non-Newtonian fluid past an impulsively started vertical plate in the presence of thermal diffusion and radiation absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Umamaheswar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation is carried out on an unsteady MHD free convection flow of a well-known non-Newtonian visco elastic second order Rivlin-Erickson fluid past an impulsively started semi-infinite vertical plate in the presence of homogeneous chemical reaction, thermal radiation, thermal diffusion, radiation absorption and heat absorption with constant mass flux. The presence of viscous dissipation is also considered at the plate under the influence of uniform transverse magnetic field. The flow is governed by a coupled nonlinear system of partial differential equations which are solved numerically by using finite difference method. The effects of various physical parameters on the flow quantities viz. velocity, temperature, concentration, Skin friction, Nusselt number and Sherwood number are studied numerically. The results are discussed with the help of graphs. We observed that the velocity decreases with an increase in magnetic field parameter, Schmidt number, and Prandtl number while it increases with an increase in Grashof number, modified Grashof number, visco-elastic parameter and Soret number. Temperature increases with an increase in radiation absorption parameter, Eckert number and visco-elastic parameter while it decreases with increasing values of radiation parameter, Prandtl number and heat absorption parameter. Concentration increases with increase in Soret number while it decreases with an increase in Schmidt number and chemical reaction parameter.

  6. The Effects of Thermal Treatment and Steam Addition on Integrated CuO/CaO Chemical Looping Combustion for CO2 Capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Recio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC with Calcium Looping (CaL using integrated pellets is an alternative CO2 capture process to the current amine-based sorbent processes, but the pellets lose sorption capacity over time. In this paper, the deactivation behavior of CaO, CuO and CuO/CaO integrated pellets used for multiple (16–20 cycles in a thermogravimetric analyzer was studied. The impact of thermal treatment and the presence of steam on the deactivation were also investigated. Nitrogen physisorption and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray analysis were used to characterize the pellets. The analysis revealed significant migration of the copper to the surface of the composite pellets, which likely suppressed carbonation capacity by reducing the accessibility of the CaO. While thermal pre-treatment and steam addition enhanced the performance of the base CaO pellets, the former led to cracks in the pellets. In contrast, thermal pretreatment of the CuO/CaO composite pellets resulted in worse CLC and CaL performance.

  7. MHD Slip Flow of Newtonian Fluid past a Stretching Sheet with Thermal Convective Boundary Condition, Radiation, and Chemical Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reda G. Abdel-Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis is carried out to study the problem of heat and mass transfer flow over a moving permeable flat stretching sheet in the presence of convective boundary condition, slip, radiation, heat generation/absorption, and first-order chemical reaction. The viscosity of fluid is assumed to vary linearly with temperature. Also the diffusivity is assumed to vary linearly with concentration. The governing partial differential equations have been reduced to the coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations by using Lie group point of transformations. The system of transformed nonlinear ordinary differential equations is solved numerically using shooting techniques with fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. Comparison between the existing literature and the present study was carried out and found to be in excellent agreement. The effects of the various interesting parameters on the flow, heat, and mass transfer are analyzed and discussed through graphs in detail. The values of the local Nusselt number, the local skin friction, and the local Sherwood number for different physical parameters are also tabulated.

  8. Forced convection in the wakes of impacting and sliding bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly Meehan, R.; Williams, N. P.; Donnelly, B.; Persoons, T.; Nolan, K.; Murray, D. B.

    2017-09-01

    Both vapour and gas bubbles are known to significantly increase heat transfer rates between a heated surface and the surrounding fluid, even with no phase change. The cooling structures observed are highly temporal, intricate and complex, with a full description of the surface cooling phenomena not yet available. The current study uses high speed infrared thermography to measure the surface temperature and determine the convective heat flux enhancement associated with the interaction of a single air bubble with a heated, inclined surface. This process can be discretised into the initial impact, in which enhancement levels in excess of 20 times natural convection are observed, and the subsequent sliding behaviour, with more moderate maximum enhancement levels of 8 times natural convection. In both cases, localised regions of suppressed heat transfer are also observed due to the recirculation of warm fluid displaced from the thermal boundary layer with the surface. The cooling patterns observed herein are consistent with the interaction between an undulating wake containing multiple hairpin vortex loops and the thermal boundary layer that exists under the surface, with the initial nature of this enhancement and suppression dependent on the particular point on its rising path at which the bubble impacts the surface.

  9. The Australian Monsoon and its Mesoscale Convective Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, Brian E.

    1992-01-01

    The 1987 Australian monsoon was observed with satellites, rawinsondes, radar and aircraft. These data are presented, with theory filling the gaps, in illustration of its dynamics. The engine of the monsoon is its embedded mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Ten MCSs were explored with airborne Doppler radar. They all exhibited multicellular convection, in lines or arcs along the edges of cold pools, aging and evolving into areas of stratiform precipitation. This temporal evolution can be divided into three stages: "convective," "intermediary," and "stratiform." Doppler radar divergence profiles for each stage show remarkable consistency from one MCS to the next. Convective areas had low-level convergence, with its peak elevated off the surface, and divergence above ~8 km altitude. Intermediary areas had very little divergence through the lower troposphere, but strong convergence near 10 km altitude, associated with upper-tropospheric ascent. Stratiform areas had midlevel convergence between divergent layers. These divergence profiles indicate thermal forcing of the monsoon by the convection, in a form more useful than heating profiles. The response of the atmosphere to thermal forcing is considered in chapter 2. Thermal disturbances travel through a stratified fluid at a speed proportional to their vertical depth. A heat source with complex vertical structure excites disturbances ("buoyancy bores"), of many depths, that separate themselves out with distance from the heat source. Hence the deeper components of a heat source can be found at greater distances from the heat source, at any given moment and also in the limit of long time in a rotating or dissipative fluid. Low-level dynamical processes initiate deep convection within the active cyclonic areas of the monsoon trough, despite the warm core aloft and the consequent (small) decrease in CAPE. In 1987, four tropical cyclones were generated in the monsoon by this runaway positive feedback loop. Two forcing

  10. Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients of Automatic Transmission Fluid Jets with Implications for Electric Machine Thermal Management: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, Kevin; Moreno, Gilberto

    2015-09-29

    Thermal management for electric machines (motors/ generators) is important as the automotive industry continues to transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. Cooling of the electric machine(s) in some electric vehicle traction drive applications is accomplished by impinging automatic transmission fluid (ATF) jets onto the machine's copper windings. In this study, we provide the results of experiments characterizing the thermal performance of ATF jets on surfaces representative of windings, using Ford's Mercon LV ATF. Experiments were carried out at various ATF temperatures and jet velocities to quantify the influence of these parameters on heat transfer coefficients. Fluid temperatures were varied from 50 degrees C to 90 degrees C to encompass potential operating temperatures within an automotive transaxle environment. The jet nozzle velocities were varied from 0.5 to 10 m/s. The experimental ATF heat transfer coefficient results provided in this report are a useful resource for understanding factors that influence the performance of ATF-based cooling systems for electric machines.

  11. 1-D Transient Thermal Modeling of an Ablative Material (MCC-1) Exposed to a Simulated Convective Titan 4 Launch Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinarts, Thomas R.; Crain, William K.; Stuckey, C. Irvin; Palko, Richard L.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the work is to demonstrate that the flat test panel substrate temperatures are consistent with analysis predictions for MCC-1 applied to a aluminum substrate. The testing was performed in an aerothermal facility on samples of three different thicknesses of MCC-1 on an aluminum substrate. The results of the test were compared with a Transient Thermal model. The key assumptions of the Transient Thermal model were: (1) a one-dimensional heat transfer; (2) a constant ablation recession rate (determined from pre and post-test measurements); (3) ablation temperature of 540 degrees F; (4) Char left behind the ablation front; and (5) temperature jump correction for incident heat transfer coefficient. Two methods were used to model the heating of bare MCC-1: (1) Directly input surface temperature as a function of time; and (2) Aerothermal heating using calibration plate data and subtracting the radiation losses to tunnel walls. The results are presented as graphs. This article is presented in Viewgraph format.

  12. Analytical study of MHD free convective, dissipative boundary layer flow past a porous vertical surface in the presence of thermal radiation, chemical reaction and constant suction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Raju

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution of MHD free convective, dissipative boundary layer flow past a vertical porous surface in the presence of thermal radiation, chemical reaction and constant suction, under the influence of uniform magnetic field which is applied normal to the surface is studied. The governing equations are solved analytically using a regular perturbation technique. The expressions for velocity, temperature and concentration fields are obtained. With the aid of these, the expressions for the coefficient of skin friction, the rate of heat transfer in the form of Nusselt number and the rate of mass transfer in the form of Sherwood number are derived. Finally the effects of various physical parameters of the flow quantities are studied with the help of graphs and tables. It is observed that the velocity and concentration increase during a generative reaction and decrease in a destructive reaction. The same observed to be true for the behavior of the fluid temperature. The presence of magnetic field and radiation diminishes the velocity and also the temperature.

  13. Heat convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiji, L.M. [City Univ. of New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    Professor Jiji's broad teaching experience lead him to select the topics for this book to provide a firm foundation for convection heat transfer with emphasis on fundamentals, physical phenomena, and mathematical modelling of a wide range of engineering applications. Reflecting recent developments, this textbook is the first to include an introduction to the challenging topic of microchannels. The strong pedagogic potential of Heat Convection is enhanced by the following ancillary materials: (1) Power Point lectures, (2) Problem Solutions, (3) Homework Facilitator, and, (4) Summary of Sections and Chapters. (orig.)

  14. Closed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Part Qualification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes variables...

  15. Colosed-Loop Control of the Thermal Stir Welding Process to Enable Rapid Process/Ppart Qualification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) provides advancement over the more conventional Friction Stir Welding (C-FSW) process because it separates the primary processes variables...

  16. Hyperthermia, Thermal Injuries, and Death from a Forced Convection Heat Source: A Case Report and Experimental Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda O; Sung, LokMan; Hubbard, Sean A; Hlavaty, Leigh

    2017-05-01

    Heat-related deaths of children are most often encountered in the context of enclosed vehicles in summer months. Deviating from this, a 16-month-old boy was found unresponsive in a stroller that was placed adjacent to a space heater during mid-winter. The cause of death was hyperthermia and thermal injuries. Manner of death determination was difficult due to alleged surrounding circumstances. To understand the time-course of this child's injuries, a child death scene investigation was performed; the stroller and space heater were recovered. In a re-enactment of the events, a slaughtered pig approximating the child's size was warmed using a water bath and placed in the stroller beside the space heater. Cutaneous temperature measurements showed rapid initial temperature rise with subsequent steady increases. Tanning of the skin was seen on periodic direct observations. Internal temperature monitoring illustrated steady increases. This experiment was essential in classifying the manner of death as homicide. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Thermal radiation effects on magnetohydrodynamic free convection heat and mass transfer from a sphere in a variable porosity regime

    KAUST Repository

    Prasad, Vallampati Ramachandra Ramachandra

    2012-02-01

    A mathematical model is presented for multiphysical transport of an optically-dense, electrically-conducting fluid along a permeable isothermal sphere embedded in a variable-porosity medium. A constant, static, magnetic field is applied transverse to the cylinder surface. The non-Darcy effects are simulated via second order Forchheimer drag force term in the momentum boundary layer equation. The surface of the sphere is maintained at a constant temperature and concentration and is permeable, i.e. transpiration into and from the boundary layer regime is possible. The boundary layer conservation equations, which are parabolic in nature, are normalized into non-similar form and then solved numerically with the well-tested, efficient, implicit, stable Keller-box finite difference scheme. Increasing porosity (ε) is found to elevate velocities, i.e. accelerate the flow but decrease temperatures, i.e. cool the boundary layer regime. Increasing Forchheimer inertial drag parameter (Λ) retards the flow considerably but enhances temperatures. Increasing Darcy number accelerates the flow due to a corresponding rise in permeability of the regime and concomitant decrease in Darcian impedance. Thermal radiation is seen to reduce both velocity and temperature in the boundary layer. Local Nusselt number is also found to be enhanced with increasing both porosity and radiation parameters. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Convection towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  19. System-Level Heat Transfer Analysis, Thermal- Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor. A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Soppet, William [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Majumdar, Saurin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, Ken [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-03

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in April 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In this report, updates are discussed related to a system level preliminary finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical design-basis thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in NUREG-6909. The discussed models and results are very preliminary. Further advancement of the discussed model is required for more accurate life prediction of reactor components. This report only presents the work related to finite element modelling activities. However, in between multiple tensile and fatigue tests were conducted. The related experimental results will be presented in the year-end report.

  20. Performance of the Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop Rover Heat Rejection System Used for Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover on the Surface of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Birur, Gajanana; Bame, David; Mastropietro, A. J.; Miller, Jennifer; Karlmann, Paul; Liu, Yuanming; Anderson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The challenging range of landing sites for which the Mars Science Laboratory Rover was designed, required a rover thermal management system that is capable of keeping temperatures controlled across a wide variety of environmental conditions. On the Martian surface where temperatures can be as cold as -123 C and as warm as 38 C, the Rover relies upon a Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop (MPFL) Rover Heat Rejection System (RHRS) and external radiators to maintain the temperature of sensitive electronics and science instruments within a -40 C to +50 C range. The RHRS harnesses some of the waste heat generated from the Rover power source, known as the Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), for use as survival heat for the rover during cold conditions. The MMRTG produces 110 Watts of electrical power while generating waste heat equivalent to approximately 2000 Watts. Heat exchanger plates (hot plates) positioned close to the MMRTG pick up this survival heat from it by radiative heat transfer and supply it to the rover. This design is the first instance of use of a RHRS for thermal control of a rover or lander on the surface of a planet. After an extremely successful landing on Mars (August 5), the rover and the RHRS have performed flawlessly for close to an earth year (half the nominal mission life). This paper will share the performance of the RHRS on the Martian surface as well as compare it to its predictions.

  1. In-vivo argon laser vascular welding using thermal feedback: open- and closed-loop patency and collagen crosslinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Ward, IV; Celliers, Peter M.; Kopchok, George E.; Reiser, Karen M.; Heredia, Nicholas J.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Eder, David C.; London, Richard A.; Heilbron, Mauricio; Hussain, Farabi; White, Rodney A.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    1997-05-01

    An in vivo study of vascular welding with a fiber-delivered argon laser was conducted using a canine model. Longitudinal arteriotomies and venotomies were treated on femoral vein and artery. Laser energy was delivered to the vessel wall via a 400 micrometer optical fiber. The surface temperature at the center of the laser spot was monitored in real time using a hollow glass optical fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. The surface temperature was limited by either a room-temperature saline drip or direct feedback control of the laser using a mechanical shutter to alternately pass and block the laser. Acute patency was evaluated either visually (leak/no leak) or by in vivo burst pressure measurements. Biochemical assays were performed to investigate the possible laser-induced formation or destruction of enzymatically mediated covalent crosslinks between collagen molecules. Viable welds were created both with and without the use of feedback control. Tissues maintained at 50 degrees Celsius using feedback control had an elevated crosslink count compared to controls, while those irradiated without feedback control experienced a decrease. Differences between the volumetric heating associated with open and closed loop protocols may account for the different effects on collagen crosslinks. Covalent mechanisms may play a role in argon laser vascular fusion.

  2. In vivo argon laser vascular welding using thermal feedback: open and closed loop patency and collagen crosslinking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, W., LLNL

    1997-02-28

    An in vivo study of vascular welding with a fiber-delivered argon laser was conducted using a canine model. Longitudinal arteriotomies and venotomies were treated on femoral vein and artery. Laser energy was delivered to the vessel wall via a 400 {micro}m optical fiber. The surface temperature at the center of the laser spot was monitored in real time using a hollow glass optical fiber-based two-color infrared thermometer. The surface temperature was limited by either a room-temperature saline drip or direct feedback control of the laser using a mechanical shutter to alternately pass and block the laser. Acute patency was evaluated either visually (leak/no leak) or by in vivo burst pressure measurements. Biochemical assays were performed to investigate the possible laser-induced formation or destruction of enzymatically mediated covalent crosslinks between collagen molecules. Viable welds were created both with and without the use of feedback control. Tissues maintained at 50 C using feedback control had an elevated crosslink count compared to controls, while those irradiated without feedback control experienced a decrease. Differences between the volumetric heating associated with open and closed loop protocols may account for the different effects on collagen crosslinks. Covalent mechanisms may play a role in argon laser vascular fusion.

  3. Rotating convection in a viscoelastic magnetic fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, L.M. [Departamento de Fíisica y Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona (Spain); Laroze, D., E-mail: dlarozen@uta.cl [Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile); Díaz, P. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad de La Frontera, Casilla 54 D, Temuco (Chile); Martinez-Mardones, J. [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Mancini, H.L. [Departamento de Fíisica y Matemática Aplicada, Universidad de Navarra, 31080 Pamplona (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    We report theoretical and numerical results on convection for a magnetic fluid in a viscoelastic carrier liquid under rotation. The viscoelastic properties are given by the Oldroyd model. We obtain explicit expressions for the convective thresholds in terms of the parameters of the system in the case of idealized boundary conditions. We also calculate numerically the convective thresholds for the case of realistic boundary conditions. The effects of the rheology and of the rotation rate on the instability thresholds for a diluted magnetic suspension are emphasized. - Highlights: • Ferrofluids. • Thermal convection. • Viscoelastic model. • Realistic boundary conditions.

  4. Topology optimisation of natural convection problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Aage, Niels; Andreasen, Casper Schousboe

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the application of the density-based topology optimisation approach for the design of heat sinks and micropumps based on natural convection effects. The problems are modelled under the assumptions of steady-state laminar flow using the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations...... coupled to the convection-diffusion equation through the Boussinesq approximation. In order to facilitate topology optimisation, the Brinkman approach is taken to penalise velocities inside the solid domain and the effective thermal conductivity is interpolated in order to accommodate differences...... for designing heat sink geometries cooled by natural convection and micropumps powered by natural convection. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  5. Bidispersive-inclined convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulone, Giuseppe; Straughan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented for thermal convection in an inclined layer of porous material when the medium has a bidispersive structure. Thus, there are the usual macropores which are full of a fluid, but there are also a system of micropores full of the same fluid. The model we employ is a modification of the one proposed by Nield & Kuznetsov (2006 Int. J. Heat Mass Transf. 49, 3068–3074. (doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2006.02.008)), although we consider a single temperature field only. PMID:27616934

  6. An Observational Investigation of Penetrative Convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Lenschow, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Data taken during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX) by the NCAR Electra aircraft have proven useful for investigating the structure of thermals penetrating into the turbulent inversion layer which caps the convective mixed layer. Variances, covariances, spectra and cospectra of poten......Data taken during the Air Mass Transformation Experiment (AMTEX) by the NCAR Electra aircraft have proven useful for investigating the structure of thermals penetrating into the turbulent inversion layer which caps the convective mixed layer. Variances, covariances, spectra and cospectra...

  7. Low order modelling and closed-loop thermal control of a ventilated plate subject to a heat source disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videcoq, E.; Girault, M.; Petit, D.

    2012-11-01

    A multi-input multi-output (MIMO) thermal control problem in real-time is investigated. An aluminum slab is heated on one side by a radiative heat source and cooled on the other side by a fan panel. Starting from a nominal steady state configuration of heat source power and ventilation level, the objective is to control temperature at 4 chosen locations on the rear side when the thermal system is subject to a perturbation: the heat source power. The 4 actuators are the ventilation levels of 4 fans. The hypothesis of small inputs and temperature responses deviations is made, resulting in the assumption of a linear control problem. The originality of this work is twofold: (i) instead of a (large-sized) classical heat transfer model built from spatial discretization of local partial differential equations governing physics over the system domain, a low order model is identified from experimental data using the Modal Identification Method, (ii) this low order model is used to perform state feedback control in real time through a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) compensator.

  8. Engineering method of calculation temperature fields and thermal stresses in the initial stage of radiation convection heating (cooling body with variable heat transfer coefficient, and the temperature of environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov A.D.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Existing solutions of radiant and convective heating (cooling body problems at the initial stage at unsteady heat transfer coefficients and temperatures are rather cumbersome. The purpose of this work is getting simpler dependencies. Decisions are based on the analysis of relations between the cause (heat flow and the effect (surface temperature in the initial period of heating. Two simple and effective engineering methods of calculation of unsteady temperature fields, and axial thermal stresses at the initial stage of heating (cooling of body of canonical form for both convection and radiation heat transfer at variable ambient temperature and environmental factors have been developed. Some of the solutions are generic in nature, which allows significantly reducing the number of variables and thus using the graphical method of problem solving. The formulas for calculating the bulk and central temperature in the initial stage are provided; other researchers of nonlinear heat conduction problems did not usually do this. It has been found that the axial thermal stresses are determined entirely by the heat flow on the surface. The adequacy of the developed techniques is based on five cases of calculation of heating (cooling plates under various conditions of its thermal loading. It is shown that the error in determining the surface temperature does not exceed 6%, and that the developed method can be used up to Fourier numbers Fo<0.4

  9. Improving the reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase through stabilizing a long loop in domain B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase were improved through site-directed mutagenesis. By using multiple sequence alignment and PoPMuSiC algorithm, Ser187 and Asn188, which located within a long loop in Domain B of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase, were selected for mutation. In addition, Ala269, which is adjacent to Ser187 and Asn188, was also investigated. Seven mutants carrying the mutations S187D, N188T, N188S, A269K, A269K/S187D, S187D/N188T, and A269K/S187D/N188T were generated and characterized. The most thermostable mutant, A269K/S187D/N188T, exhibited a 9-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C and pH 5.5, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. Mutant A269K/S187D/N188T also exhibited improved catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of mutant A269K/S187D/N188T reached 5.87×103±0.17 g·L-1·s-1 at pH 5.5, which is 1.84-fold larger than the corresponding value determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the structure analysis showed that immobilization of the loop containing Ser187 and Asn188 plays a significant role in developing the properties of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase. PMID:28253342

  10. CONVECTION REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, R.P.; King, L.D.P.

    1960-03-22

    An homogeneous nuclear power reactor utilizing convection circulation of the liquid fuel is proposed. The reactor has an internal heat exchanger looated in the same pressure vessel as the critical assembly, thereby eliminating necessity for handling the hot liquid fuel outside the reactor pressure vessel during normal operation. The liquid fuel used in this reactor eliminates the necessity for extensive radiolytic gas rocombination apparatus, and the reactor is resiliently pressurized and, without any movable mechanical apparatus, automatically regulates itself to the condition of criticality during moderate variations in temperature snd pressure and shuts itself down as the pressure exceeds a predetermined safe operating value.

  11. Rezūm System Water Vapor Treatment for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms/Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Validation of Convective Thermal Energy Transfer and Characterization With Magnetic Resonance Imaging and 3-Dimensional Renderings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynderse, Lance A; Hanson, Dennis; Robb, Richard A; Pacik, Dalibor; Vit, Viteslav; Varga, Gabriel; Wagrell, Lennart; Tornblom, Magnus; Cedano, Edwin Rijo; Woodrum, David A; Dixon, Christopher M; Larson, Thayne R

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate by magnetic resonance imaging the physical effects of convective thermal energy transfer with water vapor as a means of treating lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Sixty-five men with lower urinary tract symptoms were treated with the Rezūm System by transurethral intraprostatic injection of water vapor. A group of 45 of these men consented to undergo a series of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imagings of the prostate after treatment to monitor the size and location of ablative lesions, their time course of resolution, and the corresponding change in prostate tissue volume. Visualization was conducted at 1 week, 1, 3, and 6 months after treatment. Outcomes were available for 44 patients. Convective thermal lesions were limited to the transition zone and correlated with targeted treatment locations. At 1 week after treatment, the mean volume of ablative lesions was 8.2 cm(3) (0.5-24.0 cm(3)). At 6 months, whole prostate volume was reduced by a mean of 28.9% and transition zone volume by 38.0% as compared with baseline 1-week images. At 3 and 6 months after treatment, the lesion volumes had reduced by 91.5% and 95.1%, respectively. Lesions remained within the targeted treatment zone without compromising integrity of the bladder, rectum, or striated urinary sphincter. This imaging study confirms the delivery of convective water vapor technology to create thermal lesions in the prostate tissue. Lesions generated underwent near complete resolution by 3 and 6 months after treatment with a concomitant one-third reduction in overall prostate and transition zone volumes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  13. Further on integrator circuit analogy for natural convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khane, Vaibhav [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 225 Fulton Hall, 300W. 13th St., Rolla, MO-65409 (United States); Usman, Shoaib, E-mail: usmans@mst.ed [Nuclear Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 225 Fulton Hall, 300W. 13th St., Rolla, MO-65409 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    This research is an extension of the previous work on the development of an integrator (RC) circuit analogy for natural convection. This analogy has been proven experimentally as well as by numerical simulations. Additional Rayleigh-Benard convection numerical simulations were performed to investigate DELTAT (temperature difference between source and sink) dependence of the thermal resistance of a natural convection system. Our results suggest that analogous to voltage dependent resistor (VDR) in electrical engineering, DELTAT dependent thermal resistance is observed in natural convection system. This DELTAT dependent thermal resistance leads to a variable time constant. Moreover, this research also suggests that for a natural convection system, in addition to the thermal capacitance a kinetic energy capacitance also exists. The relative contribution of kinetic energy capacitance depends on Rayleigh number. These results provide significant step forward towards development of a new inexpensive modeling and transient analysis tool for a natural convection system.

  14. Can high-temperature, high-heat flux hydrothermal vent fields be explained by thermal convection in the lower crust along fast-spreading Mid-Ocean Ridges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Fabrice J.; Rabinowicz, M.; Cannat, M.

    2017-05-01

    We present numerical models to explore possible couplings along the axis of fast-spreading ridges, between hydrothermal convection in the upper crust and magmatic flow in the lower crust. In an end-member category of models corresponding to effective viscosities μM lower than 1013 Pa.s in a melt-rich lower crustal along-axis corridor and permeability k not exceeding ˜10-16 m2 in the upper crust, the hot, melt-rich, gabbroic lower crust convects as a viscous fluid, with convection rolls parallel to the ridge axis. In these models, we show that the magmatic-hydrothermal interface settles at realistic depths for fast ridges, i.e., 1-2 km below seafloor. Convection cells in both horizons are strongly coupled and kilometer-wide hydrothermal upflows/plumes, spaced by 8-10 km, arise on top of the magmatic upflows. Such magmatic-hydrothermal convective couplings may explain the distribution of vent fields along the East (EPR) and South-East Pacific Rise (SEPR). The lower crustal plumes deliver melt locally at the top of the magmatic horizon possibly explaining the observed distribution of melt-rich regions/pockets in the axial melt lenses of EPR and SEPR. Crystallization of this melt provides the necessary latent heat to sustain permanent ˜100 MW vents fields. Our models also contribute to current discussions on how the lower crust forms at fast ridges: they provide a possible mechanism for focused transport of melt-rich crystal mushes from moho level to the axial melt lens where they further crystallize, feed eruptions, and are transported both along and off-axis to produce the lower crust.

  15. Procedural techniques and multicenter postmarket experience using minimally invasive convective radiofrequency thermal therapy with Rezūm system for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darson, Micheal F; Alexander, Erik E; Schiffman, Zvi J; Lewitton, Michael; Light, Robert A; Sutton, Mark A; Delgado-Rodriguez, Carlos; Gonzalez, Ricardo R

    2017-01-01

    This report evaluates clinical experience with the Rezūm system after US Food and Drug Administration clearance in consecutive cases accrued by multiple community urologists for the treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Treatment techniques for transurethral convective radiofrequency water-vapor thermal therapy and outcomes with up to 12 months' follow-up are presented. A total of 131 patients with moderate-severe LUTS were included in a retrospective analysis of BPH procedures with the Rezūm system. Pre- and postprocedure assessments included International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), quality of life, peak urinary flow rate, voided volume, and postvoid residual urine volume. Urologists used their own discretion for patient selection, with variable prostate sizes, LUTS severity, urinary retention, or presence of an obstructing median lobe. Safety signals and surgical retreatment rates were monitored prospectively. Men aged 47-96 years with prostates 13-183 cm3 showed significant improvement in IPSS, quality of life, and postvoid residual volume durable through 12 months after thermal therapy. Patients with either moderate (IPSS 8-19) or severe (IPSS 20-35) symptoms achieved significantly improved scores. Postprocedure adverse events normally anticipated and related to endoscopic instrumentation were transient and mild-moderate in nature. No de novo erectile or ejaculatory dysfunction was reported. This study corroborates prior published pilot and randomized controlled trial results indicating significant relief of urinary symptoms and reproducibility of responses to thermal therapy. Convective radiofrequency thermal therapy with the Rezūm system warrants consideration as a first-line treatment for LUTS/BPH as an alternative to the use of pharmaceutical agents.

  16. Investigation of a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine in a looped-tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novotný Petr

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, four configurations of a traveling wave thermoacoustic engine in a looped tube were investigated by means of theoretical calculations and experiments. The effect of natural heat convection on their functionality was observed. Acoustic intensity was measured using a dual two microphone method. The stack was designed with few times higher dimension of channels than thermal penetration depth, due to the stack should not be called regenerator. Pressure distribution in the resonator was measured, and a good agreement with theoretical calculations from DELTAEC has been demonstrated.

  17. Magnetic Fields in the Solar Convection Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yuhong

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the dynamic evolution of magnetic flux tubes in the solar convection zone are reviewed with focus on emerging flux tubes responsible for the formation of solar active regions. The current prevailing picture is that active regions on the solar surface originate from strong toroidal magnetic fields generated by the solar dynamo mechanism at the thin tachocline layer at the base of the solar convection zone. Thus the magnetic fields need to traverse the entire convection zone before they reach the photosphere to form the observed solar active regions. This review discusses results with regard to the following major topics: 1. the equilibrium properties of the toroidal magnetic fields stored in the stable overshoot region at the base of the convection zone, 2. the buoyancy instability associated with the toroidal magnetic fields and the formation of buoyant magnetic flux tubes, 3. the rise of emerging flux loops through the solar convective envelope as modeled by the thin flux tube calculations which infer that the field strength of the toroidal magnetic fields at the base of the solar convection zone is significantly higher than the value in equipartition with convection, 4. the minimum twist needed for maintaining cohesion of the rising flux tubes, 5. the rise of highly twisted kink unstable flux tubes as a possible origin of d -sunspots, 6. the evolution of buoyant magnetic flux tubes in 3D stratified convection, 7. turbulent pumping of magnetic flux by penetrative compressible convection, 8. an alternative mechanism for intensifying toroidal magnetic fields to significantly super-equipartition field strengths by conversion of the potential energy associated with the superadiabatic stratification of the solar convection zone, and finally 9. a brief overview of our current understanding of flux emergence at the surface and post-emergence evolution of the subsurface magnetic fields.

  18. Convection in arc weld pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oreper, G.M.; Eagar, T.W.; Szekely, J.

    1982-11-01

    A mathematical model was developed to account for convection and temperature distributions in stationary arc weld pools driven by buoyancy, electromagnetic and surface tension forces. It is shown that the electromagnetic and surface tension forces dominate the flow behavior. In some cases, these forces produce double circulation loops, which are indirectly confirmed by experimental measurements of segregation in the weld pool. It is also shown that the surface tension driven flows are very effective in dissipating the incident energy flux on the pool surface which, in turn, reduces the vaporization from the weld pool.

  19. Analytical model of unsteady-state convective heat transfer between the heat carrier and the finite sizes plate adjusted for the thermal relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarushkin Danila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hyperbolic boundary value problem of the thermal conduction of a two-dimensional plate with the third kind boundary conditions is formulated. The transient thermal process in the plate is due to the temperature changes of the external medium over time and along the plate length, and also by a multiple step change of the plate surface heat transfer coefficient throughout the transient process. An analytical solution with improved convergence adjusted for thermal relaxation and thermal damping is obtained for the temperature field in the plate.

  20. Solar Surface Magneto-Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Stein

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We review the properties of solar magneto-convection in the top half of the convection zones scale heights (from 20 Mm below the visible surface to the surface, and then through the photosphere to the temperature minimum. Convection is a highly non-linear and non-local process, so it is best studied by numerical simulations. We focus on simulations that include sufficient detailed physics so that their results can be quantitatively compared with observations. The solar surface is covered with magnetic features with spatial sizes ranging from unobservably small to hundreds of megameters. Three orders of magnitude more magnetic flux emerges in the quiet Sun than emerges in active regions. In this review we focus mainly on the properties of the quiet Sun magnetic field. The Sun’s magnetic field is produced by dynamo action throughout the convection zone, primarily by stretching and twisting in the turbulent downflows. Diverging convective upflows and magnetic buoyancy carry magnetic flux toward the surface and sweep the field into the surrounding downflow lanes where the field is dragged downward. The result is a hierarchy of undulating magnetic Ω- and U-loops of different sizes. New magnetic flux first appears at the surface in a mixed polarity random pattern and then collects into isolated unipolar regions due to underlying larger scale magnetic structures. Rising magnetic structures are not coherent, but develop a filamentary structure. Emerging magnetic flux alters the convection properties, producing larger, darker granules. Strong field concentrations inhibit transverse plasma motions and, as a result, reduce convective heat transport toward the surface which cools. Being cooler, these magnetic field concentrations have a shorter scale height and become evacuated. The field becomes further compressed and can reach strengths in balance with the surrounding gas pressure. Because of their small internal density, photons escape from deeper in

  1. Effects of variable suction and thermophoresis on steady MHD combined free-forced convective heat and mass transfer flow over a semi-infinite permeable inclined plate in the presence of thermal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, M.S.; Rahman, M.M. [Department of Mathematics, University of Dhaka, Dhaka-1000 (Bangladesh); Sattar, M.A. [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, North South University, 12 Kemal Ataturk Avenue, Banani, Dhaka-1213 (Bangladesh)

    2008-06-15

    A two-dimensional steady MHD mixed convection and mass transfer flow over a semi-infinite porous inclined plate in the presence of thermal radiation with variable suction and thermophoresis has been analyzed numerically. The governing fundamental equations are approximated by a system of non-linear locally similar ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically by applying Nachtsheim-Swigert shooting iteration technique along with sixth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. Favorable comparison with previously published work is performed. Numerical results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles as well as for the skin-friction coefficient, wall heat transfer and particle deposition rate are obtained and displayed graphically for pertinent parameters to show interesting aspects of the solutions. (author)

  2. Loop-to-loop coupling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lucero, Larry Martin; Langston, William L.; Salazar, Robert Austin; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Basilio, Lorena I.; Bacon, Larry Donald

    2012-05-01

    This report estimates inductively-coupled energy to a low-impedance load in a loop-to-loop arrangement. Both analytical models and full-wave numerical simulations are used and the resulting fields, coupled powers and energies are compared. The energies are simply estimated from the coupled powers through approximations to the energy theorem. The transmitter loop is taken to be either a circular geometry or a rectangular-loop (stripline-type) geometry that was used in an experimental setup. Simple magnetic field models are constructed and used to estimate the mutual inductance to the receiving loop, which is taken to be circular with one or several turns. Circuit elements are estimated and used to determine the coupled current and power (an equivalent antenna picture is also given). These results are compared to an electromagnetic simulation of the transmitter geometry. Simple approximate relations are also given to estimate coupled energy from the power. The effect of additional loads in the form of attached leads, forming transmission lines, are considered. The results are summarized in a set of susceptibility-type curves. Finally, we also consider drives to the cables themselves and the resulting common-to-differential mode currents in the load.

  3. National Convective Weather Forecast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCWF is an automatically generated depiction of: (1) current convection and (2) extrapolated signficant current convection. It is a supplement to, but does NOT...

  4. Maxwell-Cattaneo Heat Convection and Thermal Stresses Responses of a Semi-Infinite Medium to High-Speed Laser Heating due to High Speed Laser Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah I. A.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on Maxwell-Cattaneo convection equation, the thermoelasticity problem is in- vestigated in this paper. The analytic solution of a boundary value problem for a semi- infinite medium with traction free surface heated by a high-speed laser-pulses have Dirac temporal profile is solved. The temperature, the displacement and the stresses distributions are obtained analytically using the Laplace transformation, and discussed at small time duration of the laser pulses. A numerical study for Cu as a target is performed. The results are presented graphically. The obtained results indicate that the small time duration of the laser pulses has no e ect on the finite velocity of the heat con- ductivity, but the behavior of the stress and the displacement distribution are affected due to the pulsed heating process and due to the structure of the governing equations.

  5. Internal Wave Generation by Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet, Daniel Michael

    In nature, it is not unusual to find stably stratified fluid adjacent to convectively unstable fluid. This can occur in the Earth's atmosphere, where the troposphere is convective and the stratosphere is stably stratified; in lakes, where surface solar heating can drive convection above stably stratified fresh water; in the oceans, where geothermal heating can drive convection near the ocean floor, but the water above is stably stratified due to salinity gradients; possible in the Earth's liquid core, where gradients in thermal conductivity and composition diffusivities maybe lead to different layers of stable or unstable liquid metal; and, in stars, as most stars contain at least one convective and at least one radiative (stably stratified) zone. Internal waves propagate in stably stratified fluids. The characterization of the internal waves generated by convection is an open problem in geophysical and astrophysical fluid dynamics. Internal waves can play a dynamically important role via nonlocal transport. Momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves is thought to generate the quasi-biennial oscillation of zonal wind in the equatorial stratosphere, an important physical phenomenon used to calibrate global climate models. Angular momentum transport by convectively excited internal waves may play a crucial role in setting the initial rotation rates of neutron stars. In the last year of life of a massive star, convectively excited internal waves may transport even energy to the surface layers to unbind them, launching a wind. In each of these cases, internal waves are able to transport some quantity--momentum, angular momentum, energy--across large, stable buoyancy gradients. Thus, internal waves represent an important, if unusual, transport mechanism. This thesis advances our understanding of internal wave generation by convection. Chapter 2 provides an underlying theoretical framework to study this problem. It describes a detailed calculation of the

  6. Topology Optimisation for Coupled Convection Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe

    This thesis deals with topology optimisation for coupled convection problems. The aim is to extend and apply topology optimisation to steady-state conjugate heat transfer problems, where the heat conduction equation governs the heat transfer in a solid and is coupled to thermal transport in a sur......This thesis deals with topology optimisation for coupled convection problems. The aim is to extend and apply topology optimisation to steady-state conjugate heat transfer problems, where the heat conduction equation governs the heat transfer in a solid and is coupled to thermal transport...... in a surrounding uid, governed by a convection-diffusion equation, where the convective velocity field is found from solving the isothermal incompressible steady-state Navier-Stokes equations. Topology optimisation is also applied to steady-state natural convection problems. The modelling is done using stabilised...... finite elements, the formulation and implementation of which was done partly during a special course as prepatory work for this thesis. The formulation is extended with a Brinkman friction term in order to facilitate the topology optimisation of fluid flow and convective cooling problems. The derived...

  7. Compressible convection under hyper-gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, L.; Le Reun, T.; Alboussiere, T.; Bergman, M. I.; Labrosse, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Convection plays an important role for heat transfer from the deep interior of planets and stars. In the Earth's core, it is responsible for the magnetic field. We often use the Boussinesq approximation for incompressible convection, and for compressible convection, we can use the anelastic liquid approximation. However, there is a lack of experimental results to check the validity of the anelastic approximation when the dissipation number is not negligible, because of the difficulty in obtaining an adiabatic gradient in the lab. Increasing the effective gravity and using a gas with a small specific heat capacity is a good way to observe a compressible convection, because for an ideal gas, the adiabatic gradient is g/Cp. We have carried out some experiments on convection in xenon gas in a cell in a centrifuge, which allows us to reach 10,000g, yielding a maximum of about 10 K across the height of the cell. In our experimental device, we measure a temperature with 11 platinum resistance thermal detectors, and the fluctuations of pressure. We can also acquire ultrasonic measurements through the cell. A Peltier module heats the bottom and PID control keeps the bottom temperature constant. The cell is insulated by perplex walls and the xenon gas in the cell is under pressure to increase the thermal inertia. We observe an adiabatic gradient at different effective gravities with different boundary conditions, and the fluctuations of temperature and pressure due to convection.

  8. Seismic sounding of convection in the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal convection is the dominant mechanism of energy transport in the outer envelope of the Sun (one-third by radius). It drives global fluid circulations and magnetic fields observed on the solar surface. Convection excites a broadband spectrum of acoustic waves that propagate within the interior and set up modal resonances. These acoustic waves, also called seismic waves, are observed at the surface of the Sun by space- and ground-based telescopes. Seismic sounding, the study of these seismic waves to infer the internal properties of the Sun, constitutes helioseismology. Here we review our knowledge of solar convection, especially that obtained through seismic inference. Several characteristics of solar convection, such as differential rotation, anisotropic Reynolds stresses, the influence of rotation on convection and supergranulation, are considered. On larger scales, several inferences suggest that convective velocities are substantially smaller than those predicted by theory and simulations. This discrepancy challenges the models of internal differential rotation that rely on convective stresses as a driving mechanism and provide an important benchmark for numerical simulations. In collaboration with Shravan Hanasoge, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai and Laurent Gizon, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Goettingen.

  9. Ceramics and healthy heating and cooling systems: thermal ceramic panels in buildings. Conditions of comfort and energy demand versus convective systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Echarri Iribarren

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Porcelain stoneware is a widely used building material. In recent years, its range of uses has expanded to encompass a new spectrum of innovative and inventive applications in architecture. In this research, we analysed the patented Thermal Ceramic Panel. This consists of a thin porcelain stoneware panel that incorporates a capillary system of polypropylene tubes measuring 3.5 mm in diameter embedded in a conductive ceramic interface. The system works with hot or cold water, producing healthy heating and cooling by means of radiant surfaces. Following an initial prototype test in which panels were placed on the walls of an office, we conducted simulations at the University of Alicante Museum using wall, ceiling and baffle panels, having previously monitored the state of the building. Thermal behaviour parameters were analysed and compared with those of other standard finishing materials, obtaining results for thermal comfort and energy savings in comparison with all-air systems.

  10. Study of Natural Convection Passive Cooling System for Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdillah, Habibi; Saputra, Geby; Novitrian; Permana, Sidik

    2017-07-01

    Fukushima nuclear reactor accident occurred due to the reactor cooling pumps and followed by all emergencies cooling systems could not work. Therefore, the system which has a passive safety system that rely on natural laws such as natural convection passive cooling system. In natural convection, the cooling material can flow due to the different density of the material due to the temperature difference. To analyze such investigation, a simple apparatus was set up and explains the study of natural convection in a vertical closed-loop system. It was set up that, in the closed loop, there is a heater at the bottom which is representing heat source system from the reactor core and cooler at the top which is showing the cooling system performance in room temperature to make a temperature difference for convection process. The study aims to find some loop configurations and some natural convection performances that can produce an optimum flow of cooling process. The study was done and focused on experimental approach and simulation. The obtained results are showing and analyzing in temperature profile data and the speed of coolant flow at some point on the closed-loop system.

  11. Transition to geostrophic convection: the role of the boundary conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Ostilla-Monico, Rodolfo; van der Poel, Erwin; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    Rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection, the flow in a rotating fluid layer heated from below and cooled from above, is used to analyse the transition to the geostrophic regime of thermal convection. In the geostrophic regime, which is of direct relevance to most geo- and astrophysical flows, the system

  12. Chaotic travelling rolls in Rayleigh–Bénard convection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    convective flow or flow reversal of the convective motion. The chaotic travelling waves are also ... expansion coefficient α, kinematic viscosity ν, thermal diffusivity κ that is enclosed between two flat conducting .... Since the temporal change in the phase of the critical mode is chaotic, the movement of the rolls would also be.

  13. Effect of nonlinear thermal radiation on non-aligned bio-convective stagnation point flow of a magnetic-nanofluid over a stretching sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jayachandra Babu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study covers the relative study of non-aligned magnetohydrodynamic stagnation point flow of a nanofluid comprising gyrotactic microorganisms across a stretching sheet in the presence of nonlinear thermal radiation and variable viscosity. The governing equations transitioned as nonlinear ordinary differential equations with suited similarity transformations. With the assistance of Runge-Kutta based shooting method, we derived solutions. Results for oblique and free stream flow cases are exhibited through plots for the parameters of concern. In tabular form, heat and mass transfer rate along with the local density of the motile microorganisms are analyzed for some parameters. It is found that local density of the motile microorganisms is highly influenced by the Biot and Peclet numbers. Rising values of the magnetic field parameter, Biot number, thermal radiation parameter and thermophoresis parameter increase the thermal boundary layer. Bioconvection Peclet number and bioconvection Lewis number have tendency to reduce the density of the motile microorganisms. It is also found that thermal and concentration boundary layers become high in free stream flow when compared with the oblique flow.

  14. Numerical Study of Entropy Generation due to Coupled Laminar and Turbulent Mixed Convection and Thermal Radiation in an Enclosure Filled with a Semitransparent Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Goodarzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of radiation on laminar and turbulent mixed convection heat transfer of a semitransparent medium in a square enclosure was studied numerically using the Finite Volume Method. A structured mesh and the SIMPLE algorithm were utilized to model the governing equations. Turbulence and radiation were modeled with the RNG k-ε model and Discrete Ordinates (DO model, respectively. For Richardson numbers ranging from 0.1 to 10, simulations were performed for Rayleigh numbers in laminar flow (104 and turbulent flow (108. The model predictions were validated against previous numerical studies and good agreement was observed. The simulated results indicate that for laminar and turbulent motion states, computing the radiation heat transfer significantly enhanced the Nusselt number (Nu as well as the heat transfer coefficient. Higher Richardson numbers did not noticeably affect the average Nusselt number and corresponding heat transfer rate. Besides, as expected, the heat transfer rate for the turbulent flow regime surpassed that in the laminar regime. The simulations additionally demonstrated that for a constant Richardson number, computing the radiation heat transfer majorly affected the heat transfer structure in the enclosure; however, its impact on the fluid flow structure was negligible.

  15. Full-Scale 3-D Finite Element Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor for Heat Transfer, Thermal-Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Life Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William K.; Majumdar, Saurindranath; Natesan, Krishnamurti

    2015-12-15

    This paper discusses a system-level finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent sequentially coupled thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of example components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in US-NRC report: NUREG-6909.

  16. Determination of the convective heat transfer coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, D.; Bosman, F.; Peters, T.; Plasschaert, F.

    The value of the convective heat transfer coefficient (htc) is determined under different loading conditions by using a computer aided method. The thermal load has been applied mathematically as well as experimentally to the coronal surface of an axisymmetric tooth model. To verify the assumptions

  17. Salinity transfer in bounded double diffusive convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Yantao; van der Poel, Erwin; Ostilla Monico, Rodolfo; Sun, Chao; Verzicco, Roberto; Grossmann, Siegfried; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    The double diffusive convection between two parallel plates is numerically studied for a series of parameters. The flow is driven by the salinity difference and stabilised by the thermal field. Our simulations are directly compared with experiments by Hage & Tilgner (Phys. Fluids, vol. 22, 2010,

  18. Interferometric investigation of convection in plexiglas boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, J. N.

    1983-09-01

    Real-time holographic interferometry is used to study free convection in cavities heated from below and bounded by Plexiglas windows. Advantages and shortcomings of this visualization technique applied to such Plexiglas boxes are discussed. As Plexiglas has a high temperature-dependent refractive index, temperature fields in the windows and the fluid layer are visualized. These visualizations furnished proof of a pronounced thermal influence of the walls on the flow pattern based on what we call “thermal memory” of Plexiglas.

  19. Mantle Convection in a Microwave Oven: New Perspectives for the Internally Heated Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limare, A.; Fourel, L.; Surducan, E.; Neamtu, C.; Surducan, V.; Vilella, K.; Farnetani, C. G.; Kaminski, E. C.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    The thermal evolution of silicate planets is primarily controlled by the balance between internal heating - due to radioactive decay - and heat transport by mantle convection. In the Earth, the problem is particularly complex due to the heterogeneous distribution of heat sources in the mantle and the non-linear coupling between this distribution and convective mixing. To investigate the behaviour of such systems, we have developed a new technology based on microwave absorption to study internally-heated convection in the laboratory. This prototype offers the ability to reach the high Rayleigh-Roberts and Prandtl numbers that are relevant for planetary convection. Our experimental results obtained for a uniform distribution of heat sources were compared to numerical calculations reproducing exactly experimental conditions (3D Cartesian geometry and temperature-dependent physical properties), thereby providing the first cross validation of experimental and numerical studies of convection in internally-heated systems. We find that the thermal boundary layer thickness and interior temperature scale with RaH-1/4, where RaH is the Rayleigh-Roberts number, as theoretically predicted by scaling arguments on the dissipation of kinetic energy. Our microwave-based method offers new perspectives for the study of internally-heated convection in heterogeneous systems which have been out of experimental reach until now. We are able to selectively heat specific regions in the convecting layer, through the careful control of the absorption properties of different miscible fluids. This is analogous to convection in the presence of chemical reservoirs with different concentration of long-lived radioactive isotopes. We shall show results for two different cases: the stability of continental lithosphere over a convective fluid and the evolution of a hidden enriched reservoir in the lowermost mantle.

  20. Infrared thermography for convective heat transfer measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; Cardone, Gennaro [University of Naples Federico II, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Naples (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    This paper deals with the evolution of infrared (IR) thermography into a powerful optical tool that can be used in complex fluid flows to either evaluate wall convective heat fluxes or investigate the surface flow field behavior. Measurement of convective heat fluxes must be performed by means of a thermal sensor, where temperatures have to be measured with proper transducers. By correctly choosing the thermal sensor, IR thermography can be successfully exploited to resolve convective heat flux distributions with both steady and transient techniques. When comparing it to standard transducers, the IR camera appears very valuable because it is non-intrusive, it has a high sensitivity (down to 20 mK), it has a low response time (down to 20 {mu}s), it is fully two dimensional (from 80 k up to 1 M pixels, at 50 Hz) and, therefore, it allows for better evaluation of errors due to tangential conduction within the sensor. This paper analyses the capability of IR thermography to perform convective heat transfer measurements and surface visualizations in complex fluid flows. In particular, it includes the following: the necessary radiation theory background, a review of the main IR camera features, a description of the pertinent heat flux sensors, an analysis of the IR image processing methods and a report on some applications to complex fluid flows, ranging from natural convection to hypersonic regime. (orig.)

  1. Mathematical Modeling of Loop Heat Pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Tarik; Ku, Jentung; Hoang, Triem T.; Cheung, Mark L.

    1998-01-01

    The primary focus of this study is to model steady-state performance of a Loop Heat Pipe (LHP). The mathematical model is based on the steady-state energy balance equations at each component of the LHP. The heat exchange between each LHP component and the surrounding is taken into account. Both convection and radiation environments are modeled. The loop operating temperature is calculated as a function of the applied power at a given loop condition. Experimental validation of the model is attempted by using two different LHP designs. The mathematical model is tested at different sink temperatures and at different elevations of the loop. Tbc comparison of the calculations and experimental results showed very good agreement (within 3%). This method proved to be a useful tool in studying steady-state LHP performance characteristics.

  2. Asymptotic Behavior of a Viscoelastic Fluid in a Closed Loop Thermosyphon: Physical Derivation, Asymptotic Analysis, and Numerical Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine Yasappan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluids subject to thermal gradients produce complex behaviors that arise from the competition with gravitational effects. Although such sort of systems have been widely studied in the literature for simple (Newtonian fluids, the behavior of viscoelastic fluids has not been explored thus far. We present a theoretical study of the dynamics of a Maxwell viscoelastic fluid in a closed-loop thermosyphon. This sort of fluid presents elastic-like behavior and memory effects. We study the asymptotic properties of the fluid inside the thermosyphon and the exact equations of motion in the inertial manifold that characterizes the asymptotic behavior. We derive, for the first time, the mathematical derivations of the motion of a viscoelastic fluid in the interior of a closed-loop thermosyphon under the effects of natural convection and a given external temperature gradient.

  3. Optimatization of loop heat pipe for cooling of electrotechnical box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Banovcan; Tomas, Puchor; Andrej, Kapjor; Milan, Malcho

    2017-09-01

    The paper deals with use of LOOP thermosyphon heat pipe to transfer heat from electrotechnical box and describe of construction individual types of LOOP heat pipes. The LOOP heat pipe is very good cooling device which requires no mechanical parts in their design. LOOP heat pipe use only phase change during heat transfer, without a compressor, fan or pump. LOOP heat pipe is more energy saving compared to conventional cooling systems with forced convection. The main advantage of cooling by heat pipe is that electrotechnical box can be hermetically closed (dust -free construction), because dust reduces the lifetime of electrotechnical elements in box. Lifetime of LOOP heat pipe equals to the lifetime of construction material. The paper describes mathematical model of LOOP thermosyphon heat pipe (condenser). Compares selected types of working fluids which are filled with a heat pipe and construction materials of heat pipe.

  4. Combined effects of chemical reaction and temperature dependent heat source on MHD mixed convective flow of a couple-stress fluid in a vertical wavy porous space with travelling thermal waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuraj R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is developed to examine the effect of chemical reaction on MHD mixed convective heat and mass transfer flow of a couple-stress fluid in vertical porous space in the presence of temperature dependent heat source with travelling thermal waves. The dimensionless governing equations are assumed to be made up of two parts: a mean part corresponding to the fully developed mean flow, and a small perturbed part, using amplitude as a small parameter. The analytical solution of perturbed part have been carried out by using the long-wave approximation. The expressions for the zeroth-order and the first order solutions are obtained and the results of the heat and mass transfer characteristics are presented graphically for various values of parameters entering into the problem. It is noted that velocity of the fluid increases with the increase of the couple stress parameter and increasing the chemical reaction parameter leads suppress the velocity of the fluid. Cross velocity decreases with an increase of the phase angle. The increase of the chemical reaction parameter and Schmidt number lead to decrease the fluid concentration. The hydrodynamic case for a non-porous space in the absence of the temperature dependent heat source for Newtonian fluid can be captured as a limiting case of our analysis by taking, and α1→0, Da→∞, a→∞.

  5. Influence of Hall Current and Thermal Radiation on MHD Convective Heat and Mass Transfer in a Rotating Porous Channel with Chemical Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulal Pal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study is carried out to obtain an analytic solution of heat and mass transfer in a vertical porous channel with rotation and Hall current. A constant suction and injection is applied to the two insulating porous plates. A strong magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction. The entire system rotates with uniform angular velocity Ω about the axis normal to the plates. The governing equations are solved by perturbation technique to obtain the analytical results for velocity, temperature, and concentration fields and shear stresses. The steady and unsteady resultant velocities along with the phase differences for various values of physical parameters are discussed in detail. The effects of rotation, buoyancy force, magnetic field, thermal radiation, and heat generation parameters on resultant velocity, temperature, and concentration fields are analyzed.

  6. Perturbation technique for unsteady MHD mixed convection periodic flow, heat and mass transfer in micropolar fluid with chemical reaction in the presence of thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Dulal; Talukdar, Babulal

    2012-10-01

    An analytical study is presented for the problem of unsteady hydromagnetic heat and mass transfer for a micropolar fluid bounded by semi-infinite vertical permeable plate in the presence of first-order chemical reaction, thermal radiation and heat absorption. A uniform magnetic field acts perpendicularly to the porous surface which absorbs the micropolar fluid with a time-dependent suction velocity. The basic partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are solved analytically using perturbation technique. Numerical calculations for the analytical expressions are carried out and the results are shown graphically. The effects of the various dimensionless parameters related to the problem on the velocity, angular velocity, temperature and concentration fields are discussed in detail.

  7. Stochastic Convection Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Joao; Reynolds, Carolyn; Suselj, Kay; Matheou, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    computational fluid dynamics, radiation, clouds, turbulence, convection, gravity waves, surface interaction, radiation interaction, cloud and aerosol microphysics, complexity (vegetation, biogeochemistry, radiation versus turbulence/convection stochastic approach, non-linearities, Monte Carlo, high resolutions, large-Eddy Simulations, cloud structure, plumes, saturation in tropics, forecasting, parameterizations, stochastic, radiation-clod interaction, hurricane forecasts

  8. Convection and downbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph J. Charney; Brian E. Potter

    2017-01-01

    Convection and downbursts are connected meteorological phenomena with the potential to affect fire behavior and thereby alter the evolution of a wildland fire. Meteorological phenomena related to convection and downbursts are often discussed in the context of fire behavior and smoke. The physical mechanisms that contribute to these phenomena are interrelated, but the...

  9. Numerical Analyses of a single-phase natural convection system for Molten Flibe using MARS-FLIBE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sarah; Bang, In Cheol [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    These advantages make the MSR attractive and to be one of the six candidates for the Generation IV Reactor. Therefore, the researches related to the MSR are being conducted. To analyze the molten salt-cooled systems in the laboratory, this study generated the properties of molten salt using MARS-LMR. In this research, the implemented salts were Flibe (LiF-BeF{sub 2}) in a molar mixture that is 66% LiF and 34% BeF{sub 2}, respectively. Table 1 indicates the comparison of thermal properties of various coolants in nuclear power plants. Molten salt was added to the MARS-LMR code to support the analysis of Flibe-cooled systems. The molten salt includes LiF-BeF{sub 2} in a molar mixture that is 66% LiF and 34% BeF{sub 2}, respectively. MARS-LMR code for liquid metals uses the soft sphere model based on Monte Carlo calculations for particles interacting with pair potentials. Although MARS was originally intended for a safety analysis of light water reactor, Flibe properties were newly added to this code as so-called MARS-FLIBE which is applicable for Flibe-cooled systems. By using this thermodynamic property table file, the thermal hydraulic systems of Flibe can be simulated for numerical and parametric studies. In this study, the natural convection phenomena in the rectangular natural convection loop and IVR-ERVC in APR 1400 were simulated. Through the simulations in Flibe-cooled systems, the temperature distribution and mass flowrate of Flibe can be calculated and the heat transfer coefficients of Flibe in natural convection loop will be calculated by adding the related heat transfer correlations in the MARS-FLIBE code. MARS-FLIBE code will be used to predict and design of Flibe-cooled systems.

  10. Two-dimensional turbulent convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzino, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    We present an overview of the most relevant, and sometimes contrasting, theoretical approaches to Rayleigh-Taylor and mean-gradient-forced Rayleigh-Bénard two-dimensional turbulence together with numerical and experimental evidences for their support. The main aim of this overview is to emphasize that, despite the different character of these two systems, especially in relation to their steadiness/unsteadiness, turbulent fluctuations are well described by the same scaling relationships originated from the Bolgiano balance. The latter states that inertial terms and buoyancy terms balance at small scales giving rise to an inverse kinetic energy cascade. The main difference with respect to the inverse energy cascade in hydrodynamic turbulence [R. H. Kraichnan, "Inertial ranges in two-dimensional turbulence," Phys. Fluids 10, 1417 (1967)] is that the rate of cascade of kinetic energy here is not constant along the inertial range of scales. Thanks to the absence of physical boundaries, the two systems here investigated turned out to be a natural physical realization of the Kraichnan scaling regime hitherto associated with the elusive "ultimate state of thermal convection" [R. H. Kraichnan, "Turbulent thermal convection at arbitrary Prandtl number," Phys. Fluids 5, 1374-1389 (1962)].

  11. AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Tyler D. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Catling, David C., E-mail: robinson@astro.washington.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195-1310 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

  12. Solar Surface Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Åke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We review the properties of solar convection that are directly observable at the solar surface, and discuss the relevant underlying physics, concentrating mostly on a range of depths from the temperature minimum down to about 20 Mm below the visible solar surface.The properties of convection at the main energy carrying (granular scales are tightly constrained by observations, in particular by the detailed shapes of photospheric spectral lines and the topology (time- and length-scales, flow velocities, etc. of the up- and downflows. Current supercomputer models match these constraints very closely, which lends credence to the models, and allows robust conclusions to be drawn from analysis of the model properties.At larger scales the properties of the convective velocity field at the solar surface are strongly influenced by constraints from mass conservation, with amplitudes of larger scale horizontal motions decreasing roughly in inverse proportion to the scale of the motion. To a large extent, the apparent presence of distinct (meso- and supergranulation scales is a result of the folding of this spectrum with the effective “filters” corresponding to various observational techniques. Convective motions on successively larger scales advect patterns created by convection on smaller scales; this includes patterns of magnetic field, which thus have an approximately self-similar structure at scales larger than granulation.Radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of solar surface convection can be used as 2D/3D time-dependent models of the solar atmosphere to predict the emergent spectrum. In general, the resulting detailed spectral line profiles agree spectacularly well with observations without invoking any micro- and macroturbulence parameters due to the presence of convective velocities and atmosphere inhomogeneities. One of the most noteworthy results has been a significant reduction in recent years in the derived solar C, N, and O abundances with

  13. Effect of using ethanol and methanol on thermal performance of a closed loop pulsating heat pipe (CLPHP) with different filling ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Lutfor; Salsabil, Zaimaa; Yasmin, Nusrat; Nourin, Farah Nazifa; Ali, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of a closed loop Pulsating Heat Pipe (CLPHP) as the demand of smaller and effective heat transfer devices is increasing day by day. PHP is a two phase heat transfer device suited for heat transfer applications, especially suited for handling moderate to high heat fluxes in different applications. A copper made Pulsating Heat Pipe (PHP) of 250 mm length is used in this experimental work with 2 mm ID and 3 mm OD, closed end-to-end in 8 looped, evacuated and then partially filled with working fluids. The evaporation section is 50 mm, adiabatic section is 120 mm and condensation section is 80 mm. The performance characterization is done for two working fluids at Vertical (0°) orientations. The working fluids are Methanol and Ethanol and the filling ratios are 40%, 50%, 60% & 70% based on total volume, respectively. The results show that the influence of various parameters, the heat input flux, and different filling ratios on a heat transfer performance of CLPHP. Methanol shows better performance as working fluid in PHP than ethanol at present orientation for a wide range of heat inputs and can be used at high heat input conditions. Ethanol is better choice to be used in low heat input conditions.

  14. Chaotic convection in a rotating fluid layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod K. Gupta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A study of thermal convection in a rotating fluid layer is investigated based on the dynamical systems approach. A system of differential equation like Lorenz model has been obtained by using Galerkin-truncated approximation. The chaotic convection is investigated in a rotating fluid layer. A low-dimensional, Lorenz-like model was obtained using Galerkin truncated approximation. The fourth-order Runge–Kutta method is employed to obtain the numerical solution of Lorenz-like system of equations. We found that there is proportional relation between Taylor number and the scaled Rayleigh number R. This means that chaotic behavior can be delayed (for increasing value of R when we increase the scaled Taylor number. We conclude that the transition from steady convection to chaos depends on the level of Taylor number.

  15. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-11-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  16. Magneto-convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Robert F

    2012-07-13

    Convection is the transport of energy by bulk mass motions. Magnetic fields alter convection via the Lorentz force, while convection moves the fields via the curl(v×B) term in the induction equation. Recent ground-based and satellite telescopes have increased our knowledge of the solar magnetic fields on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Magneto-convection modelling has also greatly improved recently as computers become more powerful. Three-dimensional simulations with radiative transfer and non-ideal equations of state are being performed. Flux emergence from the convection zone through the visible surface (and into the chromosphere and corona) has been modelled. Local, convectively driven dynamo action has been studied. The alteration in the appearance of granules and the formation of pores and sunspots has been investigated. Magneto-convection calculations have improved our ability to interpret solar observations, especially the inversion of Stokes spectra to obtain the magnetic field and the use of helioseismology to determine the subsurface structure of the Sun.

  17. Observing Convective Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.; Wing, Allison A.; Bony, Sandrine; Muller, Caroline; Masunaga, Hirohiko; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Turner, David D.; Zuidema, Paquita

    2017-06-01

    Convective self-aggregation, the spontaneous organization of initially scattered convection into isolated convective clusters despite spatially homogeneous boundary conditions and forcing, was first recognized and studied in idealized numerical simulations. While there is a rich history of observational work on convective clustering and organization, there have been only a few studies that have analyzed observations to look specifically for processes related to self-aggregation in models. Here we review observational work in both of these categories and motivate the need for more of this work. We acknowledge that self-aggregation may appear to be far-removed from observed convective organization in terms of time scales, initial conditions, initiation processes, and mean state extremes, but we argue that these differences vary greatly across the diverse range of model simulations in the literature and that these comparisons are already offering important insights into real tropical phenomena. Some preliminary new findings are presented, including results showing that a self-aggregation simulation with square geometry has too broad distribution of humidity and is too dry in the driest regions when compared with radiosonde records from Nauru, while an elongated channel simulation has realistic representations of atmospheric humidity and its variability. We discuss recent work increasing our understanding of how organized convection and climate change may interact, and how model discrepancies related to this question are prompting interest in observational comparisons. We also propose possible future directions for observational work related to convective aggregation, including novel satellite approaches and a ground-based observational network.

  18. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  19. Improvement of Thermal Stability via Outer-Loop Ion Pair Interaction of Mutated T1 Lipase from Geobacillus zalihae Strain T1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahiran Basri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutant D311E and K344R were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis to introduce an additional ion pair at the inter-loop and the intra-loop, respectively, to determine the effect of ion pairs on the stability of T1 lipase isolated from Geobacillus zalihae. A series of purification steps was applied, and the pure lipases of T1, D311E and K344R were obtained. The wild-type and mutant lipases were analyzed using circular dichroism. The Tm for T1 lipase, D311E lipase and K344R lipase were approximately 68.52 °C, 70.59 °C and 68.54 °C, respectively. Mutation at D311 increases the stability of T1 lipase and exhibited higher Tm as compared to the wild-type and K344R. Based on the above, D311E lipase was chosen for further study. D311E lipase was successfully crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The crystal was diffracted at 2.1 Å using an in-house X-ray beam and belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with the unit cell parameters a = 117.32 Å, b = 81.16 Å and c = 100.14 Å. Structural analysis showed the existence of an additional ion pair around E311 in the structure of D311E. The additional ion pair in D311E may regulate the stability of this mutant lipase at high temperatures as predicted in silico and spectroscopically.

  20. Improvement of Thermal Stability via Outer-Loop Ion Pair Interaction of Mutated T1 Lipase from Geobacillus zalihae Strain T1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruslan, Rudzanna; Abd. Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja; Leow, Thean Chor; Ali, Mohd Shukuri Mohamad; Basri, Mahiran; Salleh, Abu Bakar

    2012-01-01

    Mutant D311E and K344R were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis to introduce an additional ion pair at the inter-loop and the intra-loop, respectively, to determine the effect of ion pairs on the stability of T1 lipase isolated from Geobacillus zalihae. A series of purification steps was applied, and the pure lipases of T1, D311E and K344R were obtained. The wild-type and mutant lipases were analyzed using circular dichroism. The Tm for T1 lipase, D311E lipase and K344R lipase were approximately 68.52 °C, 70.59 °C and 68.54 °C, respectively. Mutation at D311 increases the stability of T1 lipase and exhibited higher Tm as compared to the wild-type and K344R. Based on the above, D311E lipase was chosen for further study. D311E lipase was successfully crystallized using the sitting drop vapor diffusion method. The crystal was diffracted at 2.1 Å using an in-house X-ray beam and belonged to the monoclinic space group C2 with the unit cell parameters a = 117.32 Å, b = 81.16 Å and c = 100.14 Å. Structural analysis showed the existence of an additional ion pair around E311 in the structure of D311E. The additional ion pair in D311E may regulate the stability of this mutant lipase at high temperatures as predicted in silico and spectroscopically. PMID:22312296

  1. A sample-to-answer, real-time convective polymerase chain reaction system for point-of-care diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Bowen; Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2017-11-15

    Timely and accurate molecular diagnostics at the point-of-care (POC) level is critical to global health. To this end, we propose a handheld convective-flow real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system capable of direct sample-to-answer genetic analysis for the first time. Such a system mainly consists of a magnetic bead-assisted photothermolysis sample preparation, a closed-loop convective PCR reactor, and a wireless video camera-based real-time fluorescence detection. The sample preparation exploits the dual functionality of vancomycin-modified magnetic beads (VMBs) for bacteria enrichment and photothermal conversion, enabling cell pre-concentration and lysis to be finished in less than 3min. On the presented system, convective thermocycling is driven by a single-heater thermal gradient, and its amplification is monitored in real-time, with an analysis speed of less than 25min, a dynamic linear range from 106 to 101 copies/µL and a detection sensitivity of as little as 1 copies/µL. Additionally, the proposed PCR system is self-contained with a control electronics, pocket-size and battery-powered, providing a low-cost genetic analysis in a portable format. Therefore, we believe that this integrated system may become a potential candidate for fast, accurate and affordable POC molecular diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical Analysis of General Trends in Single-Phase Natural Circulation in a 2D-Annular Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Desrayaud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to address fluid flow behavior of natural circulation in a 2D-annular loop filled with water. A two-dimensional, numerical analysis of natural convection in a 2D-annular closed-loop thermosyphon has been performed for various radius ratios from 1.2 to 2.0, the loop being heated at a constant flux over the bottom half and cooled at a constant temperature over the top half. It has been numerically shown that natural convection in a 2D-annular closed-loop thermosyphon is capable of showing pseudoconductive regime at pitchfork bifurcation, stationary convective regimes without and with recirculating regions occurring at the entrance of the exchangers, oscillatory convection at Hopf bifurcation and Lorenz-like chaotic flow. The complexity of the dynamic properties experimentally encountered in toroidal or rectangular loops is thus also found here.

  3. Convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Kakac, Sadik; Pramuanjaroenkij, Anchasa

    2014-01-01

    Intended for readers who have taken a basic heat transfer course and have a basic knowledge of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and differential equations, Convective Heat Transfer, Third Edition provides an overview of phenomenological convective heat transfer. This book combines applications of engineering with the basic concepts of convection. It offers a clear and balanced presentation of essential topics using both traditional and numerical methods. The text addresses emerging science and technology matters, and highlights biomedical applications and energy technologies. What’s New in the Third Edition: Includes updated chapters and two new chapters on heat transfer in microchannels and heat transfer with nanofluids Expands problem sets and introduces new correlations and solved examples Provides more coverage of numerical/computer methods The third edition details the new research areas of heat transfer in microchannels and the enhancement of convective heat transfer with nanofluids....

  4. Conformal thermal therapy using planar ultrasound transducers and adaptive closed-loop MR temperature control: demonstration in gel phantoms and ex vivo tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, K; Choy, V; Chopra, R; Bronskill, M J

    2007-05-21

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Integrating a multi-element planar transducer with active MR temperature feedback can enable three-dimensional conformal thermal therapy of a target region within the prostate gland while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Continuous measurement of the temperature distribution in tissue enables dynamic compensation for unknown changes in blood flow and tissue properties during treatment. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5 T MR imager for conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both gel phantoms and excised tissue with a transurethral heating applicator, and the rotation rate and power were varied based on the thermal measurements. The capability to produce a region of thermal damage that matched a target boundary was evaluated. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) on the desired pattern of thermal damage was also investigated in gel phantoms. Results showed high correlation between the desired target boundary and the 55 degrees C isotherm generated during heating with an average distance error of 0.9 mm +/- 0.4 mm (n = 6) in turkey breasts, 1.4 mm +/- 0.6 mm (n = 4) in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm +/- 0.6 mm (n = 3) in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. The results were obtained using a temporal update rate of 5 s, a spatial resolution of 3 x 3 x 10 mm for the control point, and a temperature uncertainty of approximately 1 degrees C. The performance of the control algorithm under these conditions was comparable to that of simulations conducted previously by our group. Overall, the feasibility of generating targeted regions of thermal damage with a transurethral heating applicator and active MR temperature feedback has been demonstrated experimentally. This method

  5. Conformal thermal therapy using planar ultrasound transducers and adaptive closed-loop MR temperature control: demonstration in gel phantoms and ex vivo tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, K [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada); Choy, V [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada); Chopra, R [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada); Bronskill, M J [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2007-05-21

    MRI-guided transurethral ultrasound therapy offers a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Integrating a multi-element planar transducer with active MR temperature feedback can enable three-dimensional conformal thermal therapy of a target region within the prostate gland while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Continuous measurement of the temperature distribution in tissue enables dynamic compensation for unknown changes in blood flow and tissue properties during treatment. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using active temperature feedback on a clinical 1.5 T MR imager for conformal thermal therapy. MR thermometry was performed during heating in both gel phantoms and excised tissue with a transurethral heating applicator, and the rotation rate and power were varied based on the thermal measurements. The capability to produce a region of thermal damage that matched a target boundary was evaluated. The influence of a cooling gradient (to simulate cooling of the rectum or urethra) on the desired pattern of thermal damage was also investigated in gel phantoms. Results showed high correlation between the desired target boundary and the 55 deg. C isotherm generated during heating with an average distance error of 0.9 mm {+-} 0.4 mm (n = 6) in turkey breasts, 1.4 mm {+-} 0.6 mm (n = 4) in gel phantoms without rectal cooling and 1.4 mm {+-} 0.6 mm (n = 3) in gel phantoms with rectal cooling. The results were obtained using a temporal update rate of 5 s, a spatial resolution of 3 x 3 x 10 mm for the control point, and a temperature uncertainty of approximately 1 deg. C. The performance of the control algorithm under these conditions was comparable to that of simulations conducted previously by our group. Overall, the feasibility of generating targeted regions of thermal damage with a transurethral heating applicator and active MR temperature feedback has been demonstrated experimentally. This method of

  6. Theory of loop flows and instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, E. R.

    A preliminary theory for the steady and transient coronal loop flows in solar active regions and their magnetohydrodynamic instability is presented. Siphon flow is shown to be possible in the loops if a pressure difference is maintained between the footpoints, and to account for the presence of cool cores and appearances of only half a loop. The evolution of active region magnetic loops is found to lead to the continual evaporation and draining of the plasma contained within them, particularly as a result of an increase in heating rate. Consideration of static models for thermally isolated loops reveals them to be thermally unstable, implying that in the absence of some atmospheric stabilizing mechanism, the loops must be in a dynamic state of thermal activity. It is shown that kilogauss photospheric fields may be formed by an intense magnetic field instability, with an associated transient downflow which may induce coronal flows at enhanced velocities. Magnetohydrodynamic stability analysis suggests that the major cause of magnetic stability may be line-tying of loop footpoints in the dense photosphere.

  7. Measurement of the Convective Heat-Transfer Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Rosaria; Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    We propose an experiment for investigating how objects cool down toward the thermal equilibrium with their surroundings. We describe the time dependence of the temperature difference of the cooling objects and the environment with an exponential decay function. By measuring the thermal constant t, we determine the convective heat-transfer…

  8. Influence of the process control on the thermal energy requirement of convection dryers in the brick industry; Einfluss der Prozessfuehrung auf den thermischen Energiebedarf von Konvektionstrocknern in der Ziegelindustrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretau, Anne

    2008-06-10

    Brick manufacturing demands high amount of energy. The energy flow analysis inside the brick factory shows that the convective drying of green bricks consumes more than half of the total thermal energy required for brick manufacturing. Therefore this paper deals with the theoretical analysis and investigation for the energy requirement of green bricks. For this, a physical-based model has been developed, which describes the dependence of drying-kinetics as well as the energy-requirement interims of the process parameter like mass of the supply air. It turns out that the specific energy requirement substantially depends on temperature and humidity of the ambience air and also supply air mass flow and its temperature. Due to the continuous temperature rise of the green bricks during the second drying section the specific energy requirement increases significantly with the progressive motion of the drying in a chamber dryer. This is due to the fact that the green brick as well as the air conditioning distance more and more from the cooling limit. Just a low part of the dryer exhaust air is saturated. The exhaust air is continuously sucked out and the green bricks are pulled inside the dryer. So the exhaust air has a relatively higher water saturation. On general, continuous dryers have a lower energy requirement than chamber dryer. For the both types of dryers, the mathematical model shows that the increasing of the supply air temperature combined with a commensurate subsidence of supply air mass flow, results in a reduction of drying energy requirement. The change of other essential parameters of drying like green brick thickness, and density as well as the moisture diffusion coefficient, and the vapour diffusity which are only important in the second drying section are of comparatively negligible effect. The developed mathematical model is successfully implemented for the energy investigation in the industrial dryers. The increase in supply air temperature results

  9. High temperature storage loop :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.

    2013-07-01

    A three year plan for thermal energy storage (TES) research was created at Sandia National Laboratories in the spring of 2012. This plan included a strategic goal of providing test capability for Sandia and for the nation in which to evaluate high temperature storage (>650ÀC) technology. The plan was to scope, design, and build a flow loop that would be compatible with a multitude of high temperature heat transfer/storage fluids. The High Temperature Storage Loop (HTSL) would be reconfigurable so that it was useful for not only storage testing, but also for high temperature receiver testing and high efficiency power cycle testing as well. In that way, HTSL was part of a much larger strategy for Sandia to provide a research and testing platform that would be integral for the evaluation of individual technologies funded under the SunShot program. DOEs SunShot program seeks to reduce the price of solar technologies to 6/kWhr to be cost competitive with carbon-based fuels. The HTSL project sought to provide evaluation capability for these SunShot supported technologies. This report includes the scoping, design, and budgetary costing aspects of this effort

  10. Convection in colloidal suspensions with particle-concentration-dependent viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glässl, M; Hilt, M; Zimmermann, W

    2010-07-01

    The onset of thermal convection in a horizontal layer of a colloidal suspension is investigated in terms of a continuum model for binary-fluid mixtures where the viscosity depends on the local concentration of colloidal particles. With an increasing difference between the viscosity at the warmer and the colder boundary the threshold of convection is reduced in the range of positive values of the separation ratio psi with the onset of stationary convection as well as in the range of negative values of psi with an oscillatory Hopf bifurcation. Additionally the convection rolls are shifted downwards with respect to the center of the horizontal layer for stationary convection psi>0 and upwards for the Hopf bifurcation (psi<0.

  11. CONVECTIVE HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN THE COMBUSTION OF CHEMICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES IN THE BOUNDARY LAYER ON A POROUS SURFACE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    COOLING, *POROUS MATERIALS), (*HEAT TRANSFER, *COMBUSTION), (* MASS TRANSFER , COMBUSTION), CONVECTION(HEAT TRANSFER), GAS FLOW, INJECTION, CHEMICAL REACTIONS, LAMINAR BOUNDARY LAYER, TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYER, THERMAL INSULATION, USSR

  12. Lattice Boltzmann model for melting with natural convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Christian [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California - Berkeley, 307 McCone Hall 4767, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 (United States)], E-mail: chuber@seismo.berkeley.edu; Parmigiani, Andrea [Computer Science Department, University of Geneva, 24, Rue du General Dufour, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)], E-mail: andrea.parmigiani@terre.unige.ch; Chopard, Bastien [Computer Science Department, University of Geneva, 24, Rue du General Dufour, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)], E-mail: Bastien.Chopard@cui.unige.ch; Manga, Michael [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California - Berkeley, 177 McCone Hall 4767, Berkeley, CA 94720-4767 (United States)], E-mail: manga@seismo.berkeley.edu; Bachmann, Olivier [Department of Earth and Space Science, University of Washington, Johnson Hall 070, Seattle WA 98195-1310 (United States)], E-mail: bachmano@u.washington.edu

    2008-10-15

    We develop a lattice Boltzmann method to couple thermal convection and pure-substance melting. The transition from conduction-dominated heat transfer to fully-developed convection is analyzed and scaling laws and previous numerical results are reproduced by our numerical method. We also investigate the limit in which thermal inertia (high Stefan number) cannot be neglected. We use our results to extend the scaling relations obtained at low Stefan number and establish the correlation between the melting front propagation and the Stefan number for fully-developed convection. We conclude by showing that the model presented here is particularly well-suited to study convection melting in geometrically complex media with many applications in geosciences.

  13. Development of Passive Fuel Cell Thermal Management Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.; Jakupca, Ian; Colozza, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing advanced passive thermal management technology to reduce the mass and improve the reliability of space fuel cell systems for the NASA exploration program. The passive thermal management system relies on heat conduction within the cooling plate to move the heat from the central portion of the cell stack out to the edges of the fuel cell stack rather than using a pumped loop cooling system to convectively remove the heat. Using the passive approach eliminates the need for a coolant pump and other cooling loop components which reduces fuel cell system mass and improves overall system reliability. Previous analysis had identified that low density, ultra-high thermal conductivity materials would be needed for the cooling plates in order to achieve the desired reductions in mass and the highly uniform thermal heat sink for each cell within a fuel cell stack. A pyrolytic graphite material was identified and fabricated into a thin plate using different methods. Also a development project with Thermacore, Inc. resulted in a planar heat pipe. Thermal conductivity tests were done using these materials. The results indicated that lightweight passive fuel cell cooling is feasible.

  14. Bifurcations and chaos in convection taking non-Fourier heat-flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, G. C.; Pati, N. C.

    2017-11-01

    In this Letter, we report the influences of thermal time-lag on the onset of convection, its bifurcations and chaos of a horizontal layer of Boussinesq fluid heated underneath taking non-Fourier Cattaneo-Christov hyperbolic model for heat propagation. A five-dimensional nonlinear system is obtained for a low-order Galerkin expansion, and it reduces to Lorenz system for Cattaneo number tending to zero. The linear stability agreed with existing results that depend on Cattaneo number C. It also gives a threshold Cattaneo number, CT, above which only oscillatory solutions can persist. The oscillatory solutions branch terminates at the subcritical steady branch with a heteroclinic loop connecting a pair of saddle points for subcritical steady-state solutions. For subcritical onset of convection two stable solutions coexist, that is, hysteresis phenomenon occurs at this stage. The steady solution undergoes a Hopf bifurcation and is of subcritical type for small value of C, while it becomes supercritical for moderate Cattaneo number. The system goes through period-doubling/noisy period-doubling transition to chaos depending on the control parameters. There after the system exhibits Shil'nikov chaos via homoclinic explosion. The complexity of spiral strange attractor is analyzed using fractal dimension and return map.

  15. Modeling approaches to natural convection in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Yan

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the field of flow and heat transfer in porous medium and focuses on presentation of a generalized approach to predict drag and convective heat transfer within porous medium of arbitrary microscopic geometry, including reticulated foams and packed beds. Practical numerical methods to solve natural convection problems in porous media will be presented with illustrative applications for filtrations, thermal storage and solar receivers.

  16. A System for Measurement of Convection Aboard Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatyrev, Gennady P.; Gorbunov, Aleksei V; Putin, Gennady F.; Ivanov, Alexander I.; Nikitin, Sergei A.; Polezhaev, Vadim I.

    1996-01-01

    A simple device for direct measurement of buoyancy driven fluid flows in a low-gravity environment is proposed. A system connecting spacecraft accelerometers data and results of thermal convection in enclosure measurements and numerical simulations is developed. This system will permit also to evaluate the low frequency microacceleration component. The goal of the paper is to present objectives and current results of ground-based experimental and numerical modeling of this convection detector.

  17. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered, and therefore topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses loop classification and populations, and then describes the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the concept of loops as multi-stranded structures. The following part of this section is devoted to the characteristics of the loop plasma and of its thermal structure in particular, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics and flows are illustrated. In the modeling section some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying some fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are distinguished between those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. Then, more specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar X-ray emitting structures related to coronal loops is included and followed by conclusions and open questions.

  18. Dynamics of mixed convective-stably-stratified fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couston, L.-A.; Lecoanet, D.; Favier, B.; Le Bars, M.

    2017-09-01

    We study the dynamical regimes of a density-stratified fluid confined between isothermal no-slip top and bottom boundaries (at temperatures Tt and Tb) via direct numerical simulation. The thermal expansion coefficient of the fluid is temperature dependent and chosen such that the fluid density is maximum at the inversion temperature Tb>Ti>Tt . Thus, the lower layer of the fluid is convectively unstable while the upper layer is stably stratified. We show that the characteristics of the convection change significantly depending on the degree of stratification of the stable layer. For strong stable stratification, the convection zone coincides with the fraction of the fluid that is convectively unstable (i.e., where T >Ti ), and convective motions consist of rising and sinking plumes of large density anomaly, as is the case in canonical Rayleigh-Bénard convection; internal gravity waves are generated by turbulent fluctuations in the convective layer and propagate in the upper layer. For weak stable stratification, we demonstrate that a large fraction of the stable fluid (i.e., with temperature T cold patches of low density-anomaly fluid with hot upward plumes and the end result is that the Ti isotherm sinks within the bottom boundary layer and that the convection is entrainment dominated. We provide a phenomenological description of the transition between the regimes of plume-dominated and entrainment-dominated convection through analysis of the differences in the heat transfer mechanisms, kinetic energy density spectra, and probability density functions for different stratification strengths. Importantly, we find that the effect of the stable layer on the convection decreases only weakly with increasing stratification strength, meaning that the dynamics of the stable layer and convection should be studied self-consistently in a wide range of applications.

  19. Anomalously Weak Solar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2012-01-01

    Convection in the solar interior is thought to comprise structures on a spectrum of scales. This conclusion emerges from phenomenological studies and numerical simulations, though neither covers the proper range of dynamical parameters of solar convection. Here, we analyze observations of the wavefield in the solar photosphere using techniques of time-distance helioseismology to image flows in the solar interior. We downsample and synthesize 900 billion wavefield observations to produce 3 billion cross-correlations, which we average and fit, measuring 5 million wave travel times. Using these travel times, we deduce the underlying flow systems and study their statistics to bound convective velocity magnitudes in the solar interior, as a function of depth and spherical- harmonic degree l..Within the wavenumber band l convective velocities are 20-100 times weaker than current theoretical estimates. This constraint suggests the prevalence of a different paradigm of turbulence from that predicted by existing models, prompting the question: what mechanism transports the heat flux of a solar luminosity outwards? Advection is dominated by Coriolis forces for wavenumbers l convection may be quasi-geostrophic. The fact that isorotation contours in the Sun are not coaligned with the axis of rotation suggests the presence of a latitudinal entropy gradient.

  20. Simulating deep convection with a shallow convection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hohenegger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Convective processes profoundly affect the global water and energy balance of our planet but remain a challenge for global climate modeling. Here we develop and investigate the suitability of a unified convection scheme, capable of handling both shallow and deep convection, to simulate cases of tropical oceanic convection, mid-latitude continental convection, and maritime shallow convection. To that aim, we employ large-eddy simulations (LES as a benchmark to test and refine a unified convection scheme implemented in the Single-column Community Atmosphere Model (SCAM. Our approach is motivated by previous cloud-resolving modeling studies, which have documented the gradual transition between shallow and deep convection and its possible importance for the simulated precipitation diurnal cycle.

    Analysis of the LES reveals that differences between shallow and deep convection, regarding cloud-base properties as well as entrainment/detrainment rates, can be related to the evaporation of precipitation. Parameterizing such effects and accordingly modifying the University of Washington shallow convection scheme, it is found that the new unified scheme can represent both shallow and deep convection as well as tropical and mid-latitude continental convection. Compared to the default SCAM version, the new scheme especially improves relative humidity, cloud cover and mass flux profiles. The new unified scheme also removes the well-known too early onset and peak of convective precipitation over mid-latitude continental areas.

  1. Mixed convection opposing flow in porous annulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ahmed N. J.; Kamangar, Sarfaraz; Al-Rashed, Abdullah A. A. A.; Khan, T. M. Yunus; Khaleed, H. M. T.

    2016-06-01

    The current work investigates the mixed convection flow in a vertical porous annulus embedded with fluid saturated porous medium. The annulus is isothermally heated discretely at 20%, 35% and 50% of the height of cylinder at the center of annulus. Darcy law with thermal non-equilibrium approach is considered. The governing partial differential equations are solved using Finite Element Method (FEM). The effects of Peclet number Pe and conductivity ratio Kr on heat transfer and fluid flow is discussed It is found that the applied velocity in the downward direction, in case of an opposing flow, does not allow the thermal energy to reach from a hot to a cold surface.

  2. Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2012-06-05

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  3. Convection and stellar oscillations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarslev, Magnus Johan

    2017-01-01

    of stars. For stars like the sun, energy transport in the outer layers occurs mainly through turbulent convection. Here, pressure mode oscillations are essentially propagating sound waves, whose properties can be altered by interaction with the turbulent motion of the gas. This has always been a problem...... for asteroseismology, because of the challenges inherent in modelling turbulent convection in 1D stellar models. As a result of oversimplifying the physics near the surface, theoretical calculations systematically overestimate the oscillation frequencies. This has become known as the asteroseismic surface effect. Due...... to lacking better options, this frequency difference is typically corrected for with ad-hoc formulae. The topic of this thesis is the improvement of 1D stellar convection models and the effects this has on asteroseismic properties. The source of improvements is 3D simulations of radiation...

  4. Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients of the Human Body under Forced Convection from Ceiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurazumi, Yoshihito; Rezgals, Lauris; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2014-01-01

    The average convective heat transfer coefficient for a seated human body exposed to downward flow from above was determined. Thermal manikin with complex body shape and size of an average Scandinavian female was used. The surface temperature distribution of the manikin’s body was as the skin...... of the convective heat transfer coefficient of the whole body (hc [W/(m2•K)]) was proposed: hc=4.088+6.592V1.715 for a seated naked body at 20ºC and hc=2.874+7.427V1.345 for a seated naked body at 26ºC. Differences in the convective heat transfer coefficient of the whole body in low air velocity range, V

  5. Parameterizing convective organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Earle Mapes

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lateral mixing parameters in buoyancy-driven deep convection schemes are among the most sensitive and important unknowns in atmosphere models. Unfortunately, there is not a true optimum value for plume mixing rate, but rather a dilemma or tradeoff: Excessive dilution of updrafts leads to unstable stratification bias in the mean state, while inadequate dilution allows deep convection to occur too easily, causing poor space and time distributions and variability. In this too-small parameter space, compromises are made based on competing metrics of model performance. We attempt to escape this “entrainment dilemma” by making bulk plume parameters (chiefly entrainment rate depend on a new prognostic variable (“organization,” org meant to reflect the rectified effects of subgrid-scale structure in meteorological fields. We test an org scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5 with a new unified shallow-deep convection scheme (UW-ens, a 2-plume version of the University of Washington scheme. Since buoyant ascent involves natural selection, subgrid structure makes convection systematically deeper and stronger than the pure unorganized case: plumes of average (or randomly sampled air rising in the average environment. To reflect this, org is nonnegative, but we leave it dimensionless. A time scale characterizes its behavior (here ∼3 h for a 2o model. Currently its source is rain evaporation, but other sources can be added easily. We also let org be horizontally transported by advection, as a mass-weighted mean over the convecting layer. Linear coefficients link org to a plume ensemble, which it assists via: 1 plume base warmth above the mean temperature 2 plume radius enhancement (reduced mixing, and 3 increased probability of overlap in a multi-plume scheme, where interactions benefit later generations (this part has only been implemented in an offline toy column model. Since rain evaporation is a source for org, it functions as a time

  6. Mathematical models of convection

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Victor K; Goncharova, Olga N; Pukhnachev, Vladislav V

    2012-01-01

    Phenomena of convection are abundant in nature as well as in industry. This volume addresses the subject of convection from the point of view of both, theory and application. While the first three chapters provide a refresher on fluid dynamics and heat transfer theory, the rest of the book describes the modern developments in theory. Thus it brings the reader to the ""front"" of the modern research. This monograph provides the theoretical foundation on a topic relevant to metallurgy, ecology, meteorology, geo-and astrophysics, aerospace industry, chemistry, crystal physics, and many other fiel

  7. Coronal Loops: Observations and Modeling of Confined Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Reale

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coronal loops are the building blocks of the X-ray bright solar corona. They owe their brightness to the dense confined plasma, and this review focuses on loops mostly as structures confining plasma. After a brief historical overview, the review is divided into two separate but not independent parts: the first illustrates the observational framework, the second reviews the theoretical knowledge. Quiescent loops and their confined plasma are considered and, therefore, topics such as loop oscillations and flaring loops (except for non-solar ones, which provide information on stellar loops are not specifically addressed here. The observational section discusses the classification, populations, and the morphology of coronal loops, its relationship with the magnetic field, and the loop stranded structure. The section continues with the thermal properties and diagnostics of the loop plasma, according to the classification into hot, warm, and cool loops. Then, temporal analyses of loops and the observations of plasma dynamics, hot and cool flows, and waves are illustrated. In the modeling section, some basics of loop physics are provided, supplying fundamental scaling laws and timescales, a useful tool for consultation. The concept of loop modeling is introduced and models are divided into those treating loops as monolithic and static, and those resolving loops into thin and dynamic strands. More specific discussions address modeling the loop fine structure and the plasma flowing along the loops. Special attention is devoted to the question of loop heating, with separate discussion of wave (AC and impulsive (DC heating. Large-scale models including atmosphere boxes and the magnetic field are also discussed. Finally, a brief discussion about stellar coronal loops is followed by highlights and open questions.

  8. Holographic thermalization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Bernamonti, A.; de Boer, J.; Copland, N.; Craps, B.; Keski-Vakkuri, E.; Müller, B.; Schäfer, A.; Shigemori, M.; Staessens, W.

    2011-01-01

    Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we probe the scale-dependence of thermalization in strongly coupled field theories following a quench, via calculations of two-point functions, Wilson loops and entanglement entropy in d=2,3,4. In the saddlepoint approximation these probes are computed in AdS space

  9. CDM Convective Forecast Planning guidance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The CDM Convective Forecast Planning (CCFP) guidance product provides a foreast of en-route aviation convective hazards. The forecasts are updated every 2 hours and...

  10. The overshoot region at the bottom of the solar convection zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J. H. M. M.; Rosner, R.; Bohn, H. U.

    1984-01-01

    The extent and thermal stratification of the region of convective overshoot underneath the convection zone of the sun are investigated. The phenomenon of convective overshoot in general is discussed, and some of the modal and model approaches to studying it are briefly reviewed. A detailed theoretical description of the motion of plumes in a stably stratified medium is given, leading to a 'derivation' of the plume equations from the hydrodynamic equations. Entrainment is discussed, and it is shown how the plume equations can be used to compute convective overshoot in the sun. The limitations of the plume model are addressed, arguing that a thin boundary layer must exist which separates convective and radiative regions. The results of numerical integrations of the plume equations, as applied to the region of convective overshoot underneath the solar convective zone, are discussed.

  11. NANOFLUID PROPERTIES FOR FORCED CONVECTION HEAT TRANSFER: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.H.Azmi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids offer a significant advantage over conventional heat transfer fluids and consequently, they have attracted much attention in recent years. The engineered suspension of nano-sized particles in a base liquid alters the properties of these nanofluids. Many researchers have measured and modeled the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids. The estimation of forced convective heat transfer coefficients is done through experiments with either metal or nonmetal solid particles dispersed in water. Regression equations are developed for the determination of the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids. The parameters influencing the decrease in convection heat transfer, observed by certain investigators, is explained.

  12. Approximate Loop Unrolling

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Cancio, Marcelino; Combemale, Benoit; Baudry, Benoit

    2016-01-01

    We introduce Approximate Unrolling, a loop optimization that reduces execution time and energy consumption, exploiting the existence of code regions that can endure some degree of approximation while still producing acceptable results. This work focuses on a specific kind of forgiving region: counted loops that map a given functions over the elements of an array. Approximate Unrolling transforms loops in a similar way Loop Unrolling does. However, unlike its exact counterpart, our optimizatio...

  13. In-Situ Testing of the Thermal Diffusivity of Polysilicon Thin Films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gu, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Zai-Fa; Sun, Chao; Li, Wei-Hua; Huang, Qing-An

    2016-01-01

    ...(t) varies as temperature rises. A delicate thermodynamic model considering thermal convection, thermal radiation, and film-to-substrate heat conduction was established for the testing structure...

  14. Blind Loop Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breeding ground for bacteria. The bacteria may produce toxins as well as block the absorption of nutrients. The greater the length of small bowel involved in the blind loop, the greater the chance of bacterial overgrowth. What triggers blind loop syndrome? Blind loop ...

  15. Centrifugally driven convection in the rotating cylindrical annulus with modulated boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Westerburg

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sinusoidally modulated conical end boundaries on convection in a rotating cylindrical annulus is investigated theoretically and experimentally. A quasiperiodic time dependence of convection in the form of thermal Rossby waves is found and semi-quantitative agreement between theory and measurements can be established. The results are relevant to convection in the Earth's outer core close to the tangent cylinder touching the inner core at its equator.

  16. The control of convection by fuelling and pumping in the JET pumped divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbour, P.J.; Andrew, P.; Campbell, D.; Clement, S.; Davies, S.; Ehrenberg, J.; Erents, S.K.; Gondhalekar, A.; Gadeberg, M.; Gottardi, N.; Von Hellermann, M.; Horton, L.; Loarte, A.; Lowry, C.; Maggi, C.; McCormick, K.; O`Brien, D.; Reichle, R.; Saibene, G.; Simonini, R.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.; Stork, D.; Taroni, A.; Vlases, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    Convection from the scrape-off layer (SOL) to the divertor will control core impurities, if it retains them in a cold, dense, divertor plasma. This implies a high impurity concentration in the divertor, low at its entrance. Particle flux into the divertor entrance can be varied systematically in JET, using the new fuelling and pumping systems. The convection ratio has been estimated for various conditions of operation. Particle convection into the divertor should increase thermal convection, decreasing thermal conduction, and temperature and density gradients along the magnetic field, hence increasing the frictional force and decreasing the thermal force on impurities. Changes in convection in the SOL, caused by gaseous fuelling, have been studied, both experimentally in the JET Mk I divertor and with EDGE2/NIMBUS. 1 ref., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. a Diagnostic Study of Midlatitude Mesoscale Convective Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubis, Steven Thomas

    Two case studies of mesoscale convective systems (MCS) over the central plains of the United States were carried out using data from the SESAME experiment. The first case study makes use of high resolution data to examine the structure and evolution of a mesoscale cyclonic vortex within the convectively-produced stratiform region. The second case study containing lower resolution mesoscale data examines the influences of an MCS on the large scale and mesoscale. Potential vorticity and its diabatically-induced Lagrangian time change is used to study the development of a mesoscale cyclonic system. Condensational heating in an ascending northward flow rapidly generated a region of locally large PV over a three to six hour period. The thermal structure and estimate of the Rossby radius of deformation suggests that a mesoscale vortex at the base of the mesoscale cyclonic system evolved towards a quasi -balanced state. Apparent sources representing unresolved horizontal and vertical eddy transports are shown to greatly affect the heat and vorticity budgets around the time of maximum convection. Mismatches between temporal and spatial resolutions in the data also affected the heat and vorticity budgets. Vertically integrated convective available energy (ICAPE) was found more accurate than traditional surface CAPE for identifying locations of initiation and continuation of convection. Low level convergence acting to release convective instability was shown to be strongly tied to convectively-favorable ICAPE changes.

  18. Convective Flow in an Aquifer Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambaru Bhatta

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Here, we investigate weakly nonlinear hydrothermal two-dimensional convective flow in a horizontal aquifer layer with horizontal isothermal and rigid boundaries. We treat such a layer as a porous medium, where Darcy’s law holds, subjected to the conditions that the porous layer’s permeability and the thermal conductivity are variable in the vertical direction. This analysis is restricted to the case that the subsequent hydraulic resistivity and diffusivity have a small rate of change with respect to the vertical variable. Applying the weakly nonlinear approach, we derive various order systems and express their solutions. The solutions for convective flow quantities such as vertical velocity and the temperature that arise as the Rayleigh number exceeds its critical value are computed and presented in graphical form.

  19. Natural convective heat transfer from short inclined cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Natural Convective Heat Transfer from Short Inclined Cylinders  examines a heat transfer situation of significant, practical importance not adequately dealt with in existing textbooks or in any widely available review papers. Specifically, the book introduces the reader to recent studies of natural convection from short cylinders mounted on a flat insulated base where there is an “exposed” upper surface. The authors considers the effects of the cylinder cross-sectional shape, the cylinder inclination angle, and the length-to-cross sectional size of the cylinder. Both numerical and experimental studies are discussed and correlation equations based on the results of these studies are reviewed. This book is ideal for professionals involved with thermal management and related systems, researchers, and graduate students in the field of natural convective heat transfer, instructors in graduate level courses in convective heat transfer.

  20. Comparison of energy expenditure and closed-loop performance of thermal and reactive distillation sequences coupled for biodiesel production; Comparacion de gasto energetico y desempeno a lazo cerrado de secuencias de destilacion reactiva y termicamente acopladas para produccion de biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo-Jacob, J.L [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Vazquez-Ojeda, M; Segovia-Hernandez, J.G; Hernandez, S [Universidad de Guanajuato, Guanajuato, Guanajuato (Mexico); Maya-Yescas, R. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)]. E-mail: rmayay@umich.mx

    2013-03-15

    Biodiesel is the common name for fatty acid methyl esters, obtained by esterification (basic catalysis) or trans-esterification (acid catalysis) of vegetable or animal oils with alcohols, and used as liquid fuel. Production involves the reaction, under mild conditions, between the oil and, typically, excess of methanol. Traditional production of biodiesel exhibits some handicaps, such as the shift of equilibrium to fatty acids by using excess of alcohol that must be separated and recycled. As alternative, it is possible to integrate reaction/separation operations into a single intensified unit, a reactive distillation column, followed by a second separation unit. These configurations exhibit several advantages such as shifting equilibrium in the reactive region and, because of the thermal integration with the second unit, energy savings during products separation. In order to design these production sequences taking advantage of steady state knowledge (energy savings) and considering dynamic performance, this work performs a controllability analysis for six possible configurations; open-loop control properties, evaluated by single value decomposition, are probed by implementing PI controllers to the system. The reactive distillation column coupled to a stripper, without reboilers, shows to be the best option in terms of closed-loop performance and energy savings. [Spanish] Biodiesel es el nombre comun dado a metil esteres de acidos grasos obtenidos por esterificacion (catalisis basica) o trans-esterificacion (catalisis acida) de aceites animales o vegetales con alcoholes, y usados como combustibles liquidos. Su produccion involucra la reaccion entre el aceite y, tipicamente, exceso de metanol a condiciones moderadas. La produccion tradicional de biodiesel exhibe algunas desventajas como el desplazamiento del equilibrio hacia acidos grasos debido al exceso de alcohol, que debe ser separado y reciclado. Alternativamente, es posible integrar las operaciones reaccion

  1. Double diffusive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mixed convective slip flow along a radiating moving vertical flat plate with convective boundary condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Mohammad M; Kavyani, Neda; Abelman, Shirley; Uddin, Mohammed J; Freidoonimehr, Navid

    2014-01-01

    In this study combined heat and mass transfer by mixed convective flow along a moving vertical flat plate with hydrodynamic slip and thermal convective boundary condition is investigated. Using similarity variables, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are converted into a system of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The transformed equations are then solved using a semi-numerical/analytical method called the differential transform method and results are compared with numerical results. Close agreement is found between the present method and the numerical method. Effects of the controlling parameters, including convective heat transfer, magnetic field, buoyancy ratio, hydrodynamic slip, mixed convective, Prandtl number and Schmidt number are investigated on the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles. In addition effects of different parameters on the skin friction factor, [Formula: see text], local Nusselt number, [Formula: see text], and local Sherwood number [Formula: see text] are shown and explained through tables.

  2. Thermal study by conduction and convection in an elongated tilted cavity with a semitransparent cover; Estudio termico por conveccion y conduccion en una cavidad alargada inclinada con una cubierta semitransparente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Rosas, Tannia Renee; Alvarez Garcia, Gabriela del S.; Xaman Villasenor, Jesus Perfecto [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico (CENIDET), Departamento de Mecanica, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)]. E-mail:Tann1a@live.com.mx; gaby@cenidet.edu.mx; jxaman@cenidet.edu.mx

    2010-11-15

    In this paper a two dimensional numerical study on heat transfer by conduction and convection in a shallow inclined cavity with a semi-transparent wall is presented, where the region between the glass cover (GC) and the absorber plate resembles a cavity. The absorber plate is considered an isothermal surface at hot temperature; whereas the vertical walls were considered adiabatic. The thermal physical and optical properties of the glass cover (GC) were taken into account for the analysis. Inclination angles from 15 degrees to 35 degrees, aspect ratios (A) of 8 and 12 and Rayleigh numbers 10 4, 10 5 and 10 6 were combined to construct the cases. The governing equations of mass, moment and energy were discretized by the use of the Finite Volume method solving the algebraic equations with the SIMPLE algorithm. Results displayed include isotherms and streamlines inside the cavity, as well as temperature distribution on the inside surface of the glass cover (GC) and Nusselt number variations regarding the inclination angle for the two aspect ratios. The results show that the heat transfer increases while the inclination angle rise up, except for the cases where A=8,12, Ra=10 4 and {lambda}=30 where a transition of the flow pattern occurs, and the heat transfer diminishes with the aspect ratio for a fixed Rayleigh. [Spanish] Se presenta el estudio numerico bidimensional de la transferencia de calor por conduccion y conveccion en una cavidad alargada inclinada con pared semitransparente, simulando como una cavidad, la region comprendida entre la cubierta de vidrio (GC) y la placa absorbedora, de un captador solar, con aire en su interior. La placa absorbedora se considero isoterma a una temperatura caliente, se tomo en cuenta las propiedades termofisicas y opticas de la cubierta de vidrio (GC), mientras las paredes verticales se consideraron adiabaticas. Las ecuaciones de conservacion de masa, momentum y energia se resolvieron usando el metodo de Volumen Finito mediante

  3. Convection heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bejan, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Written by an internationally recognized authority on heat transfer and thermodynamics, this second edition of Convection Heat Transfer contains new and updated problems and examples reflecting real-world research and applications, including heat exchanger design. Teaching not only structure but also technique, the book begins with the simplest problem solving method (scale analysis), and moves on to progressively more advanced and exact methods (integral method, self similarity, asymptotic behavior). A solutions manual is available for all problems and exercises.

  4. Force distribution in a semiflexible loop

    CERN Document Server

    Waters, James T

    2016-01-01

    Loops undergoing thermal fluctuations are prevalent in nature. Ring-like or cross-linked polymers, cyclic macromolecules, and protein-mediated DNA loops all belong to this category. Stability of these molecules are generally described in terms of free energy, an average quantity, but it may also be impacted by local fluctuating forces acting within these systems. The full distribution of these forces can thus give us insights into mechanochemistry beyond the predictive capability of thermodynamics. In this paper, we study the force exerted by an inextensible semiflexible polymer constrained in a looped state. By using a novel simulation method termed "phase-space sampling", we generate the equilibrium distribution of chain conformations in both position and momentum space. We compute the constraint forces between the two ends of the loop in this chain ensemble using Lagrangian mechanics, and show that the mean of these forces is equal to the thermodynamic force. By analyzing kinetic and potential contribution...

  5. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    with 3 cm diameter graphite-based fuel pebbles slowly circulating up through the core. Molten salt coolant (FLiBe) at 700°C flows concurrently (at significantly higher velocity) with the pebbles and is used to remove heat generated in the reactor core (approximately 1280 W/pebble), and supply it to a power conversion system. Refueling equipment continuously sorts spent fuel pebbles and replaces spent or damaged pebbles with fresh fuel. By combining greater or fewer numbers of pebble channel assemblies, multiple reactor designs with varying power levels can be offered. The PB-AHTR design is discussed in detail in Reference [1] and is shown schematically in Fig. 1. Fig. 1. PB-AHTR concept (drawing taken from Peterson et al., Design and Development of the Modular PB-AHTR Proceedings of ICApp 08). Pebble behavior within the core is a key issue in proving the viability of this concept. This includes understanding the behavior of the pebbles thermally, hydraulically, and mechanically (quantifying pebble wear characteristics, flow channel wear, etc). The experiment being developed is an initial step in characterizing the pebble behavior under realistic PB-AHTR operating conditions. It focuses on thermal and hydraulic behavior of a static pebble bed using a convective salt loop to provide prototypic fluid conditions to the bed, and a unique inductive heating technique to provide prototypic heating in the pebbles. The facility design is sufficiently versatile to allow a variety of other experimentation to be performed in the future. The facility can accommodate testing of scaled reactor components or sub-components such as flow diodes, salt-to-salt heat exchangers, and improved pump designs as well as testing of refueling equipment, high temperature instrumentation, and other reactor core designs.

  6. Rossby numbers of fully convective and partially convective stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landin, Natália R.; Mendes, Luiz T. S.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the stellar magnetic activity in the theoretical point of view, through the use of stellar structure and evolution models. We present theoretical values of convective turnover times and Rossby numbers for low-mass stars, calculated with the ATON stellar structure and evolution code. We concentrate our analysis on fully convective and partially convective stars motivated by recent observations of X-ray emission of slowly rotating fully convective stars, which suggest that the presence of a tachocline is not a central key for magnetic fields generation. We investigate the behavior of the convective turnover time evolution, as well as its radial profile inside the star. A discussion about the location where the convective turnover time is calculated in the stellar interior is also addressed. Our theoretical results are compared to observational data from low-mass stars.

  7. JUSTIFICATION OF THE CHOICE OF STEP MODE MICROWAVE-CONVECTIVE DRYING OF PEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Demyanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis the kinetic regularities stationary regimes of microwave-convective drying pears and differential thermal analysis was performed. As a result of this combined rational mode of drying pears which was developed.

  8. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification using self-avoiding molecular recognition systems and antarctic thermal sensitive uracil-DNA-glycosylase for detection of nucleic acid with prevention of carryover contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Liu, Dongxin; Deng, Jianping; Wang, Yan; Xu, Jianguo; Ye, Changyun

    2017-12-15

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is the most popular technique to amplify nucleic acid sequence without the use of temperature cycling. However, LAMP is often confounded by false-positive results, arising from interactions between (hetero-dimer) or within (self-dimerization) primers, off-target hybrids and carryover contaminants. Here, we devised a new LAMP technique that is self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS) components and antarctic thermal sensitive uracil-DNA-glycosylase (AUDG) enzyme-assisted, termed AUDG-SAMRS-LAMP. Incorporating SAMRS components into 3'-ends of LAMP primers can improve assay's specificity, which completely prevents the non-specific amplification yielding from off-target hybrids and undesired interactions between or within primers. Adding AUDG into reaction mixtures can effectively eliminate the false-positive results arising from carryover contamination, thus the genuine positive reactions are generated from the amplification of target templates. Furthermore, AUDG-SAMRS-LAMP results are confirmed using a new analysis strategy, which is developed for detecting LAMP amplicons by lateral flow biosensor (LFB). Only a single labeled primer is required in the analysis system, thus the false positive results arising from hybridization (the labeled primer and probe, or between two labeled primers) are avoided. Hence, the SAMRS components, AUDG and LFB convert traditional LAMP from a technique suited for the research laboratory into one that has practical value in the field of diagnosis. Human Tuberculosis (TB) is caused by infection with members of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), which are detected by the AUDG-SAMRS-LAMP technique to demonstrate the availability of target analysis. The proof-of-concept method can be reconfigured to detect various nucleic acids by redesigning the specific primers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Unsteady MHD free convective flow past a vertical porous plate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt has been made to study the unsteady MHD free convective flow past a vertical porous plate immersed in a porous medium with Hall current, thermal diffusion and heat source. Analytical solution has been found depending on the physical parameters including the Hartmann number M, the Prandtl number Pr, the ...

  10. analysis and computer simulation of a natural convective solar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model has been developed to predict the outlet air temperature and air flow rate from a solar collector based on the theory of thermal buoyancy. A high capacitance solar collector directly coupled to an animal building absorbs solar radiation, which heats up air and forces entry into the building by convection. In order to ...

  11. Numerical experimentation on convective coolant flow in Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerical experiments on one dimensional convective coolant flow during steady state operation of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-I) were performed to determine the thermal hydraulic parameters of temperature, density and flow rate. The computational domain was the reactor vessel, including the reactor core.

  12. Mode-to-mode energy transfers in convective patterns

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We investigate the energy transfer between various Fourier modes in a low- dimensional model for thermal convection. We have used the formalism of mode-to-mode energy transfer rate in our calculation. The evolution equations derived using this scheme is the same as those derived using the hydrodynamical ...

  13. Natural convection mud type solar dryers for rural farmers | Eke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prototype direct mod'e natural convection mud type solar dryer was designed, fabricated and tested. Mud was selected as a major dryer material based on its thermal properties, availability and workability by the rural dwellers who .are the end users. Consequent to the laboratory test which dried maize from initial moisture ...

  14. Modelling of transient two-phase heat transfer for spacecraft thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyy, W.

    1994-01-01

    A computational method for predicting the two-phase transient fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics within a reservoir of the capillary-pumped-loop, intended to be used for spacecraft thermal management, has been developed. The model is based on the enthalpy formulation in an axisymmetric configuration. The reservoir operates under a constant thermodynamic pressure by allowing mass exchange between the reservoir and the outside loop. Both 1 g and 0 g environments have been considered to assess the effects of gravity on the reservoir performance. Depending on the gravity level, the power input and the reservoir orientation, three different convection modes have been identified, namely, the thermocapillary mode, the buoyancy mode, and the rapid-expansion mode (caused by interface movement). The impact of these modes on the performance of the reservoir and the associated physical phenomena have been discussed.

  15. Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert Andrus; Gregory Burns; John Chiu; Gregory Lijedahl; Peter Stromberg; Paul Thibeault

    2009-01-07

    For the past several years Alstom Power Inc. (Alstom), a leading world-wide power system manufacturer and supplier, has been in the initial stages of developing an entirely new, ultra-clean, low cost, high efficiency power plant for the global power market. This new power plant concept is based on a hybrid combustion-gasification process utilizing high temperature chemical and thermal looping technology The process consists of the oxidation, reduction, carbonation, and calcination of calcium-based compounds, which chemically react with coal, biomass, or opportunity fuels in two chemical loops and one thermal loop. The chemical and thermal looping technology can be alternatively configured as (i) a combustion-based steam power plant with CO{sub 2} capture, (ii) a hybrid combustion-gasification process producing a syngas for gas turbines or fuel cells, or (iii) an integrated hybrid combustion-gasification process producing hydrogen for gas turbines, fuel cells or other hydrogen based applications while also producing a separate stream of CO{sub 2} for use or sequestration. In its most advanced configuration, this new concept offers the promise to become the technology link from today's Rankine cycle steam power plants to tomorrow's advanced energy plants. The objective of this work is to develop and verify the high temperature chemical and thermal looping process concept at a small-scale pilot facility in order to enable AL to design, construct and demonstrate a pre-commercial, prototype version of this advanced system. In support of this objective, Alstom and DOE started a multi-year program, under this contract. Before the contract started, in a preliminary phase (Phase 0) Alstom funded and built the required small-scale pilot facility (Process Development Unit, PDU) at its Power Plant Laboratories in Windsor, Connecticut. Construction was completed in calendar year 2003. The objective for Phase I was to develop the indirect combustion loop with CO{sub 2

  16. Convective heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Habibur; Abedin, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Nanofluids are considered to offer important advantages over conventional heat transfer fluids. Over a decade ago, researchers focused on measuring and modeling the effective thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluids. Recently important theoretical and experimental research works on convective heat transfer appeared in the open literatures on the enhancement of heat transfer using suspensions of nanometer-sized solid particle materials, metallic or nonmetallic in base heat transfer fluids. The purpose of this article is to summarize recent research on fluid flow and heat transfer enhancement characteristics of nanofluids and thereby identify opportunities for future research.

  17. High-Power Liquid-Metal Heat-Transfer Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Fujita, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Proposed closed-loop system for transfer of thermal power operates at relatively high differential pressure between vapor and liquid phases of liquid-metal working fluid. Resembles "capillary-pumped" liquid-metal heat-transfer loop except electric field across permselective barrier of beta alumina keeps liquid and vapor separate at heat-input end. Increases output thermal power, contains no moving parts, highly reliable and well suited to long-term unattended operation.

  18. Convective heat transfer in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, P.

    Recent emerging technologies on the extraction of geothermal energy, the design of insulation systems for energy conservation, the use of aquifers for hot-water storage, the disposal of nuclear wastes in sub-seabeds, the enhanced recovery of oils by thermal methods, and the design of catalyst-bed reactors have demanded an improved understanding of heat transfer mechanisms in fluid-filled porous media. Experiments have been conducted to investigate the onset of free convection in rectangular and cylindrical enclosures filled with porous media and heated from below. The Nusselt numbers determined from these experiments during steady conditions are correlated in terms of the Rayleigh number. The data for free convection in rectangular geometries show considerable scattering among investigators using different porous media and fluids. Recently, some data has been obtained for free convect on in water-filled glass beads adjacent to a heated vertical flat plate, a horizontal cylinder and between vertical concentric cylinders. The data obtained at low Rayleigh numbers is found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions based on Darcy's law.

  19. Titan Balloon Convection Model Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovative research effort is directed at determining, quantitatively, the convective heat transfer coefficients applicable to a Montgolfiere balloon operating...

  20. Modelling of stellar convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupka, Friedrich; Muthsam, Herbert J.

    2017-07-01

    The review considers the modelling process for stellar convection rather than specific astrophysical results. For achieving reasonable depth and length we deal with hydrodynamics only, omitting MHD. A historically oriented introduction offers first glimpses on the physics of stellar convection. Examination of its basic properties shows that two very different kinds of modelling keep being needed: low dimensional models (mixing length, Reynolds stress, etc.) and "full" 3D simulations. A list of affordable and not affordable tasks for the latter is given. Various low dimensional modelling approaches are put in a hierarchy and basic principles which they should respect are formulated. In 3D simulations of low Mach number convection the inclusion of then unimportant sound waves with their rapid time variation is numerically impossible. We describe a number of approaches where the Navier-Stokes equations are modified for their elimination (anelastic approximation, etc.). We then turn to working with the full Navier-Stokes equations and deal with numerical principles for faithful and efficient numerics. Spatial differentiation as well as time marching aspects are considered. A list of codes allows assessing the state of the art. An important recent development is the treatment of even the low Mach number problem without prior modification of the basic equation (obviating side effects) by specifically designed numerical methods. Finally, we review a number of important trends such as how to further develop low-dimensional models, how to use 3D models for that purpose, what effect recent hardware developments may have on 3D modelling, and others.

  1. Convection and evaporation rate of planar liquid films subjected to impulsive superheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, J. T.; Hermanson, J. C.; Allen, J. S.

    2010-11-01

    The interfacial stability, convective structure, and evaporation rate of upward-facing, thin liquid films were studied experimentally. Four different working fluids were used. Films initially 5 mm to 100 μm thick were subjected to impulsive superheating. The films resided on a temperature controlled, gold-plated copper surface in a closed, initially degassed test chamber. Superheating was achieved by suddenly dropping the pressure of the saturated pure vapor in the test chamber. The dynamic film thickness was measured at multiple points using ultrasound, and instability wavelength and convective structure information was obtained by schlieren imaging. Considering previous quasi-steady results, the observed convection patterns in many cases suggest an initial, limited penetration of the convection structures into the film. The initial convection patterns and measured evaporation rate in these films are independent of the thermal boundary condition of the substrate. After a sufficiently long time, the convection pattern changes and approaches the previously observed quasi-steady condition.

  2. Hall Effect on Bénard Convection of Compressible Viscoelastic Fluid through Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahinder Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation made on the effect of Hall currents on thermal instability of a compressible Walter’s B′ elasticoviscous fluid through porous medium is considered. The analysis is carried out within the framework of linear stability theory and normal mode technique. For the case of stationary convection, Hall currents and compressibility have postponed the onset of convection through porous medium. Moreover, medium permeability hasten postpone the onset of convection, and magnetic field has duel character on the onset of convection. The critical Rayleigh numbers and the wave numbers of the associated disturbances for the onset of instability as stationary convection have been obtained and the behavior of various parameters on critical thermal Rayleigh numbers has been depicted graphically. The magnetic field, Hall currents found to introduce oscillatory modes, in the absence of these effects the principle of exchange of stabilities is valid.

  3. Long-lived magnetism from solidification-driven convection on the pallasite parent body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryson, James F.J.; Nichols, Claire I. O.; Herrero-Albillos, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic measurements of meteorites suggest that, shortly after the birth of the Solar System, themolten metallic cores ofmany small planetary bodies convected vigorously and were capable of generating magnetic fields. Convection on these bodies is currently thought to have been thermally...... characteristics and cooling rates. Solidification-driven convectionwas probably commonamong small body cores, and, in contrast to thermally driven convection, will have led to a relatively late (hundreds of millions of years after accretion), long-lasting, intense and widespread epoch of magnetic activity among...

  4. Determining in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials through numerical analysis of thermal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, H.; Hamamoto, S.; Moldrup, P.; Komatsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems use ground or groundwater as a heat/cooling source, typically by circulating anti-freezing solution inside a vertically installed closed-loop tube known as a U-tube to transfer heat to/from the ground. Since GSHP systems are based on renewable energy and can achieve much higher coefficient of performance (COP) than conventional air source heat pump systems, use of GSHP systems has been rapidly increasing worldwide. However, environmental impacts by GSHP systems including thermal effects on subsurface physical-chemical and microbiological properties have not been fully investigated. To rigorously assess GSHP impact on the subsurface environment, ground thermal properties including thermal conductivity and heat capacity need to be accurately characterized. Ground thermal properties were investigated at two experimental sites at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TAT) and Saitama University (SA), both located in the Kanto area of Japan. Thermal properties were evaluated both by thermal probe measurements on boring core samples and by performing in-situ Thermal Response Tests (TRT) in 50-80 m deep U-tubes. At both TAT and SU sites, heat-pulse probe measurements gave unrealistic low thermal conductivities for coarse textured materials (dominated by particles > 75 micrometers). Such underestimation can be partly due to poor contact between probe and porous material and partly to markedly decreasing sample water content during drilling, carrying, and storing sandy/gravelly samples. A more reliable approach for estimating in-situ thermal conductivity of coarse textured materials is therefore needed, and may be based on the commonly used TRT test. However, analyses of TRT data is typically based on Kelvin's line source model and provides an average (effective) thermal property for the whole soil profile around the U-tube but not for each geological layer. The main objective of this study was therefore to develop a method

  5. Natural convection reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, D.F.; Bernath, L.; Menegus, R.L.; Ring, H.F.

    1956-05-01

    A previous report described the conceptual design of a plutonium producing reactor that may be characterized as follows: Power output (2000 MW); cooling - (natural convection of light water through the reactor, up through a draft tube to an evaporative cooling pond, then back to the reactor, and fuel (400 to 500 tons of uranium enriched to 1.2% U-235). Because this reactor would be cooled by the natural convection of light water, it is believed that the construction costs would be significantly less than for a Savannah or Hanford type reactor. Such expensive items as water treatment and water pumping facilities would be eliminated entirely. The inventory of 500 tons of slightly enriched uranium, however, is an unattractive feature. It represents not only a large dollar investment but also makes the reactor less attractive for construction during periods of national emergency because of the almost certain scarcity of even slightly enriched uranium at that time. The Atomic Energy Commission asked that the design be reviewed with the objective of reducing the inventory of uranium, The results of this review are given in this report.

  6. MHD Natural Convection with Convective Surface Boundary Condition over a Flat Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Rashidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply the one parameter continuous group method to investigate similarity solutions of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD heat and mass transfer flow of a steady viscous incompressible fluid over a flat plate. By using the one parameter group method, similarity transformations and corresponding similarity representations are presented. A convective boundary condition is applied instead of the usual boundary conditions of constant surface temperature or constant heat flux. In addition it is assumed that viscosity, thermal conductivity, and concentration diffusivity vary linearly. Our study indicates that a similarity solution is possible if the convective heat transfer related to the hot fluid on the lower surface of the plate is directly proportional to (x--1/2 where x- is the distance from the leading edge of the solid surface. Numerical solutions of the ordinary differential equations are obtained by the Keller Box method for different values of the controlling parameters associated with the problem.

  7. Sharp nonlinear stability for centrifugal filtration convection in magnetizable media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, S; Brindha, D

    2011-11-01

    A nonlinear stability theory is adopted to study centrifugal thermal convection in a magnetic-fluid-saturated and differentially heated porous layer placed in a zero-gravity environment. The axis of rotation of the layer is placed within its boundaries that leads to an alternating direction of the centrifugal body force. An analysis through the variational principles is made to find the unconditional and sharp nonlinear limits. The compound matrix method is employed to solve the eigenvalue problems of the nonlinear and corresponding linear theories. The importance of nonlinear theory is established by demonstrating the failure of the linear theory in capturing the physics of the onset of convection.

  8. Scaling of time-dependent stagnant lid convection: Application to small-scale convection on Earth and other terrestrial planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomatov, V. S.; Moresi, L.-N.

    2000-09-01

    Small-scale convection associated with instabilities at the bottom of the lithospheric plates on the Earth and other terrestrial planets occurs in the stagnant lid regime of temperature-dependent viscosity convection. Systematic numerical simulations of time-dependent, internally heated stagnant lid convection suggest simple scaling relationships for a variety of convective parameters and in a broad range of power law viscosities. Application of these scaling relationships to the Earth's oceanic lithosphere shows that for either diffusion or dislocation viscosity of olivine, convective instabilities occur in the lower part of the lithosphere between 85 and 100 km depth (the rheological sublayer). ``Wet'' olivine satisfies constraints on the heat flux and mantle temperature better than ``dry'' olivine, supporting the view that the upper mantle of the Earth is wet. This is also consistent with the fact that the rheological sublayer is located below the Gutenberg discontinuity which was proposed to represent a sharp change in water content. The viscosity of asthenosphere is (3-6)×1018Pas, consistent with previous estimates. The velocities of cold plumes are relatively high reaching several meters per year in the dislocation creep regime. A low value of the heat flux in old continental cratons suggests that continental lithosphere might be convectively stable unless it is perturbed by processes associated with plate tectonics and hot plumes. The absence of plate tectonics on other terrestrial planets and the low heat transport efficiency of stagnant lid convection can lead to widespread melting during the thermal evolution of the terrestrial planets. If the terrestrial planets are dry, small-scale convection cannot occur at subsolidus temperatures.

  9. Interaction Between Convection and Pulsation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günter Houdek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews our current understanding of modelling convection dynamics in stars. Several semi-analytical time-dependent convection models have been proposed for pulsating one-dimensional stellar structures with different formulations for how the convective turbulent velocity field couples with the global stellar oscillations. In this review we put emphasis on two, widely used, time-dependent convection formulations for estimating pulsation properties in one-dimensional stellar models. Applications to pulsating stars are presented with results for oscillation properties, such as the effects of convection dynamics on the oscillation frequencies, or the stability of pulsation modes, in classical pulsators and in stars supporting solar-type oscillations.

  10. Natural convection through enclosed disconnected solid blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, Fernando Cesar De; Junqueira, Silvio L.M.; Franco, Admilson T. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mails: fernandodelai@gmail.com; silvio@utfpr.edu.br; admilson@utfpr.edu.br; Lage, Jose L. [Southern Methodist University (SMU), Dallas, TX (United States)]. E-mail: JLL@smu.edu

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the natural convection inside a fluid filled, enclosure containing several solid obstructions and being heated from the side is modeled and numerically simulated. The solid obstructions are equally spaced, conducting, and disconnected square blocks. The mathematical model is based on the balance equations of mass, momentum and energy, which are then solved numerically via the finite-volume method with the SIMPLEST algorithm and the HYBRID scheme. The effects of varying the solid-fluid thermal conductivity ratio (K), the fluid volume-fraction or porosity ({phi}), the number of solid blocks (N) and the heating strength (represented by the Rayleigh number, Ra) of the enclosure on the Nusselt number based on the surface-averaged heat transfer coefficient along the heated wall of the enclosure are studied. The results indicate a competing effect caused by the proximity of the solid blocks to the heated and cooled walls, vis-a-vis hindering the boundary layer growth, hence reducing the heat transfer effectiveness, and at the same time enhancing the heat transfer when the blocks' thermal conductivity is larger than that of the fluid. An analytical estimate of the minimum number of blocks beyond which the convection hindrance becomes predominant is presented and validated by the numerical results. (author)

  11. Convection in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    1992-01-01

    This book provides a user-friendly introduction to the topic of convection in porous media The authors as- sume that the reader is familiar with the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, but otherwise the book is self-contained The book will be useful both as a review (for reference) and as a tutorial work, suitable as a textbook in a graduate course or seminar The book brings into perspective the voluminous research that has been performed during the last two decades The field has recently exploded because of worldwide concern with issues such as energy self-sufficiency and pollution of the environment Areas of application include the insulation of buildings and equipment, energy storage and recovery, geothermal reservoirs, nuclear waste disposal, chemical reactor engineering, and the storage of heat-generating materials such as grain and coal Geophysical applications range from the flow of groundwater around hot intrusions to the stability of snow against avalanches

  12. Convection in Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    2013-01-01

    Convection in Porous Media, 4th Edition, provides a user-friendly introduction to the subject, covering a wide range of topics, such as fibrous insulation, geological strata, and catalytic reactors. The presentation is self-contained, requiring only routine mathematics and the basic elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer. The book will be of use not only to researchers and practicing engineers as a review and reference, but also to graduate students and others entering the field. The new edition features approximately 1,750 new references and covers current research in nanofluids, cellular porous materials, strong heterogeneity, pulsating flow, and more. Recognized as the standard reference in the field Includes a comprehensive, 250-page reference list Cited over 2300 times to date in its various editions Serves as an introduction for those entering the field and as a comprehensive reference for experienced researchers Features new sections on nanofluids, carbon dioxide sequestration, and applications...

  13. Pore Water Convection in Carbonaceous Chondrite Planetesimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, B. J.; Schubert, G.

    2004-12-01

    Chondritic meteorites are so named because they nearly all contain chondrules - small spherules of olivine and pyroxene that condensed and crystallized in the solar nebula and then combined with other material to form a matrix. Their parent bodies did not differentiate, i.e., form a crust and a core. Carbonaceous chondrites (CCs) derived from undifferentiated icy planetesimals. Asteroids of the inner solar system are probably present-day representatives of the early planetesimals. CCs exhibit liquid water-rock interactions. CCs contain small but significant amounts of radiogenic elements (e.g., 26Al), sufficient to warm up an initially cold planetesimal. A warmed-up phase could last millions of years. During the warmed-up phase, liquid water will form, and could evolve into a hydrothermal convective flow. Flowing water will affect the evolution of minerals. We report on results of a numerical study of the thermal evolution of CCs, considering the major factors that control heating history and possible flow, namely: permeability, radiogenic element content, and planetesimal radius. We determine the time sequence of thermal processes, length of time for a convective phase and patterns of flow, amount of fluid flow throughout the planetesimals, and sensitivity of evolution to primary parameters. We use the MAGHNUM code to simulate 3-D dynamic freezing and thawing and flow of water in a self-gravitating, permeable spherical body. Governing equations are Darcy's law, mass conservation, energy conservation, and equation of state for water and ice. We have simulated the evolution of heating, melting of ice, subsequent flow and eventual re-freezing for several examples of CC planetesimals. For a reference simulation, we use typical values from meteorite analyses: 20 % porosity, 1 darcy permeability (~10-12 m2), 3x10-8 wt fraction of 26Al, rock density of 3000 kg/m3, rock specific heat of 1000 J/kg/K, body radius of 50 km, solid rock thermal conductivity of 3 W/m/K. For the

  14. Numerical modelling of Rayleigh-Benard convection and heat transfer in normal {sup 3}He near the critical point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polezhaev, V I; Gorbunov, A A; Nikitin, S A; Soboleva, E B [Institute for Problems in Mechanics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: polezh@ipmnet.ru

    2009-02-01

    New numerical results on thermal gravity-driven convection in a layer filled with near-critical {sup 3}He and heated from below are presented. Corrections of conditions for convection onset are discussed. The heat transfer calibrations near the critical point are tested using experimental data. Stratification effects are analysed. As found, space environment that suppresses the strong density gradients near the critical point may provoke the enhancement of convection compared to the terrestrial conditions.

  15. Solar flare loops observations and interpretations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Guangli; Ji, Haisheng; Ning, Zongjun

    2018-01-01

    This book provides results of analysis of typical solar events, statistical analysis, the diagnostics of energetic electrons and magnetic field, as well as the global behavior of solar flaring loops such as their contraction and expansion. It pays particular attention to analyzing solar flare loops with microwave, hard X-ray, optical and EUV emissions, as well as the theories of their radiation, and electron acceleration/transport. The results concerning influence of the pitch-angle anisotropy of non-thermal electrons on their microwave and hard X-ray emissions, new spectral behaviors in X-ray and microwave bands, and results related to the contraction of flaring loops, are widely discussed in the literature of solar physics. The book is useful for graduate students and researchers in solar and space physics.

  16. Shallow open-loop geothermal systems: simulation of heat transfer in groundwater and experimental tests for improving parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossoul, F.; Orban, P.; Dassargues, A.; Hydrogeology; Environmental Geology

    2011-12-01

    Innovative and efficient strategies for energy use become a priority, especially in civil engineering. Geothermal open-loop systems (geothermal wells) are not so developed in Belgium contrary to close-loop systems. This is generally due to the lack of relevant dimensioning and impact study that must be foreseen during the planning phases of the building. However, as shallow groundwater is widely available, geothermal wells potential is significant. Using both experimental and numerical tools, our aim is to develop a rigorous methodology to design heating and cooling shallow geothermal wells (pumping/reinjection), with a detailed hydrogeological characterization coupled to feasibility, environmental impact assessment, dimensioning, and system sustainability. Concerning numerical modeling, Groundwater flow and heat transfer is computed using different codes (HydroGeoSphere, MT3DMS and SHEMAT) for a comparative sensitivity analysis on a typical case. Coupling and temperature non linearities of hydro-thermal parameters values are checked accurately. As shown previously, small temperature variations (temperatures ranging from 12 to 25 °C) allow to use conventional solute transport codes for modeling heat transfer in groundwater taking benefits of the similarities between solute transport and heat transfer equations. When numerical codes are used as dimensioning tools for long-term simulations, reliable values for hydro-thermal properties of the aquifer are essential. As very few experimental values are available in the literature, field experiments are needed to determine more accurately the local values in different geological/hydrogeological conditions. Apart from thermal response tests (TRT) usually performed for designing a close-loop system within a borehole considered in static groundwater conditions, there is no standard procedure for geothermal wells systems. In an open-loop system, groundwater movement induced by the pumping is responsible for a major heat

  17. Scaling of plate tectonic convection with pseudoplastic rheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2010-11-01

    The scaling of plate tectonic convection is investigated by simulating thermal convection with pseudoplastic rheology and strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The effect of mantle melting is also explored with additional depth-dependent viscosity. Heat flow scaling can be constructed with only two parameters, the internal Rayleigh number and the lithospheric viscosity contrast, the latter of which is determined entirely by rheological properties. The critical viscosity contrast for the transition between plate tectonic and stagnant lid convection is found to be proportional to the square root of the internal Rayleigh number. The relation between mantle temperature and surface heat flux on Earth is discussed on the basis of these scaling laws, and the inverse relationship between them, as previously suggested from the consideration of global energy balance, is confirmed by this fully dynamic approach. In the presence of surface water to reduce the effective friction coefficient, the operation of plate tectonics is suggested to be plausible throughout the Earth history.

  18. Vector cylindrical harmonics for low-dimensional convection models

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Douglas H; Knox, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Approximate empirical models of thermal convection can allow us to identify the essential properties of the flow in simplified form, and to produce empirical estimates using only a few parameters. Such "low-dimensional" empirical models can be constructed systematically by writing numerical or experimental measurements as superpositions of a set of appropriate basis modes, a process known as Galerkin projection. For Boussinesq convection in a cylinder, those basis modes should be defined in cylindrical coordinates, vector-valued, divergence-free, and mutually orthogonal. Here we construct two such basis sets, one using Bessel functions in the radial direction, and one using Chebyshev polynomials. We demonstrate that each set has those desired characteristics and demonstrate the advantages and drawbacks of each set. We show their use for representing sample simulation data and point out their potential for low-dimensional convection models.

  19. Blind Loop Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of tissue that protrude through the intestinal wall (diverticulosis) Certain medical conditions, including Crohn's disease, radiation enteritis, ... History of radiation therapy to the abdomen Diabetes Diverticulosis of the small intestine A blind loop can ...

  20. Convection in Type 2 supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Douglas Scott [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1993-10-15

    Results are presented here from several two dimensional numerical calculations of events in Type II supernovae. A new 2-D hydrodynamics and neutrino transport code has been used to compute the effect on the supernova explosion mechanism of convection between the neutrinosphere and the shock. This convection is referred to as exterior convection to distinguish it from convection beneath the neutrinosphere. The model equations and initial and boundary conditions are presented along with the simulation results. The 2-D code was used to compute an exterior convective velocity to compare with the convective model of the Mayle and Wilson 1-D code. Results are presented from several runs with varying sizes of initial perturbation, as well as a case with no initial perturbation but including the effects of rotation. The M&W code does not produce an explosion using the 2-D convective velocity. Exterior convection enhances the outward propagation of the shock, but not enough to ensure a successful explosion. Analytic estimates of the growth rate of the neutron finger instability axe presented. It is shown that this instability can occur beneath the neutrinosphere of the proto-neutron star in a supernova explosion with a growth time of ~ 3 microseconds. The behavior of the high entropy bubble that forms between the shock and the neutrinosphere in one dimensional calculations of supernova is investigated. It has been speculated that this bubble is a site for γ-process generation of heavy elements. Two dimensional calculations are presented of the time evolution of the hot bubble and the surrounding stellar material. Unlike one dimensional calculations, the 2D code fails to achieve high entropies in the bubble. When run in a spherically symmetric mode the 2-D code reaches entropies of ~ 200. When convection is allowed, the bubble reaches ~60 then the bubble begins to move upward into the cooler, denser material above it.

  1. Internally heated convection and Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    CERN Document Server

    Goluskin, David

    2016-01-01

    This Brief describes six basic models of buoyancy-driven convection in a fluid layer: three configurations of internally heated convection and three configurations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The author discusses the main quantities that characterize heat transport in each model, along with the constraints on these quantities. This presentation is the first to place the various models in a unified framework, and similarities and differences between the cases are highlighted. Necessary and sufficient conditions for convective motion are given. For the internally heated cases only, parameter-dependent lower bounds on the mean fluid temperature are proven, and results of past simulations and laboratory experiments are summarized and reanalyzed. The author poses several open questions for future study.

  2. Heat Transfer in a Loop Heat Pipe Using Fe2NiO4-H2O Nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnasegaran Prem

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are stable suspensions of nano fibers and particles in fluids. Recent investigations show that thermal behavior of these fluids, such as improved thermal conductivity and convection coefficients are superior to those of pure fluid or fluid suspension containing larger size particles. The use of enhanced thermal properties of nanofluids in a loop heat pipe (LHP for the cooling of computer microchips is the main aim of this study. Thus, the Fe2NiO4-H2O served as the working fluid with nanoparticle mass concentrations ranged from 0 to 3 % in LHP for the heat input range from 20W to 60W was employed. Experimental apparatus and procedures were designed and implemented for measurements of the surface temperature of LHP. Then, a commercial liquid cooling kit of LHP system similar as used in experimental study was installed in real desktop PC CPU cooling system. The test results of the proposed system indicate that the average decrease of 5.75oC (14% was achieved in core temperatures of desktop PC CPU charged with Fe2NiO4-H2O as compared with pure water under the same operating conditions. The results from this study should find it’s used in many industrial processes in which the knowledge on the heat transfer behavior in nanofluids charged LHP is of uttermost importance.

  3. Instability and Route to Chaos in Porous Media Convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vadasz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A review of the research on the instability of steady porous media convection leading to chaos, and the possibility of controlling the transition from steady convection to chaos is presented. The governing equations consisting of the continuity, the extended Darcy, and the energy equations subject to the assumption of local thermal equilibrium and the Boussinesq approximation are converted into a set of three nonlinear ordinary differential equations by assuming two-dimensional convection and expansion of the dependent variables into a truncated spectrum of modes. Analytical (weak nonlinear, computational (Adomian decomposition as well as numerical (Runge-Kutta-Verner solutions to the resulting set of equations are presented and compared to each other. The analytical solution for the transition point to chaos is identical to the computational and numerical solutions in the neighborhood of a convective fixed point and deviates from the accurate computational and numerical solutions as the initial conditions deviate from the neighborhood of a convective fixed point. The control of this transition is also discussed.

  4. State of the Magnetotail: Steady and Bursty Magnetospheric Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, E. I.; Slavin, J. A.

    2004-12-01

    Geotail and Cluster observations are used to examine the state of the Earth's magnetotail. In this paper we are particularly interested about the plasma sheet convection and the tail "stress level". Tail static pressure (magnetic + thermal pressure) is used to characterize different convection modes, and earthward bulk velocity is used to identify burstyness of the plasma sheet. Four basic convection modes are identified: loading, unloading, steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) and continuous magnetospheric dissipation (CMD). Bulk ion velocity is used to characterize the nature of the convection in the plasma sheet during each of these states. Bursty bulk flows (BBFs) were found to be basic building blocks of the all the tail states. When solar wind drives magnetosphere over several substorm cycle (> 8 hours) the plasma sheet was observed to be highly active and non-steady. The tail stress level was studied by using magnetic and plasma measurements from four Cluster spacecraft. Tail total current was computed, and x-component of the J cross B was used as a "tail stress index". Examples of slightly and strongly stretched magnetotail will be presented and the validity of the tail stress index will be evaluated.

  5. The Role of the Velocity Gradient in Laminar Convective Heat Transfer through a Tube with a Uniform Wall Heat Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Bi; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Xiao-Xia

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of convective heat transfer. For this purpose, the reason why thermal diffusivity should be placed before the Laplacian operator of the heat flux, and the role of the velocity gradient in convective heat transfer are analysed. The background to these analyses is that, when the energy…

  6. Heating of the Solar Corona and its Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, James A.

    2009-01-01

    At several million degrees, the solar corona is more than two orders of magnitude hotter than the underlying solar surface. The reason for these extreme conditions has been a puzzle for decades and is considered one of the fundamental problems in astrophysics. Much of the coronal plasma is organized by the magnetic field into arch-like structures called loops. Recent observational and theoretical advances have led to great progress in understanding the nature of these loops. In particular, we now believe they are bundles of unresolved magnetic strands that are heated by storms of impulsive energy bursts called nanoflares. Turbulent convection at the solar surface shuffles the footpoints of the strands and causes them to become tangled. A nanoflare occurs when the magnetic stresses reach a critical threshold, probably by way of a mechanism called the secondary instability. I will describe our current state of knowledge concerning the corona, its loops, and how they are heated.

  7. Numerical analysis of the fluid dynamics in a natural circulation loop; Analise numerica da dinamica do escoamento em circuitos de circulacao natural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelo, Gabriel

    2013-07-01

    Natural circulation loops apply to many engineering applications such as: water heating solar energy system (thermo-siphons), thermal management of electrical components (voltage converter), geothermal energy, nuclear reactors, etc. In pressurized water nuclear reactors, known as PWR's, the natural circulation loops are employed to ensure passive safety. In critical situations, the heat transfer will occur only by natural convection, without any external control or mechanical devices. This feature is desired and has been considered in modern nuclear reactor projects. This work consists of a numerical study of the natural circulation loop, located at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in order to establish the flow pattern in single phase conditions. The comparison of numerical results to experiments in transient condition revealed significant deviations for the Zero Equation turbulence model. Intermediate deviations for the Eddy Viscosity Turbulence Equation (EVTE), k - {omega}, SST e SSG models. And the best results are obtained by the k - {epsilon} e DES models (with better results for the k - {epsilon} model). (author)

  8. Impact of tidal heating on the onset of convection in Enceladus' ice shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behounkova, Marie; Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gael; Cadek, Ondrej

    2013-04-01

    Observations of Enceladus by the Cassini spacecraft indicated that its south pole is very active, with jets of water vapor and ice emanating from warm tectonic ridges. Convective processes in the ice shell are commonly advocated to explain the enhanced activity at the south pole. The conditions under which convection may occur on Enceladus are, however, still puzzling. According to the estimation of Barr and McKinnon (2007) based on scaling laws, convection may initiate in Enceladus' ice shell only for grain size smaller than 0.3 mm, which is very small compared to the grain size observed on Earth in polar ice sheets for similar temperature and stress conditions (2-4mm). Moreover, Bahounková et al. (2012) showed that such enhanced activity periods associated with thermal convection and internal melting should be brief (~ 1 - 10Myrs) and should be followed by relatively long periods of inactivity (~ 100Myrs), with a probable cessation of thermal convection. In order to constrain the likelihood and periodicity of enhanced activity periods, the conditions under which thermal convection may restart are needed to be investigated. In particular, the goal is to understand how tidal heating, especially during periods of elevated eccentricity, may influence the onset of convection. To answer this question, 3D simulations of thermal convection including a self-consistent computation of tidal dissipation using the code Antigone (Bahounková et al., 2010, 2012) were performed, a composite non-Newtonian rheology (Goldsby and Kohlstedt, 2001) and Maxwell-like rheology mimicking Andrade model were considered. Our simulations show that the onset of convection may occur in Enceladus' ice shell only for ice grain size smaller or equal than 0.5 mm in absence of tidal heating. Tidal dissipation shifts the critical grain size for convection up to values of 1-1.5 mm. The convection is initiated in the polar region due to enhanced tidal dissipation in this area and remains in the

  9. Deep Convection in the Ocean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McWilliams, James

    1999-01-01

    ... mechanism of water mass transformation. The resultant newly mixed deep water masses form a component of the thermohaline circulation, and hence it is essential to understand the deep convection process if the variability of the meridional...

  10. Rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection at low Prandtl number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre Guzman, Andres; Ostilla-Monico, Rodolfo; Clercx, Herman; Kunnen, Rudie

    2017-11-01

    Most geo- and astrophysical convective flows are too remote or too complex for direct measurements of the physical quantities involved, and thus a reduced framework with the main physical constituents is beneficial. This approach is given by the problem of rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RRBC). For large-scale systems, the governing parameters of RRBC take extreme values, leading to the geostrophic turbulent regime. We perform Direct Numerical Simulations to investigate the transition to this regime at low Prandtl number (Pr). In low- Pr fluids, thermal diffusivity dominates over momentum diffusivity; we use Pr = 0.1 , relevant to liquid metals. In particular, we study the convective heat transfer (Nusselt number Nu) as a function of rotation (assessed by the Ekman number Ek). The strength of the buoyant forcing (Rayleigh number Ra) is Ra = 1 ×1010 to ensure turbulent convection. Varying Ek , we observe a change of the power-law scaling Nu Ekβ that suggests a transition to geostrophic turbulence, which is likely to occur at Ek = 9 ×10-7 . The thermal boundary layer thickness, however, may suggest a transition at lower Ekman numbers, indicating that perhaps not all statistical quantities show a transitional behaviour at the same Ek .

  11. Measurements of Magnetic Field Convection in Spherical Liquid Sodium Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, W. J.; Reighard, A. B.; Trucksess, C. D.; Brown, M. R.

    1998-11-01

    We have performed magnetic field measurements both inside and outside a 0.15 m diameter sphere of flowing liquid sodium. Experiments have been conducted in both smooth (laminar flow) and corrugated (turbulent flow) Pyrex spheres. A teflon stirrer generates a non-axisymmetric MHD flow with a magnetic Reynold's number boxcar averager with pick-up loops are used to measure magnetic fields in the flow. Preliminary results indicate evidence of both toroidal and poloidal convection of the magnetic field (internally and externally); total magnetic flux remains approximately fixed. Results will be compared with TRIM MHD computer simulations.

  12. Mixed convection flow and heat transfer in a vertical wavy channel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed convection flow and heat transfer in a vertical wavy channel containing porous and fluid layer with traveling thermal waves. ... Results for a wide range of governing parameters such as Grashof number, viscosity ratio, width ratio, conductivity ratio, and traveling thermal temperature are plotted for different values of ...

  13. Earth's CMB topography and mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassak, T. M.; McNamara, A. K.; Zhong, S.; Garnero, E.

    2008-12-01

    Better understanding topography on Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB) may provide important constraints on mantle dynamics, specifically the style of mantle convection, and on lower mantle heterogeneity. For example, the origin of large, lowermost mantle low shear wave velocity provinces beneath the central Pacific and Africa is not well constrained, but are likely related to both mantle dynamics and CMB topography. Two competing hypotheses for these anomalies are: thermal upwellings (e.g., plume clusters) or large intrinsically dense piles of primitive mantle material (e.g., thermochemical piles). Here we discuss the results from our current 3D investigation of CMB topography in two styles of mantle convection: 1) an isochemical mantle with plume clusters, and 2) a thermochemical mantle with large, intrinsically dense piles. In this study, we numerically investigate 3D spherical models of mantle convection and calculate maps of topography (CMB and surface, with self-gravitation included) and geoid (CMB and surface). Maps of CMB topography and geoid (CMB and surface) are produced, and compared to observed CMB topography (e.g., Morelli and Dziewonski, 1987; Boschi and Dziewonski, 2000; Sze and van der Hilst, 2003) and surface geoid (e.g., Earth Geopotential Model, 1996). Our predicted surface geoid maps provide a key image of how CMB topography, for any given model, will affect the geoid. The results of this work emphasize the importance in using a suite of observables (in this case, topography and geoid maps for CMB and surface) to constrain whole mantle dynamics and lower mantle structure.

  14. Two-dimensional convection and interchange motions in fluids and magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Naulin, V.

    2006-01-01

    In this contribution some recent investigations of two- dimensional thermal convection relevant to ordinary fluids as well as magnetized plasmas are reviewed. An introductory discussion is given of the physical mechanism for baroclinic vorticity generation and convective motions in stratified...... fluids, emphasizing its relation to interchange motions of non- uniformly magnetized plasmas. This is followed by a review of the theories for the onset of convection and quasi-linear saturation in driven-dissipative systems. Non-linear numerical simulations which result in stationary convective states...... deals with the generation of differential rotation by fluctuating motions through tilting of the convective structures. The role of kinetic energy transfer and shearing due to differential advection is pointed out. Numerical simulations for strongly driven systems reveal turbulent states with a bursty...

  15. An Analytic Radiative-Convective Model for Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, T. D.; Catling, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    A fundamental aspect of planetary atmospheres is the vertical thermal structure. Simple one-dimensional (vertical) models can provide reasonable estimates of a planet's global-mean temperature profile while providing insights into the physics behind the thermal profile of an atmosphere. The best basic models are those that incorporate the minimum amount of complexity while still remaining general enough to provide intuitive understanding. Here, we present an analytic 1-D radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres [1]. We assume that thermal radiative transfer is gray, and we include two shortwave channels for absorbed solar (or stellar) light so that the model can compute realistic stratospheric temperature inversions. A convective profile is placed at the base of the portion of the atmosphere that is in radiative equilibrium, and the model ensures that both the temperature profile and the upwelling flux profile are continuous across the radiation-convection boundary. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. The utility, validity, and generality of our model are demonstrated by applying it to a disparate range of worlds, including Jupiter, Venus, and Titan. Our model can be used to explain general observed phenomena in the Solar System [2], and we explore the behaviors of variants of our model, showing its ability to provide clear insights. Given the wealth of new problems posed by exoplanets, development of an analytic model with few parameters is likely to be useful for future application to such worlds, for which only limited data will be known. Our model can be used to help interpret

  16. The Cinderella loop project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Beene, J.; Coyle, T.; Douglass, J.; Nasraoui, K.; O'Connor, J.; Roames, J.; Scott, M.

    2006-01-01

    The solar loop that formed off the northeast limb of the Sun on 1999 November 6 (a.k.a. the Cinderella loop) is one of the few examples of a loop on the limb observed with all three of the following imaging instruments: the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE), the SOHO Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT), and the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope (SXT). In this project we investigate the temperature differences that result when examining the Cinderella loop with one instrument compared with another. For example, what temperature differences result from the increased spatial resolution between the two EUV imagers? More specifically, given that TRACE and EIT have almost identical temperature response to coronal plasma, does the different spatial resolution of TRACE (with 0.5″ pixels) and EIT (with 2.6″ pixels) produce statistically different results? We find that the answer is no, and that our results do not change after background subtraction. In addition, the spatial resolution of EIT and SXT is similar, but the temperature responses of the two instruments are quite different. The two instruments do not seem to be viewing the same loop strands, and the plasma temperature differences are significant.

  17. Model of two-temperature convective transfer in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruais, Isabelle; Poliševski, Dan

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behaviour of the solution of a convective heat transfer boundary problem in an ɛ -periodic domain which consists of two interwoven phases, solid and fluid, separated by an interface. The fluid flow and its dependence with respect to the temperature are governed by the Boussinesq approximation of the Stokes equations. The tensors of thermal diffusion of both phases are ɛ -periodic, as well as the heat transfer coefficient which is used to describe the first-order jump condition on the interface. We find by homogenization that the two-scale limits of the solutions verify the most common system used to describe local thermal non-equilibrium phenomena in porous media (see Nield and Bejan in Convection in porous media, Springer, New York, 1999; Rees and Pop in Transport phenomena in porous media III, Elsevier, Oxford, 2005). Since now, this system was justified only by volume averaging arguments.

  18. Control strategy on the double-diffusive convection in a nanofluid layer with internal heat generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, N. F. M.; Khalid, I. K.; Siri, Z.; Ibrahim, Z. B.; Gani, S. S. A.

    2017-10-01

    The influences of feedback control and internal heat source on the onset of Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a horizontal nanofluid layer is studied analytically due to Soret and Dufour parameters. The confining boundaries of the nanofluid layer (bottom boundary-top boundary) are assumed to be free-free, rigid-free, and rigid-rigid, with a source of heat from below. Linear stability theory is applied, and the eigenvalue solution is obtained numerically using the Galerkin technique. Focusing on the stationary convection, it is shown that there is a positive thermal resistance in the presence of feedback control on the onset of double-diffusive convection, while there is a positive thermal efficiency in the existence of internal heat generation. The possibilities of suppress or augment of the Rayleigh-Bénard convection in a nanofluid layer are also discussed in detail.

  19. Conjugate Problems in Convective Heat Transfer: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abram Dorfman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of conjugate convective heat transfer problems solved during the early and current time of development of this modern approach is presented. The discussion is based on analytical solutions of selected typical relatively simple conjugate problems including steady-state and transient processes, thermal material treatment, and heat and mass transfer in drying. This brief survey is accompanied by the list of almost two hundred publications considering application of different more and less complex analytical and numerical conjugate models for simulating technology processes and industrial devices from aerospace systems to food production. The references are combined in the groups of works studying similar problems so that each of the groups corresponds to one of selected analytical solutions considered in detail. Such structure of review gives the reader the understanding of early and current situation in conjugate convective heat transfer modeling and makes possible to use the information presented as an introduction to this area on the one hand, and to find more complicated publications of interest on the other hand.

  20. A Generalized Simple Formulation of Convective Adjustment Timescale for Cumulus Convection Parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convective adjustment timescale (τ) for cumulus clouds is one of the most influential parameters controlling parameterized convective precipitation in climate and weather simulation models at global and regional scales. Due to the complex nature of deep convection, a pres...

  1. Gregarious Convection and Radiative Feedbacks in Idealized Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    temperature profiles in a statistical or ‘‘quasi-’’ equilibrium state that is as close to con- vective neutrality as Earth’s gravity is strong. But...latent heat release in cloudy updrafts means that moist convective ‘‘ neutrality ’’ is actually a stable thermal stratification (called a moist adiabat...2000] on local scales. Given the efficiency of internal wave heat transport, the net condensation heating associated with precipita- tion can do its

  2. Closing global material loops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prosman, Ernst-Jan; Wæhrens, Brian Vejrum; Liotta, Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    Replacing virgin materials with waste materials, a practice known as Industrial Symbiosis (IS), has been identified as a key strategy for closing material loops. This article adopts a critical view on geographic proximity and external coordinators – two key enablers of IS. By ‘uncovering’ a case...... for geographic proximity and external coordinators. In doing so, our insights into firm-level challenges of long-distance IS exchanges contribute to closing global material loops by increasing the number of potential circular pathways....

  3. Hidden-loop colostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombeau, J L; Turnbul, R B

    1978-04-01

    Records of 15 patients having hidden-loop colostomies were reviewed. All patients had metastatic colonic cancers with impending obstructions. Six colostomies were subsequently opened because of obstructions due to cancer. All colostomy openings were done using local anesthesia in the emergency room. This technique prevented six major celiotomies and provided additional time of living without a stoma. There were two postoperative stomal prolapses, one of which necessitated reoperation. A hidden-loop colostomy is easily constructed and readily opened. It should be considered at celiotomy for selected patients who have metastatic colonic cancer with impending obstruction.

  4. Parametric Study of Mixed Convective RadiativeHeat Transfer in an Inclined Annulus

    OpenAIRE

    Raed G. Saihood; Manal H. Al-Hafidh

    2008-01-01

    The steady state laminar mixed convection and radiation through inclined rectangular duct with an interior circular tube is investigated numerically for a thermally and hydrodynamicaly fully developed flow. The two heat transfer mechanisms of convection and radiation are treated independently and simultaneously. The governing equations which used are continuity, momentum and energy equations. These equations are normalized and solved using the Vorticity-Stream function and the Body Fitted Coo...

  5. Thermocapillary Convection Experiment Facility of an open Cylindrical Annuli for SJ-10 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Qi; Duan, Li; Zhang, Li; Yin, Yongli; Yang, Jingsong; Hu, Wenrui

    2016-05-01

    Thermocapillary convection has always been a hot topic of great importance in either crystal growth or thin films science. A space experiment about thermocapillary convection in an open cylindrical annuli pool will be done on SJ-10 satellite. A payload for space experiment has been established, which includes a cylindrical annuli thermocapillary convection system, a thermocouple temperature controlling system and measurement system, a thermal infrared imager, a high-precision displacement sensor, and an experiment controlling system. Some experiments have been done on the ground in order to compare with the results of space experiment. Some results from the ground experiment are shown, such as temperature oscillation, surface oscillation, and flow pattern transfer.

  6. Local Lorentz force and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry in a vertical convection liquid metal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zürner, Till; Vogt, Tobias; Resagk, Christian; Eckert, Sven; Schumacher, Jörg

    2018-01-01

    We report velocity measurements in a vertical turbulent convection flow cell that is filled with the eutectic liquid metal alloy gallium-indium-tin by the use of local Lorentz force velocimetry (LLFV) and ultrasound Doppler velocimetry. We demonstrate the applicability of LLFV for a thermal convection flow and reproduce a linear dependence of the measured force in the range of micronewtons on the local flow velocity magnitude. Furthermore, the presented experiment is used to explore scaling laws of the global turbulent transport of heat and momentum in this low-Prandtl-number convection flow. Our results are found to be consistent with theoretical predictions and recent direct numerical simulations.

  7. Solutions manual and computer programs for physical and computational aspects of convective heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1989-01-01

    This book is designed to accompany Physical and Computational Aspects of Convective Heat Transfer by T Cebeci and P Bradshaw and contains solutions to the exercises and computer programs for the numerical methods contained in that book Physical and Computational Aspects of Convective Heat Transfer begins with a thorough discussion of the physical aspects of convective heat transfer and presents in some detail the partial differential equations governing the transport of thermal energy in various types of flows The book is intended for senior undergraduate and graduate students of aeronautical, chemical, civil and mechanical engineering It can also serve as a reference for the practitioner

  8. Suppression of heating of coronal loops rooted in opposite polarity sunspot umbrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Thalmann, Julia K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Panesar, Navdeep; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2016-05-01

    EUV observations of active region (AR) coronae reveal the presence of loops at different temperatures. To understand the mechanisms that result in hotter or cooler loops, we study a typical bipolar AR, near solar disk center, which has moderate overall magnetic twist and at least one fully developed sunspot of each polarity. From AIA 193 and 94 A images we identify many clearly discernible coronal loops that connect plage or a sunspot of one polarity to an opposite-polarity plage region. The AIA 94 A images show dim regions in the umbrae of the spots. To see which coronal loops are rooted in a dim umbral area, we performed a non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling using photospheric vector magnetic field measurements obtained with the HMI onboard SDO. After validation of the NLFFF model by comparison of calculated model field lines and observed loops in AIA 193 and 94, we specify the photospheric roots of the model field lines. The model field then shows the coronal magnetic loops that arch from the dim umbral areas of the opposite polarity sunspots. Because these coronal loops are not visible in any of the coronal EUV and X-ray images of the AR, we conclude they are the coolest loops in the AR. This result suggests that the loops connecting opposite polarity umbrae are the least heated because the field in umbrae is so strong that the convective braiding of the field is strongly suppressed.We hypothesize that the convective freedom at the feet of a coronal loop, together with the strength of the field in the body of the loop, determines the strength of the heating. In particular, we expect the hottest coronal loops to have one foot in an umbra and the other foot in opposite-polarity penumbra or plage (coronal moss), the areas of strong field in which convection is not as strongly suppressed as in umbra. Many transient, outstandingly bright, loops in the AIA 94 movie of the AR do have this expected rooting pattern. We will also present another example of AR in

  9. Coronal Loops: Evolving Beyond the Isothermal Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, J. T.; Cirtain, J. W.; Allen, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Are coronal loops isothermal? A controversy over this question has arisen recently because different investigators using different techniques have obtained very different answers. Analysis of SOHO-EIT and TRACE data using narrowband filter ratios to obtain temperature maps has produced several key publications that suggest that coronal loops may be isothermal. We have constructed a multi-thermal distribution for several pixels along a relatively isolated coronal loop on the southwest limb of the solar disk using spectral line data from SOHO-CDS taken on 1998 Apr 20. These distributions are clearly inconsistent with isothermal plasma along either the line of sight or the length of the loop, and suggested rather that the temperature increases from the footpoints to the loop top. We speculated originally that these differences could be attributed to pixel size -- CDS pixels are larger, and more `contaminating' material would be expected along the line of sight. To test this idea, we used CDS iron line ratios from our data set to mimic the isothermal results from the narrowband filter instruments. These ratios indicated that the temperature gradient along the loop was flat, despite the fact that a more complete analysis of the same data showed this result to be false! The CDS pixel size was not the cause of the discrepancy; rather, the problem lies with the isothermal approximation used in EIT and TRACE analysis. These results should serve as a strong warning to anyone using this simplistic method to obtain temperature. This warning is echoed on the EIT web page: ``Danger! Enter at your own risk!'' In other words, values for temperature may be found, but they may have nothing to do with physical reality. Solar physics research at the University of Memphis is supported by NASA grant NAG5-9783. This research was funded in part by the NASA/TRACE MODA grant for Montana State University.

  10. Loop Quantum Gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rovelli Carlo

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of finding the quantum theory of the gravitational field, and thus understanding what is quantum spacetime, is still open. One of the most active of the current approaches is loop quantum gravity. Loop quantum gravity is a mathematically well-defined, non-perturbative and background independent quantization of general relativity, with its conventional matter couplings. Research in loop quantum gravity today forms a vast area, ranging from mathematical foundations to physical applications. Among the most significant results obtained are: (i The computation of the physical spectra of geometrical quantities such as area and volume, which yields quantitative predictions on Planck-scale physics. (ii A derivation of the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy formula. (iii An intriguing physical picture of the microstructure of quantum physical space, characterized by a polymer-like Planck scale discreteness. This discreteness emerges naturally from the quantum theory and provides a mathematically well-defined realization of Wheeler's intuition of a spacetime ``foam''. Long standing open problems within the approach (lack of a scalar product, over-completeness of the loop basis, implementation of reality conditions have been fully solved. The weak part of the approach is the treatment of the dynamics: at present there exist several proposals, which are intensely debated. Here, I provide a general overview of ideas, techniques, results and open problems of this candidate theory of quantum gravity, and a guide to the relevant literature.

  11. LAPAROSCOPIC ILEAL LOOP CONDUIT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Then the right ureter was laparoscopically spa- tulated and anastomosed to the ileostomy opening using interrupted 4/0 vicryl sutures. After finishing half the circumference of the anastomotic line, a 4 Fr. ureteric catheter was introduced through the external stoma of the loop up to the site of the anastomosis with the aid of a ...

  12. Improving Loop Dependence Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Nicklas Bo; Karlsson, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Programmers can no longer depend on new processors to have significantly improved single-thread performance. Instead, gains have to come from other sources such as the compiler and its optimization passes. Advanced passes make use of information on the dependencies related to loops. We improve th...

  13. Convective heat transfer in non-uniformly heated corrugated slots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Arman; Floryan, J. M.

    2017-10-01

    An analysis of heat transfer in non-uniformly heated corrugated slots has been carried out. A sinusoidal corrugation is placed at the lower plate that is exposed to heating consisting of uniform and sinusoidal components, while the upper smooth plate is kept isothermal. The phase difference ΩTL describes the shift between the heating and geometric non-uniformities. The analysis is limited to heating conditions that do not give rise to secondary motions. Depending on ΩTL, the conductive heat flow is directed either upwards, or downwards, or is eliminated. Its magnitude is smallest for the long-wavelength systems and largest for the short-wavelength systems, and it increases proportionally to the corrugation amplitude and heating intensity. The same heating creates horizontal temperature gradients that give rise to convection whose form depends on ΩTL. Convection consists of counter-rotating rolls with the size dictated by the system wavelength when the hot spots (points of maximum temperature) overlap either with the corrugation tips or with the corrugation bottoms. Thermal drift forms for all other values of ΩTL. The convective heat flow is always directed upwards, and it is the largest in systems with wavelengths comparable to the slot height. The magnitude of the overall heat flow increases proportionally to the heating intensity when conductive effects dominate and proportionally to the second power of the heating intensity when convection dominates. It also increases proportionally to the corrugation amplitude. The system characteristics are dictated by convection when the relative position of the heating and corrugation patterns eliminates conduction. Addition of the uniform heating component amplifies the above processes, while uniform cooling reduces them. The processes described above are qualitatively similar for all Prandtl numbers of practical interest with the magnitude of the convective heat flow increasing with Pr.

  14. Second Law Analysis in Convective Heat and Mass Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ben Brahim

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the numerical determination of the entropy generation due to heat transfer, mass transfer and fluid friction in steady state for laminar double diffusive convection, in an inclined enclosure with heat and mass diffusive walls, by solving numerically the mass, momentum, species conservation and energy balance equations, using a Control Volume Finite-Element Method. The influences of the inclination angle, the thermal Grashof number and the buoyancy ratio on total entropy generation were investigated. The irreversibilities localization due to heat transfer, mass transfer and fluid friction is discussed for three inclination angles at a fixed thermal Grashof number.

  15. The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer with non-equilibrium model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Yang

    Full Text Available The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer is studied when the fluid and solid phase are not in local thermal equilibrium. The modified Darcy model is used for the momentum equation and a two-field model is used for energy equation each representing the fluid and solid phases separately. The effect of thermal non-equilibrium on the onset of double diffusive convection is discussed. The critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding wave number for the exchange of stability and over-stability are obtained, and the onset criterion for stationary and oscillatory convection is derived analytically and discussed numerically.

  16. The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer with non-equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhixin; Wang, Shaowei; Zhao, Moli; Li, Shucai; Zhang, Qiangyong

    2013-01-01

    The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer is studied when the fluid and solid phase are not in local thermal equilibrium. The modified Darcy model is used for the momentum equation and a two-field model is used for energy equation each representing the fluid and solid phases separately. The effect of thermal non-equilibrium on the onset of double diffusive convection is discussed. The critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding wave number for the exchange of stability and over-stability are obtained, and the onset criterion for stationary and oscillatory convection is derived analytically and discussed numerically.

  17. Mesoscale Modeling of Marangoni Convection in Evaporating Colloidal Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we develop a three-dimensional free-energy-based multiphase lattice Boltzmann-Brownian dynamics model with thermal effects for elucidating particle dynamics in evaporating nanoparticle-laden droplets in the presence of Marangoni convection. The introduction of thermal effects enables the development of the 3D internal flow structures due to concomitant inhomogeneous evaporation at the droplet surface and thermal conduction inside the droplet. In particular, the model is capable of capturing thermal Marangoni flow along the surface of droplets and its interplay with the internal flow. We calculate the temperature field separately and consider the thermal effect as a forcing term in the lattice Boltzmann model. We first model non-evaporating droplets loaded with nanoparticles and the effects of temperature field on the flow structure. By implementing evaporation, we probe the self-assembly of nanoparticles inside the droplets or at the liquid-vapor interface. We analyze the microstructure of nanoparticle assemblies through radial distribution functions and structure factors. Our findings provide critical insights into the dynamics of nanoparticle self-assembly in evaporating fluid mass with Marangoni convection. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538090.

  18. Thermal energy test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, N. F.

    1991-10-01

    The Navy Clothing and Textile Research Facility (NCTRF) designed and fabricated a thermal energy test apparatus to permit evaluation of the heat protection provided by crash crew firefighter's proximity clothing materials against radiant and convective heat loads, similar to those found outside the flame zone of aircraft fuel fires. The apparatus employs electrically operated quartz lamp radiant heaters and a hot air convective heater assembly to produce the heat load conditions the materials to be subjected to, and is equipped with heat flux sensors of different sensitivities to measure the incident heat flux on the sample material as well as the heat flux transmitted by the sample. Tests of the apparatus have shown that it can produce radiant heat flux levels equivalent to those estimated to be possible in close proximity to large aircraft fuel fires, and can produce convective heat fluxes equivalent to those measured in close proximity to aircraft fuel fires at upwind and sidewind locations. Work was performed in 1974.

  19. Concentration and temperature combined convection due to the melting of a horizontal ice cylinder in a CaCl{sub 2} solution; Suihei hyo enchu no yukai ni yoru ondo nodo fukugo tairyu kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, M.; Tago, M.; Fujita, T. [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Resouce and Science; Sawaki, A. [Akita University, Akita (Japan)

    1999-08-25

    This paper is concerned with the double diffusive convection due to the melting of a horizontal ice cylinder into a calcium chloride aqueous solution inside a cylinder cavity. It appears a quiescent layer between an upper concentration convection and a lower thermal convection in the melt liquid. The thickness of the layer gradually Increases during the melting process due to the decay of the both convections. The present numerical results predicts well the mean Nusselt number at the melting front. (author)

  20. Evidence of suppressed heating of coronal loops rooted in opposite polarity sunspot umbrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Thalmann, Julia K.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Panesar, Navdeep K.; Moore, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    Observations of active region (AR) coronae in different EUV wavelengths reveal the presence of various loops at different temperatures. To understand the mechanisms that result in hotter or cooler loops, we study a typical bipolar AR, near solar disk center, which has moderate overall magnetic twist and at least one fully developed sunspot of each polarity. From AIA 193 and 94 A images we identify many clearly discernible coronal loops that connect opposite-polarity plage or a sunspot to a opposite-polarity plage region. The AIA 94 A images show dim regions in the umbrae of the spots. To see which coronal loops are rooted in a dim umbral area, we performed a non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) modeling using photospheric vector magnetic field measurements obtained with the Heliosesmic Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard SDO. After validation of the NLFFF model by comparison of calculated model field lines and observed loops in AIA 193 and 94 A, we specify the photospheric roots of the model field lines. The model field then shows the coronal magnetic loops that arch from the dim umbral area of the positive-polarity sunspot to the dim umbral area of a negative-polarity sunspot. Because these coronal loops are not visible in any of the coronal EUV and X-ray images of the AR, we conclude they are the coolest loops in the AR. This result suggests that the loops connecting opposite polarity umbrae are the least heated because the field in umbrae is so strong that the convective braiding of the field is strongly suppressed.From this result, we further hypothesize that the convective freedom at the feet of a coronal loop, together with the strength of the field in the body of the loop, determines the strength of the heating. In particular, we expect the hottest coronal loops to have one foot in an umbra and the other foot in opposite-polarity penumbra or plage (coronal moss), the areas of strong field in which convection is not as strongly suppressed as in umbrae. Many

  1. A Computing Approach with the Heat-Loss Model for the Transient Analysis of Liquid Metal Natural Circulation Loop

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Daogang; Zhang, Xun; Guo, Chao

    2014-01-01

    .../Simulink to predict the thermal-hydraulic characteristic of liquid metal NCL. The transient processes including the start-up, the loss of pump, and the shutdown of thermal-hydraulic ADS lead bismuth loop (TALL...

  2. Electric Motor Thermal Management R&D. Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, Kevin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-04-01

    With the push to reduce component volumes, lower costs, and reduce weight without sacrificing performance or reliability, the challenges associated with thermal management increase for power electronics and electric motors. Thermal management for electric motors will become more important as the automotive industry continues the transition to more electrically dominant vehicle propulsion systems. The transition to more electrically dominant propulsion systems leads to higher-power duty cycles for electric drive systems. Thermal constraints place significant limitations on how electric motors ultimately perform, and as thermal management improves, there will be a direct trade-off between motor performance, efficiency, cost, and the sizing of electric motors to operate within the thermal constraints. The goal of this research project is to support broad industry demand for data, analysis methods, and experimental techniques to improve and better understand motor thermal management. Work in FY15 focused on two areas related to motor thermal management: passive thermal performance and active convective cooling. Passive thermal performance emphasized the thermal impact of materials and thermal interfaces among materials within an assembled motor. The research tasks supported the publication of test methods and data for thermal contact resistances and direction-dependent thermal conductivity within an electric motor. Active convective cooling focused on measuring convective heat-transfer coefficients using automatic transmission fluid (ATF). Data for average convective heat transfer coefficients for direct impingement of ATF jets was published. Also, experimental hardware for mapping local-scale and stator-scale convective heat transfer coefficients for ATF jet impingement were developed.

  3. Convection in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Nield, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    This updated edition of a widely admired text provides a user-friendly introduction to the field that requires only routine mathematics. The book starts with the elements of fluid mechanics and heat transfer, and covers a wide range of applications from fibrous insulation and catalytic reactors to geological strata, nuclear waste disposal, geothermal reservoirs, and the storage of heat-generating materials. As the standard reference in the field, this book will be essential to researchers and practicing engineers, while remaining an accessible introduction for graduate students and others entering the field. The new edition features 2700 new references covering a number of rapidly expanding fields, including the heat transfer properties of nanofluids and applications involving local thermal non-equilibrium and microfluidic effects. Recognized as the standard reference in the field Includes a comprehensive, 350-page reference list Cited over 5900 times to date in its various editions Serves as an introduction ...

  4. Effects of thermal radiation and magnetic field on unsteady mixed convection flow and heat transfer over an exponentially stretching surface with suction in the presence of internal heat generation/absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsayed M.A. Elbashbeshy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the problem of unsteady laminar two-dimensional boundary layer flow and heat transfer of an incompressible viscous fluid in the presence of thermal radiation, internal heat generation or absorption, and magnetic field over an exponentially stretching surface subjected to suction with an exponential temperature distribution is discussed numerically. The governing boundary layer equations are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations. New numerical method using Mathematica has been used to solve such system after obtaining the missed initial conditions. Comparison of obtained numerical results is made with previously published results in some special cases, and found to be in a good agreement.

  5. Solar thermoelectric cooling using closed loop heat exchangers with macro channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Raghied M.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we describe the design, analysis and experimental study of an advanced coolant air conditioning system which cools or warms airflow using thermoelectric (TE) devices powered by solar cells. Both faces of the TE devices are directly connected to closed-loop highly efficient channels plates with macro scale channels and liquid-to-air heat exchangers. The hot side of the system consists of a pump that moves a coolant through the hot face of the TE modules, a radiator that drives heat away into the air, and a fan that transfer the heat over the radiator by forced convection. The cold side of the system consists also of a pump that moves coolant through the cold face of the TE modules, a radiator that drives cold away into the air, and a fan that blows cold air off the radiator. The system was integrated with solar panels, tested and its thermal performance was assessed. The experimental results verify the possibility of heating or cooling air using TE modules with a relatively high coefficient of performance (COP). The system was able to cool a closed space of 30 m3 by 14 °C below ambient within 90 min. The maximum COP of the whole system was 0.72 when the TE modules were running at 11.2 Å and 12 V. This improvement in the system COP over the air cooled heat sink is due to the improvement of the system heat exchange by means of channels plates.

  6. Loop Quantum Cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time. Supplementary material is available for this article at 10.12942/lrr-2008-4.

  7. PAR Loop Schedule Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, Jr.; W.F.

    1958-04-30

    The schedule for the installation of the PAR slurry loop experiment in the South Facility of the ORR has been reviewed and revised. The design, fabrications and Installation is approximately two weeks behind schedule at this time due to many factors; however, indications are that this time can be made up. Design is estimated to be 75% complete, fabrication 32% complete and installation 12% complete.

  8. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations in which classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical spacetime inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding spacetime is then modified. One particular theory is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. The main effects are introduced into effective classical equations, which allow one to avoid the interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early-universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function, which allows an extension of quantum spacetime beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of spacetime arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds light on more general issues, such as the nature of time.

  9. Loop Quantum Cosmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojowald Martin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantum gravity is expected to be necessary in order to understand situations where classical general relativity breaks down. In particular in cosmology one has to deal with initial singularities, i.e., the fact that the backward evolution of a classical space-time inevitably comes to an end after a finite amount of proper time. This presents a breakdown of the classical picture and requires an extended theory for a meaningful description. Since small length scales and high curvatures are involved, quantum effects must play a role. Not only the singularity itself but also the surrounding space-time is then modified. One particular realization is loop quantum cosmology, an application of loop quantum gravity to homogeneous systems, which removes classical singularities. Its implications can be studied at different levels. Main effects are introduced into effective classical equations which allow to avoid interpretational problems of quantum theory. They give rise to new kinds of early universe phenomenology with applications to inflation and cyclic models. To resolve classical singularities and to understand the structure of geometry around them, the quantum description is necessary. Classical evolution is then replaced by a difference equation for a wave function which allows to extend space-time beyond classical singularities. One main question is how these homogeneous scenarios are related to full loop quantum gravity, which can be dealt with at the level of distributional symmetric states. Finally, the new structure of space-time arising in loop quantum gravity and its application to cosmology sheds new light on more general issues such as time.

  10. Thermal management for LED applications

    CERN Document Server

    Poppe, András

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Management for LED Applications provides state-of-the-art information on recent developments in thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems and their applications. Coverage begins with an overview of the basics of thermal management including thermal design for LEDs, thermal characterization and testing of LEDs, and issues related to failure mechanisms and reliability and performance in harsh environments. Advances and recent developments in thermal management round out the book with discussions on advances in TIMs (thermal interface materials) for LED applications, advances in forced convection cooling of LEDs, and advances in heat sinks for LED assemblies. This book also: Presents a comprehensive overview of the basics of thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems Discusses both design and thermal management considerations when manufacturing LEDs and LED-based systems Covers reliability and performance of LEDs in harsh environments Has a hands-on applications a...

  11. Cosmic string loop microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Jolyon K.; Chernoff, David F.

    2014-06-01

    Cosmic superstring loops within the galaxy microlens background point sources lying close to the observer-string line of sight. For suitable alignments, multiple paths coexist and the (achromatic) flux enhancement is a factor of two. We explore this unique type of lensing by numerically solving for geodesics that extend from source to observer as they pass near an oscillating string. We characterize the duration of the flux doubling and the scale of the image splitting. We probe and confirm the existence of a variety of fundamental effects predicted from previous analyses of the static infinite straight string: the deficit angle, the Kaiser-Stebbins effect, and the scale of the impact parameter required to produce microlensing. Our quantitative results for dynamical loops vary by O(1) factors with respect to estimates based on infinite straight strings for a given impact parameter. A number of new features are identified in the computed microlensing solutions. Our results suggest that optical microlensing can offer a new and potentially powerful methodology for searches for superstring loop relics of the inflationary era.

  12. Natural convection from circular cylinders

    CERN Document Server

    Boetcher, Sandra K S

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a concise, yet thorough, reference for all heat transfer coefficient correlations and data for all types of cylinders: vertical, horizontal, and inclined. This book covers all natural convection heat transfer laws for vertical and inclined cylinders and is an excellent resource for engineers working in the area of heat transfer engineering.

  13. Heat transfers in porous media. Conduction, convection, radiant transfer; Transferts de chaleur dans les milieux poreux. Conduction, convection, rayonnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bories, S.; Mojtabi, A.; Prat, M.; Quintard, M. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, 31 (France)

    2008-10-15

    Multiple physico-chemical and transport phenomena take place in porous media. The study of these phenomena requires the knowledge of fluid storage, transfer and mechanical properties of these media. Like all polyphasic heterogenous systems, these properties depend on the morphology of the matrix and of the phenomena interacting in the different phases. This makes the heat transfers in porous media a particularly huge field of researches. This article makes a synthesis of these researches. Content: 1 - classification and characterization of porous media; 2 - modeling of transfer phenomena; 3 - heat transfer by conduction: concept of equivalent thermal conductivity (ETC), modeling of conduction heat transfer, ETC determination; 4 - heat transfer by convection: modeling of convection heat transfer, natural convection (in confined media, along surfaces or impermeable bodies immersed in a saturated porous medium), forced and mixed convection; 5 - radiant heat transfer: energy status equation, approximate solutions of the radiant transfer equation, use of the approximate solutions: case of fibrous insulating materials; 6 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  14. Presentation on Tropical Mesoscale convective Systems and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Exchange. Dynamics of deep convection. Microphysics of deep convection. Fountain. (Water Vapor). Intrusion. (Ozone). Circulation. Mass and Energy. Budget ... km (wet spell). 厂 Inversion more during dry spell. 厂 Buoyancy - more during the wet spell. Mon. Wea. Rev, 2010 & 2011. Convection in wet and dry spells.

  15. Radiative mixed convection over an isothermal cone embedded in a porous medium with variable permeability

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of mixed convection with thermal radiation of an optical dense viscous fluid adjacent to an isothermal cone imbedded in a porous medium with Rosseland diffusion approximation incorporating the variation of permeability and thermal conductivity is numerically investigated. The transformed conservation laws are solved numerically for the case of variable surface temperature conditions. Numerical results are given for the dimensionless temperature profiles and the local Nusselt number for various values of the mixed convection parameter , the cone angle parameter ?, the radiation-conduction parameter R d, and the surface temperature parameter H. Copyright 2011 M. F. El-Amin et al.

  16. Hall effect on thermosolutal convection of ferromagnetic fluids in porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, A. K.; Makhija, Suman

    2017-10-01

    The present study deals with effect of Hall currents on thermal convection of ferromagnetic fluids in porous medium. The combined effect of solute gradient, medium permeability, magnetic field and Hall currents on the thermal stability has been investigated. It is found that Hall currents destabilize the system. The magnetic field and solute gradient have stabilizing effect on the convection. The medium permeability has conditional effect on the stability. The principle of exchange of stabilities (PES) is not satisfied under these conditions. In the absence of magnetic field and solute gradient, PES is valid.

  17. Effects of compressibility on the temperature jump at the interface of layered, spherical-shell convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, David A.; Zhang, Shuxia; Langenberger, Sherri E.

    1988-01-01

    Large temperature jumps at the interface of layered convection are important to the argument used against the likelihood of separate circulations in the upper and lower mantles. This problem was studied within the framework of a compressible, constant viscosity spherical-shell model. Both mechanical and thermal coupling configurations are considered. Although the temperature jumps are reduced by compressibility, their magnitudes remain quite large, in the case of mechanical coupling. For thermal coupling, the temperature jumps become smaller but still are substantial, between 500 to 1000 C. In layered spherical-shell convection, flows in the lower mantle are several times greater than the surface velocities.

  18. Carbon-nanotube nanofluid thermophysical properties and heat transfer by natural convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Inagaki, T.; Yamauchi, N.

    2014-11-01

    We measured the thermophysical properties of suspensions of carbon nanotubes in water as a type of nanofluid, and experimentally investigated their heat transfer characteristics in a horizontal, closed rectangular vessel. Using a previously constructed system for high- reliability measurement, we quantitatively determined their thermophysical properties and the temperature dependence of these properties. We also investigated the as yet unexplained mechanism of heat transport in carbon-nanotube nanofluids and their flow properties from a thermal perspective. The results indicated that these nanofluids are non-Newtonian fluids, whose high viscosity impedes convection and leads to a low heat transfer coefficient under natural convection, despite their high thermal conductivity.

  19. LoopIng: a template-based tool for predicting the structure of protein loops.

    KAUST Repository

    Messih, Mario Abdel

    2015-08-06

    Predicting the structure of protein loops is very challenging, mainly because they are not necessarily subject to strong evolutionary pressure. This implies that, unlike the rest of the protein, standard homology modeling techniques are not very effective in modeling their structure. However, loops are often involved in protein function, hence inferring their structure is important for predicting protein structure as well as function.We describe a method, LoopIng, based on the Random Forest automated learning technique, which, given a target loop, selects a structural template for it from a database of loop candidates. Compared to the most recently available methods, LoopIng is able to achieve similar accuracy for short loops (4-10 residues) and significant enhancements for long loops (11-20 residues). The quality of the predictions is robust to errors that unavoidably affect the stem regions when these are modeled. The method returns a confidence score for the predicted template loops and has the advantage of being very fast (on average: 1 min/loop).www.biocomputing.it/loopinganna.tramontano@uniroma1.itSupplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Performance of a convective, infrared and combined infrared- convective heated conveyor-belt dryer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mesery, Hany S; Mwithiga, Gikuru

    2015-05-01

    A conveyor-belt dryer was developed using a combined infrared and hot air heating system that can be used in the drying of fruits and vegetables. The drying system having two chambers was fitted with infrared radiation heaters and through-flow hot air was provided from a convective heating system. The system was designed to operate under either infrared radiation and cold air (IR-CA) settings of 2000 W/m(2) with forced ambient air at 30 °C and air flow of 0.6 m/s or combined infrared and hot air convection (IR-HA) dryer setting with infrared intensity set at 2000 W/m(2) and hot at 60 °C being blown through the dryer at a velocity of 0.6 m/s or hot air convection (HA) at an air temperature of 60 °C and air flow velocity 0.6 m/s but without infrared heating. Apple slices dried under the different dryer settings were evaluated for quality and energy requirements. It was found that drying of apple (Golden Delicious) slices took place in the falling rate drying period and no constant rate period of drying was observed under any of the test conditions. The IR-HA setting was 57.5 and 39.1 % faster than IR-CA and HA setting, respectively. Specific energy consumption was lower and thermal efficiency was higher for the IR-HA setting when compared to both IR-CA and HA settings. The rehydration ratio, shrinkage and colour properties of apples dried under IR-HA conditions were better than for either IR-CA or HA.

  1. Thermal instability of Walters B' viscoelastic fluid permeated with suspended particles in hydromagnetics in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pardeep

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of suspended particles on the thermal instability of Walters B' viscoelastic fluid in hydromantic in porous medium is considered. For stationary convection, Walters B' viscoelastic fluid behaves like a Newtonian fluid. The medium permeability and suspended particles has ten the onset of convection whereas the magnetic field postpones the onset of convection, for the case of stationary convection. The magnetic field and viscoelasticity intro duce oscillatory modes in the system which was non-existent in their absence.

  2. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  3. Laminar convective heat transfer of non-Newtonian nanofluids with constant wall temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojjat, M.; Etemad, S. Gh.; Bagheri, R.; Thibault, J.

    2011-02-01

    Nanofluids are obtained by dispersing homogeneously nanoparticles into a base fluid. Nanofluids often exhibit higher heat transfer rate in comparison with the base fluid. In the present study, forced convection heat transfer under laminar flow conditions was investigated experimentally for three types of non-Newtonian nanofluids in a circular tube with constant wall temperature. CMC solution was used as the base fluid and γ-Al2O3, TiO2 and CuO nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed to create nanodispersions of different concentrations. Nanofluids as well as the base fluid show shear thinning (pseudoplastic) rheological behavior. Results show that the presence of nanoparticles increases the convective heat transfer of the nanodispersions in comparison with the base fluid. The convective heat transfer enhancement is more significant when both the Peclet number and the nanoparticle concentration are increased. The increase in convective heat transfer is higher than the increase caused by the augmentation of the effective thermal conductivity.

  4. Convection of viscous fluids: Energetics, self-similarity, experiments, geophysical applications and analogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golitsyn, G. S.

    1977-01-01

    The main results were the formulas for the mean convection velocities, of a viscous fluid and for the mean temperature difference in the bulk of the convecting fluid. These were obtained: by scaling analysis of the Boussinesq equations, by analysis of the energetics of the process, and by using similarity and dimensional arguments. The last approach defines the criteria of similarity and allows the proposition of some self-similarity hypotheses. By several simple new ways, an expression for the efficiency coefficient gamma of the thermal convection was also obtained. An analogy is pointed out between non-turbulent convection of a viscous fluid and the structure of turbulence for scales less than Kolmogorov's internal viscous microscale of turbulence.

  5. On the Existence of Oscillatory-Convective Thermohaline Flow in Sedimentary Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, T.; Diersch, H. G.; Simmons, C. T.

    2009-05-01

    In the Earth's crust, both groundwater temperature and salinity increase with depth. As a consequence, water density is variable, thereby creating density-driven thermohaline groundwater flow. While prior steady-state studies of thermohaline flow in porous media identified conductive, oscillatory and convective thermohaline flow modes, the present study numerically analyzes thermohaline flow using a transient approach. We discovered the existence of an oscillatory-convective flow mode within a specific range of thermal and haline Raleigh numbers. Oscillatory-convective thermohaline flow only exists when water temperature and salinity increase with depth (positive RaT, negative RaS). Candidate sedimentary basins of oscillatory-convective thermohaline flow may be found in Western Canada (Alberta), in the Gulf of Mexico, in Northern Germany, or in Australia.

  6. Improved Performance of Personalized Ventilation by Control of the Convection Flow around Occupant Body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Krenek, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    -scale test room with background mixing ventilation. Thermal manikin with realistic free convection flow was used. The PV supplied air from front/above towards the face. All measurements were performed under isothermal conditions at 20 °C and 26 °C. The air in the test room was mixed with tracer gas, while...... personalized air was free of it. Tracer gas concentration measurements were used to identify the effect of controlling the free convection flow on inhaled air quality. The use of both methods improved the performance of PV and made it possible to bring more than 90% clean air in inhalation at substantially......This paper reports on methods of control of the free convection flow around human body aiming at improvement of inhaled air quality for occupants at workstations with personalized ventilation (PV). Two methods of control were developed and explored: passive - blocking the free convection...

  7. Seismic Constraints on Interior Solar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Duvall, Thomas L.; DeRosa, Marc L.

    2010-01-01

    We constrain the velocity spectral distribution of global-scale solar convective cells at depth using techniques of local helioseismology. We calibrate the sensitivity of helioseismic waves to large-scale convective cells in the interior by analyzing simulations of waves propagating through a velocity snapshot of global solar convection via methods of time-distance helioseismology. Applying identical analysis techniques to observations of the Sun, we are able to bound from above the magnitudes of solar convective cells as a function of spatial convective scale. We find that convection at a depth of r/R(solar) = 0.95 with spatial extent l Convective features deeper than r/R(solar) = 0.95 are more difficult to image due to the rapidly decreasing sensitivity of helioseismic waves.

  8. A Generalized Theory of DNA Looping and Cyclization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Lillian, Todd; Perkins, Noel; Tkachenko, Alexei; Meiners, Jens-Christian

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a semi-analytic method for calculating the Stockmayer Jacobson J-factor for protein mediated DNA loops. The formation of DNA loops on the order of a few persistence lengths is a key component in many biological regulatory functions. The binding of LacI protein within the Lac Operon of E.coli serves as the canonical example for loop regulated transcription. We use a non-linear rod model to determine the equilibrium shape of the inter-operator DNA loop under prescribed binding constraints while taking sequence-dependent curvature and elasticity into account. Then we construct a Hamiltonian that describes thermal fluctuations about the open and looped equilibrium states, yielding the entropic and enthalpic costs of loop formation. Our work demonstrates that even for short sequences of the order one persistence length, entropic terms contribute substantially to the J factor. We also show that entropic considerations are able to determine the most favorable binding topology. The J factor can be used to compare the relative loop lifetimes of various DNA sequences, making it a useful tool in sequence design. A corollary of this work is the computation of an effective torsional persistence length, which demonstrates how torsion bending coupling in a constrained geometry affects the conversion of writhe to twist.

  9. The Role of Entropic Effects on DNA Loop Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Tkachenko, Alexei; Lillian, Todd; Perkins, Noel; Meiners, Jens Christian

    2009-03-01

    The formation of protein mediated DNA loops often regulates gene expression. Typically, a protein is simultaneously bound to two DNA operator sites. An example is the lactose repressor which binds to the Lac operon of E. coli. We characterize the mechanics of this system by calculating the free energy cost of loop formation. We construct a Hamiltonian that describes the change in DNA bending energy due to linear perturbations about the looped and open states, starting from a non-linear mechanical rod model that determines the shape and bending energy of the inter-operator DNA loop while capturing the intrinsic curvature and sequence-dependent elasticity of the DNA. The crystal structure of the LacI protein provides the boundary conditions for the DNA. We then calculate normal modes of the open and closed loops to account for the thermal fluctuations. The ratio of determinants of the two Hamiltonians yields the partition function, and the enthalphic and entropic cost of looping. This calculation goes beyond standard elastic energy models because it fully accounts for the substantial entropic differences between the two states. It also includes effects of sequence dependent curvature and stiffness and allows anisotropic variations in persistence length. From the free energy we then calculate the J-factor and ratio of loop lifetimes.

  10. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the individual and combined effects of radiation and thermal conduction are studied by displaying the analytical solution numerically. Our discussions and conclusions are presented in Section 5. 2. The model and governing equations. We model a straight coronal loop, in which the magnetic field is uniform and in.

  11. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  12. Marangoni mixed convection flow with Joule heating and nonlinear radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Marangoni mixed convective flow of Casson fluid in a thermally stratified medium is addressed. Flow analysis has been carried out in presence of inclined magnetic field. Heat transfer analysis is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and nonlinear thermal radiation. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are first converted into ordinary differential systems and then developed the convergent series solutions. Flow pattern with the influence of pertinent parameters namely the magnetic parameter, Casson fluid parameter, temperature ratio parameter, stratification parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and radiation parameter is investigated. Expression of local Nusselt number is computed and analyzed. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases by increasing magnetic parameter, temperature ratio parameter, angle of inclination and stratification parameter. Moreover the effect of buoyancy parameter on the velocity distribution is opposite in both the opposing and assisting flow phenomena. Thermal field and associated layer thickness are enhanced for larger radiation parameter.

  13. Wilson loops as precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susskind, Leonard [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4060 (United States); Toumbas, Nicolaos [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4060 (United States)

    2000-02-15

    There is substantial evidence that string theory on AdS{sub 5}xS{sub 5} is a holographic theory in which the number of degrees of freedom scales as the area of the boundary in Planck units. Precisely how the theory can describe bulk physics using only surface degrees of freedom is not well understood. A particularly paradoxical situation involves an event deep in the interior of the bulk space. The event must be recorded in the (Schroedinger picture) state vector of the boundary theory long before a signal, such as a gravitational wave, can propagate from the event to the boundary. In a previous paper with Polchinski, we argued that the ''precursor'' operators which carry information stored in the wave during the time when it vanishes in a neighborhood of the boundary are necessarily non-local. In this paper we argue that the precursors cannot be products of local gauge invariant operators such as the energy momentum tensor. In fact gauge theories have a class of intrinsically non-local operators which cannot be built from local gauge invariant objects. These are the Wilson loops. We show that the precursors can be identified with Wilson loops whose spatial size is dictated by the UV-IR connection. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  14. Infrasound generation by turbulent convection

    OpenAIRE

    Akhalkatsi, M.; Gogoberidze, G.; Morrison, P. J.

    2004-01-01

    Low frequency acoustic wave generation is studied taking into account the effect of stratification, inhomogeneity of background velocity profile and temperature fluctuations. It is shown that for the typical parameters of convective storms the dipole radiation related to temperature inhomogeneities is at least of the same order as radiation of Lighthill's quadrupole source. It is also shown that the source related to stratification could have valuable contribution whereas some other sources a...

  15. Hybrid Cooling Loop Technology for Robust High Heat Flux Cooling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. proposes to develop a hybrid cooling loop technology for space thermal control. The proposed technology combines the high heat...

  16. Hybrid Cooling Loop Technology for Robust High Heat Flux Cooling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) proposes to develop a hybrid cooling loop and cold plate technology for space systems thermal management. The proposed...

  17. The influence of trees and grass on outdoor thermal comfort in a hot‐arid environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shashua‐Bar, Limor; Pearlmutter, David; Erell, Evyatar

    2011-01-01

    .... The index of thermal stress was calculated hourly from measured meteorological data in the studied sites to evaluate thermal comfort in the different spaces based on radiative and convective pedestrian...

  18. Thermal Nanosystems and Nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Volz, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Heat transfer laws for conduction, radiation and convection change when the dimensions of the systems in question shrink. The altered behaviours can be used efficiently in energy conversion, respectively bio- and high-performance materials to control microelectronic devices. To understand and model those thermal mechanisms, specific metrologies have to be established. This book provides an overview of actual devices and materials involving micro-nanoscale heat transfer mechanisms. These are clearly explained and exemplified by a large spectrum of relevant physical models, while the most advanced nanoscale thermal metrologies are presented.

  19. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M. [Department of Physics, Swansea University,Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-05

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.

  20. Leptogenesis from loop effects in curved spacetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jamie I.; Shore, Graham M.

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new mechanism — radiatively-induced gravitational leptogenesis — for generating the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe. We show how quantum loop effects in C and CP violating theories cause matter and antimatter to propagate differently in the presence of gravity, and prove this is forbidden in flat space by CPT and translation symmetry. This generates a curvature-dependent chemical potential for leptons, allowing a matter-antimatter asymmetry to be generated in thermal equilibrium in the early Universe. The time-dependent dynamics necessary for leptogenesis is provided by the interaction of the virtual self-energy cloud of the leptons with the expanding curved spacetime background, which violates the strong equivalence principle and allows a distinction between matter and antimatter. We show here how this mechanism is realised in a particular BSM theory, the see-saw model, where the quantum loops involve the heavy sterile neutrinos responsible for light neutrino masses. We demonstrate by explicit computation of the relevant two-loop Feynman diagrams how the size of the radiative corrections relevant for leptogenesis becomes enhanced by increasing the mass hierarchy of the sterile neutrinos, and show how the induced lepton asymmetry may be sufficiently large to play an important rôle in determining the baryon-to-photon ratio of the Universe.