WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal control coatings

  1. Spacecraft thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumon, Jean-Claude; Paillous, Alain

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment AO 138-6 was located on the trailing edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility as part of the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) Experiment. It was purely passive in nature: material specimens 2 x 2 cm, independently mounted in sample-holders, with their surface in the same reference plane, were exposed to space. Thirty samples were set in a vacuum-tight canister which was opened in space a few days after LDEF deployment and closed while still in orbit ten months later; twenty-four samples were directly exposed to space for the total flight duration (preflight handling, shuttle bay environment, separation from shuttle, shuttle environment, LEO environment, docking, descent, transfer to KSC). Materials included paints (conductive or nonconductive), SSM's, polymeric films, surface coatings, composite materials, and metals. After sample retrieving, inspection and measurements were carried out in atmospheric laboratory conditions on each sample: observation with binocular lenses and scanning electron microscopy, spectral relectance and transmittance using an integrating sphere in the wavelength range 280-2300 nm, emissivity by the means of a Gier & Dunkle portable reflectometer, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA-XPS), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements on some selected samples. The results obtained from flight were compared to laboratory data obtained in UV-irradiation tests when these data were available. As a general statement a good spectral concordance is observed for all samples not in the canister so long as air recoveries are taken into account. For one material, the degradation is more important for the sample in the canister than for those of the same material mounted at the surface of the tray; for most samples in the canister the degradation is slightly higher than the one which can be predicted from laboratory standard irradiations. Contamination problems having

  2. Porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, H.; King, H. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and evaluation of a highly adherent, low solar absorptance, porcelain enamel thermal control coating applied to 6061 and 1100 aluminum for space vehicle use. The coating consists of a low index of refraction, transparent host frit and a high volume fraction of titania as rutile, crystallized in-situ, as the scattering medium. Solar absorptance is 0.21 at a coating thickness of 0.013 cm. Hemispherical emittance is 0.88. The change in solar absorptance is 0.03, as measured in-situ, after an exposure of 1000 equivalent sun hours in vacuum.

  3. Space stable thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Efforts to develop an engineering paint were concentrated on inorganic silicate-bonded systems as opposed to the silicone coatings. The UV-vacuum stability of potassium silicate-Zn2TiO4 paints were shown to be quite good. Reflectance optimization of these systems is being studied by maximizing thickness and pigment to binder ratio.

  4. Inorganic Zn2TiO4 thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Silicate-bonded zinc orthotitanate thermal control coatings for space applications have been developed. This paper discusses preparation of the pigment, paint formulation and application, and some properties of the coatings. Very high reflectance (low solar absorptance), high emittance, and good stability in an ultraviolet-vacuum environment are indicated for this paint.

  5. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  6. Theoretical investigation on degradation behaviors of spectral properties of thermal control coatings induced by charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yuge; Ma, Wei; Xuan, Yimin, E-mail: ymxuan@mail.njust.edu.cn

    2013-10-01

    The degradation of spectral properties of thermal control coatings on spacecrafts is investigated in this paper. By studying their physical components and geometry structure, the factors which determine the spectral properties of the coatings are founded. A theoretical model for calculating the spectral absorptance of coatings is proposed based on the Mie's theory and Stratified Media theory. Mathematical expressions are introduced for accounting for the effect of the complicated environment. Based on these work, a predicting model for the degradation of spectral absorptance properties of the coatings is established. To validate this model, the predicted degradation performance of spectral properties of zinc oxide based coatings under electrons and protons exposure are compared with the experimental data. A good agreement is found at the wavelength between 250 nm and 2500 nm. Finally, a useful approach for predicting the degradation behaviors of thermal control coatings on spacecrafts in orbit is established.

  7. Effects of LDEF flight exposure on selected polymeric films and thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Young, Philip R.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of polymeric films and thermal control coatings which were exposed for five years and ten months to the low-Earth environment is reported. Changes in solar absorptance, thermal emittance, and transmission are compared to laboratory control specimens. Sputter-deposited metallic coatings are shown to eliminate atomic oxygen erosion of resin matrix composite materials. The effects of long-term atomic oxygen exposure to metallized FEP Teflon film is characterized. Chemical characterization of polymeric films indicates that although surface erosion occurs, the molecular structure of the basic polymeric film has not changed significantly in response to this exposure.

  8. Electrically conductive, black thermal control coatings for spacecraft application. I - Silicate matrix formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J. L.; Odonnell, T. P.; Hribar, V. F.

    1986-01-01

    The formulation of the graphite silicate paints MH-11 and MH-11Z, which will serve as electrically conductive, heat-resistant thermal control coatings for the Galileo spacecraft's 400 Newton engine plume shield, 10 Newton thruster plume shields, and external shunt radiators, is described, and performance results for these paints are reported. The MH-11 is produced by combining a certain grade of graphite powder with a silicate base to produce a black, inorganic, electrically conductive, room temperature cure thermal control paint having high temperature capability. Zinc oxide is added to the MH-11 formulation to produce the blister resistant painta MH-11Z. The mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and radiation characteristics of the coatings are reported. The formulation, mixing, application, and surface preparation of the substrates are described, and a method of determining the electrical resistance of the coatings is demonstrated.

  9. Investigation of environmental effects on coatings for thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, N. A.; Gilligan, J. E.; Zerlaut, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Accomplishments made during study of coatings are reported. Development of structure/property theory for selecting most appropriate pigments for space vehicle paints is discussed along with improvements made in zinc-oxide pigmented potassium silicate paint.

  10. Further Analysis of Thermal Control Coatings on MISSE for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Mike; McNulty, Robert; Finckenor, Miria

    2009-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment. Engineers and scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center have analyzed a number of these materials, including Z93P zinc oxide/potassium silicate coating, YB-71P zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate coating, NZOT, which is a low-cost alternative to YB-71P, several electrically conductive/static dissipative thermal control coatings, as well as black coatings for part marking and automated rendezvous and capture. These were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was very limited for some samples. Results from the one-year exposure of MISSE-3 and MISSE-4 are compared to the four-year exposure of MISSE-1 and MISSE-2. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. The effect of contamination from an active space station on the performance of white thermal control coatings is discussed.

  11. Spacecraft thermal control coatings (AO 138-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillous, Alain; Guillaumon, Jean Claude

    1991-01-01

    The experiment A0 138-6 was located on the trailing edge of LDEF as part of the Experiment FRECOPA. Material specimens 2 x 2 cm, independently mounted in sample-holders with their surface in the same reference plane, were exposed to space. Materials include paints (conductive or not), SSMs, polymeric films, surface coatings, composite materials, and metals. The results show that for some materials the degradation was higher for samples in the canister than for those directly mounted on the tray; contamination problems were ruled out, the higher temperature experienced by the samples inside the canister probably explains this phenomenon.

  12. Investigation of phase-change coatings for variable thermal control of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelliher, W. C.; Young, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a spacecraft coating system that could vary the ratio of its solar absorptance to thermal emittance to adjust automatically for changes in the thermal balance of a spacecraft. This study resulted in a new concept called the phase-change effect which uses the change that occurs in the optical properties of many materials during the phase transition from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. A series of two-component model coatings was developed which, when placed on a highly reflecting substrate, exhibited a sharp decrease in solar absorptance within a narrow temperature range. A variable thermal control coating can have a significant amount of temperature regulation with the phase-change effect. Data are presented on several crystallite-polymer formulations, their physical and optical properties, and associated phase-change temperatures. Aspects pertaining to their use in a space environment and an example of the degree of thermal regulation attainable with these coatings is also given.

  13. Investigation of conductive thermal control coatings by a contactless method in vacuo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, W.; Shai, C. M.; Sanford, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for determining the conductance per unit area of thermal control coatings for electrostatically clean spacecraft is described. In order to simulate orbital conditions more closely, current-density-voltage (j-V) curves are obtained by a contactless method in which the paint on an aluminum substrate is the anode of a vacuum diode configuration with a tungsten filament cathode. Conductances per unit area which satisfy the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) requirement were observed on black paints containing carbon and in white and green paints filled with zinc oxide which were fired in order to induce defect conductivity. Because of surface effects and the nonhomogeneous nature of paints, large discrepancies were found between measurements with the contactless method and measurements employing metallic contacts, particularly at low current densities. Therefore, measurements with metallic contacts are considered to be of questionable value in deciding the suitability of coatings for electrostatic charge control.

  14. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  15. Investigation of absorptance and emissivity of thermal control coatings on Mg–Li alloys and OES analysis during PEO process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Qixing; Ju, Pengfei; Wang, Jiankang; Su, Peibo; Li, Dongqi; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Thermal control ceramic coatings on Mg–Li alloys have been successfully prepared in silicate electrolyte system by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The PEO coatings are mainly composed of crystallized Mg2SiO4 and MgO, which have typical porous structure with some bulges on the surface; OES analysis shows that the plasma temperature, which is influenced by the technique parameters, determines the formation of the coatings with different crystalline phases and morphologies, combined with “quick cooling effect” by the electrolyte; and the electron concentration is constant, which is related to the electric spark breakdown, determined by the nature of the coating and the interface of coating/electrolyte. Technique parameters influence the coating thickness, roughness and surface morphology, but do not change the coating composition in the specific PEO regime, and therefore the absorptance (αS) and emissivity (ε) of the coatings can be adjusted by the technique parameters through changing thickness and roughness in a certain degree. The coating prepared at 10 A/dm2, 50 Hz, 30 min and 14 g/L Na2SiO3 has the minimum value of αS (0.35) and the maximum value of ε (0.82), with the balance temperature of 320 K. PMID:27383569

  16. Refractory porcelain enamel passive-thermal-control coating for high-temperature superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H.; Auker, B. H.; Gardos, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    Study was conducted to match thermal expansion coefficients thereby preventing enamels from cracking. Report discusses various enamel coatings that are applied to two different high-temperature superalloys. Study may be of interest to manufacturers of chemical equipment, furnaces, and metal components intended for high-temperature applications.

  17. Thermal post-treatment alters nutrient release from a controlled-release fertilizer coated with a waterborne polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Zijun; Du, Changwen; Li, Ting; Shen, Yazhen; Zhou, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) use a controlled-release technology to enhance the nutrient use efficiency of crops. Many factors affect the release of nutrients from the waterborne polymer-coated CRF, but the effects of thermal post-treatments remain unclear. In this study, a waterborne polyacrylate-coated CRF was post-treated at different temperatures (30 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C) and durations (2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h) after being developed in the Wurster fluidized bed. To characterize the ...

  18. Advanced Durable Flexible Ultra Low Outgassing Thermal Control Coatings for NASA Science Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I program proposes to synthesize novel nanoengineered ultra low out gassing elastomers and formulate high temperature capable flexible thermal control...

  19. Multilayer Microlaminated Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Charles

    1997-01-01

    .... Both thermal and mechanical characteristics of the coatings can be potentially optimized, and the coating will be more tolerant towards strain damage, have better thermal insulation and provide...

  20. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  1. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  2. Solvent free fabrication of micro and nanostructured drug coatings by thermal evaporation for controlled release and increased effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman S Zarie

    Full Text Available Nanostructuring of drug delivery systems offers many promising applications like precise control of dissolution and release kinetics, enhanced activities, flexibility in terms of surface coatings, integration into implants, designing the appropriate scaffolds or even integrating into microelectronic chips etc. for different desired applications. In general such kind of structuring is difficult due to unintentional mixing of chemical solvents used during drug formulations. We demonstrate here the successful solvent-free fabrication of micro-nanostructured pharmaceutical molecules by simple thermal evaporation (TE. The evaporation of drug molecules and their emission to a specific surface under vacuum led to controlled assembling of the molecules from vapour phase to solid phase. The most important aspects of thermal evaporation technique are: solvent-free, precise control of size, possibility of fabricating multilayer/hybrid, and free choice of substrates. This could be shown for twenty eight pharmaceutical substances of different chemical structures which were evaporated on surfaces of titanium and glass discs. Structural investigations of different TE fabricated drugs were performed by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy which revealed that these drug substances preserve their structurality after evaporation. Titanium discs coated with antimicrobial substances by thermal evaporation were subjected to tests for antibacterial or antifungal activities, respectively. A significant increase in their antimicrobial activity was observed in zones of inhibition tests compared to controls of the diluted substances on the discs made of paper for filtration. With thermal evaporation, we have successfully synthesized solvent-free nanostructured drug delivery systems in form of multilayer structures and in hybrid drug complexes respectively. Analyses of these substances consolidated that thermal evaporation opens up

  3. Ultraviolet radiation effects on the infrared damage rate of a thermal control coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation on the infrared reflectance of ZnO silicone white thermal coatings were investigated. Narrow band ultraviolet radiation for wavelengths in the 2200A to 3500A range by a monochromator and a high pressure, 150-W Eimac xenon lamp. The sample was irradiated while in a vacuum of at least 0.000001 torr, and infrared reflectance was measured in situ with a spectroreflectometer at 19,500A. Reflectance degradation was studied as a function of wavelength, time, intensity, and dose. Damage was wavelength dependent at constant exposure, but no maximum was evident above the shortest wavelength investigated here. The degradation rate at constant intensity was an exponential function of time and varies with intensity.

  4. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to shield the blades of gas turbines from heat and wear. There is a pressing need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of TBCs in the thermal design of advanced gas turbines with high energy efficiency. These TBCs consist of a ceramic-based top coat and a bond coat on a superalloy substrate. Usually, the focus is on the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of the TBC because heat tends to diffuse from the surface of the top coat to the substrate. However, the in-plane thermal conductivity is also important in the thermal design of gas turbines because the temperature distribution within the turbine cannot be ignored. Accordingly, a method is developed in this study for measuring the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the top coat. Yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats are prepared by thermal spraying under different conditions. The in-plane and cross-plane thermal diffusivities of the top coats are measured by the flash method to investigate the anisotropy of thermal conduction in a TBC. It is found that the in-plane thermal diffusivity is higher than the cross-plane one for each top coat and that the top coats have significantly anisotropic thermal diffusivity. The cross-sectional and in-plane microstructures of the top coats are observed, from which their porosities are evaluated. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy are discussed in detail in relation to microstructure and porosity.

  5. Thermal stability of phosphate coatings on steel

    OpenAIRE

    P. Pokorny; P. Szelag; Novak, M; L. Mastny; Brozek, V.

    2015-01-01

    The work was validated thermal stability of zinc, manganese and tri-cations phosphate coatings on steel, made from commercial phosphating bath type Pragofos. Thermogravimetric data dehydration of scholzite, phosphophylite and hureaulite coatings in the temperature range 160 °C – 400 °C define the conditions for applying paints with higher firing temperature or thermal spraying ceramic coatings.

  6. Thermal stability of phosphate coatings on steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The work was validated thermal stability of zinc, manganese and tri-cations phosphate coatings on steel, made from commercial phosphating bath type Pragofos. Thermogravimetric data dehydration of scholzite, phosphophylite and hureaulite coatings in the temperature range 160 °C – 400 °C define the conditions for applying paints with higher firing temperature or thermal spraying ceramic coatings.

  7. Development of a space stable thermal control coatings for use in large space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, J. E.; Ashford, N. A.; Harada, Y.; Leas, R. M.

    1971-01-01

    The preparation and evaluation of zinc orthotitanate and of several new pigments and the environmental testing and evaluation of these pigments and of coatings made from them constitute the bulk of the work accomplished. New pigments were prepared and EPR spectra of pigments and their precursor compounds studied. Results of extensive testing of commercially-available, strippable, protective coatings are reported; Owens-Illinois 650 glass resin has been stabilized against progressive mechanical failures; and definite improvements have been noted. A zinc oxide pigmented lithium silicate paint has demonstrated very good ultraviolet stability.

  8. Thermal barrier coating system having improved adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Sovey, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The adherence between a ceramic thermal barrier coating and a metal bond coating is improved by ion sputtering a ceramic film on the bond cost. A ceramic thermal barrier coating is then plasma-sprayed onto this primer film. This improves the integrity and strength of the interface between the plasma-sprayed ceramic layer and metallic bond coat which insures stronger adherence between the metal and the ceramic.

  9. Pratt & Whitney thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Co., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems. The operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic with fewer transients-compared with those for aircraft gas turbine engines. Therefore, creep rather than thermal fatigue, becomes primary life-limiting for hot section components. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the program. TBCs allow surface temperatures to increase without compromising the structural properties of the alloy. TBCs typically consist of a ceramic insulating layer, deposited onto the substrate with an intervening metallic layer, which imparts oxidation protection to the substrate and provides a surface to which the ceramic layer can adhere.

  10. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  11. Quantitative analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns the development of simulation tools for mapping of insulation properties of thermal insulation coatings based on selected functional filler materials. A mathematical model, which includes the underlying physics (i.e. thermal conductivity of a heterogeneous two-component coating...

  12. Thermal stress fracture of ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal stress failures of ceramic coatings are discussed in terms of fracture mechanics concepts. The effects of transient and residual stresses on single and multiple cycle failure mechanisms are considered. A specific example of a zirconia thermal barrier coating is presented and its endurance calculated using the proposed relationships.

  13. Thermal Coatings Seminar Series Training Part 1: Properties of Thermal Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, Jack

    2015-01-01

    This course will present an overview of a variety of thermal coatings-related topics, including: coating types and availability, thermal properties measurements, environmental testing (lab and in-flight), environmental impacts, contamination impacts, contamination liabilities, determination of BOLEOL values, and what does specularity mean to the thermal engineer.

  14. Micro-thermal analysis of polyester coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    The application and suitability of micro-thermal analysis to detect changes in the chemical and physical properties of coating due to ageing and especially photo-degradation is demonstrated using a model polyester coating based on neopentyl glycol isophthalic acid. The changes in chemical structure

  15. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation.

  16. Thermal barrier coatings for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive NASA-Lewis program of coating development for aircraft gas turbine blades and vanes is presented. Improved ceramic layer compositions are investigated, along the MCrAlY bond films and the methods of uniform deposition of the coatings; the thermomechanical and fuel impurity tolerance limits of the coatings are being studied. Materials include the ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY system; the effects of the bond coat and zirconia composition on coating life and Mach 1 burner rig test results are discussed. It is concluded that Diesel engines can also utilize thermal barrier coatings; they have been used successfully on piston crowns and exhaust valves of shipboard engines to combat lower grade fuel combustion corrosion.

  17. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  18. Delamination-Indicating Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2007-01-01

    The risk of premature failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), typically composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), compromises the reliability of TBCs used to provide thermal protection for turbine engine components. Unfortunately, TBC delamination proceeds well beneath the TBC surface and cannot be monitored by visible inspection. Nondestructive diagnostic tools that could reliably probe the subsurface damage state of TBCs would alleviate the risk of TBC premature failure by indicating when the TBC needs to be replaced before the level of TBC damage threatens engine performance or safety. To meet this need, a new coating design for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that are self-indicating for delamination has been successfully implemented by incorporating a europium-doped luminescent sublayer at the base of a TBC composed of YSZ. The luminescent sublayer has the same YSZ composition as the rest of the TBC except for the addition of low-level europium doping and therefore does not alter TBC performance.

  19. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  20. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  1. The use of electrochemical measurement techniques towards quality control and optimisation of corrosion properties of thermal spray coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreijling, M.P.W.; Hofman, R.; Westing, E.P.M. van; Ferrari, G.M.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1998-01-01

    Metal spray coatings are ever more recognised as a possible superior means of corrosion protection in many environments. Extended service life combined with little or no maintenance provides interesting opportunities for both environmentalists and corrosion engineers. Although many successful

  2. Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating with Bond Coat Species in Cyclic Thermal Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungyu Paik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the bond coat species on the delamination or fracture behavior in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs was investigated using the yclic thermal fatigue and thermal-shock tests. The interface microstructures of each TBC showed a good condition without cracking or delamination after flame thermal fatigue (FTF for 1429 cycles. The TBC with the bond coat prepared by the air-plasma spray (APS method showed a good condition at the interface between the top and bond coats after cyclic furnace thermal fatigue (CFTF for 1429 cycles, whereas the TBCs with the bond coats prepared by the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF and low-pressure plasma spray (LPPS methods showed a partial cracking (and/or delamination and a delamination after 780 cycles, respectively. The TBCs with the bond coats prepared by the APS, HVOF and LPPS methods were fully delaminated (>50% after 159, 36, and 46 cycles, respectively, during the thermal-shock tests. The TGO thickness in the TBCs was strongly dependent on the both exposure time and temperature difference tested. The hardness values were found to be increased only after the CFTF, and the TBC with the bond coat prepared by the APS showed the highest adhesive strength before and after the FTF.

  3. Thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine and diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Bailey, M. Murray

    1989-01-01

    The present state of development of thin thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines and thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines is assessed. Although current thermal barrier coatings are flying in certain gas turbine engines, additional advances will be needed for future engines. Thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines have advanced to the point where they are being seriously considered for the next generation of engine. Since coatings for truck engines is a young field of inquiry, continued research and development efforts will be required to help bring this technology to commercialization.

  4. Electrically-controlled near-field radiative thermal modulator made of graphene-coated silicon carbide plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we propose a hybrid near-field radiative thermal modulator made of two graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) plates separated by a nanometer vacuum gap. The near-field photon tunneling between the emitter and receiver is modulated by changing graphene chemical potentials with symmetrically or asymmetrically applied voltage biases. The radiative heat flux calculated from fluctuational electrodynamics significantly varies with graphene chemical potentials due to tunable near-field coupling strength between graphene plasmons across the vacuum gap. Thermal modulation and switching, which are the key functionalities required for a thermal modulator, are theoretically realized and analyzed. Newly introduced quantities of the modulation factor, the sensitivity factor and switching factor are studied quite extensively in a large parameter range for both graphene chemical potential and vacuum gap distance. This opto-electronic device with faster operating mode, which is in principle only limited by electronics and not by the thermal inertia, will facilitate the practical application of active thermal management, thermal circuits, and thermal computing with photon-based near-field thermal transport.

  5. Development of metal based thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Il

    In this work, metal-based thermal barrier coatings (MBTBCs) have been produced, using high frequency induction plasma spraying (IPS) of iron-based nanostructured alloy powders. Important advances have been made over recent years to the development of ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for internal combustion engines application, but they are not yet applied in mass production situations. Besides the important economic considerations, the reliability of ceramic: TBCs is also an issue, being associated with the difficulty of predicting their "in-service" lifetime. Through engineering of the nano/amorphous structure of MBTBCs, their thermal conductivity can be made as low as those of ceramic-based TBCs, with reduced mean free paths of the electrons/phonons scattering. In this work, nano/amorphous structured coatings were deposited by IPS using the following spray parameters: spraying distance (210 ˜ 270 mm), plasma gas composition (Ar/N2), IPS torch power (24kW), and powder feed-rate (16g/min.). The structure and properties of the deposited layers were characterized through SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) observations. The thermal diffusivity (alpha) properties of the MBTBCs were measured using a laser flash method. Density (rho) and specific heat (Cp) of the MBTBCs were also measured, and their thermal conductivity (k) calculated (k =alpharhoCp). The thermal conductivity of MBTBCs was found to be as low as 1.99 W/m/K. The heat treatment study showed that crystal structure changes, and grain size growth from a few nanometers to tenth of nanometers occurred at 550°C under static exposure conditions. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of MBTBCs was 13E-6/K, which is close to the TEC of cast iron and thus, closer to the TEC values of aluminium alloys than are conventional TBCs. Fracture toughness of MBTBCs has also been assessed by use of Vickers hardness tests, with a 500 g load for 15 s, and the results show that there are no measurable crack

  6. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Research and development into thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines is reviewed critically. The type of coating systems developed for aircraft applications are found to be preferred for clear fuel electric utility applications. These coating systems consists of a layer of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria ceramic over a layer of MCrAly bond coat. They are not recommended for use when molten salts are presented. Efforts to understand coating degradation in dirty environments and to develop corrosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  7. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  8. Combination Thermal Barrier And Wear Coatings For Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Mike; Moller, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Thermal-barrier layers covered with self-lubricating surface layers. Zirconia thermal-barrier coat applied to surface of combustion chamber in engine by plasma-arc spraying. Then PS-200 plasma-arc sprayed onto zirconia. Self-lubricating coat prevents sliding contact between thermal barrier and piston ring, effectively preventing both wear and production of additional heat via friction. Other combinations of thermal-barrier and self-lubricating, wear-resistant coating materials used as long as two materials adhere to each other, applied by use of similar or compatible processes, have similar coefficients of thermal expansion, sufficiently strong at high temperatures, and affordable.

  9. Transient thermal camouflage and heat signature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tian-Zhi; Su, Yishu; Xu, Weikai; Yang, Xiao-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials have been proposed to manipulate heat flux as a new way to cloak or camouflage objects in the infrared world. To date, however, thermal metamaterials only operate in the steady-state and exhibit detectable, transient heat signatures. In this letter, the theoretical basis for a thermal camouflaging technique with controlled transient diffusion is presented. This technique renders an object invisible in real time. More importantly, the thermal camouflaging device instantaneously generates a pre-designed heat signature and behaves as a perfect thermal illusion device. A metamaterial coating with homogeneous and isotropic thermal conductivity, density, and volumetric heat capacity was fabricated and very good camouflaging performance was achieved.

  10. Oxidation and thermal shock behavior of thermal barrier coated 18/10CrNi alloy with coating modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guergen, Selim [Vocational School of Transportation, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan); Diltemiz, Seyid Fehmi [Turkish Air Force1st Air Supply and Maintenance Center Command, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan); Kushan, Melih Cemal [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan)

    2017-01-15

    In this study, substrates of 18/10CrNi alloy plates were initially sprayed with a Ni-21Cr-10Al-1Y bond coat and then with an yttria stabilized zirconia top coat by plasma spraying. Subsequently, plasma-sprayed Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were treated with two different modification methods, namely, vacuum heat treatment and laser glazing. The effects of modifications on the oxidation and thermal shock behavior of the coatings were evaluated. The effect of coat thickness on the bond strength of the coats was also investigated. Results showed enhancement of the oxidation resistance and thermal shock resistance of TBCs following modifications. Although vacuum heat treatment and laser glazing exhibited comparable results as per oxidation resistance, the former generated the best improvement in the thermal shock resistance of the TBCs. Bond strength also decreased as coat thickness increased.

  11. Low emittance coatings and the thermal performance of vacuum glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor J.; Zhao, Junfu; Wang, Jinlei; Huang, Ye [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip C. [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Norton, Brian [Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier Street, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2007-01-15

    The thermal performances of vacuum glazings employing coatings with emittance between 0.02 and 0.16 were simulated using a three-dimensional finite volume model. Physical samples of vacuum glazings with hard and soft coatings with emittance of 0.04, 0.12 and 0.16 were fabricated and their thermal performance characterised experimentally using a guarded hot box calorimeter. Good agreement was found between experimental and theoretical thermal performances for both a vacuum glazing with a soft coating (emittance 0.04) and those with hard coatings (emittance 0.12 and 0.16). Simulations showed that for a low value of emittance (e.g. 0.02), the use of two low-emittance coatings gives limited improvement in thermal performance of the glazing system. The use of a single high performance low-emittance coating in a vacuum glazing has been shown to provide excellent performance. (author)

  12. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Infiltration and Cyclic Degradations of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Smialek, Jim; Miller, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop higher temperature capable turbine thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) resistance of the advanced coating systems needs to be evaluated and improved. This paper highlights some of NASA past high heat flux testing approaches for turbine thermal and environmental barrier coatings assessments in CMAS environments. One of our current emphases has been focused on the thermal barrier - environmental barrier coating composition and testing developments. The effort has included the CMAS infiltrations in high temperature and high heat flux turbine engine like conditions using advanced laser high heat flux rigs, and subsequently degradation studies in laser heat flux thermal gradient cyclic and isothermal furnace cyclic testing conditions. These heat flux CMAS infiltration and related coating durability testing are essential where appropriate CMAS melting, infiltration and coating-substrate temperature exposure temperature controls can be achieved, thus helping quantify the CMAS-coating interaction and degradation mechanisms. The CMAS work is also playing a critical role in advanced coating developments, by developing laboratory coating durability assessment methodologies in simulated turbine engine conditions and helping establish CMAS test standards in laboratory environments.

  13. Thermomechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings. Thermal Barrier Coatings II - interim report; Haltbarkeit thermomechanisch belasteter Waermedaemmschichtsysteme. Waermedaemmschichtsysteme II - Zwischenbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.; Schmidt, A. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (DE). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde (IFW); Scholz, A.; Stamm, W. [Siemens Power AG, Muelheim/Ruhr (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The thermomechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is being investigated by strain controlled service-type thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests in order to simulate creep fatigue life of coatings on gas turbine blades. A first service-type cycle with a cycle period of 20 min, a maximum temperature of 930 C and a minimum temperature of 60 C for industrial gas turbines and a second cycle with a cycle period of 8 min, a maximum temperature of 1050 C and a minimum temperature of 300 C for aero engine gas turbines are applied. A special test technique was developed for hollow test pieces with a component typical wall thickness of 1.8 mm made of a single crystal alloy. Different bondcoats (MCrAIY and PtAI) and an air plasma sprayed (APS-) topcoat as well as electron beam (EB-PVD) topcoat are under investigation. After each specific experiment microstructural investigation is used for damage characterisation. The growth of oxides together with thermal mismatch could be identified as the most important damaging effects. Data from long-term Pre-Oxidation experiments allows to adjust the thickness of the TGO for each specific TMF-experiment. The main objective is to ideal with the influence of different bond coat morphologies on the durability of the thermal barrier coating (TBC-) system. The influence of surface roughness, grain size in the bond coat as well as different bond coats (MCrAIY and PtAI) are investigated. First results show that the surface roughness may have a larger influence on the durability of the TBC-system than initially expected. In order to gain deeper understanding of the damaging mechanisms, finite elements calculations are performed to simulate critical local deformation in the TBC-system. The experiments allow deep insight into the damaging mechanisms governing TBC-systems under service-type conditions and thus are suitable for life time prediction TBC-systems. Although a lot of research has been done on this topic. The influence of

  14. Thermal barrier coating experience in the gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, S.; Demasi-Marcin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC), provide thermal insulation and oxidation resistance in an environment consisting of hot combustion gases. TBC's consist of a two layer system. The outer ceramic layer provides good thermal insulation due to the low thermal conductivity of the ceramic coatings used, while the inner metallic bond coat layer provides needed oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy. Pratt & Whitney has over a decade of experience with several generations of TBC systems on turbine airfoils. This paper will focus on the latest TBC field experience along with a proposed durability model.

  15. Thermophysical properties of selected powders for thermal barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    M. Drajewicz; M. Góral; M. Pytel; J. Sieniawski

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings often have the problems of spallation and cracking in service owing to their poor bond strength and high residual stresses. Functionally graded thermal barrier coatings with a gradual compositional variation from heat resistant ceramics to fracture-resistant metals are proposed to mitigate these problems.Design/methodology/approach: The results of measurements of thermal diffusivity by using one of the most modern experimental sets LFA 427 (Las...

  16. Thermal repellent properties of surface coating using silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. Y.; Halim, M. S.; Aminudin, E.; Guntor, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    Extensive land development in urban areas is completely altering the surface profile of human living environment. As cities growing rapidly, impervious building and paved surfaces are replacing the natural landscape. In the developing countries with tropical climate, large masses of building elements, such as brick wall and concrete members, absorb and store large amount of heat, which in turn radiate back to the surrounding air during the night time. This bubble of heat is known as urban heat island (UHI). The use of high albedo urban surfaces is an inexpensive measure that can reduce surrounded temperature. Thus, the main focus of this study is to investigate the ability of silica, SiO2, with high albedo value, to be used as a thermal-repelled surface coating for brick wall. Three different silica coatings were used, namely silicone resin, silicone wax and rain repellent and one exterior commercial paint (jota shield paint) that commercially available in the market were applied on small-scale brick wall models. An uncoated sample also had been fabricated as a control sample for comparison. These models were placed at the outdoor space for solar exposure. Outdoor environment measurement was carried out where the ambient temperature, surface temperature, relative humidity and UV reflectance were recorded. The effect of different type of surface coating on temperature variation of the surface brick wall and the thermal performance of coatings as potential of heat reduction for brick wall have been studied. Based on the results, model with silicone resin achieved the lowest surface temperature which indicated that SiO2 can be potentially used to reduce heat absorption on the brick wall and further retains indoor passive thermal comfortability.

  17. Thermal behavior variations in coating thickness using pulse phase thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Chung, Yoonjae; Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    This paper presents a study on the use of pulsed phase thermography in the measurement of thermal barrier coating thickness with a numerical simulation. A multilayer heat transfer model was used to analyze the surface temperature response acquired from one-sided pulsed thermal imaging. The test sample comprised four layers: the metal substrate, bond coat, thermally grown oxide and the top coat. The finite element software, ANSYS, was used to model and predict the temperature distribution in the test sample under an imposed heat flux on the exterior of the TBC. The phase image was computed with the use of the software MATLAB and Thermofit Pro using a Fourier transform. The relationship between the coating thickness and the corresponding phase angle was then established with the coating thickness being expressed as a function of the phase angle. The method is successfully applied to measure the coating thickness that varied from 0.25 mm to 1.5 mm.

  18. Study on Preparation Technologies of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ning; Li, Yang; Wang, Hao; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yunshan

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is one of the main key technology for the high-pressure turbine blades which are the main components of the high-performance aerospace engines. It offers protection for underline metallic components from corrosion, oxidation and localized melting by insulating the metal from hot gases in the engine core. The properties and lifetime of TBCs are greatly influenced by the preparation technology, which includes plasma spraying (PS), physical vapor deposition (PVD) and laser re-melting (LM). In this paper, three technologies used to prepare the TBCs are reviewed. Resulting features of coating fabricated by each technology are also discussed such as: the porosity, the thermally grown oxide (TGO), the erosion resistance, the thermal shock and so on. Especially, it is pointed out that the performances of gradient coating and nano-coating are better than the traditional coatings. In addition, it is widely accepted that laser can be applied to re-melt the PS coating and even directly clad the gradient coating. In the future, the traditional preparation technology should be improved continually in order to enhance the coating lifetime, enhance the properties of coating and lower the cost of process. Moreover, the researches on gradient-nano-structured coatings preparation are absent and should be done with emphasis since the nano-structure and gradient structure can both benefit the lifetime and properties of coatings.

  19. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for commercial gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Sheffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the short history, current status, and future prospects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines. Particular attention is given to plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized (7 wt pct Y2O3) zirconia systems. Recent advances include improvements in the spallation life of thermal barrier coatings, improved bond coat composition and spraying techniques, and improved component design. The discussion also covers field experience, life prediction modeling, and future directions in ceramic coatings in relation to gas turbine engine design.

  20. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  1. Functional hydrophobin-coating of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Mäkilä, Ermei; Raula, Janne; Laaksonen, Timo; Laaksonen, Päivi; Strommer, Katharina; Kauppinen, Esko I; Salonen, Jarno; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2011-12-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) particles have been widely used in modulating the dissolution rate of various types of drugs loaded within its mesopores. This material can be surface treated in order to vary its hydrophobicity and several other properties, such as drug loading degree and release rate. Hydrophobins are a family of self-assembling proteins of fungal origin which have the ability to form layers on hydrophobic materials. This type of protein layer can modify the characteristics and control the binding properties of the surface on which it assembles. In this study, we have developed a procedure to coat thermally hydrocarbonized-PSi microparticles with hydrophobin II (HFBII) in order to modify the particles' hydrophobicity and to improve their biocompatibility, while maintaining intact the advantageous drug releasing properties of the PSi. The HFBII content adsorbed onto the particles was successfully quantified by a protein assay. Drug dissolution and permeation across Caco-2 cell monolayers were also conducted, together with viability studies in AGS, Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. The characterization and coating stability assessment showed that the HFBII-coating desorbs partially from the particles' surface as the pH increases. The HFBII coating also improved the biocompatibility of the particles without compromising the enhanced drug permeation or release. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  3. Thermal-barrier coatings for utility gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of thermal barrier coatings for use in utility gas turbines was assessed. Pressurized passage and ambient pressure doped fuel burner rig tests revealed that thermal barrier coatings are not resistant to dirty combustion environments. However, present thermal barrier coatings, such as duplex partially stabilized zirconia and duplex Ca2SiO4 have ample resistance to the thermo-mechanical stress and temperature levels anticipated for heavy duty gas turbines firing clean fuel as revealed by clean fuel pressurized passage and ambient pressure burner rig tests. Thus, it is appropriate to evaluate such coatings on blades, vanes and combustors in the field. However, such field tests should be backed up with adequate effort in the areas of coating application technology and design analysis so that the field tests yield unequivocal results.

  4. Solar Thermal AIR Collector Based on New Type Selective Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musiy, R.Y; Midyana, G.G; Makitra, R.G; Vasyutin, J.M; Khovanets, G.I; Zaborowskiy, A.B

    2014-01-01

    Based on the best for optical performance and selective coating solar thermal air collector, which operates by solar power on the principle of simultaneous ventilation and heating facilities, is designed...

  5. Quantitative analysis of silica aerogel-based thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical heat transfer model for a silica aerogel-based thermal insulation coating was developed. The model can estimate the thermal conductivity of a two-component (binder-aerogel) coating with potential binder intrusion into the nano-porous aerogel structure. The latter is modelled using......, to get an indication of the effect of important model parameters on the thermal conductivity of an insulation coating. With relevant data available for service life exposure conditions and raw material costs, the model can also be used as an optimization algorithm....... and experimental data with shell thickness and/or thermal conductivity of the shell as adjustable parameters. However, the experimental data was not sufficiently detailed to allow a separation of the effects of the two parameters. In the ideal case of no aerogel binder intrusion, a comparison with a coating...

  6. INFLUENCE OF WORKPIECE SURFACE PREPARATION ON THERMAL BARRIER COATING DURABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Petrova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Article deals with the impact of workpiece surface quality on adhesive strength and durability of thermal barrier coating. The result revealed that the roughness of metal layer influences on the adhesion of ceramic coating and depends the thickness of ceramic crystals when using method of Electron beam deposition.

  7. Infrared control coating of thin film devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berland, Brian Spencer; Stowell, Jr., Michael Wayne; Hollingsworth, Russell

    2017-02-28

    Systems and methods for creating an infrared-control coated thin film device with certain visible light transmittance and infrared reflectance properties are disclosed. The device may be made using various techniques including physical vapor deposition, chemical vapor deposition, thermal evaporation, pulsed laser deposition, sputter deposition, and sol-gel processes. In particular, a pulsed energy microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process may be used. Production of the device may occur at speeds greater than 50 Angstroms/second and temperatures lower than 200.degree. C.

  8. Admissible stresses in thermal sprayed coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watremez, M. [Valenciennes Univ. (France). Groupe Genie Mecanique; LAMAC, Univ. de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambresis, C.R.I.T.T.Z.I., MAUBEUGE (France); Renaux, T.; Guerin, J.D.; Bricout, J.P. [Valenciennes Univ. (France). Groupe Genie Mecanique

    2002-07-01

    Friction materials of current railway brake discs have to support more and more frictional and thermomechanical stresses. It has been shown that some specified couple of materials, composed of a plasma sprayed disc coupled with sintered ceramic pads, leads to good behaviour in high speed train braking simulation. It's now to show coatings' reliability and reproductibility as well as limits of such solutions. To that objective, present work consists in testing coatings adhesion or cohesion. Numerical models have been developed to show that the coating's failure energy is representative of admissible stresses state in coatings. Some results are then discussed. (orig.)

  9. Preparation and performance of thermal insulation energy saving coating materials for exterior wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liang, Jinsheng; Tang, Qingguo; Chen, Gong; Chen, Yalei

    2014-05-01

    Nano zinc oxide with a high refractive index has good thermal reflection performance, hollow glass microspheres have good thermal reflection and insulation performance, and sepiolite nanofibers with many nanostructural pores have good thermal insulation performance. The dispensability of nano zinc oxide in coating materials was improved by optimizing surface silane coupling agent modification process, leading to the good thermal reflection performance. The thermal insulation performance was improved by hollow glass microspheres and sepiolite nanofibers. On this basis, the thermal insulation coating materials were prepared by exploring the effect of amount, complex mode, and other factors of the above three kinds of functional fillers on the thermal reflection and insulation performance of coating materials. The results showed that the surface modification effect of nano zinc oxide was the best when the silane coupling agent addition was 6%. The reflection and insulation performance of the coatings were the best when the additions of modified nano zinc oxide, hollow glass microspheres, and sepiolite nanofibers were 3%, 4%, and 4%, respectively. Compared with the control coating materials, the thermal insulation effect was improved obviously, which was evaluated by the -13.5 degrees C increase of maximum temperature difference between the upper and the lower surfaces.

  10. UNDERWATER COATINGS FOR CONTAMINATION CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) deactivated several aging nuclear fuel storage basins. Planners for this effort were greatly concerned that radioactive contamination present on the basin walls could become airborne as the sides of the basins became exposed during deactivation and allowed to dry after water removal. One way to control this airborne contamination was to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls were still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market for marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives were easily applied and adhered well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INL fuel pools. Lab-scale experiments were conducted by applying fourteen different commercial underwater coatings to four substrate materials representative of the storage basin construction materials, and evaluating their performance. The coupons included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The evaluation criteria included ease of application, adherence to the four surfaces of interest, no change on water clarity or chemistry, non-hazardous in final applied form and be proven in underwater applications. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected from the underwater coatings tested for application to all four pools. Divers scrubbed loose contamination off the basin walls and floors using a ship hull scrubber and vacuumed up the sludge. The divers then applied the coating using a special powered roller with two separate heated hoses that allowed the epoxy to mix at the roller surface was used to eliminate pot time concerns. The walls were successfully coated and water was removed from the pools with no detectable airborne contamination releases.

  11. Thermal noise reduction and absorption optimization via multimaterial coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Martin, Iain W.; Hough, Jim; Krüger, Christoph; Rowan, Sheila; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Future gravitational wave detectors (GWDs) such as Advanced LIGO upgrades and the Einstein Telescope are planned to operate at cryogenic temperatures using crystalline silicon (cSi) test-mass mirrors at an operation wavelength of 1550 nm. The reduction in temperature in principle provides a direct reduction in coating thermal noise, but the presently used coating stacks which are composed of silica (SiO2) and tantala (Ta2O5) show cryogenic loss peaks which results in less thermal noise improvement than might be expected. Due to low mechanical loss at low temperature amorphous silicon (aSi) is a very promising candidate material for dielectric mirror coatings and could replace Ta2O5. Unfortunately, such an aSi /SiO2 coating is not suitable for use in GWDs due to high optical absorption in aSi coatings. We explore the use of a three material based coating stack. In this multimaterial design the low absorbing Ta2O5 in the outermost coating layers significantly reduces the incident light power, while aSi is used only in the lower bilayers to maintain low optical absorption. Such a coating design would enable a reduction of Brownian thermal noise by 25%. We show experimentally that an optical absorption of only (5.3 ±0.4 ) ppm at 1550 nm should be achievable.

  12. Thermal conductive epoxy enhanced by nanodiamond-coated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Jiang, Guohua

    2017-11-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles were coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical reactions. Reliable bonding was formed by the combination of acyl chloride on NDs and amine group on CNTs. ND coated CNTs (CNT-ND) were dispersed into epoxy to fabricate thermal conductive resins. The results show that the surface energy of CNTs is decreased by the coated NDs, which is contributed to the excellent dispersion of CNT-NDs in the epoxy matrix. The heat-transfer channels were built by the venous CNTs cooperating with the coated NDs, which not only plays an effective role of heat conduction for CNTs and NDs, but also avoids the electrical leakage by the protection of NDs surrounding outside of CNTs. Electrical and thermal conductance measurements demonstrate that the influence of the CNT-ND incorporation on the electrical conductance is minor, however, the thermal conductivity is improved significantly for the epoxy filled with CNT-ND.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. Simulation of thermo-Elastics Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal barrier coatings are used to protect different parts in compressors and turbines from heat. They are generally composed of two layers, one metallic layer providing resistance to heat corrosion and oxidation, and one thermally insulating ceramic layer. Two different techniques are industrially used. Plasma spray ...

  14. Model-based analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    conducted exploring the effects of the following parameters: pigment (hollow spheres) volume concentration (PVC), average sphere size or sphere size distribution, thermal conductivities of binder and sphere wall material, and sphere wall thickness. All the parameters affected the thermal conductivity...... of an epoxy coating, but simulations revealed that the most important parameters are the PVC, the sphere wall thickness, and the sphere wall material. The model can be used, qualitatively, to get an indication of the effect of important model parameters on the thermal conductivity of an HS-based coating...

  15. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  16. Stiffness of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shiladitya Paul

    2017-01-01

    .... In this paper, the Young’s modulus of TBC top coat, measured using different techniques, such as four-point bending, indentation and impulse excitation is reported, along with a brief description of how the techniques probe...

  17. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  18. Waterproof Silicone Coatings of Thermal Insulation and Vaporization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation composed of porous ceramic material can be waterproofed by producing a thin silicone film on the surface of the insulation by exposing it to volatile silicone precursors at ambient conditions. When the silicone precursor reactants are multi-functional siloxanes or silanes containing alkenes or alkynes carbon groups higher molecular weight films can be produced. Catalyst are usually required for the silicone precursors to react at room temperature to form the films. The catalyst are particularly useful in the single component system e.g. dimethylethoxysilane (DNMS) to accelerate the reaction and decrease the time to waterproof and protect the insulation. In comparison to other methods, the chemical vapor technique assures better control over the quantity and location of the film being deposited on the ceramic insulation to improve the waterproof coating.

  19. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott t.

    2011-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of existing microcapsulation designs, the corrosion controlled release function that triggers the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand, only when and where needed. Microencapsulation of self-healing agents for autonomous repair of mechanical damage to the coating is also being pursued. Corrosion indicators, corrosion inhibitors, as well as self-healing agents, have been encapsulated and dispersed into several paint systems to test the corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing properties of the coating. Key words: Corrosion, coating, autonomous corrosion control, corrosion indication, corrosion inhibition, self-healing coating, smart coating, multifunctional coating, microencapsulation.

  20. Simulation to coating weight control for galvanizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junsheng; Yan, Zhang; Wu, Kunkui; Song, Lei

    2013-05-01

    Zinc coating weight control is one of the most critical issues for continuous galvanizing line. The process has the characteristic of variable-time large time delay, nonlinear, multivariable. It can result in seriously coating weight error and non-uniform coating. We develop a control system, which can automatically control the air knives pressure and its position to give a constant and uniform zinc coating, in accordance with customer-order specification through an auto-adaptive empirical model-based feed forward adaptive controller, and two model-free adaptive feedback controllers . The proposed models with controller were applied to continuous galvanizing line (CGL) at Angang Steel Works. By the production results, the precise and stability of the control model reduces over-coating weight and improves coating uniform. The product for this hot dip galvanizing line does not only satisfy the customers' quality requirement but also save the zinc consumption.

  1. Thermal Spray Coatings for Blast Furnace Tuyere Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A.; Sivakumar, G.; Prusty, D.; Shalini, J.; Dutta, M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The components in an integrated steel plant are invariably exposed to harsh working environments involving exposure to high temperatures, corrosive gases, and erosion/wear conditions. One such critical component in the blast furnace is the tuyere, which is prone to thermal damage by splashing of molten metal/slag, erosive damage by falling burden material, and corrosion from the ensuing gases. All the above, collectively or independently, accelerate tuyere failure, which presents a potential explosion hazard in a blast furnace. Recently, thermal spray coatings have emerged as an effective solution to mitigate such severe operational challenges. In the present work, five different coatings deposited using detonation spray and air plasma spray techniques were comprehensively characterized. Performance evaluation involving thermal cycling, hot corrosion, and erosion tests was also carried out. Based on the studies, a coating system was suggested for possible tuyere applications and found to yield substantial improvement in service life during actual field trials.

  2. Deposition stress effects on thermal barrier coating burner rig life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  3. Preparation of a Novel Water-based Acrylic Multi-Thermal Insulation Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Xiufang YE; Dongchu CHEN; Chang, Menglei; Youtian MO; Wang, Qingxiang

    2017-01-01

    To efficiently improve the thermal insulation effect of coatings, a novel water-based acrylic multi-thermal insulation coating (multi-WATIC) combined with thermal obstruction, echo, and radiation was prepared. The category and ratio of thermal insulation functional fillers are crucial. First, water-based acrylic thermal insulation coating (WATIC) with single thermal insulation functional fillers was prepared, and the thermal insulation property tests were done. Thereafter, a novel multi-WATIC...

  4. The Numerical Modeling of Thermal Stress Distribution in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasik A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of numerical calculations of temperature and thermal stress distribution in thermal barrier coatings deposited by thermal spraying process on the nickel based superalloy. An assumption was made to apply conventional zirconium oxide modified with yttrium oxide (8YSZ and apply pyrochlore type material with formula La2Zr2O7. The bond coat was made of NiCoCrAlY. Analysis of the distribution of temperature and stresses in ceramic coatings of different thicknesses was performed in the function of bond-coat thickness and the type of ceramic insulation layer. It was revealed that the thickness of NiCrAlY bond-coat has not significant influence on the stress distribution, but there is relatively strong effect on temperature level. The most important factor influenced on stress distribution in TBC system is related with type and properties of ceramic insulation layer.

  5. Optical Coatings and Thermal Noise in Precision Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Gregory; Bodiya, Timothy P.; DeSalvo, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    1. Theory of thermal noise in optical mirrors Y. Levin; 2. Coating technology S. Chao; 3. Compendium of thermal noises in optical mirrors V. B. Braginsky, M. L. Gorodetsky and S. P. Vyatchanin; 4. Coating thermal noise I. Martin and S. Reid; 5. Direct measurements of coating thermal noise K. Numata; 6. Methods of improving thermal noise S. Ballmer and K. Somiya; 7. Substrate thermal noise S. Rowan and I. Martin; 8. Cryogenics K. Numata and K. Yamamoto; 9. Thermo-optic noise M. Evans and G. Ogin; 10. Absorption and thermal issues P. Willems, D. Ottaway and P. Beyersdorf; 11. Optical scatter J. R. Smith and M. E. Zucker; 12. Reflectivity and thickness optimisation I. M. Pinto, M. Principe and R. DeSalvo; 13. Beam shaping A. Freise; 14. Gravitational wave detection D. Ottaway and S. D. Penn; 15. High-precision laser stabilisation via optical cavities M. J. Martin and J. Ye; 16. Quantum optomechanics G. D. Cole and M. Aspelmeyer; 17. Cavity quantum electrodynamics T. E. Northup.

  6. Underwater Coatings for Contamination Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julia L. Tripp; Kip Archibald; Ann-Marie Phillips; Joseph Campbell

    2004-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is deactivating several fuel storage basins. Airborne contamination is a concern when the sides of the basins are exposed and allowed to dry during water removal. One way of controlling this airborne contamination is to fix the contamination in place while the pool walls are still submerged. There are many underwater coatings available on the market that are used in marine, naval and other applications. A series of tests were run to determine whether the candidate underwater fixatives are easily applied and adhere well to the substrates (pool wall materials) found in INEEL fuel pools. The four pools considered included 1) Test Area North (TAN-607) with epoxy painted concrete walls; 2) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (CPP-603) with bare concrete walls; 3) Materials Test Reactor (MTR) Canal with stainless steel lined concrete walls; and 4) Power Burst Facility (PBF-620) with stainless steel lined concrete walls on the bottom and epoxy painted carbon steel lined walls on the upper portions. Therefore, the four materials chosen for testing included bare concrete, epoxy painted concrete, epoxy painted carbon steel, and stainless steel. The typical water temperature of the pools varies from 55oF to 80oF dependent on the pool and the season. These tests were done at room temperature. The following criteria were used during this evaluation. The underwater coating must: · Be easy to apply · Adhere well to the four surfaces of interest · Not change or have a negative impact on water chemistry or clarity · Not be hazardous in final applied form · Be proven in other underwater applications. In addition, it is desirable for the coating to have a high pigment or high cross-link density to prevent radiation from penetrating. This paper will detail the testing completed and the test results. A proprietary two-part, underwater epoxy owned by S. G. Pinney and Associates was selected to

  7. Thermal Conductivity in Suspension Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Kumara, Chamara; Gupta, Mohit; Nylen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS) can generate microstructures with higher porosity and pores in the size range from submicron to nanometer. ASPS thermal barrier coatings (TBC) have already shown a great potential to produce low thermal conductivity coatings for gas turbine applications. It is important to understand the fundamental relationships between microstructural defects in ASPS coatings such as crystallite boundaries, porosity etc. and thermal conductivity. Object-oriented finite element (OOF) analysis has been shown as an effective tool for evaluating thermal conductivity of conventional TBCs as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent microstructure in the model. The objective of this work was to analyze the thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs using experimental techniques and also to evaluate a procedure where OOF can be used to predict and analyze the thermal conductivity for these coatings. Verification of the model was done by comparing modeling results with the experimental thermal conductivity. The results showed that the varied scaled porosity has a significant influence on the thermal conductivity. Smaller crystallites and higher overall porosity content resulted in lower thermal conductivity. It was shown that OOF could be a powerful tool to predict and rank thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs.

  8. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  9. Power Electronics Thermal Control (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2010-05-05

    Thermal management plays an important part in the cost of electric drives in terms of power electronics packaging. Very promising results have been obtained by using microporous coatings and skived surfaces in conjunction with single-phase and two-phase flows. Sintered materials and thermoplastics with embedded fibers show significant promise as thermal interface materials, or TIMs. Appropriate cooling technologies depend on the power electronics package application and reliability.

  10. Comparative evaluation of different thermally modified wood samples finishing with UV-curable and waterborne coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, René; Muszyńska, Monika; Krystofiak, Tomasz; Labidi, Jalel

    2015-12-01

    Thermally modified wood has been developed as an industrial method to improve durability and dimensional stability of wood and thus extends the range of uses and service life of wood-based products. Despite the improvements gained by treatment, surface finishing using coatings prevents esthetical changes such as color degradation or occasional growth of mold adding protection in outdoor use and extending the service life of products. The wood finishing process was carried out with commercially available waterborne and UV-curable coatings on industrially modified at 192, 200, 212 °C and unmodified European ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) wood, using an industrial rollers system and a laboratory brushing system. Changes caused by thermal treatment which could affect the surface finish were measured and compared with control samples, such as water uptake, wettability and acidity. Following the wood finishing, surface properties and esthetic changes were evaluated; as well as the coatings performance. Thermally modified wood presented improved adherence compared with unmodified wood with a significant improvement in samples modified at 212 °C, which also present the highest hardness when UV-cured. Finishes with UV-curing maintain the hydrophobic effect of thermally modified wood, whereas waterborne finishes increase the surface wettability. Thermal modification did not negatively influence on the elastic properties of the coated substrate and thus allows this material to be finished with different coating systems in the same conditions as unmodified wood.

  11. Thermal modelling of various thermal barrier coatings in a high heat flux rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Traditional Air Plasma Sprayed (APS) ZrO2-Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC's) and Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed (LPPS) ZrO2-Y2O3/Ni-Cr-Al-Y cermet coatings were tested in a H2/O2 rocked engine. The traditional ZrO2-Y2O3 (TBC's) showed considerable metal temperature reductions during testing in the hydrogen-rich environment. A thermal model was developed to predict the thermal response of the tubes with the various coatings. Good agreement was observed between predicted temperatures and measured temperatures at the inner wall of the tube and in the metal near the coating/metal interface. The thermal model was also used to examine the effect of the differences in the reported values of the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic coatings, the effect of 100 micron (0.004 in.) thick metallic bond coat, the effect of tangential heat transfer around the tube, and the effect or radiation from the surface of the ceramic coating. It was shown that for the short duration testing in the rocket engine, the most important of these considerations was the effect of the uncertainty in the thermal conductivity of temperatures (greater than 100 C) predicted in the tube. The thermal model was also used to predict the thermal response of the coated rod in order to quantify the difference in the metal temperatures between the two substrate geometries and to explain the previously-observed increased life of coatings on rods over that on tubes. A thermal model was also developed to predict heat transfer to the leading edge of High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) blades during start-up of the space shuttle main engines. The ability of various TBC's to reduce metal temperatures during the two thermal excursions occurring on start-up was predicted. Temperature reductions of 150 to 470 C were predicted for 165 micron (0.0065 in.) coatings for the greater of the two thermal excursions.

  12. Wear and corrosion behaviour of Al2O3-TiO2 coatings produced by flame thermal projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Duran, M.; Dulce-Moreno, H. J.; Ferrer-Pacheco, M.; Vargas-Galvis, F.

    2017-12-01

    Evaluated the wear resistance and the coatings corrosion behaviour of Al2O3-TiO2 prepared by thermal spraying by flame on AISI 1020 carbon steel substrates, previously coated with an alloy base Ni. For this purpose, were controlled parameters of thermal spraying and the use of powders of similar but different chemical composition is taken as a variable commercial reference for ceramic coating. SEM images allowed to know the morphology of the powders and coatings. Electrochemical techniques (Tafel) were applied to evaluate the protection against corrosion. Coatings were tested for wear with a tribometer configuration bola-disco. It was determined that the phases present in coatings are directly relate to the behaviour against corrosion and wear them. Keywords: wear, corrosion, thermal imaging.

  13. Solar Thermal AIR Collector Based on New Type Selective Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musiy, R.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the best for optical performance and selective coating solar thermal air collector, which operates by solar power on the principle of simultaneous ventilation and heating facilities, is designed. It can be used for vacation homes, museums, wooden churches, warehouses, garages, houses, greenhouses etc.

  14. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramic based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are currently considered as a candidate material for advanced stationary gas turbine components. Crack propagation studies under bending are described that were performed on plasma sprayed ZrO2, bonded by MCrAlY layer to Ni base superalloy. The crack propagation ...

  15. Recycling light metals : Optimal thermal de-coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvithyld, A.; Meskers, C.E.M.; Gaal, S.; Reuter, M.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal de-coating of painted and lacquered scrap is one of the new innovations developed for aluminum recycling. If implemented in all recycling and optimized as suggested in this article, recovery would be improved with considerable economic impact. Generally, contaminated scrap is difficult to

  16. Morphology and thermal conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Hengbei [Materials Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)]. E-mail: hz5e@virginia.edu; Yu Fengling [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bennett, Ted D. [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Wadley, Haydn N.G. [Materials Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    An electron beam directed vapor deposition method was used to grow 7 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} (7YSZ) coatings and the effects of substrate rotation upon the coating porosity, morphology, texture, and thermal conductivity were explored. As the rotation rate was increased, the texture changed from <1 1 1> to <1 0 0>. Under stationary deposition, the coatings were composed of straight columns, while low-frequency rotation resulted in wavy columns. Increases in rotation rate resulted in a gradual straightening and narrowing of the growth columns. The pore fraction slowly decreased as the rotation rate increased. The thermal conductivity was found to be inversely related to the pore fraction. The structural and thermal conductivity alterations are a result of changes to flux shadowing associated with specimen rotation in a gas jet-entrained vapor plume. The minimum thermal conductivity at a low rotation rate is 0.8 W/(m K), well below that of conventionally deposited coatings.

  17. Evaluations of Strength of Thermal Sprayed Coating for Complex Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Ohmori, Akira

    Fracture strength of WC-12Co thermal sprayed coating is investigated experimentally and analytically. In the experiments, one pair of butt cylindrical specimen with coating is subjected to combined tension with torsion stresses. Fracture loci were obtained for three kinds of thickness of the coating in σ-τ stress plane. Stress distributions at crack tip singular point on fractured surfaces are analyzed by Finite-Element-Method and approximated by the expression σ=KR-λ where R means normalized thickness coordinate. It is found that the normal stress distributions are common to all cases of testing stress conditions and so fracture condition of the brittle coating is represented as K≥Kcr in the normal stress distribution even under mixed deformation mode I and III. The delamination critical shear stress distribution could also be obtained.

  18. Analysis of Thermal Radiation Effects on Temperatures in Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are important, and in some instances a necessity, for high temperature applications such as combustor liners, and turbine vanes and rotating blades for current and advanced turbine engines. Some of the insulating materials used for coatings, such as zirconia that currently has widespread use, are partially transparent to thermal radiation. A translucent coating permits energy to be transported internally by radiation, thereby increasing the total energy transfer and acting like an increase in thermal conductivity. This degrades the insulating ability of the coating. Because of the strong dependence of radiant emission on temperature, internal radiative transfer effects are increased as temperatures are raised. Hence evaluating the significance of internal radiation is of importance as temperatures are increased to obtain higher efficiencies in advanced engines.

  19. Investigation of thermo-physical properties of thermal insulation coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopčok, Michal; Lukovičová, Jozefa; Kačur, Jozef; Pavlendová, Gabriela

    2017-07-01

    This paper examines the thermal properties of thermal insulation coating applied to the building materials surfaces. The main objective is to determine the insulation coating impact on the heat flux transfer. The heat flux is modelled in terms of the heat transfer coefficient on the surface of a solid body. The thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient are obtained from the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem in 3D, based on the temperature measurements. The real temperature evolution is perturbed due to intrinsic properties of the measuring apparatus. We correct this situation via modelling a thermocouple function. Afterwards the determination procedure of the heat flux transfer parameters is a standard solution of the inverse problem based on the minimization of discrepancy between corrected measured data and computed temperature data.

  20. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating

  1. Ternary ceramic thermal spraying powder and method of manufacturing thermal sprayed coating using said powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogli, Evelina; Sherman, Andrew J.; Glasgow, Curtis P.

    2018-02-06

    The invention describes a method for producing ternary and binary ceramic powders and their thermal spraying capable of manufacturing thermal sprayed coatings with superior properties. Powder contain at least 30% by weight ternary ceramic, at least 20% by weight binary molybdenum borides, at least one of the binary borides of Cr, Fe, Ni, W and Co and a maximum of 10% by weight of nano and submicro-sized boron nitride. The primary crystal phase of the manufactured thermal sprayed coatings from these powders is a ternary ceramic, while the secondary phases are binary ceramics. The coatings have extremely high resistance against corrosion of molten metal, extremely thermal shock resistance and superior tribological properties at low and at high temperatures.

  2. SERS investigation of coatings on thermal modified titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amininejad, Sayed; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2) are progressively manufactured and used in a wide variety of products such as sunscreens, papers, paints and toothpastes. The increase in the production and use of Titanium dioxide nanoparticles would escalate the risk for exposure of the natural environments to these compounds. There are several techniques for identifying and quantifying nanoparticles and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) is an emerging technique which combines raman spectroscopy with nanotechnology. SERS can also be used to investigate the changes of natural coatings on nanoparticles as an important factor regarding their environmental fate and biological effects. In this work, TiO2 P25 nanoparticles are thermally modified at different temperatures to study the effects of thermal shock on the crystal structure, surface properties and subsequently the Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering from 4-Mercaptobenzoic acid molecules coated on TiO2 nanoparticles has been observed. The results show that 4-Mercaptobenzoic acid molecules coated on nanoparticles exhibit different degree SERS enhancement on the surface of different nanoparticles modified at different temperatures by thermal modification method. This research work is expected to be important for improving SERS performance of TiO2 nanoparticles for characterization of natural coatings. Keywords: SERS, TiO2, 4-Mercaptobenzoic acid

  3. Thermal Modelling of Various Thermal Barrier Coatings in a High Flux Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1998-01-01

    A thermal model was developed to predict the thermal response of coated and uncoated tubes tested in a H2/O2 rocket engine. Temperatures were predicted for traditional APS ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings, as well as APS and LPPS ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY cermet coatings. Good agreement was observed between predicted and measured metal temperatures at locations near the tube surface or at the inner tube wall. The thermal model was also used to quantitatively examine the effect of various coating system parameters on the temperatures in the substrate and coating. Accordingly, the effect of the presence a metallic bond coat and the effect of radiation from the surface of the ceramic layer were examined. In addition, the effect of a variation in the values of the thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer was also investigated. It was shown that a variation in the thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer, on the order of that reported in the literature for plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 coatings, can result in temperature differences in the substrate greater than 100 C, a much greater effect than that due to the presence of a bond coat or radiation from the ceramic layer. The thermal model was also used to predict the thermal response of a coated rod in order to quantify the difference in the metal temperatures between the two substrate geometries in order to explain the previously-observed increased life of coatings on rods over that on tubes. It was shown that for the short duration testing in the rocket engine, the temperature in a tube could exceed that in a rod by more than 100 C. Lastly, a two-dimensional model was developed to evaluate the effect of tangential heat transfer around the tube and its impact on reducing the stagnation point temperature. It was also shown that tangential heat transfer does not significantly reduce the stagnation point temperature, thus allowing application of a simpler, one-dimensional model for comparing measured and predicted stagnation point

  4. Reduction of temperature in silicon photovoltaic module using thermal radiation coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of solar cells increases under the actual operating conditions, and the conversion efficiency of solar cells decreases with increasing temperature. In this study, a thermal radiation layer was coated on the back sheet of the PV module by a spray coating method and the effect was evaluated. The thickness of the layer was 30 μm. The temperature of the PV module with the thermal radiation coating was lower than that of the PV module without the thermal radiation coating. And the operating temperature range of the PV module with the thermal radiation coating was decreased by 2~3°C. The open-circuit voltage of the PV module with the thermal radiation coating was 0.1 V higher than that of the module without the coating due to the thermal radiation coating.

  5. Perspective on thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutasim, Zaher; Brentnall, William

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) have been used in high thrust aircraft engines for many years, and have proved to be very effective in providing thermal protection and increasing engine efficiencies. TBC life requirements for aircraft engines are typically less than those required for industrial gas turbines. This paper describes current and future applications of TBC's in industrial gas turbine engines. Early testing and applications of TBC's is reviewed. Areas of concern from the engine designer's and materials engineer's perspective are identified and evaluated. This paper focuses on the key factors that are expected to influence utilization of TBC's in advanced industrial gas turbine engines. It is anticipated that reliable, durable and highly effective coating systems will be produced that will ultimately improve engine efficiency and performance.

  6. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  7. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  8. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  9. High-field thermal transports properties of REBCO coated conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bonura, M

    2015-01-01

    The use of REBCO coated conductors is envisaged for many applications, extending from power cables to high-field magnets. Whatever the case, thermal properties of REBCO tapes play a key role for the stability of superconducting devices. In this work, we present the first study on the longitudinal thermal conductivity (k) of REBCO coated conductors in magnetic fields up to 19 T applied both parallelly and perpendicularly to the thermal-current direction. Copper-stabilized tapes from six industrial manufacturers have been investigated. We show that zero-field k of coated conductors can be calculated with an accuracy of ‡ 15% from the residual resistivity ratio of the stabilizer and the Cu/non-Cu ratio. Measurements performed at high fields have allowed us to evaluate the consistency of the procedures generally used for estimating in-field k in the framework of the Wiedemann-Franz law from an electrical characterization of the materials. In-field data are intended to provide primary ingredients for the ...

  10. Comparative Study of Microstructure and Properties of Thermal Sprayed MCrAlY Bond Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglima, Michael William

    A series of experiments were performed in order to observe certain process-property trends in thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coatings for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications in gas-turbine engines. Firstly, the basis of gas-turbine operation and design is discussed with a focus on the Brayton cycle and basic thermodynamic properties with respect to both the thermal and fuel efficiency of the turbine. The high-temperature environment inside the gas-turbine engine creates an extremely corrosive medium in which the engineering components must operate with sufficient operating life times. These engineering constraints, both thermal/fuel efficiency and operating life, pose a serious problem during long operation as well as thermal cycling of a civil aerospace engine. The concept of a thermal barrier coating is introduced along with how these coatings protect the internal engineering components, mostly in the hot-section of the turbine, and increase both the efficiency as well as the operating life of the components. The method used to create TBC's is then introduced being thermal spray processing along with standard operating procedures (SOP) used during coating deposition. The main focus of the experiments was to quantify the process-property trends seen during thermal spray processing of TBC's with respect to the adhesion and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer, as well as how sensitive these properties are to changing variables during coating deposition. The design of experiment (DOE) method was used in order to have sufficient statistical process control over the output as well as a standard method for quantifying the results. A total of three DOE's were performed using two main types of thermal spray processes being high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and atmospheric plasma spray (APS), with a total of five different types of torches which are categorized by liquid-fuel, gas-fuel, and single cathode plasma. The variables used in the proceeding experiments were

  11. Anti-icing Behavior of Thermally Sprayed Polymer Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuluoto, Heli; Stenroos, Christian; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Apostol, Marian; Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Vuoristo, Petri

    2017-01-01

    Surface engineering shows an increasing potential to provide a sustainable approach to icing problems. Currently, several passive anti-ice properties adoptable to coatings are known, but further research is required to proceed for practical applications. This is due to the fact that icing reduces safety, operational tempo, productivity and reliability of logistics, industry and infrastructure. An icing wind tunnel and a centrifugal ice adhesion test equipment can be used to evaluate and develop anti-icing and icephobic coatings for a potential use in various arctic environments, e.g., in wind power generation, oil drilling, mining and logistic industries. The present study deals with evaluation of icing properties of flame-sprayed polyethylene (PE)-based polymer coatings. In the laboratory-scale icing tests, thermally sprayed polymer coatings showed low ice adhesion compared with metals such as aluminum and stainless steel. The ice adhesion strength of the flame-sprayed PE coating was found to have approximately seven times lower ice adhesion values compared with metallic aluminum, indicating a very promising anti-icing behavior.

  12. Thermal spray coating for corrosion under insulation (CUI) prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Mohd Fazril Irfan Ahmad; Razak, Khalil Abdul; Alias, Nur Hashimah; Othman, Nur Hidayati; Lah, Nik Khairul Irfan Nik Ab

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is one of the predominant issues affecting process of Oil and Gas and Petrochemical industries. CUI refers to external corrosion, but it is difficult to be detected as the insulation cover masks the corrosion problem. One of the options to prevent CUI is by utilizing the protective coating systems. Thermal spray coating (TSC) is an advanced coating system and it shows promising performance in harsh environment, which could be used to prevent CUI. However, the application of TSC is not attractive due to the high initial cost. This work evaluates the potential of TSC based on corrosion performance using linear polarization resistance (LPR) method and salt spray test (SST). Prior to the evaluation, the mechanical performance of TSC was first investigated using adhesion test and bend test. Microstructure characterization of the coating was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The LPR test results showed that low corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/years was obtained for TSC in compared to the bare steel especially at high temperature of 80 °C, where usually normal coating would fail. For the salt spray test, there was no sign of corrosion products especially at the center (fully coated region) was observed. From SEM images, no corrosion defects were observed after 336 hours of continuous exposure to salt fog test. This indicates that TSC protected the steel satisfactorily by acting as a barrier from a corrosive environment. In conclusion, TSC can be a possible solution to minimize the CUI in a long term. Further research should be done on corrosion performance and life cycle cost by comparing TSC with other conventional coating technology.

  13. Indentation methods for adhesion measurement in thermal barrier coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qin

    This thesis investigates the fundamentals of indentation-induced delamination of electron beam physical vapor deposition thermal barrier coatings (EB-PVD TBCs). Thermal barrier coatings are thin ceramic coatings used to insulate gas turbine components. In the as-processed state, TBCs are well-bonded to the metallic substrate they are deposited upon. However, as these coatings are exposed to high temperatures during turbine operation, they lose their adhesion. The goal of this thesis is to determine how to use indentation testing techniques, coupled with fracture mechanics principles, to track this loss of adhesion and to identify mechanisms causing it. This thesis addresses four primary topics. First, a detailed fracture mechanics analysis of indentation-induced delamination is made, including the quantification of energy release rates, interfacial toughnesses and mode mix. The second topic addressed is application of the indentation test to track toughness losses in TBC systems subjected to a variety of thermal exposures. Three subtopics are included: (1) mechanism-based tests for the isothermal dry air exposures; (2) mechanism-based tests for exposures with water vapor and (3) mechanism-based tests for cyclic thermal exposures. In the first subtopic, TGO thickening and TBC sintering are modeled. Various mechanisms that lead to toughness degradation are discussed and analyzed quantitatively. An Arrhenius analysis has been performed to understand accelerated testing methods. The second subtopic presents the results of toughness degradation and the evolution of microstructures due to isothermal exposure with water vapor. The third subtopic investigates the toughness degradation for cyclic thermal exposures in dry air. Piezospectroscopy method has been applied to track the evolution of residual stresses in the TGO layer with thermal cycles. Quantitative analysis has been provided to give insights into the effects of oxide damage during thermal cycling. The final two

  14. Optimal control in thermal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Badescu, Viorel

    2017-01-01

    This book is the first major work covering applications in thermal engineering and offering a comprehensive introduction to optimal control theory, which has applications in mechanical engineering, particularly aircraft and missile trajectory optimization. The book is organized in three parts: The first part includes a brief presentation of function optimization and variational calculus, while the second part presents a summary of the optimal control theory. Lastly, the third part describes several applications of optimal control theory in solving various thermal engineering problems. These applications are grouped in four sections: heat transfer and thermal energy storage, solar thermal engineering, heat engines and lubrication.Clearly presented and easy-to-use, it is a valuable resource for thermal engineers and thermal-system designers as well as postgraduate students.

  15. Design Optimization of Liquid Fueled High Velocity Oxy- Fuel Thermal Spraying Technique for Durable Coating for Fossil Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhuri, Ahsan [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); Love, Norman [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2016-11-04

    High-velocity oxy–fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying was developed in 1930 and has been commercially available for twenty-five years. HVOF thermal spraying has several benefits over the more conventional plasma spray technique including a faster deposition rate which leads to quicker turn-around, with more durable coatings and higher bond strength, hardness and wear resistance due to a homogeneous distribution of the sprayed particles. HVOF thermal spraying is frequently used in engineering to deposit cermets, metallic alloys, composites and polymers, to enhance product life and performance. HVOF thermal spraying system is a highly promising technique for applying durable coatings on structural materials for corrosive and high temperature environments in advanced ultra-supercritical coal- fired (AUSC) boilers, steam turbines and gas turbines. HVOF thermal spraying is the preferred method for producing coatings with low porosity and high adhesion. HVOF thermal spray process has been shown to be one of the most efficient techniques to deposit high performance coatings at moderate cost. Variables affecting the deposit formation and coating properties include hardware characteristics such as nozzle geometry and spraying distance and process parameters such as equivalence ratio, gas flow density, and powder feedstock. In the spray process, the powder particles experience very high speeds combined with fast heating to the powder material melting point or above. This high temperature causes evaporation of the powder, dissolution, and phase transformations. Due to the complex nature of the HVOF technique, the control and optimization of the process is difficult. In general, good coating quality with suitable properties and required performance for specific applications is the goal in producing thermal spray coatings. In order to reach this goal, a deeper understanding of the spray process as a whole is needed. Although many researchers studied commercial HVOF thermal spray

  16. Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit; Kumara, Chamara; Nylén, Per

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  17. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  18. A facility for the simulation of environmental parameters and qualification of flight thermal coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowski, F. N.

    1978-01-01

    There is a continuing interest and need for investigation and development of, various paints, coatings, multi-layer insulation, and electrically conductive paints and coatings used for thermal control and electrical discharge of spacecraft surfaces. Degradation of these surfaces by solar-wind energy particles and ultraviolet irradiation, as well as contamination by the outgassing of materials used in conjunction or close proximity to these surfaces, continues to be a matter of concern. The following is a description of a facility with the capability of evaluating the synergistic effects encountered in the space environment. Actual flight qualification programs are also described.

  19. Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier coatings under thermal shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier ceramic coatings (TBCs under different cycles of thermal shock loading of 1100°C was investigated by the microscopic digital image correlation (DIC and micro-Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained results showed that, as the cycle number of the thermal shock loading increases, the evolution of the residual stress undergoes three distinct stages: a sharp increase, a gradual change, and a reduction. The extension stress near the TBC surface is fast transformed to compressive one through just one thermal cycle. After different thermal shock cycles with peak temperature of 1100°C, phase transformation in TBC does not happen, whereas the generation, development, evolution of the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer and micro-cracks are the main reasons causing the evolution regularity of the residual stress.

  20. Environmental/Thermal Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites: Thermal Tradeoff Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. M.; Brewer, David; Shah, Ashwin R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent interest in environmental/thermal barrier coatings (EBC/TBCs) has prompted research to develop life-prediction methodologies for the coating systems of advanced high-temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Heat-transfer analysis of EBC/TBCs for CMCs is an essential part of the effort. It helps establish the resulting thermal profile through the thickness of the CMC that is protected by the EBC/TBC system. This report documents the results of a one-dimensional analysis of an advanced high-temperature CMC system protected with an EBC/TBC system. The one-dimensional analysis was used for tradeoff studies involving parametric variation of the conductivity; the thickness of the EBC/TBCs, bond coat, and CMC substrate; and the cooling requirements. The insight gained from the results will be used to configure a viable EBC/TBC system for CMC liners that meet the desired hot surface, cold surface, and substrate temperature requirements.

  1. Optical Diagnostics for High-Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments, such as in jet turbine engines. Taking advantage of the translucent nature of TBCs, optical diagnostics have been developed that can provide an informed assessment of TBC health that will allow mitigating action to be taken before TBC degradation threatens performance or safety. In particular, rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers have been integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence that monitors TBC erosion, delamination, and temperature gradients. Erosion monitoring of TBC-coated specimens is demonstrated by utilizing visible luminescence that is excited from a sublayer that is exposed by erosion. TBC delamination monitoring is achieved in TBCs with a base rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayer by the reflectance-enhanced increase in luminescence produced in regions containing buried delamination cracks. TBC temperature monitoring is demonstrated using the temperature-dependent decay time for luminescence originating from the specific coating depth associated with a rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayer. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers is discussed, including co-doping strategies to produce more penetrating near-infrared luminescence. It is demonstrated that integration of the rare-earth-doped sublayers is achieved with no reduction in TBC life. In addition, results for multilayer TBCs designed to also perform as radiation barriers are also presented.

  2. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  3. Contamination Control for Thermal Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rachel B.

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Spaceflight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). This course will cover the basics of Contamination Control, including contamination control related failures, the effects of contamination on Flight Hardware, what contamination requirements translate to, design methodology, and implementing contamination control into Integration, Testing and Launch.

  4. Sporicidal efficacy of thermal-sprayed copper alloy coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghi, Romina; Mostaghimi, Javad; Pershin, Valerian; Ringuette, Maurice

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 200 000 Canadians acquire healthcare-associated bacterial infections each year and several-fold more acquire food-borne bacterial illnesses. Bacterial spores are particularly problematic because they can survive on surfaces for several months. Owing to its sporicidal activity, copper alloy sheet metal is sometimes used in hospital settings, but its widespread use is limited by cost and incompatibility with complex furniture and instrument designs and topographies. A potential alternative is the use of thermal spray technology to coat surfaces with copper alloys. We compared the sporicidal activity of thermally sprayed copper alloy on stainless steel with that of copper alloy sheet metal against Bacillus subtilis spores. Spores remained intact for at least 1 week on uncoated stainless steel, whereas spore fragmentation was initiated within 2 h of exposure to either copper surface. Less than 15% of spores were viable 2 h after exposure to either copper surface, as compared with stainless steel. By day 7, only degraded spores and petal-like nanoflowers were present on the copper surfaces. Nanoflowers, which are laminar arrangements of thin crystal sheets composed of carbon - copper phosphate, appeared to be derived from the degraded spores. Altogether, these results indicate that a thermal-sprayed copper alloy coating on stainless steel provides sporicidal activity similar to that afforded by copper alloy sheet metal.

  5. Laser Processing of Multilayered Thermal Spray Coatings: Optimal Processing Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Zhang, Tao; Lee, Hwasoo; Sampath, Sanjay; Hwang, David; Longtin, Jon

    2017-11-01

    Laser processing offers an innovative approach for the fabrication and transformation of a wide range of materials. As a rapid, non-contact, and precision material removal technology, lasers are natural tools to process thermal spray coatings. Recently, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) was fabricated using thermal spray and laser processing. The TEG device represents a multilayer, multimaterial functional thermal spray structure, with laser processing serving an essential role in its fabrication. Several unique challenges are presented when processing such multilayer coatings, and the focus of this work is on the selection of laser processing parameters for optimal feature quality and device performance. A parametric study is carried out using three short-pulse lasers, where laser power, repetition rate and processing speed are varied to determine the laser parameters that result in high-quality features. The resulting laser patterns are characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electrical isolation tests between patterned regions. The underlying laser interaction and material removal mechanisms that affect the feature quality are discussed. Feature quality was found to improve both by using a multiscanning approach and an optional assist gas of air or nitrogen. Electrically isolated regions were also patterned in a cylindrical test specimen.

  6. Laser Processing of Multilayered Thermal Spray Coatings: Optimal Processing Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Zhang, Tao; Lee, Hwasoo; Sampath, Sanjay; Hwang, David; Longtin, Jon

    2017-12-01

    Laser processing offers an innovative approach for the fabrication and transformation of a wide range of materials. As a rapid, non-contact, and precision material removal technology, lasers are natural tools to process thermal spray coatings. Recently, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) was fabricated using thermal spray and laser processing. The TEG device represents a multilayer, multimaterial functional thermal spray structure, with laser processing serving an essential role in its fabrication. Several unique challenges are presented when processing such multilayer coatings, and the focus of this work is on the selection of laser processing parameters for optimal feature quality and device performance. A parametric study is carried out using three short-pulse lasers, where laser power, repetition rate and processing speed are varied to determine the laser parameters that result in high-quality features. The resulting laser patterns are characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electrical isolation tests between patterned regions. The underlying laser interaction and material removal mechanisms that affect the feature quality are discussed. Feature quality was found to improve both by using a multiscanning approach and an optional assist gas of air or nitrogen. Electrically isolated regions were also patterned in a cylindrical test specimen.

  7. Processing and Deposition of Nanocrystalline Oxide Composites for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ying, Jackie

    2000-01-01

    .... Electrophoretic deposition was used to coat the nanocomposite powders onto nickel substrates. The effect of alumina content, powder calcination temperature, and film thickness on the thermal stability of zirconia-based coatings was examined...

  8. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on microencapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where they are needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into the microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy.

  9. Effect of thermal dissipation by adding graphene materials to surface coating of LED lighting module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Jeong, J Y; Han, S H; Kim, J H; Kwon, K T; Hwang, M K; Kim, I T; Cho, G S

    2013-05-01

    The effect of thermal dissipation by adding graphene nano-platelets to two different commercially available thermal dissipation coatings (ceramic coating and powder coating) was studied. Steady state temperatures of each points of LED modules was monitored in a closed system, with an integral photo detection sphere where there is no external air flow. Having eliminated the contributions of thermal conduction and air flow convection, the module with a conventional heat dissipation coatings showed 8-16% enhancement of thermal dissipation compared to that of non-coated LED module. The addition of graphene is shown to have about 3% additional enhancement. By analyzing thermal resistance of each component of the LED module, the improved thermal conductivity of the graphene added coatings contributes to the enhancement of slight improvement with heat dissipation.

  10. Coherent gradient sensing method for measuring thermal stress field of thermal barrier coating structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coherent gradient sensing (CGS method can be used to measure the slope of a reflective surface, and has the merits of full-field, non-contact, and real-time measurement. In this study, the thermal stress field of thermal barrier coating (TBC structures is measured by CGS method. Two kinds of powders were sprayed onto Ni-based alloy using a plasma spraying method to obtain two groups of film–substrate specimens. The specimens were then heated with an oxy-acetylene flame. The resulting thermal mismatch between the film and substrate led to out-of-plane deformation of the specimen. The deformation was measured by the reflective CGS method and the thermal stress field of the structure was obtained through calibration with the help of finite element analysis. Both the experiment and numerical results showed that the thermal stress field of TBC structures can be successfully measured by CGS method.

  11. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  12. Innovation in the Process of Thermal Spraying Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczucka-Lasota B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the hybrid method connects the ultrasonic spraying method with a injector of complex cooling micro-jet system is presented. The use of properly constructed injector allows for local and selective cooling of the coating structure immediately after spraying process. The construction of injector is the subject of patent in Polen. The presented new technology gives practical possibility of control of coatings structure. This is the kind of positive feedback between the technology process and obtained product (the quality of the process increases the quality of the final product. The initial experimental investigations, presented in this paper, show, that the obtained coatings structure is: fine-dispersion of the grain, with a lower porosity, good compactness and adhesion to the substrate.

  13. Preparation and Thermal Characterization of Annealed Gold Coated Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afarin Bahrami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon (PSi layers were formed on a p-type Si wafer. Six samples were anodised electrically with a 30 mA/cm2 fixed current density for different etching times. The samples were coated with a 50–60 nm gold layer and annealed at different temperatures under Ar flow. The morphology of the layers, before and after annealing, formed by this method was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS measurements were carried out to measure the thermal diffusivity (TD of the PSi and Au/PSi samples. For the Au/PSi samples, the thermal diffusivity was measured before and after annealing to study the effect of annealing. Also to study the aging effect, a comparison was made between freshly annealed samples and samples 30 days after annealing.

  14. Low Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Eric [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Gell, Maurice [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are crucial to improved energy efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. The use of traditional topcoat materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is limited at elevated temperatures due to (1) the accelerated undesirable phase transformations and (2) corrosive attacks by calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) deposits and moisture. The first goal of this project is to use the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) process to further reduce the thermal conductivity of YSZ TBCs by introducing a unique microstructural feature of layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries (IPBs). Extensive process optimization accompanied with hundreds of spray trials as well as associated SEM cross-section and laser-flash measurements, yielded a thermal conductivity as low as 0.62 Wm⁻¹K⁻¹ in SPPS YSZ TBCs, approximately 50% reduction of APS TBCs; while other engine critical properties, such as cyclic durability, erosion resistance and sintering resistance, were characterized to be equivalent or better than APS baselines. In addition, modifications were introduced to SPPS TBCs so as to enhance their resistance to CMAS under harsh IGCC environments. Several mitigation approaches were explored, including doping the coatings with Al₂O₃ and TiO₂, applying a CMAS infiltration-inhibiting surface layer, and filling topcoat cracks with blocking substances. The efficacy of all these modifications was assessed with a set of novel CMAS-TBC interaction tests, and the moisture resistance was tested in a custom-built high-temperature moisture rig. In the end, the optimal low thermal conductivity TBC system was selected based on all evaluation tests and its processing conditions were documented. The optimal coating consisted on a thick inner layer of YSZ coating made by the SPPS process having a thermal conductivity 50% lower than standard YSZ coatings topped with a high temperature tolerant CMAS resistant gadolinium

  15. High-field thermal transport properties of REBCO coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonura, Marco; Senatore, Carmine

    2015-02-01

    The use of REBCO coated conductors (CCs) is envisaged for many applications, extending from power cables to high-field magnets. Whatever the case, thermal properties of REBCO tapes play a key role for the stability of superconducting devices. In this work, we present the first study on the longitudinal thermal conductivity (κ) of REBCO CCs in magnetic fields up to 19 T applied both parallel and perpendicularly to the thermal-current direction. Copper-stabilized tapes from six industrial manufacturers have been investigated. We show that zero-field κ of CCs can be calculated with an accuracy of +/- 15% from the residual resistivity ratio of the stabilizer and the Cu/non-Cu ratio. Measurements performed at high fields have allowed us to evaluate the consistency of the procedures generally used for estimating in-field κ in the framework of the Wiedemann-Franz law from an electrical characterization of the materials. In-field data are intended to provide primary ingredients for the thermal stability analysis of high-temperature superconductor-based magnets.

  16. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  17. The Effects of Using Some Common White Pigments on Thermal and Aesthetic Performances of Pigmented Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneshi, Mehdi; Maruyama, Shigenao; Komiya, Atsuki

    A coated surface with high reflectance in the near infrared (NIR) region and low reflectance in the visible (VIS) region can both stay cool in the sun and retain its appearance by reducing the glare of reflected sunlight. To design such coatings, an optimization method that embraces both thermal and aesthetic effects is introduced. White pigments are widely used in designing cool coatings due to their relatively high reflectance of sunlight. However, using white pigments may produce glare, which can cause visual discomfort. It is possible to control these effects by controlling the size of pigment particles, volume concentration of pigments and coating thickness. Among the various white pigments that are available, we chose titanium dioxide, zinc oxide and alumina for this study. Radiative heat transfer in an anisotropic scattering, monodisperse pigmented layer was analyzed using the radiation element method by ray emission model (REM2). Both collimated and diffuse solar irradiations were considered. The CIE (International Commission on Illumination) colorimetric system was used for color analysis. Finally, the optimum values of particle size, volume fraction of pigment, and coating thickness were obtained and compared for the three mentioned pigments.

  18. Effect of Damage Processes on Spallation Life in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newaz, Golam M

    2001-01-01

    .... TBCs consist of an outer ceramic layer that provides good thermal insulation due to the low thermal conductivity of the ceramic used, and the inner metallic bond coat layer that provides needed...

  19. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  20. Launch Pad Coatings for Smart Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Bucherl, Cori N.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Curran, Jerome P.; Whitten, Mary C.

    2010-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material as a result of its interaction with the environment. The environment at the KSC launch pads has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the US. The 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that are generated by the solid rocket boosters during a launch exacerbate the corrosiveness of the environment at the pads. Numerous failures at the pads are caused by the pitting of stainless steels, rebar corrosion, and the degradation of concrete. Corrosion control of launch pad structures relies on the use of coatings selected from the qualified products list (QPL) of the NASA Standard 5008A for Protective Coating of Carbon Steel, Stainless Steel, and Aluminum on Launch Structures, Facilities, and Ground Support Equipment. This standard was developed to establish uniform engineering practices and methods and to ensure the inclusion of essential criteria in the coating of ground support equipment (GSE) and facilities used by or for NASA. This standard is applicable to GSE and facilities that support space vehicle or payload programs or projects and to critical facilities at all NASA locations worldwide. Environmental regulation changes have dramatically reduced the production, handling, use, and availability of conventional protective coatings for application to KSC launch structures and ground support equipment. Current attrition rate of qualified KSC coatings will drastically limit the number of commercial off the shelf (COTS) products available for the Constellation Program (CxP) ground operations (GO). CxP GO identified corrosion detection and control technologies as a critical, initial capability technology need for ground processing of Ares I and Ares V to meet Constellation Architecture Requirements Document (CARD) CxP 70000 operability requirements for reduced ground processing complexity, streamlined integrated testing, and operations phase affordability

  1. Thermal implications of interactions between insulation, solar reflectance, and fur structure in the summer coats of diverse species of kangaroo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Terence J; Maloney, Shane K

    2017-04-01

    Not all of the solar radiation that impinges on a mammalian coat is absorbed and converted into thermal energy at the coat surface. Some is reflected back to the environment, while another portion is reflected further into the coat where it is absorbed and manifested as heat at differing levels. Substantial insulation in a coat limits the thermal impact at the skin of solar radiation, irrespective where in the coat it is absorbed. In coats with low insulation, the zone where solar radiation is absorbed may govern the consequent heat load on the skin (HL-SR). Thin summer furs of four species of kangaroo from differing climatic zones were used to determine how variation in insulation and in coat spectral and structural characteristics influence the HL-SR. Coat depth, structure, and solar reflectance varied between body regions, as well as between species. The modulation of solar radiation and resultant heat flows in these coats were measured at low (1 m s-1) and high (6 m s-1) wind speeds by mounting them on a heat flux transducer/temperature-controlled plate apparatus in a wind tunnel. A lamp with a spectrum similar to solar radiation was used as a proxy for the sun. We established that coat insulation was largely determined by coat depth at natural fur lie, despite large variations in fibre density, fibre diameter, and fur mass. Higher wind speed decreased coat insulation, but depth still determined the overall level. A multiple regression analysis that included coat depth (insulation), fibre diameter, fibre density, and solar reflectance was used to determine the best predictors of HL-SR. Only depth and reflectance had significant impacts and both factors had negative weights, so, as either insulation or reflectance increased, HL-SR declined, the larger impact coming from coat reflectance. This reverses the pattern observed in deep coats where insulation dominates over effects of reflectance. Across all coats, as insulation declined, reflectance increased. An

  2. Thermal Performance Study of Composite Phase Change Material with Polyacrylicand Conformal Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Shin Yiing; Munusamy, Yamuna; Ong, Kok Seng; Cornelis Metselaar, Hendrik Simon; Chee, Swee Yong; Lai, Koon Chun

    2017-07-28

    The composite PCM was prepared by blending polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and myristic acid (MA) in different weight percentages. The MA and PMMA were selected as PCM and supporting material, respectively. As liquid MA may leak out during the phase transition, this study proposes the use of two coatings, namely a polyacrylic coating and a conformal coating to overcome the leakage problem. Both coatings were studied in terms of the leakage test, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, morphology, and reliability. No leakage was found in the PCMs with coatings compared to those without under the same proportions of MA/PMMA, thus justifying the use of coatings in the present study. The chemically compatibility was confirmed by FTIR spectra: the functional groups of PCMs were in accordance with those of coatings. DSC showed that the coatings did not significantly change the melting and freezing temperatures, however, they improved the thermal stability of composite PCMs as seen in TGA analysis. Furthermore, the composite PCMs demonstrated good thermal reliability after 1000 times thermal cycling. The latent heat of melting reduced by only 0.16% and 1.02% for the PCMs coated with conformal coating and polyacrylic coating, respectively. Therefore, the proposed coatings can be considered in preparing fatty acid/PMMA blends attributed to the good stability, compatibility and leakage prevention.

  3. A Multifunctional Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, L. M.; Hintze, P. E.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Jolley, S. T.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the effects of corrosion on various structures at the Kennedy Space Center, and the work to discover a corrosion control coating that will be autonomous and will indicate corrosion at an early point in the process. Kennedy Space Center has many environmental conditions that are corrosive: ocean salt spray, heat, humidity, sunlight and acidic exhaust from the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs). Presented is a chart which shows the corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations. KSC has the highest corrosion rates with 42.0 mils/yr, leading the next highest Galeta Point Beach, in the Panama Canal Zone with 27 mils/yr corrosion. A chart shows the changes in corrosion rate with the distance from the ocean. The three types of corrosion protective coatings are described: barrier (passive), Barrier plus active corrosion inhibiting components, and smart. A smart coating will detect and respond actively to changes in its environment in a functional and predictable manner and is capable of adapting its properties dynamically. The smart coating uses microcapsules, particles or liquid drops coated in polymers, that can detect and control the corrosion caused by the environment. The mechanism for a pH sensitive microcapsule and the hydrophobic core microcapsule are demonstrated and the chemistry is reviewed. When corrosion begins, the microcapsule will release the contents of the core (indicator, inhibitor, and self healing agent) in close proximity to the corrosion. The response to a pH increase is demonstrated by a series of pictures that show the breakdown of the microcapsule and the contents release. An example of bolt corrosion is used, as an example of corrosion in places that are difficult to ascertain. A comparison of various coating systems is shown.

  4. Possibilities of utilization high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF coatings in conditions of thermal cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brezinová

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The item deals with the possibilities of utilization HVOF coatings in thermal cyclic loading conditions. There were evaluated three types of coatings based on WC-Co, WC-Co-Cr and Cr3C2-25NiCr. The quality of coatings was evaluated in terms of their adhesion as sprayed and also during the cyclic thermal loading, EDX analysis and evaluation of microhardness. Construction and structure of coatings were studied using optical and electron microscopy. There was also evaluated resistance of the coatings against erosive wear.

  5. Life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating life models developed under the NASA Lewis Research Center's Hot Section Technology (HOST) Program are summarized. An initial laboratory model and three design-capable models are discussed. Current understanding of coating failure mechanisms are also summarized. The materials and structural aspects of thermal barrier coatings have been successfully integrated under the HOST program to produce models which may now or in the near future be used in design. Efforts on this program continue at Pratt and Whitney Aircraft where their model is being extended to the life prediction of physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings.

  6. Reliability and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite insulating coatings on cooled hydrogen-oxygen rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. G., Jr.; Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structural integrity and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite coatings was conducted. These coatings were plasma sprayed onto the combustion side of water-cooled, 12.7-centimeter throat diameter, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chambers operating at 2.07 to 4.14 meganewtons per square meter chamber pressure. The metallic-ceramic composites functioned for six to 17 cycles and for as long as 213 seconds of rocket operations and could have probably provided their insulating properties for many additional cycles. The effective thermal conductivity of all the coatings was in the range of 0.7472 to 4.483 w/(m)(K), which makes the coatings a very effective thermal barrier. Photomicrographic studies of cross-sectioned coolant tubes seem to indicate that the effective thermal conductivity of the coatings is controlled by contact resistance between the particles, as a result of the spraying process, and not the thermal conductivity of the bulk materials.

  7. Preparation of a Novel Water-based Acrylic Multi-Thermal Insulation Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufang YE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently improve the thermal insulation effect of coatings, a novel water-based acrylic multi-thermal insulation coating (multi-WATIC combined with thermal obstruction, echo, and radiation was prepared. The category and ratio of thermal insulation functional fillers are crucial. First, water-based acrylic thermal insulation coating (WATIC with single thermal insulation functional fillers was prepared, and the thermal insulation property tests were done. Thereafter, a novel multi-WATIC was prepared combined with the 3 thermal insulation functional fillers together, and the formula of the novel multi-WATIC was optimized based on single factor experiments by response surface methodology (RSM. Test results showed that multi-WATIC has excellent thermal insulation property, and the fitting result obtained by RSM is in good agreement with test data.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.16090

  8. 49 CFR 192.461 - External corrosion control: Protective coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Protective coating... for Corrosion Control § 192.461 External corrosion control: Protective coating. (a) Each external protective coating, whether conductive or insulating, applied for the purpose of external corrosion control...

  9. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  10. Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitin Padture

    2011-12-31

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

  11. Investigation of Thermal Properties of Ni-Coated Graphene Nanoribbons Based on Molecular Dynamics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fulong; Kan, Yan; Tang, Kai; Liu, Sheng

    2017-08-01

    The thermal properties of graphene and Ni-coated graphene have been investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results showed that the thermal conductivity of Ni-coated graphene was lower than that of graphene. More excited low-frequency phonons resulted in this decrease. The thermal conductivity of single-layer Ni-coated graphene was 70% of that of graphene, and the thermal conductivity of double-layer Ni-coated graphene was 56% of that of graphene at room temperature. The strong dependence of size on the thermal conductivity of graphene and Ni-coated graphene is discussed in this work. The thermal conductivity of Ni-coated graphene increased with length, but the trend was less pronounced than that of the thermal conductivity of graphene. Because of boundary scattering, the thermal conductivity of Ni-coated graphene increased with increasing width. The temperature effect indicated that the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature from 200 K to 700 K.

  12. Expanding of the fatigue life of thermal barrier coating by mixing MoSl{sub 2} to thermal sprayed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoya, K. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Tobe, S. [Ashikaga Inst. of Tech., Ashikaga-shi, Tochigi-ken (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Recent trends of turbine blades of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines are to increase output power of the engines, to increase engine efficiency and to reduce environmental emission, and thus, higher operating temperatures of the engines are required. One of the technologies for increasing the operating temperature is a thermal barrier splayed coating [1,2]. The coating usually consists of a bonding coating layer of an alloy of NiCrAlY on the turbine blade and a top layer of ZrO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, namely, partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). However, conventional coating systems deteriorate during turbine operation due to thermal and mechanical stresses imposed and corrosion actions by combustion gas coming from combustion chambers. Thus, the main issue is to develop measures against high oxidation rate and low fatigue life of the bonding coating layer. An idea for enhancing oxidation resistance and fatigue life as well of thermal barrier coatings consisting of a zirconia-based coating is to provide with a self-healing capability to the coating by diffusing a suitable substance to fatigue crack surfaces formed in the coating. Excessive oxidation of the NiCrAlY layer beneath is prevented for extending fatigue life of the splayed barrier coating. Several investigations have been conducted on the matter, and a research paper [3] claims that MoSi{sub 2} in a splayed coating has a self-healing capability for cracks formed in the coating by embedding the cracks with SiO{sub 2} formed from MoSi{sub 2} at high temperatures. Thus, a new coating system containing NiCrAlY, MoSi{sub 2}, and PSZ is expected to be developed instead of a two-layer coating system of NiCrAlY and PSZ.

  13. PLASMA THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WITH HIGH THERMAL STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Devoino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents optimization of  processes for obtaining maximum content of tetragonal phase in the initial material and thermal barrier coatings (TBC based on zirconium dioxide and hafnium oxide.  Results of the investigations on phase composition of oxide HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3  system have been given in the paper. The system represents  a microstructure which is similar to  zirconia dioxide and  transformed for its application at 1300 °C. The paper explains a mechanism of hafnium oxide influence on formation of the given microstructure. The research methodology has been based on complex metallography, X – ray diffraction and electron microscopic investigations of  structural elements of the composite plasma coating HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O system.In order to stabilize zirconium dioxide  dopant oxide should not only have an appropriate size of  metal ion, but also form a solid solution with the zirconia. This condition severely limits the number of possible stabilizers. In fact, such stabilization is possible only with the help of rare earth oxides (Y2O3, Yb2O3, CeO2, HfO2. Chemical purity of the applied materials plays a significant role for obtaining high-quality thermal barrier coatings. Hafnium oxide has been selected as powder for thermal barrier coatings instead of zirconium dioxide due to their similarities in structural modification, grating, chemical and physical properties and its high temperature structural transformations. It has been established that plasma thermal barrier HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3 coatings consist of  one tetragonal phase. This phase is equivalent to a non-equilibrium tetragonal t' phase in the “zirconium dioxide stabilized with yttrium oxide” system. Affinity of  Hf+4 and Zr+4 cations leads to the formation of identical metastable phases during rapid quenching.

  14. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Quasi-Columnar YSZ Coatings Deposited by PS-PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiasheng; Zhao, Huayu; Zhong, Xinghua; Shao, Fang; Liu, Chenguang; Zhuang, Yin; Ni, Jinxing; Tao, Shunyan

    2017-01-01

    Columnar-structured thermal barrier coatings, owing to their high strain tolerance, are expected for their potential possibilities to substantially extend turbine lives and improve engine efficiencies. In this paper, plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) process was used to deposit yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings with quasi-columnar structures. Thermal cyclic tests on burner rigs and thermal shock tests by heating and water-quenching method were involved to evaluate the thermal cycling and thermal shock behaviors of such kind of structured thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Evolution of the microstructures, phase composition, residual stresses and failure behaviors of quasi-columnar YSZ coatings before and after the thermal tests was investigated. The quasi-columnar coating obtained had an average life of around 623 cycles when the spallation area reached about 10% of the total coating surface during burner rig tests with the coating surface temperature of 1250 °C. Failure of the coating is mainly due to the break and pull-out of center columnar segments.

  15. A travelling photothermal technique employing pyroelectric detection to measure thermal diffusivity of films and coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, J.; Manjusha, M. V.; Soumya, H.

    2011-10-01

    A travelling thermal wave technique employing optical excitation and pyroelectric detection of thermal waves propagating along a material film/coating on a substrate is described. The method enables direct measurement of thermal diffusivity. The technique involves measurement of the phase lag undergone by an optically excited thermal wave as it propagates along the coating. The set up has been automated for convenient and fast data acquisition and analysis. The technique has been adapted to measurement of thermal diffusivity of a commercial paint sample coated on glass and copper substrates. It is found that thermal diffusivity of the coating is independent of the thermal conductivity of the substrate. Dependence of thermal diffusivity on coating thickness shows exponential increase, with value reaching a constant at a characteristic high thickness. Measurements have been carried out on a few other samples with wide variations in thermal diffusivity, and the results compared with available reports or results obtained following other techniques. Analyses of the results show that the technique allows measurement of thermal diffusivity of coatings and films with uncertainties better than ±2.5%.

  16. Nucleation controlled surface oxidation epitaxy of thermally grown NiO on (0 0 1) Ni for coated conductor applications assisted by Mo or Mn microalloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kursumovic, A.; Huehne, R.; Tomov, R.; Holzapfel, B.; Glowacki, B.A.; Evetts, J.E

    2004-06-15

    High temperature oxidation of cube textured (1 0 0)Ni and (1 0 0)Ni-0.1wt%(Mo or Mn) was carried out in a wide temperature regime between 900 and 1400 deg. C in air. Special attention was paid to avoid pre-oxidation at lower temperatures, thus favouring nucleation controlled surface oxidation epitaxy (SOE) as opposed to SOE achieved by competitive grain growth. Consequently, cube textured epitaxial NiO layers, under 1 {mu}m in thickness, have been grown on pure Ni in a much wider working window than previously published. Furthermore, thin cube textured NiO layers have been grown on Ni-0.1%Mo tape in a still wider working window of {approx}200 deg. C between 1150 and 1350 deg. C. Preliminary results on Ni-0.1wt%Mn show a similar trend. An in-plane orientation of <5 deg. and out of plane orientation approaching 2 deg. was obtained. Single crystal like transparent NiO films were grown under optimal conditions.

  17. Instrumental color control for metallic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, W.; Han, Bing; Cui, Guihua; Rigg, Bryan; Luo, Ming R.

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes work investigating a suitable color quality control method for metallic coatings. A set of psychological experiments was carried out based upon 50 pairs of samples. The results were used to test the performance of various color difference formulae. Different techniques were developed by optimising the weights and/or the lightness parametric factors of colour differences calculated from the four measuring angles. The results show that the new techniques give a significant improvement compared to conventional techniques.

  18. Dust coatings on basaltic rocks and implications for thermal infrared spectroscopy of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Christensen, P.R.; Lucey, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Thin coatings of atmospherically deposited dust can mask the spectral characteristics of underlying surfaces on Mars from the visible to thermal infrared wavelengths, making identification of substrate and coating mineralogy difficult from lander and orbiter spectrometer data. To study the spectral effects of dust coatings, we acquired thermal emission and hemispherical reflectance spectra (5-25 μm; 2000-400 cm-1) of basaltic andesite coated with different thicknesses of air fall-deposited palagonitic soils, fine-grained ceramic clay powders, and terrestrial loess. The results show that thin coatings (10-20 μm) reduce the spectral contrast of the rock substrate substantially, consistent with previous work. This contrast reduction continues linearly with increasing coating thickness until a "saturation thickness" is reached, after which little further change is observed. The saturation thickness of the spectrally flat palagonite coatings is ~100-120 μm, whereas that for coatings with higher spectral contrast is only ~50-75 μm. Spectral differences among coated and uncoated samples correlate with measured coating thicknesses in a quadratic manner, whereas correlations with estimated surface area coverage are better fit by linear functions. Linear mixture modeling of coated samples using the rock substrate and coating materials as end-members is also consistent with their measured coating thicknesses and areal coverage. A comparison of ratios of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra of dark and bright intracrater and windstreak deposits associated with Radau crater suggests that the dark windstreak material may be coated with as much as 90% areal coverage of palagonitic dust. The data presented here also will help improve interpretations of upcoming mini-TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) observations of coated Mars surface materials.

  19. Monitoring thermally grown oxides under thermal barrier coatings using photoluminescence piezospectroscopy (PLPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Corno, A.; De Maria, L.; Rinaldi, C. [ERSE, Milan (Italy); Nalin, L.; Simms, N.J. [Cranfield Univ., Bedford (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Centre

    2010-07-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on cooled components in industrial gas turbine has enabled higher inlet gas temperatures to be used and hence higher efficiencies to be achieved, without increasing component metal temperatures. However TBCs have a complex coating structure that during high temperature exposure and thermal cycling modifies until TBC spalling which can result in dangerous over-heating of components. This paper reports the results of a TBC exposure programme planned to monitor TGOs development in an example TBC system in terms of both stress evolution within the TGOs and TGO growth. The COST538 reference TBC system was used: an yttria stabilised zirconia TBC applied to an Amdry 995 bond coat on an CMSX-4 substrate. Samples were in the form of 10 mm diameter bars, with the TBC applied to their curved surface. Coated samples were exposed in simulated combustion gases at temperatures 850, 900 and 950 C for periods of up to 10,000 hours. Every 1000 hours samples were cooled and weighed to monitor the progression of the oxidation: selected samples NDT inspected using PLPS and/or destructive examination. Cross-sections were prepared and examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at multiple locations to determine TGO thickness distributions. PLPS spectra were measured and elaborated with a system self developed in ERSE, able to calculate and map the TGO residual stress values under columnar TBCs. So the positions could be evidenced where the damage of the TBC /TGO/BC interface is higher on the exposed bars. The data of TGO thickness distributions and PLPS stress measurement distributions were compared to the exposures carried out on samples to identify and quantify trends in their development. Metallography confirmed that the PLPs technique can reliably detect interface cracking before visible EB-PVD TBC spalling. (orig.)

  20. Numerically modeling Brownian thermal noise in amorphous and crystalline thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey; Demos, Nicholas; Khan, Haroon

    2018-01-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be one of the noise sources limiting the astrophysical reach of Advanced LIGO (once commissioning is complete) and third-generation detectors. Adopting crystalline materials for thin, reflecting mirror coatings, rather than the amorphous coatings used in current-generation detectors, could potentially reduce thermal noise. Understanding and reducing thermal noise requires accurate theoretical models, but modeling thermal noise analytically is especially challenging with crystalline materials. Thermal noise models typically rely on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates the power spectral density of the thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. In this paper, we present results from a new, open-source tool that numerically solves the auxiliary elastic problem to compute the Brownian thermal noise for both amorphous and crystalline coatings. We employ the open-source deal.ii and PETSc frameworks to solve the auxiliary elastic problem using a finite-element method, adaptive mesh refinement, and parallel processing that enables us to use high resolutions capable of resolving the thin reflective coating. We verify numerical convergence, and by running on up to hundreds of compute cores, we resolve the coating elastic energy in the auxiliary problem to approximately 0.1%. We compare with approximate analytic solutions for amorphous materials, and we verify that our solutions scale as expected with changing beam size, mirror dimensions, and coating thickness. Finally, we model the crystalline coating thermal noise in an experiment reported by Cole et al (2013 Nat. Photon. 7 644–50), comparing our results to a simpler numerical calculation that treats the coating as an ‘effectively amorphous’ material. We find that treating the coating as a cubic crystal instead of as an effectively amorphous material increases the thermal noise by about 3%. Our results are a step toward better understanding and reducing thermal noise to

  1. Thermal Conductivity and Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To protect aluminum parts in vehicle engines, metal-based thermal barrier coatings in the form of Fe59Cr12Nb5B20Si4 amorphous coatings were prepared by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF spraying under two different conditions. The microstructure, thermal transport behavior, and wear behavior of the coatings were characterized simultaneously. As a result, this alloy shows high process robustness during spraying. Both Fe-based coatings present dense, layered structure with porosities below 0.9%. Due to higher amorphous phase content, the coating H-1 exhibits a relatively low thermal conductivity, reaching 2.66 W/(m·K, two times lower than the reference stainless steel coating (5.85 W/(m·K, indicating a good thermal barrier property. Meanwhile, the thermal diffusivity of amorphous coatings display a limited increase with temperature up to 500 °C, which guarantees a steady and wide usage on aluminum alloy. Furthermore, the amorphous coating shows better wear resistance compared to high carbon martensitic GCr15 steel at different temperatures. The increased temperature accelerating the tribological reaction, leads to the friction coefficient and wear rate of coating increasing at 200 °C and decreasing at 400 °C.

  2. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  3. Quantitative model of the effects of contamination and space environment on in-flight aging of thermal coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhove, Emilie; Roussel, Jean-François; Remaury, Stéphanie; Faye, Delphine; Guigue, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    The in-orbit aging of thermo-optical properties of thermal coatings critically impacts both spacecraft thermal balance and heating power consumption. Nevertheless, in-flight thermal coating aging is generally larger than the one measured on ground and the current knowledge does not allow making reliable predictions1. As a result, a large oversizing of thermal control systems is required. To address this issue, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales has developed a low-cost experiment, called THERME, which enables to monitor the in-flight time-evolution of the solar absorptivity of a large variety of coatings, including commonly used coatings and new materials by measuring their temperature. This experiment has been carried out on sunsynchronous spacecrafts for more than 27 years, allowing thus the generation of a very large set of telemetry measurements. The aim of this work was to develop a model able to semi-quantitatively reproduce these data with a restraint number of parameters. The underlying objectives were to better understand the contribution of the different involved phenomena and, later on, to predict the thermal coating aging at end of life. The physical processes modeled include contamination deposition, UV aging of both contamination layers and intrinsic material and atomic oxygen erosion. Efforts were particularly focused on the satellite leading wall as this face is exposed to the highest variations in environmental conditions during the solar cycle. The non-monotonous time-evolution of the solar absorptivity of thermal coatings is shown to be due to a succession of contamination and contaminant erosion by atomic oxygen phased with the solar cycle.

  4. Liquid Feedstock Plasma Spraying: An Emerging Process for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markocsan, Nicolaie; Gupta, Mohit; Joshi, Shrikant; Nylén, Per; Li, Xin-Hai; Wigren, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Liquid feedstock plasma spraying (LFPS) involves deposition of ultrafine droplets of suspensions or solution precursors (typically ranging from nano- to submicron size) and permits production of coatings with unique microstructures that are promising for advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. This paper reviews the recent progress arising from efforts devoted to development of high-performance TBCs using the LFPS approach. Advancements in both suspension plasma spraying and solution precursor plasma spraying, which constitute the two main variants of LFPS, are presented. Results illustrating the different types of the microstructures that can be realized in LFPS through appropriate process parameter control, model-assisted assessment of influence of coating defects on thermo-mechanical properties and the complex interplay between pore coarsening, sintering and crystallite growth in governing thermal conductivity are summarized. The enhancement in functional performances/lifetime possible in LFPS TBCs with multilayered architectures and by incorporating new pyrochlore chemistries such as gadolinium zirconate, besides the conventional single 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia insulating ceramic layer, is specifically highlighted.

  5. A Robot Trajectory Optimization Approach for Thermal Barrier Coatings Used for Free-Form Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Qi, Beichun; Tao, Chongyuan; Luo, Jie; Chen, Yuepeng; Xie, Changjun

    2017-10-01

    This paper is concerned with a robot trajectory optimization approach for thermal barrier coatings. As the requirements of high reproducibility of complex workpieces increase, an optimal thermal spraying trajectory should not only guarantee an accurate control of spray parameters defined by users (e.g., scanning speed, spray distance, scanning step, etc.) to achieve coating thickness homogeneity but also help to homogenize the heat transfer distribution on the coating surface. A mesh-based trajectory generation approach is introduced in this work to generate path curves on a free-form component. Then, two types of meander trajectories are generated by performing a different connection method. Additionally, this paper presents a research approach for introducing the heat transfer analysis into the trajectory planning process. Combining heat transfer analysis with trajectory planning overcomes the defects of traditional trajectory planning methods (e.g., local over-heating), which helps form the uniform temperature field by optimizing the time sequence of path curves. The influence of two different robot trajectories on the process of heat transfer is estimated by coupled FEM models which demonstrates the effectiveness of the presented optimization approach.

  6. Positioning system of a torch used in thermal spray coatings applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Absalón Torres-Barahona

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, construction and performance evaluation of a positioning system used for the deposition of coatings with molten particles, by using a torch CastoDyn Ds 8000 thermal spray with oxyacetylene combustion. The design has been done with parameters obtained in the laboratory of materials of the Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, and the information determined from the evaluation of the device, allows to control the main process variables as the projection distance, flow powder, torch speed and rotation speed of the sample holder; this has been seen in coatings made in application tests zirconia / nickel on a carbon steel substrate and analyzed with Scanning Electron Microscopy - SEM.

  7. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such as Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air, and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of metal into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tailpipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  8. Research on the Properties of Thermal Sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the flame sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B coating on aluminum alloy substrates. Before the thermal spraying process, aluminum samples were modified applying chemical, mechanical and thermal processing pre-treatment methods. The main aluminum surface treatment was removing an oxide layer from the surface and improving the exploitation properties of nickel-based coatings. The work involved coating microstructure, porosity, adhesion and microhardness tests. The dependence of the estimated exploitation properties of flame spray coatings on aluminum surface preparation methods and technological parameters of spraying has been established.Article in Lithuanian

  9. Research on the Properties of Thermal Sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the flame sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B coating on aluminum alloy substrates. Before the thermal spraying process, aluminum samples were modified applying chemical, mechanical and thermal processing pre-treatment methods. The main aluminum surface treatment was removing an oxide layer from the surface and improving the exploitation properties of nickel-based coatings. The work involved coating microstructure, porosity, adhesion and microhardness tests. The dependence of the estimated exploitation properties of flame spray coatings on aluminum surface preparation methods and technological parameters of spraying has been established.Article in Lithuanian

  10. Modeling of Thickness and Profile Uniformity of Thermally Sprayed Coatings Deposited on Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanjun, Zhang; Wenbo, Li; Dayu, Li; Jinkun, Xiao; Chao, Zhang

    2017-11-01

    In thermal spraying processes, kinematic parameters of the robot play a decisive role in the coating thickness and profile. In this regard, some achievements have been made to optimize the spray trajectory on flat surfaces. However, few reports have focused on nonholonomic or variable-curvature cylindrical surfaces. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the coating profile, coating thickness, and scanning step, which is determined by the radius of curvature and scanning angle. A mathematical simulation model was developed to predict the thickness of thermally sprayed coatings. Experiments were performed on cylinders with different radiuses of curvature to evaluate the predictive ability of the model.

  11. History of Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Engines: Emphasizing NASA's Role from 1942 to 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has played a central role in the development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for gas turbine applications. This report discusses the history of TBCs emphasizing the role NASA has played beginning with (1) frit coatings in the 1940s and 1950s; (2) thermally sprayed coatings for rocket application in the 1960s and early 1970s; (3) the beginnings of the modern era of turbine section coatings in the mid 1970s; and (4) failure mechanism and life prediction studies in the 1980s and 1990s. More recent efforts are also briefly discussed.

  12. Design and optimization of coating structure for the thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying via finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first prerequisite for fabricating the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with excellent performance is to find an optimized coating structure with high thermal insulation effect and low residual stress. This paper discusses the design and optimization of a suitable coating structure for the TBCs prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS using the finite element method. The design and optimization processes comply with the rules step by step, as the structure develops from a simple to a complex one. The research results indicate that the suitable thicknesses of the bond-coating and top-coating are 60–120 μm and 300–420 μm, respectively, for the single ceramic layer YSZ/NiCoCrAlY APS-TBC. The embedded interlayer (50 wt.%YSZ + 50 wt.%NiCoCrAlY will further reduce the residual stress without sacrificing the thermal insulation effect. The double ceramic layer was further considered which was based on the single ceramic layer TBC. The embedded interlayer and the upper additional ceramic layer will have a best match between the low residual stress and high thermal insulation effect. Finally, the optimized coating structure was obtained, i.e., the La2Ce2O7(LC/YSZ/Interlayer/NiCoCrAlY coating structure with appropriate layer thickness is the best choice. The effective thermal conductivity of this optimized LC/YSZ/IL/BL TBC is 13.2% lower than that of the typical single ceramic layer YSZ/BL TBC.

  13. In-situ grown MgO-ZnO ceramic coating with high thermal emittance on Mg alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Lu, Songtao; Qin, Wei; Wu, Xiaohong

    2017-07-01

    Intense solar radiation and internal heat generation determine the equilibrium temperature of an in-orbit spacecraft. Thermal control coatings with low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance effectively maintain the thermal equilibrium within safe operating limits for exposed, miniaturized and highly integrated components. A novel ceramic coating with high thermal emittance and good adhesion was directly prepared on the Mg substrate using an economical process of controlled plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in the electrolyte containing ZnSO4. XRD and XPS results showed that this coating was mainly composed of the MgO phase as well as an unusual ZnO crystalline phase. The adhesive strength between the coating and substrate determined by a pull-off test revealed an excellent adhesion. Thermal and optical properties test revealed that the coating exhibited a high infrared emittance of 0.88 (2-16 μm) and low solar absorptance of 0.35 (200-2500 nm). The result indicated that the formation of ZnO during the PEO process played an important role in the improvement of the coating emittance. The process developed provides a simple surface method for improving the thermal emittance of Mg alloy, which presents a promising application prospect in the thermal management of the spacecraft.

  14. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampath, Sanjay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  15. Combating Wear of ASTM A36 Steel by Surface Modification Using Thermally Sprayed Cermet Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Shibe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal spray coatings can be applied economically on machine parts to enhance their requisite surface properties like wear, corrosion, erosion resistance, and so forth. Detonation gun (D-Gun thermal spray coatings can be applied on the surface of carbon steels to improve their wear resistance. In the present study, alloy powder cermet coatings WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr have been deposited on ASTM A36 steel with D-Gun thermal spray technique. Sliding wear behavior of uncoated ASTM A36 steel and D-Gun sprayed WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr coatings on base material is observed on a Pin-On-Disc Wear Tester. Sliding wear performance of WC-12% Co coating is found to be better than the Cr3C2-25% NiCr coating. Wear performance of both these cermet coatings is found to be better than uncoated ASTM A36 steel. Thermally sprayed WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr cermet coatings using D-Gun thermal spray technique is found to be very useful in improving the sliding wear resistance of ASTM A36 steel.

  16. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  17. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings with the addition of trace elements and polyaspartic acid by a low-thermal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Sanzhong; Lin Xiangjin [The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Yang Xianyan; Chen Xiaoyi; Gao Changyou; Gou Zhongru [Zhejiang-California International NanoSystems Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhang Lei; Yang Guojing, E-mail: zhrgou@zju.edu.cn [Rui' an People' s Hospital and the 3rd Hospital Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical College, Rui' an 325200 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Research in the field of orthopedic implantology is currently focused on developing methodologies to potentiate osseointegration and to expedite the reestablishment of full functionality. We have developed a simple biomimetic approach for preparing trace elements-codoped calcium phosphate (teCaP) coatings on a titanium substrate. The reaction proceeded via low-thermal incubation in trace elements (TEs)-added simulated body fluid (teSBF) at 90 and 120 deg. C. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray analyses demonstrated that the teCaP coating was the composite of hydroxyapatite and whitlockite, simultaneously doped with magnesium, strontium, zinc and silicon. The addition of polyaspartic acid and TEs into SBF significantly densified the coating. The incubation temperature is another important factor controlling the coating precipitation rate and bonding strength. An incubation temperature of 120 deg. C could accelerate the coating precipitation and improve the interface bonding strength. The in vitro cell culture investigation indicated that the teCaP coating supported the adhesion and spreading of ovariectomized rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and particularly, promoted rMSCs proliferation compared to the CaP coating prepared in SBF. Collectively, from such a biomimetic route there potentially arises a general procedure to prepare a wide range of bioactive teCaP coatings of different composition for osteoporotic osteogenic cells activation response.

  18. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    high temperatures with the formation of an intermediate ... The ramp rate for loading was maintained as 2⋅5 N s–1 and the deflection ... The strain energy released at the interface of the ceramic coating and the bond coat and within the bond coat are shown in table. 2. From the load deflection curves of the bent composite.

  19. Deterioration of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades by Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Swar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single-stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests were performed to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity, and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two-stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDFs were developed to represent experimentally based correlations for particle surface interaction models and TBC erosion rates models. UDFs were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics and TBC erosion rates on the blade surfaces. Computational results are presented in a commercial turbine and a NASA-designed automotive turbine. The similarities between the erosion patterns in the two turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5% of the stator blade span to represent the flow cooling of the combustor liner.

  20. Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; Barmak, K.; Chan, H.M. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc{hor_ellipsis}). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

  1. Very Tough, Erosion-Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are receiving increased attention for advanced gas turbine engine applications. These coatings are considered to be technologically important because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus achieving higher engine efficiency, lower emissions, and increased performance goals. To take full advantage of the capabilities of these coatings, researchers need to use an aggressive design approach whenever possible--one that allows greater temperature reductions through the coating systems and less cooling air to the components. Advanced TBCs that have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability than current coatings have been developed for future ultra-efficient, low-emission engine systems. Multicomponent-doped, defect-clustered TBCs have been shown to offer the low conductivity and high stability required for future high-temperature engine applications.

  2. Fracture evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings in dependence on cohesive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, J.; Česánek, Z.

    2017-05-01

    Measuring the cohesive strength of thermally sprayed coatings is relatively difficult matter, which can be accessed in many directions. This issue is nowadays solved by use of Scratch test method. This method is not completely sufficient for the cohesive strength testing because the coating is under load of combined stresses during the Scratch test. The reason to develop this method was need for exact measurement of tensile cohesion toughness of thermally sprayed coatings, which could provide results as close to a classic tensile test as possible. Another reason for development of this method was the impossibility of direct comparison with results obtained by other methods. Tested coatings were prepared using HP / HVOF (Stellite 6, NiCrBSi, CrC-NiCr and Hastelloy C-276). These coatings were selected as commonly used in commercial sector and also on because of rising customer demand for ability to provide such coating characteristics. The tested coatings were evaluated in terms of cohesive strength (method based on tensile strength test). Final fractures were evaluated by optical microscopy together with scanning electron microscopy and EDS analysis. As expected higher cohesive strength showed metallic coatings with top results of coating Stellite 6. Carbide coatings showed approximately third of the cohesion strength in comparison with metal based coating.

  3. Characterization of thermal sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on some biomedical implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder Pal; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Hazoor

    2014-06-12

    To characterize two thermal sprayed coatings of different particle-sized hydroxyapatite on some biomedical implant materials. Characterization of the as-sprayed coatings was performed using x-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), and x-ray mapping techniques. Bond strength of the sprayed coatings measured as per ASTM-C633 standard and cell culture studies were performed to access the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results indicated that, HA coatings of 10 μm particle sized powder were completely amorphous, while that of 30 μm sized powder consisted of crystalline HA with minor tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) phases. This flame spray HA-A and HA-B coatings exhibited higher bond strength (67.8 and 49.3 MPa respectively) in comparison with other thermal spray HA coating techniques reported in literature. In-vitro biocompatibility studies revealed that HA-B coated specimens had good biocompatibility with a human osteosarcoma cell line KHOSNP (R-970-5). These observations show that particle size of HA powders have a significant effect on the phase composition, microstructure, roughness and biocompatibility of deposited coatings. HA-B coatings were found to be metallurgically better than the HA-A coating from the point of view of biomedical applications.

  4. The Effect of Particle Size of Wollastonite Filler on Thermal Performance of Intumescent Fire Retardant Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intumescent Fire retardant coatings (IFRC’s are one of the simplest ways to protect substrates exposed to fire. In this study, Wollastonite (W filler of two different particle sizes were used to determine the fire performance of intumescent fire retardant coating. The basic ingredients of the coating were ammonium poly-phosphate (APP as acid source, expandable graphite (EG as carbon source, melamine (MEL as blowing agent in epoxy binder, boric acid as additive and hardener as curing agent. A series of coating formulations were developed by using different weight percentages of both sized Wollastonite fillers. The coated steel substrate samples were tested for fire performance using Bunsen burner and char expansion was measured using furnace fire test. A Comparison of the coatings thermal performance was determined. Wollastonite containing filler particle size 10 μm showed better thermal performance than formulations containing filler’s particle size 44 μm.

  5. PECULIARITIES OF BORIDE COATING FORMATION MADE OF COMPOSITE METAL-THERMAL POWDER MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Galynskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has investigated an influence of compositions pertaining to complex powder metal-thermal saturating media for boriding on phase-, structure formation and properties of boride coatings in respect of carbon steel.

  6. Failure modes of vacuum plasma spray tungsten coating created on carbon fibre composites under thermal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, T.; Bekris, N.; Coad, J. P.; Grisolia, C.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.; Matthews, G. F.; Philipps, V.; Wessel, E.

    2009-07-01

    Vacuum plasma spray tungsten (VPS-W) coating created on a carbon fibre reinforced composite (CFC) was tested under two thermal load schemes in the electron beam facility to examine the operation limits and failure modes. In cyclic ELM-like short transient thermal loads, the VPS-W coating was destroyed sub-layer by sub-layer at 0.33 GW/m 2 for 1 ms pulse duration. At longer single pulses, simulating steady-state thermal loads, the coating was destroyed at surface temperatures above 2700 °C by melting of the rhenium containing multilayer at the interface between VPS-W and CFC. The operation limits and failure modes of the VPS-W coating in the thermal load schemes are discussed in detail.

  7. Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fibre-reinforced polypropylene composite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phiri, G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ?C). Figure 1 shows the processing steps followed to produce composite samples. Up to 15% fibre loading could be achieved and the sisal fibres were coated with water glass to improve fire resistance. In order to improve the adhesion between sisal... preparation process: (A) WG coated fibre, (B) High speed granulator, (C) Composite granules, (D) Single screw extruder, (E) Injection moulder and (F) Composite samples (dumbbells) Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fi bre...

  8. Thermal conductivity of titanium aluminum silicon nitride coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samani, M.K., E-mail: majid1@e.ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); CINTRA-CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Ding, X.Z. [Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Amini, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering. Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore (Singapore); Khosravian, N.; Cheong, J.Y. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chen, G. [BC Photonics Technological Company, 5255 Woodwards Rd., Richmond, BC V7E 1G9 (Canada); Tay, B.K. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA-CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2013-06-30

    A series of physical vapour deposition titanium aluminum silicon nitride nanocomposite coating with a different (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, with a thickness of around 2.5 μm were deposited on stainless steel substrate by a lateral rotating cathode arc process in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere. The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy observation. The titanium nitride (TiN) coating shows a clear columnar structure with a predominant (111) preferential orientation. With the incorporation of Al and Si, the crystallite size in the coatings decreased gradually, and the columnar structure and (111) preferred orientation disappeared. Thermal conductivity of the as-deposited coating samples at room temperature was measured by using pulsed photothermal reflectance technique. Thermal conductivity of the pure TiN coating is about 11.9 W/mK. With increasing the (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, the coatings' thermal conductivity decreased monotonously. This reduction of thermal conductivity could be ascribed to the variation of coatings' microstructure, including the decrease of grain size and the resultant increase of grain boundaries, the disruption of columnar structure, and the reduced preferential orientation. - Highlights: • A series of titanium aluminum silicon nitride with different (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio were deposited on Fe304. • The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed. • Thermal conductivity of the samples was measured by pulsed photothermal reflectance. • With increasing the (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, thermal conductivity decreased. • Reduction of thermal conductivity is ascribed to the variation of its microstructure.

  9. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings with MCrAlY Bond Coat Irradiated by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Lv, Peng; Guan, Qingfeng; Xu, Xiaojing; Lu, Jinzhong; Wang, Zhiping; Han, Zhiyong

    2016-11-30

    Microstructural modifications of a thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat subjected to high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) and their relationships with thermal cycling behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated. Microstructural observations revealed that the rough surface of air plasma spraying (APS) samples was significantly remelted and replaced by many interconnected bulged nodules after HCPEB irradiation. Meanwhile, the parallel columnar grains with growth direction perpendicular to the coating surface were observed inside these bulged nodules. Substantial Y-rich Al2O3 bubbles and varieties of nanocrystallines were distributed evenly on the top of the modified layer. A physical model was proposed to describe the evaporation-condensation mechanism taking place at the irradiated surface for generating such surface morphologies. The results of thermal cycling test showed that HCPEB-TBCs presented higher thermal cycling resistance, the spalling area of which after 200 cycles accounted for only 1% of its total area, while it was about 34% for APS-TBCs. The resulting failure mode, i.e., in particular, a mixed delamination crack path, was shown and discussed. The irradiated effects including compact remelted surface, abundant nanoparticles, refined columnar grains, Y-rich alumina bubbles, and deformation structures contributed to the formation of a stable, continuous, slow-growing, and uniform thermally grown oxide with strong adherent ability. It appeared to be responsible for releasing stress and changing the cracking paths, and ultimately greatly improving the thermal cycling behavior of HCPEB-TBCs.

  10. The oxidation behavior of classical thermal barrier coatings exposed to extreme temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina DRAGOMIRESCU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC are designed to protect metal surfaces from extreme temperatures and improve their resistance to oxidation during service. Currently, the most commonly used systems are those that have the TBC structure bond coat (BC / top coat (TC layers. The top coat layer is a ceramic layer. Oxidation tests are designed to identify the dynamics of the thermally oxide layer (TGO growth at the interface of bond coat / top coat layers, delamination mechanism and the TBC structural changes induced by thermal conditions. This paper is a short study on the evolution of aluminum oxide protective layer along with prolonged exposure to the testing temperature. There have been tested rectangular specimens of metal super alloy with four surfaces coated with a duplex thermal barrier coating system. The specimens were microscopically and EDAX analyzed before and after the tests. In order to determine the oxide type, the samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction. The results of the investigation are encouraging for future studies. The results show a direct relationship between the development of the oxide layer and long exposure to the test temperature. Future research will focus on changing the testing temperature to compare the results.

  11. Current status and future trends in turbine application of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Keith D.; Gupta, Dinesh K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current status and future trends in application of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to turbine components, and in particular to high turbine airfoils. Included are descriptions of the favorable results achieved to date with bill-of-material applications of plasma deposited TBC, and recent experience with developmental coatings applied by electron beam-physical vapor deposition.

  12. Achieving Control of Coating Process in your Foundry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Muoio, G. L.; Tiedje, N. S.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving control of coating thickness in foundry moulds is needed in order to guarantee uniform properties of the mould but also to achieve control of drying time. Since drying time of water based coatings is heavily dependent on the amount of water present in the coating layer, a stable coating...... process is prerequisite for a stable drying process. In this study, we analyse the effect of different variables on the coating layer properties. We start by considering four critical variables identified in a previous study such as sand compaction, coating density, dipping time and gravity and then we...... add centre points to the original experimental plans to identify possible non-linear effects and variation in process stability. Finally, we investigate the relation between coating penetration (a variable that is relatively simple to measure in production) and other coating layer thickness properties...

  13. Specific Features of Chip Making and Work-piece Surface Layer Formation in Machining Thermal Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    V. M. Yaroslavtsev

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of unique engineering structural and performance properties inherent in metallic composites characterizes wear- and erosion-resistant high-temperature coatings made by thermal spraying methods. This allows their use both in manufacturing processes to enhance the wear strength of products, which have to operate under the cyclic loading, high contact pressures, corrosion and high temperatures and in product renewal.Thermal coatings contribute to the qualitative improvement of the t...

  14. Study of Selected Properties of Thermally Sprayed Coatings Containing WC and WB Hard Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brezinová Janette

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research of the essential characteristics of two kinds of advanced coatings applied by HVOF technology. One studied coating: WB-WC-Co (60-30-10% contains two types of hard particles (WC and WB, the second coating is eco-friendly alternative to the previously used WC-based coatings, called “green carbides” with the composition WC-FeCrAl (85-15%. In green carbides coating the heavy metals (Co, Ni, NiCr forming the binding matrix in conventional wear-resistant coatings are replaced by more environmentally friendly matrix based on FeCrAl alloy. On the coatings was carried out: metallographic analysis, measurement of thickness, micro-hardness, adhesion, resistance to thermal cyclic loading and adhesive wear resistance (pin-on-disk test. One thermal cycle consisted of heating the coatings to 600°C, dwell for 10 minutes, and subsequently cooling on the still air. The number of thermal cycles: 10. The base material was stainless steel AISI 316L, pretreatment prior to application of the coating: blasting with white corundum, application device JP-5000.

  15. Thermal Control Working Group report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Robert; Mahefkey, E. Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The Thermal Control Working Group limited its evaluation to issues associated with Earth orbiting and planetary spacecraft with power levels up to 50 kW. It was concluded that the space station technology is a necessary precursor but does not meet S/C 2000 needs (life, high heat flux, long term cryogenics, and survivability). Additional basic and applied research are required (fluid/materials compatibility and two phase system modeling). Scaling, the key issue, must define accelerated life test criteria. The two phase systems require 0g to 1 g correlation. Additional ground test beds are required and combined space environment tests of materials.

  16. Thermal Conductivity and Water Vapor Stability of Ceramic HfO2-Based Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 are candidate thermal/environmental barrier coating materials for gas turbine ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liner applications because of their relatively low thermal conductivity and high temperature capability. In this paper, thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability of plasma-sprayed coatings and/or hot-pressed HfO2-5mol%Y2O3, HfO2-15mol%Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 were evaluated at temperatures up to 1700 C using a steady-state laser heat-flux technique. Sintering behavior of the plasma-sprayed coatings was determined by monitoring the thermal conductivity increases during a 20-hour test period at various temperatures. Durability and failure mechanisms of the HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 coatings on mullite/SiC Hexoloy or CMC substrates were investigated at 1650 C under thermal gradient cyclic conditions. Coating design and testing issues for the 1650 C thermal/environmental barrier coating applications will also be discussed.

  17. Potential benefits of a ceramic thermal barrier coating on large power generation gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating design option offers benefit in terms of reduced electricity costs when used in utility gas turbines. Options considered include: increased firing temperature, increased component life, reduced cooling air requirements, and increased corrosion resistance (resulting in increased tolerance for dirty fuels). Performance and cost data were obtained. Simple, recuperated and combined cycle applications were considered, and distillate and residual fuels were assumed. The results indicate that thermal barrier coatings could produce large electricity cost savings if these coatings permit turbine operation with residual fuels at distillate-rated firing temperatures. The results also show that increased turbine inlet temperature can result in substantial savings in fuel and capital costs.

  18. Inhibiting electro-thermal breakdown of acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators by dielectric gel coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) is very localized; a spark and a pinhole (puncture) in dielectric ends up with short-circuit. This letter shows that prevention of electrothermal breakdown helps defer failure of DEAs even with conductive-grease electrodes. Dielectric gel encapsulation or coating (Dow Corning 3-4170) helps protect acrylic elastomer (VHB 4905), making it thermally more stable and delaying its thermal oxidation (burn) from 218 °C to 300 °C. Dielectric-gel-coated acrylic DEAs can withstand higher local leak-induced heating and thus achieve higher dielectric strengths than non-coated DEAs do.

  19. Applicability of coatings to control metal dusting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermse, C.G.M.; Wortel, J.C. van

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a long term comparative study between five wrought and three centricast materials, both as-is, and in coated condition. Two commercially available coatings were applied to each different alloy. One coating was aluminum based with a chromium rich intermediate layer. The other

  20. Controllable coating of microneedles for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianmin; Qiu, Yuqin; Zhang, Suohui; Yang, Guozhong; Gao, Yunhua

    2015-03-01

    Coated microneedles have been paid much attention recently, and several coating strategies have been developed to address the problems during coating process. However, there are still some unresolved issues, such as, precise control requirements, microneedle substrate contamination and high processing temperature. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and controllable method to make uniform coatings on microneedles at room temperature. This novel method avoids the contamination of microneedle substrate by providing both the adsorption force of thickener and micro-scale coating film produced by a newly design device. Thickeners were screened to enhance the mass of coatings. The parameters that influence the coatings were tested systematically, which made coating process controllable. Finally, three model drugs were coated onto microneedles to prove the method is applicable more broadly. In addition, insertion experiments were carried out to test the drug delivery feasibility of the coated microneedles. In conclusion, this study presents a simple and controllable method to coat microneedles with small molecular chemical drugs or large proteins for rapid skin drug delivery.

  1. Advanced Thermal Barrier and Environmental Barrier Coating Development at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Robinson, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This presentation summarizes NASA's advanced thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, and the coating performance improvements that has recently been achieved and documented in laboratory simulated rig test conditions. One of the emphases has been placed on the toughness and impact resistance enhancements of the low conductivity, defect cluster thermal barrier coating systems. The advances in the next generation environmental barrier coatings for SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites have also been highlighted, particularly in the design of a new series of oxide-silicate composition systems to be integrated with next generation SiC-SiC turbine engine components for 2700F coating applications. Major technical barriers in developing the thermal and environmental barrier coating systems are also described. The performance and model validations in the rig simulated turbine combustion, heat flux, steam and calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) environments have helped the current progress in improved temperature capability, environmental stability, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability of the advanced thermal and environmental barrier coating systems.

  2. Development of YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The axial injection of the suspension in the atmospheric plasma spraying process (here called axial suspension plasma spraying is an attractive and advanced thermal spraying technology especially for the deposition of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs. It enables the growth of columnar-like structures and, hence, combines advantages of electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD technology with the considerably cheaper atmospheric plasma spraying (APS. In the first part of this study, the effects of spraying conditions on the microstructure of yttria partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ top coats and the deposition efficiency were investigated. YSZ coatings deposited on as-sprayed bond coats with 5 wt % solid content suspension appeared to have nicely-developed columnar structures. Based on the preliminary results, the nicely developed columnar coatings with variations of the stand-off distances and yttria content were subjected to thermal cycling tests in a gas burner rig. In these tests, all columnar structured TBCs showed relatively short lifetimes compared with porous APS coatings. Indentation measurements for Young’s modulus and fracture toughness on the columns of the SPS coatings indicated a correlation between mechanical properties and lifetime for the SPS samples. A simplified model is presented which correlates mechanical properties and lifetime of SPS coatings.

  3. Design of a Nickel-Based Bond-Coat Alloy for Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Fiedler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To increase the lifetime of rocket combustion chambers, thermal barrier coatings (TBC may be applied on the copper chamber wall. Since standard TBC systems used in gas turbines are not suitable for rocket-engine application and fail at the interface between the substrate and bond coat, a new bond-coat material has to be designed. This bond-coat material has to be chemically compatible to the copper substrate to improve the adhesion and needs a coefficient of thermal expansion close to that of copper to reduce thermal stresses. One approach to achieve this is to modify the standard NiCrAlY alloy used in gas turbines by adding copper. In this work, the influence of copper on the microstructure of NiCrAlY-alloys is investigated with thermodynamical calculations, optical microscopy, SEM, EDX and calorimetry. Adding copper leads to the formation of a significant amount of \\(\\beta\\ and \\(\\alpha\\ Reducing the aluminum and chromium content leads furthermore to a two-phase fcc microstructure.

  4. Investigations of thermal barrier coatings of turbine parts using gas flame heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeshkin, A. R.; Bichkov, N. G.; Ilinskaja, O. I.; Nazarov, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The development of methods for the calculated and experimental investigations thermal barrier coatings and thermal state of gas-turbine engine parts with a thermal barrier coatings is actual work. The gas flame heating was demonstrated to be effectively used during investigations of a thermal ceramic barrier coatings and thermal state of such gas-turbine engine parts with a TBC as the cooled turbine blades and vanes and combustion liner components. The gas-flame heating is considered to be preferable when investigating the gas-turbine engine parts with a TBC in the special cases when both the convective and radiant components of thermal flow are of great importance. The small-size rig with gas-flame flow made it possible to conduct the comparison investigations with the purpose of evaluating the efficiency of thermal protection of the ceramic deposited thermal barrier coatings on APS and EB techniques. The developed design-experiment method was introduced in bench tests of turbine blades and combustion liner components of gas turbine engines.

  5. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Ceramic Coatings Fabricated by Thermal Spray Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Guo, Kun; Tan, Chee Kiang Ivan; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2017-11-01

    This paper starts from a review on the progress in fabrication of piezoelectric ceramic coatings by thermal spray method. For our experimental work, two types of lead-free piezoelectric ceramic coatings, including potassium-sodium niobate-based and bismuth sodium titanate-based, are fabricated by thermal spray process, and their structure, morphology, and piezoelectric properties are characterized. Our obtained lead-free ceramic coatings exhibit single phase of perovskite structure, relatively dense morphology, and competitive piezoelectric coefficients. The mechanism of forming the piezoelectric perovskite crystalline phase by thermal spray involving melting-recrystallization process is analyzed in comparison to that of ceramic synthesis through solid-state reaction. Suppression of volatile loss and decomposition at high temperature due to the extremely high melting and cooling rate in the thermal spray process, and the impact on the resulting structure are discussed. Significant advantages of the thermal spray method over alternative processing methods for forming piezoelectric ceramic coatings are summarized. The combination of environmentally friendly lead-free compositions and the scalable thermal spray processing method will promote more applications of piezoelectric ceramic coatings for producing distributive sensors and transducers, and forming advanced smart structures and systems.

  6. Radiation control coatings installed on rough-surfaced built-up roofs -- Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have tracked the solar reflectance and thermal performance of small samples of various radiation control coatings on smooth surfaces for several years on a roof test facility in East Tennessee. The focus is on white coatings because of their potential to weather, causing the solar reflectance to decrease as the coatings age. Support of the federal New Technology Demonstration Program allowed them to extend the study to more samples on smooth surfaces and entire rough-surfaced roofs at a federal facility in the Panhandle of Florida. Two rough-surfaced, moderately well-insulated, low solar reflectance built-up roofs (BURs) were spray-coated with a latex-based product with ceramic beads added to improve solar reflectance. In the first three months after installation, the fresh BUR coatings showed a significant decrease in both the outside-surface temperature and the heat flux through the roof insulation. Average sunlit values were generated to exclude nighttime data, data on cloudy days, and data when the uncoated patch on one roof was more strongly shaded in mid-afternoon on sunny days. The average power demand during occupied periods for the first month with the coating for the building with the thermally massive roof deck was 13% less than during the previous month without the coating. For the other buildings with a lightweight roof deck but high internal loads, there were no clear average power savings due to the coating. The authors are continuing to monitor electricity use in these all-electric buildings to calibrate a model for the peak power and annual energy use of the buildings. Modeling results to be given at the end of the two year project will address the effect of roof R-value, geographic location, and solar reflectance, including the effect of weathering, on the performance of coated roofs. The calibrated models should allow one to segregate site-specific effects such as shading and large thermal mass.

  7. The influence of mechanical vibrations on microstructure of Ni-based thermally sprayed-fused coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena ŠKAMAT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of mechanical vibrations on microstructure and properties of Ni-based thermally sprayed and fused coatings deposited on a steel substrate has been studied. Self-fluxing powder with about 73% Ni was used as a sprayed material. As-sprayed coatings were refused using conventional flame technique and with introducing of mechanical vibrations. In result coatings with quite complicated microstructure were obtained. During investigation of coatings by different methods it was found that vibratory treatment really influences the solidified microstructure. It was found that vibrations promote densimetric movement of hard particles up - towards a surface with forming of thicker so-called “hard-inclusions-free” layer near interface. Some tendency was noted that coatings, remelted under vibrations, showed better corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistance in comparison with coatings created without vibrational treatment during solidification.

  8. High Temperature Damping Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    A high temperature damping test apparatus has been developed using a high heat flux CO 2 laser rig in conjunction with a TIRA S540 25 kHz Shaker and Polytec OFV 5000 Vibrometer system. The test rig has been successfully used to determine the damping performance of metallic and ceramic protective coating systems at high temperature for turbine engine applications. The initial work has been primarily focused on the microstructure and processing effects on the coating temperature-dependence damping behavior. Advanced ceramic coatings, including multicomponent tetragonal and cubic phase thermal barrier coatings, along with composite bond coats, have also been investigated. The coating high temperature damping mechanisms will also be discussed.

  9. Synthesis and Behavior of Nanostructured Coatings Using Thermal Spraying

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lavernia, E

    2003-01-01

    ... (powder as well as coatings) for structure, composition, properties, and performance. One of the program's accomplishments was the successful synthesis of diverse nanostructured feedstock powders using mechanical milling in different...

  10. Technical and Economical Aspects of Current Thermal Barrier Coating Systems for Gas Turbine Engines by Thermal Spray and EBPVD: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Albert; Knapp, James; Taylor, Thomas; Ashary, Adil; Bolcavage, Ann; Hitchman, Neil

    2008-06-01

    The most advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for aircraft engine and power generation hot section components consist of electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) applied yttria-stabilized zirconia and platinum modified diffusion aluminide bond coating. Thermally sprayed ceramic and MCrAlY bond coatings, however, are still used extensively for combustors and power generation blades and vanes. This article highlights the key features of plasma spray and HVOF, diffusion aluminizing, and EBPVD coating processes. The coating characteristics of thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat as well as low density and dense vertically cracked (DVC) Zircoat TBC are described. Essential features of a typical EBPVD TBC coating system, consisting of a diffusion aluminide and a columnar TBC, are also presented. The major coating cost elements such as material, equipment and processing are explained for the different technologies, with a performance and cost comparison given for selected examples.

  11. Duplex Al-based thermal spray coatings for corrosion protection in high temperature refinery applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana da Cunha Rocha

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of thermal spray coatings has been effective in preventing corrosion of steel and iron products. It has been used in a wide range of applications spreading from the petroleum to the food industry. In this work, the performance and effectiveness of a two-layered aluminum-based thermal spray coating applied to an ASTM A387 G11 steel was evaluated. The coating structure was comprised of an inner Al-Fe-Cr layer and an outer layer of aluminum. Coated samples were tested in the reactor zone of a fluid catalytic cracking unit (FCCU of a petrochemical plant for 2.5 years. The reactor zone temperature was about 793 K (520 °C and the environment was a mixed gas containing sulfur, oxygen and carbon. Laboratory-scale tests were also conducted on the coated samples in order to gain a better understanding of the corrosive effect of the gaseous species present in the FCCU atmosphere. Porosity present in the thermal spray coatings allowed the penetration of the atmosphere corrodents, which instigated intergranular corrosion of the steel substrate. The presence of an inner Al-Fe-Cr layer did not prevent coating spallation, which further contributed to the internal corrosion process.

  12. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  13. Possibilities of surface coating for thermal insulation. [zirconium dioxide, titanium dioxide, and zircon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschel, E.; Weisser, G.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations performed for pulsating heat sources indicate a relatively thin (200-1000 micron) coating can lower temperature both inside and on the surface of a construction material. Various coating materials (including zirconium dioxide) are discussed, together with possible thermic stresses and ways to deal with the latter.

  14. Sealing of thermally-sprayed stainless steel coatings against corrosion using nickel electroplating technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hathaipat Koiprasert

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Electric arc spraying (EAS is one of the thermal spray techniques used for restoration and to providecorrosion resistance. It can be utilized to build up coatings to thicknesses of several millimeters, It is easy to use on-site. Most importantly, the cost of this technique is lower than other thermal spraying techniques thatmay be suitable for part restoration. A major disadvantage associated with the electric arc sprayed coating is its high porosity, which can be as high as 3-8% making it not appropriate for use in immersion condition. This work was carried out around the idea of using electroplating to seal off the pore of the EAS coating, with an aim to improve the corrosion resistance of the coating in immersion condition. This research compared the corrosion behavior of a stainless steel 316 electric arc sprayed coating in 2M NaOH solution at 25oC. It was found that the Ni plating used as sealant can improve the corrosion resistance of the EAS coating. Furthermore, the smoothened and plated stainless steel 316 coating has a better corrosion resistance than the plated EAS coating that was not ground to smoothen the surface before plating.

  15. SELECTION OF OXIDES FOR STABILIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WHILE OBTAINING THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Okovity

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes selection of oxides and describes in details a majority of oxide systems which are applicable for stabilization of zirconium dioxide while obtaining thermal barrier coatings with maximum amount of tetragonal phase. Methodology of investigation is based on a review of analytical information on the current state of thermal barrier coatings on the basis of zirconium dioxide stabilized by oxides of rare-earth metals. The method used for application of  zirconium dioxide thermal barrier coatings is plasma spraying. Positive results have been also obtained while applying e-beam sputtering, ion-plasma deposition and magnetron sputtering. Nevertheless preferred plasma spraying application for thermal barrier coatings still continues due to its high productivity and versatility that permits to deposit metallic and ceramic materials of the ordered chemical and phase composition.Ytterbium and cerium oxides have been selected as oxides for stabilization of zirconium dioxide in order to obtain thermal barrier coatings. The paper also considers аn oxide system of zirconium dioxide: “hafnium oxide – yttrium oxide”, representing in itself the structure which is similar to zirconium dioxide.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of the Relationship Between Microstructures and Thermal Conductivity for YSZ Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Song, Xuemei; Liu, Ziwei; Lin, Chucheng; Zeng, Yi; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebing

    2017-04-01

    The thermal conductivities of as-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying at different temperatures are investigated based on quantitative microstructural analysis. Multiple linear regression is used to develop quantitative models which describe the relationship between multiple elements such as porosity, grain boundary density, monoclinic phase content, temperature and thermal conductivity. Results reveal that the thermal conductivity of the coating is mainly determined by the porosity and grain boundary density below 300 °C and by the monoclinic phase content above 800 °C. Furthermore, based on the significance testing analysis, the confidence interval under a confidence level of 95% at different temperatures enables researchers to predict the thermal conductivity based on microstructural information.

  17. Characterization of Copper Coatings Deposited by High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray for Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimijazi, H. R.; Aghaee, M.; Salehi, M.; Garcia, E.

    2017-11-01

    Copper coatings were deposited on steel substrates by high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying. The microstructure of the feedstock copper powders and free-standing coatings were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The x-ray diffraction pattern was utilized to determine phase compositions of powders and coatings. Oxygen content was determined by a LECO-T300 oxygen determiner. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured in two directions, through-thickness and in-plane by laser flash apparatus. The electrical resistivity of the coatings was measured by the four-point probe method. Oxygen content of the coatings was two times higher than that of the initial powders (0.35-0.37%). The thermal and electrical conductivities of the coatings were different depending on the direction of the measurement. The thermal and electrical conductivity of the coatings improved after annealing for 6 h at a temperature of 600°C.

  18. Lunar roving vehicle thermal control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, R. G.; Paoletti, C. J.; Britt, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    A thermal control system was incorporated into the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) to maintain temperature sensitive components within appropriate temperature limits during the translunar transportation phase, lunar surface operation, and quiescent periods between lunar traverses. This paper describes the thermal control system and discusses its thermal characteristics during all phases of operation. The basic concept is a passive system which stores internally generated energy during operation with subsequent radiation to space. The external environments are regulated by selected radiative surface finishes. Multi-layer insulation blankets, space radiators, flexible thermal straps, and fusible mass heat sinks were designed to control the temperatures of the electronic components.

  19. Deposition stress effects on the life of thermal barrier coatings on burner rigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  20. Corrosion protection of Mg/Al alloys by thermal sprayed aluminium coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A., E-mail: anpardo@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Casajus, P.; Mohedano, M.; Coy, A.E.; Viejo, F. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres, B. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Matykina, E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    The protective features of thermal sprayed Al-coatings applied on AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium/aluminium alloys were evaluated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution by electrochemical and gravimetric measurements. The changes in the morphology and corrosion behaviour of the Al-coatings induced by a cold-pressing post-treatment were also examined. The specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and low-angle X-ray diffraction. The as-sprayed Al-coatings revealed a high degree of porosity and poor corrosion protection, which resulted in galvanic acceleration of the corrosion of the magnesium substrates. The application of a cold-pressing post-treatment produced more compact Al-coatings with better bonding at the substrate/coating interface and higher corrosion resistance regardless of the nature of the magnesium alloy.

  1. The role of nano-particles in the field of thermal spray coating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmann, Stephan; Leparoux, Marc; Rohr, Lukas

    2005-06-01

    Nano-particles play not only a key role in recent research fields, but also in the public discussions about health and safety in nanotechnology. Nevertheless, the worldwide activities in nano-particles research increased dramatically during the last 5 to 10 years. There are different potential routes for the future production of nano-particles at large scale. The main directions envisaged are mechanical milling, wet chemical reactions or gas phase processes. Each of the processes has its specific advantages and limitations. Mechanical milling and wet chemical reactions are typically time intensive and batch processes, whereas gas phase productions by flames or plasma can be carried out continuously. Materials of interest are mainly oxide ceramics, carbides, nitrides, and pure metals. Nano-ceramics are interesting candidates for coating technologies due to expected higher coating toughness, better thermal shock and wear resistance. Especially embedded nano-carbides and-nitrides offer homogenously distributed hard phases, which enhance coatings hardness. Thermal spraying, a nearly 100 years old and world wide established coating technology, gets new possibilities thanks to optimized, nano-sized and/or nano-structured powders. Latest coating system developments like high velocity flame spraying (HVOF), cold gas deposition or liquid suspension spraying in combination with new powder qualities may open new applications and markets. This article gives an overview on the latest activities in nano-particle research and production in special relation to thermal spray coating technology.

  2. Thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades: Chemical vapor deposition (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenov, I. K.; Aksenov, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Schemes are presented for experimental setups (reactors) developed at leading scientific centers connected with the development of technologies for the deposition of coatings using the CVD method: at the Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany), the French Aerospace Research Center, the Materials Research Institute (Tohoku University, Japan) and the National Laboratory Oak Ridge (USA). Conditions and modes for obtaining the coatings with high operational parameters are considered. It is established that the formed thermal barrier coatings do not fundamentally differ in their properties (columnar microstructure, thermocyclic resistance, thermal conductivity coefficient) from standard electron-beam condensates, but the highest growth rates and the perfection of the crystal structure are achieved in the case of plasma-chemical processes and in reactors with additional laser or induction heating of a workpiece. It is shown that CVD reactors can serve as a basis for the development of rational and more advanced technologies for coating gas turbine blades that are not inferior to standard electron-beam plants in terms of the quality of produced coatings and have a much simpler and cheaper structure. The possibility of developing a new technology based on CVD processes for the formation of thermal barrier coatings with high operational parameters is discussed, including a set of requirements for industrial reactors, high-performance sources of vapor precursors, and promising new materials.

  3. Weathering of coil-coatings: UV radiation and thermal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castela, A. S.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat and of QUV ageing on coil coatings was tested by electrochemical impedance, and the results compared with surface analysis of the polymers by FTIR and XPS. It was shown that UV radiation is more relevant than heat to chemical degradation. A different correlation between water permeation and chemical degradation was observed depending on the coating thickness: for the thinner coatings, the higher UV degradation has corresponded to increased water absorption, whereas in the thicker coating, the bulk effect of heat was more relevant to water permeation.

    El efecto del calor y del envejecimiento, QUV, sobre recubrimiemtos de bobinas se probó mediante la impedancia electroquímica, y los resultados se compararon con análisis superficiales de los polímeros usando FTIR y XPS. Se encontró que la radiación UV es más importante que el calor en la degradación química. Una correlación diferente, entre agua infiltrada y degradación química, se observó, dependiendo del espesor del recubrimiento: para los recubrimientos más delgados, mayor degradación UV correspondió a un incremento de absorción de agua; en cambio, para los recubrimientos más gruesos, el efecto del calor fue más importante para la infiltración del agua.

  4. Thermal shock removal of defective glass-enamel coating from cast-iron products

    OpenAIRE

    Aleutdinov, Alexander Dmitrievich; Gyngazov, Sergey Anatolievich; Mylnikova, Tatyana Stepanovna; Luchnikov, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    A setup for light beam exposure has been developed. The setup was used to consider the technology of thermal shock destruction of the coating by pulsed-periodic exposure to powerful focused light from the xenon arc lamp DKsShRB-10000. It is shown that this type of exposure can effectively remove the glass-enamel coating from iron products. The optimal mode of setup operation to efficiently remove the defective glass-enamel coating is found: the diameter of the focused light beams is 2.5-3.5 c...

  5. Mixed Mode Fracture of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Effects of Anisotropy and Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis L.

    2008-01-01

    The combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of anisotropic ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the microsplat coating material was modeled using Finite Element approach to account for anisotropy and micro cracked structures, and predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  6. Quality control of fireproof coatings for reinforced concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravit, Marina; Dmitriev, Ivan; Ishkov, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    The article analyzes methods of quality inspection of fireproof coatings (work flow, measuring, laboratory, etc.). In modern construction there is a problem of lack of distinct monitoring for the fire protection testing. There is a description of this testing for reinforced concrete structures. The article shows the results of calculation quality control of hatches as an example of fireproof coating for reinforced concrete structures.

  7. Thin-layer thermal insulation coatings based on high-filled spheroplastics with polyorganosiloxane binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukhlanov, V. Yu; Selivanov, O. G.; Trifonova, T. A.; Ilina, M. E.; Chukhlanova, N. V.

    2017-10-01

    Thermal insulation coatings, based on polyorganosiloxane as a binder and hollow glass microspheres, have been studied in this research. The developed materials are widely applied in various branches of science and engineering basically in construction. Components interaction processes are comprehensively studied. Spraying production methods of thin layer thermal insulation coatings have been researched. Ideal technological parameters for polyorganosiloxane coatings hardening depending on components ratio, ambient temperature, solvent and curative concentration have been determined. Stress related characteristics of constructional energy saving materials containing polyorganosiloxane have been researched. Components structure and ratio concerning compound extension strength properties have been revealed. Substantiation of Danneberg model application for the strength characteristics enhancing, when hollow microspheres are introduced, has been suggested. Thermal properties of coating thermal insulation have been studied. To research these characteristics standard methods applying devices IT-S-400 and IT-λ-400 have been chosen. Filler concentration increase was stated to decrease the composition heat conductivity coefficient and to the reduction of temperature dependence of this index. The authors suggested to employ the developed thermal insulation materials for construction and power engineering facilities operating under high temperature and other unfavorable environment.

  8. High Thermal Conductivity of Copper Matrix Composite Coatings with Highly-Aligned Graphite Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, Alessandro; Tagliaferri, Vincenzo; Ucciardello, Nadia

    2017-10-25

    Nanocomposite coatings with highly-aligned graphite nanoplatelets in a copper matrix were successfully fabricated by electrodeposition. For the first time, the disposition and thermal conductivity of the nanofiller has been evaluated. The degree of alignment and inclination of the filling materials has been quantitatively evaluated by polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity were extracted for the graphite nanoplatelets by the dependence of the Raman G-peak frequency on the laser power excitation. Temperature dependency of the G-peak shift has been also measured. Most remarkable is the global thermal conductivity of 640 ± 20 W·m -1 ·K -1 (+57% of copper) obtained for the composite coating by the flash method. Our experimental results are accounted for by an effective medium approximation (EMA) model that considers the influence of filler geometry, orientation, and thermal conductivity inside a copper matrix.

  9. High Thermal Conductivity of Copper Matrix Composite Coatings with Highly-Aligned Graphite Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Simoncini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite coatings with highly-aligned graphite nanoplatelets in a copper matrix were successfully fabricated by electrodeposition. For the first time, the disposition and thermal conductivity of the nanofiller has been evaluated. The degree of alignment and inclination of the filling materials has been quantitatively evaluated by polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity were extracted for the graphite nanoplatelets by the dependence of the Raman G-peak frequency on the laser power excitation. Temperature dependency of the G-peak shift has been also measured. Most remarkable is the global thermal conductivity of 640 ± 20 W·m−1·K−1 (+57% of copper obtained for the composite coating by the flash method. Our experimental results are accounted for by an effective medium approximation (EMA model that considers the influence of filler geometry, orientation, and thermal conductivity inside a copper matrix.

  10. Investigation on the Interface Characteristics of the Thermal Barrier Coating System through Flat Cylindrical Indenters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coating (TBC systems are highly advanced material systems and usually applied to insulate components from large and prolonged heat loads by utilizing thermally insulating materials. In this study, the characteristics of the interface of thermal barrier coating systems have been simulated by the finite-element method (FEM. The emphasis was put on the stress distribution at the interface which is beneath the indenter. The effect of the interface roughness, the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer's thickness, and the modulus ratio (η of the thin film with the substrate has been considered. Finite-element results showed that the influences of the interface roughness and the TGO layer's thickness on stress distribution were important. At the same time, the residual stress distribution has been investigated in detail.

  11. Thermal Barrier Coatings (les Revetements anti-mur de chaleur)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Coatings (les Revetements anti-mur de chaleur ) U:.j> ^ST^K^NT A Papers presented at the 85th Meeting of the AGARD Structures and Materials Panel...nations in aerospace research and development; — Exchange of scientific and technical information; — Providing assistance to member nations for the...Panels which are composed of experts appointed by the National Delegates, the Consultant and Exchange Programme and the Aerospace Applications Studies

  12. Thermal Spray Coatings for Fusion Applications — Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel; Linke, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2007), s. 64-83 ISSN 1059-9630 Grant - others:-(XE) EFDA Task DV4/04 (TW0; -(XE) EFDA Task TW5-TVM-PSW Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : beryllium * boron carbide * plasma facing components * plasma sprayed coatings * thermonuclear fusion * tungsten Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.204, year: 2007

  13. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CORROSION AND THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC...THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COATINGS by John A Luhn June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Sarath...precipitate. The resolution of the EDS process may not have been sufficient to show very small precipitates however. SEM imaging at higher

  14. Thermal barrier coating by electron beam-physical vapor deposition of zirconia co-doped with yttria and niobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Soares de Almeida

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The most usual ceramic material for coating turbine blades is yttria doped zirconia. Addition of niobia, as a co-dopant in the Y2O3-ZrO2 system, can reduce the thermal conductivity and improve mechanical properties of the coating. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the influence of the addition of niobia on the microstructure and thermal properties of the ceramic coatings. SEM on coatings fractured cross-section shows a columnar structure and the results of XRD show only zirconia tetragonal phase in the ceramic coating for the chemical composition range studied. As the difference NbO2,5-YO1,5 mol percent increases, the tetragonality increases. A significant reduction of the thermal conductivity, measured by laser flash technique in the zirconia coating co-doped with yttria and niobia when compared with zirconia-yttria coating was observed.

  15. Study on modernization processes in the coating metal surfaces (plain bearings by thermal spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena IRIMIE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge accumulated within the metal coating through thermal spraying allows the understanding of aspects related to the coat structure phenomena, in this case of the routs that need to be followed in order to create strong and stabile connections between the coats subsided through thermal spraying, between the particles that compose those coats, respectively. However, all this knowledge does not ensure the understanding of some practical situations that are apparently paradoxes, as for instance the absence of tin bronze adherence to ignobly steel holders, the perfect adherence of bronze to the aluminum on the same types of holders, in the context in which both elements, tin and aluminum, respectively are found in equal quantity in the two type of bonze that maintain them in solid solutions (below 10%.The parallel study in the sinter antifriction domain has offered information regarding the optimal correlation between the composition of antifriction material and the required type of application, the optimal pinches level and the way that this morphological characteristic may be influenced. By experimental research it is necessary to determine the conditions under which such coverage can be obtained by thermal spraying of the metal coatings.

  16. Corrosion Testing of Thermal Spray Coatings in a Biomass Co-Firing Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Oksa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale use of biomass and recycled fuel is increasing in energy production due to climate and energy targets. A 40% cut in greenhouse gas emission compared to 1990 levels and at least a 27% share of renewable energy consumption are set in EU Energy Strategy 2030. Burning fuels with high content of corrosive species such as chlorine and heavy metals causes deterioration of boiler components, shortened lifetime, limited availability of a plant and hence higher maintenance and investment costs and lower thermal and economic efficiency. Coatings can be applied to protect the critical boiler components against high temperature corrosion. In this study, five thermal spray coatings were tested in an actual biomass co-firing boiler for 1300 h with a measurement probe. The coatings were analyzed after the exposure by metallographic means and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (SEM/EDX. The deposits formed on the specimens were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence. At 550 °C, the coatings showed excellent corrosion performance compared to reference material ferritic steel T92. At 750 °C, tube material A263 together with NiCr and NiCrTi had the highest corrosion resistance. To conclude, thermal spray coatings can offer substantial corrosion protection in biomass and recycled fuel burning power plants.

  17. Thermal properties and flame retardancy of an ether-type UV-cured polyurethane coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A new UV-reactive monomer piperazine-N,N′-bis(acryloxyethylaryl-phosphoramidate (N-PBAAP containing phosphorus and nitrogen was synthesized and used as flame retardant for an ether-type UV-cured polyurethane acrylate (PUA coating. The thermal properties of the PUA films were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA in air and nitrogen atmosphere. The TGA results showed that the incorporation of N-PBAAP can obviously enhance the char residue of the PUA coatings. From the TGA and real time Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (RT-FTIR results, different degradation behaviors were observed in the PUA coatings with different N-PBAAP content. The combustibility of the PUA coatings was evaluated by microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC. The MCC results revealed that the addition of NPBAAP in the coatings can significantly reduce the peak Heat Release Rate (pHRR, Heat Release Capacity (HRC and the Total Heat Release (THR of the samples. Furthermore, dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMA was employed to examine the viscoelastic properties of the PUA films. It was found that the incorporation of N-PBAAP in the formulation can bring in more functional groups to the coatings, which results in an increase of the glass transition temperature (Tg and cross linking density (XLD of the films.

  18. Thermally Sprayable Anti-corrosion Marine Coatings Based on MAH-g-LDPE/UHMWPE Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeva Jothi, K.; Santhoskumar, A. U.; Amanulla, Syed; Palanivelu, K.

    2014-12-01

    Polymer composite coatings based on low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) blends were prepared for marine coatings. The incorporation of carboxyl moiety in the polymer blends of LDPE/UHMWPE was carried out by grafting with maleic anhydride (MAH) at varying concentrations of 1-8 wt.% using reactive extrusion process. An optimum percentage of grafting of 2.1% was achieved with 5 wt.% of maleic anhydride. Further, the nanocomposites of MAH-grafted-LDPE/UHMWPE blends were prepared by incorporating cloisite 15A nanoclay at varying concentrations of 1-4 wt.%. The polymer nanocomposites were converted into fine powders suitable for thermal spray having ≤200 μ particle size using cryogenic grinding. The effect of the intact coatings applied on grit-blasted mild steel by thermal spray technique was evaluated for abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, and corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of the polymer nanocomposites was studied by salt spray technique and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy The abrasion resistance of coatings increases with increasing UHMWPE content in the blends. However, blends with higher concentration of UHMWPE resulted in coarse coatings with poor adhesion. The coatings with 90:10 MAH-grafted-LDPE/UHMWPE having 3 wt.% of nanoclay showed good abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, and better corrosion resistance.

  19. Cassava starch coatings for postharvest control of papaya anthracnose

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bruno F Oliveira; André F Cruz; Eduardo Alves

    2016-01-01

      The effects of coating papaya fruit (Carica papaya) with cassava starch were studied to determine the best concentration and mode of action of this material in postharvest control of anthracnose...

  20. Development and Application of Coating Weight Control Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hyoung [Dongbu Steel, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Precise coating weight control is very important issue on quality and minimizing operating costs on continuous galvanizing line. These days, many steel making companies are having a new understanding of cost importance by rise raw material prices and customers requirement for cost reduction. Dongbu steel also meets these situations and decided to develop the technologies. Dongbu Steel developed Integrated coating weight control system jointly with Objective Control Ltd. and installed 2CGL and 4CGL. Several technological functions were developed and realized to achieve true hands-off operation and maximum cost benefit by combining model-based preset and dynamic prediction models. We also installed it on 1 CGL on April, 2008. This paper will present the interface, functions and application result of the integrated coating weight control system including Zn saving and coating weight uniformity.

  1. Electrochemical methods for characterisation of thermal spray corrosion resistant stainless steel coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Vreijling, M.P.W.; Ferrari, G.M.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal spray stainless steel coatings for protection of low alloyed steels against different types of corrosion is limited due to high porosity levels and oxide inclusions. In this paper electrochemical methods like corrosion potential monitoring and cyclic voltammetry are reported to

  2. Influence of coating on nanocrystalline magnetic properties during high temperature thermal ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekdim, Atef, E-mail: atef.lekdim@univ-lyon1.fr; Morel, Laurent; Raulet, Marie-Ange

    2017-05-15

    Since their birth or mergence the late 1980s, the nanocrystalline ultrasoft magnetic materials are taking a great importance in power electronic systems conception. One of the main advantages that make them more attractive nowadays is their ability to be packaged since the reduction of the magnetostrictive constant to almost zero. In aircraft applications, due to the high component compactness and to their location (for example near the jet engine), the operating temperature increases and may reach easily 200 °C and more. Consequently, the magnetic thermal ageing may occur but is, unfortunately, weakly studied. This paper focuses on the influence of the coating (packaging type) on the magnetic nanocrystalline performances during a thermal ageing. This study is based on monitoring the magnetic characteristics of two types of nanocrystalline cores (naked and coated) during a thermal activated ageing (100, 150 and 200 °C). Based on a dedicated monitoring protocol, a large magnetic characterization has been done and analyzed. Elsewhere, X-Ray Diffraction and magnetostriction measurements were carried out to support the study of the anisotropy energies evolution with ageing. This latter is discussed in this paper to explain and give hypothesis about the ageing phenomena. - Highlights: • The coating impacts drastically the magnetic properties during thermal ageing. • Irreversible ageing phenomena after the total coating breakage. • The deteriorations are related to the storage of the magnetoelastic anisotropy.

  3. Loadings in thermal barrier coatings of jet engine turbine blades an experimental research and numerical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses complex loadings of turbine blades and protective layer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC), under real working airplane jet conditions. They obey both multi-axial mechanical loading and sudden temperature variation during starting and landing of the airplanes. In particular, two types of blades are analyzed: stationary and rotating, which are widely applied in turbine engines produced by airplane factories.

  4. Progress toward life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress toward developing life models for simulating the behavior of thermal barrier coatings in aircraffft gas turbine engines is discussed. A preliminary laboratory model is described as are current efforts to develop engine-capable models. Current understanding of failure mechanisms is also summarized.

  5. Some recent trends in research and technology of advanced thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, U.; Leyens, Ch.; Fritscher, K.; Peters, M.; Saruhan-Brings, B. [Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR, Institute of Mateirals Research, Koln (Germany); Lavigne, O.; Dorvaux, J.M.; Poulain, M.; Mevrel, R.; Caliez, M. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Dept. of Metallic Materials and Processing, 92 - Chatillon (France)

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) offer the potential to significantly improve efficiencies of aero engines as well as stationary gas turbines for power generation. On internally cooled turbine parts temperature gradients of the order of 100 to 150 deg. C can be achieved. Today, state-of-the-art TBCs, typically consisting of an yttria-stabilised zirconia top coat and a metallic bond coat deposited onto a superalloy substrate, are mainly used to extend lifetime. Further efficiency improvements require TBCs being an integral part of the component which, in turn, requires reliable and predictable TBC performance. Presently, TBCs produced by electron beam physical vapour deposition are favoured for high performance applications. The paper highlights critical R and D needs for advanced TBC systems with a special focus on reduced thermal conductivity and life prediction needs. (authors)

  6. Design and simulation of thermal residual stresses of coatings on WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tool substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Anhai; Zhao, Jun; Zang, Jian; Zheng, Wei [Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture of MOE, School of Mechanical EngineeringShandong University, Jinan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Large thermal residual stresses in coatings during the coating deposition process may easily lead to coating delamination of coated carbide tools in machining. In order to reduce the possibility of coating delamination during the tool failure process, a theoretical method was proposed and a numerical method was constructed for the coating design of WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tools. The thermal residual stresses of multi-layered coatings were analytically modeled based on equivalent parameters of coating properties, and the stress distribution of coatings are simulated by Finite element method (FEM). The theoretically calculated results and the FEM simulated results were verified and in good agreement with the experimental test results. The effects of coating thickness, tool substrate, coating type and interlayer were investigated by the proposed geometric and FEM model. Based on the evaluations of matchability of tool substrate and tool coatings, the basic principles of tool coating design were proposed. This provides theoretical basis for the selection and design of coatings of cutting tools in high-speed machining.

  7. Thermal energy storage apparatus, controllers and thermal energy storage control methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2016-05-03

    Thermal energy storage apparatus, controllers and thermal energy storage control methods are described. According to one aspect, a thermal energy storage apparatus controller includes processing circuitry configured to access first information which is indicative of surpluses and deficiencies of electrical energy upon an electrical power system at a plurality of moments in time, access second information which is indicative of temperature of a thermal energy storage medium at a plurality of moments in time, and use the first and second information to control an amount of electrical energy which is utilized by a heating element to heat the thermal energy storage medium at a plurality of moments in time.

  8. Novel Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings in Coal-Fired Power Plant Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing [Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This project presents a detailed investigation of a novel functionally graded coating material, pyrochlore oxide, for thermal barrier coating (TBC) in gas turbines used in coal-fired power plants. Thermal barrier coatings are refractory materials deposited on gas turbine components, which provide thermal protection for metallic components at operating conditions. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a manufacturing process to produce the novel low thermal conductivity and high thermal stability pyrochlore oxide based coatings with improved high-temperature durability. The current standard TBC, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), has service temperatures limited to <1200°C, due to sintering and phase transition at higher temperatures. In contrast, pyrochlore oxide, e.g., lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7, LZ), has demonstrated lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability, which are crucial to high temperature applications, such as gas turbines used in coal-fired power plants. Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) has collaborated with Praxair Surface Technologies (PST), and Changwon National University in South Korea to perform the proposed research. The research findings are critical to the extension of current TBCs to a broader range of high-temperature materials and applications. Several tasks were originally proposed and accomplished, with additional new opportunities identified during the course of the project. In this report, a description of the project tasks, the main findings and conclusions are given. A list of publications and presentations resulted from this research is listed in the Appendix at the end of the report.

  9. The Influence of Different Absorbed Coatings on Thermal Effect of Prefabricated Solar Collector Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prefabricated solar collector panels is a kind of new permeability structure of collector panels. For this test, we adopt a certain proportion of copper oxide, magnesium oxide and iron oxide to enamel paint as absorbed panel coating and make two kinds of collector panels for different forms of color by dark green coating and black coating. By the methods of comparison, the two kinds of panel collector efficiency and heat loss coefficient UL were tested. The results showed that there was a slight difference between the heat loss coefficient of prefabricated solar collector panels, using the panel with dark green coating’s comprehensive thermal effect is well than the panel with black coating. The beautiful appearance color is more suitable for building requirements.

  10. Constrained sintering of an air-plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocks, A.C.F., E-mail: alan.cocks@eng.ox.ac.uk [Department of Engineering Science, Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Fleck, N.A. [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington St., Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    A micromechanical model is presented for the constrained sintering of an air-plasma-sprayed, thermal barrier coating upon a thick superalloy substrate. The coating comprises random splats with intervening penny-shaped cracks. The crack faces make contact at asperities, which progressively sinter in-service by interfacial diffusion, accommodated by bulk creep. Diffusion is driven by the reduction in interfacial energy at the developing contacts and by the local asperity contact stress. At elevated operating temperature, both sintering and creep strains accumulate within the plane of the coating. The sensitivities of sintering rate and microstructure evolution rate to the kinetic parameters and thermodynamic driving forces are explored. It is demonstrated that the sintering response is governed by three independent timescales, as dictated by the material and geometric properties of the coating. Finally, the role of substrate constraint is assessed by comparing the rate of constrained sintering with that for free sintering.

  11. Fly ash based geopolymer thin coatings on metal substrates and its thermal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temuujin, Jadambaa; Minjigmaa, Amgalan; Rickard, William; Lee, Melissa; Williams, Iestyn; van Riessen, Arie

    2010-08-15

    Class F fly ash based Na-geopolymer formulations have been applied as fire resistant coatings on steel. The main variables for the coating formulations were Si: Al molar and water: cement weight ratios. We have determined that the adhesive strength of the coatings strongly depend on geopolymer composition. The ease with which geopolymer can be applied onto metal surfaces and the resultant thickness depend on the water content of the formulation. Adhesive strengths of greater than 3.5 MPa have been achieved on mild steel surfaces for compositions with Si:Al of 3.5. Microstructure evolution and thermal properties of the optimised coating formulations show that they have very promising fire resistant characteristics. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation of the influence of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres on properties of elastomer fire-thermal protective coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kablov Victor F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the influence of the introduction of aluminosilicate microspheres on value of the Payne effect, rheometric, physico-mechanical thermophysical and fire-heat-shielding properties of the elastomer compositions used in the thermal protective coatings based on ethylene-propylene rubber. It was found that partial sorption of vulcanization accelerators and sulfur can occur on the surface of microspheres, followed by their desorption at the vulcanization temperature. This is confirmed by the appearance of a second peak on the vulcanization rate curve. The use of hollow aluminosilicate microspheres in the composition of elastomeric fire-heat-shielding coatings makes it possible to increase the efficiency of these compositions by reducing the thermal conductivity and density of the article while saving the optimum level of physico-mechanical properties. In accordance with the proposed mechanism for the interaction of the polymer matrix and microspheres, additional crosslinked structures are formed within the rubber matrix. An increase in the content of microspheres leads to an increase in the filler-filler interaction, which leads to a relative increase in thermal conductivity. However, the thermal conductivity of compositions containing relatively large amounts of the microspheres is still lower than that of the control. The introduction of microspheres slows down the heating of the sample during high-temperature tests, while reducing the loss of mass and the rate of linear combustion.

  13. Abrasion, Erosion and Cavitation Erosion Wear Properties of Thermally Sprayed Alumina Based Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Matikainen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermally-sprayed alumina based materials, e.g., alumina-titania (Al2O3-TiO2, are commonly applied as wear resistant coatings in industrial applications. Properties of the coatings depend on the spray process, powder morphology, and chemical composition of the powder. In this study, wear resistant coatings from Al2O3 and Al2O3-13TiO2 powders were sprayed with plasma and high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF spray processes. Both, fused and crushed, and agglomerated and sintered Al2O3-13TiO2 powders were studied and compared to pure Al2O3. The coatings were tested for abrasion, erosion, and cavitation resistances in order to study the effect of the coating structure on the wear behavior. Improved coating properties were achieved when agglomerated and sintered nanostructured Al2O3-13TiO2 powder was used in plasma spraying. Coatings with the highest wear resistance in all tests were produced by HVOF spraying from fused and crushed powders.

  14. Study of different biocomposite coatings on Ti alloy by a subsonic thermal spraying technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Muqin [Provincial Key Laboratory of Biomaterials, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154007 (China); Zhang Rui [College of Stomatology, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154003 (China); Wang Jianping [College of Stomatology, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154003 (China); Yang Shiqin [State Key Laboratory Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 (China)

    2007-03-01

    A subsonic thermal spraying technique (STS) was used to make different biocomposite coatings on titanium alloys for preparing three kinds of implants: 8Ti2G, HA and 8H2B, respectively. The implants were embedded in a region of jaw of dogs whose teeth were pulled out three months previously. The dogs, in two groups, were killed 30 days and 90 days, respectively, after they were operated on. Osteointegration between the implants and host bone was investigated by x-ray, histology and the SEM technique. The results showed that the three kinds of coatings all exhibited good biocompatibility and synostosis, but their osteointegration capability showed a difference and decreased in the sequence of 8H2B, HA and 8Ti2G. The activity of coating, which promoted the reactions between implants and bone tissue, was further increased by the addition of bioglass in the 8H2B coating. Subsequently, chemical bonding was formed, and the osteointegration strength was increased. The study provided a new approach to prepare biocomposite coatings. The 8H2B implants, which formed an integral functional biocomposite coating on Ti alloys, showed a better osteointegration capability with bioactivity and pore gradient variation. A theoretical base was provided for the biocomposite coating application.

  15. Application of thermal barrier coating for improving the suitability of Annona biodiesel in a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Senthil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annona biodiesel was produced from Annona oil through transesterification process. The aim of the present study is to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder, direct injection, compression ignition engine using a annona methyl ester as a fuel. They are blended together with the Neat diesel fuel such as 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and Neat biodiesel. The performance, emission and combustion characteristics are evaluated by operating the engine at different loads. The performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption. The emission constituents such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and smoke were recorded. Then the piston and both exhaust and intake valves of the test engine were coated with 100 µm of NiCrAl as lining layer. Later the same parts were coated with 400 µm material of coating that was the mixture of 88% of ZrO2, 4% of MgO, and 8% of Al2O3. After the engine coating process, the same fuels is tested in the engine at the same engine operation. The same performance and emission parameters were evaluated. Finally, these parameters are compared with uncoated engine in order to find out the changes in the performance and emission parameters of the coated engine. It is concluded that the coating engine resulting in better performance, especially in considerably lower brake specific fuel consumption values. The engine emissions are lowered both through coating and annona methyl ester biodiesel expect the nitrogen oxides emission.

  16. Bioinspired Omniphobic Coatings with a Thermal Self-Repair Function on Industrial Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Kato, Keiko; Blois, Alexandre P; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-03-01

    Inspired by the wax regeneration ability of plant leaves and the slippery surfaces of the Nepenthes pitcher plants, we have developed a new form of cross-species bioinspired slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (X-SLIPS) that can self-repair under thermal stimulation even under large-area physical and chemical damage. The performance and underlying mechanism of the thermal-healing property has been studied and characterized in detail. These thermally self-healing omniphobic coatings can be applied to a broad range of metals, plastics, glass, and ceramics of various shapes and show excellent repellency toward aqueous and organic liquids.

  17. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  18. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    /thermo-chemical attack mechanisms; (iv) developing a mechanics-based analysis of the driving forces for crack growth and delamination, based on molten phase infiltration, misfit upon cooling, and loss of compliance; (v) understanding changes in TGO growth mechanisms associated with these emerging combustion product streams; and (vi) identifying degradation resistant alternative materials (including new compositions or bi-layer concepts) for use in mitigating the observed degradation modes. To address the materials stability concerns, this program integrated research thrusts aimed at: (1) Conducting tests in simulated syngas and HHC environments to evaluate materials evolution and degradation mechanisms; assessing thermally grown oxide development unique to HHC environmental exposures; carrying out high-resolution imaging and microanalysis to elucidate the evolution of surface deposits (molten phase formation and infiltration); exploring thermo-chemical instabilities; assessing thermo-mechanical drivers and thermal gradient effects on degradation; and quantitatively measuring stress evolution due to enhanced sintering and thermo-chemical instabilities induced in the coating. (2) Executing experiments to study the melting and infiltration of simulated ash deposits, and identifying reaction products and evolving phases associated with molten phase corrosion mechanisms; utilizing thermal spray techniques to fabricate test coupons with controlled microstructures to study mechanisms of instability and degradation; facilitating thermal gradient testing; and developing new materials systems for laboratory testing; (3) Correlating information on the resulting combustion environments to properly assess materials exposure conditions and guide the development of lab-scale simulations of material exposures; specification of representative syngas and high-hydrogen fuels with realistic levels of impurities and contaminants, to explore differences in heat transfer, surface degradation, and deposit

  19. Personal thermal management by metallic nanowire-coated textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Liu, Xiaoge; Liu, Chong; Xie, Xing; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Welch, Alex J; Zhao, Tom; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-14

    Heating consumes large amount of energy and is a primary source of greenhouse gas emission. Although energy-efficient buildings are developing quickly based on improving insulation and design, a large portion of energy continues to be wasted on heating empty space and nonhuman objects. Here, we demonstrate a system of personal thermal management using metallic nanowire-embedded cloth that can reduce this waste. The metallic nanowires form a conductive network that not only is highly thermal insulating because it reflects human body infrared radiation but also allows Joule heating to complement the passive insulation. The breathability and durability of the original cloth is not sacrificed because of the nanowires' porous structure. This nanowire cloth can efficiently warm human bodies and save hundreds of watts per person as compared to traditional indoor heaters.

  20. The evaluation of integrity and elasticity of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings by ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppinen, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1997-12-31

    Thermally sprayed ceramic coatings are widely used in industrial applications where the coated component is subject to, e.g. high thermal loads or mechanical wear. The mechanical properties of the coating are finally created in the coating process and the chemical composition of the powder used as raw material can only give some hints about the properties of the final coating. Several non-destructive testing techniques are available for the detection of defects in ceramic materials or for the evaluation of density and density variations. In addition to this, ultrasonic techniques can be used for quantitative evaluation of elastic properties of materials. This evaluation is based on the measurement of sound velocities of different wave modes in the material and is normally applied only to relatively simple-shaped specimens having parallel surfaces. Acoustic microscopy operating at very high (> 100 MHz) frequencies has been used to measure the sound velocities in homogeneous and thin coatings. With this type of equipment, reliable and accurate results have been achieved in laboratory measurements. A lot of development work has been carried out world-wide to develop the measurement techniques and acoustic lenses (transducers) used in acoustic microscopy. However, less attention has been paid on the development of techniques for industrial applications on-site. The present work was focused on the development of measurement techniques for industrial applications. A new type of large-aperture low-frequency transducer was designed and constructed for the measurement of sound velocities in thermally sprayed ceramic coatings. The major difference to the lenses used in acoustic microscopy is that in the new transducer no separate lens is needed for focusing the sound beam. The piezoelectric element in the new transducer is a plastic (PVDF)-film that can be shaped to create the required focus. The practical measurement of the sound velocity is based on a modification of the V

  1. Thermal coupling within LTP dynamics control loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nofrarias, M; Garcia Marin, A F; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Danzmann, K [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert Einstein Institut (AEI), Callinstrasse 38, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Lobo, A; Sanjuan, J [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (ICE-CSIC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Ramos-Castro, J, E-mail: miquel.nofrarias@aei.mpg.d [Departament d' Enginyeria Electronica, UPC, Campus Nord, Edifici C4, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-01

    The Diagnostic Subsytem in the LISA Technology Package (LTP) on board the LISA Pathfinder mission (LPF) will characterise those external disturbances with a potential impact on the performance of the experiment coming from either thermal, magnetic or charged particles perturbations. A correct design of the experiments to measure these effects in flight requires a closed loop analysis that takes into account the dynamics of the test masses, the force applied by the controllers and those noisy terms (coming from sensing or force noise) that enters into the loop. We describe this analysis in the thermal case and we give a first numerical example of the instrument response to controlled thermal inputs.

  2. Determination of elastic and thermal properties of a thin nanocrystalline diamond coating using all-optical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sermeus, J.; Verstraeten, B.; Salenbien, R. [KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Soft Matter and Biophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Pobedinskas, P.; Haenen, K. [Instituut voor Materiaalonderzoek (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Glorieux, C., E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Soft Matter and Biophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    Results are presented on the thermal and elastic properties of a thin, 1.5 μm, nanocrystalline diamond coating (NCD), deposited on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A combination of two all-optical measurement techniques, impulsive stimulated thermal scattering and grating induced laser beam deflection, was employed to launch and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The relation between the dispersive propagation velocity of SAWs to the coating-substrate geometry is exploited to determine the elastic properties of the NCD coating. The elastic properties are found to be consistent with literature values. The thermal properties of the coating were determined by monitoring the thermal diffusion induced washing away of the laser induced transient surface temperature grating. The transient thermal grating signals were fitted by the low-frequency limit of a thermoelastic model for a multilayer configuration. Similar to the dispersion of the surface acoustic wave velocity, the characteristic time of the thermal diffusion driven grating decay evolves from a coating-dominated value at short grating spacings towards a substrate-dominated value at grating spacings well exceeding the coating thickness. The grating spacing dependence of the corresponding effective thermal diffusivity was experimentally determined and fitted, leading to a value for the thermal diffusivity of the NCD coating α{sub NCD} = 8.4{sub −0.1}{sup +2.7} mm{sup 2}·s{sup −1}, which is an order of magnitude lower than that of the silicon substrate. The low value of the thermal diffusivity is interpreted with a simple touching model. - Highlights: • We investigate a thin nano-crystalline diamond coating. • We used two all optical surface acoustic wave based methods. • We found a young's modulus and density that is in line with literature. • The thermal diffusivity of the NCD coating was 2 orders of magnitude lower than the one of bulk diamond.

  3. Influence of surface morphology and microstructure on performance of CVD tungsten coating under fusion transient thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Youyun, E-mail: lianyy@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jianbao; Feng, Fan [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Lv, Yanwei; Song, Jiupeng [China National R& D Center for Tungsten Technology, Xiamen Tungsten Co. Ltd, 361026 Xiamen (China); Chen, Jiming [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Thick CVD-W coatingswere deposited at a rapid growth rate. • The polished CVD-W coatings have highly textured structure and exhibited a very strong preferred orientation. • The polished CVD tungsten coatings show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings. • The crack formation of the polished CVD-W was almost suppressed at an elevated temperature. - Abstract: Thick tungsten coatings have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a rapid growth rate. A series of tungsten coatings with different thickness and surface morphology were prepared. The surface morphology, microstructure and preferred orientation of the CVD tungsten coatings were investigated. Thermal shock analyses were performed by using an electron beam facility to study the influence of the surface morphology and the microstructure on the thermal shock resistance of the CVD tungsten coatings. Repetitive (100 pulses) ELMs-like thermal shock loads were applied at various temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C with pulse duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of up to 1 GW/m{sup 2}. The results of the tests demonstrated that the specific surface morphology and columnar crystal structure of the CVD tungsten have significant influence on the surface cracking threshold and crack propagation of the materials. The CVD tungsten coatings with a polished surface show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings with a rough surface.

  4. A Five-year Performance Study of Low VOC Coatings over Zinc Thermal Spray for the Protection of Carbon Steel at the Kennedy Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    The launch facilities at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) are located approximately 1000 feet from the Atlantic Ocean where they are exposed to salt deposits, high humidity, high UV degradation, and acidic exhaust from solid rocket boosters. These assets are constructed from carbon steel, which requires a suitable coating to provide long-term protection to reduce corrosion and its associated costs. While currently used coating systems provide excellent corrosion control performance, they are subject to occupational, safety, and environmental regulations at the Federal and State levels that limit their use. Many contain high volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hazardous air pollutants, and other hazardous materials. Hazardous waste from coating operations include vacuum filters, zinc dust, hazardous paint related material, and solid paint. There are also worker safety issues such as exposure to solvents and isocyanates. To address these issues, top-coated thermal spray zinc coating systems were investigated as a promising environmentally friendly corrosion protection for carbon steel in an acidic launch environment. Additional benefits of the combined coating system include a long service life, cathodic protection to the substrate, no volatile contaminants, and high service temperatures. This paper reports the results of a performance based study to evaluate low VOC topcoats (for thermal spray zinc coatings) on carbon steel for use in a space launch environment.

  5. Application techniques of coatings by thermal projection; Tecnicas de aplicacion de recubrimientos por proyeccion termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcayo Calderon, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    The coatings applied by thermal projection have an important number of applications in different industries (chemical, oil, electric, nuclear, etc.). The main purpose of the protection by means of coatings is to alter the surface characteristics of a component so as to resist corrosive environments, abrasion and erosion, among others. The coatings can be applied by different methods, but due to the fact that its characteristics appreciably differ from the base metal, it is important the knowledge of its properties when a coating is selected for a specific use. In this article the characteristics of the applied coatings by thermal projection, the factors that affect its performance and the principal application techniques, are described. [Espanol] Los recubrimientos aplicados por proyeccion termica tienen un numero importante de aplicaciones en diferentes industrias (quimica, petrolera, electrica, nuclear, etc.). El proposito principal de la proteccion por medio de recubrimientos es alterar las caracteristicas de la superficie de un componente de manera que resista ambientes corrosivos, abrasion y erosion, entre otros. Los recubrimientos pueden aplicarse por diferentes metodos, pero debido a que sus propiedades difieren apreciablemente de las del metal base, es importante el conocimiento de sus propiedades cuando se selecciona un recubrimiento para un uso especifico. En este articulo se describen las caracteristicas de los recubrimientos aplicados por proyeccion termica, los factores que afectan su desempeno y las principales tecnicas de aplicacion.

  6. Temperature measurement involving nanostructured thermal barrier coating using a multiwavelength pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    It has been reported that erroneous results were obtained when a conventional pyrometer was used to measure the surface temperature of turbine engine components. Temperatures discrepancies were observed in components which were identical, except that one had its measured surface covered by a nanostructured thermal barrier coating (TBC) whereas the other component's surface was not so coated. These components were placed in an identical environment, receiving identical heat fluxes. A pyrometer measured the TBC covered surface hundreds degrees lower. These coatings were about 25 (mu)m thick, consisting of hundreds of layers of finer structures. The TBC's had very low thermal conductivity, heat flux calculations indicated that the temperatures of the coated surface should exhibit much higher temperature than the uncoated surface. Because these coatings were transparent to radiation from the visible to the infrared region, the temperatures measured by the pyrometer should be the temperature of the covered surface. Turbo components' performance and service life depend critically on the temperatures that it would experience; it is therefore important to know accurately and confidently the real surface temperature. Out of these concerns, an investigation into the measurement of nanostructured material surface temperature was carried out.

  7. Photodetector based on Vernier-Enhanced Fabry-Perot Interferometers with a Photo-Thermal Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, George Y.; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Xiaokong; Lancaster, David G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Xu, Haolan

    2017-01-01

    We present a new type of fiber-coupled photodetector with a thermal-based optical sensor head, which enables it to operate even in the presence of strong electro-magnetic interference and in electrically sensitive environments. The optical sensor head consists of three cascaded Fabry-Perot interferometers. The end-face surface is coated with copper-oxide micro-particles embedded in hydrogel, which is a new photo-thermal coating that can be readily coated on many different surfaces. Under irradiation, photons are absorbed by the photo-thermal coating, and are converted into heat, changing the optical path length of the probing light and induces a resonant wavelength shift. For white-light irradiation, the photodetector exhibits a power sensitivity of 760 pm/mW, a power detection limit of 16.4 μW (i.e. specific detectivity of 2.2 × 105 cm.√Hz/W), and an optical damage threshold of ~100 mW or ~800 mW/cm2. The response and recovery times are 3.0 s (~90% of change within 100 ms) and 16.0 s respectively.

  8. Thermal conductivity of titanium nitride/titanium aluminum nitride multilayer coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samani, M.K., E-mail: majid1@e.ntu.edu.sg [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Ding, X.Z. [Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Khosravian, N. [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Amin-Ahmadi, B. [Electron Microscopy for materials Science (EMAT), Department of Physics, University of Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Yi, Yang [Data Storage Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 117608 (Singapore); Chen, G. [BC Photonics Technological Company, 5255 Woodwards Rd., Richmond, BC V7E 1G9 (Canada); Neyts, E.C.; Bogaerts, A. [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Tay, B.K. [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    A series of [TiN/TiAlN]{sub n} multilayer coatings with different bilayer numbers n = 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 were deposited on stainless steel substrate AISI 304 by a lateral rotating cathode arc technique in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere. The composition and microstructure of the coatings have been analyzed by using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD analysis shows that the preferential orientation growth along the (111) direction is reduced in the multilayer coatings. TEM analysis reveals that the grain size of the coatings decreases with increasing bilayer number. HRTEM imaging of the multilayer coatings shows a high density misfit dislocation between the TiN and TiAlN layers. The cross-plane thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured by a pulsed photothermal reflectance technique. With increasing bilayer number, the multilayer coatings' thermal conductivity decreases gradually. This reduction of thermal conductivity can be ascribed to increased phonon scattering due to the disruption of columnar structure, reduced preferential orientation, decreased grain size of the coatings and present misfit dislocations at the interfaces. - Highlights: • TiN/TiAlN multilayer coatings with different bilayer number were deposited on SS. • The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed. • Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured by pulsed photothermal reflectance. • Thermal conductivity depends on the coatings' microstructure and number of layers. • With increasing the bilayer number, thermal conductivity decreased.

  9. Sedimentary controls on modern sand grain coat formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowey, Patrick J.; Worden, Richard H.; Utley, James; Hodgson, David M.

    2017-05-01

    Coated sand grains can influence reservoir quality evolution during sandstone diagenesis. Porosity can be reduced and fluid flow restricted where grain coats encroach into pore space. Conversely pore-lining grain coats can restrict the growth of pore-filling quartz cement in deeply buried sandstones, and thus can result in unusually high porosity in deeply buried sandstones. Being able to predict the distribution of coated sand grains within petroleum reservoirs is thus important to help find good reservoir quality. Here we report a modern analogue study of 12 sediment cores from the Anllóns Estuary, Galicia, NW Spain, collected from a range of sub-environments, to help develop an understanding of the occurrence and distribution of coated grains. The cores were described for grain size, bioturbation and sedimentary structures, and then sub-sampled for electron and light microscopy, laser granulometry, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The Anllóns Estuary is sand-dominated with intertidal sand flats and saltmarsh environments at the margins; there is a shallowing/fining-upwards trend in the estuary-fill succession. Grain coats are present in nearly every sample analysed; they are between 1 μm and 100 μm thick and typically lack internal organisation. The extent of grain coat coverage can exceed 25% in some samples with coverage highest in the top 20 cm of cores. Samples from muddy intertidal flat and the muddy saltmarsh environments, close to the margins of the estuary, have the highest coat coverage (mean coat coverage of 20.2% and 21.3%, respectively). The lowest mean coat coverage occurs in the sandy saltmarsh (10.4%), beyond the upper tidal limit and sandy intertidal flat environments (8.4%), close to the main estuary channel. Mean coat coverage correlates with the concentration of clay fraction. The primary controls on the distribution of fine-grained sediment, and therefore grain coat distribution, are primary sediment transport and deposition processes that

  10. Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2006-03-02

    The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings

  11. Engineered Theranostic Magnetic Nanostructures: Role of Composition and Surface Coating on Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast and Thermal Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandwana, Vikas; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Kanthala, Shanthi; De, Mrinmoy; Chou, Stanley S; Prasad, Pottumarthi V; Dravid, Vinayak P

    2016-03-23

    Magnetic nanostructures (MNS) have emerged as promising functional probes for simultaneous diagnostics and therapeutics (theranostic) applications due to their ability to enhance localized contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and heat under external radio frequency (RF) field, respectively. We show that the "theranostic" potential of the MNS can be significantly enhanced by tuning their core composition and architecture of surface coating. Metal ferrite (e.g., MFe2O4) nanoparticles of ∼8 nm size and nitrodopamine conjugated polyethylene glycol (NDOPA-PEG) were used as the core and surface coating of the MNS, respectively. The composition was controlled by tuning the stoichiometry of MFe2O4 nanoparticles (M = Fe, Mn, Zn, ZnxMn1-x) while the architecture of surface coating was tuned by changing the molecular weight of PEG, such that larger weight is expected to result in longer length extended away from the MNS surface. Our results suggest that both core as well as surface coating are important factors to take into consideration during the design of MNS as theranostic agents which is illustrated by relaxivity and thermal activation plots of MNS with different core composition and surface coating thickness. After optimization of these parameters, the r2 relaxivity and specific absorption rate (SAR) up to 552 mM(-1) s(-1) and 385 W/g were obtained, respectively, which are among the highest values reported for MNS with core magnetic nanoparticles of size below 10 nm. In addition, NDOPA-PEG coated MFe2O4 nanostructures showed enhanced biocompatibility (up to [Fe] = 200 μg/mL) and reduced nonspecific uptake in macrophage cells in comparison to other well established FDA approved Fe based MR contrast agents.

  12. DESIGN OF THERMAL EQUIPMENT MILLING FOR FABRICATING THE TIO2 PHOTOCATALYSTS COATED GRAIN POLYMERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aliah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic waste water treatment can be conducted with technique of photocatalytic. Photocatalytic activity involves factors light intensity and amount of catalyst. In order this process can take place optimally, the catalyst material coating on the surface of the material buffer such as polymer shaped grains can be an alternative method. Setting the temperature and the duration of heating automatically is very efficient in controlling the physical characteristics of the photocatalyst materials. In this experiment, modification done on of the two types of thermal equipment milling namely cylindrical equipment milling equipped with heater and equipment milling based electric oven. The testing process of the thermal equipment milling performed with controlled temperature in the range of 110 ° C and setting the timer to 60 minutes. In testing the thermal characteristics of milling equipment, it takes as long as 220 minutes for each immobilization process using cylindrical milling and 65 minutes when using an electric oven. Setting the temperature and time in the electric oven milling  can be performed automatically, which can not be performed using cylindrical milling. Milling equipment based electric oven has also been used in the selection of buffer polymer materials and fabricate TiO2 photocatalysts which tested on photodegradation of organic compound of methylene blue (MB.Penjernihan air limbah organik dapat dilakukan dengan teknik fotokatalisis. Agar aktivitas fotokatalitik yang melibatkan faktor intensitas cahaya dan jumlah katalis dapat berlangsung secara optimal, pelapisan material katalis pada permukaan material penyangga berupa bulir polimer termoplastik dapat menjadi salah satu alternatif. Pengaturan temperatur dan lamanya pemanasan secara otomatis sangat efisien dalam mengendalikan karakteristik fisis material fotokatalis Dalam penelitian ini dilakukan modifikasi terhadap dua jenis peralatan thermal millng, yaitu peralatan milling

  13. MISSE Thermal Control Materials with Comparison to Previous Flight Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria; Pippin, H. Gary; Frey, George

    2008-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE), including inorganic coatings, anodized aluminum, and multi-layer insulation materials. These and other material samples were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was limited for some samples. Materials flown on MISSE-1 and MISSE-2 were exposed to the space environment for nearly four years. Materials flown on MISSE-3, MISSE-4, and MISSE-5 were exposed to the space environment for one year. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. Effects of short duration versus long duration exposure on ISS are explored, as well as comparable data from previous flight experiments, such as the Passive Optical Sample Assembly (POSA), Optical Properties Monitor (OPM), and Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).

  14. Environmentally Friendly Coating Technology for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz M.; Li, Wenyan; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Jolley, Scott T.; Pearman, Benjamin P.; Zhang, Xuejun; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Gillis, Mathew; Blanton, Michael; hide

    2016-01-01

    This work concerns the development of environmentally friendly encapsulation technology, specifically designed to incorporate corrosion indicators, inhibitors, and self-healing agents into a coating, in such a way that the delivery of the indicators and inhibitors is triggered by the corrosion process, and the delivery of self-healing agents is triggered by mechanical damage to the coating. Encapsulation of the active corrosion control ingredients allows the incorporation of desired autonomous corrosion control functions such as: early corrosion detection, hidden corrosion detection, corrosion inhibition, and self-healing of mechanical damage into a coating. The technology offers the versatility needed to include one or several corrosion control functions into the same coating.The development of the encapsulation technology has progressed from the initial proof-of-concept work, in which a corrosion indicator was encapsulated into an oil-core (hydrophobic) microcapsule and shown to be delivered autonomously, under simulated corrosion conditions, to a sophisticated portfolio of micro carriers (organic, inorganic, and hybrid) that can be used to deliver a wide range of active corrosion ingredients at a rate that can be adjusted to offer immediate as well as long-term corrosion control. The micro carriers have been incorporated into different coating formulas to test and optimize the autonomous corrosion detection, inhibition, and self-healing functions of the coatings. This paper provides an overview of progress made to date and highlights recent technical developments, such as improved corrosion detection sensitivity, inhibitor test results in various types of coatings, and highly effective self-healing coatings based on green chemistry.

  15. The corrosion resistance of 140MXC, 530AS and 560AS coatings produced by thermal spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Alexis López Covaleda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Three commercial materials were deposited using electric arc thermal spraying: 140MXC (with Fe, W, Cr, Nb, 530AS (AISI 1015 steel and 560AS (AISI 420 steel on AISI 4340 steel. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the best strategy for improving a coating-substrate system’s corrosion resistance, using the following combinations: homogeneous single coatings, bilayers consisting of 530AS or 560AS under 140MXC and 140MXC + 530AS and 140MXC + 560AS coatings deposited simultaneously. The coatings were characterised using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion resistance was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarisation and hardness by using the Vickers test. Corrosion resistance depends on the amount of microstructure defects, the deposition strategy and the alloy elements. However, corrosion resistance was similar in single coatings of 140MXC and bilayers, having -630 V corrosion potential and 708 nA corrosion current. The details and corrosion mechanism of the coatings so produced are described in this paper.

  16. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  17. Laser surface modification (LSM) of thermally-sprayed Diamalloy 2002 coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisario, A.; Barletta, M.; Veniali, F.

    2012-09-01

    Thermally-sprayed Diamalloy 2002 is widely used as overlay coating in several applications for their good wear and corrosion protection. Although, in the past, any effort has been produced to deposit Diamalloy 2002 with a low degree of defectiveness, some residual porosity and cracks can often affect the final property of the resulting coatings. Different techniques are commonly used to improve the performance of Diamalloy 2002. Recently, laser post-treatment seems to be one of the most promising, being an effective, non-contact, mini-invasive technology. In this respect, the present investigation deals with the application of a continuous wave high power diode laser to post-treat Diamalloy 2002 deposited by HVOF on AA 6082 T6 aluminum alloy. Different laser power and scan speed were investigated in order to identify the process window most favorable to improve the overall mechanical property of Diamalloy 2002 coatings. The changes in morphology, micro-structure and chemical composition of the coatings after laser post-treatments were investigated by inductive gage profilometry and combined SEM-EDXS. Further, the changes in the mechanical properties of the coatings were investigated in terms of hardness, elastic modulus, scratch and wear resistance. Consistent improvements in mechanical property can be achieved by Diamalloy 2002 when laser processing is performed at higher power and reduced scan speed. Yet, too much increase in power density should be always avoided as it can be detrimental to the final property of the coatings and cause high defectiveness and their failure.

  18. Review of hot corrosion of thermal barrier coatings of gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yongbao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The review was done in order to make clear the problem of the hot corrosion of the Thermal Barrier Coatings(TBCsduring gas turbine serving. This paper summarizes the factors resulting from the hot corrosion of TBCs during turbine service and classifies methods for enhancing the corrosive resistance of TBCs. A prospective methodology for improving corrosion resistance is also formulated. The main types of corrosion coating include phase reaction, oxidizing of the bond coating, salt-fog corrosion, CMAS corrosion and fuel impurity corrosion. So far, methods for improving the corrosion resistance of TBCs include developing new coating materials, anticorrosive treatment on the surface of TBCs, modifying the stacking configuration and improving the cleansing functions of the gas turbines. In the future, developing new materials with excellent performance will still be the main direction for boosting the improvement of the hot corrosion resistance of TBCs. Simultaneously, improving the tacking configuration and nanotechnology of TBC coatings are potential approaches for improving corrosion resistance. With the development of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC, the focus of the hot corrosion of TBCs may turn to that of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs.

  19. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  20. Corrosion control under thermal insulation and fireproofing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delahunt, J.F.

    1982-02-01

    Corrosion occurring on carbon steel which is protected by thermal insulation (mineral wool, fiberglass, foam glass, calcium silicate, phenolics, and polyurethanes) or by fireproofing material (concrete or gunite) is discussed. Examples are given and illustrated of corrosion in refineries, petrochemical plants, and pipelines which have been thermally insulated or fireproofed. Four corrosion mechanisms have been identified and are discussed. The promoting action of chlorides as well as the pH effect or corrosion are described and it is concluded that the corrosion under thermal insulation follows two patterns. Further, organic cellular foams (polyurethanes and phenolics) are shown to accelerate corrosive action. Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel under thermal insulation is described and the effect of improper design/application is stressed. Specific measures to control corrosion are discussed for concrete fireproofing and thermal insulation. (MJJ)

  1. The effect of TiO{sub 2}/aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives on the mechanical and thermal properties of polyacrylic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosrati, Rahimeh, E-mail: ra.nosrati@gmail.com; Olad, Ali, E-mail: a.olad@yahoo.com

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Novel nonocomposite coatings based on commercial polyacrylic latex were prepared. • Nanostructured TiO{sub 2}/aluminosilicate nanocomposites materials were prepared. • TiO{sub 2}/aluminosilicate nanocomposites used as additive for modification of polyacrylic latex. • Modified coatings showed better adhesion strength and hardness than unmodified polymer. • Most of modified coatings showed better tensile properties and lower T{sub g} than unmodified polymer. - Abstract: The commercial grade polyacrylic latex was modified in order to prepare a mechanical and thermal improved coating. TiO{sub 2}/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposites with montmorillonite, zeolite-A and clinoptilolite aluminosilicates were prepared and used as additive in the matrix of polyacrylic latex to achieve a coating with proper mechanical and thermal properties. X-ray diffraction patterns and FESEM were used to characterize the composition, structure, and morphology of the nanocomposite additives. Polyacrylic coatings modified by TiO{sub 2}/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives showed higher adhesion strength and hardness compared to unmodified commercial grade polyacrylic coatings. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed lower glass transition temperature for modified polyacrylic coatings than that of unmodified polyacrylic coatings. The tensile tests were also carried out for unmodified and modified polyacrylic coatings. According to the results, the modified polyacrylic based coating with TiO{sub 2}/Ag-exchanged-clinoptilolite nanocomposite additive was the best coating considering most of useful properties.

  2. Experimental Study of the Micro-Arc Oxide Coating Effect on Thermal Properties of an Aluminium Alloy Piston Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Yu. Dudareva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of differently sized microarc oxidation coatings, applied to the bottom of pistons made with an Al-12Si-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy, on its thermal properties by simulating the operation of a real engine. This study is based on the premise that the alumina coating thickness affects the heat transfer and temperature distribution in the piston. The analysis of thermal properties of pistons and suggestions for the optimal thermal barrier coating thickness are presented.

  3. Thermal improvement of vision control windows renewable energy branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilgen, E. (Univel Inc., Boucherville, PQ (Canada))

    1987-04-30

    Vision Control windows are automated venetian blind window systems containing horizontal pivoted louvers installed and sealed between 2 glass panes. The heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation through the window system was studied theoretically and its thermal performance determined. The solution of the governing system of non-linear equations was carried out by using an iterative numerical method. As a result, a thermal model has been developed to use as as design tool in the study of improvements of the Vision Control windows. A theoretical study has been carried out to identify the possible improvement areas, followed by an experimental study using a variable temperature calorimeter to verify the theoretical results and the suggested improvements. It has been found that the Vision Control window system can be improved by using low emissivity coating at the inside surface of the inside glass and heat absorbing glass as the inside glass pane, depending on the requirements. A system study was carried out for a single one-zone building using typical summer and winter days and the optimum strategy determined for minimizing the auxiliary energy requirements by modulating the louver position at an optimum angle. The thermal performance of the system was compared to that of a similar system without the louvers and it was found that considerable energy economy in summer and winter is possible by an automatic control of the louver positions. 18 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  5. A Multifunctional Smart Coating for Autonomous Corrosion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Buhrow, Jerry W.; Jolley, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion is a destructive process that often causes failure in metallic components and structures. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to control it. The multi-functionality of the coating is based on micro-encapsulation technology specifically designed for corrosion control applications. This design has, in addition to all the advantages of other existing microcapsules designs, the corrosion controlled release function that allows the delivery of corrosion indicators and inhibitors on demand only when and where needed. Corrosion indicators as well as corrosion inhibitors have been incorporated into microcapsules, blended into several paint systems, and tested for corrosion detection and protection efficacy. This

  6. Thermal control wall prototype and test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, M.; Ohshima, K.; Jitsukawa, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a heat exchanger prototype and test results. The heat exchanger, called a thermal control wall, functions as a skin wall and as a means to vary the exterior wall thermal resistance of a building. Test results confirm that the capacity of the TCW is influenced by solar radiation. Furthermore, this TCW capacity can be evaluated by an overall heat transmission coefficient defined using the same sol air temperature difference as for a conventional wall.

  7. Microstructure and creep behaviour of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, R.; Coyle, T.W.; Mostaghimi [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the creep/sintering characteristics of thermally sprayed zirconia coatings and attempt to understand the influence of microstructure on the creep resistance of deposits. The major modification, compared with more typical practice, was employment of powder feedstock with agglomerated sub-micron size particles (Nanox), which is compared to one of the best commercially available powders (HOSP). Thick plasma sprayed coatings were prepared and their physical and mechanical properties were characterized. Creep/sintering experiments were then conducted to investigate the response of the materials when exposed to high temperatures under load. The results showed that it could be possible to correlate the splat thickness to the creep behaviour of the coatings. (orig.)

  8. Thermal stability and adhesion of low-emissivity electroplated Au coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorenby, Jeff W.; Hachman, John T., Jr.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Chames, Jeffrey M.; Clift, W. Miles

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a low-emissivity thermal management coating system to minimize radiative heat losses under a high-vacuum environment. Good adhesion, low outgassing, and good thermal stability of the coating material are essential elements for a long-life, reliable thermal management device. The system of electroplated Au coating on the adhesion-enhancing Wood's Ni strike and 304L substrate was selected due to its low emissivity and low surface chemical reactivity. The physical and chemical properties, interface bonding, thermal aging, and compatibility of the above Au/Ni/304L system were examined extensively. The study shows that the as-plated electroplated Au and Ni samples contain submicron columnar grains, stringers of nanopores, and/or H{sub 2} gas bubbles, as expected. The grain structure of Au and Ni are thermally stable up to 250 C for 63 days. The interface bonding is strong, which can be attributed to good mechanical locking among the Au, the 304L, and the porous Ni strike. However, thermal instability of the nanopore structure (i.e., pore coalescence and coarsening due to vacancy and/or entrapped gaseous phase diffusion) and Ni diffusion were observed. In addition, the study also found that prebaking 304L in the furnace at {ge} 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr promotes surface Cr-oxides on the 304L surface, which reduces the effectiveness of the intended H-removal. The extent of the pore coalescence and coarsening and their effect on the long-term system integrity and outgassing are yet to be understood. Mitigating system outgassing and improving Au adhesion require a further understanding of the process-structure-system performance relationships within the electroplated Au/Ni/304L system.

  9. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL, which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO and the bond coat (BC, is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  10. Cassava starch coatings for postharvest control of papaya anthracnose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno F. DE OLIVEIRA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of coating papaya fruit (Carica papaya with cassava starch were studied, to determine the best concentration and mode of action of this material in postharvest control of anthracnose. The concentrations of starch tested were 1%, 2%, 3% and 4%. These were prepared to give gel consistency. Surface sterilized papaya fruits were inoculated with conidia of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and incubated for 48 h in a moisture chamber. The were then treated with cassava fruit gels and dried. During the following 14 d storage period, fruit maturation and anthracnose on the fruits were assessed, and electron microscopy was used to examine fruit epicarps. All cassava starch coating concentrations reduced fruit maturation and anthracnose, with the 2%, 3% or 4% coatings giving 100% disease control. The 2% starch coating is likely to be optimum, considering the lower cost efficiency of disease control. The mechanism of disease control provided by the coating is likely to be related to delay of ripening and the formation of a protective layer over the fruit.

  11. Development of reliable thermal barrier coatings for high-loaded turbine and combustor parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossmann, Hans-Peter; Witz, Gregoire; Baumann, Robert [Alstom (Switzerland) Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC), mainly consisting of 7 % Yttria stabilised Zirconia (7YSZ), have been used for decades in gas turbines. A variety of MCrAIY have been developed as bondcoat (BC), where M represents Ni, Co or a combination of both. Further elements have been added to improve BC behaviour. For application of BC/TBC, thermal spraying of fine metallic/ceramic powder is state of the art. TBC is applied by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), BC either by vacuum or low pressure plasma spraying or APS. (orig.)

  12. Determination of Thermal Properties of Graphite-Black-Coating by Photothermal and Electro-Pyroelectric Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najoua Bennaji

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we will describe and compare photothermal and Electro-pyroelectric techniques which permit the determination of thermal properties of materials. We will give a brief account of the basic aspects of the photothermal model and of a setup with an alternative detection technique with a pyroelectric transducer. The possibilities of these measuring schemes for the simultaneous measurement of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity will be illustrated with results from a study of Graphite- black-coating. Finally, we will compare those two non-destructive techniques (photothermal and Electro-pyroelectric.

  13. Thermal performance of alumina filler reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz; Ullah, Sami; Farhana Mohammad, Wan; Farth Shariff, M.

    2014-06-01

    In the modern construction, fire safety has significant consideration for the protection of people and assets. Several intumescent fire protection systems are in practice and have constrain of releasing toxic gases on degradation forms an insulating char layer protecting underlying substrate. An intumescent coating expands many times of its thickness on exposure to fire and protect the underlying substrate from fire. This study presents the results of thermal performance of an intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) developed for structural application. IFRC was developed using expandable graphite (EG), ammonium poly phosphate (APP) and melamine (MEL), epoxy resin Bisphenol-A (BPA) and hardener triethylenetetramine (TETA) were used as a binder as a curing agent. Char expansion of IFRC was measured by furnace fire test at 450°C, thermal performance was measured using a Bunsen burner at 950°C and temperature of substrate was recorded for 60 min at an interval of two min. Results showed that IFRC containing 3wt% alumina showed char expansion X19. After one hour exposure of coating to heat, substrate temperature recorded was 154°C. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed the presence of high temperature compounds present in the char of coating, considered responsible to reduce the penetration of heat to the substrate.

  14. Thermal performance of glass fiber reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz; Ullah, Sami; Aziz, Hammad; Omar, Nor Sharifah

    2015-07-01

    The results of influence of glass fiber addition into the basic intumescent coating formulation towards the enhancement of its thermal insulation properties are presented. The intumescent coatings were formulated from expandable graphite, ammonium polyphosphate, melamine, boric acid, bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188, polyamide amine H-2310 hardener and fiberglass (FG) of length 3.0 mm. Eight intumescent formulations were developed and the samples were tested for their fire performance by burning them at 450°C, 650°C and 850°C in the furnace for two hours. The effects of each fire test at different temperatures; low and high temperature were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscope, X-Ray Diffraction technique and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis were conducted on the samples to study the morphology, the chemical components of char and the residual weight of the coatings. The formulation, FG08 containing 7.0 wt% glass fiber provided better results with enhanced thermal insulation properties of the coatings.

  15. Aluminium-12wt% silicon coating prepared by thermal spraying technique: Part 2 microstructure and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, thermal spray technology has been widely used as an alternative method for wear protection in materials by applying coated layer on an original worn surface. This research studied the thermal sprayed Al-12wt%Si coating prepared by flame spray technique. This material has been known as a candidate for wear resistance in particularly an automobile industry. In this research, the most suitable spraying condition had been achieved by a design of experiment which was 38 ft3/hr (1.026 m3/hr of oxygen flow rate, 27 ft3/hr (0.729 m3/hr of acetylene flow rate and 58 mm of spray distance. The as-sprayed coating had a hardness of 87.0±8.3 HV, thickness of 236.7±20.5 μm, percentage volume fraction of porosity of 14.99± 1.63 and wear rate of 1.108x10-3 ± 0.001 mm3/m. Microstructure of the coating was also investigated.

  16. Thermal performance of glass fiber reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Ullah, Sami; Aziz, Hammad, E-mail: engr.hammad.aziz03@gmail.com; Omar, Nor Sharifah [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The results of influence of glass fiber addition into the basic intumescent coating formulation towards the enhancement of its thermal insulation properties are presented. The intumescent coatings were formulated from expandable graphite, ammonium polyphosphate, melamine, boric acid, bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188, polyamide amine H-2310 hardener and fiberglass (FG) of length 3.0 mm. Eight intumescent formulations were developed and the samples were tested for their fire performance by burning them at 450°C, 650°C and 850°C in the furnace for two hours. The effects of each fire test at different temperatures; low and high temperature were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscope, X-Ray Diffraction technique and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis were conducted on the samples to study the morphology, the chemical components of char and the residual weight of the coatings. The formulation, FG08 containing 7.0 wt% glass fiber provided better results with enhanced thermal insulation properties of the coatings.

  17. Thermal, Mechanical and Optical Features of Aluminosilicate-Coated Cotton Textiles via the Crosslinking Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Ojstršek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented study focuses on the development of a pad-dry-thermofix functional coating process using a mixture of microporous aluminosilicate particles in diverse bath formulations to impart UV-ray-blocking, thermal stability and easy-care properties to the cotton fabric. The results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray powder Diffraction (XRD revealed the presence of three different types of zeolites within the examined sample, i.e., the largest amount being zeolite A, followed by the zeolite X, and the zeolite ZSM-5. The surface characterization results of zeolite-coated/cross-linked textiles provided evidence of acceptable UV-ray-blocking properties and increased thermal stability, as well as enhanced tensile strength and breaking tenacity without considerably decreasing the whiteness degree. Moreover, the dry crease recovery angle increased for the cotton fabric cross-linked via an mDMDHEU, and decreased significantly using 30 g/L zeolites negatively influencing qualitative values. TG/DTA results have proven the enlarged thermal stability of aluminosilicate-coated cotton, although combustion was not prevented.

  18. NDE of degradation of thermal barrier coating by means of impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Minkov, Dorian; Shoji, Tetsuo [Tohoku Univ., Research Inst. for Fracture Technology, Sendai (Japan); Sato, Minoru; Hashimoto, Hideo [Tohoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Sendai (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Nondestructive evaluation of thermal barrier coating (TBC) degradation during service operation has received a wide attention for service life prediction of advanced gas turbines. In this work, TBC on nickel base superalloy degraded at various degrees by thermal aging is investigated. Particularly, TBC and Metal-Chromium-Aluminum-Yttrium alloy (MCrAlY) (M indicates iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni) or these combinations) bond coating interface where a detrimental reaction takes place and forms various reaction products during thermal aging, is studied in detail. Formation kinetics and physical properties of the reaction layer are evaluated by means of Impedance Spectroscopy (IS). Specimens aged at higher temperature and a longer aging time shows larger impedance. The impedance behavior of TBC and bond coating is found to be markedly changed by the formation of the reaction layer. Physical properties and thickness of the reaction layer are evaluated using the change of the impedance. A mechanistic interpretation of the cause of change in the physical properties and IS behavior are described. (Author)

  19. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  20. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Jeffrey Hawk

    2004-02-01

    In an effort to realize minimum of a 2x increase in wear life of ground engaging components used on mining machines, two potentially cost effective processes were explored for the production of tailored, highly abrasion resistant materials: (1) hybrid pressure casting of steel composites, and (2) arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings. Steel composites comprised of cermet or oxide hard particles were successfully produced using pressure casting processes, although a cost effective process has not yet been identified for oxide particles. Both composites achieved project wear targets in high stress gouging wear, but the cermet composites did not meet the targets in impact wear, due to poor matrix toughness resulting from particle dissolution. Oxide composites had superior toughness and are expected to meet impact wear goals. Arc lamp processing of thermal spray coatings was successfully demonstrated to produce a metallurgical bond at the coating interface. Functionally graded materials were developed and successfully fused to allow for the accommodation of thermal process stresses in an intermediate layer. Ultimately, three functionally graded materials were identified as having high stress, three-body abrasion resistance sufficient to exceed project goals.

  1. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-09-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  2. Graphene-coated meshes for electroactive flow control devices utilizing two antagonistic functions of repellency and permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassian, Rassoul; Oh, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Sooyeun; Kim, Donggyu; Ryu, Seunghwa; Cho, Seung-Min; Koratkar, Nikhil; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2016-10-01

    The wettability of graphene on various substrates has been intensively investigated for practical applications including surgical and medical tools, textiles, water harvesting, self-cleaning, oil spill removal and microfluidic devices. However, most previous studies have been limited to investigating the intrinsic and passive wettability of graphene and graphene hybrid composites. Here, we report the electrowetting of graphene-coated metal meshes for use as electroactive flow control devices, utilizing two antagonistic functions, hydrophobic repellency versus liquid permeability. Graphene coating was able to prevent the thermal oxidation and corrosion problems that plague unprotected metal meshes, while also maintaining its hydrophobicity. The shapes of liquid droplets and the degree of water penetration through the graphene-coated meshes were controlled by electrical stimuli based on the functional control of hydrophobic repellency and liquid permeability. Furthermore, using the graphene-coated metal meshes, we developed two active flow devices demonstrating the dynamic locomotion of water droplets and electroactive flow switching.

  3. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  4. Post-Plasma SiOx Coatings of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles for Enhanced Thermal Stability and Tunable Photoactivity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Patrick; Jidenko, Nicolas; Weber, Alfred P.; Borra, Jean-Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The plasma-based aerosol process developed for the direct coating of particles in gases with silicon oxide in a continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process is presented. It is shown that non-thermal plasma filaments induced in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure trigger post-DBD gas phase reactions. DBD operating conditions are first scanned to produce ozone and dinitrogen pentoxide. In the selected conditions, these plasma species react with gaseous tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) precursor downstream of the DBD. The gaseous intermediates then condense on the surface of nanoparticles and self-reactions lead to homogeneous solid SiOx coatings, with thickness from nanometer to micrometer. This confirms the interest of post-DBD injection of the organo-silicon precursor to achieve stable production of actives species with subsequent controlled thickness of SiOx coatings. SiOx coatings of spherical and agglomerated metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (Pt, CuO, TiO2) are achieved. In the selected DBD operating conditions, the thickness of homogeneous nanometer sized coatings of spherical nanoparticles depends on the reaction duration and on the precursor concentration. For agglomerates, operating conditions can be tuned to cover preferentially the interparticle contact zones between primary particles, shifting the sintering of platinum agglomerates to much higher temperatures than the usual sintering temperature. Potential applications for enhanced thermal stability and tunable photoactivity of coated agglomerates are presented. PMID:28335219

  5. Evaluation of the Shearing Strength of a WC-12Co Thermal Spray Coating by the Scraping Test Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kaneko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an experimental and analytical investigation conducted into efficacy of the scraping shear-test method in estimating the shearing adhesive strength of a thermally sprayed coating. It was found that the critical average shear stress, the apparent failure strength of WC-Co thermal spray coating, depends on both the dimensions of the test piece and the loading position around the interface between the coating and the substrate. More specifically, the apparent critical shear stress decreased as the height and width of the test piece increased. In addition, the apparent critical shear stress increased with increasing coating thickness and with decreasing loading point distance measured from the interface. Consequently, the real adhesive strength of thermally sprayed coating could not be ascertained from these experimental results. Furthermore, most of the failure initiation points were inside the coating, as opposed to at the interface. This fact means that the results of the tests do not indicate the interfacial adhesive strength, but rather the shear strength of the coating. Three-dimensional finite element method (FEM analysis showed that the distributions of the shearing stress at the loading points were virtually the same at failure, regardless of the dimensions of the test piece. These results suggest that the scraping test method needs a corresponding numerical analysis of the failure mode in order to produce reliable results and is not necessarily able to estimate the interfacial adhesive strength of thermally sprayed coating.

  6. Thermally-Conductive Metallic Coatings and Applications for Heat Removal on In-Space Cryogenic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, Lauren; Hervol, David; Waters, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    For large in-space cryogenic upper stages, substantial axial heat removal from a forward skirt by vapor-based heat interception may not be achieved by simple attachment methods unless sufficient thermal conductance from the skirt to the cooling fluid can be achieved. Preferable methods would allow for the addition of the cooling system to existing structure with minimal impact on the structure. Otherwise, significant modification to the basic structural design andor novel and complex attachment mechanisms with high effective thermal conductance are likely to be required. The approach being pursued by evolvable Cryogenics (eCryo) is to increase the thermal performance of a relatively simple attachment system by applying metallic or other thermally conductive material coatings to the mating surface area of the fluid channel where it is attached the skirt wall. The expectation of candidate materials is that the dramatic increase in conductivity of pure metals at temperatures close to liquid hydrogen vapor temperature will compensate for the reduced actual contact area typical of mechanical joints. Basic contact conductance data at low temperatures for candidate interface materials is required to enable the test approach. A test rig was designed at NASA Glenn Research Center to provide thermal contact resistance testing between small sample coupons coated with conductive material via electron beam evaporation, a low-temperature option that will not affect physical properties of base materials. Average coating thicknesses were 10 k. The test fixture was designed to mount directly to a cryocooler cold head within a vacuum test chamber. The purpose of this test was to determine qualitative contact conductance between various test samples. Results from this effort will be implemented in a sub-scale vapor-based heat interception test, where the applicability for increased heat removal on large structural skirts will be considered.

  7. Effect of thermal barrier coating with various blends of pumpkin seed oil methyl ester in DI diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthickeyan, V.; Balamurugan, P.

    2017-10-01

    The rise in oil prices, dependency on fossil fuels, degradation of non-renewable energy resources and global warming strives to find a low-carbon content alternative fuel to the conventional fuel. In the present work, Partially Stabilized Zirconia (PSZ) was used as a thermal barrier coating in piston head, cylinder head and intake and exhaust valves using plasma spray technique, which provided a rise in combustion chamber temperature. With the present study, the effects of thermal barrier coating on the blends of Pumpkin Seed Oil Methyl Ester (PSOME) were observed in both the coated and uncoated engine. Performance and emission characteristics of the PSOME in coated and uncoated engines were observed and compared. Increased thermal efficiency and reduced fuel consumption were observed for B25 and diesel in coated and uncoated engine. On comparing with the other biodiesel samples, B25 exhibited lower HC, NOx and smoke emissions in thermally coated engine than uncoated engine. After 100 h of operation, no anamolies were found in the thermally coated components except minor cracks were identified in the edges of the piston head.

  8. Development of Reliability Based Life Prediction Methods for Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin

    2001-01-01

    Literature survey related to the EBC/TBC (environmental barrier coating/thermal barrier coating) fife models, failure mechanisms in EBC/TBC and the initial work plan for the proposed EBC/TBC life prediction methods development was developed as well as the finite element model for the thermal/stress analysis of the GRC-developed EBC system was prepared. Technical report for these activities is given in the subsequent sections.

  9. Anodisation with dynamic current control for tailored alumina coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, M.; Althöfer, I.; Höhlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Böttger, D.; Böttger, S.; Böttger, E.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    The anodic oxidation process is commonly used to refine the surface of aluminium and its alloys. Compared to the substrate, the alumina layers produced by anodising exhibit an increased hardness and chemical resistance. Thus, the corrosion and wear resistance are generally improved. The coatings are also electrically isolating and may serve decorative purposes. Applying a time-variant, dynamic electrical process control by pulse-current or current-steps is a promising approach to improve the coating properties, which is partially deployed in an industrial scale. In the present work, the influence of dynamic electrical process control on the coating properties is examined by means of a design of experiments (DOE). The effects of various electrolyte compositions and temperatures as well as processing time are considered with regard to coating thickness, hardness, wear resistance and the electrical energy consumption during the formation of the coatings. Information about the statistical significance of the effects of the parameters on the considered properties is obtained by an analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  10. Smart microneedle coatings for controlled delivery and biomedical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, H; Mehta, P; Msallam, H; Armitage, D; Ahmad, Z

    2014-11-01

    The work presented demonstrates an unconventional approach in the preparation of smart microneedle (MN) coatings utilising electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) principles. Stainless steel (600-900 µm in height) MNs were coupled to a ground electrode (in the EHDA coating set-up) with the deposition distance and collecting methodology varied for an ethanol:methanol (50:50) vehicle system. The preparation of nano- and micrometre-scaled pharmaceutical coatings was achieved. Fluorescein dye (serving as potential drug, sensory materials or disease state markers) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, polymer matrix system) formed the remaining components of the coating formulation. Based on these excipients and by varying the coating process, particles (100 nm to 3 µm) and fibres (400 nm to 1 µm) were deposited directly on MNs in controlled and selectable fashion (flow rates variable ∼ 5-50 µL/min, applied voltage variable 6-19 kV). These demonstrated options for multiple targeting and analysis applications. The underlying EHDA process permits room temperature fabrication, controlled output and scale-up potential for emerging MN devices as drug systems or lab-chip testing devices.

  11. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling and atomic oxygen on altered and coated Kapton surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.; Rodriguez, Elvin

    1992-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) power system for Space Station Freedom (SSF) uses solar array blankets which provide structural support for the solar cells and house the electrical interconnections. In the low earth orbital (LEO) environment where SSF will be located, surfaces will be exposed to potentially damaging environmental conditions including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen. It is necessary to use ground based tests to determine how these environmental conditions would affect the mass loss and optical properties of candidate SSF blanket materials. Silicone containing, silicone coated, and SiO(x) coated polyimide film materials were exposed to simulated LEO environmental conditions to determine their durability and whether the environmental conditions of UV, thermal cycling and oxygen atoms act synergistically on these materials. A candidate PV blanket material called AOR Kapton, a polysiloxane polyimide cast from a solution mixture, shows an improvement in durability to oxygen atoms erosion after exposure to UV radiation or thermal cycling combined with UV radiation. This may indicate that the environmental conditions react synergistically with this material, and the damage predicted by exposure to atomic oxygen alone is more severe than that which would occur in LEO where atomic oxygen, thermal cycling and UV radiation are present together.

  12. Electrically Conductive White Thermal-Control Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hsien; Forsberg, Gustaf A.; O'Donnell, Timothy P.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes development of white thermal-control paint intended for use on spacecraft. Paint required to exhibit combination of high emittance (equal to or greater than 0.90), low absorptance (equal to or less than 0.20), and electrical conductivity sufficient to prevent charging with static electricity to potentials beyond range of plus or minus 10 V.

  13. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad

    2015-07-01

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  14. Thermal Stability of Silver Paste Sintering on Coated Copper and Aluminum Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Chun; Chen, Chuantong; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Fu, Guicui

    2017-10-01

    The thermal stability of silver (Ag) paste sintering on coated copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) substrates has been investigated. Instead of conventional zincating or nickel plating, magnetron sputtering was used to achieve coating with titanium (Ti) and Ag. Silicon (Si) chips were bonded to coated Cu and Al substrates using a mixture of submicron Ag flakes and particles under 250°C and 0.4 MPa for 30 min. The joints were then subject to aging testing at 250°C for duration of 200 h, 500 h, and 1000 h. Two types of joints exhibited satisfactory initial shear strength above 45 MPa. However, the shear strength of the joints on Al substrate decreased to 28 MPa after 1000 h of aging, while no shear strength decline was detected for the joints on Cu substrate. Fracture surface analysis revealed that the vulnerable points of the two types of joints were (1) the Ag layer and (2) the interface between the Ti layer and Cu substrate. Based on the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and simulations, cracks in the Ag layer were identified as the cause of the shear strength degradation in the joints on Al substrate. The interface evolution of the joints on Cu substrate was ascribed to Cu migration and discontinuity points that initialized in the Ti layer. This study reveals that Al exhibited superior thermal stability with sintered Ag paste.

  15. Marangoni effects on a thin liquid film coating a sphere with axial or radial thermal gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Di; Nadim, Ali; Chugunova, Marina

    2017-07-01

    We study the time evolution of a thin liquid film coating the outer surface of a sphere in the presence of gravity, surface tension, and thermal gradients. We derive the fourth-order nonlinear partial differential equation that models the thin film dynamics, including Marangoni terms arising from the dependence of surface tension σ on temperature T. We consider two different imposed temperature distributions with axial or radial thermal gradients. We analyze the stability of a uniform coating under small perturbations and carry out numerical simulations in COMSOL for a range of parameter values. In the case of an axial temperature gradient, we find steady states either with uniform film thickness or with the fluid accumulating at the bottom or near the top of the sphere, depending on the total volume of liquid in the film, dictating whether gravity or Marangoni effects dominate. This suggests a potential method for the indirect measurement of d σ /d T by monitoring the thickness profile of the thin film. In the case of a radial temperature gradient, a stability analysis reveals the most unstable non-axisymmetric modes on an initially uniform coating film.

  16. Thermal Stability of Silver Paste Sintering on Coated Copper and Aluminum Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Chun; Chen, Chuantong; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Fu, Guicui

    2018-01-01

    The thermal stability of silver (Ag) paste sintering on coated copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) substrates has been investigated. Instead of conventional zincating or nickel plating, magnetron sputtering was used to achieve coating with titanium (Ti) and Ag. Silicon (Si) chips were bonded to coated Cu and Al substrates using a mixture of submicron Ag flakes and particles under 250°C and 0.4 MPa for 30 min. The joints were then subject to aging testing at 250°C for duration of 200 h, 500 h, and 1000 h. Two types of joints exhibited satisfactory initial shear strength above 45 MPa. However, the shear strength of the joints on Al substrate decreased to 28 MPa after 1000 h of aging, while no shear strength decline was detected for the joints on Cu substrate. Fracture surface analysis revealed that the vulnerable points of the two types of joints were (1) the Ag layer and (2) the interface between the Ti layer and Cu substrate. Based on the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and simulations, cracks in the Ag layer were identified as the cause of the shear strength degradation in the joints on Al substrate. The interface evolution of the joints on Cu substrate was ascribed to Cu migration and discontinuity points that initialized in the Ti layer. This study reveals that Al exhibited superior thermal stability with sintered Ag paste.

  17. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M., E-mail: engr.ziamustafa@gmail.com; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad [Mechanical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  18. Thermal Alternating Polymer Nanocomposite (TAPNC) Coating Designed to Prevent Aerodynamic Insect Fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Krishnan, K. Ghokulla; Robison, Robert; Loth, Eric; Berry, Douglas H.; Farrell, Thomas E.; Crouch, Jeffrey D.

    2016-12-01

    Insect residue adhesion to moving surfaces such as turbine blades and aircraft not only causes surface contamination problems but also increases drag on these surfaces. Insect fouling during takeoff, climb and landing can result in increased drag and fuel consumption for aircraft with laminar-flow surfaces. Hence, certain topographical and chemical features of non-wettable surfaces need to be designed properly for preventing insect residue accumulation on surfaces. In this work, we developed a superhydrophobic coating that is able to maintain negligible levels of insect residue after 100 high speed (50 m/s) insect impact events produced in a wind tunnel. The coating comprises alternating layers of a hydrophobic, perfluorinated acrylic copolymer and hydrophobic surface functional silicon dioxide nanoparticles that are infused into one another by successive thermal treatments. The design of this coating was achieved as a result of various experiments conducted in the wind tunnel by using a series of superhydrophobic surfaces made by the combination of the same polymer and nanoparticles in the form of nanocomposites with varying surface texture and self-cleaning hydrophobicity properties. Moreover, the coating demonstrated acceptable levels of wear abrasion and substrate adhesion resistance against pencil hardness, dry/wet scribed tape peel adhesion and 17.5 kPa Taber linear abraser tests.

  19. Surface Pre-treatment for Thermally Sprayed ZnAl15 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Pre-treatment of substrates is an important step in thermal spraying. It is widely accepted that mechanical interlocking is the dominant adhesion mechanism for most substrate-coating combinations. To prevent premature failure, minimum coating adhesion strength, surface preparation grades, and roughness parameters are often specified. For corrosion-protection coatings for offshore wind turbines, an adhesion strength ≥ 5 MPa is commonly assumed to ensure adhesion over service lifetime. In order to fulfill this requirement, Rz > 80 µm and a preparation grade of Sa3 are common specifications. In this study, the necessity of these requirements is investigated using the widely used combination of twin-wire arc-sprayed ZnAl15 on S355J2 + N as a test case. By using different blasting media and parameters, the correlation between coating adhesion and roughness parameters is analyzed. The adhesion strength of these systems is measured using a test method allowing measurements on real parts. The results are compared to DIN EN 582:1993, the European equivalent of ASTM-C633. In another series of experiments, the influence of surface pre-treatment grades Sa2.5 and Sa3 is considered. By combining the results of these three sets of experiments, a guideline for surface pre-treatment and adhesion testing on real parts is proposed for the considered system.

  20. The effect of TiO2/aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives on the mechanical and thermal properties of polyacrylic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Rahimeh; Olad, Ali

    2015-12-01

    The commercial grade polyacrylic latex was modified in order to prepare a mechanical and thermal improved coating. TiO2/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposites with montmorillonite, zeolite-A and clinoptilolite aluminosilicates were prepared and used as additive in the matrix of polyacrylic latex to achieve a coating with proper mechanical and thermal properties. X-ray diffraction patterns and FESEM were used to characterize the composition, structure, and morphology of the nanocomposite additives. Polyacrylic coatings modified by TiO2/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives showed higher adhesion strength and hardness compared to unmodified commercial grade polyacrylic coatings. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed lower glass transition temperature for modified polyacrylic coatings than that of unmodified polyacrylic coatings. The tensile tests were also carried out for unmodified and modified polyacrylic coatings. According to the results, the modified polyacrylic based coating with TiO2/Ag-exchanged-clinoptilolite nanocomposite additive was the best coating considering most of useful properties.

  1. Thermally Sprayed Aluminum Coatings for the Protection of Subsea Risers and Pipelines Carrying Hot Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Ce

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effect of boiling synthetic seawater on the performance of damaged Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA on carbon steel. Small defects (4% of the sample’s geometric surface area were drilled, exposing the steel, and the performance of the coating was analyzed for corrosion potential for different exposure times (2 h, 335 h, and 5000 h. The samples were monitored using linear polarization resistance (LPR in order to obtain their corrosion rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used for post-test characterization. The results showed that a protective layer of Mg(OH2 formed in the damaged area, which protected the underlying steel. Additionally, no coating detachment from the steel near the defect region was observed. The corrosion rate was found to be 0.010–0.015 mm/year after 5000 h in boiling synthetic seawater.

  2. Mesoscopic Nonlinear Elastic Modulus of Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by Cylindrical Punch Indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Cylindrical punch indentations are performed to determine the effective modulus of a plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8Wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coating (TBC) as a function of coating depth. Cylindrical punch indentations offer significant advantages over pointed (Vickers, Berkovich, or Knoop) indentations for materials that do not exhibit linear elastic behavior. Cyclic loading with a cylindrical punch clearly shows the TBCs to exhibit nonlinear elastic behavior with significant hysteresis that is related to the compaction and internal sliding within the plasma-spray splat microstructure. In addition, the effect of a high heat flux laser treatment was shown to produce a gradient both in the effective TBC modulus and degree of loading/unloading hysteresis with depth.

  3. Life Prediction Issues in Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Brewer, David N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2001-01-01

    Issues and design requirements for the environmental barrier coating (EBC)/thermal barrier coating (TBC) life that are general and those specific to the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) development program have been described. The current state and trend of the research, methods in vogue related to the failure analysis, and long-term behavior and life prediction of EBCITBC systems are reported. Also, the perceived failure mechanisms, variables, and related uncertainties governing the EBCITBC system life are summarized. A combined heat transfer and structural analysis approach based on the oxidation kinetics using the Arrhenius theory is proposed to develop a life prediction model for the EBC/TBC systems. Stochastic process-based reliability approach that includes the physical variables such as gas pressure, temperature, velocity, moisture content, crack density, oxygen content, etc., is suggested. Benefits of the reliability-based approach are also discussed in the report.

  4. Use of indentation technique to measure elastic modulus of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.P.; Sutaria, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Ferber, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Elastic modulus of an yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) was evaluated with a Knoop indentation technique. The measured elastic modulus values for the coating ranged from 68.4 {+-} 22.6 GPa at an indentation load of 50 g to 35.7 {+-} 9.8 at an indentation load of 300 g. At higher loads, the elastic modulus values did not change significantly. This steady-state value of 35.7 GPa for ZrO{sub 2} TBC agreed well with literature values obtained by the Hertzian indentation method. Furthermore, the measured elastic modulus for the TBC is lower than that reported for bulk ZrO{sub 2} ({approx} 190 GPa). This difference is believed to be due to the presence of a significant amount of porosity and microcracks in the TBCs. Hardness was also measured.

  5. Influence of coating on nanocrystalline magnetic properties during high temperature thermal ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekdim, Atef; Morel, Laurent; Raulet, Marie-Ange

    2017-05-01

    Since their birth or mergence the late 1980s, the nanocrystalline ultrasoft magnetic materials are taking a great importance in power electronic systems conception. One of the main advantages that make them more attractive nowadays is their ability to be packaged since the reduction of the magnetostrictive constant to almost zero. In aircraft applications, due to the high component compactness and to their location (for example near the jet engine), the operating temperature increases and may reach easily 200 °C and more. Consequently, the magnetic thermal ageing may occur but is, unfortunately, weakly studied. This paper focuses on the influence of the coating (packaging type) on the magnetic nanocrystalline performances during a thermal ageing. This study is based on monitoring the magnetic characteristics of two types of nanocrystalline cores (naked and coated) during a thermal activated ageing (100, 150 and 200 °C). Based on a dedicated monitoring protocol, a large magnetic characterization has been done and analyzed. Elsewhere, X-Ray Diffraction and magnetostriction measurements were carried out to support the study of the anisotropy energies evolution with ageing. This latter is discussed in this paper to explain and give hypothesis about the ageing phenomena.

  6. Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, William P.; Hoffman, Eugene E.; Lee, Woo Y.; Wright, Ian G.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is aimed at fostering the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS machines will emphasize different criteria in the selection of materials for the critical components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. In fact, the goals of the ATS will require significant improvements in TBC technology, since these turbines will be totally reliant on TBC's, which will be required to function on critical components such as the first stage vanes and blades for times considerably in excess of those experienced in current applications. Issues that assume increased importance are the mechanical and chemical stability of the ceramic layer and of the metallic bond coat; the thermal expansion characteristics and compliance of the ceramic layer; and the thermal conductivity across the thickness of the ceramic layer. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBC's, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology. A significant TBC development effort is planned in the ATS program which will address these key issues.

  7. Nondestructive Evaluation of Flaking-Resistance in Thermal Sprayed Ceramic Coatings with X-ray Diffraction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toru; Kubohori, Toshifumi; Morimoto, Jyunji

    Thermal spraying has emerged as an important tool of increasingly sophisticated surface engineering technology. Therefore, the demand for technology that is checked non-destructively has become more insistent. This paper presents the nondestructive evaluation of fl aking-resistance in thermal sprayed Al2O3, ZrO2 and TiO2 coating. The full-width at half maximum taken from the X-ray diffraction peak profi le was used as a nondestructive evaluation method in this study. The results by the nondestructive method were compared to the results with scratch test. It was found that nondestructive evaluation of the thermal sprayed ceramic coating was effective.

  8. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  9. Microencapsulation of Self Healing Agents for Corrosion Control Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, S. T.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Corrosion, the environmentally induced degradation of materials, is a very costly problem that has a major impact on the global economy. Results from a 2-year breakthrough study released in 2002 by the U.S. Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) showed that the total annual estimated direct cost associated with metallic corrosion in nearly every U.S. industry sector was a staggering $276 billion, approximately 3.1% of the nation's Gross Domestic Product (GOP). Corrosion protective coatings are widely used to protect metallic structures from the detrimental effects of corrosion but their effectiveness can be seriously compromised by mechanical damage, such as a scratch, that exposes the metallic substrate. The incorporation of a self healing mechanism into a corrosion control coating would have the potential to significantly increase its effectiveness and useful lifetime. This paper describes work performed to incorporate a number of microcapsule-based self healing systems into corrosion control coatings. The work includes the preparation and evaluation of self-healing systems based on curable epoxy, acrylate, and siloxane resins, as well as, microencapsulated systems based on passive, solvent born, healing agent delivery. The synthesis and optimization of microcapsule-based self healing systems for thin coating (less than 100 micron) will be presented.

  10. Evaluation of tribological wear and corrosion in coatings of diamalloy 4060NS deposited by thermal spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña R, S. M.; Moreno T, C. M.; Espinosa C, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Surface engineering seeks the development of new techniques to improve the performance and life of components of machines or industrial facilities, always looking for low costs and the least possible environmental damage. Thermal projection is one of the techniques that is based on the projection of particles of compounds and alloys on properly prepared and heated substrates, these particles are driven by a stream of air passing through an oxyacetylene flame which gives the energy to the process; These coatings give the possibility to improve the properties of the materials or the maintenance of components to maximize the availability of service. In order to reduce the damage caused by wear and corrosion of a low carbon AISI 1020 steel, they were coated with a metal based alloy, studying the effect of the cobalt-chromium-silicon-tungsten carbide alloy coating (DIAMALLLOY 4060 NS). The coating was deposited with two different pressures in the gases supplied to the torch, obtaining two flames and working three thicknesses of coating that oscillate between 100-500μm, according to the number of deposited layers, making use of a projection gun Castolin Eutectic. Powder and substrate characterization was performed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), spark emission spectroscopy and metallographic analysis. The results confirm the chemical nature and structure of the powder of the alloy and the substrate to be used, in addition, the thermal stability of the system was verified. The evaluation of the adhesion of the deposited layers was carried out by the implementation of pull-off tests according to ASTM D4541, in order to determine the type of failure that is presented. Mechanical wear was determined using a MT/60/NI microtest tribometer while electrochemical tests were performed using a suitable experimental unit for this purpose, confirming that the substrate exhibits lower wear levels when coated with

  11. Moisture-Induced Delamination Video of an Oxidized Thermal Barrier Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    PVD TBC coatings were thermally cycled to near-failure at 1150 C. Normal failure occurred after 200 to 300 1-hr cycles with only moderate weight gains (0.5 mg/sq cm). Delamination and buckling was often delayed until well after cooldown (desktop spallation), but could be instantly induced by the application of water drops, as shown in a video clip which can be viewed by clicking on figure 2 of this report. Moisture therefore plays a primary role in delayed desktop TBC failure. Hydrogen embrittlement is proposed as the underlying mechanism.

  12. Specific Features of Chip Making and Work-piece Surface Layer Formation in Machining Thermal Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Yaroslavtsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of unique engineering structural and performance properties inherent in metallic composites characterizes wear- and erosion-resistant high-temperature coatings made by thermal spraying methods. This allows their use both in manufacturing processes to enhance the wear strength of products, which have to operate under the cyclic loading, high contact pressures, corrosion and high temperatures and in product renewal.Thermal coatings contribute to the qualitative improvement of the technical level of production and product restoration using the ceramic composite materials. However, the possibility to have a significantly increased product performance, reduce their factory labour hours and materials/output ratio in manufacturing and restoration is largely dependent on the degree of the surface layer quality of products at their finishing stage, which is usually provided by different kinds of machining.When machining the plasma-sprayed thermal coatings, a removing process of the cut-off layer material is determined by its distinctive features such as a layered structure, high internal stresses, low ductility material, high tendency to the surface layer strengthening and rehardening, porosity, high abrasive properties, etc. When coatings are machined these coating properties result in specific characteristics of chip formation and conditions for formation of the billet surface layer.The chip formation of plasma-sprayed coatings was studied at micro-velocities using an experimental tool-setting microscope-based setup, created in BMSTU. The setup allowed simultaneous recording both the individual stages (phases of the chip formation process and the operating force factors.It is found that formation of individual chip elements comes with the multiple micro-cracks that cause chipping-off the small particles of material. The emerging main crack in the cut-off layer of material leads to separation of the largest chip element. Then all the stages

  13. Delamination Mechanisms of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced ceramic thermal harrier coatings will play an increasingly important role In future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability issue remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. In this paper, thermal cyclic response and delamination failure modes of a ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite/BSAS thermaVenvironmenta1 barrier coating system on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were investigated using a laser high-heat-flux technique. The coating degradation and delamination processes were monitored in real time by measuring coating apparent conductivity changes during the cyclic tests under realistic engine temperature and stress gradients, utilizing the fact that delamination cracking causes an apparent decrease in the measured thermal conductivity. The ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation driving forces under the cyclic thermal loads, in conjunction with the mechanical testing results, will be discussed.

  14. Wettability of Y2O3: A Relative Analysis of Thermally Oxidized, Reactively Sputtered and Template Assisted Nanostructured Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan T. Manikandanath

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The wettability of reactively sputtered Y2O3, thermally oxidized Y-Y2O3 and Cd-CdO template assisted Y2O3 coatings has been studied. The wettability of as-deposited Y2O3 coatings was determined by contact angle measurements. The water contact angles for reactively sputtered, thermally oxidized and template assisted Y2O3 nanostructured coatings were 99°, 117° and 155°, respectively. The average surface roughness values of reactively sputtered, thermally oxidized and template assisted Y2O3 coatings were determined by using atomic force microscopy and the corresponding values were 3, 11 and 180 nm, respectively. The low contact angle of the sputter deposited Y2O3 and thermally oxidized Y-Y2O3 coatings is attributed to a densely packed nano-grain like microstructure without any void space, leading to low surface roughness. A water droplet on such surfaces is mostly in contact with a solid surface relative to a void space, leading to a hydrophobic surface (low contact angle. Surface roughness is a crucial factor for the fabrication of a superhydrophobic surface. For Y2O3 coatings, the surface roughness was improved by depositing a thin film of Y2O3 on the Cd-CdO template (average roughness = 178 nm, which resulted in a contact angle greater than 150°. The work of adhesion of water was very high for the reactively sputtered Y2O3 (54 mJ/m2 and thermally oxidized Y-Y2O3 coatings (43 mJ/m2 compared to the Cd-CdO template assisted Y2O3 coating (7 mJ/m2.

  15. Linear laser fast scanning thermography NDT for artificial disbond defects in thermal barrier coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanwei; Jiao, Dacheng; Shi, Wenxiong; Xie, Huimin

    2017-12-11

    Interface disbond in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is one of the key issues that cause their premature failure. In general, blind hole defects are often used as substitutes in transient thermography. The linear laser fast scanning thermography (LLFST) method was developed in this study and combined with several post-processing algorithms to accurately detect blind hole defects in TBCs. Through numerical simulation and experimental verification, a unique thermal response characteristic of blind holes in the cooling phase, namely a distinct "tailing" phenomenon, was summarized and utilized to recognize small defects. Validation tests indicated that blind holes with diameters of 1, 2, and 3 mm and artificial disbonds with diameters of 2 and 3 mm in TBCs are detected with high efficiency.

  16. Luminescence-Based Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coating Health and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments in both air- and land-based turbine engines. For advanced turbine engines designed for higher temperature operation, a diagnostic capability for the health and performance of TBCs will be essential to indicate when a mitigating action needs to be taken before premature TBC failure threatens engine performance or safety. In particular, it is shown that rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers can be integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence emission that can be monitored to assess TBC erosion and delamination progression, and to map surface and subsurface temperatures as a measure of TBC performance. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers are presented.

  17. Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Approaches to Turbine Blade Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Reliance on Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) to reduce the amount of air used for turbine vane cooling is beneficial both from the standpoint of reduced NOx production, and as a means of improving cycle efficiency through improved component efficiency. It is shown that reducing vane cooling from 10 to 5 percent of mainstream air can lead to NOx reductions of nearly 25 percent while maintaining the same rotor inlet temperature. An analysis is given which shows that, when a TBC is relied upon in the vane thermal design process, significantly less coolant is required using internal cooling alone compared to film cooling. This is especially true for small turbines where internal cooling without film cooling permits the surface boundary layer to remain laminar over a significant fraction of the vane surface.

  18. Engineered bio-inspired coating for passive flow control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra Evans, Humberto; Hamed, Ali M; Gorumlu, Serdar; Doosttalab, Ali; Aksak, Burak; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Castillo, Luciano

    2018-02-06

    Flow separation and vortex shedding are some of the most common phenomena experienced by bluff bodies under relative motion with the surrounding medium. They often result in a recirculation bubble in regions with adverse pressure gradient, which typically reduces efficiency in vehicles and increases loading on structures. Here, the ability of an engineered coating to manipulate the large-scale recirculation region was tested in a separated flow at moderate momentum thickness Reynolds number, [Formula: see text] We show that the coating, composed of uniformly distributed cylindrical pillars with diverging tips, successfully reduces the size of, and shifts downstream, the separation bubble. Despite the so-called roughness parameter, [Formula: see text], falling within the hydrodynamic smooth regime, the coating is able to modulate the large-scale recirculating motion. Remarkably, this modulation does not induce noticeable changes in the near-wall turbulence levels. Supported with experimental data and theoretical arguments based on the averaged equations of motion, we suggest that the inherent mechanism responsible for the bubble modulation is essentially unsteady suction and blowing controlled by the increasing cross-section of the tips. The coating can be easily fabricated and installed and works under dry and wet conditions, increasing its potential impact on a diverse range of applications. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  19. Thermal Fatigue Testing of ZrO2-Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coating Systems using a High Power CO2 Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, and of coating failure, under thermal loads that simulate diesel engine conditions, are investigated. The surface cracks initiate early and grow continuously under thermal Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) and High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) stresses. It is found that, in the absence of interfacial oxidation, the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures. Significant LCF and HCF interactions have been observed in the thermal fatigue tests. The fatigue crack growth rate in the ceramic coating strongly depends on the characteristic HCF cycle number, N*(sub NCF), which is defined as the number of HCF cycles per LCF cycle. The crack growth rate is increased from 0.36 microns/LCF cycle for a pure LCF test to 2.8 microns/LCF cycle for a combined LCF and HCF test at N*(sub NCF) about 20,000. A surface wedging model has been proposed to account for the HCF crack growth in the coating systems. This mechanism predicts that HCF damage effect increases with increasing surface temperature swing, the thermal expansion coefficient and the elastic modulus of the ceramic coating, as well as with the HCF interacting depth. A good agreement has been found between the analysis and experimental evidence.

  20. Improving thermal insulation of TC4 using YSZ-based coating and SiO2 aerogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, air plasmas spray (APS was used to prepare YSZ and Sc2O3–YSZ (ScYSZ coating in order to improve the thermal insulation ability of TC4 alloy. SiO2 aerogel was also synthesized and affixed on TC4 titanium alloy to inhabit thermal flow. The microstructures, phase compositions and thermal insulation performance of three coatings were analyzed in detail. The results of thermal diffusivity test by a laser flash method showed that the thermal diffusivities of YSZ, Sc2O3–YSZ and SiO2 aerogel are 0.553, 0.539 and 0.2097×10−6 m2/s, respectively. Then, the thermal insulation performances of three kinds of coating were investigated from 20 °C to 400 °C using high infrared radiation heat flux technology. The experimental results indicated that the corresponding temperature difference between the top TC4 alloy (400 °C and the bottom surface of YSZ is 41.5 °C for 0.6 mm thickness coating. For 1 mm thickness coating, the corresponding temperature difference between the top TC4 alloys (400 °C and the bottom surface of YSZ, ScYSZ, SiO2 aerogel three specimens is 54, 54.6 and 208 °C, respectively. The coating thickness and species were found to influence the heat insulation ability. In these materials, YSZ and ScYSZ exhibited a little difference for heat insulation behavior. However, SiO2 aerogel was the best one among them and it can be taken as protection material on TC4 alloys. In outer space, SiO2 aerogel can meet the need of thermal insulation of TC4 of high-speed aircraft.

  1. Infrared Thermography as a Non-destructive Testing Solution for Thermal Spray Metal Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Paolo E.; Allesina, Giulio; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Matikainen, Ville; Vuoristo, Petri

    2017-09-01

    In this work, an infrared (IR) thermographic procedure was evaluated as a non-destructive testing tool to detect damage in thermal spray metallic coatings. As model systems, polished HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Fe-based layers deposited onto steel plates were employed. Damage by external-object impingement was simulated through a cyclic impact-test apparatus, which induced circumferential and radial cracks across all model systems, and interface cracks of different sizes in distinct samples. Damaged and undamaged plates were bulk-heated to above 100 °C using an IR lamp; their free-convection cooling was then recorded by an IR thermocamera. The intentionally induced defects were hardly detectable in IR thermograms, due to IR reflection and artificial "hot" spots induced by residuals of transfer material from the impacting counterbody. As a micrometer-thin layer of black paint was applied, surface emissivity got homogenized and any artifacts were effectively suppressed, so that failed coating areas clearly showed up as "cold spots." This effect was more apparent when large interface cracks occurred. Finite-element modeling proved the physical significance of the IR-thermography approach, showing that failed coating areas are cooled by surrounding air faster than they are heated by conduction from the hot substrate, which is due to the insulating effect of cracks.

  2. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  3. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  4. Nonradiation Cellular Thermometry Based on Interfacial Thermally Induced Phase Transformation in Polymer Coating of Optical Microfiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunyun; Guo, Tuan; Tian, Zhuang; Yu, Bo; Ding, Mingfei; Li, Xiangping; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-03-15

    A nonradiation approach based on thermoresponsive polymer coated silica microfibers has been developed. A highly thermoresponsive and biocompatible poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) was surface functionlized to conjugate to the tapered silica microfiber with waist diameter of 7.5 μm. The interfacial phase transtition of coating triggered by the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) causes a drastic molecular morphological change in the body temperature range of 35-42 °C. This surface morphological change strongly modulates optical path difference between the higher order and the fundamental mode propagating in the microfiber because of the evanescent-field interaction and, therefore, shifts the intermodal interference fringe. Owing to the nonradiation-based nature, the thermoresponsive polymer coated microfiber enables an improved thermal sensitivity of 18.74 nm/°C and, hence, a high-temperature resolution of millidegree. Furthermore, the micrometer-sized footprint enables its easy implantation in human organs for cellular thermometry and for the potential of in vivo applications.

  5. Rapid Deposition of Uniform Polydopamine Coatings on Nanoparticle Surfaces with Controllable Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orishchin, Nazar; Crane, Cameron C; Brownell, Matthew; Wang, Tengjiao; Jenkins, Samuel; Zou, Min; Nair, Arun; Chen, Jingyi

    2017-06-20

    Polydopamine is a bioinspired, versatile material that can adhere to bulk and nanoscale surfaces made of disparate materials to improve their physical and chemical properties in many applications. The typical methods to coat polydopamine on the nanoparticle substrates usually take several hours to a day. This work successfully applies a dispersion method to form a controllable, uniform coating on a nanoparticle surface within minutes. Using plasmonic Ag nanoparticles as a substrate, the coating thickness can be monitored using a spectroscopic method based on the extinction peak shifts of the Ag nanoparticles. The deposition rate increases with dopamine concentration; however, too much excess dopamine leads to the formation of free dopamine particles. The optimized concentration of dopamine (i.e., ∼6 mM) can be applied to other nanoparticles by normalizing the number of particles to maintain a constant concentration of dopamine per unit surface area (i.e., 1.70 × 10(4) dopamine/nm(2)). The molecular dynamics simulation reveals that the amount of hydrogen bonding increases with water content, suggesting that sufficient mixing using the dispersion tool facilitates the formation of hydrogen bonding, thus rapidly depositing PDA on the nanoparticle surface. The physical and chemical properties (e.g., pH response and thermal stability) can be tailored by varying the coating thickness due to the changes in the number of hydrogen bonds and the conformation of π-π interactions. This dispersion method provides a facile means to control the PDA coating thickness on nanoparticle surfaces and thus the surface properties of nanoparticles toward various applications.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Magnesium Oxide Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Peng Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium oxide coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MgO@MWNT were fabricated and dispersed into epoxy matrix. The microstructures of MgO@MWNT and epoxy/MgO@MWNT nanocomposites were characterized by TEM and SEM. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of epoxy nanocomposites were investigated with high resistance meter and thermal conductivity meter, respectively. MgO@MWNT has core-shell structure with MgO as shell and nanotube as core, and the thickness of MgO shell is ca. 15 nm. MgO@MWNT has been dispersed well in the epoxy matrix. MgO@MWNT loaded epoxy nanocomposites still retain electrical insulation inspite of the filler content increase. However, thermal conductivity of epoxy was increased with the MgO@MWNT content increasing. When MgO@MWNT content reached 2.0 wt.%, thermal conductivity was increased by 89% compared to neat epoxy, higher than that of unmodified MWNT nanocomposites with the same loading content.

  7. High Thermal Dissipation of Al Heat Sink When Inserting Ceramic Powders by Ultrasonic Mechanical Coating and Armoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Yu; Huang, Guan-Rong; Wang, Kuang-Kuo; Chen, Chin-Fu; Huang, J C

    2017-04-26

    Aluminum alloys, which serve as heat sink in light-emitting diode (LED) lighting, are often inherent with a high thermal conductivity, but poor thermal total emissivity. Thus, high emissive coatings on the Al substrate can enhance the thermal dissipation efficiency of radiation. In this study, the ultrasonic mechanical coating and armoring (UMCA) technique was used to insert various ceramic combinations, such as Al₂O₃, SiO₂, or graphite, to enhance thermal dissipation. Analytic models have been established to couple the thermal radiation and convection on the sample surface through heat flow equations. A promising match has been reached between the theoretical predictions and experimental measurements. With the adequate insertion of ceramic powders, the temperature of the Al heat sinks can be lowered by 5-11 °C, which is highly favorable for applications requiring cooling components.

  8. Influence of Bondcoat Spray Process on Lifetime of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Markocsan, N.; Li, X.-H.; Östergren, L.

    2018-01-01

    Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) manufactured by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is of high commercial interest as SPS has been shown capable of producing highly porous columnar microstructures similar to the conventionally used electron beam-physical vapor deposition. However, lifetime of SPS coatings needs to be improved further to be used in commercial applications. The bondcoat microstructure as well as topcoat-bondcoat interface topography affects the TBC lifetime significantly. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different bondcoat deposition processes for SPS topcoats. In this work, a NiCoCrAlY bondcoat deposited by high velocity air fuel (HVAF) was compared to commercial vacuum plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY and PtAl diffusion bondcoats. All bondcoat variations were prepared with and without grit blasting the bondcoat surface. SPS was used to deposit the topcoats on all samples using the same spray parameters. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. Isothermal heat treatment was performed to study bondcoat oxidation over time. The effect of bondcoat deposition process and interface topography on lifetime in each case has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs.

  9. Depth-Penetrating Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Thermographic Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J..; Allison, Stephen W.; Beshears, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors have been previously demonstrated to provide effective non-contact, emissivity-independent surface temperature measurements. Because of the translucent nature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), thermographic phosphor-based temperature measurements can be extended beyond the surface to provide depth-selective temperature measurements by incorporating the thermographic phosphor layer at the depth where the temperature measurement is desired. In this paper, thermographic phosphor (Y2O3:Eu) fluorescence decay time measurements are demonstrated to provide through-the-coating thickness temperature readings up to 1100 C with the phosphor layer residing beneath a 100 micron thick TBC (plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia). With an appropriately chosen excitation wavelength and detection configuration, it is shown that sufficient phosphor emission is generated to provide effective temperature measurements, despite the attenuation of both the excitation and emission intensities by the overlying TBC. This depth-penetrating temperature measurement capability should prove particularly useful for TBC diagnostics where a large thermal gradient is typically present across the TBC thickness. The fluorescence decay from the Y2O3:Eu layer exhibited both an initial short-term exponential rise and a longer-term exponential decay. The rise time constant was demonstrated to provide better temperature indication below 500 C while the decay time constant was a better indicator at higher temperatures.

  10. Overview on Recent Developments of Bondcoats for Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, D.; Pillai, R.; Chyrkin, A.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    The performance of MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) bondcoats for atmospheric plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (APS-TBCs) is substantially affected by the contents of Co, Ni, Cr, and Al as well as minor additions of Y, Hf, Zr, etc., but also by manufacturing-related properties such as coating thickness, porosity, surface roughness, and oxygen content. The latter properties depend in turn on the exact technology and set of parameters used for bondcoat deposition. The well-established LPPS process competes nowadays with alternative technologies such as HVOF and APS. In addition, new technologies have been developed for bondcoats manufacturing such as high-velocity APS or a combination of HVOF and APS for application of a flashcoat. Future developments of the bondcoat systems will likely include optimization of thermal spraying methods for obtaining complex bondcoat roughness profiles required for extended APS-TBC lifetimes. Introduction of the newest generation single-crystal superalloys possessing low Cr and high Al and refractory metals (Re, Ru) contents will require definition of new bondcoat compositions and/or multilayered bondcoats to minimize interdiffusion issues. The developments of new bondcoat compositions may be substantially facilitated using thermodynamic-kinetic modeling, the vast potential of which has been demonstrated in recent years.

  11. Mechanistic Study on the Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings Induced by Volcanic Ash Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    Thermal stress generated on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by volcanic ash (VA) deposition was assessed measuring the tip deflection of a multilayered beam structure as a function of temperature. The TBC in this study was deposited onto the surface of a blade utilized in a land-based gas turbine which is composed of 8 wt.%Y2O3-ZrO2/CoNiCrAlY on a Ni-based superalloy. The VA-deposited TBC sample was heated at 1453 K, and the effect of VA deposition on TBC delamination was examined in comparison with a TBC sample without VA deposition as a reference. On the basis of the VA attack damage mechanism which was investigated via the tip deflection measurement and a comprehensive microstructure examination, a damage-coupled constitutive model was proposed. The proposed model was based on the infiltration of the molten VA inside pores and phase transformations of yttria -tabilized zirconia in the TBC system. The numerical analysis results, which were simulated utilizing the finite element code installing the developed constitutive model, showed us that VA attack on the TBC sample induced near-interfacial cracks because of a significant increasing in the coating stress.

  12. Review of Thermal Spray Coating Applications in the Steel Industry: Part 2—Zinc Pot Hardware in the Continuous Galvanizing Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; James, B.

    2010-12-01

    This two-part article series reviews the application of thermal spray coating technology in the production of steel and steel sheet products. Part 2 of this article series is dedicated to coating solutions in the continuous galvanizing line. The corrosion mechanisms of Fe- and Co-based bulk materials are briefly reviewed as a basis for the development of thermal spray coating solutions. WC-Co thermal spray coatings are commonly applied to low Al-content galvanizing hardware due to their superior corrosion resistance compared to Fe and Co alloys. The effect of phase degradation, carbon content, and WC grain size are discussed. At high Al concentrations, the properties of WC-Co coatings degrade significantly, leading to the application of oxide-based coatings and corrosion-resistant boride containing coatings. The latest results of testing are summarized, highlighting the critical coating parameters.

  13. Deconsolidation and combustion performance of thermally consolidated propellants deterred by multi-layers coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-gang Xiao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Both heating and solvent-spray methods are used to consolidate the standard grains of double-base oblate sphere propellants plasticized with triethyleneglycol dinitrate (TEGDN (TEGDN propellants to high density propellants. The obtained consolidated propellants are deterred and coated with the slow burning multi-layer coating. The maximum compaction density of deterred and coated consolidated propellants can reach up to 1.39 g/cm3. Their mechanic, deconsolidation and combustion performances are tested by the materials test machine, interrupted burning set-up and closed vessel, respectively. The static compression strength of consolidated propellants deterred by multi-layer coating increases significantly to 18 MPa, indicating that they can be applied in most circumstances of charge service. And the samples are easy to deconsolidate in the interrupted burning test. Furthermore, the closed bomb burning curves of the samples indicate a two-stage combustion phenomenon under the condition of certain thickness of coated multi-layers. After the outer deterred multi-layer coating of consolidated samples is finished burning, the inner consolidated propellants continue to burn and breakup into aggregates and grains. The high burning progressivity can be carefully obtained by the smart control of deconsolidation process and duration of consolidated propellants. The preliminary results of consolidated propellants show that a rapid deconsolidation process at higher deconsolidation pressure is presented in the dynamic vivacity curves of closed bomb test. Higher density and higher macro progressivity of consolidated propellants can be obtained by the techniques in this paper.

  14. Determination of the thermal conductivity of metallic coatings; Determinacion de la conductividad termica de recubrimientos metalicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uc Way, Manuel Eugenio

    1998-02-01

    Due to the corrosion by high temperature there is a serious problem of unavailability and efficiency of the steam generators in the thermoelectric power stations. One of the parts that is more affected by this phenomenon is the superheater tube banks. In order to diminish this problem it is intended to apply to these tubes a metallic coating nickel and chromium based (80Ni20Cr), the deposition of the coating is made by the method of thermal spraying of powders by flame. The coating thickness once it has been deposited is of the order of 500mm, it is doubtless that the thermal flow between gases of combustion and the fluid conducted in the tubes is affected. That is why it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the coating in order to evaluate the impact that it has in the operation of the steam generator. This necessity is the one that gives rise to the present thesis project, in which a technique that allows to measure the thermal conductivity of the coating is designed. The experimentation is carried out taking as departure point the ASTM norm E1225-87 and is adapted to the characteristics of the material to prove. A test piece of stainless steel 316 was designed to measure the thermal flow that traverses the coating. First the experimental installation was characterized in order to determine its reliability. Later the experimentation was made finding an average thermal conductivity of 2.09{+-}0.72 W/m K in the temperature interval of 110-180 Celsius degrees. This value is 12.3% inferior to the corresponding one of a solid metal of the same composition. If we consider that in the high temperature banks of the steam generators the thermal flow is in the interval from 15.000 to 100.000 W/m{sup 2} and a coating thickness of the order of 500mm it would cause that this material would introduce a temperature difference of 0.6 to 4 Celsius degrees, respectively. Please note that for the highest thermal flow a maximum affectation of 4 Celsuis degrees is

  15. Control Optimization of Solar Thermally Driven Chillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Dalibard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Many installed solar thermally driven cooling systems suffer from high auxiliary electric energy consumption which makes them not more efficient than conventional compression cooling systems. A main reason for this is the use of non-efficient controls with constant set points that do not allow a chiller power modulation at partial-load and therefore lead to unnecessary high power consumption of the parasitics. The aims of this paper are to present a method to control efficiently solar thermally driven chillers, to demonstrate experimentally its applicability and to quantify the benefits. It has been shown that the cooling capacity of a diffusion absorption chiller can be modulated very effectively by adjusting both the temperature and the flow rate of the cooling water. With the developed approach and the use of optimization algorithms, both the temperature and the flow rate can be controlled simultaneously in a way that the cooling load is matched and the electricity consumption is minimized. Depending on the weather and operating conditions, electricity savings between 20% and 60% can be achieved compared to other tested control approaches. The highest savings are obtained when the chiller is operated at partial load. The presented method is not restricted to solar cooling systems and can also be applied to other conventional heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC systems.

  16. The Tribological Performance of Hardfaced/ Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Increasing the Wear Resistance of Ventilation Mill Working Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vencl

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During the coal pulverizing, the working parts of the ventilation mill are being worn by the sand particles. For this reason, the working parts are usually protected with materials resistant to wear (hardfaced/thermal sprayed coatings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tribological performance of four different types of coatings as candidates for wear protection of the mill’s working parts. The coatings were produced by using the filler materials with the following nominal chemical composition: NiFeBSi-WC, NiCrBSiC, FeCrCTiSi, and FeCrNiCSiBMn, and by using the plasma arc welding and flame and electric arc spraying processes. The results showed that Ni-based coatings exhibited higher wear resistance than Fe-based coatings. The highest wear resistance showed coating produced by using the NiFeBSi-WC filler material and plasma transferred arc welding deposition process. The hardness was not the only characteristic that affected the wear resistance. In this context, the wear rate of NiFeBSi-WC coating was not in correlation with its hardness, in contrast to other coatings. The different wear performance of NiFeBSi-WC coating was attributed to the different type and morphological features of the reinforcing particles (WC.

  17. Thermal performance analysis of an electrochromic vacuum glazing with low emittance coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor; Hewitt, Neil [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip C. [Centre for Research in Renewable Energy Science and Technology, University of Loughborough (United Kingdom); Norton, Brian [Dublin Energy Lab, Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier Street, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-04-15

    Thermal performance of an electrochromic (EC) vacuum glazing (VG) was modelled under ASTM standard winter conditions. The EC VG comprised three 0.5 m by 0.5 m glass panes with a 0.12 mm wide evacuated space between two 4 mm thick panes sealed contiguously by a 6 mm wide indium based edge seal with either one or two low-emittance (low-e) coatings supported by a 0.32 mm diameter square pillar grid spaced at 25 mm. The third glass pane on which the 0.1 mm thick EC layer was deposited was sealed to the evacuated glass unit. The whole unit was rebated by 10 mm within a solid wood frame. The low-e coating absorbed 10% of solar energy incident on it. With the EC VG installed with the EC component facing the outdoor environment, for an incident solar radiation of 300 W m{sup -2}, simulations demonstrated that when the EC layer is opaque for winter conditions, the temperature of the inside glass pane is higher than the indoor air temperature, due to solar radiation absorbed by the low-e coatings and the EC layer, the EC VG is a heat source with heat transferred from the glazing to the interior environment. When the emittance was lower to 0.02, the outdoor and indoor glass pane temperatures of the glazing with single and two low-e coatings are very close to each other. For an insolation of 1000 W m{sup -2}, the outdoor glass pane temperature exceeds the indoor glass pane temperature, consequentially the outdoor glass pane transfers heat to the indoor glass pane. (author)

  18. TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTILAYER METAL-CERAMIC COATINGS UNDER NONSTATIONARY THERMAL EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy M. Samoilenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the aircraft engine construction is determined by the increase of operation parameters of gas turbine engines, which is inevitably accompanied by an increase of operating temperatures and load for the vital elements of the turbine hot ducts. Furthermore, the requirements for reliability of the engine in general are also increasing. Achievement of these requirements is determined by the performance of the materials turbine blades are made of and is made possible by the application of high-heat Nickel alloys in combination with combined heat-shielding coatings.This article dwells on the problem of assessing the impact of non-stationary thermal effects on the temperature distribution in a multilayer heatproof coating. With the aim of assessing the working capacity of heatproof coatings we propose a method of calculating the temperature field for the blade profile and the coatingdepth, based on the solution of the basic one-dimensional differential equation of heat conduction.This method allows us to assess the performance of heatproof coating and also gives us an opportunity to choose a combination of heatproof coating layers for the specific operating conditions of a gas turbine engine’s blades.In addition, using the proposed method it is possible to evaluate the effect of non-stationary heat flux on the structure of high-temperature alloy of the engine’s turbine blades and, therefore, to evaluate the capacity with the given coating. At temperatures of 1150–1200 °C and higher in heat-resistant Nickel alloys there starts a coagulation process of the main reinforcing coherent particle phase on the basis of the intermetallic compound, long plates with wavy shapes are formed instead of the cuboids, a formation of topologically close-packed phases which are needle-like compositions happens. These processes lead to a significant deterioration of the strength characteristics of heat-resistant alloys. Making calculations according to

  19. Adhesion and thermal stability of thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) polyurethane-based paint coatings on copper substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunic, R. [FRAGMAT TIM, d.d., Spodnja Recica 77, SI-3270 Lasko (Slovenia); Kozelj, M.; Orel, B.; Surca Vuk, A.; Vilcnik, A.; Slemenik Perse, L. [Laboratory for Spectroscopy of Materials, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Merlini, D. [COLOR, d.d., Cesta komandanta Staneta 4, SI-1215 Medvode (Slovenia); Brunold, S. [Institut fuer Solartechnik, Oberseestrasse 10, Postfach 1475, CH-8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    Thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) paint coatings based on a polyurethane polymeric binder deposited on copper substrates were investigated to obtain information about their service lifetime. The degradation of TISS paint coatings was performed according to the methodology worked out within Task 10 of the IEA's Solar heating and the cooling programme. The activation energy (E{sub a}) for the degradation process was derived from vibrational band changes of the polyurethane binder recorded in the infrared hemispherical reflectance spectra of TISS paint coatings exposed to different thermal loads. The results of the vibrational band analysis were correlated with cross-cut tests, showing that the coatings started to lose integrity at 190 C but protected the copper substrate against oxidation perfectly even at 200 C (15 days). An accelerated test procedure confirmed that TISS coatings could be safely used in solar collectors for at least 45 years. (author)

  20. Thermal Annealing Effect on Optical Properties of Binary TiO2-SiO2 Sol-Gel Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available TiO2-SiO2 binary coatings were deposited by a sol-gel dip-coating method using tetrabutyl titanate and tetraethyl orthosilicate as precursors. The structure and chemical composition of the coatings annealed at different temperatures were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. The refractive indices of the coatings were calculated from the measured transmittance and reflectance spectra. An increase in refractive index with the high temperature thermal annealing process was observed. The Raman and FTIR results indicate that the refractive index variation is due to changes in the removal of the organic component, phase separation and the crystal structure of the binary coatings.

  1. Development of a thermal fatigue test method for thermal barrier coatings by laser excitation using a laser thermal shock facility; Entwicklung eines Pruefverfahrens zur laserinduzierten thermischen Ermuedung thermischer Schutzschichten mittels einer Laser-Thermoschockpruefeinrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nies, Daniel

    2012-07-13

    The finite nature of fossil fuel supply and the growing environmental awareness become increasingly stronger motivations for the development of efficient gas turbines and jet engines for power generation or as engines for land-, sea- and water-based vehicles. One concept developed for this purpose are thermal barrier coatings, where the thermal load of components is reduced by applying a ceramic coating onto the components. In this work the possibility to use a laser thermal shock facility for thermo-cyclic testing of thermal barrier coatings is examined. A focused laser beam is used for heating the sample and a homogeneous temperature distribution on the sample surface is achieved by the used trajectory and radial adjusted laser power. The required improvements of the existing testing facility are explained, including the development of a new sample holder and of the testing and evaluation routines for the experiments. For the assessment of the initiation and evolution of damages, acoustic emission and thermographic methods are used. The possibilities and limits of these methods are assessed during the experiments. The work also includes an extensive temperature dependent characterisation of the ceramic material used for the thermal barrier coating. In this part, the measurement of the Young's modulus by a dynamic method is to be highlighted, as this is a rarely used technique. The characterisations show the expected values, except for a lower porosity as expected by the manufacturer and no significant phase changes during isothermal heat treatments. To reach sample surface temperatures above 1000 C, it is necessary to increase the absorption by an additional coating of magnetite. The temperature distribution on the surface is measured by an infrared camera, which is calibrated for this purpose. With the incorporated active air cooling of the sample backside, the temperature gradient can be controlled, but still leaves room for improvements. Already without

  2. INFLUENCE ОF MODIFIER THERMAL TREATMENT ОN CHARACTERISTICS ОF COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR PROTECTIVE COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ivashko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results that reveal influence of modifiers characterized by different nature and composition and subjected to heat treatment on operational characteristics of single and binary compositions. Interaction between dispersed clay particles and dependence of  coating properties on  their mass content in oligomeric and polymeric matrices have been justified in the paper. The paper contains data that prove an increase of coating hardness by 15–20 %. The coating composition includes thermally-treated dispersed clay particles.

  3. A study of coating mechanical and optical losses in view of reducing mirror thermal noise in gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaminio, R.; Franc, J.; Michel, C.; Morgado, N.; Pinard, L.; Sassolas, B.

    2010-04-01

    Mirror coatings play a crucial role in the performance of laser interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection such as Virgo and LIGO. Mechanical losses in the coating material limit the sensitivity of the detectors due to the associated mirror thermal noise. The absorption of light in the coating induces a thermal lens in the mirror substrate which reduces the quality of the optical interference and requires sophisticated thermal compensation systems. This paper describes the work ongoing at LMA in order to reduce mechanical losses and optical absorption in the coating. The results obtained by doping Ta2O5 layers and testing different high-index materials are described. Finally the performances of different potential coatings are compared and the results obtained with a 40 kg mirror are reported. Titania doped Ta2O5 shows mechanical losses of 2 × 10-4 and absorption below 0.5 ppm. Nb2O5 appears to be the best competitor from the thermal noise point of view but it has an optical absorption four to five times larger.

  4. Erosion Performance of Gadolinium Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Processed by Suspension Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    7-8 wt.% Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the standard thermal barrier coating (TBC) material used by the gas turbines industry due to its excellent thermal and thermo-mechanical properties up to 1200 °C. The need for improvement in gas turbine efficiency has led to an increase in the turbine inlet gas temperature. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as poor sintering resistance, poor phase stability and susceptibility to calcium magnesium alumino silicates (CMAS) degradation. Gadolinium zirconate (GZ) is considered as one of the promising top coat candidates for TBC applications at high temperatures (>1200 °C) due to its low thermal conductivity, good sintering resistance and CMAS attack resistance. Single-layer 8YSZ, double-layer GZ/YSZ and triple-layer GZdense/GZ/YSZ TBCs were deposited by suspension plasma spray (SPS) process. Microstructural analysis was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A columnar microstructure was observed in the single-, double- and triple-layer TBCs. Phase analysis of the as-sprayed TBCs was carried out using XRD (x-ray diffraction) where a tetragonal prime phase of zirconia in the single-layer YSZ TBC and a cubic defect fluorite phase of GZ in the double and triple-layer TBCs was observed. Porosity measurements of the as-sprayed TBCs were made by water intrusion method and image analysis method. The as-sprayed GZ-based multi-layered TBCs were subjected to erosion test at room temperature, and their erosion resistance was compared with single-layer 8YSZ. It was shown that the erosion resistance of 8YSZ single-layer TBC was higher than GZ-based multi-layered TBCs. Among the multi-layered TBCs, triple-layer TBC was slightly better than double layer in terms of erosion resistance. The eroded TBCs were cold-mounted and analyzed by SEM.

  5. Thermal control of solid breeder blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Ying, A.; Gorbis, Z.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    An assessment of the thermal control mechanisms applicable to solid breeder blanket designs under ITER-like operating conditions is presented in this paper. Four cases are considered: a helium gap; a sintered block Be region; a sintered block helium region with a metallic felt at the Be/clad interface; and a Be packed bed region. For these cases, typical operating are explored to determine the ranges of wall load which can be accommodated while maintaining the breeder within its allowable operating temperature window. The corresponding region thicknesses are calculated to help identify practicality and design tolerances.

  6. Thermal control of solid breeder blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffray, A.R.; Ying, A.; Gorbis, Z.; Tillack, M.S.; Abdou, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An assessment of the thermal control mechanisms applicable to solid breeder blanket designs under ITER-like operating conditions is presented in this paper. Four cases are considered: a helium gap; a sintered block Be region; a sintered block helium region with a metallic felt at the Be/clad interface; and a Be packed bed region. For these cases, typical operating are explored to determine the ranges of wall load which can be accommodated while maintaining the breeder within its allowable operating temperature window. The corresponding region thicknesses are calculated to help identify practicality and design tolerances.

  7. Semiconductor nanowires: Controlled growth and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiying

    This dissertation presents an experimental study of the controlled growth of semiconductor nanowires and their thermophysical properties. The synthesis of nanowires was based on the well-known Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism in which the growth of nanowire is initiated by a nanosized liquid droplet. The prepared nanowires are single-crystalline with certain preferred growth direction. Nanowires with different compositions have been synthesized, including Si, Ge, boron and MgB2. The control of nanowire composition, diameter and orientation has also been achieved. In addition, a Pulsed Laser Ablation-Chemical Vapor Deposition (PLA-CVD) hybrid process was developed to synthesize Si/SiGe longitudinally superlattice nanowires. The thermal conductivity of individual pure Si nanowire and Si/SiGe nanowire was measured using a microfabricated suspended device over a temperature range of 20--320 K. The thermal conductivities of individual 22, 37, 56, and 115 nm diameter single crystalline intrinsic Si nanowires were much lower than the bulk value due to the strong phonon boundary scattering. Except for the 22 nm diameter nanowire, theoretical predictions using a modified Callaway model fit the experimental data very well. The data for the 22 nm diameter wire suggest that changes in phonon dispersion due to confinement can cause additional thermal conductivity reduction. The Si/SiGe superlattice nanowires with diameters of 83 run and 58 nm were also measured. Their thermal conductivities are smaller than pure Si nanowire with similar diameter, as well as Si/SiGe superlattice thin film with comparable period. Both the alloying scattering and the boundary scattering are believed to contribute to this reduction. Size dependent melting-recrystallization study of the carbon-sheathed semiconductor Ge nanowires was carried out in in-situ high temperature transmission electron microscope (TEM). Significant depression in melting temperature with decreasing size of the nanowires as

  8. Neural network computation for the evaluation of process rendering: application to thermally sprayed coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guessasma Sofiane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, neural network computation is attempted to relate alumina and titania phase changes of a coating microstructure with respect to energetic parameters of atmospheric plasma straying (APS process. Experimental results were analysed using standard fitting routines and neural computation to quantify the effect of arc current, hydrogen ratio and total plasma flow rate. For a large parameter domain, phase changes were 10% for alumina and 8% for titania with a significant control of titania phase.

  9. Effect of Gd2O3 on the microstructure and thermal properties of nanostructured thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiong Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nanostructured 4–8 mol% Gd2O3−4.5 mol% Y2O3-ZrO2 (4–8 mol% GdYSZ coatings were developed by the atmospheric plasma spraying technique. The microstructure and thermal properties of plasma-sprayed 4–8 mol% GdYSZ coatings were investigated. The experimental results indicate that typical microstructure of the as-sprayed coatings were consisted of melted zones, nano-zones, splats, nano-pores, high-volume spheroidal pores and micro-cracks. The porosity of the 4, 6 and 8 mol% GdYSZ coatings was about 9.3%, 11.7% and 13.3%, respectively. It was observed that the addition of gadolinia to the nano-YSZ could significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of nano-YSZ. The thermal conductivity of GdYSZ decreased with increasing Gd2O3 addition. And the reduction in thermal conductivity is mainly attributed to the addition of Gd2O3, which results in the increase in oxygen vacancies, lattice distortion and porosity.

  10. Novel hybrid coatings with controlled wettability by composite nanoparticle aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hritcu, Doina, E-mail: dhritcu@ch.tuiasi.ro; Dodi, Gianina; Iordache, Mirabela L.; Draganescu, Dan; Sava, Elena; Popa, Marcel I.

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Magnetite-grafted chitosan composite nanoparticles were synthesized. • The particles are able to assemble under the influence of a silane derivative. • Thin films containing composites, chitosan and hydrolyzed silane were optimized. • The novel hybrid coatings show hierarchical roughness and high wetting angle. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to evaluate novel hybrid materials as potential candidates for producing coatings with hierarchical roughness and controlled wetting behaviour. Magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles obtained by co-precipitation were embedded in matrices synthesized by radical graft co-polymerization of butyl acrylate (BA), butyl methacrylate (BMA), hexyl acrylate (HA) or styrene (ST) with ethylene glycol di-methacrylate (EGDMA) onto previously modified chitosan bearing surface vinyl groups. The resulting composite particles were characterized regarding their average size, composition and magnetic properties. Hybrid thin films containing suspension of composite particles in ethanol and pre-hydrolysed hexadecyltrimethoxysilane (HDTS) as a coupling/crosslinking agent were deposited by spin coating or spraying. The films were cured by heating and subsequently characterized regarding their morphology (scanning electron microscopy), contact angle with water and adhesion to substrate (scratch test). The structure-property relationship is discussed.

  11. Influence of thermal spraying parameters on the corrosion resistance of aluminium oxide coatings deposited on steel 1020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Vera, E.; Moreno, M.; Pineda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Parameters required for the preparation of coatings of aluminium oxide deposited on AISI 1020 steels were determined according to their thickness and type of flame to differentiate their behaviour against corrosion. Commercial powders were used by the method of thermal spraying deposition. The coatings were analysed by OM (optical microscopy), the thickness was measured by means of a coating thickness gauge and electrochemical techniques variables measured was the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and approximation Tafel potentiodynamic curves. The corrosion current for steel 1020 with Na2SO4 electrolyte of 3.5% is of the order of hundreds of A/cm2 and coated steel given in the order of A/cm2, which leads to think that the projection produces coatings uniform low closed porosity, although techniques DC indicate a significant porosity as is observable current response to the potentiodynamic curve. The observed thicknesses fall into the hundreds of microns and little uniformity was noted in this coatings. The coatings deposited by oxidizing flame was better performance in corrosion than the coating deposited by neutral flame.

  12. Controlled reactions between chromia and coating on alloy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren

    1996-01-01

    An electrically conducting Sr-doped lanthanum chromite (LSC) coating has been produced by reacting a coating of fine particles of La oxide and Sr oxide with chromia formed as an external scale on a metallic alloy. In addition to the formation of LSC the coating also resulted in much reduced...... buckling of the underlying chromia layer compared with a non-coated alloy....

  13. Thermal Hardware for the Thermal Analyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeld, David

    2015-01-01

    The presentation will be given at the 26th Annual Thermal Fluids Analysis Workshop (TFAWS 2015) hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Thermal Engineering Branch (Code 545). NCTS 21070-1. Most Thermal analysts do not have a good background into the hardware which thermally controls the spacecraft they design. SINDA and Thermal Desktop models are nice, but knowing how this applies to the actual thermal hardware (heaters, thermostats, thermistors, MLI blanketing, optical coatings, etc...) is just as important. The course will delve into the thermal hardware and their application techniques on actual spacecraft. Knowledge of how thermal hardware is used and applied will make a thermal analyst a better engineer.

  14. An Experimental Thermally Deposited Coating for Improved Bonding to Glass-fiber Posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Giselle Rodrigues; Silva, Fernanda Pereira; Oliveira-Ogliari, Aline; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Moraes, Rafael R; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa

    To determine whether an experimental thermally deposited siloxane-methacrylate coating for use in industrial scale applications would improve the bond strength of resin-based materials to glass fiber posts (GFPs) without affecting their mechanical properties. An experimental 5% (w/v) solution of methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane was prepared. Two types of GFPs (Exacto, Angelus; White Post DC, FGM) were divided into the following groups: S: silane; SA: silane and adhesive; HS: 35% H₂O₂ and silane; HSA: 35% H₂O₂, silane and adhesive; Exp: siloxane-methacrylate coating (Si-O) via post immersion in experimental solution followed by heating; Exp-S: silane after Si-O treatment; Exp-A: adhesive after Si-O treatment; and Exp-SA: silane and adhesive after Si-O treatment. The posts were positioned in a mold to allow insertion of a dual-curing resin core, serially sectioned into beams, and subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTSB) testing. The three-point bending test and SEM/EDX analysis were used to assess the mechanical and surface properties of untreated GFPs that were etched with H₂O₂ or treated with Si-O. Surface treatments affected the μTSB only for the Exacto GFPs. The highest μTBS (MPa) was observed in Exp-S and Exp-SA groups, whereas H₂O₂ etching resulted in intermediate values. The mechanical properties were not affected by surface treatments. Exacto GFPs had significantly higher flexural strength (σf) and flexural modulus (Ef) than did the White Post DC GFPs, but the latter were significantly stiffer (S) than Exacto, regardless of the surface treatment tested. H₂O₂ promoted morphological changes in post surfaces. The experimental treatment promoted deposition of Si onto the post surface, improving bond strengths of Exacto posts. The proposed novel coating technique is a viable procedure for fiber post manufacturers to improve the μTSB of resin-based materials.

  15. Fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation of an epoxy based nano intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Hammad, E-mail: engr.hammad.aziz03@gmail.com; Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Yusoff, P. S. M. Megat; Zia-ul-Mustafa, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) is a passive fire protection system which swells upon heating to form expanded multi-cellular char layer that protects the substrate from fire. In this research work, IFRC’s were developed using different flame retardants such as ammonium polyphosphate, expandable graphite, melamine and boric acid. These flame retardants were bound together with the help of epoxy binder and cured together using curing agent. IFRC was then reinforced with nano magnesium oxide and nano alumina as inorganic fillers to study their effect towards fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation. Small scale fire test was conducted to investigate the thermal insulation of coating whereas fire performance was calculated using thermal margin value. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructure of char obtained after fire test. Thermogravimetric analysis was conducted to investigate the residual weight of coating. Results showed that the performance of the coating was enhanced by reinforcement with nano size fillers as compared to non-filler based coating. Comparing both nano size magnesium oxide and nano size alumina; nano size alumina gave better fire performance with improved microstructure of char and high residual weight.

  16. High-resolution Thermal Micro-imaging Using Europium Chelate Luminescent Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseman, Timothy M; Hao, Yang; Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K; Welp, Ulrich; Koshelev, Alexei E; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Divan, Ralu; Keiser, Courtney; Watanabe, Chiharu; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2017-04-16

    Micro-electronic devices often undergo significant self-heating when biased to their typical operating conditions. This paper describes a convenient optical micro-imaging technique which can be used to map and quantify such behavior. Europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (EuTFC) has a 612 nm luminescence line whose activation efficiency drops strongly with increasing temperature, due to T-dependent interactions between the Eu3+ ion and the organic chelating compound. This material may be readily coated on to a sample surface by thermal sublimation in vacuum. When the coating is excited with ultraviolet light (337 nm) an optical micro-image of the 612 nm luminescent response can be converted directly into a map of the sample surface temperature. This technique offers spatial resolution limited only by the microscope optics (about 1 micron) and time resolution limited by the speed of the camera employed. It offers the additional advantages of only requiring comparatively simple and non-specialized equipment, and giving a quantitative probe of sample temperature.

  17. Correlation between Hierarchical Structure and Processing Control of Large-area Spray-coated Polymer Solar Cells toward High Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ching; Tsao, Cheng-Si; Cha, Hou-Chin; Chuang, Chih-Min; Su, Chun-Jen; Jeng, U.-Ser; Chen, Charn-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The formation mechanism of a spray-coated film is different from that of a spin-coated film. This study employs grazing incidence small- and wide-angle X-ray Scattering (GISAXS and GIWAXS, respectively) quantitatively and systematically to investigate the hierarchical structure and phase-separated behavior of a spray-deposited blend film. The formation of PCBM clusters involves mutual interactions with both the P3HT crystal domains and droplet boundary. The processing control and the formed hierarchical structure of the active layer in the spray-coated polymer/fullerene blend film are compared to those in the spin-coated film. How the different post-treatments, such as thermal and solvent vapor annealing, tailor the hierarchical structure of the spray-coated films is quantitatively studied. Finally, the relationship between the processing control and tailored BHJ structures and the performance of polymer solar cell devices is established here, taking into account the evolution of the device area from 1 × 0.3 and 1 × 1 cm2. The formation and control of the special networks formed by the PCBM cluster and P3HT crystallites, respectively, are related to the droplet boundary. These structures are favorable for the transverse transport of electrons and holes.

  18. Thin films of spin-crossover coordination polymers with large thermal hysteresis loops prepared by nanoparticle spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Daisuke; Aketa, Naoki; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tamaki, Takashi; Inose, Tomoko; Akai, Tomoki; Toyama, Hirotaka; Sakata, Osami; Tajiri, Hiroo; Ogawa, Takuji

    2014-09-11

    This communication describes the synthesis of spin-crossover nanoparticles, which can disperse in various organic solvents without an excess amount of surfactants. The nanoparticles form homogeneous thin films on substrates by spin coating. The films show abrupt spin transitions with large thermal hysteresis loops.

  19. Experimental and analytical investigation of thermal coating effectiveness for 3 m3 LPG tanks engulfed by fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landucci, G.; Molag, M.; Reinders, J.; Cozzani, V.

    2009-01-01

    Two large-scale diesel pool fire engulfment tests were carried out on LPG tanks protected with intumescing materials to test the effectiveness of thermal coatings in the prevention of hot BLEVE accidental scenarios in the road and rail transport of LPG. A specific test protocol was defined to

  20. Experimental investigation of thermal barrier (8YSZ-TiO2-Al2O3 coated piston used in direct injection compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthusamy Jayaram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings are becoming increasingly important in providing protection from high temperature degradation for heat engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. The main objective of this research work is to experimentally investigate the air plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia with addition of titanium oxide and aluminum oxide thermal barrier coating on Al-13% Si piston material. The mechanical properties of the coated and uncoated samples were comparatively analyzed. The test revealed that hardness values of coated samples are ten times higher than the hardness values of uncoated samples. The microstructure and surface morphology of the coating were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The delamination behaviour of thermal barrier coating was evaluated by thermal cycle test. Finally, the performance test of the coated and uncoated engine was evaluated with the same engine operating conditions. The brake thermal efficiency is increased by 5.99%. The brake specific fuel consumption was decreased by 0.06 kg/kWh, in TBC engine with 8YSZ + Al2O3 + TiO2. The CO and HC was greatly decreased in thermal barrier coating engine. There was the greater reduction of NOx is observed due to coating because of nitrogen has absorbed by zirconia.

  1. Power Admission Control with Predictive Thermal Management in Smart Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Jianguo; Costanzo, Giuseppe Tommaso; Zhu, Guchuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a control scheme for thermal management in smart buildings based on predictive power admission control. This approach combines model predictive control with budget-schedulability analysis in order to reduce peak power consumption as well as ensure thermal comfort. First...... appliances. The performance of the proposed control scheme is assessed by simulation based on the thermal dynamics of a real eight-room office building located at Danish Technical University....

  2. Thermal stability of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods with different aspect ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergely-Fülöp, Eszter, E-mail: fulop.eszter@ttk.mta.hu; Zámbó, Dániel, E-mail: zambo.daniel@ttk.mta.hu; Deák, András, E-mail: deak.andras@ttk.mta.hu

    2014-12-15

    The effect of different temperatures (up to 900 °C) on the morphology of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods was systematically investigated. Gold nanorods with different aspect ratios (AR ranging from 2.5 to 4.3) were coated with a 15 nm thick mesoporous silica shell. Silicon supported monolayers of the particles were annealed in the temperature range of 300–900 °C. The resulting changes in particle morphology were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and visible wavelength extinction spectroscopy. The silica coating generally improved the stability of the nanorods from ca. 250 °C by several hundreds degree Celsius. For nanorods with AR < 3 the shape and the aspect ratio change is only moderate up to 700 °C. At 900 °C these nanorods became spherical. For nanorods with AR>3, lower stability was found as the aspect ratio decrease was more significant and they transformed into spherical particles already at 700 °C. It was confirmed by investigating empty silica shells that the observed conformal change of the shell material when annealing core/shell particles is dictated by the deformation of the core particle. This also implies that a significant mechanical stress is exerted on the shell upon core deformation. In accordance with this, for the highest aspect ratio (AR ∼ 4) nanorod the shell breaks up at 900 °C and the gold cores were partially released and coalesced into large spherical particles. - Highlights: • Deformation of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods upon annealing up to 900 °C. • The silica shell protects the gold cores from turning into spheres up to 500 °C. • Decreasing thermal stability with increasing aspect ratio. • Deformation of the silica shell dictated by the shape change of the gold core. • Core induced break-up of the shell for high aspect ratio nanorods.

  3. Corrosion Resistance Properties of Aluminum Coating Applied by Arc Thermal Metal Spray in SAE J2334 Solution with Exposure Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arc thermal metal spray coating provides excellent corrosion, erosion and wear resistance to steel substrates. This paper incorporates some results of aluminum coating applied by this method on plain carbon steel. Thereafter, coated panels were exposed to an environment known to form stable corrosion products with aluminum. The coated panels were immersed in Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE J2334 for different periods of time. This solution consists of an aqueous solution of NaCl, CaCl2 and NaHCO3. Various electrochemical techniques, i.e., corrosion potential-time, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and the potentiodynamic were used to determine the performance of stimulants in improving the properties of the coating. EIS studies revealed the kinetics and mechanism of corrosion and potentiodynamic attributed the formation of a passive film, which stifles the penetration of aggressive ions towards the substrate. The corrosion products that formed on the coating surface, identified using Raman spectroscopy, were Dawsonite (NaAlCO3(OH2 and Al(OH3. These compounds of aluminum are very sparingly soluble in aqueous solution and protect the substrate from pitting and uniform corrosion. The morphology and composition of corrosion products determined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analyses indicated that the environment plays a decisive role in improving the corrosion resistance of aluminum coating.

  4. 49 CFR 195.559 - What coating material may I use for external corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.559 Section 195.559 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.559 What coating material may I use for external corrosion control? Coating material for external corrosion control under...

  5. Space shuttle heat pipe thermal control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alario, J.

    1973-01-01

    Heat pipe (HP) thermal control systems designed for possible space shuttle applications were built and tested under this program. They are: (1) a HP augmented cold rail, (2) a HP/phase change material (PCM) modular heat sink and (3) a HP radiating panel for compartment temperature control. The HP augmented cold rail is similar to a standard two-passage fluid cold rail except that it contains an integral, centrally located HP throughout its length. The central HP core helps to increase the local power density capability by spreading concentrated heat inputs over the entire rail. The HP/PCM modular heat sink system consists of a diode HP connected in series to a standard HP that has a PCM canister attached to its mid-section. It is designed to connect a heat source to a structural heat sink during normal operation, and to automatically decouple from it and sink to the PCM whenever structural temperatures are too high. The HP radiating panel is designed to conductively couple the panel feeder HPs directly to a fluid line that serves as a source of waste heat. It is a simple strap-on type of system that requires no internal or external line modifications to distribute the heat to a large radiating area.

  6. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  7. The Development of HfO2-Rare Earth Based Oxide Materials and Barrier Coatings for Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan James

    2014-01-01

    Advanced hafnia-rare earth oxides, rare earth aluminates and silicates have been developed for thermal environmental barrier systems for aerospace propulsion engine and thermal protection applications. The high temperature stability, low thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of these oxide material systems make them attractive and potentially viable for thermal protection systems. This paper will focus on the development of the high performance and high temperature capable ZrO2HfO2-rare earth based alloy and compound oxide materials, processed as protective coating systems using state-or-the-art processing techniques. The emphasis has been in particular placed on assessing their temperature capability, stability and suitability for advanced space vehicle entry thermal protection systems. Fundamental thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the material systems have been investigated at high temperatures. Laser high-heat-flux testing has also been developed to validate the material systems, and demonstrating durability under space entry high heat flux conditions.

  8. Effect of basalt fibres reinforcement and aluminum trihydrate on the thermal properties of intumescent fire retardant coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Amir, Norlaili Binti; Ahmad, Faiz; Syahirah Rodzhan, N.

    2017-08-01

    This research is carried out in order to study the synergistic effect of aluminium trihydrate and basalt fibres on the properties of fire resistant intumescent coatings. Intumescent fire retardant coatings were developed using different flame retardants such as ammonium polyphosphate, expandable graphite, melamine and boric acid. These flame retardants were bound together with the help of epoxy binder along with curing agent. Furthermore, individual and combinations of aluminium trihydrate and basalt fibres was incorporated in the formulations to analyse mechanical and chemical properties of the coatings. Char expansion was observed using furnace test, thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine residual weight, X-Ray Diffraction was performed to investigate compounds present in the char, shear test was conducted to determine char strength and scanning electron microscopy analysis was performed to observe morphology of the burnt char. From the microscopic investigation it was concluded that the dense structure of the char increased the char integrity by adding basalt and aluminium trihydrate as fillers. X-Ray Diffraction results shows the presence boron phosphate, and boric acid which enhanced the thermal performance of the coating up to 800°C. From the Thermogravimetric analysis it was concluded that the residual weight of the char was increased up to 34.9 % for IC-B2A4 which enhanced thermal performance of intumescent coating.

  9. Interplay among Coating Thickness, Strip Size, and Thermal and Solidification Characteristics in A356 Lost Foam Casting Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabestari, S. G.; Divandari, M.; Ghoncheh, M. H.; Jamali, V.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this research was evaluation of the solidification parameters of A356 alloy, e.g., dendrite arm spacing (DAS), correlation between cooling rate (CR) and DAS, hot tearing, and microstructural analysis at different coating thicknesses and strip sizes during the lost foam casting process (LFC). To achieve this goal, the DAS was measured at six coating thicknesses and six different strip sizes. In addition, thermal characteristics, such as the CR, temperatures of start and finish points of solidification, recalescence undercooling, and hot tearing susceptibility (HCSC), at five coating thicknesses were recognized from the cooling curves and their first derivative and the solid fraction curves, which have been plotted through the thermal analysis technique. The pouring temperature and strip size were fixed at 1063 K (790 °C) and 12 mm, respectively. Besides, to derive a numerical equation to predict the CR by measuring the DAS in this alloy, a microstructural evaluation was carried out on samples cast through 12-mm strip size. The results showed that both coating thickness and strip size had similar influences on the DAS, in which, by retaining one parameter at a constant value and simultaneous enhancement in the other parameter, the DAS increased significantly. Furthermore, at thinner coating layer, the higher amount of the CR was observed, which caused reduction in the temperatures of both the start and finish points of solidification. Also, increasing the CR caused a nonlinear increase in both the recalescence undercooling and the HCSC.

  10. Preparation and properties of thermal insulation coatings with a sodium stearate-modified shell powder as a filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiang; Zhang, Ya-mei; Zhang, Pei-gen; Shi, Jin-jie; Tian, Wu-bian; Sun, Zheng-ming

    2017-10-01

    Waste shell stacking with odor and toxicity is a serious hazard to our living environment. To make effective use of the natural resources, the shell powder was applied as a filler of outdoor thermal insulation coatings. Sodium stearate (SS) was used to modify the properties of shell powder to reduce its agglomeration and to increase its compatibility with the emulsion. The oil absorption rate and the spectrum reflectance of the shell powder show that the optimized content of SS as a modifier is 1.5wt%. The total spectrum reflectance of the coating made with the shell powder that is modified at this optimum SS content is 9.33% higher than that without any modification. At the optimum SS content of 1.5wt%, the thermal insulation of the coatings is improved by 1.0°C for the cement mortar board and 1.6°C for the steel plate, respectively. The scouring resistance of the coating with the 1.5wt% SS-modified shell powder is three times that of the coating without modification.

  11. The Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems for Space Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is submitted to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of processing the space environment stable, multifunctional thermal control material system...

  12. Advanced understanding of paper coating structure and its relationship to coating performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Li, Lanfang; Roper, John; Ginzburg, Valeriy; Wocke, Colmar; Smith, Rebecca

    Paper coatings have been utilized to improve paper performance for decades, for example, for improving brightness, opacity, gloss, stiffness, ink acceptance, printability, and smoothness. In thermal paper, coatings are employed to impart improved thermal, morphological and mechanical properties often through the incorporation of hollow spheres into the coating film. Hollow sphere pigments having well controlled size and narrow size distribution provide a unique opportunity to model and study the particle packing phenomena and its effect on coating film strength, smoothness and thermal properties. This talk introduces a multi-dimensional modeling approach in paper coating modeling, with a special interest in microscopic mechanistic model. Based on these approaches we have seen that control of binary packing and local structure lead to improved and balanced coating mechanical property and thermal conductivity. This will enable us to achieve better coating materials using guided design of single particle geometry and formulation.

  13. A new strategy for improvement of the corrosion resistance of a green cerium conversion coating through thermal treatment procedure before and after application of epoxy coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahidashti, Z. [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahrabi, T., E-mail: tshahrabi34@modares.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box: 14115-143, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh-bh@icrc.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), P.O. 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • The Ce conversion coating was post-heated at various conditions. • The corrosion resistance of post-heated Ce films was evaluated. • A crack free and denser Ce film were obtained after post-heating. • The corrosion resistance of Ce film noticeably increased. • Post-heated Ce film resulted better protection performance of epoxy coating. - Abstract: The effect of post-heating of CeCC on its surface morphology and chemistry has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and contact angle (CA) measurements. The corrosion protection performance of the coatings was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The effect of thermal treatment of CeCC on the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating was investigated by EIS. Results showed that the heat treatment of Ce film noticeably improved its corrosion resistance and adhesion properties compared to that of untreated samples. The CeCC deposited on the steel substrate at room temperature had a highly cracked structure, while the amount of micro-cracks significantly reduced after post-heating procedure. Results obtained from EIS analysis confirmed the effect of post-heating of CeCC on its corrosion protection performance enhancement. The increase of post-heating temperature and time up to 140 °C and 3 h led to better results.

  14. 49 CFR 195.561 - When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.561 Section 195.561 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.561 When must I inspect pipe coating used for external corrosion control? (a) You must inspect all external pipe coating...

  15. Cooling Effectiveness Measurements for Air Film Cooling of Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces in a Burner Rig Environment Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. In this investigation, surface temperature mapping was performed using recently developed Cr-doped GdAlO3 phosphor thermometry. Measurements were performed in the NASA GRC Mach 0.3 burner rig on a TBC-coated plate using a scaled up cooling hole geometry where both the mainstream hot gas temperature and the blowing ratio were varied. Procedures for surface temperature and cooling effectiveness mapping of the air film-cooled TBC-coated surface are described. Applications are also shown for an engine component in both the burner rig test environment as well as an engine afterburner environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  16. Design and optimization of nanoparticle-pigmented solar selective absorber coatings for high-temperature concentrating solar thermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxin; Yu, Xiaobai; Fu, Sidan; Lee, Eldred; Kekalo, Katerina; Liu, Jifeng

    2018-01-01

    We present a systematic approach for the design and optimization of nanoparticle-pigmented solar selective absorbers for operation at 750 °C. Using the scattering and absorption cross-sections calculated by Lorenz-Mie scattering theory as input, we employ a four-flux radiative transfer method to investigate the solar selectivity mechanism and optimize the optical-to-thermal conversion efficiency (ηtherm) as a function of the metallic nanoparticle material, the nanoparticle diameter, the volume fraction, and the coating thickness. Among the nanoparticle material candidates in this study, C54-TiSi2 is the best option with an optimized ηtherm = 87.0% for a solar concentration ratio of C = 100 and ηtherm = 94.4% for C = 1000 at 750 °C. NiSi is also a promising candidate comparable to TiSi2 in thermal efficiency. Experimentally, an un-optimized 200 nm-diameter TiSi2 nanoparticle-silicone solar selective coating has already achieved ηtherm = 89.8% for C = 1000 at 750 °C. This performance is consistent with the theoretical model and close to the thermal efficiency of the commercial Pyromark 2500 coatings (90.1%). We also demonstrate that Ni/NiSi core-shell structures embedded in the SiO1.5 matrix is thermally stable at 750 °C for 1000 h in air. These results indicate that silicide cermet coatings are promising to achieve high optical performance and high temperature thermal stability simultaneously.

  17. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  18. Acute and Subacute Toxicity In Vivo of Thermal-Sprayed Silver Containing Hydroxyapatite Coating in Rat Tibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masatsugu Tsukamoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To reduce the incidence of implant-associated infection, we previously developed a novel coating technology using hydroxyapatite (HA containing silver (Ag. This study examined in vivo acute and subacute toxicity associated with the Ag-HA coating in rat tibiae. Ten-week-old rats received implantation of HA-, 2% Ag-HA-, or 50% Ag-HA-coated titanium rods. Concentrations of silver in serum, brain, liver, kidneys, and spleen were measured in the acute phase (2–4 days after treatment and subacute phase (4–12 weeks after treatment. Biochemical and histological examinations of those organs were also performed. Mean serum silver concentration peaked in the acute phase and then gradually decreased. Mean silver concentrations in all examined organs from the 2% Ag-HA coating groups showed no significant differences compared with the HA coating group. No significant differences in mean levels of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine, or blood urea nitrogen were seen between the three groups and controls. Histological examinations of all organs revealed no abnormal pathologic findings. No acute or subacute toxicity was seen in vivo for 2% Ag-HA coating or HA coating. Ag-HA coatings on implants may represent biologically safe antibacterial biomaterials and may be of value for reducing surgical-site infections related to implantation.

  19. Acute and subacute toxicity in vivo of thermal-sprayed silver containing hydroxyapatite coating in rat tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Masatsugu; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Ando, Yoshiki; Noda, Iwao; Eto, Shuichi; Akiyama, Takayuki; Yonekura, Yutaka; Sonohata, Motoki; Mawatari, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the incidence of implant-associated infection, we previously developed a novel coating technology using hydroxyapatite (HA) containing silver (Ag). This study examined in vivo acute and subacute toxicity associated with the Ag-HA coating in rat tibiae. Ten-week-old rats received implantation of HA-, 2% Ag-HA-, or 50% Ag-HA-coated titanium rods. Concentrations of silver in serum, brain, liver, kidneys, and spleen were measured in the acute phase (2-4 days after treatment) and subacute phase (4-12 weeks after treatment). Biochemical and histological examinations of those organs were also performed. Mean serum silver concentration peaked in the acute phase and then gradually decreased. Mean silver concentrations in all examined organs from the 2% Ag-HA coating groups showed no significant differences compared with the HA coating group. No significant differences in mean levels of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, creatinine, or blood urea nitrogen were seen between the three groups and controls. Histological examinations of all organs revealed no abnormal pathologic findings. No acute or subacute toxicity was seen in vivo for 2% Ag-HA coating or HA coating. Ag-HA coatings on implants may represent biologically safe antibacterial biomaterials and may be of value for reducing surgical-site infections related to implantation.

  20. [Research advances on controlled-release mechanisms of nutrients in coated fertilizers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Wu, Zhijie; Liang, Wenju; Xie, Hongtu

    2003-12-01

    Using encapsulation techniques to coat easily soluble fertilizers is an important way to improve fertilizer use efficiency while reduce environmental hazards. Based on a wide range of literature collection on coated fertilizer research, the theories, processes, and characters of nutrient controlled-release from coated fertilizer were discussed, and the factors affecting nutrient controlled-release and the mathematical simulations on it were reviewed. The main tendencies related to this research in China were also put forward.

  1. The Influence of Thermal Spray Process Technological Parameters on the Properties of Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Lebedev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the plasma sprayed Ni-based coating on aluminum alloy substrates. Before spraying, the surfaces of substrates were modified employing sandblasting and its combination with preheating. The coatings were sprayed under variation of spray process parameters. The study involves coating microstructure, porosity and adhesion tests. The influence of spray parameters and substrate pre-treatment on the properties of coating were evaluated.

  2. Chitosan coating and films : evaluation of surface, permeation, mechanical and thermal propertiess

    OpenAIRE

    Casariego, A.; Souza, B.W.S.; L. Cruz; Díaz, R; Teixeira, J. A.; A.A. Vicente

    2008-01-01

    The potentialities of chitosan (from lobster of the cuban coasts) coating to extend the shelf life of vegetables were evaluated. To do so, the surface properties of tomato and carrot were characterized and the wettability properties of chitosan coatings were studied. In such coatings, chitosan concentration and effects of type and concentration of plasticizer or surfactant on wettability of chitosan coatings were evaluated, as well as the respective barrier and mechanical properti...

  3. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Takenaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over −30 ppm K−1. Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining practical aspects, this review briefly summarizes materials and mechanisms of NTE as well as composites containing NTE materials, based mainly on activities of the last decade.

  4. Modeling the absorption behavior of solar thermal collector coatings utilizing graded alpha-C:H/TiC layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, D P; Engel, G; Sormann, H; Schüler, A; Papousek, W

    2009-03-10

    Wavelength selective coatings are of common use in order to enhance the efficiency of devices heated by radiation such as solar thermal collectors. The use of suitable materials and the optimization of coating layer thicknesses are advisable ways to maximize the absorption. Further improvement is achievable by embedding particles in certain layers in order to modify material properties. We focus on optimizing the absorption behavior of a solar collector setup using copper as substrate, a layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon with embedded titanium carbide particles (a-C:H/TiC), and an antireflection coating of amorphous silicon dioxide (aSiO(2)). For the setup utilizing homogeneous particle distribution, a relative absorption of 90.98% was found, while inhomogeneous particle embedding yielded 98.29%. These results are particularly interesting since until now, absorption of more than 95% was found only by using embedded Cr but not by using the more biocompatible Ti.

  5. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  6. High critical current density in YBCO coated conductors prepared by thermal co-evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindi, M [Edison Termoelettrica SpA, Foro Buonaparte 31, I-20121 Milan (Italy); Botarelli, A [Europa Metalli SpA, Superconductor Division, via Repubblica 257, I-55052 Fornaci di Barga, Lucca (Italy); Gauzzi, A [IMEM-CNR, Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43010 Parma (Italy); Gianni, L [Edison Termoelettrica SpA, Foro Buonaparte 31, I-20121 Milan (Italy); Ginocchio, S [Edison Termoelettrica SpA, Foro Buonaparte 31, I-20121 Milan (Italy); Holzapfel, B [Institut fuer Festkoerper-und Werkstoffsforschung, Helmholtzstrasse 20, Dresden (Germany); Baldini, A [Europa Metalli SpA, Superconductor Division, via Repubblica 257, I-55052 Fornaci di Barga, Lucca (Italy); Zannella, S [Edison Termoelettrica SpA, Foro Buonaparte 31, I-20121 Milan (Italy)

    2004-03-01

    We report on the in situ preparation of Y Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} films uniformly deposited over large areas,>20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, at 690 C by thermal co-evaporation onto Ni-5 at.% W biaxially textured tapes buffered with e-beam evaporated CeO{sub 2}. Typically, the thickness of the YBCO and CeO{sub 2} layers was 0.9 and 0.1 {mu}m, respectively. Deposition rates were 0.2 and 2.5 nm s{sup -1}, respectively. X-ray diffraction {theta}-2{theta} Bragg-Brentano and pole figure measurements, and Nomarsky optical and SEM microscopy analysis show good biaxial texture of both layers, sharp interfaces and the absence of cracks. Midpoint critical temperatures, T{sub c}, fall reproducibly in the 87-88 K range with transition widths {delta}T{sub c} = 1 K. Remarkably high transport critical current densities, J{sub c}, in the 2.0-2.5 MA cm{sup -2} range are achieved at 77 K in 1 cm long samples. The above deposition route appears to be promising for the development of long-length YBCO coated conductors thanks to the relatively low deposition temperature, the high degree of uniformity over large areas and the simple single buffer layer architecture.

  7. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  8. A Numerical Procedure to Obtain the Creep Parameters of the Thermal Barrier Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-point bending creep test was used to understand the creep behavior of typical thin film/substrate systems—thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. Firstly, a simplified model, which does not consider the local effect, has been set up to get an analytical relationship. The important result is that creep stress exponent of materials is equal to the creep load exponent of the steady-state deflection rate of BC specimens. Secondly, in order to consider the local effect of bending, the finite element method (FEM has been carried out. FEM calculation shows that there is a steady stage of the creep deflection under a constant applied load. And the exponent of the steady-state creep deflection rate to the applied load is found to be equal to the creep stress exponent of materials. The creep constant of the materials can be obtained by a set of trials with assumed creep constants of materials and can be finally determined by the best fit method. Finally, the finite element results show that the influences of the friction, the thickness of TBCs, and the modulus ratio of TBC to the substrate on stress distribution are important.

  9. Assessment of Proposed Cab Glass Coating for FAA Control Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. i Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 REPORT...droplets from rain in such a way that one would expect improved visibility through the coated windows. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cab glass, coatings...distribution of water droplets from rain (left is uncoated, right is coated

  10. A non-destructive method for determination of thermal conductivity of YSZ coatings deposited on Si substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, C. [Thin Films Group, Department of Physics, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Research Group in Development of Materials and Products, CDT-ASTIN SENA, Cali (Colombia); Caicedo, J.C., E-mail: jcaicedoangulo1@gmail.com [Thin Films Group, Department of Physics, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Yanez-Limon, J.M. [Cinvestav-Unidad Queretaro, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Queretaro (Mexico); Vargas, R.A. [Group Phase Transitions in Non-metallic Systems, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Zambrano, G.; Gomez, M.E. [Thin Films Group, Department of Physics, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia); Prieto, P. [Excellence Center for Novel Materials, Universidad del Valle, Cali (Colombia)

    2012-10-15

    Thermal diffusivity ({alpha}) of YSZ coatings was determined by the phase lag method of the photo-acoustic signal for rear and frontal illuminations using a two-beam photo-acoustic cell. XRD results show the presence of a tetragonal phase with (101) and (112) orientations, and FTIR spectra exhibit the 2{sub Eu} and F{sub 1u} modes as two broad bands in the frequency at 453 cm{sup -1}, 468 cm{sup -1}, corresponding to the tetragonal phase of ZrO{sub 2}. Thermal diffusivity was measured in the Si/YSZ system and also on the Si (100) substrate from which a simple two-layer system model. Via specific heat measurements at constant pressure (C{sub p}) using the (DSC) technique, and mass density ({rho}) calculations using Archimedes and Aleksandrov's methods for both in-bulk and film YSZ samples, thermal conductivity ({kappa}) was obtained. The results were: {alpha} = (0.0021 {+-} 0.0002) and (0.0023 {+-} 0.0002) cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}, {rho} = (4.7725 {+-} 0.005) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} and (5.883 {+-} 0.005) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} kg m{sup -3}, C{sub p} = (427 {+-} 14) J kg{sup -1} K{sup -1}, and {kappa} = (0.43 {+-} 0.06) and (0.57 {+-} 0.06) W m{sup -1} K{sup -1} for in-bulk and film YSZ samples, respectively. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anon-destructive method for determination of thermal conductivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Novel relationship between density, porosity and thermal diffusivity in 8YSZ coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal diffusivity of 8YSZ coating analyzed by the phase lag method of the photo-acoustic signal.

  11. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed.

  12. Antimicrobial beeswax coated polylactide films with silver control release capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Abad, Antonio; Lagarón, Jose Maria; Ocio, María Jose

    2014-03-17

    Although the application of silver based antimicrobial systems is a widespread technology, its implementation in areas such as food packaging is still challenging. The present paper describes the fabrication of poly(lactic acid) (PLA) coated with beeswax with controlled release properties for sustained antimicrobial performance. Release of silver ions from the polymers was monitored voltammetrically under various conditions (surface contact, immersion in various liquid media and at different pH values) throughout at least 7days. A higher release was noted with decreasing pH while surface release was much slower than the release when immersed in liquid medium. While uncoated films demonstrated a high burst release which in some instances implied surpassing some current migration restrictions (<0.05mg/kg food), the addition of a beeswax layer allowed a sustained release of the antimicrobial compound. Increasing the thickness of the beeswax layer resulted in an increase in the water barrier properties of the films while reducing the relatively constant values of sustained release. Antimicrobial performance was correlated with the release of silver ions, indicating threshold concentrations for biocide action of <6μg/L and 9-14μg/L for surface contact and in liquid media, respectively. Either by surface contact or by immersion in growth medium or vegetable soup, the coated films displayed a strong bactericidal effect against Salmonella enterica. The application of this functional barrier thus offers the possibility of tuning the release profiles of the films to suit a specific application and puts forth the possible suitability of these materials for food packaging or other migration sensitive applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of intermediate ZrO2-CaO coatings deposited by cold thermal spraying on the titanium-porcelain bond in dental restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelli, Emanuela; Costantino, Maria Laura; Villa, Tomaso; Bagnoli, Paola; Zannoli, Romano; Corazza, Ivan; Cercenelli, Laura

    2014-11-01

    Metal ceramic systems are used for the majority of dental crowns and fixed dental prostheses. However, problems with porcelain bonding are encountered when titanium is used as the substrate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intermediate calcium oxide-stabilized zirconia (ZrO2-CaO) coatings deposited by cold thermal spraying on the titanium-porcelain bonding in dental restorations. Two different types of ZrO2-CaO coatings obtained by oxyacetylene cold thermal spraying deposition were applied on commercially pure titanium bars before adding the porcelain layer. Type 1 was obtained by directly spraying the ZrO2-CaO powder on the titanium substrate. Type 2 was obtained by spraying a bond coat of nickel-aluminum-molybdenum alloy before spraying the ZrO2-CaO powder. Three-point bend tests according to International Organization of Standardization 9693-1:2012 were carried out to evaluate the debonding strength for the ZrO2-CaO-coated specimens (types 1 and 2) in comparison with a noncoated group (control), which received a traditional bonder-based adhesive technique. The results were compared with ANOVA, followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls test for pairwise comparisons. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectroscopy were used to examine the interfacial properties and the failure mode of each group. Mean (±standard deviation) debonding strength values for type 1 coating (25.97 ±2.53 MPa) and control (23.51 ±2.94 MPa) were near the acceptable lower limit of 25 MPa indicated by the International Organization of Standardization 9693-1:2012 and were not significantly different (Student-Newman-Keuls test, P>.05). Type 2 coating produced an improved titanium-porcelain bonding (debonding strength=39.47 ±4.12 MPa), significantly higher than both type 1 (Student-Newman-Keuls test, Pporcelain bond. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental-calculation study of ion-plasma thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades made of intermetallic nickel superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinovskii, S. A.; Matveev, P. V.; Zhivushkin, A. A.; Tikhomirova, E. A.; Belyaeva, L. A.; Balakin, S. M.

    2017-06-01

    The ion-plasma thermal barrier coatings deposited onto samples and blades made of intermetallic VKNA-1V and VKNA-25 alloys are tested in a laboratory. The external ceramic layer of the thermal barrier coatings (TBC) is formed by magnetron sputtering of zirconium alloy targets and has a columnar structure. The influence of NiCrAlY(Re, Ta, Hf) + AlNiY(Hf) + ZrYGdO TBC on the long-term strength at a test temperature of 1200°C and on the high-cycle fatigue at a temperature of 900°C is studied. Blades with TBC are subjected to thermal cycling tests in the temperature range 950 ↔ 400°C and 1050 ↔ 400°C during air cooling and in the range 950 ↔ 200°C during water cooling at 500 cycles. The temperature fields in the cross section of a blade airfoil during thermal cycling are calculated. The laws of formation of fracture zones and the development of thermal fatigue cracks under the conditions that are close to the operating conditions of nozzle TBC-containing blades are investigated.

  15. Comparative of the Tribological Performance of Hydraulic Cylinders Coated by the Process of Thermal Spray HVOF and Hard Chrome Plating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Castro

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the necessity of obtaining a surface that is resistant to wear and oxidation, hydraulic cylinders are typically coated with hard chrome through the process of electroplating process. However, this type of coating shows an increase of the area to support sealing elements, which interferes directly in the lubrication of the rod, causing damage to the seal components and bringing oil leakage. Another disadvantage in using the electroplated hard chromium process is the presence of high level hexavalent chromium Cr+6 which is not only carcinogenic, but also extremely contaminating to the environment. Currently, the alternative process of high-speed thermal spraying (HVOF - High Velocity Oxy-Fuel, uses composite materials (metal-ceramic possessing low wear rates. Research has shown that some mechanical properties are changed positively with the thermal spray process in industrial applications. It is evident that a coating based on WC has upper characteristics as: wear resistance, low friction coefficient, with respect to hard chrome coatings. These characteristics were analyzed by optical microscopy, roughness measurements and wear test.

  16. Qualification of the system for thermal coating rehabilitation in situ of oil pipeline in operation; Qualificacao de sistema de reabilitacao in situ de revestimento termico para oleodutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koebsch, Andre; Correa, Anyr Rosa; Cabral, Glaucia Brazuna; Castanheiras Junior, Wilson Gil [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliver, Joao Hipolito de Lima; Pinto, Mucio Eduardo Amarante Costa [PETROBRAS Transporte S.A. (TRANSPETRO), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The transfer of some derived products of petroleum with high viscosity is accomplished with the same ones heated up. These buried pipelines are provided of Thermal Isolation System (TIS). Those TIS are composed with a polyurethane foam layer (PU) that is externally protected by polyethylene layer (PE). The acids production was generated by the deterioration of TIS. This associated with an absence of anticorrosive coating on the pipeline cause the corrosion with its thickness loss and consequently it's endangered. The rehabilitation of the existent TIS was done necessary to control this corrosive process, by reason of the Cathodic Protection System usually used in complement to the anticorrosive coating does not work on this TIS. A TIS rehabilitation process with the pipeline in operation was specified by PETROBRAS - ENGINEER and TRANSPETRO. It's qualified and was composed by two stages: Pre-qualification: tests in factory using pipes with original TIS and operating with hot water to 85 deg C. This stage was composed by the removal of original TIS, pipe surface preparation, application and tests on the anticorrosive coating, application and tests of the PU foam and application and tests of the PE casing. Qualification: stage composed by the application in field of the new TIS in a thousand meters of the pipeline OBATI-SP, operated by TRANSPETRO, and tests of the pipe assembly. This work presents the results of the Qualification for the rehabilitation of the thermal coating. It achieves the quality level demanded by PETROBRAS - Engineer and TRANSPETRO. (author)

  17. ZnO Coatings with Controlled Pore Size, Crystallinity and Electrical Conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman SCHMACK

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide is a wide bandgap semiconductor with unique optical, electrical and catalytic properties. Many of its practical applications rely on the materials pore structure, crystallinity and electrical conductivity. We report a synthesis method for ZnO films with ordered mesopore structure and tuneable crystallinity and electrical conductivity. The synthesis relies on dip-coating of solutions containing micelles of an amphiphilic block copolymer and complexes of Zn2+ ions with aliphatic ligands. A subsequent calcination at 400°C removes the template and induces crystallization of the pore walls. The pore structure is controlled by the template polymer, whereas the aliphatic ligands control the crystallinity of the pore walls. Complexes with a higher thermal stability result in ZnO films with a higher content of residual carbon, smaller ZnO crystals and therefore lower electrical conductivity. The paper discusses the ability of different types of ligands to assist in the synthesis of mesoporous ZnO and relates the structure and thermal stability of the precursor complexes to the crystallinity and electrical conductivity of the zinc oxide.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.1.8634

  18. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  19. Combined Effects of JP-8 Fuel and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Performance and Emissions of a DI Diesel Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klett, David

    1999-01-01

    .... The experiments were conducted on a Ricardo Hydra single-cylinder DI diesel engine. Thin ceramic thermal barrier coatings were applied to various combustion chamber surfaces including the piston crown, cylinder head, and cylinder liner...

  20. RESEARCH OF PROCESSES ON FORMATION AND TRIBOTECHNICAL PROPERTIES OF WEAR-RESISTANT COMPOSITE GAS THERMAL COATINGS BEING DISPERSIVELY STRENGTHENED BY SYNTHETIC DIAMONDS AND ELECTRO-CORUNDUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Kobjakov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation processes, tribotechnical and wear-resistant properties of composite gas thermal coatings being dispersively strengthened by synthetic diamonds and electro-corundum are investigated in the paper.

  1. Combined Effects of JP-8 Fuel and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Performance and Emissions of a DI Diesel Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klett, David

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the combined effects of using JP-8 Fuel in conjunction with thin thermal barrier coatings on the specific fuel consumption and emissions of UHC, NO, and smoke of a DI diesel engine...

  2. Voltage-controlled surface wrinkling of elastomeric coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Kamminga, J.D.; Boersma, A.; Andritsch, T.; Steeneken, P.G.

    2013-01-01

    Wrinkling of elastomeric coatings by an electric field is reported. The associated changes in the coating's optical properties yield switchable mirrors and windows. The field Ec needed to induce wrinkling is a factor of 4.4 lower than the theoretically predicted value, which is attributed to

  3. A minimal model for flow control on an aerofoil using a poro-elastic coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Divya; Bottaro, Alessandro; Govindarajan, Rama

    2014-05-01

    A minimal model is obtained for vortex-shedding from an aerofoil with a porous coating of flow-compliant feather-like actuators, in order to better understand this passive way to achieve flow control. This model is realized by linearly coupling a minimal-order model for vortex-shedding from the same aerofoil without any such coating with an equation for the poro-elastic coating, here modelled as a linear damped oscillator. The various coefficients in this model, derived using perturbation techniques, aid in our understanding of the physics of this fluid-structure interaction problem. The minimal model for a coated aerofoil indicates the presence of distinct regimes that are dependent on the flow and coating characteristics. The models and the parametric studies performed provide insight into the selection of optimal coating parameters, to enable flow control at low Reynolds numbers.

  4. INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGICAL MODES OF MAGNETIC-ELECTRIC GRINDING ON MICROSTRUCTURE OF GAS-THERMAL SPRAYED NI–CR–B–SI-COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Spiridonov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of technological modes of magnetic-electric grinding on structural changes in a surface layer of gas-thermal sprayed coatings is investigated in the paper. The paper presents optimum modes of  coating roughing and finishing processes.

  5. Thermal control system for SSF sensor/electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akau, R. L.; Lee, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal control system was designed for the Space Station Freedom (SSF) sensor/electronics box (SSTACK). Multi-layer insulation and heaters are used to maintain the temperatures of the critical components within their operating and survival temperature limits. Detailed and simplified SSTACK thermal models were developed and temperatures were calculated for worst-case orbital conditions. A comparison between the two models showed very good agreement. Temperature predictions were also compared to measured temperatures from a thermal-vacuum test.

  6. Power Control and Monitoring Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the MAP Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The specific heater control requirements for the thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland are described. The testing was conducted in the 10m wide x 18.3m high Space Environment Simulator (SES) Thermal Vacuum Facility. The MAP thermal testing required accurate quantification of spacecraft and fixture power levels while minimizing heater electrical emissions. The special requirements of the MAP test necessitated construction of five (5) new heater racks.

  7. Coating of reverse osmosis membranes with amphiphilic copolymers for biofouling control

    KAUST Repository

    Bucs, Szilard

    2017-05-30

    Surface coating of membranes may be a promising option to control biofilm development and biofouling impact on membrane performance of spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) systems. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of an amphiphilic copolymer coating on biofilm formation and biofouling control. The coating was composed of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and perfluorodecyl acrylate (PFA), respectively. Commercial RO membranes were coated with HEMA-PFA copolymer film. Long and short term biofouling studies with coated and uncoated membranes and feed spacer were performed using membrane fouling simulators (MFSs) operated in parallel, fed with water containing nutrients. For the long-term studies pressure drop development in time was monitored and after eight days the MFSs were opened and the accumulated biofilm on the membrane and spacer sheets was quantified and characterized. The presence of the membrane coating was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results showed that the amphiphilic coating (i) delayed biofouling (a lower pressure drop increase by a factor of 3 and a lower accumulated active biomass amount by a factor of 6), (ii) influenced the biofilm composition (23% lower polysaccharides and 132% higher protein content) and (iii) was still completely present on the membrane at the end of the biofouling study, showing that the coating was strongly attached to the membrane surface. Using coated membranes and feed spacers in combination with advanced cleaning strategies may be a suitable way to control biofouling.

  8. Analysis of the energetic/environmental performances of gas turbine plant: Effect of thermal barrier coatings and mass of cooling air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ion V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 is the most common material to be applied in thermal barrier coatings owing to its excellent properties: low thermal conductivity, high toughness and thermal expansion coefficient as ceramic material. Calculation has been made to evaluate the gains of thermal barrier coatings applied on gas turbine blades. The study considers a top ceramic coating Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 on a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and Inconel 738LC as substrate. For different thickness and different cooling air flow rates, a thermodynamic analysis has been performed and pollutants emissions (CO, NOx have been estimated to analyze the effect of rising the gas inlet temperature. The effect of thickness and thermal conductivity of top coating and the mass flow rate of cooling air have been analyzed. The model for heat transfer analysis gives the temperature reduction through the wall blade for the considered conditions and the results presented in this contribution are restricted to a two considered limits: (1 maximum allowable temperature for top layer (1200ºC and (2 for blade material (1000ºC. The model can be used to analyze other materials that support higher temperatures helping in the development of new materials for thermal barrier coatings.

  9. An Integrated Study of a Novel Thermal Coating for Nb-Based High Temperature Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shizhong [Southern Univ. and A & M College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on the interfaces between niobium substrate and coatings at atomic level. Potential oxidation barrier bond coat, Nb₂AlC and high entropy alloys, and top coat candidates were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in our labs. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students and postdoc training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  10. Photodetectors with passive thermal radiation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Dodson, Brian W.

    2001-10-02

    A new class of photodetectors which include means for passive shielding against undesired thermal radiation is disclosed. Such devices can substitute in applications currently requiring cooled optical sensors, such as IR detection and imaging. This description is included for purposes of searching, and is not intended to limit or otherwise influence the interpretation of the present invention.

  11. Combined Experimental and Numerical Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Awate; Tabakoff, Widen; Swar, Rohan; Shin, Dongyun; Woggon, Nthanial; Miller, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC) blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests of particle surface interactions were performed in specially designed tunnels to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDF) were developed to represent experimentally-based correlations for particle surface interaction models which were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics after each surface impact. The experimentally based erosion UDF model was used to predict the TBC erosion rates on the turbine blade surfaces based on the computed statistical data of the particles impact locations, velocities and angles relative to the blade surface. Computational results are presented for the predicted TBC blade erosion in a single stage commercial APU turbine, for a NASA designed automotive turbine, and for the NASA turbine scaled for modern rotorcraft operating conditions. The erosion patterns in the turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5 percent of the stator blade span representing the flow cooling the combustor liner.

  12. Biomimetic thermal barrier coating in jet engine to resist volcanic ash deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Schulz, Uwe; Muth, Tobias; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The threat of volcanic ash to aviation safety is attracting extensive attention when several commercial jet aircraft were damaged after flying through volcanic ash clouds from the May 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helen in Washington, U.S. and especially after the air traffic disruption in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. A major hazard presented by volcanic ash to aircraft is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Due to the fact ash has a lower melting point, around 1100 °C, than the gas temperature in the hot section (between 1400 to 2000 °C), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components (e.g., combustor and turbine blades), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components of the engine creating, substantial damage or even engine failure after ingestion. Here, inspiring form the natural surface of lotus leaf (exhibiting extreme water repellency, known as 'lotus effect'), we firstly create the multifunctional surface thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by producing a hierarchical structure with femtosecond laser pulses. In detail, we investigate the effect of one of primary femtosecond laser irradiation process parameter (scanning speed) on the hydrophobicity of water droplets onto the two kinds of TBCs fabricated by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spray (APS), respectively as well as their corresponding to morphology. It is found that, comparison with the original surface (without femtosecond laser ablation), all of the irradiated samples demonstrate more significant hydrophobic properties due to nanostructuring. On the basis of these preliminary room-temperature results, the wettability of volcanic ash droplets will be analysed at the high temperature to constrain the potential impact of volcanic ash on the jet engines.

  13. Role of Oxides and Porosity on High-Temperature Oxidation of Liquid-Fueled HVOF Thermal-Sprayed Ni50Cr Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, B.; Bai, M.; Voisey, K. T.; Hussain, T.

    2017-02-01

    High chromium content in Ni50Cr thermally sprayed coatings can generate a dense and protective scale at the surface of coating. Thus, the Ni50Cr coating is widely used in high-temperature oxidation and corrosion applications. A commercially available gas atomized Ni50Cr powder was sprayed onto a power plant steel (ASME P92) using a liquid-fueled high velocity oxy-fuel thermal spray with three processing parameters in this study. Microstructure of as-sprayed coatings was examined using oxygen content analysis, mercury intrusion porosimetry, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Short-term air oxidation tests (4 h) of freestanding coatings (without boiler steel substrate) in a thermogravimetric analyzer at 700 °C were performed to obtain the kinetics of oxidation of the as-sprayed coating. Long-term air oxidation tests (100 h) of the coated substrates were performed at same temperature to obtain the oxidation products for further characterization in detail using SEM/EDX and XRD. In all samples, oxides of various morphologies developed on top of the Ni50Cr coatings. Cr2O3 was the main oxidation product on the surface of all three coatings. The coating with medium porosity and medium oxygen content has the best high-temperature oxidation performance in this study.

  14. Vesicle coating and uncoating: controlling the formation of large COPII-coated carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Anna K

    2009-01-01

    The basic mechanisms underlying the formation of coated vesicles are now defined in considerable detail. This article highlights recent developments in our understanding of the problem of exporting large macromolecular cargo such as procollagen from the endoplasmic reticulum and discusses the implications that this has for cell and tissue organisation and human disease. PMID:20401317

  15. Versatile surface engineering of porous nanomaterials with bioinspired polyphenol coatings for targeted and controlled drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Wu, Shuxian; Wu, Cuichen; Qiu, Liping; Zhu, Guizhi; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I.-Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles, termed MSN@polyphenol. The polyphenol coatings not only improved colloidal stability and prevented premature drug leakage, but also provided a scaffold for immobilization of targeting moieties, such as aptamers. Both immobilization of targeting aptamers and synthesis of polyphenol coating are easily accomplished without the aid of any other organic reagents. Importantly, the polyphenol coating (EGCg) used in this study could be biodegraded by acidic pH and intracellular glutathione, resulting in the release of trapped anticancer drugs. Based on confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity experiments, drug-loaded and polyphenol-coated MSNs were shown to possess highly efficient internalization and an apparent cytotoxic effect on target cancer, but not control, cells. Our results suggest that these highly biocompatible and biodegradable polyphenol-coated MSNs are promising vectors for controlled-release biomedical applications and cancer therapy.The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

  16. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  17. A thermal manikin with human thermoregulatory control: implementation and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Ehab; Sirén, Kai

    2012-09-01

    Tens of different sorts of thermal manikins are employed worldwide, mainly in the evaluation of clothing thermal insulation and thermal environments. They are regulated thermally using simplified control modes. This paper reports on the implementation and validation of a new thermoregulatory control mode for thermal manikins. The new control mode is based on a multi-segmental Pierce (MSP) model. In this study, the MSP control mode was implemented, using the LabVIEW platform, onto the control system of the thermal manikin 'Therminator'. The MSP mode was then used to estimate the segmental equivalent temperature (t(eq)) along with constant surface temperature (CST) mode under two asymmetric thermal conditions. Furthermore, subjective tests under the same two conditions were carried out using 17 human subjects. The estimated segmental t(eq) from the experiments with the two modes and from the subjective assessment were compared in order to validate the use of the MSP mode for the estimation of t(eq). The results showed that the t(eq) values estimated by the MSP mode were closer to the subjective mean votes under the two test conditions for most body segments and compared favourably with values estimated by the CST mode.

  18. Thermal Stability and Oxidation Resistance of Nanocomposite TiC/a-C Protective Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martinez, Diego; Lopez-Cartes, Carlos; Gago, Raul; Fernandez, Asuncion; Carlos Sanchez-Lopez, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Nanocomposite films composed by small crystallites of hard phases embedded in an amorphous lubricant matrix have been extensively studied as protective coatings. These kinds of coatings have often to work in extreme environments, exposed to high temperatures (above 800-900 degrees C), and/or

  19. Demonstration of Thermally Sprayed Metal and Polymer Coatings for Steel Structures at Fort Bragg, NC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Application of EAA-modified polyolefin powder coating (lighter color ) with flame spray...14 Figure 9. Polyolefin coating (lighter color ) applied on water tower leg...systems: • SSPC-SP5 (NACE No. 1) “ White Metal Blast Cleaning” was the required level of surface preparation for all surfaces of both the heating plant’s

  20. Effect of Kaolin Clay and Alumina on Thermal Performance and Char Morphology of Intumescent fire retardant coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    aziz Hammad

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC have been developed by using ammonium polyphosphate, expandable graphite, melamine, boric acid, kaolin clay and alumina as fillers bound together with epoxy resin and cured with the help of curing agent. Five different formulations were developed with and without using fillers. Cured samples were burned in furnace at 500°C for 2h for char expansion. Bunsen burner test was performed for 1h using UL-94 vertical burning test to investigate the thermal performance of IFRC. The resultant char obtained after burning of coated samples were characterized by using field emission scanning electron microscopy for char morphology. Char composition was analyzed by using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis was carried out to investigate the residual weight of coating. Results showed that formulation with 0.5 weight % of kaolin clay and 0.5 weight % of alumina provide best thermal performance, uniform and multi-porous char structure with high anti-oxidation property.

  1. CubeSat Form Factor Thermal Control Louvers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal control of small spacecraft, including CubeSats, is a challenge for the next era of NASA spaceflight. Science objectives and components will still require...

  2. INTEGRAL RADIATORS FOR NEXT GENERATION THERMAL CONTROL SYSTEMS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main goal of spacecraft thermal control systems is to maintain internal and external temperature within acceptable boundaries while minimizing impact on vehicle...

  3. Spacecraft Thermal Control System Not Requiring Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The thermal management of spacecraft would be enhanced by dynamic control over surface emissivity in the mid-infrared. In this SBIR program, Triton Systems proposes...

  4. Thermal sensors to control polymer forming. Challenge and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeunier, F.; Boyard, N.; Sarda, A.; Plot, C.; Lefèvre, N.; Petit, I.; Colomines, G.; Allanic, N.; Bailleul, J. L.

    2017-10-01

    Many thermal sensors are already used, for many years, to better understand and control material forming processes, especially polymer processing. Due to technical constraints (high pressure, sealing, sensor dimensions…) the thermal measurement is often performed in the tool or close its surface. Thus, it only gives partial and disturbed information. Having reliable information about the heat flux exchanges between the tool and the material during the process would be very helpful to improve the control of the process and to favor the development of new materials. In this work, we present several sensors developed in labs to study the molding steps in forming processes. The analysis of the obtained thermal measurements (temperature, heat flux) shows the required sensitivity threshold of sensitivity of thermal sensors to be able to detect on-line the rate of thermal reaction. Based on these data, we will present new sensor designs which have been patented.

  5. Automatic Thermal Control System with Temperature Difference or Derivation Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darina Matiskova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Automatic thermal control systems seem to be non-linear systems with thermal inertias and time delay. A controller is also non-linear because its information and power signals are limited. The application of methods that are available to on-linear systems together with computer simulation and mathematical modelling creates a possibility to acquire important information about the researched system. This paper provides a new look at the heated system model and also designs the structure of the thermal system with temperature derivation feedback. The designed system was simulated by using a special software in Turbo Pascal. Time responses of this system are compared to responses of a conventional thermal system. The thermal system with temperature derivation feedback provides better transients, better quality of regulation and better dynamical properties.

  6. Stress controlled gas-barrier oxide coatings on semi-crystalline polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochat, G. [Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymeres (LTC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Leterrier, Y. [Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymeres (LTC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Fayet, P. [Tetra Pak (Suisse) SA, Tetra Pak R and D, Plasma Technology, C.P. 32, CH-1680 Romont (Switzerland); Manson, J.-A.E. [Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymeres (LTC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jan-anders.manson@epfl.ch

    2005-07-22

    Thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) barrier coatings formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates were subjected to post-deposition annealing treatments in the temperature range for orientation relaxation of the polymer. The resulting change in coating internal stress state was measured by means of thermo-mechanical analyses, and its effect on the coating cohesive properties and coating/polymer adhesion was determined from the analysis of uniaxial fragmentation tests in situ in a scanning electron microscope, assuming a Weibull-type probability of failure and a perfectly plastic stress transfer at the SiO{sub x}/PET interface. The strain to failure and intrinsic fracture toughness of the ultrathin oxide coating were found to be as high as 5.7% and 10 J/m{sup 2}, respectively, and its interfacial shear strength with PET was found to be close to 100 MPa. Annealing for 10 min at 150 deg. C did not modify the oxygen permeation properties of the SiO{sub x}/PET film, which suggests that the defect population of the oxide was not affected by the thermal treatment. In contrast, the coating internal compressive stress resulting from annealing was shown to increase by 40% the apparent coating cohesive properties and adhesion to the polymer.

  7. Theoretical prediction of energy release rate for interface crack initiation by thermal stress in environmental barrier coatings for ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, E.; Umeno, Y.

    2017-05-01

    As weight reduction of turbines for aircraft engines is demanded to improve fuel consumption and curb emission of carbon dioxide, silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiC/SiC) are drawing enormous attention as high-pressure turbine materials. For preventing degradation of SiC/SiC, environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for ceramics are deposited on the composites. The purpose of this study is to establish theoretical guidelines for structural design which ensures the mechanical reliability of EBC. We conducted finite element method (FEM) analysis to calculate energy release rates (ERRs) for interface crack initiation due to thermal stress in EBC consisting of Si-based bond coat, Mullite and Ytterbium (Yb)-silicate layers on a SiC/SiC substrate. In the FEM analysis, the thickness of one EBC layer was changed from 25 μm to 200 μm while the thicknesses of the other layers were fixed at 25 μm, 50 μm and 100 μm. We compared ERRs obtained by the FEM analysis and a simple theory for interface crack in a single-layered structure where ERR is estimated as nominal strain energy in the coating layers multiplied by a constant factor (independent of layer thicknesses). We found that, unlike the case of single-layered structures, the multiplication factor is no longer a constant but is determined by the combination of consisting coating layer thicknesses.

  8. The ceramic coatings bonding under ultrasonic control; L'adherence des revetements ceramiques sous controle ultrasonore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossuat, B. [Cetim-Centre Technique des Industries Mecaniques, 30 - Senlis (France)

    2001-07-01

    The plasma spaying of ceramic coating is largely used in the nuclear and aeronautic industries. To control these coatings integrity destructive tests are today used. In correlation with the destructive tests, an ultrasonic testing has been developed. It is presented and discussed in this paper. (A.L.B.)

  9. Active Thermal Control Experiments for LISA Ground Verification Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Sei; DeBra, Daniel B.

    2006-11-01

    The primary mission goal of LISA is detecting gravitational waves. LISA uses laser metrology to measure the distance between proof masses in three identical spacecrafts. The total acceleration disturbance to each proof mass is required to be below 3 × 10-15 m/s2√Hz . Optical path length variations on each optical bench must be kept below 40 pm/√Hz over 1 Hz to 0.1 mHz. Thermal variations due to, for example, solar radiation or temperature gradients across the proof mass housing will distort the spacecraft causing changes in the mass attraction and sensor location. We have developed a thermal control system developed for the LISA gravitational reference sensor (GRS) ground verification testing which provides thermal stability better than 1 mK/√Hz to f control for the LISA spacecraft to compensate solar irradiation. Thermally stable environment is very demanded for LISA performance verification. In a lab environment specifications can be met with considerable amount of insulation and thermal mass. For spacecraft, the very limited thermal mass calls for an active control system which can meet disturbance rejection and stability requirements simultaneously in the presence of long time delay. A simple proportional plus integral control law presently provides approximately 1 mK/√Hz of thermal stability for over 80 hours. Continuing development of a model predictive feed-forward algorithm will extend performance to below 1 mK/√Hz at f < 1 mHz and lower.

  10. A new process control strategy for aqueous film coating of pellets in fluidised bed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C.C.; Sonnergaard, Jørn; Bertelsen, Pernille Scholdan

    2003-01-01

    The parameters with effect on maximum spray rate and maximum relative outlet air humidity when coating pellets in a fluidised bed were investigated. The tested variables include type of water based modified release film coating (Eudragit® NE 30D, Eudragit® RS 30D, Aquacoat ECD®) coating principle...... to be the controlling factor. The type of pellets affected the maximum spray rate. A thermodynamic model for the coating process is employed throughout the process and not just during steady state. The thermodynamic model is incorporated into a new process control strategy. The process control strategy is based on in......-process calculation of degree of utilisation of the potential evaporation energy (DUE) of the outlet air and the relative outlet air humidity (RH). The spray rate is maximised using set points of DUE and RH as control parameters. The product temperature is controlled simultaneously by regulating the inlet air...

  11. A Review of Tribological Coatings for Control Drive Mechanisms in Space Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CJ Larkin; JD Edington; BJ Close

    2006-02-21

    Tribological coatings must provide lubrication for moving components of the control drive mechanism for a space reactor and prevent seizing due to friction or diffusion welding to provide highly reliable and precise control of reflector position over the mission lifetime. Several coatings were evaluated based on tribological performance at elevated temperatures and in ultrahigh vacuum environments. Candidates with proven performance in the anticipated environment are limited primarily to disulfide materials. Irradiation data for these coatings is nonexistent. Compatibility issues between coating materials and structural components may require the use of barrier layers between the solid lubricant and structural components to prevent deleterious interactions. It would be advisable to consider possible lubricant interactions prior to down-selection of structural materials. A battery of tests was proposed to provide the necessary data for eventual solid lubricant/coating selection.

  12. The regulation of sepiolite surface free energy and its impact on the thermal insulation property of coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Liang, Jinsheng; Wang, Fei; Tang, Qingguo; Chen, Yalei

    2014-05-01

    Surface modification is used to regulate surface free energy of sepiolite with 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilanes (3-GPTMS), 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilanes (3-MAPTMS) and 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (3-MPTMS). Through characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, surface free energy, zeta potential and sedimentation measurements and infrared emissivity, it is found that the surface free energy of 3-MPTMS modified sepiolite decreases to 31.72 mJ/m2 and the percentage of polar component increases to 89.75%, thus leading to that the infrared emissivity of 3-MPTMS modified sepiolite increase to be higher than 0.8 and the dispersion of sepiolite has been improved. The excellent thermal insulation property of coating is prepared with 10% additive amount of 3-MPTMS modified sepiolite and the temperature difference between upper and lower box of modified sepiolite coatings is 10 degrees C which is higher than the untreated sepiolite.

  13. Thermal response of rigid and flexible insulations and reflective coating in an aeroconvective heating environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Chiu, S. A.; Iverson, D. J.; Lowe, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    Described here is the thermal performance of rigid and flexible thermal protection systems considered for potential use in future Aeroassist Space Transfer Vehicles. The thermal response of these materials subjected to aeroconvective heating from a plasma arc is described. Properties that were measured included the thermal conductivity of both rigid and flexible insulations at various temperatures and pressures and the emissivity of the fabrics used in the flexible insulations. The results from computerized thermal analysis models describing the thermal response of these materials subjected to flight conditions are included.

  14. MMOD Protection and Degradation Effects for Thermal Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) environment overview Hypervelocity impact effects & MMOD shielding MMOD risk assessment process Requirements & protection techniques - ISS - Shuttle - Orion/Commercial Crew Vehicles MMOD effects on spacecraft systems & improving MMOD protection - Radiators Coatings - Thermal protection system (TPS) for atmospheric entry vehicles Coatings - Windows - Solar arrays - Solar array masts - EVA Handrails - Thermal Blankets Orbital Debris provided by JSC & is the predominate threat in low Earth orbit - ORDEM 3.0 is latest model (released December 2013) - http://orbitaldebris.jsc.nasa.gov/ - Man-made objects in orbit about Earth impacting up to 16 km/s average 9-10 km/s for ISS orbit - High-density debris (steel) is major issue Meteoroid model provided by MSFC - MEM-R2 is latest release - http://www.nasa.gov/offices/meo/home/index.html - Natural particles in orbit about sun Mg-silicates, Ni-Fe, others - Meteoroid environment (MEM): 11-72 km/s Average 22-23 km/s.

  15. CFD Analysis of Thermal Control System Using NX Thermal and Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, C. R.; Harris, M. F. (Editor); McConnell, S. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS) is a key part of the Advanced Plant Habitat (APH) for the International Space Station (ISS). The purpose of this subsystem is to provide thermal control, mainly cooling, to the other APH subsystems. One of these subsystems, the Environmental Control Subsystem (ECS), controls the temperature and humidity of the growth chamber (GC) air to optimize the growth of plants in the habitat. The TCS provides thermal control to the ECS with three cold plates, which use Thermoelectric Coolers (TECs) to heat or cool water as needed to control the air temperature in the ECS system. In order to optimize the TCS design, pressure drop and heat transfer analyses were needed. The analysis for this system was performed in Siemens NX Thermal/Flow software (Version 8.5). NX Thermal/Flow has the ability to perform 1D or 3D flow solutions. The 1D flow solver can be used to represent simple geometries, such as pipes and tubes. The 1D flow method also has the ability to simulate either fluid only or fluid and wall regions. The 3D flow solver is similar to other Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) software. TCS performance was analyzed using both the 1D and 3D solvers. Each method produced different results, which will be evaluated and discussed.

  16. Poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) graphene oxide composite coatings for controlling magnesium implant corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, Kasey; Li, Huaxiu; Cui, X Tracy

    2017-01-15

    Magnesium (Mg) is a promising biodegradable implant material because of its appropriate mechanical properties and safe degradation products. However, in vivo corrosion speed and hydrogen gas production need to be controlled for uses in biomedical applications. Here we report the development of a conducting polymer 3,4-ethylenedioxythiphene (PEDOT) and graphene oxide (GO) composite coating as a corrosion control layer. PEDOT/GO was electropolymerized on Mg samples in ethanol media. The coated Mg samples were subjected to various corrosion tests. The PEDOT/GO coating significantly reduced the rate of corrosion as evidenced by lower Mg ion concentration and pH of the corrosion media. In addition, the coating decreased the evolved hydrogen. Electrochemical analysis of the corroding samples showed more positive corrosion potential, a decreased corrosion current, and an increase in the polarization resistance. PEDOT/GO corrosion protection is attributed to three factors; an initial passive layer preventing solution ingress, buildup of negative charges in the film, and formation of corrosion protective Mg phosphate layer through redox coupling with Mg corrosion. To explore the biocompatibility of the coated implants in vitro, corrosion media from PEDOT/GO coated or uncoated Mg samples were exposed to cultured neurons where PEDOT/GO coated samples showed decreased toxicity. These results suggest that PEDOT/GO coating will be an effective treatment for controlling corrosion of Mg based medical implants. Coating Mg substrates with a PEDOT/GO composite coating showed a significant decrease in corrosion rate. While conducting polymer coatings have been used to prevent corrosion on various metals, there has been little work on the use of these coatings for Mg. Additionally, to our knowledge, there has not been a report of the combined used of conducting polymer and GO as a corrosion control layer. Corrosion control is attributed to an initial barrier layer followed by

  17. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I SBIR program is to develop polymer derived rare earth silicate nanocomposite environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for providing...

  18. Fact Sheet: Control Techniques Guidelines (CTG) for Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Facilities Operation (Surface Coating)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains an August 1996 fact sheet with information regarding the CTG and Alternative Control Techniques (ACT) for Surface Coating at Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Facilities Operations. This document provides a summary of this guidance

  19. Controlled-release fertilizer composition substantially coated with an impermeable layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ankeny, Mark

    2016-03-29

    A controlled-release fertilizer composition is provided that is substantially coated with an impermeable layer. The fertilizer composition may further include one or more hollow sections to allow for root penetration and efficient delivery of nutrients.

  20. High-temperature stable absorber coatings for linear concentrating solar thermal power plants; Hochtemperaturstabile Absorberschichten fuer linear konzentrierende solarthermische Kraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, Christina

    2009-03-23

    This work describes the development of new absorber coatings for different applications - para-bolic trough and linear Fresnel collectors - and operating conditions - absorber in vacuum or in air. The demand for higher efficiencies of solar thermal power plants using parabolic trough technology results in higher temperatures in the collectors and on the absorber tubes. As heat losses increase strongly with increasing temperatures, the need for a lower emissivity of the absorber coating at constant absorptivity arises. The linear Fresnel application envisions ab-sorber tubes stable in air at high temperatures of about 450 C, which are to date commercially not available. This work comprises the theoretical background, the modeling and the fabrication of absorber tubes including the technology transfer to a production-size inline sputter coater. In annealing tests and accompanying optical measurements, degradation processes have been observed and specified more precisely by material characterization techniques. The simulations provided the capability of different materials used as potential IR-reflector. The highest selectivity can be achieved by applying silver which consequently has been chosen for the application in absorber coatings of the parabolic trough technology. Thin silver films how-ever need to be stabilized when used at high temperatures. Appropriate barrier layers as well as process and layer parameters were identified. A high selectivity was achieved and stability of the absorber coating for 1200 h at 500 C in vacuum has been demonstrated. For the application in air, silver was also analyzed as a potential IR-reflector. Even though the stability could be increased considerably, it nevertheless proved to be insufficient. The main factors influencing stability in a positive way are the use of higher quality polishing, additional barrier layers and adequate process parameters. This knowledge was applied for developing coatings which are stable in air at

  1. Preparation of Controlled-Release Fine Particles Using a Dry Coating Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shohei; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Ito, Tomonori; Kabasawa, Kazuhiro; Yuasa, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Wet coating methods use organic solvents to prepare layered particles that provide controlled-release medications. However, this approach has disadvantages in that it can cause particle agglomeration, reduce pharmaceutical stability, and leave residual organic solvents. We used a dry coating method to overcome these issues. Fine particles (less than 50 μm in diameter) of controlled-release theophylline were created using theophylline (TP; model drug), polyethylene glycol 20,000 (PEG; drug fixative), hydrogenated castor oil (HCO; controlled-release material), hydrogenated rapeseed oil (HRSO; controlled-release material), and cornstarch (CS; core particle). An ultrahigh-speed mixer was employed to mix TP and CS for 5 min at 28,000 rpm. Subsequent addition of PEG produced single-core particles with a drug reservoir coating. Addition of HCO and HRSO to these particles produced a controlled-release layer on their surface, resulting in less than 10% TP dissolution after 8 h. We successfully demonstrated that this dry coating method could be used to coat 16-μm CS particles with a drug reservoir layer and a controlled-release layer, producing multi-layer coated single-core particles that were less than 50 μm in diameter. These can be used to prepare controlled-release tablets, capsules, and orally disintegrating tablets.

  2. Microwave absorption properties of carbon nanocoils coated with highly controlled magnetic materials by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guizhen; Gao, Zhe; Tang, Shiwei; Chen, Chaoqiu; Duan, Feifei; Zhao, Shichao; Lin, Shiwei; Feng, Yuhong; Zhou, Lei; Qin, Yong

    2012-12-21

    In this work, atomic layer deposition is applied to coat carbon nanocoils with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) or Ni. The coatings have a uniform and highly controlled thickness. The coated nanocoils with coaxial multilayer nanostructures exhibit remarkably improved microwave absorption properties compared to the pristine carbon nanocoils. The enhanced absorption ability arises from the efficient complementarity between complex permittivity and permeability, chiral morphology, and multilayer structure of the products. This method can be extended to exploit other composite materials benefiting from its convenient control of the impedance matching and combination of dielectric-magnetic multiple loss mechanisms for microwave absorption applications.

  3. Thermal Spray Coatings for High-Temperature Corrosion Protection in Biomass Co-Fired Boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksa, M.; Metsäjoki, J.; Kärki, J.

    2015-01-01

    There are over 1000 biomass boilers and about 500 plants using waste as fuel in Europe, and the numbers are increasing. Many of them encounter serious problems with high-temperature corrosion due to detrimental elements such as chlorides, alkali metals, and heavy metals. By HVOF spraying, it is possible to produce very dense and well-adhered coatings, which can be applied for corrosion protection of heat exchanger surfaces in biomass and waste-to-energy power plant boilers. Four HVOF coatings and one arc sprayed coating were exposed to actual biomass co-fired boiler conditions in superheater area with a probe measurement installation for 5900 h at 550 and 750 °C. The coating materials were Ni-Cr, IN625, Fe-Cr-W-Nb-Mo, and Ni-Cr-Ti. CJS and DJ Hybrid spray guns were used for HVOF spraying to compare the corrosion resistance of Ni-Cr coating structures. Reference materials were ferritic steel T92 and nickel super alloy A263. The circulating fluidized bed boiler burnt a mixture of wood, peat and coal. The coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance at 550 °C compared to the ferritic steel. At higher temperature, NiCr sprayed with CJS had the best corrosion resistance. IN625 was consumed almost completely during the exposure at 750 °C.

  4. Controlling Thermal Expansion: A Metal–Organic Frameworks Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Controlling thermal expansion is an important, not yet resolved, and challenging problem in materials research. A conceptual design is introduced here, for the first time, for the use of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) as platforms for controlling thermal expansion devices that can operate in the negative, zero, and positive expansion regimes. A detailed computer simulation study, based on molecular dynamics, is presented to support the targeted application. MOF-5 has been selected as model material, along with three molecules of similar size and known differences in terms of the nature of host–guest interactions. It has been shown that adsorbate molecules can control, in a colligative way, the thermal expansion of the solid, so that changing the adsorbate molecules induces the solid to display positive, zero, or negative thermal expansion. We analyze in depth the distortion mechanisms, beyond the ligand metal junction, to cover the ligand distortions, and the energetic and entropic effect on the thermo-structural behavior. We provide an unprecedented atomistic insight on the effect of adsorbates on the thermal expansion of MOFs as a basic tool toward controlling the thermal expansion. PMID:28190918

  5. Controlling Thermal Expansion: A Metal-Organic Frameworks Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, Salvador R G; Bueno-Perez, Rocio; Hamad, Said; Dubbeldam, David; Ruiz-Salvador, A Rabdel; Calero, Sofia

    2016-11-22

    Controlling thermal expansion is an important, not yet resolved, and challenging problem in materials research. A conceptual design is introduced here, for the first time, for the use of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as platforms for controlling thermal expansion devices that can operate in the negative, zero, and positive expansion regimes. A detailed computer simulation study, based on molecular dynamics, is presented to support the targeted application. MOF-5 has been selected as model material, along with three molecules of similar size and known differences in terms of the nature of host-guest interactions. It has been shown that adsorbate molecules can control, in a colligative way, the thermal expansion of the solid, so that changing the adsorbate molecules induces the solid to display positive, zero, or negative thermal expansion. We analyze in depth the distortion mechanisms, beyond the ligand metal junction, to cover the ligand distortions, and the energetic and entropic effect on the thermo-structural behavior. We provide an unprecedented atomistic insight on the effect of adsorbates on the thermal expansion of MOFs as a basic tool toward controlling the thermal expansion.

  6. Electrochemical Behavior of Bilayer Thermal-Spray Coatings in Low-Temperature Corrosion Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Sadeghimeresht

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cr3C2-NiCr coatings are greatly used to protect critical components in corrosive environments and to extend their lifetime and/or improve functional performance. However, the pores formed during spraying restrict the coating’s applicability area for many corrosion protection applications. To overcome this technical challenge, bilayer coatings have been developed, in which an additional layer (the so-called “intermediate layer” is deposited on the substrate before spraying the Cr3C2-NiCr coating (the so-called “top layer”. The corrosion behavior of the bilayer coating depends on the composition and microstructure of each layer. In the present work, different single-layer coatings (i.e., Cr3C2-NiCr, Fe- and Ni-based coatings were initially sprayed by a high-velocity air fuel (HVAF process. Microstructure analysis, as well as electrochemical tests, for example, open-circuit potential (OCP and polarization tests, were performed. The potential difference (ΔE had a great influence on galvanic corrosion between the top and intermediate layers, and thus, the coatings were ranked based on the OCP values (from high to low as follows: NiCoCrAlY > NiCr > Cr3C2-NiCr > NiAl > Fe-based coatings (alloyed with Cr > pure Ni. The Ni-based coatings were chosen to be further used as intermediate layers with the Cr3C2-NiCr top layer due to their capabilities to show high OCP. The corrosion resistance (Rp of the bilayer coatings was ranked (from high to low as follows: NiCoCrAlY/Cr3C2-NiCr > NiCr/Cr3C2-NiCr > NiAl/Cr3C2-NiCr > Ni/Cr3C2-NiCr. It was shown that splat boundaries and interconnected pores are detrimental for corrosion resistance, however, a sufficient reservoir of protective scale-forming elements (such as Cr or/and Al in the intermediate layer can significantly improve the corrosion resistance.

  7. Self-assembled polyelectrolyte complexes films as efficient compression coating layers for controlled-releasing tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Huo, Mengmeng; Sen Chaudhuri, Arka; Yang, Chen; Cao, Dazhong; Wu, Zhenghong; Qi, Xiaole

    2017-05-01

    Currently, polysaccharide-based hydrogels are widely studied macromolecular networks to modify drug dissolution from controlled-releasing matrix tablets. Among them, polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC) films consisted of chitosan (CS) and sodium alginate (SA) could be obtained via spontaneously assembling under physiological gastrointestinal environment. Here, we utilized these self-assembled PEC films as an efficient coating materials to develop controlled-released matrix tablets through compression coating process, with paracetamol (APAP) as model drug. The constitutive and morphology characteristic studies on these PEC films illustrated that the mixture of CS and SA with the weight ratio of 1:1 would be an promising outer layer for compression-coating tablets. In addition, the in vitro drug releasing behavior experiments demonstrated that the optimized compression coating tablets displayed satisfied zero-order drug releasing profits. Furthermore, the in vivo pharmacokinetic studies of these APAP loaded compression-coated tablets in New Zealand rabbits gave that the T max (12.32 ± 1.05 h) was significantly prolonged (p tablets (Jinfuning ® ) after oral administration. These studies suggest that the compression-coated tablets with self-assembled PEC film as coating outer layer may be a promising strategy for peroral controlled release delivery system of water soluble drugs.

  8. Statistical Design Model (SDM) of satellite thermal control subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshams, Mehran; Zabihian, Ehsan; Aarabi Chamalishahi, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Satellites thermal control, is a satellite subsystem that its main task is keeping the satellite components at its own survival and activity temperatures. Ability of satellite thermal control plays a key role in satisfying satellite's operational requirements and designing this subsystem is a part of satellite design. In the other hand due to the lack of information provided by companies and designers still doesn't have a specific design process while it is one of the fundamental subsystems. The aim of this paper, is to identify and extract statistical design models of spacecraft thermal control subsystem by using SDM design method. This method analyses statistical data with a particular procedure. To implement SDM method, a complete database is required. Therefore, we first collect spacecraft data and create a database, and then we extract statistical graphs using Microsoft Excel, from which we further extract mathematical models. Inputs parameters of the method are mass, mission, and life time of the satellite. For this purpose at first thermal control subsystem has been introduced and hardware using in the this subsystem and its variants has been investigated. In the next part different statistical models has been mentioned and a brief compare will be between them. Finally, this paper particular statistical model is extracted from collected statistical data. Process of testing the accuracy and verifying the method use a case study. Which by the comparisons between the specifications of thermal control subsystem of a fabricated satellite and the analyses results, the methodology in this paper was proved to be effective. Key Words: Thermal control subsystem design, Statistical design model (SDM), Satellite conceptual design, Thermal hardware

  9. Smart Multifunctional Coatings for Corrosion Detection and Control in the Aerospace Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    Nearly all metals and their alloys are subject to corrosion that causes them to lose their structural integrity or other critical functionality. It is essential to detect corrosion when it occurs, and preferably at its early stage, so that action can be taken to avoid structural damage or loss of function. Protective coatings are the most commonly used method of corrosion control. However, progressively stricter environmental regulations have resulted in the ban of many commercially available corrosion protective coatings due to the harmful effects of their solvents or corrosion inhibitors. This work concerns the development of a multifunctional, smart coating for the autonomous control of corrosion. This coating is being developed to have the inherent ability to detect the chemical changes associated with the onset of corrosion and respond autonomously to indicate it and control it.

  10. Thermal control of the Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Ann B.; Roettker, William A.

    1987-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) will employ lidar techniques to study the atmosphere from space. The LITE instrument will be flown in the Space Shuttle Payload Bay with an earth directed orientation. The experiment thermal control incorporates both active and passive techniques. The Laser Transmitter Module (LTM) and the system electronics will be actively cooled through the Shuttle pallet coolant loop. The receiver system and experiment platform will be passsively controlled through the use of insulation and component surface properties. This paper explains the thermal control techniques used and the analysis results, with primary focus on the receiver system.

  11. High-Temperature Oxidation-Resistant and Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion NiAl-Base Bond Coat Developed for a Turbine Blade Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Many critical gas turbine engine components are currently made from Ni-base superalloys that are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC). The TBC consists of a ZrO2-based top coat and a bond coat that is used to enhance the bonding between the superalloy substrate and the top coat. MCrAlY alloys (CoCrAlY and NiCrAlY) are currently used as bond coats and are chosen for their very good oxidation resistance. TBC life is frequently limited by the oxidation resistance of the bond coat, along with a thermal expansion mismatch between the metallic bond coat and the ceramic top coat. The aim of this investigation at the NASA Glenn Research Center was to develop a new longer life, higher temperature bond coat by improving both the oxidation resistance and the thermal expansion characteristics of the bond coat. Nickel aluminide (NiAl) has excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance and can sustain a protective Al2O3 scale to longer times and higher temperatures in comparison to MCrAlY alloys. Cryomilling of NiAl results in aluminum nitride (AlN) formation that reduces the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the alloy and enhances creep strength. Thus, additions of cryomilled NiAl-AlN to CoCrAlY were examined as a potential bond coat. In this work, the composite alloy was investigated as a stand-alone substrate to demonstrate its feasibility prior to actual use as a coating. About 85 percent of prealloyed NiAl and 15 percent of standard commercial CoCrAlY alloys were mixed and cryomilled in an attritor with stainless steel balls used as grinding media. The milling was carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The milled powder was consolidated by hot extrusion or by hot isostatic pressing. From the consolidated material, oxidation coupons, four-point bend, CTE, and tensile specimens were machined. The CTE measurements were made between room temperature and 1000 C in an argon atmosphere. It is shown that the CTE of the NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY composite bond coat

  12. Thermal Storage Power Balancing with Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The method described in this paper balances power production and consumption with a large number of thermal loads. Linear controllers are used for the loads to track a temperature set point, while Model Predictive Control (MPC) and model estimation of the load behavior are used for coordination...

  13. Active shape control of composite structures under thermal loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binette, P.; Dano, M.-L.; Gendron, G.

    2009-02-01

    Maintaining the shape of high-precision structures such as space antennas and optical mirrors is still a challenging issue for designers. These structures are subjected to varying temperature conditions which often introduce thermal distortions. The development of smart materials offers great potential to correct the shape and to minimize the surface error. In this study, shape control of a composite structure under thermal loading using piezocomposites is investigated. The composite structure is made of a foam core and two carbon-epoxy face sheets. Macro-fiber composite (MFC™) patches are bonded on one side of the structure. The structure is subjected to a through-the-thickness temperature gradient which induces thermal distortion, essentially in the form of bending. The objective is to apply electric potential to the MFC™ actuators such that the deflection can be minimized. Finite-element analyses are conducted using the commercial software ABAQUS. Experiments are performed to study thermally induced distortion, piezoelectric actuation, and compensation of thermal distortion using MFC™ actuators. Numerical and experimental results are compared. A control loop based on strain measurements is used to actively control the structure. The results show that MFC™ actuators can compensate thermal distortion at all times, and that this is an efficient methodology.

  14. Performance of silvered Teflon (trademark) thermal control blankets on spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, Gary; Stuckey, Wayne; Hemminger, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Silverized Teflon (Ag/FEP) is a widely used passive thermal control material for space applications. The material has a very low alpha/e ratio (less than 0.1) for low operating temperatures and is fabricated with various FEP thicknesses (as the Teflon thickness increases, the emittance increases). It is low outgassing and, because of its flexibility, can be applied around complex, curved shapes. Ag/FEP has achieved multiyear lifetimes under a variety of exposure conditions. This has been demonstrated by the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), Solar Max, Spacecraft Charging at High Altitudes (SCATHA), and other flight experiments. Ag/FEP material has been held in place on spacecraft by a variety of methods: mechanical clamping, direct adhesive bonding of tapes and sheets, and by Velcro(TM) tape adhesively bonded to back surfaces. On LDEF, for example, 5-mil blankets held by Velcro(TM) and clamping were used for thermal control over 3- by 4-ft areas on each of 17 trays. Adhesively bonded 2- and 5-mil sheets were used on other LDEF experiments, both for thermal control and as tape to hold other thermal control blankets in place. Performance data over extended time periods are available from a number of flights. The observed effects on optical properties, mechanical properties, and surface chemistry will be summarized in this paper. This leads to a discussion of performance life estimates and other design lessons for Ag/FEP thermal control material.

  15. Fabrication of Polymeric Coatings with Controlled Microtopographies Using an Electrospraying Technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiongyu Guo

    Full Text Available Surface topography of medical implants provides an important biophysical cue on guiding cellular functions at the cell-implant interface. However, few techniques are available to produce polymeric coatings with controlled microtopographies onto surgical implants, especially onto implant devices of small dimension and with complex structures such as drug-eluting stents. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to develop a new strategy to fabricate polymeric coatings using an electrospraying technique based on the uniqueness of this technique in that it can be used to produce a mist of charged droplets with a precise control of their shape and dimension. We hypothesized that this technique would allow facile manipulation of coating morphology by controlling the shape and dimension of electrosprayed droplets. More specifically, we employed the electrospraying technique to coat a layer of biodegradable polyurethane with tailored microtopographies onto commercial coronary stents. The topography of such stent coatings was modulated by controlling the ratio of round to stretched droplets or the ratio of round to crumped droplets under high electric field before deposition. The shape of electrosprayed droplets was governed by the stability of these charged droplets right after ejection or during their flight in the air. Using the electrospraying technique, we achieved conformal polymeric coatings with tailored microtopographies onto conductive surgical implants. The approach offers potential for controlling the surface topography of surgical implant devices to modulate their integration with surrounding tissues.

  16. Mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate nanoparticle agglomerates for the preparation of controlled release fine particles: The relationship between coating performance and the characteristics of various polymethacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keita; Kato, Shinsuke; Niwa, Toshiyuki

    2017-10-30

    We aimed to understand the factors controlling mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate. The relationship between coating performance and the characteristics of polymethacrylate powders was investigated. First, theophylline crystals were treated using a mechanical powder processor to obtain theophylline spheres (<100μm). Second, five polymethacrylate latexes were powdered by spray freeze drying to produce colloidal agglomerates. Finally, mechanical particle coating was performed by mixing theophylline spheres and polymethacrylate agglomerates using the processor. The agglomerates were broken under mechanical stress to coat the spheres effectively. The coating performance of polymethacrylate agglomerates tended to increase as their pulverization progressed. Differences in the grindability of the agglomerates were attributed to differences in particle structure, resulting from consolidation between colloidal particles. High-grindability agglomerates exhibited higher pulverization as their glass transition temperature (Tg) increased and the further pulverization promoted coating. We therefore conclude that the minimization of polymethacrylate powder by pulverization is an important factor in mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate with low deformability. Meanwhile, when product temperature during coating approaches Tg of polymer, polymethacrylate was soften to show high coating performance by plastic deformation. The effective coating by this mechanism may be accomplished by adjusting the temperature in the processor to the Tg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of Shot Peening on Tribological Behaviors of Molybdenum-Thermal Spray Coating using HVOF Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mohassel

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the influence of post-shot peening on Mo-coating as compared to substrate steel 16MnCr5 (according to ZFN-413 A. Shot peening of carburized steel discs with and without Mo-coating was performed by using Shot size S230, Almen intensity 0.42 mm ’A’ and exposure time 96 sec. Tribological properties were analyzed, using pin-on-disc tribometer apparatus, under dry sliding conditions at different specific applied loads, sliding velocities and distance. Typical standardized methods were used for studying of surface integrity parameters (micro-hardness, topography and surface roughness. Surface morphology of the Mo-coating specimens with and without Shot Peening before and after wear was evaluated by Scanning Electron Microscopy. The results showed that shot peening after Mo-coating has considerable effect on improving wear resistance and because of having low friction coefficient has showed better wear behavior and tribologi cal properties over that of the un-peened Mo-coating.

  18. Structure characterization and wear performance of NiTi thermal sprayed coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinca, N.; Isalgué, A.; Fernández, J.; Guilemany, J. M.

    2010-08-01

    NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) has been studied for many years for its shape memory and pseudoelastic properties, as well as its biocompatibility, which make it suitable for many biomedical applications. However, SMA NiTi is also interesting for relevant wear resistance near the transition temperature which, along with its high oxidation and corrosion resistance, suggests its use as a coating to increase the lifetime of some components. Also, whereas bulk material properties have been characterized in respect of the nominal composition, manufacturing methods and thermo-mechanical treatments, NiTi overlays have been investigated much less. Most existent works in this field specifically deal with magnetron sputtering technology for thin films and its use in micro-devices (micro-electro-mechanical systems, MEMS), just some works refer to vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) for thicker coatings. The present paper explores and compares the microstructure and wear-related properties of coatings obtained from atomized NiTi powders, by VPS as well as by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) techniques. In the present case, the wear behaviour of the NiTi deposits has been studied by rubber-wheel equipment and ball-on-disk tests. The results obtained at room temperature show that the APS-quenched coatings exhibit a preferential dry sliding wear mechanism, while the VPS and HVOF coatings show an abrasive mechanism.

  19. Bond Strength of Multicomponent White Cast Iron Coatings Applied by HVOF Thermal Spray Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranho, Ossimar; Rodrigues, Daniel; Boccalini, Mario; Sinatora, Amilton

    2009-12-01

    Multicomponent white cast iron is a new alloy that belongs to system Fe-C-Cr-W-Mo-V, and because of its excellent wear resistance it is used in the manufacture of hot rolling mills rolls. To date, this alloy has been processed by casting, powder metallurgy, and spray forming. The high-velocity oxyfuel process is now also considered for the manufacture of components with this alloy. The effects of substrate, preheating temperature, and coating thickness on bond strength of coatings have been determined. Substrates of AISI 1020 steel and of cast iron with preheating of 150 °C and at room temperature were used to apply coatings with 200 and 400 μm nominal thickness. The bond strength of coatings was measured with the pull-off test method and the failure mode by scanning electron microscopic analysis. Coatings with thickness of 200 μm and applied on substrates of AISI 1020 steel with preheating presented bond strength of 87 ± 4 MPa.

  20. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Peng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ-based thermal barrier coating (TBC has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm; a photo-multiplier tube (PMT and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor’s performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature.

  1. Photo-thermal and cytotoxic properties of inkjet-printed copper sulfide films on biocompatible latex coated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfraz, Jawad; Borzenkov, Mykola; Niemelä, Erik; Weinberger, Christian; Törngren, Björn; Rosqvist, Emil; Collini, Maddalena; Pallavicini, Piersandro; Eriksson, John; Peltonen, Jouko; Ihalainen, Petri; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    Inkjet-printing of metal nanoparticles is a particularly promising technique for the fabrication and modification of surfaces with a multifunctional nature. Recently copper sulfide nanoparticles (CuS NPs) have attracted wide interest due to a range of valuable properties including long term stability, photo-thermal activity, ease of synthesis and low cost. In the present study, printed CuS patterns were successfully fabricated on latex coated paper substrates and characterized by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GID). The resulted patterns displayed pronounced photo-thermal effect under Near Infrared Irradiation (NIR) even with relatively low laser power. Finally, by utilizing an automated real-time imaging platform it was possible to verify that the CuS printed film was not cytotoxic to human dermal fibroblast cells (HDF). The pronounced photo-thermal properties and nontoxic nature of these printed low-cost flexible CuS films make them promising candidates for fabrication of devices with localized photo-thermal effect suitable for biomedical applications.

  2. Atomic Layer Deposition Al2O3 Coatings Significantly Improve Thermal, Chemical, and Mechanical Stability of Anodic TiO2 Nanotube Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    We report on a very significant enhancement of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of self-organized TiO2 nanotubes layers, provided by thin Al2O3 coatings of different thicknesses prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). TiO2 nanotube layers coated with Al2O3 coatings exhibit significantly improved thermal stability as illustrated by the preservation of the nanotubular structure upon annealing treatment at high temperatures (870 °C). In addition, a high anatase content is preserved in the nanotube layers against expectation of the total rutile conversion at such a high temperature. Hardness of the resulting nanotube layers is investigated by nanoindentation measurements and shows strongly improved values compared to uncoated counterparts. Finally, it is demonstrated that Al2O3 coatings guarantee unprecedented chemical stability of TiO2 nanotube layers in harsh environments of concentrated H3PO4 solutions. PMID:28291942

  3. Particle In-Flight and Coating Properties of Fe-Based Feedstock Materials Sprayed with Modern Thermal Spray Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Kopp, Nils; Warda, Thomas; Petkovic, Ivica; Schaefer, Marcel; Landes, Klaus Dieter; Forster, Guenter; Zimmermann, Stephan; Marques, Jose-Luis; Kirner, Stefan; Kauffeldt, Marina; Schein, Jochen

    2013-03-01

    New developments in the field of thermal spraying systems (increased particle velocities, enhanced process stability) are leading to improved coatings. Innovations in the field of feedstock materials are supporting this trend. The combination of both has led to a renaissance of Fe-based feedstocks. Using modern APS or HVOF systems, it is now possible to compete with classical materials for wear and corrosion applications like Ni-basis or metal-matrix composites. This study intends to give an analysis of the in-flight particle and spray jet properties achievable with two different modern thermal spraying systems using Fe-based powders. The velocity fields are measured with the Laser Doppler Anemometry. Resulting coatings are analyzed and a correlation with the particle in-flight properties is given. The experiments are accompanied by computational fluid dynamics simulations of spray jet and particle velocities, leading to a comprehensive analysis of the achievable particle properties with state-of-the-art HVOF and APS systems.

  4. Thermal reduction of graphene-oxide-coated cotton for oil and organic solvent removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoai, Nguyen To, E-mail: hoaito@pvu.edu.vn; Sang, Nguyen Nhat; Hoang, Tran Dinh

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • A new method for preparation of reduced-graphene-oxide (RGO) coated cotton is proposed. • The RGO-Cotton composites were carefully characterized using many modern techniques. • RGO-Cotton exhibited superhydrophobicity and superolephilicity. • RGO-Cotton sponges can absorb many types of oils and organic solvents and can be recycled. - Abstract: The reduced-graphene-oxide (RGO)-coated cotton sponge (RGO-Cot) was prepared by simply heating a graphene-oxide (GO)-coated cotton sponge, which was fabricated by dipping a commercial cotton sponge into a GO dispersion, under vacuum at 200 °C for 2 h. The thus prepared RGO-Cot sponges exhibited superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity, with a water contact angle of 151°. These RGO-Cot sponges could be used for removal of many types of oils and organic solvents as they exhibit absorption capacities in the range of 22–45 times their weight and good absorption recyclability.

  5. Microstructural control of Co-based PTA coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Gomes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt-based alloys are widely used as hardfacing materials when wear resistance is required at room temperature or high temperature applications. However, their performance is a consequence of their microstructures that depends on the processing conditions. This work focused on the influence of solidification rate on the structure development by processing the alloys with and without the interference of the substrate. The coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer, optical microscopy and instrument indentation tests. Results showed that despite the same phases developed in tested conditions, differences in the solidification microstructure and the influence of Fe diffusing from the substrate accounted for the measured variation in hardness. Higher hardness values were obtained for the samples processed free-standing (mini billets with respect to the coatings and they were independent of the processing parameters, indicating that the substrate compromise the properties of hardness, as expected.

  6. ZrB2-SiC as a protective coating for C/SiC composites: Effect of high temperature oxidation on thermal shock property and protection mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ZrB2-SiC coating was prepared on C/SiC composites surface by slurry method, and then the thermal fatigue behavior of ZrB2-SiC coated C/SiC composites was studied. The composition of the coating layers was characterized by XRD, SEM and EDS. With the thickness was 200 μm, the coating was ZrB2 and SiC. During thermal cycle between 1773 K in air and 373 K in boiling water, the weight of the ZrB2-SiC coated composites decreased lightly. The decrease of the flexural strength during the thermal cycle was primarily due to the debonding of the fiber–matrix interfaces and the oxidation of the coated samples. Compared with the uncoated C/SiC composites, the coating played an important role in enhancing the resistance to the thermal shock.

  7. Biocatalytic coatings for air pollution control: a proof of concept study on VOC biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, José M; Bernal, Oscar I; Flickinger, Michael C; Muñoz, Raúl; Deshusses, Marc A

    2015-02-01

    Although biofilm-based biotechnologies exhibit a large potential as solutions for off-gas treatment, the high water content of biofilms often causes pollutant mass transfer limitations, which ultimately limit their widespread application. The present study reports on the proof of concept of the applicability of bioactive latex coatings for air pollution control. Toluene vapors served as a model volatile organic compound (VOC). The results showed that Pseudomonas putida F1 cells could be successfully entrapped in nanoporous latex coatings while preserving their toluene degradation activity. Bioactive latex coatings exhibited toluene specific biodegradation rates 10 times higher than agarose-based biofilms, because the thin coatings were less subject to diffusional mass transfer limitations. Drying and pollutant starvation were identified as key factors inducing a gradual deterioration of the biodegradation capacity in these innovative coatings. This study constitutes the first application of bioactive latex coatings for VOC abatement. These coatings could become promising means for air pollution control. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Thermal Control System Development to Support the Crew Exploration Vehicle and Lunar Surface Access Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Molly; Westheimer, David

    2006-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has recently evaluated all of the agency s technology development work and identified key areas that must be addressed to aid in the successful development of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  9. Fuel efficiency and fouling control coatings in maritime transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholdt, Asger

    with a radius of 11.45 cm. The drag performances in the newly applied coating condition and after one month of static immersion in natural seawater were measured using a friction disk machine (FDM). The four best performing coatings were re-examined for their drag performance after an additional 2.5 months...... friction of four FCCs over an extended period of time in conditions simulating the vast majority of ship profiles (i.e., speed and activity) in the present market. The setup consisted of two separate parts; one part aged FCCs directly in seawater in a dynamic manner similar to that experienced by a ship......’s hull, and a second, laboratory part measured the torque (drag) of coated cylinders in a rotary setup. Four commercial FCCs were exposed for 53 weeks in Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, i.e., in relatively cold seawater (salinity of 1.2 wt%), from the spring of 2013 to the autumn of 2014. The in situ immersion...

  10. Delamination evaluation of thermal barrier coating on turbine blade owing to isothermal degradation using ultrasonic C-scan image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Girl; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) is an essential element consisting of a super-alloy base and ceramic coating designed to achieve long operational time under a high temperature and pressure environment. However, the top coat of TBC can be delaminated at certain temperatures with long operation time. As the delamination of TBC is directly related to the blade damage, the coupling status of the TBC should be assured for reliable operation. Conventional studies of nondestructive evaluation have been made for detecting generation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) or qualitatively evaluating delamination in TBC. In this study, the ultrasonic C-scan method was developed to obtain the damage map inside TBC by estimating the delamination in a quantitative way. All specimens were isothermally degraded at 1,100°C with different time, having different partial delamination area. To detect partial delamination in TBC, the C-scan was performed by a single transducer using pulse-echo method with normal incidence. Partial delamination coefficients of 1 mm to 6 mm were derived by the proportion of the surface reflection signal and flaw signal which were theoretical signals using Rogers-Van Buren and Kim's equations. Using the partial delamination coefficients, the partial delamination maps were obtained. Regardless of the partial delamination coefficient, partial delamination area was increased when degradation time was increased in TBC. In addition, a decrease in partial delamination area in each TBC specimen was observed when the partial delamination coefficient was increased. From the portion of the partial delamination maps, the criterion for delamination was derived.

  11. Controllable Thermal Rectification Realized in Binary Phase Change Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Renjie; Cui, Yalong; Tian, He; Yao, Ruimin; Liu, Zhenpu; Shu, Yi; Li, Cheng; Yang, Yi; Ren, Tianling; Zhang, Gang; Zou, Ruqiang

    2015-03-01

    Phase transition is a natural phenomenon happened around our daily life, represented by the process from ice to water. While melting and solidifying at a certain temperature, a high heat of fusion is accompanied, classified as the latent heat. Phase change material (PCM) has been widely applied to store and release large amount of energy attributed to the distinctive thermal behavior. Here, with the help of nanoporous materials, we introduce a general strategy to achieve the binary eicosane/PEG4000 stuffed reduced graphene oxide aerogels, which has two ends with different melting points. It's successfully demonstrated this binary PCM composites exhibits thermal rectification characteristic. Partial phase transitions within porous networks instantaneously result in one end of the thermal conductivity saltation at a critical temperature, and therefore switch on or off the thermal rectification with the coefficient up to 1.23. This value can be further raised by adjusting the loading content of PCM. The uniqueness of this device lies in its performance as a normal thermal conductor at low temperature, only exhibiting rectification phenomenon when temperature is higher than a critical value. The stated technology has broad applications for thermal energy control in macroscopic scale such as energy-efficiency building or nanodevice thermal management.

  12. Environmental controls on the thermal structure of alpine glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water entrapped in glacier accumulation zones represents a significant latent heat contribution to the development of thermal structure. It also provides a direct link between glacier environments and thermal regimes. We apply a two-dimensional mechanically-coupled model of heat flow to synthetic glacier geometries in order to explore the environmental controls on flowband thermal structure. We use this model to test the sensitivity of thermal structure to physical and environmental variables and to explore glacier thermal response to environmental changes. In different conditions consistent with a warming climate, mean glacier temperature and the volume of temperate ice may either increase or decrease, depending on the competing effects of elevated meltwater production, reduced accumulation zone extent and thinning firn. For two model reference states that exhibit commonly-observed thermal structures, the fraction of temperate ice is shown to decline with warming air temperatures. Mass balance and aquifer sensitivities play an important role in determining how the englacial thermal regimes of alpine glaciers will adjust in the future.

  13. Evaluation of coated columbian alloy heat shields for space shuttle thermal protection system application. Volume 1: Phase 1 - Environmental criteria and material characterization, October 1970 - March 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    The studies presented are directed toward establishing criteria for a niobium alloy thermal protection system for the space shuttle. Evaluation of three niobium alloys and two silicon coatings for heat shield configurations culminated in the selection of two coating/substrate combinations for environmental criteria and material characterization tests. Specimens were exposed to boost and reentry temperatures, pressure, and loads simulating a space shuttle orbiter flight profile.

  14. Environmental Control Unit with Integral Thermal Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-12

    Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase I project, Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) evaluated an Environmental Control Unit ( ECU ) that uses an...energy during the coolest part of the day, the PHX can reduce the power consumption of an ECU by up to 10% over a 24 hour period. The PHX was...Leveling 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 2 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT

  15. Fe-Al Weld Overlay and High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Thermal Spray Coatings for Corrosion Protection of Waterwalls in Fossil Fired Plants with Low NOx Burners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regina, J.R.

    2002-02-08

    Iron-aluminum-chromium coatings were investigated to determine the best candidates for coatings of boiler tubes in Low NOx fossil fueled power plants. Ten iron-aluminum-chromium weld claddings with aluminum concentrations up to 10wt% were tested in a variety of environments to evaluate their high temperature corrosion resistance. The weld overlay claddings also contained titanium additions to investigate any beneficial effects from these ternary and quaternary alloying additions. Several High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with higher aluminum concentrations were investigated as well. Gaseous corrosion testing revealed that at least 10wt%Al is required for protection in the range of environments examined. Chromium additions were beneficial in all of the environments, but additions of titanium were beneficial only in sulfur rich atmospheres. Similar results were observed when weld claddings were in contact with corrosive slag while simultaneously, exposed to the corrosive environments. An aluminum concentration of 10wt% was required to prevent large amounts of corrosion to take place. Again chromium additions were beneficial with the greatest corrosion protection occurring for welds containing both 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr. The exposed thermal spray coatings showed either significant cracking within the coating, considerable thickness loss, or corrosion products at the coating substrate interface. Therefore, the thermal spray coatings provided the substrate very little protection. Overall, it was concluded that of the coatings studied weld overlay coatings provide superior protection in these Low NOx environments; specifically, the ternary weld composition of 10wt%Al and 5wt%Cr provided the best corrosion protection in all of the environments tested.

  16. 49 CFR 195.557 - Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corrosion control? 195.557 Section 195.557 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Corrosion Control § 195.557 Which pipelines must have coating for external corrosion control? Except bottoms of aboveground breakout tanks, each...

  17. Novel Thermal Control Concepts Using Micro Heat Pipes - Spacecraft Thermal Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peterson, G

    2001-01-01

    ...; Flexible polymer heat pipes have been fabricated and modeled; Theses polymer heat pipes offer a greater degree of flexibility and a potentially higher effective thermal conductivity than any previously developed...

  18. Automation and control of the MMT thermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. D.; Porter, Dallan; Goble, William

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the software automation and control framework for the MMT thermal system. Thermal-related effects on observing and telescope behavior have been considered during the entire software development process. Regression analysis of telescope and observatory subsystem data is used to characterize and model these thermal-related effects. The regression models help predict expected changes in focus and overall astronomical seeing that result from temperature variations within the telescope structure, within the primary mirror glass, and between the primary mirror glass and adjacent air (i.e., mirror seeing). This discussion is followed by a description of ongoing upgrades to the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system and the associated software controls. The improvements of the MMT thermal system have two objectives: 1) to provide air conditioning capabilities for the MMT facilities, and 2) to modernize and enhance the primary mirror (M1) ventilation system. The HVAC upgrade necessitates changes to the automation and control of the M1 ventilation system. The revised control system must factor in the additional requirements of the HVAC system, while still optimizing performance of the M1 ventilation system and the M1's optical behavior. An industry-standard HVAC communication and networking protocol, BACnet (Building Automation and Control network), has been adopted. Integration of the BACnet protocol into the existing software framework at the MMT is discussed. Performance of the existing automated system is evaluated and a preliminary upgraded automated control system is presented. Finally, user interfaces to the new HVAC system are discussed.

  19. Joint excitation and reactive power control in thermal power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragosavac Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The coordinated voltage and reactive power controller, designed for the thermal power plant, is presented in the paper. A brief explanation of the need for such device is given and justification for commissioning of such equipment is outlined. After short description of the theoretical background of the proposed control design, the achieved features of the commissioned equipment are fully given. Achieved performances are illustrated by recorded reactive power and bus voltage responses after commissioning of the described equipment into the largest thermal power plant in Serbia. As it can be seen in presented records, all design targets are met.

  20. Design and performance of Skylab thermal/environmental control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopson, G. D.; Littles, J. W.; Patterson, W. C.

    1974-01-01

    The function of the thermal/environmental control systems was to provide a comfortable thermal environment for the crew, to cool electronic components, to supply a controlled oxygen/nitrogen atmosphere, and to remove moisture, carbon dioxide, odors, and trace contaminants from the atmosphere. A separate refrigeration system was used to chill and freeze food and biomedical samples and to provide cold water for drinking. This paper describes system design and compares in-flight performance to preflight predictions. A discussion of in-flight anomalies and corrective actions is also included.