WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal comptonization models

  1. A New Model for Thermal and Bulk Comptonization in Accretion-Powered X-ray Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Peter A.; Wolff, Michael T.

    2018-01-01

    The theory of spectral formation in accretion-powered X-ray pulsars has advanced considerably in the past decade, with the development of new models for the continuum and the cyclotron line formation processes. In many sources, the cyclotron line centroid energy is observed to vary as a function of source luminosity (and therefore accretion rate). In some cases, the variations in the luminosity seem to indicate a change in the structure of the accretion column, as the source passes from the sub-critical to the super-critical regime. With the recent launches of NuSTAR and NICER, observations of accreting X-ray pulsars are entering a new era, with large effective areas, broadband energy coverage, and good temporal resolution. These observations are already presenting new challenges to the theory, requiring the development of a new generation of more sophisticated physical models. In this paper, we discuss an improved model for bulk and thermal Comptonization in X-ray pulsars that will allow greater self-consistency in the data analysis process than current models, leading to more rigorous determinations of source parameters such as magnetic field strength, temperature, etc. The model improvements include (1) a more realistic geometry for the accretion column; (2) a more rigorous accretion velocity profile that merges smoothly with Newtonian free-fall as r → ∞ and (3) a more realistic free-streaming radiative boundary condition at the top of the column. This latter improvement means that we can now compute the pencil and fan beam components separately, which is necessary in order to analyze phase-dependent spectral data. We discuss applications of the new model to Her X-1, LMC X-4, and Cen X-3, and also to the Be X-ray binary 4U 0115+63.

  2. On the inverse Compton scattering model of radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Xu, Ren Xin; Liu, J. F.; Han, J. L.; Zhang, B.

    Some characteristics of the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model are reviewed. At least the following properties of radio pulsars can be reproduced in the model: core or central emission beam, one or two hollow emission cones, different emission heights of these components, diverse pulse profiles at various frequencies, linear and circular polarization features of core and cones.

  3. Study of non-thermal photon production under different scenarios in solar flares. 2: The Compton inverse and Bremsstrahlung models and fittings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Laville, A.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectra of photons emitted from Bremsstrahlung (BR) of energetic electrons with matter, is obtained from the deconvolution of the electron energy spectra. It can be inferred that the scenario for the production of X-rays and gamma rays in solar flares may vary from event to event. However, it is possible in many cases to associated low energy events to impulsive acceleration, and the high energy phase of some events to stochastic acceleration. In both cases, flare particles seem to be strongly modulated by local energy losses. Electric field acceleration, associated to neutral current sheets is a suitable candidate for impulsive acceleration. Finally, that the predominant radiation process of this radiation is the inverse Compton effect due to the local flare photon field.

  4. An Inverse Compton Scattering Model of Pulsar Emission. III. Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, R. X.; Liu, J. F.; Han, J. L.; Qiao, G. J.

    2000-05-01

    Qiao and his collaborators recently proposed an inverse Compton scattering model to explain radio emission from pulsars. In this paper, we investigate the polarization properties of pulsar emission in the model. First of all, using the lower frequency approximation, we derived the analytical amplitude of the inverse Compton scattered wave of a single electron in a strong magnetic field. We found that the outgoing radio emission of a single relativistic electron scattering off the ``low-frequency waves'' produced by gap sparking should be linearly polarized and have no circular polarization at all. However, considering the coherency of the emission from a bunch of electrons, we found that the outgoing radiation from the inner part of the emission beam, i.e., that from the lower emission altitudes, preferentially has to have circular polarization. Computer simulations show that the polarization properties, such as the sense reversal of circular polarization near the pulse center, the S-shape of position angle swing of the linear polarization, and a strong linear polarization in conal components, can be reproduced in the ICS model.

  5. Thermal management and prototype testing of Compton scattering X-ray beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Yang, B. X.; Collins, J. T.; Ramanathan, M.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are key elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade. In the next-generation XBPMs for the canted-undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0 mrad, the lower beam power (changes through the interface via thermal simulations, the thermal contact resistance (TCR) of TIMs at an interface between two solid materials under even contact pressure must be known. This paper addresses the TCR measurements of several TIMs, including gold, silver, pyrolytic graphite sheet, and 3D graphene foam. In addition, a prototype of a Compton-scattering XBPM with diamond blades was installed at APS Beamline 24-ID-A in May 2015 and has been tested. This paper presents the design of the Compton-scattering XBPM, and compares thermal simulation results obtained for the diamond blade of this XBPM by the finite element method with in situ empirical measurements obtained by using reliable infrared technology.

  6. Recent developments of inverse Compton scattering model of pulsar radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X.; Liu, J. F.; Zhang, B.; Han, J. L.

    Many theoretical efforts were made to understand the core and conal emission identified from observations by Rankin (1983) and Lyne and Manchester (1988). One of them, named as inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model (Qiao & Lin 1998), has been proposed. It is found in the model that: there are central or `core' emission beam, and one or two hollow conical emission beams; the different emission components are emitted at different heights; owing to different radiation components emitted from different height, the observed emission beams can be shifted from each other due to retardation and aberration effects; the sizes of emission components change with frequencies. Recent developments of the model include: simulations of pulse profiles at different frequencies; studying the basic polarization properties of inverse Compton scattering in strong magnetic fields; computing the polarizations and spectrum of core and cones. A new classification system was also proposed. The main results calculated from the model are consistent with the observations.

  7. Deeply virtual Compton scattering in a relativistic quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitzenberg, T.

    2007-09-15

    This thesis is mainly concerned with a model calculation for generalized parton distributions (GPDs). We calculate vectorial- and axial GPDs for the N{yields}N and N{yields}{delta} transition in the framework of a light front quark model. This requires the elaboration of a connection between transition amplitudes and GPDs. We provide the first quark model calculations for N{yields}{delta} GPDs. The examination of transition amplitudes leads to various model independent consistency relations. These relations are not exactly obeyed by our model calculation since the use of the impulse approximation in the light front quark model leads to a violation of Poincare covariance. We explore the impact of this covariance breaking on the GPDs and form factors which we determine in our model calculation and find large effects. The reference frame dependence of our results which originates from the breaking of Poincare covariance can be eliminated by introducing spurious covariants. We extend this formalism in order to obtain frame independent results from our transition amplitudes. (orig.)

  8. Modeled Performance of a Compton Telescope Based on Planar Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Bradley L.

    of an advanced Compton telescope (proposed as the ATHENA mission) to predict its performance capabilities. The effective area, background, and point spread function (the imaged response to a point source) were modeled for several configurations of this Compton telescope. Thus, the sensitivity of these different configurations of this Compton telescope were compared. The sensitivity of the best configurations of this advanced Compton telescope are ~3×10-7 gamma-rays s-1 cm-2 which is nearly 100 times more sensitivity than previous gamma-ray instruments.

  9. PSR B2111+46: a test of the inverse Compton scattering model of radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Qiao, G. J.; Han, J. L.; Lee, K. J.; Wang, H. G.

    2007-04-01

    The region in which pulsars radiate is very important to constrain pulsar emission mechanisms. A three-dimensional (3D) method to calculate emission heights is developed in this paper. As an example, radiation regions for different components at different frequencies have been calculated for PSR B2111+46. Emission components at seven frequencies are fitted with Gaussian components, then the radiation heights for emission components are calculated. We found that different emission components, even if at the same radio frequency, are radiated from different heights. This is probably a common phenomena and challenges any emission mechanisms. The inverse Compton scattering emission model for pulsar radio emission can explain these results well.

  10. An inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model of pulsar emission. II. Frequency behavior of pulse profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Liu, J. F.; Zhang, B.; Han, J. L.

    2001-10-01

    The shapes of pulse profiles, especially their variations with respect to observing frequencies, are very important to understand emission mechanisms of pulsars. However, no previous attempt has been made to interpret their complicated phenomenology. In this paper, we present theoretical simulations for the integrated pulse profiles and their frequency evolution within the framework of the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model proposed by Qiao (\\cite{Qiao88}) and Qiao & Lin (\\cite{Qiao98}). Using the phase positions of the pulse components predicted by the ``beam-frequency figure'' of the ICS model, we present Gaussian fits to the multi-frequency pulse profiles for some pulsars. It is shown that the model can reproduce various types of the frequency evolution behaviors of pulse profiles observed.

  11. Constraint on the Parameters of the Inverse Compton Scattering Model for Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, M.; Wang, H. G.; Lee, K. J.; Qiao, G. J.; Xu, R. X.

    2011-11-01

    The inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model can explain various pulse profile shapes and the diversity of the pulse profile evolution based on the mechanism where the radio emission is generated through ICS between secondary relativistic particles and radio waves from polar gap avalanches. In this paper, we study the parameter space of the ICS model for 15 pulsars that share the common pulse profile evolution phenomenon, where the pulse profiles are narrower at higher observing frequencies. Two key parameters, the initial Lorentz factor and the energy loss factor of secondary particles, are constrained using the least-squares fitting method, where we fit the theoretical curve of the "beam-frequency mapping" of the ICS model to the observed pulse widths at multiple frequencies. The uncertainty of the inclination and viewing angles are taken into account in the fitting process. It is found that the initial Lorentz factor is larger than 4000, and the energy loss factor is between 20 and 560. The Lorentz factor is consistent with the prediction of the inner vacuum gap model. Such high-energy loss factors suggest significant energy loss for secondary particles at altitudes of a few tens to hundreds of kilometers.

  12. Model-Based Detection of Radioactive Contraband for Harbor Defense Incorporating Compton Scattering Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V; Chambers, D H; Breitfeller, E F; Guidry, B L; Verbeke, J M; Axelrod, M A; Sale, K E; Meyer, A M

    2010-03-02

    The detection of radioactive contraband is a critical problem is maintaining national security for any country. Photon emissions from threat materials challenge both detection and measurement technologies especially when concealed by various types of shielding complicating the transport physics significantly. This problem becomes especially important when ships are intercepted by U.S. Coast Guard harbor patrols searching for contraband. The development of a sequential model-based processor that captures both the underlying transport physics of gamma-ray emissions including Compton scattering and the measurement of photon energies offers a physics-based approach to attack this challenging problem. The inclusion of a basic radionuclide representation of absorbed/scattered photons at a given energy along with interarrival times is used to extract the physics information available from the noisy measurements portable radiation detection systems used to interdict contraband. It is shown that this physics representation can incorporated scattering physics leading to an 'extended' model-based structure that can be used to develop an effective sequential detection technique. The resulting model-based processor is shown to perform quite well based on data obtained from a controlled experiment.

  13. Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botto, D.J.; Pratt, R.H.

    1979-05-01

    The current status of Compton scattering, both experimental observations and the theoretical predictions, is examined. Classes of experiments are distinguished and the results obtained are summarized. The validity of the incoherent scattering function approximation and the impulse approximation is discussed. These simple theoretical approaches are compared with predictions of the nonrelativistic dipole formula of Gavrila and with the relativistic results of Whittingham. It is noted that the A/sup -2/ based approximations fail to predict resonances and an infrared divergence, both of which have been observed. It appears that at present the various available theoretical approaches differ significantly in their predictions and that further and more systematic work is required.

  14. Building Thermal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peabody, Hume L.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation is meant to be an overview of the model building process It is based on typical techniques (Monte Carlo Ray Tracing for radiation exchange, Lumped Parameter, Finite Difference for thermal solution) used by the aerospace industry This is not intended to be a "How to Use ThermalDesktop" course. It is intended to be a "How to Build Thermal Models" course and the techniques will be demonstrated using the capabilities of ThermalDesktop (TD). Other codes may or may not have similar capabilities. The General Model Building Process can be broken into four top level steps: 1. Build Model; 2. Check Model; 3. Execute Model; 4. Verify Results.

  15. Theoretical modeling of Comptonized X-ray spectra of super-Eddington accretion flow: Origin of hard excess in ultraluminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaki, Takaaki; Mineshige, Shin; Ohsuga, Ken; Kawashima, Tomohisa

    2017-12-01

    X-ray continuum spectra of super-Eddington accretion flow are studied by means of Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations based on the radiation hydrodynamic simulation data, in which both thermal- and bulk-Compton scatterings are taken into account. We compare the calculated spectra of accretion flow around black holes with masses of MBH = 10, 102, 103, and 104 M⊙ for a fixed mass injection rate (from the computational boundary at 103 rs) of 103 LEdd/c2 (with rs, LEdd, and c being the Schwarzschild radius, the Eddington luminosity, and the speed of light, respectively). The soft X-ray spectra exhibit mass dependence in accordance with the standard-disk relation; the maximum surface temperature is scaled as T ∝ M_{ BH}^{ -1/4}. The spectra in the hard X-ray band, by contrast with soft X-ray, look to be quite similar among different models, if we normalize the radiation luminosity by MBH. This reflects that the hard component is created by thermal- and bulk-Compton scatterings of soft photons originating from an accretion flow in the overheated and/or funnel regions, the temperatures of which have no dependence on mass. The hard X-ray spectra can be reproduced by a Wien spectrum with the temperature of T ˜ 3 keV accompanied by a hard excess at photon energy above several keV. The excess spectrum can be fitted well with a power law with a photon index of Γ ˜ 3. This feature is in good agreement with that of the recent NuSTAR observations of ULXs (ultra-luminous X-ray sources).

  16. Combining thermal comfort models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, A.

    1999-07-01

    Two models commonly used in thermal comfort studies were combined to develop a two-dimensional computer model that estimates the resistance to dry and evaporative heat transfer for a clothing system from fabric resistance data, fabric thickness data, and information concerning the amount of body surface area covered by different fabric layers and the amount of air trapped between fabric layers. Five different clothing ensembles with different total thermal insulation and very different distributions of the insulation on the body were simulated with 16 sedentary subjects. This paper first evaluates total thermal insulation predictions from the Fanger steady-state model and then uses these data in the Gagge two-compartment (or two-node) model. The combined model uses the transient heat balance of each segment and the whole body. It estimates total insulation value and then uses this value to calculate transient temperature and wettedness. By application of the combined model, predictions of human responses to a wide range of thermal conditions are compared with the responses of human subjects as described in reports of laboratory experiments. Possible reasons for discrepancies between the observed data and predictions of the model are briefly discussed.

  17. A spectral geometric model for Compton single scatter in PET based on the single scatter simulation approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantsev, I. G.; Olsen, U. L.; Poulsen, H. F.; Hansen, P. C.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the idealized mathematical model of single scatter in PET for a detector system possessing excellent energy resolution. The model has the form of integral transforms estimating the distribution of photons undergoing a single Compton scattering with a certain angle. The total single scatter is interpreted as the volume integral over scatter points that constitute a rotation body with a football shape, while single scattering with a certain angle is evaluated as the surface integral over the boundary of the rotation body. The equations for total and sample single scatter calculations are derived using a single scatter simulation approximation. We show that the three-dimensional slice-by-slice filtered backprojection algorithm is applicable for scatter data inversion provided that the attenuation map is assumed to be constant. The results of the numerical experiments are presented.

  18. Thermal Network Modelling Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Thermal mathematical modelling is discussed in detail. A three-fold purpose was established: (1) to acquaint the new user with the terminology and concepts used in thermal mathematical modelling, (2) to present the more experienced and occasional user with quick formulas and methods for solving everyday problems, coupled with study cases which lend insight into the relationships that exist among the various solution techniques and parameters, and (3) to begin to catalog in an orderly fashion the common formulas which may be applied to automated conversational language techniques.

  19. Synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    1987-01-01

    The application of synchro-Compton theory to real compact radio sources, the question of a self-Compton origin of the X-rays in radio-loud quasars and active galactic nuclei, and the phenomenology of superluminal motion are discussed in a review of research concerning synchro-Compton emission from superluminal sources. After examining the basic synchro-Compton theory of ideal sources, applications of the theory to real sources is discussed. It is concluded that the Compton problem and total energy requirements are not substantially mitigated by considering source structures more complicated than the multiple, uniform-component model used by most investigators. Also, alternatives to the standard model of superluminal motion are discussed, focusing on the assumptions usually made when interpreting superluminal sources.

  20. Scaling behavior of the Compton profile of alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekania, Michael; Appelt, Wilhelm H.; Benea, Diana; Ebert, Hubert; Vollhardt, Dieter; Chioncel, Liviu

    2018-01-01

    The contribution of the valence electrons to the Compton profiles of the crystalline alkali metals is calculated using density functional theory. We show that the Compton profiles can be modeled by a q-Gaussian distribution, which is characterized by an anisotropic, element dependent parameter q. Thereby we derive an unexpected scaling behavior of the Compton profiles of all alkali metals.

  1. Spacecraft thermal modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, J. H.; Panczak, T. D.; Fried, L.

    1992-09-01

    Thermal modeling of spacecraft requires approaches which can handle dominant radiative heat transfers and many special thermal control components. Present network-type thermal analyzers allow simulation, especially for components with rectangular geometries, but at the expense of considerable awkwardness and much error-prone manual input. The user interfaces for pre- and postprocessing for these analyzers are also very deficient. Finite element thermal analyzers solve some of the analytical difficulties, but are not widely used because they lack the flexibility to simulate special operations. The Galerkin finite element method (GFEM) distributes the contributions within an element to the element nodal points. The assembly of the contributions from all elements yields a system of energy balance equations for the nodal points of the system. Monte Carlo raytracing, in conjunction with a GFEM energy distribution to element nodal points, yields a procedure of consistent nonisothermal surface radiation exchange. This procedure reduces a source of simulation error caused by nonuniform element illumination and shading. Orbital heating, fluid flow and special analysis features are discussed. The main analysis program is interfaced to the preprocessing and postprocessing modules.

  2. Rectenna thermal model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadiramangalam, Murall; Alden, Adrian; Speyer, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    Deploying rectennas in space requires adapting existing designs developed for terrestrial applications to the space environment. One of the major issues in doing so is to understand the thermal performance of existing designs in the space environment. Toward that end, a 3D rectenna thermal model has been developed, which involves analyzing shorted rectenna elements and finite size rectenna element arrays. A shorted rectenna element is a single element whose ends are connected together by a material of negligible thermal resistance. A shorted element is a good approximation to a central element of a large array. This model has been applied to Brown's 2.45 GHz rectenna design. Results indicate that Brown's rectenna requires redesign or some means of enhancing the heat dissipation in order for the diode temperature to be maintained below 200 C above an output power density of 620 W/sq.m. The model developed in this paper is very general and can be used for the analysis and design of any type of rectenna design of any frequency.

  3. Compton profile of tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scale-Compton profile is directly related to the momentum distribution of the electrons. The spectral analysis ... proximation, the Compton profile J(q) is the projection of the target's electron momentum distribution, n(p) ... densed matter and serves as a reliable test of the accuracy of the calculated wave functions. Such basic ...

  4. A Spectral Geometrical Model for Compton Scatter Tomography Based on the SSS Approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazantsev, Ivan G.; Olsen, Ulrik Lund; Poulsen, Henning Friis

    2016-01-01

    The forward model of single scatter in the Positron Emission Tomography for a detector system possessing an excellent spectral resolution under idealized geometrical assumptions is investigated. This model has the form of integral equations describing a flux of photons emanating from the same...... annihilation event and undergoing a single scattering at a certain angle. The equations for single scatter calculation are derived using the Single Scatter Simulation approximation. We show that the three-dimensional slice-by-slice filtered backprojection algorithm is applicable for scatter data inversion...

  5. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert. galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, and Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubifiski, and Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above approximately 50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  6. Advanced Spacecraft Thermal Modeling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For spacecraft developers who spend millions to billions of dollars per unit and require 3 to 7 years to deploy, the LoadPath reduced-order (RO) modeling thermal...

  7. Compton profile of tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Compton profile of tantalum (Ta) has been measured using IGP type coaxial photon detector. The target atoms were excited by means of 59.54 keV -rays from Am-241. The measurements were carried out on a high purity thin elemental foil. The data were recoreded in a 4 K multichannel analyzer. These data duly ...

  8. Compton, Prof. Arthur Holly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1935 Honorary. Compton, Prof. Arthur Holly Nobel Laureate (Physics) - 1927. Date of birth: 10 September 1892. Date of death: 15 March 1962. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the ...

  9. Compton scattering study of ZnSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, V.; Purvia, V.; Sharma, Y. C.; Joshi, K. B.; Sharma, B. K.

    In this work we report on the Compton scattering study of ZnSe. The Am241 Compton spectrometer, which uses 59.54 keV gamma rays, has been used for the measurements. The data has been compared with the ionic model based calculations for various Zn+x Se-x configurations (x varying from 0 to 2) and also with the Compton profiles computed from the local and non-local empirical pseudopotential methods. Although, the agreement is better with the local empirical pseudopotential calculation compared to the non-local method, the best agreement has been found with the ionic model for Zn+2Se-2 configuration suggesting that the bonding in this compound is mainly ionic in nature.

  10. Lumped Thermal Household Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Andersen, Palle; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    pump portfolio. Following, we illustrate two disadvantages of individual models, namely that it requires much computational effort to optimize over a large portfolio, and second that it is difficult to accurately model the houses in certain time periods due to local disturbances. Finally, we propose...

  11. Compton scattering collision module for OSIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Gaudio, Fabrizio; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luís

    2017-10-01

    Compton scattering plays a fundamental role in a variety of different astrophysical environments, such as at the gaps of pulsars and the stagnation surface of black holes. In these scenarios, Compton scattering is coupled with self-consistent mechanisms such as pair cascades. We present the implementation of a novel module, embedded in the self-consistent framework of the PIC code OSIRIS 4.0, capable of simulating Compton scattering from first principles and that is fully integrated with the self-consistent plasma dynamics. The algorithm accounts for the stochastic nature of Compton scattering reproducing without approximations the exchange of energy between photons and unbound charged species. We present benchmarks of the code against the analytical results of Blumenthal et al. and the numerical solution of the linear Kompaneets equation and good agreement is found between the simulations and the theoretical models. This work is supported by the European Research Council Grant (ERC- 2015-AdG 695088) and the Fundao para a Céncia e Tecnologia (Bolsa de Investigao PD/BD/114323/2016).

  12. Thermal modelling using discrete vasculature for thermal therapy: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, H Petra; Gellermann, Johanna; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Stauffer, Paul R; Hand, Jeffrey W; Crezee, Johannes

    2013-06-01

    Reliable temperature information during clinical hyperthermia and thermal ablation is essential for adequate treatment control, but conventional temperature measurements do not provide 3D temperature information. Treatment planning is a very useful tool to improve treatment quality, and substantial progress has been made over the last decade. Thermal modelling is a very important and challenging aspect of hyperthermia treatment planning. Various thermal models have been developed for this purpose, with varying complexity. Since blood perfusion is such an important factor in thermal redistribution of energy in in vivo tissue, thermal simulations are most accurately performed by modelling discrete vasculature. This review describes the progress in thermal modelling with discrete vasculature for the purpose of hyperthermia treatment planning and thermal ablation. There has been significant progress in thermal modelling with discrete vasculature. Recent developments have made real-time simulations possible, which can provide feedback during treatment for improved therapy. Future clinical application of thermal modelling with discrete vasculature in hyperthermia treatment planning is expected to further improve treatment quality.

  13. Compton polarimetry revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, D.

    2015-11-01

    We compute the average polarisation asymmetry from the Klein–Nishina differential cross-section on free electrons at rest. As expected from the expression for the asymmetry, the average asymmetry is found to decrease like the inverse of the incident photon energy asymptotically at high energy. We then compute a simple estimator of the polarisation fraction that makes optimal use of all the kinematic information present in an event final state, by the use of “moments” method, and we compare its statistical power to that of a simple fit of the azimuthal distribution. In contrast to polarimetry with pair creation, for which we obtained an improvement by a factor of larger than two in a previous work, here for Compton scattering the improvement is only of 10–20%.

  14. Compton scattering at high intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinzl, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.heinzl@plymouth.ac.u [University of Plymouth, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-01

    High-intensity Compton scattering takes place when an electron beam is brought into collision with a high power laser. We briefly review the main intensity signatures using the formalism of strong-field quantum electrodynamics.

  15. Richard Compton, University of Oxford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    The Analyst profiles Richard Compton, Professor of Chemistry at the University of Oxford and the first and only recipient of both the RSC Medals in Electrochemistry and in Electroanalytical Chemistry.

  16. Thermal modeling of forearc regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kominz, M. A.; Bond, G. C.

    1989-08-01

    The unconventional natural gas resource program of the Department of Energy has targeted ancient subduction zones as a possible source of organic-origin natural gas. The suggestion is that organic sediments which have been accreted in the prism and/or subducted beneath the prism will produce gas at greater depths than in more conventional, generally hotter, basins. A critical element in determining the likelihood of gas generation in ancient or modern accretionary prisms is the thermal regime of the accreting prism. We have developed a computer model to determine the overall thermal regime in the modern forearcs of Oregon/Washington and southern Alaska. This allows us to predict the likelihood that gas has been generated at depth in the forearc prism, or within sediments as they are subducted beneath the prism. In fact, the model results indicate that subduction and accretion of these sediments at low temperatures increases the probability that ancient subduction zones, once accreted to the craton and allowed to heat in response to migration of the volcanic front, could be the source of natural gas. 75 refs., 24 figs.

  17. A Lumped Thermal Model Including Thermal Coupling and Thermal Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    Detailed thermal dynamics of high power IGBT modules are important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behavior in the IGBTs: The typically used...... thermal model based on one-dimensional RC lumps have limits to provide temperature distributions inside the device, moreover some variable factors in the real-field applications like the cooling and heating conditions of the converter cannot be adapted. On the other hand, the more advanced three......-dimensional thermal models based on Finite Element Method (FEM) need massive computations, which make the long-term thermal dynamics difficult to calculate. In this paper, a new lumped three-dimensional thermal model is proposed, which can be easily characterized from FEM simulations and can acquire the critical...

  18. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  19. The first demonstration of the concept of “narrow-FOV Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton camera”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichinohe, Yuto, E-mail: ichinohe@astro.isas.jaxa.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Uchida, Yuusuke; Watanabe, Shin [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Edahiro, Ikumi [Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Hayashi, Katsuhiro [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Kawano, Takafumi; Ohno, Masanori [Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Ohta, Masayuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichiro [Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, 1919-1 Tancha, Onna-son, Okinawa 904-0495 (Japan); Fukazawa, Yasushi [Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Katsuragawa, Miho [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Nakazawa, Kazuhiro [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Odaka, Hirokazu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tajima, Hiroyasu [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Takahashi, Hiromitsu [Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); and others

    2016-01-11

    The Soft Gamma-ray Detector (SGD), to be deployed on board the ASTRO-H satellite, has been developed to provide the highest sensitivity observations of celestial sources in the energy band of 60–600 keV by employing a detector concept which uses a Compton camera whose field-of-view is restricted by a BGO shield to a few degree (narrow-FOV Compton camera). In this concept, the background from outside the FOV can be heavily suppressed by constraining the incident direction of the gamma ray reconstructed by the Compton camera to be consistent with the narrow FOV. We, for the first time, demonstrate the validity of the concept using background data taken during the thermal vacuum test and the low-temperature environment test of the flight model of SGD on ground. We show that the measured background level is suppressed to less than 10% by combining the event rejection using the anti-coincidence trigger of the active BGO shield and by using Compton event reconstruction techniques. More than 75% of the signals from the field-of-view are retained against the background rejection, which clearly demonstrates the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. The estimated effective area of 22.8 cm{sup 2} meets the mission requirement even though not all of the operational parameters of the instrument have been fully optimized yet.

  20. Overview of thermal conductivity models of anisotropic thermal insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurikhin, A. V.; Kostanovsky, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, the most of existing materials and substances under elaboration are anisotropic. It makes certain difficulties in the study of heat transfer process. Thermal conductivity of the materials can be characterized by tensor of the second order. Also, the parallelism between the temperature gradient vector and the density of heat flow vector is violated in anisotropic thermal insulation materials (TIM). One of the most famous TIM is a family of integrated thermal insulation refractory material («ITIRM»). The main component ensuring its properties is the «inflated» vermiculite. Natural mineral vermiculite is ground into powder state, fired by gas burner for dehydration, and its precipitate is then compressed. The key feature of thus treated batch of vermiculite is a package structure. The properties of the material lead to a slow heating of manufactured products due to low absorption and high radiation reflection. The maximum of reflection function is referred to infrared spectral region. A review of current models of heat propagation in anisotropic thermal insulation materials is carried out, as well as analysis of their thermal and optical properties. A theoretical model, which allows to determine the heat conductivity «ITIRM», can be useful in the study of thermal characteristics such as specific heat capacity, temperature conductivity, and others. Materials as «ITIRM» can be used in the metallurgy industry, thermal energy and nuclear power-engineering.

  1. Signature of inverse Compton emission from blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Haritma; Mohan, Prashanth; Wierzcholska, Alicja; Gu, Minfeng

    2018-01-01

    Blazars are classified into high-, intermediate- and low-energy-peaked sources based on the location of their synchrotron peak. This lies in infra-red/optical to ultra-violet bands for low- and intermediate-peaked blazars. The transition from synchrotron to inverse Compton emission falls in the X-ray bands for such sources. We present the spectral and timing analysis of 14 low- and intermediate-energy-peaked blazars observed with XMM-Newton spanning 31 epochs. Parametric fits to X-ray spectra help constrain the possible location of transition from the high-energy end of the synchrotron to the low-energy end of the inverse Compton emission. In seven sources in our sample, we infer such a transition and constrain the break energy in the range 0.6-10 keV. The Lomb-Scargle periodogram is used to estimate the power spectral density (PSD) shape. It is well described by a power law in a majority of light curves, the index being flatter compared to general expectation from active galactic nuclei, ranging here between 0.01 and 1.12, possibly due to short observation durations resulting in an absence of long-term trends. A toy model involving synchrotron self-Compton and external Compton (EC; disc, broad line region, torus) mechanisms are used to estimate magnetic field strength ≤0.03-0.88 G in sources displaying the energy break and infer a prominent EC contribution. The time-scale for variability being shorter than synchrotron cooling implies steeper PSD slopes which are inferred in these sources.

  2. Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2008-09-01

    This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the

  3. SPEIR: A Ge Compton camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States)]. E-mail: mihailescu1@llnl.gov; Vetter, K.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Burks, M.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Hull, E.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Craig, W.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for{gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a Compton scatter {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The imaging system consists of double-sided segmented (DSSD) planar Ge detectors, an acquisition system instrumenting the detectors, and a set of data analysis methods. The analysis methods employ event reconstruction algorithms that increase the intrinsic position resolution and granularity of the detectors, and provide photon scattering information relevant for Compton imaging.

  4. Asteroid thermal modeling: recent developments and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harris, A. W.; Mueller, M.

    2006-01-01

    A variety of thermal models are used for the derivation of asteroid physical parameters from thermal-infrared observations Simple models based on spherical geometry are often adequate for obtaining sizes and albedos when very little information about an object is available However sophisticated

  5. First-Generation Hybrid Compact Compton Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, M; Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Krings, T; Lange, D; Hull, E; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Protic, D; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-07

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we are pursuing the development of a gamma-ray imaging system using the Compton effect. We have built our first generation hybrid Compton imaging system, and we have conducted initial calibration and image measurements using this system. In this paper, we present the details of the hybrid Compton imaging system and initial calibration and image measurements.

  6. The hydrogen anomaly problem in neutron Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik B.

    2018-03-01

    Neutron Compton scattering (also called ‘deep inelastic scattering of neutrons’, DINS) is a method used to study momentum distributions of light atoms in solids and liquids. It has been employed extensively since the start-up of intense pulsed neutron sources about 25 years ago. The information lies primarily in the width and shape of the Compton profile and not in the absolute intensity of the Compton peaks. It was therefore not immediately recognized that the relative intensities of Compton peaks arising from scattering on different isotopes did not always agree with values expected from standard neutron cross-section tables. The discrepancies were particularly large for scattering on protons, a phenomenon that became known as ‘the hydrogen anomaly problem’. The present paper is a review of the discovery, experimental tests to prove or disprove the existence of the hydrogen anomaly and discussions concerning its origin. It covers a twenty-year-long history of experimentation, theoretical treatments and discussions. The problem is of fundamental interest, since it involves quantum phenomena on the subfemtosecond time scale, which are not visible in conventional thermal neutron scattering but are important in Compton scattering where neutrons have two orders of magnitude times higher energy. Different H-containing systems show different cross-section deficiencies and when the scattering processes are followed on the femtosecond time scale the cross-section losses disappear on different characteristic time scales for each H-environment. The last section of this review reproduces results from published papers based on quantum interference in scattering on identical particles (proton or deuteron pairs or clusters), which have given a quantitative theoretical explanation both regarding the H-cross-section reduction and its time dependence. Some new explanations are added and the concluding chapter summarizes the conditions for observing the specific quantum

  7. Conductive thermal modeling of Wyoming geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, H.P.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    A summary of techniques used by the Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group in defining low-temperature hydrothermal resource areas is presented. Emphasis is placed on thermal modeling techniques appropriate to Wyoming's geologic setting. Thermal parameters discussed include oil-well bottom hole temperatures, heat flow, thermal conductivity, and measured temperature-depth profiles. Examples of the use of these techniques are from the regional study of the Bighorn Basin and two site specific studies within the Basin.

  8. Proton spin polarizabilities from polarized Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Pasquini; D. Drechsel; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2007-07-01

    Polarized Compton scattering off the proton is studied within the framework of subtracted dispersion relations for photon energies up to 300 MeV. As a guideline for forthcoming experiments, we focus the attention on the role of the proton's spin polarizabilities and investigate the most favorable conditions to extract them with a minimum of model dependence. We conclude that a complete separation of the four spin polarizabilities is possible, at photon energies between threshold and the $\\Delta(1232)$ region, provided one can achieve polarization measurements with an accuracy of a few percent.

  9. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the neutron

    CERN Document Server

    Mazouz, M; Ferdi, C; Gavalian, G; Kuchina, E; Amarian, M; Aniol, K A; Beaumel, M; Benaoum, H; Bertin, P; Brossard, M; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; De Jager, C W; Deur, A; Feuerbach, R; Fieschi, J M; Frullani, S; Garçon, M; Garibaldi, F; Gayou, O; Gilman, R; Gómez, J; Gueye, P; Guichon, P A M; Guillon, B; Hansen, O; Hayes, D; Higinbotham, D; Holmstrom, T; Hyde, C E; Ibrahim, H; Igarashi, R; Jiang, X; Jo, H S; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kumbartzki, G; Laveissière, G; Le Rose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Lu, H J; Margaziotis, D J; Meziani, Z E; McCormick, K; Michaels, R; Michel, B; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Nanda, S; Nelyubin, V; Potokar, M; Qiang, Y; Ransome, R D; Real, J S; Reitz, B; Roblin, Y; Roche, J; Sabatie, F; Saha, A; Sirca, S; Slifer, K; Solvignon, P; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Ulmer, P E; Voutier, E; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2007-01-01

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D$({\\vec e},e'\\gamma)X$ cross section measured at $Q^2$=1.9 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to $E_q$, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  10. The NPS Virtual Thermal Image processing model

    OpenAIRE

    Kenter, Yucel.

    2001-01-01

    A new virtual thermal image-processing model that has been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School is introduced in this thesis. This visualization program is based on an earlier work, the Visibility MRTD model, which is focused on predicting the minimum resolvable temperature difference (MRTD). The MRTD is a standard performance measure for forward-looking infrared (FLIR) imaging systems. It takes into account thermal imaging system modeling concerns, such as modulation transfer functions...

  11. Transmutation Fuel Performance Code Thermal Model Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory K. Miller; Pavel G. Medvedev

    2007-09-01

    FRAPCON fuel performance code is being modified to be able to model performance of the nuclear fuels of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). The present report documents the effort for verification of the FRAPCON thermal model. It was found that, with minor modifications, FRAPCON thermal model temperature calculation agrees with that of the commercial software ABAQUS (Version 6.4-4). This report outlines the methodology of the verification, code input, and calculation results.

  12. Pressure And Thermal Modeling Of Rocket Launches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.; Farmer, Richard C.; Freeman, Jon A.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents mathematical model for use in designing rocket-launching stand. Predicts pressure and thermal environment, as well as thermal responses of structures to impinging rocket-exhaust plumes. Enables relatively inexperienced analyst to determine time-varying distributions and absolute levels of pressure and heat loads on structures.

  13. Inclusive and Exclusive Compton Processes in Quantum Chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Psaker, Ales [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    In our work, we describe two types of Compton processes. As an example of an inclusive process, we consider the high-energy photoproduction of massive muon pairs off the nucleon. We analyze the process in the framework of the QCD parton model, in which the usual parton distributions emerge as a tool to describe the nucleon in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. To study its exclusive version, a new class of phenomenological functions is required, namely, generalized parton distributions. They can be considered as a generalization of the usual parton distributions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering. Generalized parton distributions (GPDs) may be observed in hard exclusive reactions such as deeply virtual Compton scattering. We develop an extension of this particular process into the weak interaction sector. We also investigate a possible application of the GPD formalism to wide-angle real Compton scattering.

  14. Thermal modelling of friction stir welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Henrik Nikolaj Blicher; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to present the basic elements of the thermal modelling of friction stir welding as well as to clarify some of the uncertainties in the literature regarding the different contributions to the heat generation. Some results from a new thermal pseudomechanical model...... in which the temperature-dependent yield stress of the weld material controls the heat generation are also presented....

  15. Thermal modeling of Fresca2 magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrowicz, S

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the thermal modeling of the Nb3Sn magnet called Fresca2 within the EuCARD-HFM project. The goal of this study is to predict the thermal behavior of the magnet and to calculate the maximum temperature difference in the magnet structure during steady and transient state conditions. Results of the maximum temperature difference are compared with the temperature margin allowed. The steady state thermal calculations of the magnet are performed with AC losses due to ramp rate and homogeneous dissipation of heat as input heat loads. The transient calculations model the cool-down process. The thermal modeling was performed for several scenarios for steady and unsteady processes and for two base temperatures of 1.9 K and 4.2 K.

  16. SPEIR: A Ge Compton Camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihailescu, L; Vetter, K M; Burks, M T; Hull, E L; Craig, W W

    2004-02-11

    The SPEctroscopic Imager for {gamma}-Rays (SPEIR) is a new concept of a compact {gamma}-ray imaging system of high efficiency and spectroscopic resolution with a 4-{pi} field-of-view. The system behind this concept employs double-sided segmented planar Ge detectors accompanied by the use of list-mode photon reconstruction methods to create a sensitive, compact Compton scatter camera.

  17. Thermal Transport Model for Heat Sink Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, James A.; Kelley, Richard L.; Brown, Ari D.; Smith, Stephen J.; Kilbourne, Caroline a.

    2009-01-01

    A document discusses the development of a finite element model for describing thermal transport through microcalorimeter arrays in order to assist in heat-sinking design. A fabricated multi-absorber transition edge sensor (PoST) was designed in order to reduce device wiring density by a factor of four. The finite element model consists of breaking the microcalorimeter array into separate elements, including the transition edge sensor (TES) and the silicon substrate on which the sensor is deposited. Each element is then broken up into subelements, whose surface area subtends 10 10 microns. The heat capacity per unit temperature, thermal conductance, and thermal diffusivity of each subelement are the model inputs, as are the temperatures of each subelement. Numerical integration using the Finite in Time Centered in Space algorithm of the thermal diffusion equation is then performed in order to obtain a temporal evolution of the subelement temperature. Thermal transport across interfaces is modeled using a thermal boundary resistance obtained using the acoustic mismatch model. The document concludes with a discussion of the PoST fabrication. PoSTs are novel because they enable incident x-ray position sensitivity with good energy resolution and low wiring density.

  18. Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

    2011-01-01

    When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

  19. Strong anisotropy in the low temperature Compton profiles of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in the orthorhombic phase of -Ga metal at low temperature are calculated in the band model for the three ... Department of Physics, Chikiti Mahavidyalaya, Chikiti 761 010, India; Department of Physics, Berhampur University, Berhampur 760 007, India ...

  20. A Non-Relativistic Look at the Compton Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Steve; Giri, Sandeep; Zakrasek, Nicholas; Affatigato, Mario

    2014-01-01

    In a usual modern physics class the Compton effect is used as the pedagogical model for introducing relativity into quantum effects. The shift in photon wavelengths is usually introduced and derived using special relativity. Indeed, this works well for explaining the effect. However, in the senior author's class one of the student coauthors…

  1. Deeply virtual Compton scattering at Jefferson Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biselli, Angela S. [Fairfield University - Department of Physics 1073 North Benson Road, Fairfield, CT 06430, USA; Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The generalized parton distributions (GPDs) have emerged as a universal tool to describe hadrons in terms of their elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) on a proton or neutron ($N$), $e N \\rightarrow e' N' \\gamma$, is the process more directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. The amplitudes of DVCS and Bethe-Heitler, the process where a photon is emitted by either the incident or scattered electron, can be accessed via cross-section measurements or exploiting their interference which gives rise to spin asymmetries. Spin asymmetries, cross sections and cross-section differences can be connected to different combinations of the four leading-twist GPDs (${H}$, ${E}$, ${\\tilde{H}}$, ${\\tilde{E}}$) for each quark flavors, depending on the observable and on the type of target. This paper gives an overview of recent experimental results obtained for DVCS at Jefferson Laboratory in the halls A and B. Several experiments have been done extracting DVCS observables over large kinematics regions. Multiple measurements with overlapping kinematic regions allow to perform a quasi-model independent extraction of the Compton form factors, which are GPDs integrals, revealing a 3D image of the nucleon.

  2. Thermal modeling of an AFPMSM: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shazly

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the axial-flux permanent-magnet synchronous motor (AFPMSM and the history of axial-flux machines. Various machine structures, features of the AFPMSM over the conventional machines and disadvantages are clarified. AFPMSMs are being developed for many applications due to their attractive features; these applications are mentioned. It also reviews the studies of thermal modeling of AFPMSM and the various techniques to analyze the thermal behavior of it.

  3. Modeling the Thermal Destruction of Chemical Warfare ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symposium Paper In the event of a terrorist attack with chemical warfare agents (CWAs), large quantities of materials, both indoor and outdoor, may be treated with thermal incineration during the site remediation process. This paper reports on a study to examine the thermal decomposition of surrogate CWAs and formation of decomposition by-products bound in model building materials (in this case, ceiling tile) in a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator simulator.

  4. Thermal Ablation Modeling for Silicate Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yih-Kanq

    2016-01-01

    A general thermal ablation model for silicates is proposed. The model includes the mass losses through the balance between evaporation and condensation, and through the moving molten layer driven by surface shear force and pressure gradient. This model can be applied in the ablation simulation of the meteoroid and the glassy ablator for spacecraft Thermal Protection Systems. Time-dependent axisymmetric computations are performed by coupling the fluid dynamics code, Data-Parallel Line Relaxation program, with the material response code, Two-dimensional Implicit Thermal Ablation simulation program, to predict the mass lost rates and shape change. The predicted mass loss rates will be compared with available data for model validation, and parametric studies will also be performed for meteoroid earth entry conditions.

  5. Modeling of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Dipole–dipole interaction; relaxation; modeling; TSDC; activation energy; PVC; ABS. Abstract. The study of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC) using the dipole–dipole interaction model is described in this work. The dipole–dipole interactionmodel (DDIM) determines the TSDC peak successfully ...

  6. Inverse Compton Origin of the Hard X-ray and Soft gamma-ray Emission from the Galactic Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; Orlando, Elena; Bouchet, Laurent

    2008-09-30

    A recent re-determination of the non-thermal component of the hard X-ray to soft {gamma}-ray emission from the Galactic ridge, using the SPI instrument on the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Observatory, is shown to be well reproduced as inverse-Compton emission from the interstellar medium. Both cosmic-ray primary electrons and secondary electrons and positrons contribute to the emission. The prediction uses the GALPROP model and includes a new calculation of the interstellar radiation field. This may solve a long-standing mystery of the origin of this emission, and potentially opens a new window on Galactic cosmic rays.

  7. Compton scattering on $^{208}$Pb

    CERN Document Server

    Alberico, W M

    1982-01-01

    The authors briefly review the formalism of the nuclear Compton scattering in the frame of the low-energy theorems (LET). They treat the resonant terms of the amplitude, having collective intermediate nuclear states, as a superposition of Lorentz lines with energy, width and strength fixed by the photo-absorption experiments. The gauge terms are evaluated starting from a simple, but realistic, nuclear Hamiltonian. Dynamical nucleon-nucleon correlations are consistently taken into account, beyond those imposed by the Pauli principle. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the data of elastic diffusion of photons from /sup 208/Pb shows that LET are insufficient to account for the experiment.

  8. Transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton and a resulting model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Zhenyu

    2007-02-15

    In this thesis we report on the rst results on the transverse target-spin asymmetry associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on the proton. It is shown that this asymmetry can provide one of the rare possibilities to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD) E of the nucleon, and thus, through models for E, also to the total angular momentum of u and d quarks in the nucleon. The measurement was performed using the 27.6 GeV positron beam of the HERA storage ring and the transversely polarized hydrogen target of the HERMES experiment at DESY. The two leading azimuthal amplitudes of the asymmetry are extracted from the HERMES 2002-2004 data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 65.3 pb.1. By comparing the results obtained at HERMES and theoretical predictions based on a phenomenological model of GPDs, we obtain a model-dependent constraint on the total angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  9. Simple modification of Compton polarimeter to redirect synchrotron radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Benesch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron radiation produced as an electron beam passes through a bending magnet is a significant source of background in many experiments. Using modeling, we show that simple modifications of the magnet geometry can reduce this background by orders of magnitude in some circumstances. Specifically, we examine possible modifications of the four dipole magnets used in Jefferson Lab’s Hall A Compton polarimeter chicane. This Compton polarimeter has been a crucial part of experiments with polarized beams and the next generation of experiments will utilize increased beam energies, up to 11 GeV, requiring a corresponding increase in Compton dipole field to 1.5 T. In consequence, the synchrotron radiation (SR from the dipole chicane will be greatly increased. Three possible modifications of the chicane dipoles are studied; each design moves about 2% of the integrated bending field to provide a gentle bend in critical regions along the beam trajectory which, in turn, greatly reduces the synchrotron radiation within the acceptance of the Compton polarimeter photon detector. Each of the modifications studied also softens the SR energy spectrum at the detector sufficiently to allow shielding with 5 mm of lead. Simulations show that these designs are each capable of reducing the background signal due to SR by three orders of magnitude. The three designs considered vary in their need for vacuum vessel changes and in their effectiveness.

  10. A test of local Lorentz invariance with Compton scattering asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanmurthy, P; Dutta, D

    2016-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the constancy and anisotropy of the speed of light relative to the electrons in photon-electron scattering. We used the Compton scattering asymmetry measured by the new Compton polarimeter in Hall~C at Jefferson Lab to test for deviations from unity of the vacuum refractive index ($n$). For photon energies in the range of 9 - 46 MeV, we obtain a new limit of $1-n < 1.4 \\times 10^{-8}$. In addition, the absence of sidereal variation over the six month period of the measurement constrains any anisotropies in the speed of light. These constitute the first study of Lorentz invariance using Compton asymmetry. Within the minimal standard model extension framework, our result yield limits on the photon and electron coefficients $\\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{YZ}, c_{TX}, \\tilde{\\kappa}_{0^+}^{ZX}$, and $c_{TY}$. Although, these limits are several orders of magnitude larger than the current best limits, they demonstrate the feasibility of using Compton asymmetry for tests of Lorentz invarianc...

  11. Narrowband Compton Scattering Yield Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykovanov, Sergey; Seipt, Daniel; Kharin, Vasily

    2017-10-01

    Compton Scattering (CS) of laser light off high-energy electrons is a well-established source of X- and gamma-rays for applications in medicine, biology, nuclear and material sciences. Main advantage of CS photon sources is the possibility to generate narrow spectra as opposed to a broad continuum obtained when utilizing Bremsstrahlung. However, due to the low cross-section of the linear process, the total photon yield is quite low. The most straightforward way to increase the number of photon-electron beam scattering events is to increase the laser pulse intensity at the interaction point by harder focusing. This leads to an unfortunate consequence. Increase in the laser pulse normalized amplitude a0, leads to additional ponderomotive spectrum broadening of the scattered radiation. The ponderomotive broadening is caused by the v × B force, which slows the electron down near the peak of the laser pulse where the intensity is high, and can be neglected near the wings of the pulse, where the intensity is low. We show that laser pulse chirping, both nonlinear (laser pulse frequency ''following'' the envelope of the pulse) and linear, leads to compensation of the ponderomotive broadening and considerably enhances the yield of the nonlinear Compton sources. Work supported by the Helmholtz Association via Helmholtz Young Investigators Grant (VH-NG-1037).

  12. Mathematical model of thermal aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostúr Karol

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Tepelné agregáty môžme charakterizova jako priemyselné pece s ve¾kou spotrebou energie. Jednou z možných ciest zníženia spotreby energie je optimalizácia a priebežné riadenie priemyselných tepelných agregátov pomocou simulaèných modelov. Východiskom pre tvorbu simulaèných modelov je matematický model. Matematické modelovanie tepelných procesov je založené na riešení parciálnych diferenciálnych rovníc a nelineárnych algebraických rovníc popisujúcich základné procesy prenosu tepelnej energie. V príspevku je popísaná základná metodika tvorby matematického modelu zónovou metódou vrátane efektívneho riešenia. Prínosom príspevku je rozpracovanie analytického postupu riešenia nelineárneho systému bilanèných rovníc, ktorého použitie znaène urých¾uje priebeh simulácie v porovnaní s numerickým riešením.

  13. NuSTAR observations of the bullet cluster: constraints on inverse compton emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wik, Daniel R.; Hornstrup, Allan; Molendi, S.

    2014-01-01

    The search for diffuse non-thermal inverse Compton (IC) emission from galaxy clusters at hard X-ray energies has been undertaken with many instruments, with most detections being either of low significance or controversial. Because all prior telescopes sensitive at E > 10 keV do not focus light...... in the energy range 3-30 keV. NuSTAR's unprecedented hard X-ray focusing capability largely eliminates confusion between diffuse IC and point sources; however, at the highest energies, the background still dominates and must be well understood. To this end, we have developed a complete background model...... constructed of physically inspired components constrained by extragalactic survey field observations, the specific parameters of which are derived locally from data in non-source regions of target observations. Applying the background model to the Bullet cluster data, we find that the spectrum is well...

  14. Thermal modeling in Ceuta, Maracaibo Basin, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcano, F.; Padron, S. (Maraven S.A., Caracas (Venezuela))

    1993-02-01

    Hydrocarbon generation from Upper Cretaceous source rocks (Fm.La Luna) in Ceuta, center-eastern Maracaibo lake area in Venezuela, is modeled here, using a kinetic method and the conventional Time-Temperature Index (TTI) procedure. Geological evolution, burial and erosional history is based on available interpretation of 3D seismic and well data. Fragmentary present-day subsurface temperature data comes from corrected measurements in a few wells. Paleogradient/heat paleoflux was estimated during the thermal modeling on wells, by calculating vitrinite reflectances (Ro) or Tmax values and then comparing them with measured ones. However, thermal-indicator data does not always appear to be consistent and some data had to be rejected. Paleogradient evolution in the Cretaceous is controlled by the development of a isolated thermal compartment related to overpressures in a thick shaly sequence in the Upper Cretaceous. A geological section was studied in detail to illustrate possible migration paths to known fields and undrilled traps. Results show a good fit between the thermal evolution of the source rock and the maturity of the crude produced in the area.

  15. Multiscale Modeling of UHTC: Thermal Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.; Murry, Daw; Squire, Thomas; Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    We are developing a multiscale framework in computational modeling for the ultra high temperature ceramics (UHTC) ZrB2 and HfB2. These materials are characterized by high melting point, good strength, and reasonable oxidation resistance. They are candidate materials for a number of applications in extreme environments including sharp leading edges of hypersonic aircraft. In particular, we used a combination of ab initio methods, atomistic simulations and continuum computations to obtain insights into fundamental properties of these materials. Ab initio methods were used to compute basic structural, mechanical and thermal properties. From these results, a database was constructed to fit a Tersoff style interatomic potential suitable for atomistic simulations. These potentials were used to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity of single crystals and the thermal resistance of simple grain boundaries. Finite element method (FEM) computations using atomistic results as inputs were performed with meshes constructed on SEM images thereby modeling the realistic microstructure. These continuum computations showed the reduction in thermal conductivity due to the grain boundary network.

  16. Measurement of the spin asymmetry of the beam in the polarized virtual Compton scattering on the proton. Study of the nucleon's energy spectra through the QCD-type potential model; Mesure de l'asymetrie de spin de faisceau en diffusion compton virtuelle polarisee sur le proton. Etude du spectre d'energie du nucleon par le modele de potentiel de type QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bensafa, I.K

    2006-05-15

    The first part of this work presents the analysis and results of the VCS-SSA (virtual Compton scattering - single spin asymmetry) experiment at MAMI (Mainz). It was carried out with beam energy 883 MeV and longitudinal polarization (about 80%), at virtual photon four-momentum transfer squared (Q{sup 2} = 0.35 GeV{sup 2}) to measure the beam asymmetry in the ep {yields} ep{gamma} and ep {yields} ep{pi}{sup 0} reactions. The asymmetry obtained in photon (resp. pion) electro-production is between 0-15% (resp. 0-2%). The dispersion relation model for virtual Compton scattering and MAID model (for {pi}{sup 0}) reproduce the amplitude globally but not completely the shape of the asymmetry. Perhaps this discrepancy is due to an imperfect parameterization of some pion production multipoles ({gamma}{sup *}N {yields} {pi}N). The second part is dedicated to the study of the nucleon energy spectrum in ground-state L=0 and excited-state L=1 in the quark model, using the Coulomb + linear potential type (CL) and a relativistic correction. The hyperfine correction is applied to discriminate the nucleon masses. The values of the mass found for the proton and the {delta}(1232) are respectively equal to (968 MeV, 1168 MeV), and the masses of the excited states are between 1564 - 1607 MeV. This part is completed by an application of the CL model to an approximate calculation of generalized polarizabilities of the proton. (author)

  17. Thermal activation model of endurance limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Baotong; Zheng, Xiulin

    1992-09-01

    A thermal activation model of the endurance limit is proposed in the present study. It can quantitatively explain the effects of temperature and frequency on the endurance limit of metals at or below room temperature. Theoretical analysis indicates that the endurance limit, σac, which is considered as a parameter characterizing the resistance of metals to cyclic microplastic deformation, has the same thermally activated nature as the plastic flow stress has and it can be resolved into two independent components: the long-range internal stress (the athermal component), μ(ɛapc), and the short-range effective stress (the thermal component), σa *( T, ɛp). The former is considered as a material constant insensitive to temperature and strain rate (or frequency). The latter, the temperature- and strain rate-dependent part of the endurance limit, is approximately identical with the effective stress component of plastic flow stress (or cyclic yielding stress). In light of the thermal activation model, the temperature and strain-rate dependence of monotonic and cyclic flow stresses in a low alloy steel (16Mn) and a precipitation-hardening aluminum alloy (LY12CZ) were experimentally investigated. The results indicate that the effective stress components of monotonic and cyclic flow stresses are identical, if the temperature and strain rate are held unchanged, and that both of them are approximately independent of the magnitude of plastic strain. On the basis of the thermal activation model, an expression predicting the endurance limit below room temperature is offered. The predicted values of the endurance limit agree with the test data of steels and aluminum alloys available in literature.

  18. INDIVIDUAL BASED MODELLING APPROACH TO THERMAL ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diadromous fish populations in the Pacific Northwest face challenges along their migratory routes from declining habitat quality, harvest, and barriers to longitudinal connectivity. Changes in river temperature regimes are producing an additional challenge for upstream migrating adult salmon and steelhead, species that are sensitive to absolute and cumulative thermal exposure. Adult salmon populations have been shown to utilize cold water patches along migration routes when mainstem river temperatures exceed thermal optimums. We are employing an individual based model (IBM) to explore the costs and benefits of spatially-distributed cold water refugia for adult migrating salmon. Our model, developed in the HexSim platform, is built around a mechanistic behavioral decision tree that drives individual interactions with their spatially explicit simulated environment. Population-scale responses to dynamic thermal regimes, coupled with other stressors such as disease and harvest, become emergent properties of the spatial IBM. Other model outputs include arrival times, species-specific survival rates, body energetic content, and reproductive fitness levels. Here, we discuss the challenges associated with parameterizing an individual based model of salmon and steelhead in a section of the Columbia River. Many rivers and streams in the Pacific Northwest are currently listed as impaired under the Clean Water Act as a result of high summer water temperatures. Adverse effec

  19. Research progress of machine tool thermal error modeling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianjian GUO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During cutting, machine tools are influenced by different heat sources, which induces machine thermal deformation, deviation and thermal error. In different machine errors, thermal error accounts for 40%~70% of total machine errors, which is the main influence factor of machining accuracy. In order to reduce machine thermal error and improve machining precision, there are mainly 3 ways at present: 1 Improving machine thermal stiffness by optimal design of machine structure; 2 Separating heat sources from machine tools; 3 Thermal error compensation, which reduces the influence of thermal distortions by predicting and compensating measures. In order to compensate thermal errors, thermal error modeling is the premise and foundation. Therefore, thermal error modeling technology is introduced in this paper firstly, and its recent development both at home and abroad is analyzed. The main obstacles in thermal error modeling field at present are summerized, and the future of the technology are presented.

  20. Theoretical and experimental analysis of titanium Compton profile using {sup 137}Cs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Science and Research Branch, Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tehran University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizi, Maryam, E-mail: aziziph@gmail.co [Tehran University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-09-15

    The objective of this study is to measure the Compton profile of a titanium coating on a glass substrate, comparing it with a profile computed by the Hillman and Skilman program based on the Hartree-Fock model. The experimental Compton profile was obtained using 661.7 keV gamma-rays from a {sup 1}Ci {sup 137}Cs source and a 3''x3'' NaI(Tl) detector. The experimental, theoretical and unfolded Compton profiles of titanium have been compared. The results illustrate the breadth of experimental Compton profile in comparison with the two others. This difference can be mainly attributed to the Doppler broadening effect, the final quantum state of the electron and partly by the approximations implemented in the theoretical model.

  1. A simple scanner for Compton tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cesareo, R; Brunetti, A; Golosio, B; Castellano, A

    2002-01-01

    A first generation CT-scanner was designed and constructed to carry out Compton images. This CT-scanner is composed of a 80 kV, 5 mA X-ray tube and a NaI(Tl) X-ray detector; the tube is strongly collimated, generating a X-ray beam of 2 mm diameter, whilst the detector is not collimated to collect Compton photons from the whole irradiated cylinder. The performances of the equipment were tested contemporaneous transmission and Compton images.

  2. Thermal measurements on the LHC collimator model

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, S; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2006-01-01

    One of the most critical design issues in the LHC collimators is the clamping of the graphite (or carbon-carbon composite) particle absorber onto the copper cooling circuit. The thermal impedance at their interface depends on several material parameters and although theoretical models exist in the literature, an experimental assessment was deemed necessary in the light of the criticality of these components. In this note the experimental setup and the measured data are briefly presented.

  3. High Power Solid State Retrofit Lamp Thermal Characterization and Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Jakovenko, J.; Formanek, J.; Janicek, V.; Husak, M.; R. Werkhoven

    2012-01-01

    Thermal and thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of solid state lightening (SSL) retrofit LED lamp are presented in this paper. Paramount importance is to design SSL lamps for reliability, in which thermal and thermo-mechanical aspects are key points. The main goal is to get a precise 3D thermal lamp model for further thermal optimization. Simulations are performed with ANSYS and CoventorWare software tools to compere different simulation approaches. Simulated thermal distribution ...

  4. The Compton-thick Growth of Supermassive Black Holes constrained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Johannes; Georgakakis, Antonis; Nandra, Kirpal; Brightman, Murray; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Liu, Zhu; Hsu, Li-Ting; Salvato, Mara; Rangel, Cyprian; Aird, James

    2017-08-01

    A heavily obscured growth phase of supermassive black holes (SMBH) is thought to be important in the co-evolution with galaxies. X-rays provide a clean and efficient selection of unobscured and obscured AGN. Recent work with deeper observations and improved analysis methodology allowed us to extend constraints to Compton-thick number densities. We present the first luminosity function of Compton-thick AGN at z=0.5-4 and constrain the overall mass density locked into black holes over cosmic time, a fundamental constraint for cosmological simulations. Recent studies including ours find that the obscuration is redshift and luminosity-dependent in a complex way, which rules out entire sets of obscurer models. A new paradigm, the radiation-lifted torus model, is proposed, in which the obscurer is Eddington-rate dependent and accretion creates and displaces torus clouds. We place observational limits on the behaviour of this mechanism.

  5. Modelling and simulation of thermal power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eborn, J.

    1998-02-01

    Mathematical modelling and simulation are important tools when dealing with engineering systems that today are becoming increasingly more complex. Integrated production and recycling of materials are trends that give rise to heterogenous systems, which are difficult to handle within one area of expertise. Model libraries are an excellent way to package engineering knowledge of systems and units to be reused by those who are not experts in modelling. Many commercial packages provide good model libraries, but they are usually domain-specific and closed. Heterogenous, multi-domain systems requires open model libraries written in general purpose modelling languages. This thesis describes a model database for thermal power plants written in the object-oriented modelling language OMOLA. The models are based on first principles. Subunits describe volumes with pressure and enthalpy dynamics and flows of heat or different media. The subunits are used to build basic units such as pumps, valves and heat exchangers which can be used to build system models. Several applications are described; a heat recovery steam generator, equipment for juice blending, steam generation in a sulphuric acid plant and a condensing steam plate heat exchanger. Model libraries for industrial use must be validated against measured data. The thesis describes how parameter estimation methods can be used for model validation. Results from a case-study on parameter optimization of a non-linear drum boiler model show how the technique can be used 32 refs, 21 figs

  6. Burner liner thermal/structural load modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeo, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    A serious problem exists interfacing the output temperatures and temperature gradients from either the heat transfer codes or engine tests with the input to stress analysis codes. A thermal load transfer code was developed and was used in conjunction with a three-dimensional model of a combustor liner for verification. The 3D heat transfer and stress analysis models of combustor liners and turbine blades were used to validate the mapped temperature produced by the transfer module. Verification cases were made for both finite element and finite difference heat transfer codes. A user manual for the code was written and is available.

  7. Infrared thermal models for Saturn's ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared (10 and 20 microns) thermal emission data for Saturn's rings are discussed in terms of simple isothermal radiative transfer models of finite optical thickness. Recent brightness temperature measurements, corresponding to essentially maximum ring tilt, indicate that optical single scattering albedos less than 0.75 are required to provide sufficient heating of the ring material. Reconciliation with analyses of the optical scattering properties of the ring requires the backscattering efficiency to be even higher than for a macroscopic sphere. Historical brightness temperature measurements are used to show that no unique isothermal ring model exists. Instead, a temperature gradient perpendicular to the ring plane appears to be present.

  8. Thermal modelling using discrete vasculature for thermal therapy: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, H. Petra; Gellermann, Johanna; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Stauffer, Paul R.; Hand, Jeffrey W.; Crezee, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Reliable temperature information during clinical hyperthermia and thermal ablation is essential for adequate treatment control, but conventional temperature measurements do not provide 3D temperature information. Treatment planning is a very useful tool to improve treatment quality, and substantial

  9. Modeling yields insight into thermal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, J.L.; Carr, R.V.; Simpson, M.S. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A fundamental understanding of the thermal decomposition of nitrotoluenes is critical in evaluating the hazards associated with transporting and storing commercial volumes of these chemicals. Detailed modeling of an adiabatic, low PHI and semi-open (vented to a larger pressure vessel) calorimeter provides insight into a multiple reaction mechanism. The reaction rates developed, along with the significant effect of reactant or intermediates vaporization were confirmed with additional experimental results. Such an interpretation of nitrotoluene decomposition is consistent with recent isothermal experiments as well as with the body of data reported in the open literature. The low temperature or induction reactions are accurately represented with a first order Arrhenius model having typical values for kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. These reactions generate minimal amounts of non condensable gas. If the material is maintained at an elevated temperature, but prevented from self-heating (by external cooling), the intermediate products form thermally unstable and nonvolatile oligomers. At higher temperatures the remaining materials undergo explosive reactions characterized by high heats of reaction, large activation energies and massive releases of non condensable gas. Quantifying the rates of nitrotoluene and/or intermediate vaporization versus oligomerization is essential in evaluating the hazard of a thermal explosion involving a commercial quantity of nitrotoluene.

  10. Stochastic modeling of thermal fatigue crack growth

    CERN Document Server

    Radu, Vasile

    2015-01-01

    The book describes a systematic stochastic modeling approach for assessing thermal-fatigue crack-growth in mixing tees, based on the power spectral density of temperature fluctuation at the inner pipe surface. It shows the development of a frequency-temperature response function in the framework of single-input, single-output (SISO) methodology from random noise/signal theory under sinusoidal input. The frequency response of stress intensity factor (SIF) is obtained by a polynomial fitting procedure of thermal stress profiles at various instants of time. The method, which takes into account the variability of material properties, and has been implemented in a real-world application, estimates the probabilities of failure by considering a limit state function and Monte Carlo analysis, which are based on the proposed stochastic model. Written in a comprehensive and accessible style, this book presents a new and effective method for assessing thermal fatigue crack, and it is intended as a concise and practice-or...

  11. Saturn Ring Data Analysis and Thermal Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Coleman

    2011-01-01

    CIRS, VIMS, UVIS, and ISS (Cassini's Composite Infrared Specrtometer, Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer, Ultra Violet Imaging Spectrometer and Imaging Science Subsystem, respectively), have each operated in a multidimensional observation space and have acquired scans of the lit and unlit rings at multiple phase angles. To better understand physical and dynamical ring particle parametric dependence, we co-registered profiles from these three instruments, taken at a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared, to associate changes in ring particle temperature with changes in observed brightness, specifically with albedos inferred by ISS, UVIS and VIMS. We work in a parameter space where the solar elevation range is constrained to 12 deg - 14 deg and the chosen radial region is the B3 region of the B ring; this region is the most optically thick region in Saturn's rings. From this compilation of multiple wavelength data, we construct and fit phase curves and color ratios using independent dynamical thermal models for ring structure and overplot Saturn, Saturn ring, and Solar spectra. Analysis of phase curve construction and color ratios reveals thermal emission to fall within the extrema of the ISS bandwidth and a geometrical dependence of reddening on phase angle, respectively. Analysis of spectra reveals Cassini CIRS Saturn spectra dominate Cassini CIRS B3 Ring Spectra from 19 to 1000 microns, while Earth-based B Ring Spectrum dominates Earth-based Saturn Spectrum from 0.4 to 4 microns. From our fits we test out dynamical thermal models; from the phase curves we derive ring albedos and non-lambertian properties of the ring particle surfaces; and from the color ratios we examine multiple scattering within the regolith of ring particles.

  12. Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-28

    The work presented in this report is a continuation of the work described in the May 2015 report, “Aqueous Solution Vessel Thermal Model Development”. This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model aims to predict the temperature and bubble volume fraction in an aqueous solution of uranium. These values affect the reactivity of the fissile solution, so it is important to be able to calculate them and determine their effects on the reaction. Part A of this report describes some of the parameter comparisons performed on the CFD model using Fluent. Part B describes the coupling of the Fluent model with a Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) neutron transport model. The fuel tank geometry is the same as it was in the May 2015 report, annular with a thickness-to-height ratio of 0.16. An accelerator-driven neutron source provides the excitation for the reaction, and internal and external water cooling channels remove the heat. The model used in this work incorporates the Eulerian multiphase model with lift, wall lubrication, turbulent dispersion and turbulence interaction. The buoyancy-driven flow is modeled using the Boussinesq approximation, and the flow turbulence is determined using the k-ω Shear-Stress-Transport (SST) model. The dispersed turbulence multiphase model is employed to capture the multiphase turbulence effects.

  13. Deeply virtual compton scattering on a virtual pion target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amrath, D.; Diehl, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Lansberg, J.P. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique]|[Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2008-07-15

    We study deeply virtual Compton scattering on a virtual pion that is emitted by a proton. Using a range of models for the generalized parton distributions of the pion, we evaluate the cross section, as well as the beam spin and beam charge asymmetries in the leading-twist approximation. Studying Compton scattering on the pion in suitable kinematics puts high demands on both beam energy and luminosity, and we find that the corresponding requirements will first be met after the energy upgrade at Jefferson Laboratory. As a by-product of our study, we construct a parameterization of pion generalized parton distributions that has a non-trivial interplay between the x and t dependence and is in good agreement with form factor data and lattice calculations. (orig.)

  14. Thermal Transport in the Kitaev Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Joji; Yoshitake, Junki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2017-09-01

    In conventional insulating magnets, heat is carried by magnons and phonons. In contrast, when the magnets harbor a quantum spin liquid state, emergent quasiparticles from the fractionalization of quantum spins can carry heat. Here, we investigate unconventional thermal transport yielded by such exotic carriers, in both longitudinal and transverse components, for the Kitaev model, whose ground state is exactly shown to be a quantum spin liquid with fractional excitations described as itinerant Majorana fermions and localized Z2 fluxes. We find that the longitudinal thermal conductivity exhibits a single peak at a high temperature, while the nonzero frequency component has a peak at a low temperature, reflecting the spin fractionalization. On the other hand, we show that the transverse thermal conductivity is induced by the magnetic field in a wide temperature range up to the energy scale of the bare exchange coupling; while increasing temperature, the transverse response divided by temperature decreases from the quantized value expected for the topologically nontrivial ground state and shows nonmonotonic temperature dependence. These characteristic behaviors provide experimentally accessible evidence of fractional excitations in the proximity to the Kitaev quantum spin liquid.

  15. Thermal modelling of a torpedo-car

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdeja-Gonzalez, L. F.; Barbes-Fernandez, M. F.; Gonzalez-Ojeda, R.; Castillo, G. A.; Colas, R.

    2005-07-01

    A two-dimensional finite element model for computing the temperature distribution in a torpedo-car holding pig iron is described in this work. The model determines the temperature gradients in steady and transient conditions whiting the different parts that constitute the systems, which are considered to be the steel casing, refractory lining, liquid iron, slag and air. Heat transfer within the main fluid phases (iron and air) is computed assuming an apparent thermal conductivity term incorporating the contribution from convention and radiation, and it is affected by the dimensions of the vessel. Thermal gradients within the constituents of the torpedo-car are used to calculate heat losses during operation. It was found that the model required the incorporate of a region within the iron-refractory interface to reproduce thermographic data recorded during operation; the heat transfer coefficient of this interface was found to be equal to 30 Wm''-2K''-1. (Author) 11 refs.

  16. Thermal-mechanical deformation modelling of soft tissues for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Jazar, Reza; Subic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Modeling of thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues is of great importance for thermal ablation. This paper presents a method by integrating the heating process with thermal-induced mechanical deformations of soft tissues for simulation and analysis of the thermal ablation process. This method combines bio-heat transfer theories, constitutive elastic material law under thermal loads as well as non-rigid motion dynamics to predict and analyze thermal-mechanical deformations of soft tissues. The 3D governing equations of thermal-mechanical soft tissue deformation are discretized by using the finite difference scheme and are subsequently solved by numerical algorithms. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively predict the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues, and can be used for the thermal ablation therapy to effectively control the delivered heat energy for cancer treatment.

  17. In-situ measurements of material thermal parameters for accurate LED lamp thermal modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellvehi, M.; Perpina, X.; Jorda, X.; Werkhoven, R.J.; Kunen, J.M.G.; Jakovenko, J.; Bancken, P.; Bolt, P.J.

    2013-01-01

    This work deals with the extraction of key thermal parameters for accurate thermal modelling of LED lamps: air exchange coefficient around the lamp, emissivity and thermal conductivity of all lamp parts. As a case study, an 8W retrofit lamp is presented. To assess simulation results, temperature is

  18. Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage : impacts of soil heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sommer, W.T.

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and monitoring of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Impacts of heterogeneity, thermal interference and bioremediation Wijbrand Sommer
    PhD thesis, Wageningen University, Wageningen, NL (2015)
    ISBN 978-94-6257-294-2 Abstract Aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) is

  19. Numerical modeling of laser thermal propulsion flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccay, T. D.; Thoenes, J.

    1984-01-01

    An review of the problems associated with modeling laser thermal propulsion flows, a synopsis of the status of such models, and the attributes of a successful model are presented. The continuous gaseous hydrogen laser-supported combustion wave (LSCW) thruster, for which a high-energy laser system (preferably space-based) should exist by the time the propulsion technology is developed, is considered in particular. The model proposed by Raizer (1970) is based on the assumptions of one-dimensional flow at constant pressure with heat conduction as the principal heat transfer mechanism. Consideration is given to subsequent models which account for radiative transfer into the ambient gas; provide a two-dimensional generalization of Raizer's analysis for the subsonic propagation of laser sparks in air; include the effect of forward plasma radiation in a one-dimensional model; and attempt a time-dependent (elliptic) solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations for the flow in a simple axisymmetric thruster. Attention is also given to thruster and nozzle flow models and thermodynamic and transport properties.

  20. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-11

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development” and “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at beam power levels between 6 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was recorded. The previous report2 described the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis performed on the as-built solution vessel geometry. The CFD simulations in the current analysis were performed using Ansys Fluent, Ver. 17.2. The same power profiles determined from MCNP calculations in earlier work were used for the 12 and 15 kW simulations. The primary goal of the current work is to calculate the temperature profiles for the 12 and 15 kW cases using reasonable estimates for the gas generation rate, based on images of the bubbles recorded during the irradiations. Temperature profiles resulting from the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  1. Compton Composites Late in the Early Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Mayer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beginning roughly two hundred years after the big-bang, a tresino phase transition generated Compton-scale composite particles and converted most of the ordinary plasma baryons into new forms of dark matter. Our model consists of ordinary electrons and protons that have been bound into mostly undetectable forms. This picture provides an explanation of the composition and history of ordinary to dark matter conversion starting with, and maintaining, a critical density Universe. The tresino phase transition started the conversion of ordinary matter plasma into tresino-proton pairs prior to the the recombination era. We derive the appropriate Saha–Boltzmann equilibrium to determine the plasma composition throughout the phase transition and later. The baryon population is shown to be quickly modified from ordinary matter plasma prior to the transition to a small amount of ordinary matter and a much larger amount of dark matter after the transition. We describe the tresino phase transition and the origin, quantity and evolution of the dark matter as it takes place from late in the early Universe until the present.

  2. Thermal sensation: a mathematical model based on neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, B R M; Schellen, L; Frijns, A J H; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W D

    2012-06-01

    Thermal sensation has a large influence on thermal comfort, which is an important parameter for building performance. Understanding of thermal sensation may benefit from incorporating the physiology of thermal reception. The main issue is that humans do not sense temperature directly; the information is coded into neural discharge rates. This manuscript describes the development of a mathematical model of thermal sensation based on the neurophysiology of thermal reception. Experimental data from two independent studies were used to develop and validate the model. In both studies, skin and core temperature were measured. Thermal sensation votes were asked on the seven-point ASHRAE thermal sensation scale. For the development dataset, young adult males (N=12, 0.04Clo) were exposed to transient conditions; Tair 30-20-35-30°C. For validation, young adult males (N=8, 1.0Clo) were exposed to transient conditions; Tair: 17-25-17°C. The neurophysiological model significantly predicted thermal sensation for the development dataset (r2=0.89, Pthermal sensation within acceptable range (root mean squared residual=0.38). The neurophysiological model captured the dynamics of thermal sensation. Therefore, the neurophysiological model of thermal sensation can be of great value in the design of high-performance buildings. The presented method, based on neurophysiology, can be highly beneficial for predicting thermal sensation under complex environments with respect to transient environments. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Adiabatic thermal models for planetary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, T.

    1985-01-01

    In a number of recent experiments it was found that the logarithmic derivative with respect to volume of the adiabatic temperature increase with pressure P to be an approximately constant quantity n. It was found that n decreases slightly with temperature, to be virtually unaffected by increasing pressure and to take values between 4 and 8 for a wide variety of materials. It is shown that these findings can be substantiated from thermodynamic arguments, finite strain theory, atomic potential theory and experimental data on the thermal expansion coefficient and the bulk modulus B. It will be shown that n is independent of pressure if it is exactly equal to dB/dP + 1. For these materials d log gamma/d log v = -1, where gamma is the thermodynamic Gruneisenparameter. It will increase with P during an isothermal transformation if n dB/dP + 1 and decrease of n dB/dP + 1. For most materials n is close to dB/dP and the changes will be slight if pressures do not become too extreme. During an adiabatic transformation n is virtually constant. Adiabatic thermal models for planetary bodies were calculated and are presented.

  4. Modeling thermal burns due to airbag deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, G N; Sidhu, H S

    2005-12-01

    Automotive airbags are now a widely accepted safety measure designed to reduce morbidity associated with motor vehicle accidents. Their usage is increasing with multiple airbags (driver, passenger and side curtain) being fitted to many vehicles. However the deployment of airbags has been identified as causing injuries in some instances including minor burns. There are three mechanisms for thermal burns due to an airbag; contact with the hot expelled gases from the airbag, contact with the hot airbag itself and melting of clothing from either of these contacts. A mathematical model is used here to predict the likelihood and severity of the first two types of burns. It is shown that direct contact with high temperature exhaust gases venting from the airbag can indeed lead to burns and that burns from contacting the hot airbag material are possible but far less likely to occur.

  5. SCHEME-FIELD MODELING OF THERMAL PROCESSES IN INDUCTION MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. O. Litvinov

    2017-07-01

    Practical significance. The integrated method for converting data of induction motor field modeling into thermal model parameters allows at increase in the number of nodes in thermal scheme from one to ten to reduce the average value of a relative error from 9,2% to 2,42%, what completely meets requirements at designing of induction motors, and also for imitating modeling of thermal processes dynamics at the variable operating conditions.

  6. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the continuation of the work reported in “Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development”. The experiment was performed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in 2014. A rastered 35 MeV electron beam deposited power in a solution of uranyl sulfate, generating heat and radiolytic gas bubbles. Irradiations were performed at three beam power levels, 6, 12 and 15 kW. Solution temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and gas bubble behavior was observed. This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiations. The previous report described an initial analysis performed on a geometry that had not been updated to reflect the as-built solution vessel. Here, the as-built geometry is used. Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) calculations were performed on the updated geometry, and these results were used to define the power deposition profile for the CFD analyses, which were performed using Fluent, Ver. 16.2. CFD analyses were performed for the 12 and 15 kW irradiations, and further improvements to the model were incorporated, including the consideration of power deposition in nearby vessel components, gas mixture composition, and bubble size distribution. The temperature results of the CFD calculations are compared to experimental measurements.

  7. An effective thermal circuit model for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-C.; Zhang, Kun

    2011-08-01

    A physics-based thermal circuit model is developed for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog circuits. The circuit model integrates a non-isothermal device thermal circuit with interconnect thermal networks and is validated with high accuracy against finite element simulations in different layout structures. The non-isothermal circuit model is implemented in BSIMSOI to account for self-heating effect (SHE) in a Spice simulator, and applied to electro-thermal simulation of an SOI cascode current mirror constructed using different layouts. Effects of layout design on electric and thermal behaviors are investigated in detail. Influences of BOX thickness are also examined. It has been shown that the proposed non-isothermal approach is able to effectively account for influences of layout design, self-heating, high temperature gradients along the islands, interconnect temperature distributions, thermal coupling, and heat losses via BOX and interconnects, etc., in SOI current mirror structures. The model provides basic concepts and thermal circuits that can be extended to develop an effective model for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog ICs.

  8. Dynamic thermal characteristics of heat pipe via segmented thermal resistance model for electric vehicle battery cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feifei; Lan, Fengchong; Chen, Jiqing

    2016-07-01

    Heat pipe cooling for battery thermal management systems (BTMSs) in electric vehicles (EVs) is growing due to its advantages of high cooling efficiency, compact structure and flexible geometry. Considering the transient conduction, phase change and uncertain thermal conditions in a heat pipe, it is challenging to obtain the dynamic thermal characteristics accurately in such complex heat and mass transfer process. In this paper, a ;segmented; thermal resistance model of a heat pipe is proposed based on thermal circuit method. The equivalent conductivities of different segments, viz. the evaporator and condenser of pipe, are used to determine their own thermal parameters and conditions integrated into the thermal model of battery for a complete three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The proposed ;segmented; model shows more precise than the ;non-segmented; model by the comparison of simulated and experimental temperature distribution and variation of an ultra-thin micro heat pipe (UMHP) battery pack, and has less calculation error to obtain dynamic thermal behavior for exact thermal design, management and control of heat pipe BTMSs. Using the ;segmented; model, the cooling effect of the UMHP pack with different natural/forced convection and arrangements is predicted, and the results correspond well to the tests.

  9. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Thermal Power Model in Thermal Desktop SINDA/FLUINT Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Fabanich, William A.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal power model that was built using the Thermal Desktop SINDA/FLUINT thermal analyzer. The model was correlated with ASRG engineering unit (EU) test data and ASRG flight unit predictions from Lockheed Martin's Ideas TMG thermal model. ASRG performance under (1) ASC hot-end temperatures, (2) ambient temperatures, and (3) years of mission for the general purpose heat source fuel decay was predicted using this model for the flight unit. The results were compared with those reported by Lockheed Martin and showed good agreement. In addition, the model was used to study the performance of the ASRG flight unit for operations on the ground and on the surface of Titan, and the concept of using gold film to reduce thermal loss through insulation was investigated.

  10. Detection of partial polarization in Compton scattered photons

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A

    2003-01-01

    It has been recently proposed (Boggs, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 503 (2003) 562), to use polarization of Compton scattered gamma-rays to improve the imaging performance of Compton telescopes. Building upon that work, we detected the aforementioned polarization in a sample of 1.836 MeV gamma-rays from the LXeGRIT Compton telescope. Here we present the measurement, together with detector oriented considerations on the application of the principle to a realistic Compton telescope.

  11. Thermal Conductivity in Suspension Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Kumara, Chamara; Gupta, Mohit; Nylen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS) can generate microstructures with higher porosity and pores in the size range from submicron to nanometer. ASPS thermal barrier coatings (TBC) have already shown a great potential to produce low thermal conductivity coatings for gas turbine applications. It is important to understand the fundamental relationships between microstructural defects in ASPS coatings such as crystallite boundaries, porosity etc. and thermal conductivity. Object-oriented finite element (OOF) analysis has been shown as an effective tool for evaluating thermal conductivity of conventional TBCs as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent microstructure in the model. The objective of this work was to analyze the thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs using experimental techniques and also to evaluate a procedure where OOF can be used to predict and analyze the thermal conductivity for these coatings. Verification of the model was done by comparing modeling results with the experimental thermal conductivity. The results showed that the varied scaled porosity has a significant influence on the thermal conductivity. Smaller crystallites and higher overall porosity content resulted in lower thermal conductivity. It was shown that OOF could be a powerful tool to predict and rank thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs.

  12. Thermal automobile interior model; Thermisches Pkw-Innenraum-Modell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flieger, Bjoern; Streblow, Rita; Mueller, Dirk [RWTH Aachen E.ON Energy Research Center (Germany). Inst. for Energy Efficient Buildings and Indoor Climate; Jachens, Arne [Continental Automotive GmbH, Babenhausen (Germany). Center of Competence Climate Controls

    2011-07-01

    Energy consumption of air conditioners is gaining increasing importance in passenger car design. The energy demand of the powertrain and auxiliary aggregates will change as increasing electrification will necessitate efficient utilisation of available energy sources in order to ensure thermal comfort. A model of the passenger compartment will provide information on air distribution and energy demand for assessing the efficiency of new air conditioning concepts and thermal comfort. [German] Der Energiebedarf von Klimageraeten nimmt in der Automobilindustrie einen immer hoeheren Stellenwert ein. Der Anteil des Energiebedarfs fuer den Antriebsstrang gegenueber dem der Nebenaggregate wird sich in der Zukunft stark veraendern. Die zunehmende Elektrifizierung im Automobilsektor verlangt im Hinblick auf alternative Antriebe in der Automobilindustrie, wie Elektrofahrzeuge oder Hybridfahrzeuge, eine effiziente Nutzung vorhandener Energien unter Einhaltung von Komfortkriterien. Mit einem Modell eines Fahrzeuginnenraums koennen Aussagen ueber die Luftverteilung und den Energiebedarf getroffen werden, um die Effizienz neuer Klimatisierungskonzepte und den thermischen Komfort zu bewerten.

  13. Novel thermal efficiency-based model for determination of thermal conductivity of membrane distillation membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanneste, Johan; Bush, John A.; Hickenbottom, Kerri L.; Marks, Christopher A.; Jassby, David; Turchi, Craig S.; Cath, Tzahi Y.

    2018-02-01

    Development and selection of membranes for membrane distillation (MD) could be accelerated if all performance-determining characteristics of the membrane could be obtained during MD operation without the need to recur to specialized or cumbersome porosity or thermal conductivity measurement techniques. By redefining the thermal efficiency, the Schofield method could be adapted to describe the flux without prior knowledge of membrane porosity, thickness, or thermal conductivity. A total of 17 commercially available membranes were analyzed in terms of flux and thermal efficiency to assess their suitability for application in MD. The thermal-efficiency based model described the flux with an average %RMSE of 4.5%, which was in the same range as the standard deviation on the measured flux. The redefinition of the thermal efficiency also enabled MD to be used as a novel thermal conductivity measurement device for thin porous hydrophobic films that cannot be measured with the conventional laser flash diffusivity technique.

  14. Thermal modelling of a torpedo-car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verdeja-González, L. F.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A two-dimensional finite element model for computing the temperature distribution in a torpedo-car holding pig iron is described in this work. The model determines the temperature gradients in steady and transient conditions within the different parts that constitute the system, which are considered to be the steel casing, refractory lining, liquid iron, slag and air. Heat transfer within the main fluid phases (iron and air is computed assuming an apparent thermal conductivity term incorporating the contribution from convection and radiation, and it is affected by the dimensions of the vessel. Thermal gradients within the constituents of the torpedo-car are used to calculate heat losses during operation. It was found that the model required the incorporation of a region within the iron-refractory interface to reproduce thermographic data recorded during operation; the heat transfer coefficient of this interface was found to be equal to 30 Wm-2K-1.

    En este trabajo se describe un modelo bidimensional basado en el método del elemento finito para calcular la distribución de temperaturas en un carro torpedo lleno de arrabio. El modelo determina los gradientes térmicos en condiciones estacionarias y transitorias dentro de las partes que constituyen el sistema considerado, como son cubierta de acero, recubrimientos refractarios, arrabio líquido, escoria y aire. La transferencia de calor en las fases fluidas (arrabio y aire se calcula suponiendo un coeficiente de conductividad térmica aparente que incorpora las contribuciones por convección y radiación y está afectado por las dimensiones del recipiente. El conocimiento de los gradientes térmicos permite calcular las pérdidas de calor durante la operación del carro. Se encontró que el modelo requiere de la incorporación de una región en la intercara hierro-refractario para reproducir la información termográfica recopilada durante pruebas en planta. El

  15. Origin of X-rays in the low state of the FSRQ 3C 273: evidence of inverse Compton emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Nibedita; Gupta, Alok C.; Wiita, Paul J.; Dewangan, Gulab C.; Duorah, Kalpana

    2017-08-01

    We analyse the 2.5-10 keV X-ray spectra of the luminous quasar 3C 273 and simultaneous observations in UV wavelengths from XMM-Newton between 2000 and 2015. The lowest flux level ever was observed in 2015. The continuum emission from 3C 273 is generally best described by an absorbed power-law but during extremely low states the addition of fluorescence from the K-shell iron line improves the fit. We study the spectral evolution of the source during its extended quiescent state and also examine connections between the X-ray and ultraviolet emissions, which have been seen in some, but not all, previous work. We detect a possible anticorrelation between these two bands during the low state that characterized 3C 273 for most of this period; however, this was not present during a flaring state. A harder-when-brighter trend for the X-ray spectrum was observed in these long-term observations of 3C 273 for the first time. We suggest that the X-ray emission in 3C 273 is the result of inverse Compton scattering of soft UV seed photons (emitted from the local environment of the AGN), most likely in a thermal corona. We can explain the significant temporal variation of the spectral continuum as an outcome of changing optical depth of the Comptonizing medium, along the lines of the wind-shock model proposed by Courvoisier and Camenzind.

  16. Gravitation and Special Relativity from Compton Wave Interactions at the Planck Scale: An Algorithmic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, William C., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper space is modeled as a lattice of Compton wave oscillators (CWOs) of near- Planck size. It is shown that gravitation and special relativity emerge from the interaction between particles Compton waves. To develop this CWO model an algorithmic approach was taken, incorporating simple rules of interaction at the Planck-scale developed using well known physical laws. This technique naturally leads to Newton s law of gravitation and a new form of doubly special relativity. The model is in apparent agreement with the holographic principle, and it predicts a cutoff energy for ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays that is consistent with observational data.

  17. Development and evaluation of thermal model reduction algorithms for spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiml, Michael; Suderland, Martin; Reiss, Philipp; Czupalla, Markus

    2015-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the topic of the reduction of thermal models of spacecraft. The work presented here has been conducted in cooperation with the company OHB AG, formerly Kayser-Threde GmbH, and the Institute of Astronautics at Technische Universität München with the goal to shorten and automatize the time-consuming and manual process of thermal model reduction. The reduction of thermal models can be divided into the simplification of the geometry model for calculation of external heat flows and radiative couplings and into the reduction of the underlying mathematical model. For simplification a method has been developed which approximates the reduced geometry model with the help of an optimization algorithm. Different linear and nonlinear model reduction techniques have been evaluated for their applicability in reduction of the mathematical model. Thereby the compatibility with the thermal analysis tool ESATAN-TMS is of major concern, which restricts the useful application of these methods. Additional model reduction methods have been developed, which account to these constraints. The Matrix Reduction method allows the approximation of the differential equation to reference values exactly expect for numerical errors. The summation method enables a useful, applicable reduction of thermal models that can be used in industry. In this work a framework for model reduction of thermal models has been created, which can be used together with a newly developed graphical user interface for the reduction of thermal models in industry.

  18. High Power Solid State Retrofit Lamp Thermal Characterization and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jakovenko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermal and thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of solid state lightening (SSL retrofit LED lamp are presented in this paper. Paramount importance is to design SSL lamps for reliability, in which thermal and thermo-mechanical aspects are key points. The main goal is to get a precise 3D thermal lamp model for further thermal optimization. Simulations are performed with ANSYS and CoventorWare software tools to compere different simulation approaches. Simulated thermal distribution has been validated with thermal measurement on a commercial 8W LED lamp. Materials parametric study has been carried out to discover problematic parts for heat transfer from power LEDs to ambient and future solutions are proposed. The objectives are to predict the thermal management by simulation of LED lamp, get more understanding in the effect of lamp shape and used materials in order to design more effective LED lamps and predict light quality, life time and reliability.

  19. Measuring the Spin-Polarizabilities of the Proton in Polarized Compton scattering at MAMI-Mainz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskimen, Rory; A2 Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    At O (ω3) four new structure constants are present in the nucleon Compton scattering amplitude; these are the spin-polarizabilities γE 1 E 1, γM 1 M 1, γE 1 M 2, and γM 1 E 2. The most model independent way to determine the spin-polarizabilities is by measuring a double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetry with polarized target and circularly polarized photons, and by measuring an in-plane/transverse-plane Compton scattering asymmetry with linearly polarized photons (Σ3) . This talk will present new Compton scattering asymmetry data taken in the Δ region by the A2 Collaboration using the Crystal Ball at Mainz, with transverse polarized proton target and circularly polarized photons, the Σ2 x asymmetry (1). A dispersion model and an EFT calculation of Compton scattering are used to fit the four spin-polarizabilities to the new experimental data on Σ2 x, earlier results (2) on Σ3, and previous determinations of γ0 and γπ. The results of the fits are compared with theoretical calculations.

  20. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation.

  1. Thermal Radiation Effects on Thermal Explosion in Polydisperse Fuel Spray-Probabilistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ophir Navea

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effect of thermal radiation on the dynamics of a thermal explosion of polydisperse fuel spray with a complete description of the chemistry via a single-step two-reactant model of general order. The polydisperse spray is modeled using a Probability Density Function (PDF. The thermal radiation energy exchange between the evaporation surface of the fuel droplets and the burning gas is described using the Marshak boundary conditions. An explicit expression of the critical condition for thermal explosion limit is derived analytically and represents a generalization of the critical parameter of the classical Semenov theory. Because we investigated the model in the range where the temperature is very high, the effect of the thermal radiation is significant.

  2. Polarization observables in Virtual Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Luca

    2007-10-15

    Virtual Compton Scattering (VCS) is an important reaction for understanding nucleon structure at low energies. By studying this process, the generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon can be measured. These observables are a generalization of the already known polarizabilities and will permit theoretical models to be challenged on a new level. More specifically, there exist six generalized polarizabilities and in order to disentangle them all, a double polarization experiment must be performed. Within this work, the VCS reaction p(e,e'p){gamma} was measured at MAMI using the A1 Collaboration three spectrometer setup with Q{sup 2}=0.33 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Using the highly polarized MAMI beam and a recoil proton polarimeter, it was possible to measure both the VCS cross section and the double polarization observables. Already in 2000, the unpolarized VCS cross section was measured at MAMI. In this new experiment, we could confirm the old data and furthermore the double polarization observables were measured for the first time. The data were taken in five periods between 2005 and 2006. In this work, the data were analyzed to extract the cross section and the proton polarization. For the analysis, a maximum likelihood algorithm was developed together with the full simulation of all the analysis steps. The experiment is limited by the low statistics due mainly to the focal plane proton polarimeter efficiency. To overcome this problem, a new determination and parameterization of the carbon analyzing power was performed. The main result of the experiment is the extraction of a new combination of the generalized polarizabilities using the double polarization observables. (orig.)

  3. Modeling thermal dilepton radiation for SIS experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seck, Florian [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Dileptons are radiated during the whole time evolution of a heavy-ion collision and leave the interaction zone unaffected. Thus they carry valuable information about the hot and dense medium created in those collisions to the detector. Realistic dilepton emission rates and an accurate description of the fireball's space-time evolution are needed to properly describe the contribution of in-medium signals to the dilepton invariant mass spectrum. In this presentation we demonstrate how this can be achieved at SIS collision energies. The framework is implemented into the event generator Pluto which is used by the HADES and CBM experiments to produce their hadronic freeze-out cocktails. With the help of an coarse-graining approach to model the fireball evolution and pertinent dilepton rates via a parametrization of the Rapp-Wambach in-medium ρ meson spectral function, the thermal contribution to the spectrum can be calculated. The results also enable us to get an estimate of the fireball lifetime at SIS18 energies.

  4. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power required, the ...

  5. A temperature dependent slip factor based thermal model for friction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper proposes a new slip factor based three-dimensional thermal model to predict the temperature distribution during friction stir welding of 304L stainless steel plates. The proposed model employs temperature and radius dependent heat source to study the thermal cycle, temperature distribution, power ...

  6. Thermal modeling of a mini rotor-stator system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikmen, E.; van der Hoogt, Peter; de Boer, Andries; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Jonker, Jan B.

    2009-01-01

    In this study the temperature increase and heat dissipation in the air gap of a cylindrical mini rotor stator system has been analyzed. A simple thermal model based on lumped parameter thermal networks has been developed. With this model the temperature dependent air properties for the fluid-rotor

  7. Thermal conductivity of microporous layers: Analytical modeling and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andisheh-Tadbir, Mehdi; Kjeang, Erik; Bahrami, Majid

    2015-11-01

    A new compact relationship is developed for the thermal conductivity of the microporous layer (MPL) used in polymer electrolyte fuel cells as a function of pore size distribution, porosity, and compression pressure. The proposed model is successfully validated against experimental data obtained from a transient plane source thermal constants analyzer. The thermal conductivities of carbon paper samples with and without MPL were measured as a function of load (1-6 bars) and the MPL thermal conductivity was found between 0.13 and 0.17 W m-1 K-1. The proposed analytical model predicts the experimental thermal conductivities within 5%. A correlation generated from the analytical model was used in a multi objective genetic algorithm to predict the pore size distribution and porosity for an MPL with optimized thermal conductivity and mass diffusivity. The results suggest that an optimized MPL, in terms of heat and mass transfer coefficients, has an average pore size of 122 nm and 63% porosity.

  8. Optimizing a three-stage Compton camera for measuring prompt gamma rays emitted during proton radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, S W; Robertson, D; Polf, J

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the use of a three-stage Compton camera to measure secondary prompt gamma rays emitted from patients treated with proton beam radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was (1) to develop an optimal three-stage Compton camera specifically designed to measure prompt gamma rays emitted from tissue and (2) to determine the feasibility of using this optimized Compton camera design to measure and image prompt gamma rays emitted during proton beam irradiation. The three-stage Compton camera was modeled in Geant4 as three high-purity germanium detector stages arranged in parallel-plane geometry. Initially, an isotropic gamma source ranging from 0 to 15 MeV was used to determine lateral width and thickness of the detector stages that provided the optimal detection efficiency. Then, the gamma source was replaced by a proton beam irradiating a tissue phantom to calculate the overall efficiency of the optimized camera for detecting emitted prompt gammas. The overall calculated efficiencies varied from ~10−6 to 10−3 prompt gammas detected per proton incident on the tissue phantom for several variations of the optimal camera design studied. Based on the overall efficiency results, we believe it feasible that a three-stage Compton camera could detect a sufficient number of prompt gammas to allow measurement and imaging of prompt gamma emission during proton radiotherapy. PMID:21048295

  9. A Thermal Plume Model for the Martian Convective Boundary Layer

    CERN Document Server

    Colaïtis, Arnaud; Hourdin, Frédéric; Rio, Catherine; Forget, François; Millour, Ehouarn

    2013-01-01

    The Martian Planetary Boundary Layer [PBL] is a crucial component of the Martian climate system. Global Climate Models [GCMs] and Mesoscale Models [MMs] lack the resolution to predict PBL mixing which is therefore parameterized. Here we propose to adapt the "thermal plume" model, recently developed for Earth climate modeling, to Martian GCMs, MMs, and single-column models. The aim of this physically-based parameterization is to represent the effect of organized turbulent structures (updrafts and downdrafts) on the daytime PBL transport, as it is resolved in Large-Eddy Simulations [LESs]. We find that the terrestrial thermal plume model needs to be modified to satisfyingly account for deep turbulent plumes found in the Martian convective PBL. Our Martian thermal plume model qualitatively and quantitatively reproduces the thermal structure of the daytime PBL on Mars: superadiabatic near-surface layer, mixing layer, and overshoot region at PBL top. This model is coupled to surface layer parameterizations taking ...

  10. Multiscale modeling of thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bohayra; Pötschke, Markus; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-03-21

    We developed a multiscale approach to explore the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene sheets. By performing equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations, the grain size effect on the thermal conductivity of ultra-fine grained polycrystalline graphene sheets is investigated. Our results reveal that the ultra-fine grained graphene structures have thermal conductivity one order of magnitude smaller than that of pristine graphene. Based on the information provided by the EMD simulations, we constructed finite element models of polycrystalline graphene sheets to probe the thermal conductivity of samples with larger grain sizes. Using the developed multiscale approach, we also investigated the effects of grain size distribution and thermal conductivity of grains on the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene. The proposed multiscale approach on the basis of molecular dynamics and finite element methods could be used to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity of polycrystalline graphene and other 2D structures.

  11. New numerical model for thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on two-stage thermal stimulation of thermoluminescence model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Kadari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal quenching plays an important role in the thermoluminescence (TL of quartz on which many applications of TL are based. The studies of the stability and kinetics of the 325 °C thermoluminescence peak in quartz are described by Wintle (1975, which show the occurrence of thermal quenching, the decrease in luminescence efficiency with rise in temperature. The thermal quenching of thermoluminescence in quartz was studied experimentally by several authors. The simulations work presented in the literature is based on the single-stage thermal stimulation model of thermoluminescence, in spite of that the mechanisms of this effect remain incomplete. This paper presents a new numerical model for thermal quenching in quartz, using the previously published two-stage thermal stimulation of thermoluminescence model.

  12. An electrochemical-thermal coupled overcharge-to-thermal-runaway model for lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dongsheng; Feng, Xuning; Lu, Languang; Ouyang, Minggao; Zheng, Siqi; Li, Jianqiu; He, Xiangming

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents an electrochemical-thermal coupled overcharge-to-thermal-runaway (TR) model to predict the highly interactive electrochemical and thermal behaviors of lithium ion battery under the overcharge conditions. In this model, the battery voltage equals the difference between the cathode potential and the anode potential, whereas the temperature is predicted by modeling the combined heat generations, including joule heat, thermal runaway reactions and internal short circuit. The model can fit well with the adiabatic overcharge tests results at 0.33C, 0.5C and 1C, indicating a good capture of the overcharge-to-TR mechanism. The modeling analysis based on the validated model helps to quantify the heat generation rates of each heat sources during the overcharge-to-TR process. And the two thermal runaway reactions including the electrolyte oxidation reaction and the reaction between deposited lithium and electrolyte are found to contribute most to the heat generations during the overcharge process. Further modeling analysis on the critical parameters is performed to find possible solutions for the overcharge problem of lithium ion battery. The result shows that increasing the oxidation potential of the electrolyte, and increasing the onset temperature of thermal runaway are the two effective ways to improve the overcharge performance of lithium ion battery.

  13. Correleation of the SAGE III on ISS Thermal Models in Thermal Desktop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Davis, Warren T.; Liles, Kaitlin, A. K.; McLeod, Shawn C.

    2017-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III was launched on February 19, 2017 and mounted to the International Space Station (ISS) to begin its three-year mission. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Correlation of the thermal model is important since the payload will be expected to survive a three-year mission on ISS under varying thermal environments. Three major thermal vacuum (TVAC) tests were completed during the development of the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP); two subsystem-level tests and a payload-level test. Additionally, a characterization TVAC test was performed in order to verify performance of a system of heater plates that was designed to allow the IP to achieve the required temperatures during payload-level testing; model correlation was performed for this test configuration as well as those including the SAGE III flight hardware. This document presents the methods that were used to correlate the SAGE III models to TVAC at the subsystem and IP level, including the approach for modeling the parts of the payload in the thermal chamber, generating pre-test predictions, and making adjustments to the model to align predictions with temperatures observed during testing. Model correlation quality will be presented and discussed, and lessons learned during the correlation process will be shared.

  14. A simplified model to estimate thermal resistance between carbon nanotube and sample in scanning thermal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarenko, Maxim; Rosamond, Mark C.; Gallant, Andrew J.; Kolosov, Oleg V.; Dubrovskii, Vladimir G.; Zeze, Dagou A.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning thermal microscopy (SThM) is an attractive technique for nanoscale thermal measurements. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) can be used to enhance a SThM probe in order to drastically increase spatial resolution while keeping required thermal sensitivity. However, an accurate prediction of the thermal resistance at the interface between the MWCNT-enhanced probe tip and a sample under study is essential for the accurate interpretation of experimental measurements. Unfortunately, there is very little literature on Kapitza interfacial resistance involving carbon nanotubes under SThM configuration. We propose a model for heat conductance through an interface between the MWCNT tip and the sample, which estimates the thermal resistance based on phonon and geometrical properties of the MWCNT and the sample, without neglecting the diamond-like carbon layer covering the MWCNT tip. The model considers acoustic phonons as the main heat carriers and account for their scattering at the interface based on a fundamental quantum mechanical approach. The predicted value of the thermal resistance is then compared with experimental data available in the literature. Theoretical predictions and experimental results are found to be of the same order of magnitude, suggesting a simplified, yet realistic model to approximate thermal resistance between carbon nanotube and sample in SThM, albeit low temperature measurements are needed to achieve a better match between theory and experiment. As a result, several possible avenues are outlined to achieve more accurate predictions and to generalize the model.

  15. Assessment of the Thermal Hydraulic Models in THALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Byeong Il; Kim, Hong Ju; Jang, Beomjun; Woo, Hae-Seuk [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    THALES (Thermal Hydraulic AnaLyzer for Enhanced Simulation of core) developed by KEPCO Nuclear Fuel is a subchannel analysis code on the basis of the single-stage core analysis model. THALES calculates the local fluid conditions and DNBR in the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) core. Currently, THALES is limited to the licensed type of the nuclear power plant because the thermal hydraulic models and CHF (Critical Heat Flux) correlations for OPR1000 and APR1400 are only licensed. KEPCO NF intends to apply THALES to WH typed nuclear power plants in Korea. To expand the applicable types of the nuclear power plants, the existing thermal hydraulic models were modified and new thermal hydraulic models were added to THALES. In this study, the thermal hydraulic models tested and added in THALES are reviewed and a preliminary calculation is performed. KEPCO NF intends to apply THALES to various typed nuclear power plants in Korea. So, the existing thermal hydraulic models implemented in THALES are modified and the void model which are generally used in the subchannel analysis code is added. Through the preliminary calculation, it is confirmed that the thermal hydraulic models are properly modified and implemented in THALES, which shows the possibility to apply THALES in various typed nuclear power plants in Korea.

  16. Thermal Destruction of TETS: Experiments and Modeling ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symposium Paper In the event of a contamination event involving chemical warfare agents (CWAs) or toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), large quantities of potentially contaminated materials, both indoor and outdoor, may be treated with thermal incineration during the site remediation process. Even if the CWAs or TICs of interest are not particularly thermally stable and might be expected to decompose readily in a high temperature combustion environment, the refractory nature of many materials found inside and outside buildings may present heat transfer challenges in an incineration system depending on how the materials are packaged and fed into the incinerator. This paper reports on a study to examine the thermal decomposition of a banned rodenticide, tetramethylene disulfotetramine (TETS) in a laboratory reactor, analysis of the results using classical reactor design theory, and subsequent scale-up of the results to a computer-simulation of a full-scale commercial hazardous waste incinerator processing ceiling tile contaminated with residual TETS.

  17. Delta-function Approximation SSC Model in 3C 273

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We obtain an approximate analytical solution using approximate calculation on the traditional one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. In this model, we describe the electron energy distribution by a broken power-law function with a sharp cut-off, and non-thermal photons are produced by both synchrotron and ...

  18. High power solid state retrofit lamp thermal characterization and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakovenko, J.; Formánek, J.; Vladimír, J.; Husák, M.; Werkhoven, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal and thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of solid state lightening (SSL) retrofit LED Lamp are presented in this paper. Paramount Importance is to design SSL lamps for reliability, in which thermal and thermo-mechanical aspects are key points. The main goal is to get a precise 3D

  19. Development of thermal models of footwear using finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covill, D; Guan, Z W; Bailey, M; Raval, H

    2011-03-01

    Thermal comfort is increasingly becoming a crucial factor to be considered in footwear design. The climate inside a shoe is controlled by thermal and moisture conditions and is crucial to attain comfort. Research undertaken has shown that thermal conditions play a dominant role in shoe climate. Development of thermal models that are capable of predicting in-shoe temperature distributions is an effective way forward to undertake extensive parametric studies to assist optimized design. In this paper, two-dimensional and three-dimensional thermal models of in-shoe climate were developed using finite element analysis through commercial code Abaqus. The thermal material properties of the upper shoe, sole, and air were considered. Dry heat flux from the foot was calculated on the basis of typical blood flow in the arteries on the foot. Using the thermal models developed, in-shoe temperatures were predicted to cover various locations for controlled ambient temperatures of 15, 25, and 35 degrees C respectively. The predicted temperatures were compared with multipoint measured temperatures through microsensor technology. Reasonably good correlation was obtained, with averaged errors of 6, 2, and 1.5 per cent, based on the averaged in-shoe temperature for the above three ambient temperatures. The models can be further used to help design shoes with optimized thermal comfort.

  20. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  1. High-Energy Compton Scattering Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hartemann, Fred V; Barty, C; Crane, John; Gibson, David J; Hartouni, E P; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    No monochromatic, high-brightness, tunable light sources currently exist above 100 keV. Important applications that would benefit from such new hard x-ray sources include: nuclear resonance fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy, and MeV flash radiography. The peak brightness of Compton scattering light sources is derived for head-on collisions and found to scale with the electron beam brightness and the drive laser pulse energy. This gamma 2

  2. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA; Oldaker, Mark E [Pleasanton, CA

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  3. 3D Temperature Distribution Model Based on Thermal Infrared Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Jia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to study the construction of 3D temperature distribution reconstruction system based on binocular vision technology. Initially, a traditional calibration method cannot be directly used, because the thermal infrared camera is only sensitive to temperature. Therefore, the thermal infrared camera is calibrated separately. Belief propagation algorithm is also investigated and its smooth model is improved in terms of stereo matching to optimize mismatching rate. Finally, the 3D temperature distribution model is built based on the matching of 3D point cloud and 2D thermal infrared information. Experimental results show that the method can accurately construct the 3D temperature distribution model and has strong robustness.

  4. Helium Compton Form Factor Measurements at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutier, Eric J.-M. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et Cosmologie

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of the parton content of nuclei, as encoded via the generalized parton distributions (GPDs), can be accessed via the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) process contributing to the cross section for leptoproduction of real photons. Similarly to the scattering of light by a material, DVCS provides information about the dynamics and the spatial structure of hadrons. The sensitivity of this process to the lepton beam polarization allows to single-out the DVCS amplitude in terms of Compton form factors that contain GPDs information. The beam spin asymmetry of the $^4$He($\\vec {\\mathrm e}$,e$' \\gamma ^4$He) process was measured in the experimental Hall B of the Jefferson Laboratory to extract the real and imaginary parts of the twist-2 Compton form factor of the $^4$He nucleus. The experimental results reported here demonstrate the relevance of this method for such a goal, and suggest the dominance of the Bethe-Heitler amplitude to the unpolarized process in the kinematic range explored by the experiment.

  5. X-RAY TRANSMISSION AND REFLECTION THROUGH A COMPTON-THICK MEDIUM VIA MONTE-CARLO SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Eikmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectral shape of an X-ray source strongly depends on the amount and distribution of the surrounding material. The spectrum of a primary source which is located in an optically thin medium with respect to Compton scattering is mainly modified by photo absorption in the lower energy range and is almost unaltered above ~ 10 keV. This picture changes when the source is obscured by gas exceeding hydrogen column densities of ~ 1024 cm−2. At this degree of absorption it is likely that photons are scattered at least twice before leaving the medium. The multiple scatterings lead to a lack of photons in the high energy range of the resulting spectrum as well as to an accumulation of photons at moderate energies forming the so-called Compton-bump. The shape of the fluorescent lines also changes since scattered line photons form several Compton-shoulders which are very prominent especially for Compton-thick sources. Using a Monte Carlo method, we demonstrate the importance of Compton scattering for high column densities. For that purpose, we compare our results with existing absorption models that do not consider Compton scattering. These calculations will be implemented in a prospective version of the tbabs absorption model including an analytic evaluation of the strength of the fluorescent lines.

  6. Thermal Model Development for an X-Ray Mirror Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Space-based x-ray optics require stringent thermal environmental control to achieve the desired image quality. Future x-ray telescopes will employ hundreds of nearly cylindrical, thin mirror shells to maximize effective area, with each shell built from small azimuthal segment pairs for manufacturability. Thermal issues with these thin optics are inevitable because the mirrors must have a near unobstructed view of space while maintaining near uniform 20 C temperature to avoid thermal deformations. NASA Goddard has been investigating the thermal characteristics of a future x-ray telescope with an image requirement of 5 arc-seconds and only 1 arc-second focusing error allocated for thermal distortion. The telescope employs 135 effective mirror shells formed from 7320 individual mirror segments mounted in three rings of 18, 30, and 36 modules each. Thermal requirements demand a complex thermal control system and detailed thermal modeling to verify performance. This presentation introduces innovative modeling efforts used for the conceptual design of the mirror assembly and presents results demonstrating potential feasibility of the thermal requirements.

  7. Reconciling inverse-Compton Doppler factors with variability Doppler factors in blazar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodakis, I.; Zezas, A.; Angelakis, E.; Hovatta, T.; Pavlidou, V.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Blazar population models have shown that the inverse-Compton and variability Doppler factor estimates yield consistent results at the population level for flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). The two methods, however, are inconsistent when compared on a source-by-source basis. Aims: In this work, we attempt to understand the source of the discrepancy by tracing the potential sources of systematic and statistical error for the inverse-Compton Doppler factors. By eliminating these sources of error, we provide stronger constrains on the value of the Doppler factor in blazar jets. Methods: We re-estimate the inverse-Compton Doppler factor for 11 sources that meet certain criteria for their synchrotron peak frequency and the availability of Doppler factor estimates in the literature. We compare these estimates with the average of two different estimates of the variability Doppler factor obtained using various datasets and methodologies to identify any discrepancies and, in each case, trace their sources in the methodology or assumptions adopted. Results: We identify three significant sources of error for the inverse-Compton Doppler factors: a) contamination of the X-ray flux by non-synchrotron self-Compton emission; b) radio observations at frequencies other than the synchrotron turnover frequency; c) non-simultaneity between radio and X-ray observations. We discuss key aspects in the correct application of the inverse-Compton method in light of these potential errors. We are able to constrain the Doppler factor of 3C 273, 3C 345, 3C 454.3, PKS 1510-089, and PKS 1633+382 effectively, since all available estimates from both methods converge to the same values for these five sources.

  8. Mathematical model for thermal solar collectors by using magnetohydrodynamic Maxwell nanofluid with slip conditions, thermal radiation and variable thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asif; Aziz, Asim; Jamshed, Wasim; Hussain, Sajid

    Solar energy is the cleanest, renewable and most abundant source of energy available on earth. The main use of solar energy is to heat and cool buildings, heat water and to generate electricity. There are two types of solar energy collection system, the photovoltaic systems and the solar thermal collectors. The efficiency of any solar thermal system depend on the thermophysical properties of the operating fluids and the geometry/length of the system in which fluid is flowing. In the present research a simplified mathematical model for the solar thermal collectors is considered in the form of non-uniform unsteady stretching surface. The flow is induced by a non-uniform stretching of the porous sheet and the uniform magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the flow. The non-Newtonian Maxwell fluid model is utilized for the working fluid along with slip boundary conditions. Moreover the high temperature effect of thermal radiation and temperature dependent thermal conductivity are also included in the present model. The mathematical formulation is carried out through a boundary layer approach and the numerical computations are carried out for cu-water and TiO2 -water nanofluids. Results are presented for the velocity and temperature profiles as well as the skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number and the discussion is concluded on the effect of various governing parameters on the motion, temperature variation, velocity gradient and the rate of heat transfer at the boundary.

  9. Room temperature Compton profiles of conduction electrons in α-Ga ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Room temperature Compton profiles of momentum distribution of conduction electrons in -Ga metal are calculated in band model. For this purpose, the ... N C Mohapatra2. Department of Physics, Chikiti Mahavidyalaya, Chikiti 761 010, India; Department of Physics, Berhampur University, Berhampur 760 007, India ...

  10. Detection of inverse Compton scattering in plasma wakefield experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlen, Simon

    2016-12-15

    Inverse Compton scattering (ICS) is the process of scattering of photons and electrons, where the photons gain a part of the electrons energy. In combination with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWA), ICS offers a compact MeV γ-ray source. A numerical study of ICS radiation produced in PWA experiments at FLASHForward was performed, using an ICS simulation code and the results from particle-in-cell modelling. The possibility of determining electron beam properties from measurements of the γ-ray source was explored for a wide range of experimental conditions. It was found that information about the electron divergence, the electron spectrum and longitudinal information can be obtained from measurements of the ICS beams for some cases. For the measurement of the ICS profile at FLASHForward, a CsI(Tl) scintillator array was chosen, similar to scintillators used in other ICS experiments. To find a suitable detector for spectrum measurements, an experimental test of a Compton spectrometer at the RAL was conducted. This test showed that a similar spectrometer could also be used at FLASHForward. However, changes to the spectrometer could be needed in order to use the pair production effect. In addition, further studies using Geant4 could lead to a better reconstruction of the obtained data. The studies presented here show that ICS is a promising method to analyse electron parameters from PWA experiments in further detail.

  11. Timelike Virtual Compton Scattering from Electron-Positron Radiative Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afanasev, Andrei; /Hampton U. /Jefferson Lab; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Carlson, Carl E.; /William-Mary Coll.; Mukherjee, Asmita; /Indian Inst. Tech., Mumbai

    2009-03-31

    We propose measurements of the deeply virtual Compton amplitude (DVCS) {gamma}* {yields} H{bar H}{gamma} in the timelike t = (p{sub H} + p{sub {bar H}}){sup 2} > 0 kinematic domain which is accessible at electron-positron colliders via the radiative annihilation process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} H{bar H}{gamma}. These processes allow the measurement of timelike deeply virtual Compton scattering for a variety of H{bar H} hadron pairs such as {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, and D{bar D} as well as p{bar p}. As in the conventional spacelike DVCS, there are interfering coherent amplitudes contributing to the timelike processes involving C = - form factors. The interference between the amplitudes measures the phase of the C = + timelike DVCS amplitude relative to the phase of the timelike form factors and can be isolated by considering the forward-backward e{sup +} {leftrightarrow} e{sup -} asymmetry. The J = 0 fixed pole contribution which arises from the local coupling of the two photons to the quark current plays a special role. As an example we present a simple model.

  12. Timelike Virtual Compton Scattering from Electron-Positron Radiative Annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanaciev,Andrei Afanasev, Stanley J. Brodsky, Carl E. Carlson, Asmita Mukherjee

    2010-02-01

    We propose measurements of the deeply virtual Compton amplitude (DVCS), gamma* to H H-bar gamma, in the timelike t = (p_{H} + p_{H-bar})^2 > 0 kinematic domain which is accessible at electron-positron colliders via the radiative annihilation process e+ e- to H H-bar gamma. These processes allow the measurement of timelike deeply virtual Compton scattering for a variety of H H-bar hadron pairs such as pi+ pi-, K+ K-, and D D-bar as well as p p-bar. As in the conventional spacelike DVCS, there are interfering coherent amplitudes contributing to the timelike processes involving C= - form factors. The interference between the amplitudes measures the phase of the C=+ timelike DVCS amplitude relative to the phase of the timelike form factors and can be isolated by considering the forward-backward e+ \\leftrightarrow e- asymmetry. The J=0 fixed pole contribution which arises from the local coupling of the two photons to the quark current plays a special role. As an example we present a simple model.

  13. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, J.; Jicha, M.

    2013-04-01

    A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus-FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met) indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  14. Coupling of the Models of Human Physiology and Thermal Comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A coupled model of human physiology and thermal comfort was developed in Dymola/Modelica. A coupling combines a modified Tanabe model of human physiology and thermal comfort model developed by Zhang. The Coupled model allows predicting the thermal sensation and comfort of both local and overall from local boundary conditions representing ambient and personal factors. The aim of this study was to compare prediction of the Coupled model with the Fiala model prediction and experimental data. Validation data were taken from the literature, mainly from the validation manual of software Theseus–FE [1]. In the paper validation of the model for very light physical activities (1 met indoor environment with temperatures from 12 °C up to 48 °C is presented. The Coupled model predicts mean skin temperature for cold, neutral and warm environment well. However prediction of core temperature in cold environment is inaccurate and very affected by ambient temperature. Evaluation of thermal comfort in warm environment is supplemented by skin wettedness prediction. The Coupled model is designed for non-uniform and transient environmental conditions; it is also suitable simulation of thermal comfort in vehicles cabins. The usage of the model is limited for very light physical activities up to 1.2 met only.

  15. Thermal Models for Intelligent Heating of Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thavlov, Anders; Bindner, Henrik W.

    2012-01-01

    The Danish government has set the ambitious goal that the share of the total Danish electricity consumption, covered by wind energy, should be increased to 50% by year 2020. This asks for radical changes in how we utilize and transmit electricity in the future power grid. To fully utilize the high...... share of renewable power generation, which is in general intermittent and non-controllable, the consumption side has to be much more flexible than today. To achieve such flexibility, methods for moving power consumption in time, within the hourly timescale, have to be developed. One approach currently...... being pursued is to use the heat capacity of the thermal mass in buildings to temporarily store excess power production by increasing the electrical heating. Likewise can the electrical heating be postponed in periods with lack of production. To exploit the potential in thermal storage and to ensure...

  16. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  17. A general thermal model of machine tool spindle

    OpenAIRE

    Yanfang Dong; Zude Zhou; Mingyao Liu

    2017-01-01

    As the core component of machine tool, the thermal characteristics of the spindle have a significant influence on machine tool running status. Lack of an accurate model of the spindle system, particularly the model of load–deformation coefficient between the bearing rolling elements and rings, severely limits the thermal error analytic precision of the spindle. In this article, bearing internal loads, especially the function relationships between the principal curvature difference F(ρ) and au...

  18. Thermal properties. Site descriptive modelling Forsmark - stage 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Paer-Erik; Wrafter, John; Sundberg, Jan [Geo Innova AB (Sweden); Rosen, L ars [Sweco Viak AB (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    The lithological data acquired from boreholes and mapping of the rock surface need to be reclassified into thermal rock classes, TRCs. The main reason is to simplify the simulations. The lithological data are used to construct models of the transition between different TRCs, thus describing the spatial statistical structure of each TRC. The result is a set of transition probability models that are used in the simulation of TRCs. The intermediate result of this first stochastic simulation is a number of realisations of the geology, each one equally probable. Based on the thermal data, a spatial statistical thermal model is constructed for each TRC. It consists of a statistical distribution and a variogram for each TRC. These are used in the stochastic simulation of thermal conductivity and the result is a number of equally probable realisations of thermal conductivity for the domain. In the next step, the realisations of TRCs (lithology) and thermal conductivity are merged, i.e. each realisation of geology is filled with simulated thermal conductivity values. The result is a set of realisations of thermal conductivity that considers both the difference in thermal properties between different TRCs, and the variability within each TRC. If the result is desired in a scale different from the simulation scale, i.e. the canister scale, upscaling of the realisations can be performed. The result is a set of equally probable realisations of thermal properties. The presented methodology was applied to rock domain RFM029 and RFM045. The main results are sets of realisations of thermal properties that can be used for further processing, most importantly for statistical analysis and numerical temperature simulations for the design of repository layout (distances between deposition holes). The main conclusions of the thermal modelling are: The choice of scale has a profound influence on the distribution of thermal conductivity values. The variance decreases and the lower tail

  19. Model-based analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    conducted exploring the effects of the following parameters: pigment (hollow spheres) volume concentration (PVC), average sphere size or sphere size distribution, thermal conductivities of binder and sphere wall material, and sphere wall thickness. All the parameters affected the thermal conductivity...... of an epoxy coating, but simulations revealed that the most important parameters are the PVC, the sphere wall thickness, and the sphere wall material. The model can be used, qualitatively, to get an indication of the effect of important model parameters on the thermal conductivity of an HS-based coating...

  20. Modeling thermal effects in braking systems of railway vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Miloš S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of thermal effects has become increasingly important in product design in different transport means, road vehicles, airplanes, railway vehicles, and so forth. The thermal analysis is a very important stage in the study of braking systems, especially of railway vehicles, where it is necessary to brake huge masses, because the thermal load of a braked railway wheel prevails compared to other types of loads. In the braking phase, kinetic energy transforms into thermal energy resulting in intense heating and high temperature states of railway wheels. Thus induced thermal loads determine thermomechanical behavior of the structure of railway wheels. In cases of thermal overloads, which mainly occur as a result of long-term braking on down-grade railroads, the generation of stresses and deformations occurs, whose consequences are the appearance of cracks on the rim of a wheel and the final total wheel defect. The importance to precisely determine the temperature distribution caused by the transfer process of the heat generated during braking due to the friction on contact surfaces of the braking system makes it a challenging research task. Therefore, the thermal analysis of a block-braked solid railway wheel of a 444 class locomotive of the national railway operator Serbian Railways is processed in detail in this paper, using analytical and numerical modeling of thermal effects during long-term braking for maintaining a constant speed on a down-grade railroad.

  1. Thermal modelling of various thermal barrier coatings in a high heat flux rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Traditional Air Plasma Sprayed (APS) ZrO2-Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC's) and Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed (LPPS) ZrO2-Y2O3/Ni-Cr-Al-Y cermet coatings were tested in a H2/O2 rocked engine. The traditional ZrO2-Y2O3 (TBC's) showed considerable metal temperature reductions during testing in the hydrogen-rich environment. A thermal model was developed to predict the thermal response of the tubes with the various coatings. Good agreement was observed between predicted temperatures and measured temperatures at the inner wall of the tube and in the metal near the coating/metal interface. The thermal model was also used to examine the effect of the differences in the reported values of the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic coatings, the effect of 100 micron (0.004 in.) thick metallic bond coat, the effect of tangential heat transfer around the tube, and the effect or radiation from the surface of the ceramic coating. It was shown that for the short duration testing in the rocket engine, the most important of these considerations was the effect of the uncertainty in the thermal conductivity of temperatures (greater than 100 C) predicted in the tube. The thermal model was also used to predict the thermal response of the coated rod in order to quantify the difference in the metal temperatures between the two substrate geometries and to explain the previously-observed increased life of coatings on rods over that on tubes. A thermal model was also developed to predict heat transfer to the leading edge of High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) blades during start-up of the space shuttle main engines. The ability of various TBC's to reduce metal temperatures during the two thermal excursions occurring on start-up was predicted. Temperature reductions of 150 to 470 C were predicted for 165 micron (0.0065 in.) coatings for the greater of the two thermal excursions.

  2. Evaluation of the Thermodynamic Models for the Thermal Diffusion Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Bagnoli, Mariana G.; Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2003-01-01

    Over the years, several thermodynamic models for the thermal diffusion factors for binary mixtures have been proposed. The goal of this paper is to test some of these models in combination with different equations of state. We tested the following models: those proposed by Rutherford and Drickamer...... we applied different thermodynamic models, such as the Soave-Redlich-Kwong and the Peng-Robinson equations of state. The necessity to try different thermo-dynamic models is caused by the high sensitivity of the thermal diffusion factors to the values of the partial molar properties. Two different...

  3. Automotive Underhood Thermal Management Analysis Using 3-D Coupled Thermal-Hydrodynamic Computer Models: Thermal Radiation Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, S; D' Azevedo, E; Zacharia, T

    2002-02-26

    The goal of the radiation modeling effort was to develop and implement a radiation algorithm that is fast and accurate for the underhood environment. As part of this CRADA, a net-radiation model was chosen to simulate radiative heat transfer in an underhood of a car. The assumptions (diffuse-gray and uniform radiative properties in each element) reduce the problem tremendously and all the view factors for radiation thermal calculations can be calculated once and for all at the beginning of the simulation. The cost for online integration of heat exchanges due to radiation is found to be less than 15% of the baseline CHAD code and thus very manageable. The off-line view factor calculation is constructed to be very modular and has been completely integrated to read CHAD grid files and the output from this code can be read into the latest version of CHAD. Further integration has to be performed to accomplish the same with STAR-CD. The main outcome of this effort is to obtain a highly scalable and portable simulation capability to model view factors for underhood environment (for e.g. a view factor calculation which took 14 hours on a single processor only took 14 minutes on 64 processors). The code has also been validated using a simple test case where analytical solutions are available. This simulation capability gives underhood designers in the automotive companies the ability to account for thermal radiation - which usually is critical in the underhood environment and also turns out to be one of the most computationally expensive components of underhood simulations. This report starts off with the original work plan as elucidated in the proposal in section B. This is followed by Technical work plan to accomplish the goals of the project in section C. In section D, background to the current work is provided with references to the previous efforts this project leverages on. The results are discussed in section 1E. This report ends with conclusions and future scope of

  4. Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit; Kumara, Chamara; Nylén, Per

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  5. A new thermal and rheological model of the European lithosphere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, M.; Kaban, M.; Cloetingh, S.A.P.L.

    2009-01-01

    We present a new thermal and rheological model of the European lithosphere (10°W-35°E; 35°N-60°N), which is based on a combination of recently obtained geophysical models. To determine temperature distribution we use a new tomography model, which is principally improved by an a-priori correction of

  6. Multiscale Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of Polymer/Carbon Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Frankland, Sarah-Jane V.; Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation was used to estimate the interfacial thermal (Kapitza) resistance between nanoparticles and amorphous and crystalline polymer matrices. Bulk thermal conductivities of the nanocomposites were then estimated using an established effective medium approach. To study functionalization, oligomeric ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers were chemically bonded to a single wall carbon nanotube. The results, in a poly(ethylene-vinyl acetate) matrix, are similar to those obtained previously for grafted linear hydrocarbon chains. To study the effect of noncovalent functionalization, two types of polyethylene matrices. -- aligned (extended-chain crystalline) vs. amorphous (random coils) were modeled. Both matrices produced the same interfacial thermal resistance values. Finally, functionalization of edges and faces of plate-like graphite nanoparticles was found to be only modestly effective in reducing the interfacial thermal resistance and improving the composite thermal conductivity

  7. Combining harmonic generation and laser chirping to achieve high spectral density in Compton sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balša Terzić

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently various laser-chirping schemes have been investigated with the goal of reducing or eliminating ponderomotive line broadening in Compton or Thomson scattering occurring at high laser intensities. As a next level of detail in the spectrum calculations, we have calculated the line smoothing and broadening expected due to incident beam energy spread within a one-dimensional plane wave model for the incident laser pulse, both for compensated (chirped and unchirped cases. The scattered compensated distributions are treatable analytically within three models for the envelope of the incident laser pulses: Gaussian, Lorentzian, or hyperbolic secant. We use the new results to demonstrate that the laser chirping in Compton sources at high laser intensities: (i enables the use of higher order harmonics, thereby reducing the required electron beam energies; and (ii increases the photon yield in a small frequency band beyond that possible with the fundamental without chirping. This combination of chirping and higher harmonics can lead to substantial savings in the design, construction and operational costs of the new Compton sources. This is of particular importance to the widely popular laser-plasma accelerator based Compton sources, as the improvement in their beam quality enters the regime where chirping is most effective.

  8. Theoretical Compton profile anisotropies in molecules and solids. VI. Compton profile anisotropies and chemical binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matcha, R.L.; Pettitt, B.M.

    1979-03-15

    An interesting empirical relationship between zero point Compton profile anisotropies ..delta..J (0) and nuclear charges is noted. It is shown that, for alkali halide molecules AB, to a good approximation ..delta..J (0) =N ln(Z/sub b//Z/sub a/).

  9. Foreign body detection in food materials using compton scattered x-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Nigel James Bruce

    This thesis investigated the application of X-ray Compton scattering to the problem of foreign body detection in food. The methods used were analytical modelling, simulation and experiment. A criterion was defined for detectability, and a model was developed for predicting the minimum time required for detection. The model was used to predict the smallest detectable cubes of air, glass, plastic and steel. Simulations and experiments were performed on voids and glass in polystyrene phantoms, water, coffee and muesli. Backscatter was used to detect bones in chicken meat. The effects of geometry and multiple scatter on contrast, signal-to-noise, and detection time were simulated. Compton scatter was compared with transmission, and the effect of inhomogeneity was modelled. Spectral shape was investigated as a means of foreign body detection. A signal-to-noise ratio of 7.4 was required for foreign body detection in food. A 0.46 cm cube of glass or a 1.19 cm cube of polystyrene were detectable in a 10 cm cube of water in one second. The minimum time to scan a whole sample varied as the 7th power of the foreign body size, and the 5th power of the sample size. Compton scatter inspection produced higher contrasts than transmission, but required longer measurement times because of the low number of photon counts. Compton scatter inspection of whole samples was very slow compared to production line speeds in the food industry. There was potential for Compton scatter in applications which did not require whole-sample scanning, such as surface inspection. There was also potential in the inspection of inhomogeneous samples. The multiple scatter fraction varied from 25% to 55% for 2 to 10 cm cubes of water, but did not have a large effect on the detection time. The spectral shape gave good contrasts and signal-to-noise ratios in the detection of chicken bones.

  10. A general thermal model of machine tool spindle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the core component of machine tool, the thermal characteristics of the spindle have a significant influence on machine tool running status. Lack of an accurate model of the spindle system, particularly the model of load–deformation coefficient between the bearing rolling elements and rings, severely limits the thermal error analytic precision of the spindle. In this article, bearing internal loads, especially the function relationships between the principal curvature difference F(ρ and auxiliary parameter nδ, semi-major axis a, and semi-minor axis b, have been determined; furthermore, high-precision heat generation combining the heat sinks in the spindle system is calculated; finally, an accurate thermal model of the spindle was established. Moreover, a conventional spindle with embedded fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors has been developed. By comparing the experiment results with simulation, it indicates that the model has good accuracy, which verifies the reliability of the modeling process.

  11. Thermal performance curves of Paramecium caudatum: a model selection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenek, Sascha; Berendonk, Thomas U; Petzoldt, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    The ongoing climate change has motivated numerous studies investigating the temperature response of various organisms, especially that of ectotherms. To correctly describe the thermal performance of these organisms, functions are needed which sufficiently fit to the complete optimum curve. Surprisingly, model-comparisons for the temperature-dependence of population growth rates of an important ectothermic group, the protozoa, are still missing. In this study, temperature reaction norms of natural isolates of the freshwater protist Paramecium caudatum were investigated, considering nearly the entire temperature range. These reaction norms were used to estimate thermal performance curves by applying a set of commonly used model functions. An information theory approach was used to compare models and to identify the best ones for describing these data. Our results indicate that the models which can describe negative growth at the high- and low-temperature branch of an optimum curve are preferable. This is a prerequisite for accurately calculating the critical upper and lower thermal limits. While we detected a temperature optimum of around 29 °C for all investigated clonal strains, the critical thermal limits were considerably different between individual clones. Here, the tropical clone showed the narrowest thermal tolerance, with a shift of its critical thermal limits to higher temperatures. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. INFORMATION SUPPLY FOR SOLAR THERMAL SYSTEMS MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitaytseva Elena Khalilovna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar thermal system are its constituent elements with their connection between each other, thermal processes within them and also input/output data. The conjunction of external and internal factors determines the efficiency of solar thermal system. No excess heat as well as its deficiency displays us high level efficiency of system. The initial data for modeling of solar thermal systems functioning are dissimilar. Parameters of system’s equipment are constant. Solar radiation amount and water consumption are variable data. The more close initial data to reality, the more definite simulated result is. The main problem is in unpredictability of water consumption by the reason of daily regime and requirement of each user. In this way user is the most instable element of the system. In this study the input data for mathematical modeling of solar thermal systems was analyzed. The climatic databases and standard specifications of hot water demand were also analyzed. The operability estimation method for solar thermal systems with variable input data was offered. The extent of suitability of any solar thermal system can be defined by certain characteristic. The value of this characteristic displays energy accumulation process.

  13. Delta-function Approximation SSC Model in 3C 273 S. J. Kang1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We obtain an approximate analytical solution using δ approximate calculation on the traditional one-zone synchrotron self-. Compton (SSC) model. In this model, we describe the electron energy distribution by a broken power-law function with a sharp cut-off, and non- thermal photons are produced by both ...

  14. Beam dynamics in Compton ring gamma sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Bulyak

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron storage rings of GeV energy with laser pulse stacking cavities are promising intense sources of polarized hard photons which, via pair production, can be used to generate polarized positron beams. In this paper, the dynamics of electron bunches circulating in a storage ring and interacting with high-power laser pulses is studied both analytically and by simulation. Both the common features and the differences in the behavior of bunches interacting with an extremely high power laser pulse and with a moderate pulse are discussed. Also considerations on particular lattice designs for Compton gamma rings are presented.

  15. Cork quality estimation by using Compton tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, A; Golosio, B; Luciano, P; Ruggero, A

    2002-01-01

    The quality control of cork stoppers is mandatory in order to guarantee the perfect conservation of the wine. Several techniques have been developed but until now the quality control was essentially related to the status of the external surface. Thus possible cracks or holes inside the stopper will be hidden. In this paper a new technique based on X-ray Compton tomography is described. It is a non-destructive technique that allows one to reconstruct and visualize the cross-section of the cork stopper analyzed, and so to put in evidence the presence of internal imperfections. Some results are reported and compared with visual classification.

  16. Radiative corrections to virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, D.; Lhuillier, D.; Wanderhaeghen, M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; Van de Wiele, J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1996-12-31

    Radiative corrections to virtual Compton scattering are calculated for the first time at the first order in {alpha}. We use the dimensional regularization scheme to treat both Ultra-Violet and Indra-Red divergences. After the compensation of divergences, the expression of the correction contains analytical terms and a numerical term which has to be computed. For a scattered photon of centre of mass energy q`= 45 MeV, a preliminary result of the comparison between theory and experimental data is presented taking into account only analytical terms. (authors). 10 refs.

  17. Mathematical Models of IABG Thermal-Vacuum Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doring, Daniel; Ulfers, Hendrik

    2014-06-01

    IABG in Ottobrunn, Germany, operates thermal-vacuum facilities of different sizes and complexities as a service for space-testing of satellites and components. One aspect of these tests is the qualification of the thermal control system that keeps all onboard components within their save operating temperature band. As not all possible operation / mission states can be simulated within a sensible test time, usually a subset of important and extreme states is tested at TV facilities to validate the thermal model of the satellite, which is then used to model all other possible mission states. With advances in the precision of customer thermal models, simple assumptions of the test environment (e.g. everything black & cold, one solar constant of light from this side) are no longer sufficient, as real space simulation chambers do deviate from this ideal. For example the mechanical adapters which support the spacecraft are usually not actively cooled. To enable IABG to provide a model that is sufficiently detailed and realistic for current system tests, Munich engineering company CASE developed ESATAN models for the two larger chambers. CASE has many years of experience in thermal analysis for space-flight systems and ESATAN. The two models represent the rather simple (and therefore very homogeneous) 3m-TVA and the extremely complex space simulation test facility and its solar simulator. The cooperation of IABG and CASE built up extensive knowledge of the facilities thermal behaviour. This is the key to optimally support customers with their test campaigns in the future. The ESARAD part of the models contains all relevant information with regard to geometry (CAD data), surface properties (optical measurements) and solar irradiation for the sun simulator. The temperature of the actively cooled thermal shrouds is measured and mapped to the thermal mesh to create the temperature field in the ESATAN part as boundary conditions. Both models comprise switches to easily

  18. Thermal modelling of an AMTEC recirculating cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suitor, J. W.; Williams, R. M.; Underwood, M. L.; Ryan, M. A.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; O'Connor, D.

    1992-01-01

    A modeling program was developed to determine the impact of various design parameters on the operation of an AMTEC system. Temperature profiles generated by the modeling program were compared to actual experimental data to verify the model accuracy. The model was then extended to predict the impact of device design on operational performance. The effect of heat loss from the liquid sodium supply end was studied for this paper.

  19. Physical-Statistical Model of Thermal Conductivity of Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Usowicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A physical-statistical model for predicting the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids is proposed. The volumetric unit of nanofluids in the model consists of solid, liquid, and gas particles and is treated as a system made up of regular geometric figures, spheres, filling the volumetric unit by layers. The model assumes that connections between layers of the spheres and between neighbouring spheres in the layer are represented by serial and parallel connections of thermal resistors, respectively. This model is expressed in terms of thermal resistance of nanoparticles and fluids and the multinomial distribution of particles in the nanofluids. The results for predicted and measured effective thermal conductivity of several nanofluids (Al2O3/ethylene glycol-based and Al2O3/water-based; CuO/ethylene glycol-based and CuO/water-based; and TiO2/ethylene glycol-based are presented. The physical-statistical model shows a reasonably good agreement with the experimental results and gives more accurate predictions for the effective thermal conductivity of nanofluids compared to existing classical models.

  20. Modelling Phase Change in a 3D Thermal Transient Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Haque, EEU; Hampson, PR

    2016-01-01

    A 3D thermal transient analysis of a gap profiling technique which utilises phase change material (plasticine) is conducted in ANSYS. Phase change is modelled by assigning enthalpy of fusion over a wide temperature range based on Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) results. Temperature dependent convection is approximated using Nusselt number correlations. A parametric study is conducted on the thermal contact conductance value between the profiling device (polymer) and adjacent (metal) s...

  1. 3D thermal modelling of the Upper Rhine Graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freymark, Jessica; Sippel, Judith; Scheck-Wenderoth, Magdalena; Bär, Kristian; Stiller, Manfred; Fritsche, Johann-Gerhard; Kracht, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    The Upper Rhine Graben (URG) is a promising target for deep geothermal energy production. As part of the EU-funded project "IMAGE" (Integrated Methods for Advanced Geothermal Exploration, grant agreement no. 608553), we aim to understand the processes that control the temperature distribution in the subsurface of the URG by using numerical simulations. Reservoir-scale numerical models are often used to predict the hydrothermal conditions and to reduce the risk of drilling non-productive geothermal wells. One major problem related to such reservoir-scale models is setting appropriate boundary conditions that define, for instance, how much heat enters the reservoir from greater depths. To overcome this problem, we combine lithospheric-scale 3D structural and thermal modelling with higher resolved hydrothermal models of the sedimentary basin fill in a workflow of successive modelling steps. After model parameterization with thermal rock properties we solve the steady-state conductive heat equation first to calculate the 3D conductive thermal field and to understand the first-order controlling factors of the regional temperature distribution. In a second step we took into account the fluid flow due to permeability variations in the porous media and the influence of major faults, which locally change the temperature distribution. These numerical simulations of coupled heat and fluid transport were performed on smaller and higher resolved models of the basin fill for which the conductive thermal model provide the thermal boundary conditions. We present the methodological workflow, the developed 3D structural and thermal models, and assess how heat transport mechanisms in response to lithological and structural features on different scales control subsurface temperatures.

  2. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  3. A thermoelastic deformation model of tissue contraction during thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chang Sub; Liu, Cong; Hall, Sheldon K; Payne, Stephen J

    2017-06-14

    Thermal ablation is an energy-based ablation technique widely used during minimally invasive cancer treatment. Simulations are used to predict the dead tissue post therapy. However, one difficulty with the simulations is accurately predicting the ablation zone in post-procedural images due to the contraction of tissue as a result of exposure to elevated temperatures. A mathematical model of the thermoelastic deformation for an elastic isotropic material was coupled with a three state thermal denaturation model to determine the contraction of tissue during thermal ablation. A finite difference method was considered to quantify the tissue contraction for a typical temperature distribution during thermal ablation. The simulations show that tissue displacement during thermal ablation was not bound to the tissue heated regions only. Both tissue expansion and contraction were observed at the different stages of the heating process. Tissue contraction of up to 42% was obtained with an applicator temperature of 90 °C. A recovery of around 2% was observed with heating removed as a result of unfolded state proteins returning back to its native state. Poisson's ratio and the applicator temperature have both been shown to affect the tissue displacement significantly. The maximum tissue contraction was found to increase with both increasing Poisson's ratio and temperature. The model presented here will allow predictions of thermal ablation to be corrected for tissue contraction, which is an important effect, during comparison with post-procedural images, thus improving the accuracy of mathematical simulations for treatment planning.

  4. Three-dimensional imaging of flat natural and cultural heritage objects by a Compton scattering modality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero Prado, Patricio; Nguyen, Mai K.; Dumas, Laurent; Cohen, Serge X.

    2017-01-01

    Characterization and interpretation of flat ancient material objects, such as those found in archaeology, paleoenvironments, paleontology, and cultural heritage, have remained a challenging task to perform by means of conventional x-ray tomography methods due to their anisotropic morphology and flattened geometry. To overcome the limitations of the mentioned methodologies for such samples, an imaging modality based on Compton scattering is proposed in this work. Classical x-ray tomography treats Compton scattering data as noise in the image formation process, while in Compton scattering tomography the conditions are set such that Compton data become the principal image contrasting agent. Under these conditions, we are able, first, to avoid relative rotations between the sample and the imaging setup, and second, to obtain three-dimensional data even when the object is supported by a dense material by exploiting backscattered photons. Mathematically this problem is addressed by means of a conical Radon transform and its inversion. The image formation process and object reconstruction model are presented. The feasibility of this methodology is supported by numerical simulations.

  5. Time-independent inverse compton spectrum for photons from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The general theoretical aspects of inverse Compton scattering was investigated and an equation for the timeindependent inverse Compton spectrum for photons from a plasma cloud of finite extent was derived. This was done by convolving the Kompaneets equation used for describing the evolution of the photon spectrum ...

  6. Thermal Modelling of Various Thermal Barrier Coatings in a High Flux Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1998-01-01

    A thermal model was developed to predict the thermal response of coated and uncoated tubes tested in a H2/O2 rocket engine. Temperatures were predicted for traditional APS ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings, as well as APS and LPPS ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY cermet coatings. Good agreement was observed between predicted and measured metal temperatures at locations near the tube surface or at the inner tube wall. The thermal model was also used to quantitatively examine the effect of various coating system parameters on the temperatures in the substrate and coating. Accordingly, the effect of the presence a metallic bond coat and the effect of radiation from the surface of the ceramic layer were examined. In addition, the effect of a variation in the values of the thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer was also investigated. It was shown that a variation in the thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer, on the order of that reported in the literature for plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 coatings, can result in temperature differences in the substrate greater than 100 C, a much greater effect than that due to the presence of a bond coat or radiation from the ceramic layer. The thermal model was also used to predict the thermal response of a coated rod in order to quantify the difference in the metal temperatures between the two substrate geometries in order to explain the previously-observed increased life of coatings on rods over that on tubes. It was shown that for the short duration testing in the rocket engine, the temperature in a tube could exceed that in a rod by more than 100 C. Lastly, a two-dimensional model was developed to evaluate the effect of tangential heat transfer around the tube and its impact on reducing the stagnation point temperature. It was also shown that tangential heat transfer does not significantly reduce the stagnation point temperature, thus allowing application of a simpler, one-dimensional model for comparing measured and predicted stagnation point

  7. Thermal modelling for an induction motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glises, R.; Miraoui, A.; Kauffmann, J. M.

    1993-09-01

    The authors of this paper intend to achieve the study of the thermal behaviour in permanent rate of an asynchronous motor with a wounded rotor of a rated power of 4kW. 66 thermocouples have been settled in the stator at different places like the centers and the bottoms of the windings or the middle of the yoke. A design has been realized thanks to the magnetostatic modulus of the computation software with the finite elements method Flux2d converted in a resolution tool of the heat equation. Another originality of this study is to introduce areas including a contact thermal resistance phenomenon in some places of the motor to characterize the motor thermophysical parameters and to obtain the experimentation-calculation convergence. Les auteurs de cet article se proposent de réaliser l'étude du comportement thermique en régime permanent d'un moteur asynchrone de 4kW à rotor bobiné. 66 thermocouples ont été positionnés en différents lieux du stator tels que les milieux des bobinages, les fonds d'encoches ou encore le milieu des tôles. Un modèle a été réalisé à l'aide du logiciel de calculs magnétostatiques par éléments finis Flux2d converti en un outil de résolution de l'équation de la chaleur. Une autre originalité de cette étude a été d'introduire en certains endroits du moteur des zones où la notion de résistance thermique de contact est particulièrement importante. L'introduction de paramètres thermophysiques les caractérisant s'est avérée nécessaire pour obtenir la convergence expérimentation-simulation.

  8. Statistical Design Model (SDM) of satellite thermal control subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirshams, Mehran; Zabihian, Ehsan; Aarabi Chamalishahi, Mahdi

    2016-07-01

    Satellites thermal control, is a satellite subsystem that its main task is keeping the satellite components at its own survival and activity temperatures. Ability of satellite thermal control plays a key role in satisfying satellite's operational requirements and designing this subsystem is a part of satellite design. In the other hand due to the lack of information provided by companies and designers still doesn't have a specific design process while it is one of the fundamental subsystems. The aim of this paper, is to identify and extract statistical design models of spacecraft thermal control subsystem by using SDM design method. This method analyses statistical data with a particular procedure. To implement SDM method, a complete database is required. Therefore, we first collect spacecraft data and create a database, and then we extract statistical graphs using Microsoft Excel, from which we further extract mathematical models. Inputs parameters of the method are mass, mission, and life time of the satellite. For this purpose at first thermal control subsystem has been introduced and hardware using in the this subsystem and its variants has been investigated. In the next part different statistical models has been mentioned and a brief compare will be between them. Finally, this paper particular statistical model is extracted from collected statistical data. Process of testing the accuracy and verifying the method use a case study. Which by the comparisons between the specifications of thermal control subsystem of a fabricated satellite and the analyses results, the methodology in this paper was proved to be effective. Key Words: Thermal control subsystem design, Statistical design model (SDM), Satellite conceptual design, Thermal hardware

  9. Thermal Storage Power Balancing with Model Predictive Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Madsen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The method described in this paper balances power production and consumption with a large number of thermal loads. Linear controllers are used for the loads to track a temperature set point, while Model Predictive Control (MPC) and model estimation of the load behavior are used for coordination...

  10. Modeling of droplet dynamic and thermal behaviour during spray ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mathematical modeling of supersonic gas atomization for spray forming has been investigated. Influence of the droplet dynamic and thermal behaviour on the resultant microstructure has been studied. Analytical models have been constructed taking into account the higher Reynolds number owing to supersonic gas flow.

  11. Thermal and mechanical modelling of convergent plate margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Beukel, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis, the thermal and mechanical structure of convergent plate margins will be investigated by means of numerical modelling. In addition, we will discuss the implications of modelling results for geological processes such as metamorphism or the break-up of a plate at a convergent plate

  12. Recent results from the Compton Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelson, P.F.; Hansen, W.W. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The Compton Observatory is an orbiting astronomical observatory for gamma-ray astronomy that covers the energy range from about 30 keV to 30 GeV. The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET), one of four instruments on-board, is capable of detecting and imaging gamma radiation from cosmic sources in the energy range from approximately 20 MeV to 30 GeV. After about one month of tests and calibration following the April 1991 launch, a 15-month all sky survey was begun. This survey is now complete and the Compton Observatory is well into Phase II of its observing program which includes guest investigator observations. Among the highlights from the all-sky survey discussed in this presentation are the following: detection of five pulsars with emission above 100 MeV; detection of more than 24 active galaxies, the most distant at redshift greater than two; detection of many high latitude, unidentified gamma-ray sources, some showing significant time variability; detection of at least two high energy gamma-ray bursts, with emission in one case extending to at least 1 GeV. EGRET has also detected gamma-ray emission from solar flares up to energies of at least 2 GeV and has observed gamma-rays from the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  13. Noise evaluation of Compton camera imaging for proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Ortega, P G; Cerutti, F; Ferrari, A; Gillam, J E; Lacasta, C; Llosá, G; Oliver, J F; Sala, P R; Solevi, P; Rafecas, M

    2015-01-01

    Compton Cameras emerged as an alternative for real-time dose monitoring techniques for Particle Therapy (PT), based on the detection of prompt-gammas. As a consequence of the Compton scattering process, the gamma origin point can be restricted onto the surface of a cone (Compton cone). Through image reconstruction techniques, the distribution of the gamma emitters can be estimated, using cone-surfaces backprojections of the Compton cones through the image space, along with more sophisticated statistical methods to improve the image quality. To calculate the Compton cone required for image reconstruction, either two interactions, the last being photoelectric absorption, or three scatter interactions are needed. Because of the high energy of the photons in PT the first option might not be adequate, as the photon is not absorbed in general. However, the second option is less efficient. That is the reason to resort to spectral reconstructions, where the incoming γ energy is considered as a variable in the recons...

  14. Gauge invariance and Compton scattering from relativistic composite systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, H. [George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Center for Nuclear Studies; Gross, F. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)]|[College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-09-01

    Using the Ward-Takahashi (W-T) identity and the Bethe-Salpeter (B-S) wave equation, we investigate the dynamical requirements imposed by electromagnetic gauge invariance on Compton scattering from relativistic composite system. The importance of off-shell rescattering in intermediate states, which is equivalent to final state interactions in inclusive processes, is clarified in the context of current conservation. It is shown that, if the nuclear force is nonlocal, there will be both two-photon interaction currents and rescattering contributions to terms involving one-photon interaction currents. We derive the two-body W-T identity for the two-photon interaction currents, and obtain explicit forms for the interaction current operators for three illustrative models of nuclear forces: (a) two-pion exchange forces with baryon resonances, (b) covariant separable forces, and (c) charged one-pion exchange.

  15. Virtual compton scattering on the proton below pion threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertin, P.Y.; VCS Collaboration

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the preliminary results of an electron-proton interaction experiment carried out with the accelerator of MAMI at Mainz (Germany) for the recording of virtual compton scattering events. More than 2 10{sup 4} events were recorded in a two days run with a liquid hydrogen target. The main limitation for the counting rate comes from the limitation of the acquisition rate (100 Hz) and the single rates (10{sup 5}) in the drift chambers. The aim of this experiment is the understanding of both the low energy expansion and the generalized polarizabilities in order to compare, confirm or exclude the models of Quantum Chromodynamics used for the understanding of the nucleon. (J.S.). 3 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Measurement of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2005-01-01

    A measurement is presented of elastic deeply virtual Compton scattering \\gamma* p \\to \\gamma p made using e^+ p collision data corresponding to a luminosity of 46.5 pb^{-1}, taken with the H1 detector at HERA. The cross section is measured as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2, the invariant mass of the \\gamma* p system, W, and for the first time, differentially in the squared momentum transfer at the proton vertex, t, in the kinematic range 2 < Q^2 < 80 GeV^2, 30 < W < 140 GeV and |t| < 1 GeV^2. QCD based calculations at next-to-leading order using generalized parton distributions can describe the data, as can colour dipole model predictions.

  17. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-03

    This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiation. It is based on the model used to calculate temperatures and volume fractions in an annular vessel containing an aqueous solution of uranium . The experiment was repeated at several electron beam power levels, but the CFD analysis was performed only for the 12 kW irradiation, because this experiment came the closest to reaching a steady-state condition. The aim of the study is to compare results of the calculation with experimental measurements to determine the validity of the CFD model.

  18. Thermal mechanical stress modeling of GCtM seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Steve Xunhu [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chambers, Robert [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Finite-element thermal stress modeling at the glass-ceramic to metal (GCtM) interface was conducted assuming heterogeneous glass-ceramic microstructure. The glass-ceramics were treated as composites consisting of high expansion silica crystalline phases dispersed in a uniform residual glass. Interfacial stresses were examined for two types of glass-ceramics. One was designated as SL16 glass -ceramic, owing to its step-like thermal strain curve with an overall coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at 16 ppm/ºC. Clustered Cristobalite is the dominant silica phase in SL16 glass-ceramic. The other, designated as NL16 glass-ceramic, exhibited clusters of mixed Cristobalite and Quartz and showed a near-linear thermal strain curve with a same CTE value.

  19. Exercises in 80223 Numerical Modelling of Thermal Processing of Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Jens Ole

    Processing of Materials'. The original copy is kept in the archives of TM on the ground floor of building 425. A copy of the exercise book can be made available by contacting the secretary on the ground floor of building 425. Please give the following number: TM 00.01 (TM = Thermal processing of Materials)......This exercise book contains exercise instructions for the 7 compulsory exercises (Exercise 1-7) and the final exercise (Exercise 8) in the course 80223 'Numerical Modelling of Thermal Processing of Materials'. The exercise book also contains written program examples in 'C' and 'Pascal'. Finally......, guidelines are given on how to write the report which has to be handed in at the end of the course. The exercise book is a updated version of the exercise book from 1999. The exercise book is used in the course 42224 'Numerical Process Modelling' which earlier was called 80223 'Numerical Modelling of Thermal...

  20. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA)

    2010-05-01

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  1. Frequency-domain thermal modelling of power semiconductor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede; Andresen, Markus

    2015-01-01

    to correctly predict the device temperatures, especially when considering the thermal grease and heat sink attached to the power semiconductor devices. In this paper, the frequency-domain approach is applied to the modelling of thermal dynamics for power devices. The limits of the existing RC lump...... network. The proposed model can be used to predict not only the internal temperature behaviours of devices but also the behaviours of heat flowing out of the devices. As a result, more correct estimation of device temperature can be achieved when considering the attached cooling conditions....

  2. Modeling and analysis of AGS thermal shock experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Kim, S.H.; Haines, J.R.

    1998-11-01

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of peak strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted.

  3. Radiative Transport Modelling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    Figure 1. Schematic of multiple scatter events inside a TBC D l1 l2 l3 l4l5 5 Two random walk simulation codes were adapted and improved upon, one...one particular n = 2 scatter event. l1 lb 1 2 l2 db DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. 11 The solution to Eq. (13...development of the new model (Task 2) and in testing it (Task 3). Some model parameter definitions are shown in Figure 1. The scattering medium is

  4. Thermal hydraulic model descrition of TASS/SMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Han Young; Kim, H. C.; Chung, Y. J.; Lim, H. S.; Yang, S. H

    2001-04-01

    The TASS/SMR code has been developed for the safety analysis of SMART. The governing equations were applied only to the primary coolant system in TASS which had been developed at KAERI. In TASS/SMR, the solution method is improved so that the primary and secondary coolant systems are solved simultaneously. Besides the solution method, thermal-hydraulic models are incorporated, in TASS/SMR, such as non-condensible gas model, helical steam generator heat transfer model, and passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS) heat transfer model for the application to SMART. The governing equtions of TASS/SMR are based on the drift-flux model so that the accidents and transients accompaning with two-phase flow can be analized. This report describes the governing equations and solution methods used in TASS/SMR and also includes the description for the thermal hydraulic models for SMART design.

  5. Thermal-hydraulic modeling of reactivity accidents in MTR reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khater Hany

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the development of a dynamic model for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of MTR research reactors during a reactivity insertion accident. The model is formulated for coupling reactor kinetics with feedback reactivity and reactor core thermal-hydraulics. To represent the reactor core, two types of channels are considered, average and hot channels. The developed computer program is compiled and executed on a personal computer, using the FORTRAN language. The model is validated by safety-related benchmark calculations for MTR-TYPE reactors of IAEA 10 MW generic reactor for both slow and fast reactivity insertion transients. A good agreement is shown between the present model and the benchmark calculations. Then, the model is used for simulating the uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod of an ETRR-2 reactor in transient with over power scram trip. The model results for ETRR-2 are analyzed and discussed.

  6. Parametric Thermal Soak Model for Earth Entry Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Samareh, Jamshid; Doan, Quy D.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis and design of an Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) is multidisciplinary in nature, requiring the application many disciplines. An integrated tool called Multi Mission System Analysis for Planetary Entry Descent and Landing or M-SAPE is being developed as part of Entry Vehicle Technology project under In-Space Technology program. Integration of a multidisciplinary problem is a challenging task. Automation of the execution process and data transfer among disciplines can be accomplished to provide significant benefits. Thermal soak analysis and temperature predictions of various interior components of entry vehicle, including the impact foam and payload container are part of the solution that M-SAPE will offer to spacecraft designers. The present paper focuses on the thermal soak analysis of an entry vehicle design based on the Mars Sample Return entry vehicle geometry and discusses a technical approach to develop parametric models for thermal soak analysis that will be integrated into M-SAPE. One of the main objectives is to be able to identify the important parameters and to develop correlation coefficients so that, for a given trajectory, can estimate the peak payload temperature based on relevant trajectory parameters and vehicle geometry. The models are being developed for two primary thermal protection (TPS) materials: 1) carbon phenolic that was used for Galileo and Pioneer Venus probes and, 2) Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), TPS material for Mars Science Lab mission. Several representative trajectories were selected from a very large trade space to include in the thermal analysis in order to develop an effective parametric thermal soak model. The selected trajectories covered a wide range of heatload and heatflux combinations. Non-linear, fully transient, thermal finite element simulations were performed for the selected trajectories to generate the temperature histories at the interior of the vehicle. Figure 1 shows the finite element model

  7. Modeling of thermally stimulated depolarization current (TSDC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-02

    Aug 2, 2007 ... where A is sample area, P0 the initial polarization and τ (T) the relaxation model used. Equation (2) gives the corrected. TSDC curve as. Icorr (T) = Cf. ∗. I (T). (3). The theoretical correction factor (Cf) is studied very inten- sively in order to get a complete picture about the correction factor behaviour along ...

  8. A thermal conductivity model for U-­Si compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    U3Si2 is a candidate for accident tolerant nuclear fuel being developed as an alternative to UO2 in commercial light water reactors (LWRs). One of its main benefits compared to UO2 is higher thermal conductivity that increases with temperature. This increase is contrary to UO2, for which the thermal conductivity decreases with temperature. The reason for the difference is the electronic origin of thermal conductivity in U3Si2, as compared to the phonon mechanism responsible for thermal transport in UO2. The phonon thermal conductivity in UO2 is unusually low for a fluorite oxide due to the strong interaction with the spins in the paramagnetic phase. The thermal conductivity of U3Si2 as well as other U-­Si compounds has been measured experimentally [1-­4]. However, for fuel performance simulations it is also critical to model the degradation of the thermal conductivity due to damage and microstructure evolution caused by the reactor environment (irradiation and high temperature). For UO2 this reduction is substantial and it has been the topic of extensive NEAMS research resulting in several publications [5, 6]. There are no data or models for the evolution of the U3Si2 thermal conductivity under irradiation. We know that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of UO2 (semi-conductor) and U3Si2 (metal) are very different, and we do not necessarily expect the dependence on damage to be the same either, which could present another advantage for the silicide fuel. In this report we summarize the first step in developing a model for the thermal conductivity of U-­Si compounds with the goal of capturing the effect of damage in U3Si2. Next year, we will focus on lattice damage. We will also attempt to assess the impact of fission gas bubbles.

  9. Features of Functioning the Integrated Building Thermal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozov Maxim N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of the building heating system, consisting of energy source, a distributed automatic control system, elements of individual heating unit and heating system is designed. Application Simulink of mathematical package Matlab is selected as a platform for the model. There are the specialized application Simscape libraries in aggregate with a wide range of Matlab mathematical tools allow to apply the “acausal” modeling concept. Implementation the “physical” representation of the object model gave improving the accuracy of the models. Principle of operation and features of the functioning of the thermal model is described. The investigations of building cooling dynamics were carried out.

  10. Numerical Modeling of Water Thermal Plumes Emitted by Thermal Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azucena Durán-Colmenares

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the study of thermal dispersion of plumes emitted by power plants into the sea. Wastewater discharge from power stations causes impacts that require investigation or monitoring. A study to characterize the physical effects of thermal plumes into the sea is carried out here by numerical modeling and field measurements. The case study is the thermal discharges of the Presidente Adolfo López Mateos Power Plant, located in Veracruz, on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico. This plant is managed by the Federal Electricity Commission of Mexico. The physical effects of such plumes are related to the increase of seawater temperature caused by the hot water discharge of the plant. We focus on the implementation, calibration, and validation of the Delft3D-FLOW model, which solves the shallow-water equations. The numerical simulations consider a critical scenario where meteorological and oceanographic parameters are taken into account to reproduce the proper physical conditions of the environment. The results show a local physical effect of the thermal plumes within the study zone, given the predominant strong winds conditions of the scenario under study.

  11. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay Mayberry

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  12. CryoModel: a cryostat thermal performance simulation tool

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez Caparrós, D

    2011-01-01

    In the design process of cryostats for accelerators equipment (magnets or RF cavities), it is of interest to estimate downtime for intervention. For this purpose, it is necessary to understand the temperature transients of the accelerator components during warm-up and cool-down processes. In this report, a mathematical model and a simulation tool to study the main heat transfer phenomena of a generic horizontal cryostat (radiation, with or without multilayer insulation system, actively cooled thermal shielding, thermal conduction through supporting systems, etc.) is presented. The thermal model and simulator have been benchmarked on experimental data from transients of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The presented tool is now being used to estimate the warm-up time needed for machine intervention in case of replacement of one cryomodule of the Superconducting Proton Linear accelerator (SPL).

  13. Compton Radiation for Nuclear Waste Management and Transmutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulyak, E.; Urakawa, J.

    2015-10-01

    Compton inverse radiation is emitted in the process of backscattering of the laser pulses off the relativistic electrons. This radiation possesses high spectral density and high energy of photons--in hard x-ray up to gammaray energy range--with moderate electron energies (hundreds of MeV up to 1 GeV) due to short wavelength of the laser radiation. The Compton radiation is well collimated: emitting within a narrow cone along the electron beam. A distinct property of the Compton inverse radiation is a steep high-energy cutoff of the spectrum and the maximal intensity just below the cutoff. The Compton sources can attain: spectral density up to 1014 gammas/(s 0.1%bandwidth) in MeV range of energies, and spectral brightness up to 1020 gammas/(smm2mr2 0.1% bw). Applicability of Compton sources for nuclear waste management and detection of radioisotopes and fissionable nuclides are discussed in the report. Also application limits of Compton gamma sources for transmutation of radioactive isotopes are estimated. A recently proposed subtracting method, in which two sets of data obtained by irradiating the object by the Compton beams with slightly different maximal energies are compared, will enhance resolution of detection radioactive elements at the 'atomic' (hundreds of keV) and the 'nuclear' (a few MeV) photon energies.

  14. Thermal characterization and modeling of ultra-thin silicon chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahed, Muhammad; Yu, Zili; Rempp, Horst; Richter, Harald; Harendt, Christine; Burghartz, Joachim N.

    2015-11-01

    Manufacturing ultra-thin chip is an emerging field in semiconductor technology that is driven by 3-D integrated circuits and flexible electronics. Unlike bulk silicon (Si) chips with thickness greater than 400 μm, the thermal management of ultra-thin Si chips with thickness smaller than 20 μm is challenging due to the increased lateral thermal resistance implying stringent cooling requirements. Therefore, a reasonable prediction of temperature gradients in such chips is necessary. In this work, a thermal chip is implemented in an ultra-thin 0.5 μm CMOS technology to be employed in surface steady-state and transient temperature measurement. Test chips are either packaged in a Pin Grid Array (PGA) ceramic package or attached to a flexible polyimide substrate. The experimental results show an on-chip temperature gradient of ∼15 °C for a dissipated power of 0.4 W in the case of the PGA package and ∼30 °C for the polyimide substrate. The time constants are ∼50 s and ∼1 s for the PGA and the polyimide packages respectively. The measurements are complemented by FEM simulations using ANSYS 14.5 workbench and spice simulations using an equivalent lumped-component thermal circuit model. The lumped-element thermal circuit model is then used for the surface temperature prediction, which is compared to measurement results.

  15. MODELING OF THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF METALS DURING ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    30 juin 2012 ... ABSTRACT. The laser welding provides a very high energy density, this allows the use of welds narrow, deep and at high speeds. Because of its advantages over other joining processes, laser welding is a process of manufacturing the most important. In order to model the thermal behavior, we must study ...

  16. Numerical Modelling of Wood Gasification in Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hirka, Ivan; Živný, Oldřich; Hrabovský, Milan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 4 (2017), s. 947-965 ISSN 0272-4324 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma modelling * CFD * Thermal plasma reactor * Biomass * Gasification * Syngas Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.355, year: 2016 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11090-017-9812-z

  17. Thermal Model Parameter Identification of a Lithium Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Nissing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of a Lithium battery cell is important for its performance, efficiency, safety, and capacity and is influenced by the environmental temperature and by the charging and discharging process itself. Battery Management Systems (BMS take into account this effect. As the temperature at the battery cell is difficult to measure, often the temperature is measured on or nearby the poles of the cell, although the accuracy of predicting the cell temperature with those quantities is limited. Therefore a thermal model of the battery is used in order to calculate and estimate the cell temperature. This paper uses a simple RC-network representation for the thermal model and shows how the thermal parameters are identified using input/output measurements only, where the load current of the battery represents the input while the temperatures at the poles represent the outputs of the measurement. With a single measurement the eight model parameters (thermal resistances, electric contact resistances, and heat capacities can be determined using the method of least-square. Experimental results show that the simple model with the identified parameters fits very accurately to the measurements.

  18. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 81; Issue 4. Analytical model of transient thermal effect on convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod ... The transient analytical solutions of temperature distribution, stress, strain and optical path difference in convectional cooled end-pumped laser rod are derived.

  19. Modelling of Thermal Degradation Kinetics of Ascorbic Acid in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) loss in thermally treated pawpaw and potato was modelled mathematically. Isothermal experiments in the temperature range of 50 -80 oC for the drying of pawpaw and 60 -100 oC for the blanch-drying of potato were utilized to determine the kinetics of ascorbic acid loss in both fruit and vegetable.

  20. Thermalization time in a model of neutron star

    OpenAIRE

    Ducomet, B.; Nečasová, Š. (Šárka)

    2011-01-01

    We consider an initial boundary value problem for the equation describing heat conduction in a spherical model of neutron star considered by Lattimer et al. We estimate the asymptotic decay of the solution, which provides a plausible estimate for a "thermalization time" for the system.

  1. Modelling of thermal degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) loss in thermally treated pawpaw and potato was modelled mathematically. Isothermal experiments in the temperature range of 50 -80 oC for the drying of pawpaw and 60 -100 oC for the blanch-drying of potato were utilized to determine the kinetics of ascorbic acid loss in both fruit and vegetable.

  2. Analytical model of transient temperature and thermal stress in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The result of this work is compared with a ... Keywords. Integral transform method; double end-pumped; laser rod; thermal stress. .... 2.2 Stress analysis. Although different methods have been used to predict failure stress, the maximum tensile hoop stress is proved to model the fracture in laser rod very well [9]. The hotter ...

  3. Numerical modeling of Thermal Response Tests in Energy Piles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A.; Toledo, M.; Moffat, R.; Herrera, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    Nowadays, thermal response tests (TRT) are used as the main tools for the evaluation of low enthalpy geothermal systems such as heat exchangers. The results of TRT are used for estimating thermal conductivity and thermal resistance values of those systems. We present results of synthetic TRT simulations that model the behavior observed in an experimental energy pile system, which was installed at the new building of the Faculty of Engineering of Universidad de Chile. Moreover, we also present a parametric study to identify the most influent parameters in the performance of this type of tests. The modeling was developed using the finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics, which allows the incorporation of flow and heat transport processes. The modeled system consists on a concrete pile with 1 m diameter and 28 m deep, which contains a 28 mm diameter PEX pipe arranged in a closed circuit. Three configurations were analyzed: a U pipe, a triple U and a helicoid shape implemented at the experimental site. All simulations were run considering transient response in a three-dimensional domain. The simulation results provided the temperature distribution on the pile for a set of different geometry and physical properties of the materials. These results were compared with analytical solutions which are commonly used to interpret TRT data. This analysis demonstrated that there are several parameters that affect the system response in a synthetic TRT. For example, the diameter of the simulated pile affects the estimated effective thermal conductivity of the system. Moreover, the simulation results show that the estimated thermal conductivity for a 1 m diameter pile did not stabilize even after 100 hours since the beginning of the test, when it reached a value 30% below value used to set up the material properties in the simulation. Furthermore, we observed different behaviors depending on the thermal properties of concrete and soil. According to the simulations, the thermal

  4. A Review of the Modelling of Thermally Interacting Multiple Boreholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seama Koohi-Fayegh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Much attention is now focused on utilizing ground heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as well as water heating, refrigeration and other thermal tasks. Modeling such systems is important for understanding, designing and optimizing their performance and characteristics. Several heat transfer models exist for ground heat exchangers. In this review article, challenges of modelling heat transfer in vertical heat exchangers are described, some analytical and numerical models are reviewed and compared, recent related developments are described and the importance of modelling these systems is discussed from a variety of aspects, such as sustainability of geothermal systems or their potential impacts on the ecosystems nearby.

  5. House thermal model parameter estimation method for Model Predictive Control applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Richard Pieter; de Wit, J.B.; Fink, J.; Smit, Gerardus Johannes Maria

    In this paper we investigate thermal network models with different model orders applied to various Dutch low-energy house types with high and low interior thermal mass and containing floor heating. Parameter estimations are performed by using data from TRNSYS simulations. The paper discusses results

  6. Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Heath

    2014-03-01

    This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

  7. A Rewriting-Logic-Based Technique for Modeling Thermal Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Lepri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rewriting-logic-based modeling and analysis technique for physical systems, with focus on thermal systems. The contributions of this paper can be summarized as follows: (i providing a framework for modeling and executing physical systems, where both the physical components and their physical interactions are treated as first-class citizens; (ii showing how heat transfer problems in thermal systems can be modeled in Real-Time Maude; (iii giving the implementation in Real-Time Maude of a basic numerical technique for executing continuous behaviors in object-oriented hybrid systems; and (iv illustrating these techniques with a set of incremental case studies using realistic physical parameters, with examples of simulation and model checking analyses.

  8. Modelling Phase Change in a 3D Thermal Transient Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Haque

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3D thermal transient analysis of a gap profiling technique which utilises phase change material (plasticine is conducted in ANSYS. Phase change is modelled by assigning enthalpy of fusion over a wide temperature range based on Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC results. Temperature dependent convection is approximated using Nusselt number correlations. A parametric study is conducted on the thermal contact conductance value between the profiling device (polymer and adjacent (metal surfaces. Initial temperatures are established using a liner extrapolation based on experimental data. Results yield good correlation with experimental data.

  9. Towards patient specific thermal modelling of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; DeLeeuw, Astrid A. C.; Jeukens, Cécile R. L. P. N.; Raaymakers, Bas W.; van Vulpen, Marco; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.

    2006-02-01

    The application of thermal modelling for hyperthermia and thermal ablation is severely hampered by lack of information about perfusion and vasculature. However, recently, with the advent of sophisticated angiography and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques, it has become possible to image small vessels and blood perfusion bringing the ultimate goal of patient specific thermal modelling closer within reach. In this study dynamic contrast enhanced multi-slice CT imaging techniques are employed to investigate the feasibility of this concept for regional hyperthermia treatment of the prostate. The results are retrospectively compared with clinical thermometry data of a patient group from an earlier trial. Furthermore, the role of the prostate vasculature in the establishment of the prostate temperature distribution is studied. Quantitative 3D perfusion maps of the prostate were constructed for five patients using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetics model to analyse dynamic CT data. CT angiography was applied to construct a discrete vessel model of the pelvis. Additionally, a discrete vessel model of the prostate vasculature was constructed of a prostate taken from a human corpse. Three thermal modelling schemes with increasing inclusion of the patient specific physiological information were used to simulate the temperature distribution of the prostate during regional hyperthermia. Prostate perfusion was found to be heterogeneous and T3 prostate carcinomas are often characterized by a strongly elevated tumour perfusion (up to 70-80 ml 100 g-1 min-1). This elevated tumour perfusion leads to 1-2 °C lower tumour temperatures than thermal simulations based on a homogeneous prostate perfusion. Furthermore, the comparison has shown that the simulations with the measured perfusion maps result in consistently lower prostate temperatures than clinically achieved. The simulations with the discrete vessel model indicate that significant pre-heating takes place

  10. Towards patient specific thermal modelling of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berg, Cornelis A T; Van de Kamer, Jeroen B; De Leeuw, Astrid A C; Jeukens, Cécile R L P N; Raaymakers, Bas W; van Vulpen, Marco; Lagendijk, Jan J W

    2006-02-21

    The application of thermal modelling for hyperthermia and thermal ablation is severely hampered by lack of information about perfusion and vasculature. However, recently, with the advent of sophisticated angiography and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) imaging techniques, it has become possible to image small vessels and blood perfusion bringing the ultimate goal of patient specific thermal modelling closer within reach. In this study dynamic contrast enhanced multi-slice CT imaging techniques are employed to investigate the feasibility of this concept for regional hyperthermia treatment of the prostate. The results are retrospectively compared with clinical thermometry data of a patient group from an earlier trial. Furthermore, the role of the prostate vasculature in the establishment of the prostate temperature distribution is studied. Quantitative 3D perfusion maps of the prostate were constructed for five patients using a distributed-parameter tracer kinetics model to analyse dynamic CT data. CT angiography was applied to construct a discrete vessel model of the pelvis. Additionally, a discrete vessel model of the prostate vasculature was constructed of a prostate taken from a human corpse. Three thermal modelling schemes with increasing inclusion of the patient specific physiological information were used to simulate the temperature distribution of the prostate during regional hyperthermia. Prostate perfusion was found to be heterogeneous and T3 prostate carcinomas are often characterized by a strongly elevated tumour perfusion (up to 70-80 ml 100 g(-1) min(-1)). This elevated tumour perfusion leads to 1-2 degrees C lower tumour temperatures than thermal simulations based on a homogeneous prostate perfusion. Furthermore, the comparison has shown that the simulations with the measured perfusion maps result in consistently lower prostate temperatures than clinically achieved. The simulations with the discrete vessel model indicate that significant pre

  11. FASTSAT-HSV01 Thermal Math Model Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Callie

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes the thermal math model correlation effort for the Fast Affordable Science and Technology SATellite (FASTSAT-HSV01), which was designed, built and tested by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and multiple partners. The satellite launched in November 2010 on a Minotaur IV rocket from the Kodiak Launch Complex in Kodiak, Alaska. It carried three Earth science experiments and two technology demonstrations into a low Earth circular orbit with an inclination of 72deg and an altitude of 650 kilometers. The mission has been successful to date with science experiment activities still taking place daily. The thermal control system on this spacecraft was a passive design relying on thermo-optical properties and six heaters placed on specific components. Flight temperature data is being recorded every minute from the 48 Resistance Temperature Devices (RTDs) onboard the satellite structure and many of its avionics boxes. An effort has been made to correlate the thermal math model to the flight temperature data using Cullimore and Ring's Thermal Desktop and by obtaining Earth and Sun vector data from the Attitude Control System (ACS) team to create an "as-flown" orbit. Several model parameters were studied during this task to understand the spacecraft's sensitivity to these changes. Many "lessons learned" have been noted from this activity that will be directly applicable to future small satellite programs.

  12. Infrared lens thermal effect: equivalent focal shift and calculating model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng-shuo; Shi, Zelin; Feng, Bin; Xu, Bao-shu

    2014-11-01

    It's well-know that the focal shift of infrared lens is the major factor in degeneration of imaging quality when temperature change. In order to figure out the connection between temperature change and focal shift, partial differential equations of thermal effect on light path are obtained by raytrace method, to begin with. The approximately solution of the PDEs show that focal shift is proportional to temperature change. And a formula to compute the proportional factor is given. In order to understand infrared lens thermal effect deeply, we use defocus by image plane shift at constant temperature to equivalently represent thermal effect on infrared lens. So equivalent focal shift (EFS) is defined and its calculating model is proposed at last. In order to verify EFS and its calculating model, Physical experimental platform including a motorized linear stage with built-in controller, blackbody, target, collimator, IR detector, computer and other devices is developed. The experimental results indicate that EFS make the image plane shift at constant temperature have the same influence on infrared lens as thermal effect and its calculating model is correct.

  13. Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) Thermal Power Model in MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional steady-state mathematical thermal power model of the ASRG. It aims to provide a guideline of understanding how the ASRG works and what can change its performance. The thermal dynamics and energy balance of the generator is explained using the thermal circuit of the ASRG. The Stirling convertor performance map is used to represent the convertor. How the convertor performance map is coupled in the thermal circuit is explained. The ASRG performance characteristics under i) different sink temperatures and ii) over the years of mission (YOM) are predicted using the one-dimensional model. Two Stirling converter control strategies, i) fixing the hot-end of temperature of the convertor by adjusting piston amplitude and ii) fixing the piston amplitude, were tested in the model. Numerical results show that the first control strategy can result in a higher system efficiency than the second control strategy when the ambient gets warmer or the general-purpose heat source (GPHS) fuel load decays over the YOM. The ASRG performance data presented in this paper doesn't pertain to the ASRG flight unit. Some data of the ASRG engineering unit (EU) and flight unit that are available in public domain are used in this paper for the purpose of numerical studies.

  14. Model of a nuclear thermal test pipe using ATHENA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibben, Mark J. [Air Force Inst. of Technology, Wright-Patterson AFB (United States)

    1992-03-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion offers significant improvements in rocket engine specific impulse over rockets employing chemical propulsion. The computer code ATHENA (Advanced Thermal Hydraulic Energy Network Analyzer) was used in a parametric analysis of a fuelpipe. The fuelpipe is an annular particle bed fuel element of the reactor with radially inward flow of hydrogen through it. The outlet temperature of the hydrogen is parametrically related to key effects, including the effect of reactor power at two different pressure drops, the effect of the power coupling factor of the Annular Core Research Reactor, and the effect of hydrogen flow. Results show that the outlet temperature is linearly related to the reactor power and nonlinearly to the change in pressure drop. The linear relationship at higher temperatures is probably not valid due to dissociation of hydrogen. Once thermal properties of hydrogen become available, the ATHENA model for this study could easily be modified to test this conjecture.

  15. Modelling of photo-thermal control of biological cellular oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assanov, Gani S; Zhanabaev, Zeinulla Zh; Govorov, Alexander O; Neiman, Alexander B

    2013-10-01

    We study the transient dynamics of biological oscillators subjected to brief heat pulses. A prospective well-defined experimental system for thermal control of oscillators is the peripheral electroreceptors in paddlefish. Epithelial cells in these receptors show spontaneous voltage oscillations which are known to be temperature sensitive. We use a computational model to predict the effect of brief thermal pulses in this system. In our model thermal stimulation is realized through the light excitation of gold nanoparticles delivered in close proximity to epithelial cells and generating heat due to plasmon resonance. We use an ensemble of modified Morris-Lecar systems to model oscillatory epithelial cells. First, we validate that the model quantitatively reproduces the dynamics of epithelial oscillations in paddlefish electroreceptors, including responses to static and slow temperature changes. Second, we use the model to predict transient responses to short heat pulses generated by the light actuated gold nanoparticles. The model predicts that the epithelial oscillators can be partially synchronized by brief 5 - 15 ms light stimuli resulting in a large-amplitude oscillations of the mean field potential.

  16. Duct thermal performance models for large commercial buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, Craig P.

    2003-10-01

    Despite the potential for significant energy savings by reducing duct leakage or other thermal losses from duct systems in large commercial buildings, California Title 24 has no provisions to credit energy-efficient duct systems in these buildings. A substantial reason is the lack of readily available simulation tools to demonstrate the energy-saving benefits associated with efficient duct systems in large commercial buildings. The overall goal of the Efficient Distribution Systems (EDS) project within the PIER High Performance Commercial Building Systems Program is to bridge the gaps in current duct thermal performance modeling capabilities, and to expand our understanding of duct thermal performance in California large commercial buildings. As steps toward this goal, our strategy in the EDS project involves two parts: (1) developing a whole-building energy simulation approach for analyzing duct thermal performance in large commercial buildings, and (2) using the tool to identify the energy impacts of duct leakage in California large commercial buildings, in support of future recommendations to address duct performance in the Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Nonresidential Buildings. The specific technical objectives for the EDS project were to: (1) Identify a near-term whole-building energy simulation approach that can be used in the impacts analysis task of this project (see Objective 3), with little or no modification. A secondary objective is to recommend how to proceed with long-term development of an improved compliance tool for Title 24 that addresses duct thermal performance. (2) Develop an Alternative Calculation Method (ACM) change proposal to include a new metric for thermal distribution system efficiency in the reporting requirements for the 2005 Title 24 Standards. The metric will facilitate future comparisons of different system types using a common ''yardstick''. (3) Using the selected near-term simulation approach

  17. Thermal Analysis of Nanofluids Using Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namboori, P. K. Krishnan; Vasavi, C. S.; Gopal, K. Varun; Gopakumar, Deepa; Ramachandran, K. I.; Narayanan, B. Sabarish

    2010-10-01

    Nanofluids are nanotechnology-based heat transfer fluids obtained by suspending nanometer-sized particles in conventional heat transfer fluids in a stable manner. In many of the physical phenomena such as boiling and properties such as latent heat, thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient, there is significant change on addition of nanoparticles. These exceptional qualities of Nanofluids mainly depend on the atomic level mechanisms, which in turn govern all mechanical properties like strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, compressibility etc. Control over the fundamental thermo physical properties of the working medium will help to understand these unique phenomena of nanofluids to a great extent. Macroscopic modeling approaches, which are based on conventional relations of thermodynamics, have been proved to be incompetent to explain this difference. Atomistic `modeling and simulation' has been emerged out as an efficient alternative for this. The enhancement of thermal conductivity of water by suspending nanoparticle inclusions has been experimented and proved to be an effective method of enhancing convective heat dissipation. This work mainly deals with characterization of the thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Nano particle sized aluminium oxide; copper oxide and titanium dioxide have been taken in this work for the analysis of thermal conductivity. The effect of thermal conductivity on parameters like volume concentration of the fluid, nature of particle material and size of the particle has been computationally formulated. It has been found that there is an increase in effective thermal conductivity of the fluid by the addition of nanomaterials ascertaining an improvement in the heat transfer behavior of nanofluids. This facilitates the reduction in size of such heat transfer systems (radiators) and lead to increased energy and fuel efficiency, lower pollution and improved reliability.

  18. Theoretical Modelling Methods for Thermal Management of Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahman Shabani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge associated with renewable energy generation is the intermittency of the renewable source of power. Because of this, back-up generation sources fuelled by fossil fuels are required. In stationary applications whether it is a back-up diesel generator or connection to the grid, these systems are yet to be truly emissions-free. One solution to the problem is the utilisation of electrochemical energy storage systems (ESS to store the excess renewable energy and then reusing this energy when the renewable energy source is insufficient to meet the demand. The performance of an ESS amongst other things is affected by the design, materials used and the operating temperature of the system. The operating temperature is critical since operating an ESS at low ambient temperatures affects its capacity and charge acceptance while operating the ESS at high ambient temperatures affects its lifetime and suggests safety risks. Safety risks are magnified in renewable energy storage applications given the scale of the ESS required to meet the energy demand. This necessity has propelled significant effort to model the thermal behaviour of ESS. Understanding and modelling the thermal behaviour of these systems is a crucial consideration before designing an efficient thermal management system that would operate safely and extend the lifetime of the ESS. This is vital in order to eliminate intermittency and add value to renewable sources of power. This paper concentrates on reviewing theoretical approaches used to simulate the operating temperatures of ESS and the subsequent endeavours of modelling thermal management systems for these systems. The intent of this review is to present some of the different methods of modelling the thermal behaviour of ESS highlighting the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

  19. An Analytic Model Of Thermal Drift In Piezoresistive Microcantilever Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loui, A; Elhadj, S; Sirbuly, D J; McCall, S K; Hart, B R; Ratto, T V

    2009-08-26

    A closed form semi-empirical model has been developed to understand the physical origins of thermal drift in piezoresistive microcantilever sensors. The two-component model describes both the effects of temperature-related bending and heat dissipation on the piezoresistance. The temperature-related bending component is based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory of elastic deformation applied to a multilayer cantilever. The heat dissipation component is based on energy conservation per unit time for a piezoresistive cantilever in a Wheatstone bridge circuit, representing a balance between electrical power input and heat dissipation into the environment. Conduction and convection are found to be the primary mechanisms of heat transfer, and the dependence of these effects on the thermal conductivity, temperature, and flow rate of the gaseous environment is described. The thermal boundary layer value which defines the length scale of the heat dissipation phenomenon is treated as an empirical fitting parameter. Using the model, it is found that the cantilever heat dissipation is unaffected by the presence of a thin polymer coating, therefore the residual thermal drift in the differential response of a coated and uncoated cantilever is the result of non-identical temperature-related bending. Differential response data shows that residual drift is eliminated under isothermal laboratory conditions but not the unregulated and variable conditions that exist in the outdoor environment (i.e., the field). The two-component model is then validated by simulating the thermal drifts of an uncoated and a coated piezoresistive cantilever under field conditions over a 24 hour period using only meteorological data as input.

  20. Process optimization of friction stir welding based on thermal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Astrup

    2010-01-01

    This thesis investigates how to apply optimization methods to numerical models of a friction stir welding process. The work is intended as a proof-of-concept using different methods that are applicable to models of high complexity, possibly with high computational cost, and without the possibility...... information of the high-fidelity model. The optimization schemes are applied to stationary thermal models of differing complexity of the friction stir welding process. The optimization problems considered are based on optimizing the temperature field in the workpiece by finding optimal translational speed...

  1. DYN3D thermal expansion models for SFR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitin, Evgeny; Fridman, Emil [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Reactor Safety

    2016-07-01

    The nodal diffusion code DYN3D is under extension for SFR applications. As a part of the extension a new model for axial thermal expansion of fuel rods was developed. The new model provides a flexible way of handling the axial fuel rod expansion, because each sub-assembly and node can be treated independently. The performance of the model was tested on a large oxide SFR core, and the results were compared to the reference full core Serpent solution. The test results indicated that the proposed model can accurately account for the axial expansion effects on full core level.

  2. HELOKA-HP thermal-hydraulic model validation and calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xue Zhou; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Badea, Aurelian Florin

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The electrical heater in HELOKA-HP has been modeled with RELAP5-3D using experimental data as input. • The model has been validated using novel techniques for assimilating experimental data and the representative model parameters with BEST-EST. • The methodology is successfully used for reducing the model uncertainties and provides a quantitative measure of the consistency between the experimental data and the model. - Abstract: The Helium Loop Karlsruhe High Pressure (HELOKA-HP) is an experimental facility for the testing of various helium-cooled components at high temperature (500 °C) and high pressure (8 MPa) for nuclear fusion applications. For modeling the loop thermal dynamics, a thermal-hydraulic model has been created using the system code RELAP5-3D. Recently, new experimental data covering the behavior of the loop components under relevant operational conditions have been made available giving the possibility of validating and calibrating the existing models in order to reduce the uncertainties of the simulated responses. This paper presents an example where such process has been applied for the HELOKA electrical heater model. Using novel techniques for assimilating experimental data, implemented in the computational module BEST-EST, the representative parameters of the model have been calibrated.

  3. Local Two-Photon Couplings and the J=0 Fixed Pole in Real and Virtual Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2008-12-05

    The local coupling of two photons to the fundamental quark currents of a hadron gives an energy-independent contribution to the Compton amplitude proportional to the charge squared of the struck quark, a contribution which has no analog in hadron scattering reactions. We show that this local contribution has a real phase and is universal, giving the same contribution for real or virtual Compton scattering for any photon virtuality and skewness at fixed momentum transfer squared t. The t-dependence of this J = 0 fixed Regge pole is parameterized by a yet unmeasured even charge-conjugation form factor of the target nucleon. The t = 0 limit gives an important constraint on the dependence of the nucleon mass on the quark mass through the Weisberger relation. We discuss how this 1=x form factor can be extracted from high energy deeply virtual Compton scattering and examine predictions given by models of the H generalized parton distribution.

  4. Thermal/Mechanical Measurement and Modeling of Bicycle Disc Brakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Feier

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Brake induced heating has become more difficult to control as bicycle component mass has been reduced. High-power braking with insufficient cooling or thermal capacitance can create excessive temperatures, boiling brake fluid, performance degradation, and damage. To better understand component heating, a disc braking dynamometer has been constructed with a motor driven disc, hydraulic braking, and a miniature wind tunnel. Disc temperatures are studied for various braking scenarios using infrared techniques and thermocouples. A transient, numerical, MATLAB, lumped parameter thermal/mechanical model is created to predict the impact of key design parameters on braking performance and to understand the heat loss mechanisms from the brake system components. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations are used to estimate the disc surface convective cooling coefficients for the model. The final model provides transient temperature predictions based on bicycle velocity and braking power, and successfully matches dynamometer experimental data.

  5. Fractional Heat Conduction Models and Thermal Diffusivity Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Žecová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the fractional heat conduction models and their use for determining thermal diffusivity. A brief historical overview of the authors who have dealt with the heat conduction equation is described in the introduction of the paper. The one-dimensional heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are listed. Analytical and numerical methods of solution of the heat conduction models with using integer- and fractional-order derivatives are described. Individual methods have been implemented in MATLAB and the examples of simulations are listed. The proposal and experimental verification of the methods for determining thermal diffusivity using half-order derivative of temperature by time are listed at the conclusion of the paper.

  6. Multiscale computational modeling of a radiantly driven solar thermal collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnuru, Koushik

    The objectives of the master's thesis are to present, discuss and apply sequential multiscale modeling that combines analytical, numerical (finite element-based) and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis to assist in the development of a radiantly driven macroscale solar thermal collector for energy harvesting. The solar thermal collector is a novel green energy system that converts solar energy to heat and utilizes dry air as a working heat transfer fluid (HTF). This energy system has important advantages over competitive technologies: it is self-contained (no energy sources are needed), there are no moving parts, no oil or supplementary fluids are needed and it is environmentally friendly since it is powered by solar radiation. This work focuses on the development of multi-physics and multiscale models for predicting the performance of the solar thermal collector. Model construction and validation is organized around three distinct and complementary levels. The first level involves an analytical analysis of the thermal transpiration phenomenon and models for predicting the associated mass flow pumping that occurs in an aerogel membrane in the presence of a large thermal gradient. Within the aerogel, a combination of convection, conduction and radiation occurs simultaneously in a domain where the pore size is comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules. CFD modeling of thermal transpiration is not possible because all the available commercial CFD codes solve the Navier Stokes equations only for continuum flow, which is based on the assumption that the net molecular mass diffusion is zero. However, thermal transpiration occurs in a flow regime where a non-zero net molecular mass diffusion exists. Thus these effects are modeled by using Sharipov's [2] analytical expression for gas flow characterized by high Knudsen number. The second level uses a detailed CFD model solving Navier Stokes equations for momentum, heat and mass transfer in the various

  7. Modelling the thermal behaviour of the low-thermal mass liquid chromatography system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Matthias; Pursch, Matthias; Eckerle, Patric; Luong, Jim; Desmet, Gert

    2011-04-22

    We report upon the experimental investigation of the heat transfer in low thermal mass LC (LTMLC) systems, used under temperature gradient conditions. The influence of the temperature ramp, the capillary dimensions, the material selection and the chromatographic conditions on the radial temperature gradients formed when applying a temperature ramp were investigated by a numerical model and verified with experimental temperature measurements. It was found that the radial temperature gradients scale linearly with the heating rate, quadratically with the radius of the capillary and inversely to the thermal diffusivity. Because of the thermal radial gradients in the liquid zone inside the capillary lead to radial viscosity and velocity gradients, they form an additional source of dispersion for the solutes. For a temperature ramp of 1 K/s and a strong temperature dependence of the retention of small molecules, the model predicts that narrow-bore columns (i.d. 2.1 mm) can be used. For a temperature ramp of 10 K/s, the maximal inner diameter is of the order of 1 mm before a substantial increase in dispersion occurs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. GEANT4 simulation of the effects of Doppler energy broadening in Compton imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uche, C Z; Cree, M J; Round, W H

    2011-09-01

    A Monte Carlo approach was used to study the effects of Doppler energy broadening on Compton camera performance. The GEANT4 simulation toolkit was used to model the radiation transport and interactions with matter in a simulated Compton camera. The low energy electromagnetic physics model of GEANT4 incorporating Doppler broadening developed by Longo et al. was used in the simulations. The camera had a 9 × 9 cm scatterer and a 10 × 10 cm absorber with a scatterer to-absorber separation of 5 cm. Modelling was done such that only the effects of Doppler broadening were taken into consideration and effects of scatterer and absorber thickness and pixelation were not taken into account, thus a 'perfect' Compton camera was assumed. Scatterer materials were either silicon or germanium and the absorber material was cadmium zinc telluride. Simulations were done for point sources 10 cm in front of the scatterer. The results of the simulations validated the use of the low energy model of GEANT4. As expected, Doppler broadening was found to degrade the Compton camera imaging resolution. For a 140.5 keV source the resulting full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of the point source image without accounting for Doppler broadening and using a silicon scatterer was 0.58 mm. This degraded to 7.1 mm when Doppler broadening was introduced and degraded further to 12.3 mm when a germanium scatterer was used instead of silicon. But for a 511 keV source, the FWHM was better than for a 140 keV source. The FWHM improved to 2.4 mm for a silicon scatterer and 4.6 mm for a germanium scatterer. Our result for silicon at 140.5 keV is in very good agreement with that published by An et al.

  9. Development of a Si/CdTe Semiconductor Compton Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T.

    2005-04-22

    We are developing a Compton telescope based on high resolution Si and CdTe imaging devices in order to obtain a high sensitivity astrophysical observation in sub-MeV gamma-ray region. In this paper, recent results from the prototype Si/CdTe semiconductor Compton telescope are reported. The Compton telescope consists of a double-sided Si strip detector (DSSD) and CdTe pixel detectors, combined with low noise analog LSI, VA32TA. With this detector, we obtained Compton reconstructed images and spectra from line gamma-rays ranging from 81 keV up to 356 keV. The energy resolution is 3.8 keV and 7.9 keV at 122 keV and 356 keV, respectively, and the angular resolution is 9.9{sup o} and 5.7{sup o} at 122 keV and 356 keV, respectively.

  10. Thermal modeling of the lithium/polymer battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pals, Carolyn R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1994-10-01

    Research in the area of advanced batteries for electric-vehicle applications has increased steadily since the 1990 zero-emission-vehicle mandate of the California Air Resources Board. Due to their design flexibility and potentially high energy and power densities, lithium/polymer batteries are an emerging technology for electric-vehicle applications. Thermal modeling of lithium/polymer batteries is particularly important because the transport properties of the system depend exponentially on temperature. Two models have been presented for assessment of the thermal behavior of lithium/polymer batteries. The one-cell model predicts the cell potential, the concentration profiles, and the heat-generation rate during discharge. The cell-stack model predicts temperature profiles and heat transfer limitations of the battery. Due to the variation of ionic conductivity and salt diffusion coefficient with temperature, the performance of the lithium/polymer battery is greatly affected by temperature. Because of this variation, it is important to optimize the cell operating temperature and design a thermal management system for the battery. Since the thermal conductivity of the polymer electrolyte is very low, heat is not easily conducted in the direction perpendicular to cell layers. Temperature profiles in the cells are not as significant as expected because heat-generation rates in warmer areas of the cell stack are lower than heat-generation rates in cooler areas of the stack. This nonuniform heat-generation rate flattens the temperature profile. Temperature profiles as calculated by this model are not as steep as those calculated by previous models that assume a uniform heat-generation rate.

  11. Computationally efficient thermal-mechanical modelling of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yabin; Ayas, Can

    2017-10-01

    The Selective laser melting (SLM) is a powder based additive manufacturing (AM) method to produce high density metal parts with complex topology. However, part distortions and accompanying residual stresses deteriorates the mechanical reliability of SLM products. Modelling of the SLM process is anticipated to be instrumental for understanding and predicting the development of residual stress field during the build process. However, SLM process modelling requires determination of the heat transients within the part being built which is coupled to a mechanical boundary value problem to calculate displacement and residual stress fields. Thermal models associated with SLM are typically complex and computationally demanding. In this paper, we present a simple semi-analytical thermal-mechanical model, developed for SLM that represents the effect of laser scanning vectors with line heat sources. The temperature field within the part being build is attained by superposition of temperature field associated with line heat sources in a semi-infinite medium and a complimentary temperature field which accounts for the actual boundary conditions. An analytical solution of a line heat source in a semi-infinite medium is first described followed by the numerical procedure used for finding the complimentary temperature field. This analytical description of the line heat sources is able to capture the steep temperature gradients in the vicinity of the laser spot which is typically tens of micrometers. In turn, semi-analytical thermal model allows for having a relatively coarse discretisation of the complimentary temperature field. The temperature history determined is used to calculate the thermal strain induced on the SLM part. Finally, a mechanical model governed by elastic-plastic constitutive rule having isotropic hardening is used to predict the residual stresses.

  12. General 3D Lumped Thermal Model with Various Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    Accurate thermal dynamics modeling of high power Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) modules is important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behaviors in the IGBTs. In this paper, a new three-dimensional (3D) lumped thermal model is proposed, which can easily be characterized from Finite Element Methods (FEM) based simulation and acqu...

  13. Nucleon polarizabilities: From Compton scattering to hydrogen atom

    OpenAIRE

    Hagelstein, Franziska; Miskimen, Rory; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of the nucleon polarizabilities and of their role in nucleon Compton scattering and in hydrogen spectrum. We discuss the basic concepts, the recent lattice QCD calculations and advances in chiral effective-field theory. On the experimental side, we review the ongoing programs aimed to measure the nucleon (scalar and spin) polarizabilities via the Compton scattering processes, with real and virtual photons. A great part of the review is devoted to the g...

  14. Experimentally validated thermal model of thin film NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favelukis, Jenna E.; Lavine, Adrienne S.; Carman, Gregory P.

    1999-06-01

    The primary focus of this work is to develop a new analytical approach for thermal modeling of Nickel Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy membranes undergoing both phase transformation and large deflections. This paper describes a thermal model of a NiTi plate or thin film, including all the modes of heat loss and latent heat dissipation during the phase transformation. This model is used to predict the NiTi temperature during cooling. The results are compared with experiments conducted on a NiTi plate and thin film (3 micrometers thick), and very good agreement is found. The thermal model is also used to predict the temperature response of a bubble actuator proposed for use in a forced flow environment. Using a 3 mm diameter, 3 micrometers thickness bubble under forced airflow conditions it is possible to achieve a frequency response faster than 300 Hz. Additional calculations were made to verify the structural stability of the actuator system. Predictions indicated that for specific geometries a pressure of at least 35 kPa can be supported by the NiTi membrane. Deflections of a bubble actuator are shown to be on the order of 10% of its diameter while the strain remains below 4%.

  15. A personalised thermal comfort model using a Bayesian network

    OpenAIRE

    Auffenberg, Frederik; Stein, Sebastian; Rogers, Alex

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the challenge of predicting optimal comfort temperatures of individual users of a smart heating system. At present, such systems use simple models of user comfort when deciding on a set point temperature. These models generally fail to adapt to an individual user’s preferences, resulting in poor estimates of a user’s preferred temperature. To address this issue, we propose a personalised thermal comfort model that uses a Bayesian network to learn and adapt to a user’...

  16. Transient electro-thermal modeling of bipolar power semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gachovska, Tanya Kirilova; Du, Bin

    2013-01-01

    This book presents physics-based electro-thermal models of bipolar power semiconductor devices including their packages, and describes their implementation in MATLAB and Simulink. It is a continuation of our first book Modeling of Bipolar Power Semiconductor Devices. The device electrical models are developed by subdividing the devices into different regions and the operations in each region, along with the interactions at the interfaces, are analyzed using the basic semiconductor physics equations that govern device behavior. The Fourier series solution is used to solve the ambipolar diffusio

  17. Software for Automated Generation of Reduced Thermal Models for Spacecraft Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal analysis is increasingly used in thermal engineering of spacecrafts in every stage, including design, test, and ground-operation simulation. Current...

  18. Power Loss Calculation and Thermal Modelling for a Three Phase Inverter Drive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhou

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Power losses calculation and thermal modelling for a three-phase inverter power system is presented in this paper. Aiming a long real time thermal simulation, an accurate average power losses calculation based on PWM reconstruction technique is proposed. For carrying out the thermal simulation, a compact thermal model for a three-phase inverter power module is built. The thermal interference of adjacent heat sources is analysed using 3D thermal simulation. The proposed model can provide accurate power losses with a large simulation time-step and suitable for a long real time thermal simulation for a three phase inverter drive system for hybrid vehicle applications.

  19. Phase-field model of dendritic sidebranching with thermal noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karma, A. [Department of Physics and Center for Interdisciplinary Research on Complex Systems, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Rappel, W. [Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    1999-10-01

    We investigate dendritic sidebranching during crystal growth in an undercooled melt by simulation of a phase-field model which incorporates thermal noise of microscopic origin. As a nontrivial quantitative test of this model, we first show that the simulated fluctuation spectrum of a one-dimensional interface in thermal equilibrium agrees with the exact sharp-interface spectrum up to an irrelevant short-wavelength cutoff comparable to the interface thickness. Simulations of dendritic growth are then carried out in two dimensions to compute sidebranching characteristics (root-mean-square amplitude and sidebranch spacing) as a function of distance behind the tip. These quantities are compared quantitatively to the predictions of the existing linear WKB theory of noise amplification. The extension of this study to three dimensions remains needed to determine the origin of noise in experiments. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Compton scattering x-ray sources driven by laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. V. Hartemann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated the generation of femtosecond, nano-Coulomb, low emittance, nearly monokinetic relativistic electron bunches of sufficient quality to produce bright, tunable, ultrafast x-rays via Compton scattering. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented using a three-dimensional Compton scattering code and a laser-plasma interaction particle-in-cell code modeling the wakefield acceleration process; x-ray fluxes exceeding 10^{21}   s^{-1} are predicted, with a peak brightness >10^{19}   photons/(mm^{2} mrad^{2} s   0.1%   bandwidth.

  1. Model predictive control of a solar-thermal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saade Saade, Maria Elizabeth

    Solar-thermal reactors represent a promising alternative to fossil fuels because they can harvest solar energy and transform it into storable and transportable fuels. The operation of solar-thermal reactors is restricted by the available sunlight and its inherently transient behavior, which affects the performance of the reactors and limits their efficiency. Before solar-thermal reactors can become commercially viable, they need to be able to maintain a continuous high-performance operation, even in the presence of passing clouds. A well-designed control system can preserve product quality and maintain stable product compositions, resulting in a more efficient and cost-effective operation, which can ultimately lead to scale-up and commercialization of solar thermochemical technologies. In this work, we propose a model predictive control (MPC) system for a solar-thermal reactor for the steam-gasification of biomass. The proposed controller aims at rejecting the disturbances in solar irradiation caused by the presence of clouds. A first-principles dynamic model of the process was developed. The model was used to study the dynamic responses of the process variables and to identify a linear time-invariant model used in the MPC algorithm. To provide an estimation of the disturbances for the control algorithm, a one-minute-ahead direct normal irradiance (DNI) predictor was developed. The proposed predictor utilizes information obtained through the analysis of sky images, in combination with current atmospheric measurements, to produce the DNI forecast. In the end, a robust controller was designed capable of rejecting disturbances within the operating region. Extensive simulation experiments showed that the controller outperforms a finely-tuned multi-loop feedback control strategy. The results obtained suggest that our controller is suitable for practical implementation.

  2. Urban microclimate and thermal comfort modelling: strategies for urban renovation

    OpenAIRE

    Tumini, Irina; Higueras García, Esther; Baereswyl Rada, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The urban microclimate plays an important role in building energy consumption and thermal comfort in outdoor spaces. Nowadays, cities need to increase energy efficiency, reduce pollutant emissions and mitigate the evident lack of sustainability. In light of this, attention has focused on the bioclimatic concepts use in the urban development. However, the speculative unsustainability of the growth model highlights the need to redirect the c...

  3. Thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers

    CERN Document Server

    Cabezas-Gómez, Luben; Saíz-Jabardo, José Maria

    2014-01-01

    This monograph introduces a numerical computational methodology for thermal performance modeling of cross-flow heat exchangers, with applications in chemical, refrigeration and automobile industries. This methodology allows obtaining effectiveness-number of transfer units (e-NTU) data and has been used for simulating several standard and complex flow arrangements configurations of cross-flow heat exchangers. Simulated results have been validated through comparisons with results from available exact and approximate analytical solutions. Very accurate results have been obtained over wide ranges

  4. New Compton densitometer for measuring pulmonary edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.; Simon, D.S.

    1985-10-01

    Pulmonary edema is the pathological increase of extravascular lung water found most often in patients with congestive heart failure and other critically ill patients who suffer from intravenous fluid overload. A non-invasive lung density monitor that is accurate, easily portable, safe and inexpensive is needed for clinical evaluation of pulmonary edema. Other researchers who have employed Compton scattering techniques generally used systems of extended size and detectors with poor energy resolution. This has resulted in significant systematic biases from multiply-scattered photons and larger errors in counting statistics at a given radiation dose to the patient. We are proposing a patented approach in which only backscattered photons are measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector in a compact system geometry. By proper design and a unique data extraction scheme, effects of the variable chest wall on lung density measurements are minimized. Preliminary test results indicate that with a radioactive source of under 30 GBq, it should be possible to make an accurate lung density measurement in one minute, with a risk of radiation exposure to the patient a thousand times smaller than that from a typical chest x-ray. The ability to make safe, frequent lung density measurements could be very helpful for monitoring the course of P.E. at the hospital bedside or outpatient clinics, and for evaluating the efficacy of therapy in clinical research. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Inverse compton scattering gamma ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, S.; Frigola, P.; Murokh, A.; Ruelas, M.; Jovanovic, I.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Travish, G.

    2009-09-01

    Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) (e.g. U-235, Pu-239) can be detected by active interrogation with gamma rays (>6 MeV) through photofission. For long-range detection (˜1 km), an intense beam of gamma rays (˜10 14 per second) is required in order to produce measurable number of neutrons. The production of such fluxes of gamma rays, and in the pulse formats useful for detection, presents many technical challenges, and requires novel approaches to the accelerator and laser technology. RadiaBeam is currently designing a gamma ray source based on Inverse Compton Scattering (ICS) from a high-energy electron beam. To achieve this, improvements in photoinjector, linac, final focus, and laser system are planned. These enhanced sub-systems build on parallel work being performed at RadiaBeam, UCLA, and elsewhere. A high-repetition rate photoinjector, a high-gradient S-band linac, and a laser pulse recirculator will be used. The proposed system will be a transportable source of high-flux, high-energy quasi-monochromatic gamma rays for active interrogation of special nuclear materials.

  6. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off unpolarised deuterium at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Gordon D.

    2008-10-15

    The HERMES experiment was a forward angle spectrometer on the HERA storage ring at DESY, Hamburg, Germany. HERMES successfully increased understanding of the ''spin puzzle'', the spin structure of the nucleon, by providing high precision measurements of {delta}{sigma} in the Quark Parton Model, the fraction of the spin carried by the current quarks. Following the link of another piece of the puzzle, the orbital angular momentum of quarks and gluons, to the Generalised Parton Distribution (GPD) theoretical framework, HERMES focused on measurements of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) process. These measurements are sensitive to GPDs, allowing further experimental constraints to be made on the components of nucleon spin. In the Winter shutdown period 2005-2006 HERMES was upgraded with a Recoil Detector in the target region. This allowed the experiment to make exclusive measurements of the DVCS process for the rst time, reducing background and increasing the resolution of various kinematic variables. The method for reconstructing particle tracks in the inhomogeneous magnetic eld is investigated here. DVCS o a deuterium target is measured with all available data prior to the installation of the Recoil Detector. A comparison is made to currently available models of spin-(1)/(2) GPDs. This analysis has been approved for publication by the HERMES collaboration. The data is further employed in an investigation of a model dependent constraint of the total angular momentum of up and down quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  7. Improvements to Wire Bundle Thermal Modeling for Ampacity Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Steve L.; Iannello, Christopher J.; Shariff, Khadijah

    2017-01-01

    Determining current carrying capacity (ampacity) of wire bundles in aerospace vehicles is critical not only to safety but also to efficient design. Published standards provide guidance on determining wire bundle ampacity but offer little flexibility for configurations where wire bundles of mixed gauges and currents are employed with varying external insulation jacket surface properties. Thermal modeling has been employed in an attempt to develop techniques to assist in ampacity determination for these complex configurations. Previous developments allowed analysis of wire bundle configurations but was constrained to configurations comprised of less than 50 elements. Additionally, for vacuum analyses, configurations with very low emittance external jackets suffered from numerical instability in the solution. A new thermal modeler is presented allowing for larger configurations and is not constrained for low bundle infrared emissivity calculations. Formulation of key internal radiation and interface conductance parameters is discussed including the effects of temperature and air pressure on wire to wire thermal conductance. Test cases comparing model-predicted ampacity and that calculated from standards documents are presented.

  8. Cu/Zn Thermal Conductivity: Experimental And ANFIS Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid S. Kareem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanofluids are fluids within which particles of nanometre sizes are suspended. In terms of thermal characteristics, nanofluids have a greater heat transfer coefficient and thermal conductivity than other traditional fluids. Bimetallic core/shell Cu/Zn particles of nanometre sizes are novel invented nanoparticle materials with considerable variations in its applications. The particles of nanometre size were suspended in a base fluid for the preparation of nanofluids for different volume fractions. A coated transitory hot wire device were built and standardized and this was subsequently employed for the determination of heat conductivities of the nanofluids for bimetallic ratios, volume fraction, base fluid temperatures and base fluids thermal conductivity. The Adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS model was subsequently employed for modelling the determined results generated. A random test of 20% from various nanofluids showed a deviation less than 1% between measured and modeled results. It was inferred that heat conductivities increase with increase in the particle volume concentrations, especially when the later one at value of 1, the heat conductivities ratio approach to 1.35. Nevertheless, the shape and the method of preparing the particles of nanometre size reveals anomalous enhancements in heat conductivities of bimetallic compared to monocular metallic nanofluids.

  9. Thermal Modeling Method Improvements for SAGE III on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liles, Kaitlin; Amundsen, Ruth; Davis, Warren; McLeod, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring aerosols and gaseous constituents in the stratosphere and troposphere. SAGE III will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle. A detailed thermal model of the SAGE III payload, which consists of multiple subsystems, has been developed in Thermal Desktop (TD). Many innovative analysis methods have been used in developing this model; these will be described in the paper. This paper builds on a paper presented at TFAWS 2013, which described some of the initial developments of efficient methods for SAGE III. The current paper describes additional improvements that have been made since that time. To expedite the correlation of the model to thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing, the chambers and GSE for both TVAC chambers at Langley used to test the payload were incorporated within the thermal model. This allowed the runs of TVAC predictions and correlations to be run within the flight model, thus eliminating the need for separate models for TVAC. In one TVAC test, radiant lamps were used which necessitated shooting rays from the lamps, and running in both solar and IR wavebands. A new Dragon model was incorporated which entailed a change in orientation; that change was made using an assembly, so that any potential additional new Dragon orbits could be added in the future without modification of the model. The Earth orbit parameters such as albedo and Earth infrared flux were incorporated as time-varying values that change over the course of the orbit; despite being required in one of the ISS documents, this had not been done before by any previous payload. All parameters such as initial temperature, heater voltage, and location of the payload are defined based on the case definition. For one component, testing was performed in both air and vacuum; incorporating the air convection in a submodel that was

  10. Modelling measurement microphones using BEM with visco-thermal losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2012-01-01

    visco-thermal losses is used to model measurement condenser microphones. The models presented are fully coupled and include a FEM model of the diaphragm. The behaviour of the acoustic variables in the gap and the effect of the pressure equalization vent are discussed, as well as the practical difficulty......For many decades, models that can explain the behaviour of measurement condenser microphones have been proposed in the literature. These devices have an apparently simple working principle, a charged capacitor whose charge varies when one of its electrodes, the diaphragm, moves as a result of sound...... these subsystems form a strongly coupled device that cannot be modelled properly as a superposition of submodels, but rather as a whole. For this reason, the challenge of microphone modelling is still an ongoing area of research. In this work, a newly developed Boundary Element Method implementation that includes...

  11. Time-step limits for a Monte Carlo Compton-scattering method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Warsa, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lowrie, Robert B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Compton scattering is an important aspect of radiative transfer in high energy density applications. In this process, the frequency and direction of a photon are altered by colliding with a free electron. The change in frequency of a scattered photon results in an energy exchange between the photon and target electron and energy coupling between radiation and matter. Canfield, Howard, and Liang have presented a Monte Carlo method for simulating Compton scattering that models the photon-electron collision kinematics exactly. However, implementing their technique in multiphysics problems that include the effects of radiation-matter energy coupling typically requires evaluating the material temperature at its beginning-of-time-step value. This explicit evaluation can lead to unstable and oscillatory solutions. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of this Monte Carlo method and present time-step limits that avoid instabilities and nonphysical oscillations by considering a spatially independent, purely scattering radiative-transfer problem. Examining a simplified problem is justified because it isolates the effects of Compton scattering, and existing Monte Carlo techniques can robustly model other physics (such as absorption, emission, sources, and photon streaming). Our analysis begins by simplifying the equations that are solved via Monte Carlo within each time step using the Fokker-Planck approximation. Next, we linearize these approximate equations about an equilibrium solution such that the resulting linearized equations describe perturbations about this equilibrium. We then solve these linearized equations over a time step and determine the corresponding eigenvalues, quantities that can predict the behavior of solutions generated by a Monte Carlo simulation as a function of time-step size and other physical parameters. With these results, we develop our time-step limits. This approach is similar to our recent investigation of time discretizations for the

  12. Engine System Model Development for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl W.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    In order to design, analyze, and evaluate conceptual Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) engine systems, an improved NTP design and analysis tool has been developed. The NTP tool utilizes the Rocket Engine Transient Simulation (ROCETS) system tool and many of the routines from the Enabler reactor model found in Nuclear Engine System Simulation (NESS). Improved non-nuclear component models and an external shield model were added to the tool. With the addition of a nearly complete system reliability model, the tool will provide performance, sizing, and reliability data for NERVA-Derived NTP engine systems. A new detailed reactor model is also being developed and will replace Enabler. The new model will allow more flexibility in reactor geometry and include detailed thermal hydraulics and neutronics models. A description of the reactor, component, and reliability models is provided. Another key feature of the modeling process is the use of comprehensive spreadsheets for each engine case. The spreadsheets include individual worksheets for each subsystem with data, plots, and scaled figures, making the output very useful to each engineering discipline. Sample performance and sizing results with the Enabler reactor model are provided including sensitivities. Before selecting an engine design, all figures of merit must be considered including the overall impacts on the vehicle and mission. Evaluations based on key figures of merit of these results and results with the new reactor model will be performed. The impacts of clustering and external shielding will also be addressed. Over time, the reactor model will be upgraded to design and analyze other NTP concepts with CERMET and carbide fuel cores.

  13. Modeling thermal sensation in a Mediterranean climate-a comparison of linear and ordinal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantavou, Katerina; Lykoudis, Spyridon

    2014-08-01

    A simple thermo-physiological model of outdoor thermal sensation adjusted with psychological factors is developed aiming to predict thermal sensation in Mediterranean climates. Microclimatic measurements simultaneously with interviews on personal and psychological conditions were carried out in a square, a street canyon and a coastal location of the greater urban area of Athens, Greece. Multiple linear and ordinal regression were applied in order to estimate thermal sensation making allowance for all the recorded parameters or specific, empirically selected, subsets producing so-called extensive and empirical models, respectively. Meteorological, thermo-physiological and overall models - considering psychological factors as well - were developed. Predictions were improved when personal and psychological factors were taken into account as compared to meteorological models. The model based on ordinal regression reproduced extreme values of thermal sensation vote more adequately than the linear regression one, while the empirical model produced satisfactory results in relation to the extensive model. The effects of adaptation and expectation on thermal sensation vote were introduced in the models by means of the exposure time, season and preference related to air temperature and irradiation. The assessment of thermal sensation could be a useful criterion in decision making regarding public health, outdoor spaces planning and tourism.

  14. Correlation of spacecraft thermal mathematical models to reference data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torralbo, Ignacio; Perez-Grande, Isabel; Sanz-Andres, Angel; Piqueras, Javier

    2018-03-01

    Model-to-test correlation is a frequent problem in spacecraft-thermal control design. The idea is to determine the values of the parameters of the thermal mathematical model (TMM) that allows reaching a good fit between the TMM results and test data, in order to reduce the uncertainty of the mathematical model. Quite often, this task is performed manually, mainly because a good engineering knowledge and experience is needed to reach a successful compromise, but the use of a mathematical tool could facilitate this work. The correlation process can be considered as the minimization of the error of the model results with regard to the reference data. In this paper, a simple method is presented suitable to solve the TMM-to-test correlation problem, using Jacobian matrix formulation and Moore-Penrose pseudo-inverse, generalized to include several load cases. Aside, in simple cases, this method also allows for analytical solutions to be obtained, which helps to analyze some problems that appear when the Jacobian matrix is singular. To show the implementation of the method, two problems have been considered, one more academic, and the other one the TMM of an electronic box of PHI instrument of ESA Solar Orbiter mission, to be flown in 2019. The use of singular value decomposition of the Jacobian matrix to analyze and reduce these models is also shown. The error in parameter space is used to assess the quality of the correlation results in both models.

  15. Nonlinear model for thermal effects in free-electron lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, Eduardo Alcides; Endler, Antônio; Rizzato, Felipe Barbedo

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we extend results of a previous paper [Peter et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 12 3104 (2013)] and develop a semi-analytical model to account for thermal effects on the nonlinear dynamics of the electron beam in free-electron lasers. We relax the condition of a cold electron beam but still use the concept of compressibility, now associated with a warm beam model, to evaluate the time scale for saturation and the peak laser intensity in high-gain regimes. Although vanishing compre...

  16. THERMUS—A thermal model package for ROOT

    CERN Document Server

    Wheaton, S; Hauer, M

    2009-01-01

    THERMUS is a package of C++ classes and functions allowing statistical-thermal model analyses of particle production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions to be performed within the ROOT framework of analysis. Calculations are possible within three statistical ensembles; a grand-canonical treatment of the conserved charges B, S and Q, a fully canonical treatment of the conserved charges, and a mixed-canonical ensemble combining a canonical treatment of strangeness with a grand-canonical treatment of baryon number and electric charge. THERMUS allows for the assignment of decay chains and detector efficiencies specific to each particle yield, which enables sensible fitting of model parameters to experimental data.

  17. Variational approach to thermal masses in compactified models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominici, Daniele [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Università di Firenze and INFN - Sezione di Firenze,Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Roditi, Itzhak [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas - CBPF/MCT,Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-20

    We investigate by means of a variational approach the effective potential of a 5DU(1) scalar model at finite temperature and compactified on S{sup 1} and S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2} as well as the corresponding 4D model obtained through a trivial dimensional reduction. We are particularly interested in the behavior of the thermal masses of the scalar field with respect to the Wilson line phase and the results obtained are compared with those coming from a one-loop effective potential calculation. We also explore the nature of the phase transition.

  18. FEM (finite element method) thermal modeling and thermal hydraulic performance of an enhanced thermal conductivity UO2/BeO composite fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenzhong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2011-03-24

    An enhanced thermal conductivity UO2-BeO composite nuclear fuel was studied. A methodology to generate ANSYS (an engineering simulation software) FEM (Finite Element Method) thermal models of enhanced thermal conductivity oxide nuclear fuels was developed. The results showed significant increase in the fuel thermal conductivities and have good agreement with the measured ones. The reactor performance analysis showed that the decrease in centerline temperature was 250-350K for the UO2-BeO composite fuel, and thus we can improve nuclear reactors' performance and safety, and high-level radioactive waste generation.

  19. Exercises in 80223 Numerical Modelling of Thermal Processing of Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Jens Ole

    This exercise book contains exercise instructions for the 7 compulsory exercises (Exercise 1-7) and the final exercise (Exercise 8) in the course 80223 'Numerical Modelling of Thermal Processing of Materials'. The exercise book also contains written program examples in 'C' and 'Pascal'. Finally, ...... by contacting the secretary on the ground floor of building 425. Please give the following number: TM 99.05 (TM = Thermal processing of Materials)......This exercise book contains exercise instructions for the 7 compulsory exercises (Exercise 1-7) and the final exercise (Exercise 8) in the course 80223 'Numerical Modelling of Thermal Processing of Materials'. The exercise book also contains written program examples in 'C' and 'Pascal'. Finally......, guidelines are given on how to write the report which has to be handed in at the end of the course. The exercise book exists in a newer, updated version from 2000. The original copy is kept in the archives of TM on the ground floor of building 425. A copy of the exercise book can be made available...

  20. Views on the future of thermal hydraulic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    It is essential for the U.S. NRC to sustain the highest level of the thermal-hydraulics and reactor safety research expertise and continuously improve their accident analysis capability. Such expertise should span over four different areas which are strongly related to each other. These are: (1) Reactor Safety Code Development, (2) Two-phase Flow Modeling, (3) Instrumentation and Fundamental Experimental Research, and (4) Separate Effect and Integral Test. The NRC is already considering a new effort in the area of advanced thermal-hydraulics effort. Its success largely depends on the availability of a significantly improved two-phase flow formulation and constitutive relations supported by detailed experimental data. Therefore, it is recommended that the NRC start significant research efforts in the areas of two-phase flow modeling, instrumentation, basic and separate effect experiments which should be pursued systematically and with clearly defined objectives. It is desirable that some international program is developed in this area. This paper is concentrated on those items in the thermal-hydraulic area which eventually determine the quality of future accident analysis codes.

  1. Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sang-Kil; Geffert, Otfried; Santra, Robin

    2017-03-01

    Compton scattering is the nonresonant inelastic scattering of an x-ray photon by an electron and has been used to probe the electron momentum distribution in gas-phase and condensed-matter samples. In the low x-ray intensity regime, Compton scattering from atoms dominantly comes from bound electrons in neutral atoms, neglecting contributions from bound electrons in ions and free (ionized) electrons. In contrast, in the high x-ray intensity regime, the sample experiences severe ionization via x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics. Thus, it becomes necessary to take into account all the contributions to the Compton scattering signal when atoms are exposed to high-intensity x-ray pulses provided by x-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs). In this paper, we investigate the Compton spectra of atoms at high x-ray intensity, using an extension of the integrated x-ray atomic physics toolkit, xatom. As the x-ray fluence increases, there is a significant contribution from ionized electrons to the Compton spectra, which gives rise to strong deviations from the Compton spectra of neutral atoms. The present study provides not only understanding of the fundamental XFEL-matter interaction but also crucial information for single-particle imaging experiments, where Compton scattering is no longer negligible. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working within the scope of J. Phys. B. This project is part of the Journal of Physics series’ 50th anniversary celebrations in 2017. Sang-Kil Son was selected by the Editorial Board of J. Phys. B as an Emerging Leader.

  2. Modelling of the Heating Process in a Thermal Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Veje, Christian T.; Lassen, Benny; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-11-01

    The procedure of separating efficiently dry-stuff (proteins), fat, and water is an important process in the handling of waste products from industrial and commercial meat manufactures. One of the sub-processes in a separation facility is a thermal screw where the raw material (after proper mincing) is heated in order to melt fat, coagulate protein, and free water. This process is very energy consuming and the efficiency of the product is highly dependent on accurate temperature control of the process. A key quality parameter is the time that the product is maintained at temperatures within a certain threshold. A detailed mathematical model for the heating process in the thermal screw is developed and analysed. The model is formulated as a set of partial differential equations including the latent heat for the melting process of the fat and the boiling of water, respectively. The product is modelled by three components; water, fat and dry-stuff (bones and proteins). The melting of the fat component is captured as a plateau in the product temperature. The model effectively captures the product outlet temperature and the energy consumed. Depending on raw material composition, "soft" or "dry", the model outlines the heat injection and screw speeds necessary to obtain optimal output quality.

  3. Thermal evolution of the Schwinger model with matrix product operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuls, M.C.; Cirac, J.I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Cichy, K. [Frankfurt am Main Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; DESY Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing (NIC); Jansen, K.; Saito, H. [DESY Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing (NIC)

    2015-10-15

    We demonstrate the suitability of tensor network techniques for describing the thermal evolution of lattice gauge theories. As a benchmark case, we have studied the temperature dependence of the chiral condensate in the Schwinger model, using matrix product operators to approximate the thermal equilibrium states for finite system sizes with non-zero lattice spacings. We show how these techniques allow for reliable extrapolations in bond dimension, step width, system size and lattice spacing, and for a systematic estimation and control of all error sources involved in the calculation. The reached values of the lattice spacing are small enough to capture the most challenging region of high temperatures and the final results are consistent with the analytical prediction by Sachs and Wipf over a broad temperature range.

  4. Thermal Remote Sensing for Reservoir Modelling and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti-Cardona, Belen; Arbat-Bofill, Marina; Prats-Rodriquez, Jordi; Pipia, Luca

    2016-08-01

    ASTER and Landsat images were used for mapping the water surface temperature in the Sobrón, Mequinenza and Ribarroja reservoirs in the Ebro River, Spain. The spatially continuous information in these maps reveals the impact of the reservoir on the river natural thermal gradient in two different periods of the year. It also evidences the thermal impact intensity and extent of the refrigeration flow discharge from a nuclear power plant located on the river bank.The high spatial resolution images of the Ribarroja reservoir, acquired by the airborne hyperspectral TASI sensor, show spatial patterns which complemented the in-situ point measurements and contributed valuable data for validating the three-dimensional thermo- hydrodynamic model of the reservoir.

  5. Electronic properties of mixed molybdenum dichalcogenide MoTeSe: LCAO calculations and Compton spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, Ushma [Department of Electrical Engineering, Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute, H. R. Mahajani Marg, Matunga (East), Mumbai 400019, Maharashtra (India); Kumar, Kishor; Joshi, Ritu [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Bhavsar, D.N. [Department of Physics, Bhavan' s Seth R.A. College of Science, Khanpur, Ahmedabad 380001, Gujarat (India); Heda, N.L., E-mail: nlheda@yahoo.co.in [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, University of Kota, Kota 324007, Rajasthan (India)

    2016-07-01

    We have employed linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method to compute the Mulliken’s population (MP), energy bands, density of states (DOS) and Compton profiles for hexagonal MoTeSe. The density functional theory (DFT) and hybridization of Hartree-Fock with DFT (B3LYP) have been used within the LCAO approximation. Performance of theoretical models has been tested by comparing the theoretical momentum densities with the experimental Compton profile of MoTeSe measured using {sup 137}Cs Compton spectrometer. It is seen that the B3LYP prescription gives a better agreement with the experimental data than other DFT based approximations. The energy bands and DOS depict an indirect band gap character in MoTeSe. In addition, a relative nature of bonding in MoTeSe and its isovalent MoTe{sub 2} is discussed in terms of equal-valence-electron-density (EVED) profiles. On the basis of EVED profiles it is seen that MoTeSe is more covalent than MoTe{sub 2}.

  6. Development of a High-Average-Power Compton Gamma Source for Lepton Colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Yakimenko, Vitaliy; Platonenko, Viktor T.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma- (γ-) ray beams of high average power and peak brightness are of demand for a number of applications in high-energy physics, material processing, medicine, etc. One of such examples is gamma conversion into polarized positrons and muons that is under consideration for projected lepton colliders. A γ-source based on the Compton backscattering from the relativistic electron beam is a promising candidate for this application. Our approach to the high-repetition γ-source assumes placing the Compton interaction point inside a CO2 laser cavity. A laser pulse interacts with periodical electron bunches on each round-trip inside the laser cavity producing the corresponding train of γ-pulses. The round-trip optical losses can be compensated by amplification in the active laser medium. The major challenge for this approach is in maintaining stable amplification rate for a picosecond CO2-laser pulse during multiple resonator round-trips without significant deterioration of its temporal and transverse profiles. Addressing this task, we elaborated on a computer code that allows identifying the directions and priorities in the development of such a multi-pass picosecond CO2 laser. Proof-of-principle experiments help to verify the model and show the viability of the concept. In these tests we demonstrated extended trains of picosecond CO2 laser pulses circulating inside the cavity that incorporates the Compton interaction point.

  7. Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon Model Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Ramsey

    2002-08-29

    The purpose of this report is to assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity in the host horizon for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. More specifically, the lithostratigraphic units studied are located within the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tpt) and consist of the upper lithophysal zone (Tptpul), the middle nonlithophysal zone (Tptpmn), the lower lithophysal zone (Tptpll), and the lower nonlithophysal zone (Tptpln). The Tptpul is the layer directly above the repository host layers, which consist of the Tptpmn, Tptpll, and the Tptpln. Current design plans indicate that the largest portion of the repository will be excavated in the Tptpll (Board et al. 2002 [157756]). The main distinguishing characteristic among the lithophysal and nonlithophysal units is the percentage of large scale (cm-m) voids within the rock. The Tptpul and Tptpll, as their names suggest, have a higher percentage of lithophysae than the Tptpmn and the Tptpln. Understanding the influence of the lithophysae is of great importance to understanding bulk thermal conductivity and perhaps repository system performance as well. To assess the spatial variability and uncertainty of thermal conductivity, a model is proposed that is functionally dependent on the volume fraction of lithophysae and the thermal conductivity of the matrix portion of the rock. In this model, void space characterized as lithophysae is assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions, while void space characterized as matrix may be either water- or air-saturated. Lithophysae are assumed to be air-saturated under all conditions since the units being studied are all located above the water table in the region of interest, and the relatively strong capillary forces of the matrix will, under most conditions, preferentially retain any moisture present in the rock.

  8. Compton scatter correction for planner scintigraphic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaan Steelandt, E.; Dobbeleir, A.; Vanregemorter, J. [Algemeen Ziekenhuis Middelheim, Antwerp (Belgium). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy

    1995-12-01

    A major problem in nuclear medicine is the image degradation due to Compton scatter in the patient. Photons emitted by the radioactive tracer scatter in collision with electrons of the surrounding tissue. Due to the resulting loss of energy and change in direction, the scattered photons induce an object dependant background on the images. This results in a degradation of the contrast of warm and cold lesions. Although theoretically interesting, most of the techniques proposed in literature like the use of symmetrical photopeaks can not be implemented on the commonly used gamma camera due to the energy/linearity/sensitivity corrections applied in the detector. A method for a single energy isotope based on existing methods with adjustments towards daily practice and clinical situations is proposed. It is assumed that the scatter image, recorded from photons collected within a scatter window adjacent to the photo peak, is a reasonable close approximation of the true scatter component of the image reconstructed from the photo peak window. A fraction `k` of the image using the scatter window is subtracted from the image recorded in the photo peak window to produce the compensated image. The principal matter of the method is the right value for the factor `k`, which is determined in a mathematical way and confirmed by experiments. To determine `k`, different kinds of scatter media are used and are positioned in different ways in order to simulate a clinical situation. For a secondary energy window from 100 to 124 keV below a photo peak window from 126 to 154 keV, a value of 0.7 is found. This value has been verified using both an antropomorph thyroid phantom and the Rollo contrast phantom.

  9. Model development for MODIS thermal band electronic cross-talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiejun; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu; Li, Yonghong; Brinkmann, Jake; Keller, Graziela; Xiong, Xiaoxiong (Jack)

    2016-10-01

    MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 bands. Among them, 16 thermal emissive bands covering a wavelength range from 3.8 to 14.4 μm. After 16 years on-orbit operation, the electronic crosstalk of a few Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands develop substantial issues which cause biases in the EV brightness temperature measurements and surface feature contamination. The crosstalk effects on band 27 with center wavelength at 6.7 μm and band 29 at 8.5 μm increased significantly in recent years, affecting downstream products such as water vapor and cloud mask. The crosstalk issue can be observed from nearly monthly scheduled lunar measurements, from which the crosstalk coefficients can be derived. Most of MODIS thermal bands are saturated at moon surface temperatures and the development of an alternative approach is very helpful for verification. In this work, a physical model was developed to assess the crosstalk impact on calibration as well as in Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. This model was applied to Terra MODIS band 29 empirically for correction of Earth brightness temperature measurements. In the model development, the detector nonlinear response is considered. The impacts of the electronic crosstalk are assessed in two steps. The first step consists of determining the impact on calibration using the on-board blackbody (BB). Due to the detector nonlinear response and large background signal, both linear and nonlinear coefficients are affected by the crosstalk from sending bands. The crosstalk impact on calibration coefficients was calculated. The second step is to calculate the effects on the Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. The effects include those from affected calibration coefficients and the contamination of Earth view measurements. This model links the measurement bias with crosstalk coefficients, detector nonlinearity, and the ratio of Earth measurements between the sending and receiving bands. The correction

  10. Models for describing the thermal characteristics of building components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez, M.J.; Madsen, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Outdoor testing of buildings and building components under real weather conditions provides useful information about their dynamic performance. Such knowledge is needed to properly characterize the heat transfer dynamics and provides useful information for implementing energy saving strategies...... of these approaches may therefore be very useful for selecting a suitable approach for each particular case. This paper presents an overview of models that can be applied for modelling the thermal characteristics of buildings and building components using data from outdoor testing. The choice of approach depends......, for example. For the analysis of these tests, dynamic analysis models and methods are required. However, a wide variety of models and methods exists, and the problem of choosing the most appropriate approach for each particular case is a non-trivial and interdisciplinary task. Knowledge of a large family...

  11. THERMUS—A thermal model package for ROOT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, S.; Cleymans, J.; Hauer, M.

    2009-01-01

    THERMUS is a package of C++ classes and functions allowing statistical-thermal model analyses of particle production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions to be performed within the ROOT framework of analysis. Calculations are possible within three statistical ensembles; a grand-canonical treatment of the conserved charges B, S and Q, a fully canonical treatment of the conserved charges, and a mixed-canonical ensemble combining a canonical treatment of strangeness with a grand-canonical treatment of baryon number and electric charge. THERMUS allows for the assignment of decay chains and detector efficiencies specific to each particle yield, which enables sensible fitting of model parameters to experimental data. Program summaryProgram title: THERMUS, version 2.1 Catalogue identifier: AEBW_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEBW_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17 152 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 93 581 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: PC, Pentium 4, 1 GB RAM (not hardware dependent) Operating system: Linux: FEDORA, RedHat, etc. Classification: 17.7 External routines: Numerical Recipes in C [1], ROOT [2] Nature of problem: Statistical-thermal model analyses of heavy-ion collision data require the calculation of both primordial particle densities and contributions from resonance decay. A set of thermal parameters (the number depending on the particular model imposed) and a set of thermalized particles, with their decays specified, is required as input to these models. The output is then a complete set of primordial thermal quantities for each particle, together with the contributions to the final particle yields from resonance decay. In many applications of

  12. General 3D Lumped Thermal Model with Various Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    Accurate thermal dynamics modeling of high power Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) modules is important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated...... thermal behaviors in the IGBTs. In this paper, a new three-dimensional (3D) lumped thermal model is proposed, which can easily be characterized from Finite Element Methods (FEM) based simulation and acquire the thermal distribution in critical points. Meanwhile the boundary conditions including...... the cooling system and power losses are modeled in the 3D thermal model, which can be adapted to different real field applications of power electronic converters. The accuracy of the proposed thermal model is verified by experimental results....

  13. Modeling Pumped Thermal Energy Storage with Waste Heat Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abarr, Miles L. Lindsey

    This work introduces a new concept for a utility scale combined energy storage and generation system. The proposed design utilizes a pumped thermal energy storage (PTES) system, which also utilizes waste heat leaving a natural gas peaker plant. This system creates a low cost utility-scale energy storage system by leveraging this dual-functionality. This dissertation first presents a review of previous work in PTES as well as the details of the proposed integrated bottoming and energy storage system. A time-domain system model was developed in Mathworks R2016a Simscape and Simulink software to analyze this system. Validation of both the fluid state model and the thermal energy storage model are provided. The experimental results showed the average error in cumulative fluid energy between simulation and measurement was +/- 0.3% per hour. Comparison to a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model showed PTES) that uses ammonia as the working fluid. This analysis focused on the effects of hot thermal storage utilization, system pressure, and evaporator/condenser size on the system performance. This work presents the estimated performance for a proposed baseline Bot-PTES. Results of this analysis showed that all selected parameters had significant effects on efficiency, with the evaporator/condenser size having the largest effect over the selected ranges. Results for the baseline case showed stand-alone energy storage efficiencies between 51 and 66% for varying power levels and charge states, and a stand-alone bottoming efficiency of 24%. The resulting efficiencies for this case were low compared to competing technologies; however, the dual-functionality of the Bot-PTES enables it to have higher capacity factor, leading to 91-197/MWh levelized cost of energy compared to 262-284/MWh for batteries and $172-254/MWh for Compressed Air Energy Storage.

  14. Numerical Modeling of a Shallow Borehole Thermal Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catolico, N.; Ge, S.; Lu, N.; McCartney, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) combined with solar thermal energy harvesting is an economic technological system to garner and store energy as well as an environmentally-sustainable alternative for the heating of buildings. The first community-scale BTES system in North America was installed in 2007 in the Drake Landing Solar Community (DLSC), about 35 miles south of Calgary, Canada. The BTES system involves direct circulation of water heated from solar thermal panels in the summer into a storage tank, after which it is circulate within an array of 144 closed-loop geothermal heat exchangers having a depth of 35 m and a spacing of 2.5 m. In the winter the circulation direction is reversed to supply heat to houses. Data collection over a six year period indicates that this system can supply more than 90% of the winter heating energy needs for 52 houses in the community. One major challenge facing the BTES system technology is the relatively low annual efficiency, i.e., the ratio of energy input and output is in the range of 15% to 40% for the system in Drake Landing. To better understand the working principles of BTES and to improve BTES performance for future applications at larger scales, a three-dimensional transient coupled fluid and heat transfer model is established using TOUGH2. The time-dependent injection temperatures and circulation rate measured over the six years of monitoring are used as model input. The simulations are calibrated using soil temperature data measured at different locations over time. The time-dependent temperature distributions within the borehole region agree well with the measured temperatures for soil with an intrinsic permeability of 10e-19 m2, an apparent thermal conductivity of 2.03 W/m°C, and a volumetric heat capacity of 2.31 MJ/m-3°C. The calibrated model serves as the basis for a sensitivity analysis of soil and operational parameters on BTES system efficiency preformed with TOUGH2. Preliminary results suggest 1) BTES

  15. Parabolic Trough Photovoltaic/Thermal Collectors: Design and Simulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Vanoli

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design procedure and a simulation model of a novel concentrating PVT collector. The layout of the PVT system under investigation was derived from a prototype recently presented in literature and commercially available. The prototype consisted in a parabolic trough concentrator and a linear triangular receiver. In that prototype, the bottom surfaces of the receiver are equipped with mono-crystalline silicon cells whereas the top surface is covered by an absorbing surface. The aperture area of the parabola was covered by a glass in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the system. In the modified version of the collector considered in this paper, two changes are implemented: the cover glass was eliminated and the mono-crystalline silicon cells were replaced by triple-junction cells. In order to analyze PVT performance, a detailed mathematical model was implemented. This model is based on zero-dimensional energy balances. The simulation model calculates the temperatures of the main components of the system and the main energy flows Results showed that the performance of the system is excellent even when the fluid temperature is very high (>100 °C. Conversely, both electrical and thermal efficiencies dramatically decrease when the incident beam radiation decreases.

  16. Numerical model for the thermal behavior of thermocline storage tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehtiwesh, Ismael A. S.; Sousa, Antonio C. M.

    2017-10-01

    Energy storage is a critical factor in the advancement of solar thermal power systems for the sustained delivery of electricity. In addition, the incorporation of thermal energy storage into the operation of concentrated solar power systems (CSPs) offers the potential of delivering electricity without fossil-fuel backup even during peak demand, independent of weather conditions and daylight. Despite this potential, some areas of the design and performance of thermocline systems still require further attention for future incorporation in commercial CSPs, particularly, their operation and control. Therefore, the present study aims to develop a simple but efficient numerical model to allow the comprehensive analysis of thermocline storage systems aiming better understanding of their dynamic temperature response. The validation results, despite the simplifying assumptions of the numerical model, agree well with the experiments for the time evolution of the thermocline region. Three different cases are considered to test the versatility of the numerical model; for the particular type of a storage tank with top round impingement inlet, a simple analytical model was developed to take into consideration the increased turbulence level in the mixing region. The numerical predictions for the three cases are in general good agreement against the experimental results.

  17. Modelling thermal degradation of zearalenone in maize bread during baking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numanoglu, E; Yener, S; Gökmen, V; Uygun, U; Koksel, H

    2013-01-01

    The thermal degradation of zearalenone (ZEA) was investigated using a crust-like model, representing maize bread, which was prepared with naturally contaminated maize flour. Model samples were heated under isothermal conditions at the temperature range of 100-250°C. No reduction was observed at 100°C. Thermal degradation rate constants (k) were calculated as 0.0017, 0.0143 and 0.0216 min(-1) for 150, 200 and 250°C, respectively. Maize bread baked at 250°C for 70 min was used to test the capability of model kinetic data for the prediction of ZEA reduction. The time-temperature history in the crust and crumb parts was recorded separately. Partial degradation of ZEA at each time interval was calculated by means of the corresponding k-values obtained by using the Arrhenius equation, and the total reduction occurring at the end of the entire baking process was predicted. The reduction in the crumb and crust of bread was also experimentally determined and found to be consistent with the predicted values. It was concluded that the kinetic constants determined by means of the crust-like model could be used to predict the ZEA reduction occurring during baking of maize bread.

  18. Results of a Si/Cdte Compton Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oonuki, Kousuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Watanabe, Shin; Takeda, Shin' ichiro; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Mitani, Takefumi; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nomachi, Masaharu; /Sagamihara, Inst. Space Astron. Sci. /Tokyo U. /SLAC /Hiroshima U. /Osaka U.

    2005-09-23

    We have been developing a semiconductor Compton telescope to explore the universe in the energy band from several tens of keV to a few MeV. We use a Si strip and CdTe pixel detector for the Compton telescope to cover an energy range from 60 keV. For energies above several hundred keV, the higher efficiency of CdTe semiconductor in comparison with Si is expected to play an important role as an absorber and a scatterer. In order to demonstrate the spectral and imaging capability of a CdTe-based Compton Telescope, we have developed a Compton telescope consisting of a stack of CdTe pixel detectors as a small scale prototype. With this prototype, we succeeded in reconstructing images and spectra by solving the Compton equation from 122 keV to 662 keV. The energy resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed spectra is 7.3 keV at 511 keV and 3.1 keV at 122 keV, respectively. The angular resolution obtained at 511 keV is measured to be 12.2{sup o}(FWHM).

  19. Neutron diagnostics using compton suppression gamma-ray spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S. P.; Kang, B. S. [Lab. Of Radiation Convergence Science, Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Medical Science, Konyang University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, C. S.; Cheon, M. S.; Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Various neutron diagnostic systems such as a fission chamber, stilbene spectrometers, and a neutron activation system (NAS) have been installed at KSTAR for more accurate detection of neutron flux. Among the systems, the NAS is the most reliable and robust tool, and the measurement data of it generally are to be used for calibration of other systems. The Compton suppression gamma-ray spectrometer which can suppress the expected background, noise signal and Compton scattering was used to measure the gamma-rays of neutron activated samples. In this study, the encapsulated indium samples which are installed and irradiated by the neutrons released from the nuclear fusion reactions in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) was used and measured using Compton suppressed gamma-ray spectrometer to minimize the measurement error. From the experimental results, the statistical error was decreased by Compton suppression system. the statistical error of the measured sample activity in the Compton suppressed system is estimated to be about 2.3 %, and the statistical error of the measured sample activity in the non-suppressed system was estimated to be about 4.9 %. It was found that the system can reduce the measurement error effectively. It is confirmed that this system can be applied to ITER TBM and future nuclear fusion devices.

  20. Lessons learned from the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniffen, Donald A.

    2003-03-01

    The second of NASA's 'Great Observatories', the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) was one of NASA's most successful missions. The scientific results changed our view of the hig-energy Universe in many fundamental ways. Originally designed as a two-year mission, CGRO continued to return hgih quality scientific data until a reference-gyro failure led NASA to de-orbit the spaceraft after nine years of operations while the capability for a controlled reentry remained. Success is a result of careful planning and wise leadership. It is useful to examine how such a mission was designed, developed, and implemented, as a model for future scientific missions. Careful scientific planning, a highly skilled and motivated project staff who worked closely with the scientists, a close working relationship with TRW, the mission contractor, a dedicated operations crew and strong support from the management of the Goddard Space Flight Center were all important to the success of CGRO. It is the purpose of this paper to examine CGRO activities from the initial science planning beginning in the eraly 1970's to the end of mission funding in 2002 to see what can be learned from the successes and the failures of this grand mission.

  1. Wide Angle Compton Scattering within the SCET factorization Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kivel Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Existing data for the electromagnetic proton form factors and for the cross section of the wide angle Compton scattering (WACS show that the hard two-gluon exchange mechanism (collinear factorization is still not applicable in the kinematical region where Mandelstam variables s ~ −t ~ −u are about few GeV2. On the other hand these observables can be described in phenomenological models where spectator quarks are soft which assumes a large contribution due to the soft-overlap mechanism. It turns out that the simple QCD factorization picture is not complete and must also include the soft-overlap contribution which can be described as a certain matrix element in the soft collinear effective theory (SCET. Then the leading power contribution to WACS amplitude is described as a sum of the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. The existing experimental data allows one to check certain conclusions based on the assumption about dominant role of the soft-spectator mechanism.

  2. Higher twist effects in deeply virtual Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirnay, Bjoern Michael

    2016-08-01

    In this work we explore the effects of higher twist power corrections on the deeply virtual Compton scattering process. The calculation of the helicity amplitudes for all possible polarization combinations is performed within the framework of QCD operator product expansion. As a result the known accuracy of the amplitudes is improved to include the (kinematic) twist-4 contributions. For the most part the analysis focuses on spin-1/2 targets, the answers for scalar targets conveniently emerge as a byproduct. We investigate the analytical structure of these corrections and prove consistency with QCD factorization. We give an estimation of the numerical impact of the sub-leading twist contributions for proton targets with the help of a phenomenological model for the nonperturbative proton generalized parton distributions. We compare different twist approximations and relate predictions for physical observables to experiments performed by the Hall A, CLAS, HERMES, H1 and ZEUS collaborations. The estimate also includes a numerical study for planned COMPASS-II runs. Throughout the analysis special emphasis is put on the convention dependence induced by finite twist truncation of scattering amplitudes.

  3. Electrochemical-thermal modeling and microscale phase change for passive internal thermal management of lithium ion batteries.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Thomas F. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Bandhauer, Todd (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Garimella, Srinivas (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2012-01-01

    A fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the impact of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. In contrast to previous modeling efforts focused either exclusively on particle electrochemistry on the one hand or overall vehicle simulations on the other, the present work predicts local electrochemical reaction rates using temperature-dependent data on commercially available batteries designed for high rates (C/LiFePO{sub 4}) in a computationally efficient manner. Simulation results show that conventional external cooling systems for these batteries, which have a low composite thermal conductivity ({approx}1 W/m-K), cause either large temperature rises or internal temperature gradients. Thus, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow at the conditions expected here is not well understood. A first-principles based cooling system performance model is developed and validated experimentally, and is integrated into the coupled electrochemical-thermal model for assessment of performance improvement relative to conventional thermal management strategies. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid. Thus, the minimization of peak temperatures and gradients within batteries allow increased power and energy densities unencumbered by thermal limitations.

  4. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked plagioclase feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Horz, F.; Staid, M.I.

    2003-01-01

    Thermal infrared emission and reflectance spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7???40 ??m) of experimentally shocked albite- and anorthite-rich rocks (17-56 GPa) demonstrate that plagioclase feldspars exhibit characteristic degradations in spectral features with increasing pressure. New measurements of albite (Ab98) presented here display major spectral absorptions between 1000-1250 cm-1 (8-10 ??m) (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) and weaker absorptions between 350-700 cm-1 (14-29 ??m) (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations). Many of these features persist to higher pressures compared to similar features in measurements of shocked anorthite, consistent with previous thermal infrared absorption studies of shocked feldspars. A transparency feature at 855 cm-1 (11.7 ??m) observed in powdered albite spectra also degrades with increasing pressure, similar to the 830 cm-1 (12.0 ??m) transparency feature in spectra of powders of shocked anorthite. Linear deconvolution models demonstrate that combinations of common mineral and glass spectra can replicate the spectra of shocked anorthite relatively well until shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation. Albite deconvolutions exhibit higher errors overall but do not change significantly with pressure, likely because certain clay minerals selected by the model exhibit absorption features similar to those in highly shocked albite. The implication for deconvolution of thermal infrared spectra of planetary surfaces (or laboratory spectra of samples) is that the use of highly shocked anorthite spectra in end-member libraries could be helpful in identifying highly shocked calcic plagioclase feldspars.

  5. On a computational model of building thermal dynamic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarošová, Petra; Vala, Jiří

    2016-07-01

    Development and exploitation of advanced materials, structures and technologies in civil engineering, both for buildings with carefully controlled interior temperature and for common residential houses, together with new European and national directives and technical standards, stimulate the development of rather complex and robust, but sufficiently simple and inexpensive computational tools, supporting their design and optimization of energy consumption. This paper demonstrates the possibility of consideration of such seemingly contradictory requirements, using the simplified non-stationary thermal model of a building, motivated by the analogy with the analysis of electric circuits; certain semi-analytical forms of solutions come from the method of lines.

  6. Thermal states of the Kitaev honeycomb model: Bures metric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abasto, Damian F.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the Bures metric over the canonical thermal states for the Kitaev honeycomb mode. In this way the effects of finite temperature on topological phase transitions can be studied. Different regions in the parameter space of the model can be clearly identified in terms of different temperature scaling behavior of the Bures metric tensor. Furthermore, we show a simple relation between the metric elements and the crossover temperature between the quasicritical and the quasiclassical regions. These results extend the analysis of Zhao and Zhou [e-print arXiv:/0803.0814v1] and Yang [Phys. Rev. A 78, 012304 (2008)] to finite temperatures.

  7. A New Mathematical Model for Food Thermal Process Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Friso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model was developed to correlate the four heat penetration parameters of 57 Stumbo’s tables (18,513 datasets in canned food: g (the difference between the retort and the coldest point temperatures in the canned food at the end of the heating process, fh/U (the ratio of the heating rate index to the sterilizing value, z (the temperature change required for the thermal destruction curve to traverse one log cycle, and Jcc, (the cooling lag factor. The quantities g, z, and Jcc, are input variables for predicting fh/U, while z, Jcc and fh/U are input variables for predicting the value of g, which is necessary to calculate the heating process time B, at constant retort temperature, using Ball’s formula. The process time calculated using the g value obtained from the mathematical model closely followed the time calculated from the tabulated g values (root mean square of absolute errors RMS = 0.567 min, average absolute error = 0.421 min with a standard deviation SD = 0.380 min. Because the mathematical model can be used to predict the intermediate values of any combination of inputs, avoiding the storage requirements and the interpolation of 57 Stumbo’s tables, it allows a quick and easy automation of thermal process calculations and to perform these calculations using a spreadsheet.

  8. Modeling the Thermal Interactions of Meteorites Below the Antarctic Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, William Jared; Radebaugh, Jani; Stephens, Denise C.; Lorenz, Ralph; Harvey, Ralph; Karner, James

    2017-10-01

    Meteorites with high specific gravities, such as irons, appear to be underrepresented in Antarctic collections over the last 40 years. This underrepresentation is in comparison with observed meteorite falls, which are believed to represent the actual population of meteorites striking Earth. Meteorites on the Antarctic ice sheet absorb solar flux, possibly leading to downward tunneling into the ice, though observations of this in action are very limited. This descent is counteracted by ice sheet flow supporting the meteorites coupled with ablation near mountain margins, which helps to force meteorites towards the surface. Meteorites that both absorb adequate thermal energy and are sufficiently dense may instead reach a shallow equilibrium depth as downward melting overcomes upward forces during the Antarctic summer. Using a pyronometer, we have measured the incoming solar flux at multiple depths in two deep field sites in Antarctica, the Miller Range and Elephant Moraine. We compare these data with laboratory analogues and model the thermal and physical interactions between a variety of meteorites and their surroundings. Our Matlab code model will account for a wide range of parameters used to characterize meteorites in an Antarctic environment. We will present the results of our model along with depth estimates for several types of meteorites. The recovery of an additional population of heavy meteorites would increase our knowledge of the formation and composition of the solar system.

  9. Modelling radon progeny concentration variations in thermal spas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Vogiannis, Efstratios

    2007-02-01

    Radon and its short-lived progenies (218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi and 214Po) are well known radioactive indoor pollutants identified as the major radiation burden component of the thermal spa users. Monitoring of short-lived progeny concentration is of great importance for short-term dose estimations both for bathers and working personnel. A prediction model of the short-lived progeny concentration variations was developed and applied on published data of the thermal spas of Lesvos Island. The physical procedures involved were modeled in a set of differential equations describing radon progeny concentration variations on the basis of radon measurements. Published daughter data were fitted on model predictions adjusting non-measured parameters, e.g. attachment and deposition rate constants for attached and unattached progenies. Attachment rate constants were estimated between 50 and 200 h-1 while the deposition rate constants between 0.25 and 5 h-1 for attached progenies and 0.5 and 170 h-1 for the unattached ones. In addition, unattached 218Po, 214Pb and 214Bi progenies were found to be shifted forward in respect to radon approximately 0.001 h, 0.05 h and 0.40 h respectively, while attached 218Po, 214Pb and 214Bi progenies 0.05 h, 0.45 h and 0.65 h respectively.

  10. Thermal and hydrodynamic modelling of active catheters for interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchandise, Emilie; Flaud, Patrice; Royon, Laurent; Blanc, Raphaël; Szewczyk, Jérome

    2011-07-01

    Interventional radiologists desire to improve their operating tools such as catheters. Active catheters in which the tip is moved using shape memory alloy actuators activated using the Joule effect present a promising approach for easier navigation in the small vessels. However, the increase in temperature caused by this Joule effect must be controlled in order to prevent damage to blood cells and tissues. This paper is devoted to the simulation and experimental validation of a fluid-thermal model of an active catheter prototype. Comparisons between computer-predicted and experimentally measured temperatures are presented for both experiments in air and water at 37°C. Good agreement between the computational and experimental results is found, demonstrating the validity of the developed computer model. These comparisons enable us to highlight some important issues in the modelling process and to determine the optimal current for the activation of the catheter.

  11. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  12. Some Issues in Deeply-Virtual Compton Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji C.-R.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Compton scattering provides a unique tool for studying hadron structure. In contrast to elastic electron scattering, which provides information about the hadron’s structure in terms of form factors, Compton scattering is more versatile, as the basic process is the coupling of two electro-magnetic currents. Therefore, the hadronic structure can be described at high momentum transfer in the language of generalized parton distributions (GPDs, which code information about the light-front wave functions of the probed hadrons. In this paper we discuss some issues involved in the application of the GPD idea, in particular the effectivity of Compton scattering as a filter of the hadron structure.

  13. A nonlinear plasma retroreflector for single pulse Compton backscattering

    CERN Document Server

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D; Hafizi, B; Helle, M; Penano, J; Ting, A

    2014-01-01

    Compton scattered x-rays can be generated using a configuration consisting of a single, ultra-intense laser pulse, and a shaped gas target. The gas target incorporates a hydrodynamically formed density spike, which nonlinearly scatters the incident pump radiation, to produce a counter-propagating electromagnetic wiggler. This self-generated wiggler field Compton scatters from electrons accelerated in the laser wakefield of the pump radiation. The nonlinear scattering mechanism in the density spike is examined theoretically and numerically in order to optimize the Compton scattered radiation. It is found that narrow-band x-rays are produced by moderate intensity pump radiation incident on the quarter-critical surface of the density spike, while high fluence, broadband x-rays are produced by high intensity pump radiation reflected near the critical surface.

  14. Forty years of Fanger's model of thermal comfort: comfort for all?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ir. Joost van Hoof

    2008-01-01

    The predicted mean vote (PMV) model of thermal comfort, created by Fanger in the late 1960s, is used worldwide to assess thermal comfort. Fanger based his model on college-aged students for use in invariant environmental conditions in air-conditioned buildings in moderate thermal climate zones.

  15. Thermal modelling of borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores; Zur thermischen Modellierung von Erdwaermesonden und Erdsonden-Waermespeichern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Dan

    2011-07-15

    The thermal use of the underground for heating and cooling applications can be done with borehole heat exchangers. This work deals with the further development of the modelling of thermal transport processes inside and outside the borehole as well as with the application of the further developed models. The combination of high accuracy and short computation time is achieved by the development of three-dimensional thermal resistance and capacity models for borehole heat exchangers. Short transient transport processes can be calculated by the developed model with a considerable higher dynamic and accuracy than with known models from literature. The model is used to evaluate measurement data of a thermal response test by parameter estimation technique with a transient three-dimensional model for the first time. Clear advantages like shortening of the test duration are shown. The developed borehole heat exchanger model is combined with a three-dimensional description of the underground in the Finite-Element-Program FEFLOW. The influence of moving groundwater on borehole heat exchangers and borehole thermal energy stores is then quantified.

  16. Model Development for MODIS Thermal Band Electronic Crosstalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tiejun; Wu, Aisheng; Geng, Xu; Li, Yonghonh; Brinkman, Jake; Keller, Graziela; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) has 36 bands. Among them, 16 thermal emissive bands covering a wavelength range from 3.8 to 14.4 m. After 16 years on-orbit operation, the electronic crosstalk of a few Terra MODIS thermal emissive bands developed substantial issues that cause biases in the EV brightness temperature measurements and surface feature contamination. The crosstalk effects on band 27 with center wavelength at 6.7 m and band 29 at 8.5 m increased significantly in recent years, affecting downstream products such as water vapor and cloud mask. The crosstalk effect is evident in the near-monthly scheduled lunar measurements, from which the crosstalk coefficients can be derived. The development of an alternative approach is very helpful for independent verification.In this work, a physical model was developed to assess the crosstalk impact on calibration as well as in Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. This model was applied to Terra MODIS band 29 empirically to correct the Earth brightness temperature measurements. In the model development, the detectors nonlinear response is considered. The impact of the electronic crosstalk is assessed in two steps. The first step consists of determining the impact on calibration using the on-board blackbody (BB). Due to the detectors nonlinear response and large background signal, both linear and nonlinear coefficients are affected by the crosstalk from sending bands. The second step is to calculate the effects on the Earth view brightness temperature retrieval. The effects include those from affected calibration coefficients and the contamination of Earth view measurements. This model links the measurement bias with crosstalk coefficients, detector non-linearity, and the ratio of Earth measurements between the sending and receiving bands. The correction of the electronic cross talk can be implemented empirically from the processed bias at different brightness temperature. The implementation

  17. Thermal Modeling of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's Solar Panel and Instruments during Aerobraking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec, John A.; Gasbarre, Joseph F.; Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2007-01-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) launched on August 12, 2005 and started aerobraking at Mars in March 2006. During the spacecraft s design phase, thermal models of the solar panels and instruments were developed to determine which components would be the most limiting thermally during aerobraking. Having determined the most limiting components, thermal limits in terms of heat rate were established. Advanced thermal modeling techniques were developed utilizing Thermal Desktop and Patran Thermal. Heat transfer coefficients were calculated using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo technique. Analysis established that the solar panels were the most limiting components during the aerobraking phase of the mission.

  18. Theoretical study of the double Compton effect with twisted photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, J. A.

    2017-05-01

    Double Compton scattering of high-energy twisted photons is investigated within the framework of relativistic quantum electrodynamics. We investigate the dependence of the angular distributions of the scattered photons on the parameters of the incident photon beam, such as momentum cone opening angle and projection of orbital angular momentum. Numerical calculations of the angular distributions of the scattered photons are presented for incoming twisted photons and compared to the standard case of incident plane-wave photons. The dependence of the angular distributions of the double-Compton-scattered photons for initially twisted photons prepared in a superposition of two vortex states is also presented.

  19. Imaging Performance of the Si/Ge Hybrid Compton Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, M; Chivers, D; Cork, C; Cunningham, M; Fabris, L; Gunter, D; Hull, E; Lange, D; Manini, H; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Niedermayr, T; Valentine, J; Vetter, K; Wright, D

    2005-11-10

    The point spread function (PSF) of a fully-instrumented silicon/germanium Compton telescope has been measured as a function of energy and angle. Overall, the resolution ranged from 3{sup o} to 4{sup o} FWHM over most of the energy range and field of view. The various contributions to the resolution have been quantified. These contributions include the energy uncertainty and position uncertainty of the detector; source energy; Doppler broadening; and the 1/r broadening characteristic of Compton back-projection. Furthermore, a distortion of the PSF is observed for sources imaged off-axis from the detector. These contributions are discussed and compared to theory and simulations.

  20. Enhanced compton backscattering by confocal multipath laser cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Sho; Miyamoto, Shuji; Mochizuki, Takayasu [Himeji Institute of Technology, Laboratory of Advanced Science Technology for Industry, Kamigori, Hyogo (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    The design considerations of a confocal multipath laser cavity to enhance Compton backscattering are presented. Laser pulses are superposed at a confocal point of the cavity and enhance laser peak filed there. Ray trace simulation results predicted that the 29 - 14-fold enhanced laser filed could be achieved with the mode locked laser pulses whose repetition rate and duration time were 89.25 MHz and 10 ps, respectively. As a result, Compton backscattered X-rays generated by interaction of this intense laser field with a relativistic electron beam, will be enhanced efficiently by a factor of more than 10 at least. (author)

  1. Improving the temperature predictions of subsurface thermal models by using high-quality input data. Part 1: Uncertainty analysis of the thermal-conductivity parameterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The subsurface temperature field and the geothermal conditions in sedimentary basins are frequently examined by using numerical thermal models. For those models, detailed knowledge of rock thermal properties are paramount for a reliable parameterization of layer properties and boundary conditions...

  2. Dynamic compact model of thermally assisted switching magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Baraji, M.; Javerliac, V.; Guo, W.; Prenat, G.; Dieny, B.

    2009-12-01

    The general purpose of spin electronics is to take advantage of the electron's spin in addition to its electrical charge to build innovative electronic devices. These devices combine magnetic materials which are used as spin polarizer or analyzer together with semiconductors or insulators, resulting in innovative hybrid CMOS/magnetic (Complementary MOS) architectures. In particular, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) can be used for the design of magnetic random access memories [S. Tehrani, Proc. IEEE 91, 703 (2003)], magnetic field programmable gate arrays [Y. Guillement, International Journal of Reconfigurable Computing, 2008], low-power application specific integrated circuits [S. Matsunaga, Appl. Phys. Express 1, 091301 (2008)], and rf oscillators. The thermally assisted switching (TAS) technology requires heating the MTJ before writing it by means of an external field. It reduces the overall power consumption, solves the data writing selectivity issues, and improves the thermal stability of the written information for high density applications. The design of hybrid architectures requires a MTJ compact model, which can be used in standard electrical simulators of the industry. As a result, complete simulations of CMOS/MTJ hybrid circuits can be performed before experimental realization and testing. This article presents a highly accurate model of the MTJ based on the TAS technology. It is compatible with the Spectre electrical simulator of Cadence design suite.

  3. Modeling and Analysis of AGS (1998) Thermal Shock Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, J.R.; Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    An overview is provided on modeling and analysis of thermal shock experiments conducted during 1998 with high-energy, short-pulse energy deposition in a mercury filled container in the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The simulation framework utilized along with the results of simulations for pressure and strain profiles are presented. While the magnitude of penk strain predictions versus data are in reasonable agreement, the temporal variations were found to differ significantly in selected cases, indicating lack of modeling of certain physical phenomena or due to uncertainties in the experimental data gathering techniques. Key thermal-shock related issues and uncertainties are highlighted. Specific experiments conducted at BNL's AGS facility during 1998 (the subject of this paper) involved high-energy (24 GeV) proton energy deposition in the mercury target over a time frame of - 0.1s. The target consisted of an - 1 m. long cylindrical stainless steel shell with a hemispherical dome at the leading edge. It was filled with mercury at room temperature and pressure. Several optical strain gages were attached to the surface of the steel target. Figure 1 shows a schematic representation of the test vessel along with the main dimensions and positions of three optical strain gages at which meaningful data were obtained. As

  4. Thermal model of a dish/Stirling systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepveu, Francois; Ferriere, Alain; Bataille, Francoise [CNRS-PROMES Laboratory, 7 rue du four solaire, 66120 Font-Romeu (France)

    2009-01-15

    This paper presents a global thermal model of the energy conversion of the 10 kW{sub el} Eurodish dish/Stirling unit erected at the CNRS-PROMES laboratory in Odeillo. Using optical measurements made by DLR, the losses by parabola reflectivity and spillage are calculated. A nodal method is used to calculate the heat losses in the cavity by conduction, convection, reflection and thermal radiation. A thermodynamic analysis of a SOLO Stirling 161 engine is made. The Stirling engine is divided in 32 control-volumes and equations of ideal gas, mass and energy conservation are written for each control-volume. The differential equation system is resolved by an iterative method developed using Matlab{sup trademark} programming environment. Temperature, mass, density of working gas, heat transfers and the mechanical power are calculated for one Stirling engine cycle of 40 ms and for a constant direct normal irradiation (DNI). The model gives consistent results correctly fitting with experimental measurements. (author)

  5. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuck SA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie A Tuck1, Vanessa Lopes-Berkas2, Sheree Beam3, Joseph C Anderson11Uptake Medical Corp, Seattle, WA, 2American Preclinical Services, Coon Rapids, MN, 3Preclinical Pathology Consulting Services, Ham Lake, MN, USAAbstract: Clinical studies indicate the potential of bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation to result in clinically relevant improvements in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema. However, the mechanisms by which vapor ablation results in lung volume reduction are not fully known. This study determined the 3-month safety and efficacy of vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema and described the histopathological changes in the lung. The cranial lobes of papain-exposed dogs were treated with a vapor dose of ten calories per gram of lung tissue (n = 8 or were sham treated (n = 3. Safety was monitored peri- and postoperatively for 3 months. Animals were then sacrificed, estimates of lung volume reduction performed, and the lungs processed for histology. Vapor ablation was associated with an average of 20% volume reduction of the treated lobes and an absence of serious adverse events. The amount of lobar volume reduction was correlated with the amount of fibrosis and atelectasis in the treated lobe. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation at a dose of 10 cal/g results in lobar volume reduction associated with remodeling of the targeted tissue characterized by mature collagen formation in the absence of major adverse events.Keywords: animal models, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchoscopy, lung volume reduction

  6. Mathematical modeling and simulation of a thermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropoc, Mirela; Gavrila, Camelia; Frunzulica, Rodica; Toma, Petrica D.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present paper is the conception of a mathematical model and simulation of a system formed by a heatexchanger for domestic hot water preparation, a storage tank for hot water and a radiator, starting from the mathematical equations describing this system and developed using Scilab-Xcos program. The model helps to determine the evolution in time for the hot water temperature, for the return temperature in the primary circuit of the heat exchanger, for the supply temperature in the secondary circuit, the thermal power for heating and for hot water preparation to the consumer respectively. In heating systems, heat-exchangers have an important role and their performances influence the energy efficiency of the systems. In the meantime, it is very important to follow the behavior of such systems in dynamic regimes. Scilab-Xcos program can be utilized to follow the important parameters of the systems in different functioning scenarios.

  7. Holographic thermalization in a top-down confining model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, B. [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Lindgren, E.J. [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Théorique et Mathématique, Université Libre de Bruxelles,Campus Plaine C.P. 231, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Taliotis, A. [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, and International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-17

    It is interesting to ask how a confinement scale affects the thermalization of strongly coupled gauge theories with gravity duals. We study this question for the AdS soliton model, which underlies top-down holographic models for Yang-Mills theory and QCD. Injecting energy via a homogeneous massless scalar source that is briefly turned on, our fully backreacted numerical analysis finds two regimes. Either a black brane forms, possibly after one or more bounces, after which the pressure components relax according to the lowest quasinormal mode. Or the scalar shell keeps scattering, in which case the pressure components oscillate and undergo modulation on time scales independent of the (small) shell amplitude. We show analytically that the scattering shell cannot relax to a homogeneous equilibrium state, and explain the modulation as due to a near-resonance between a normal mode frequency of the metric and the frequency with which the scalar shell oscillates.

  8. Thermal phase transition in a QCD-like holographic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Nick; Threlfall, Ed

    2008-11-01

    We investigate the high-temperature phase of a dilaton flow deformation of the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence. We argue that these geometries should be interpreted as the N=4 gauge theory perturbed by a SO(6) invariant scalar mass and that the high-temperature phase is just the well-known anti-de Sitter-Schwarzschild solution. We compute, within supergravity, the resulting Hawking-Page phase transition, which in this model can be interpreted as a deconfining transition in which the vacuum expectation value for the operator TrF2 dissolves. In the presence of quarks the model also displays a simultaneous chiral symmetry restoring transition with the Goldstone mode and other quark bound states dissolving into the thermal bath.

  9. Modeling of the Response Time of Thermal Flow Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Lang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a simple theoretical model for the response time of thermal flow sensors. Response time is defined here as the time needed by the sensor output signal to reach 63.2% of amplitude due to a change of fluid flow. This model uses the finite-difference method to solve the heat transfer equations, taking into consideration the transient conduction and convection between the sensor membrane and the surrounding fluid. Program results agree with experimental measurements and explain the response time dependence on the velocity and the sensor geometry. Values of the response time vary from about 5 ms in the case of stagnant flow to 1.5 ms for a flow velocity of 44 m/s.

  10. Transmission line matrix modelling of thermal injuries to skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliouat Bellia, S; Saidane, A; Hamou, A; Benzohra, M; Saiter, J M

    2008-08-01

    A numerical model based on the transmission line matrix method is presented for the quantitative prediction of skin burn resulting from exposure of a specific region of human skin surface to a high temperature heat source. Transient temperatures were numerically estimated by Pennes' bioheat equation, and the damage function denoting the extent of burn was calculated using the Arrhenius assumptions for protein damage rate. A two-dimensional transmission line matrix model was used to predict the effects of exposure time and structure thicknesses on the transient temperature distribution and damage extent. Compared with other numerical sources the transmission line matrix results revealed good agreement, suggesting that this method may be an effective tool for the thermal diagnostic of burns.

  11. Thermal modeling of lesion growth with radiofrequency ablation devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Uyen D

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature is a frequently used parameter to describe the predicted size of lesions computed by computational models. In many cases, however, temperature correlates poorly with lesion size. Although many studies have been conducted to characterize the relationship between time-temperature exposure of tissue heating to cell damage, to date these relationships have not been employed in a finite element model. Methods We present an axisymmetric two-dimensional finite element model that calculates cell damage in tissues and compare lesion sizes using common tissue damage and iso-temperature contour definitions. The model accounts for both temperature-dependent changes in the electrical conductivity of tissue as well as tissue damage-dependent changes in local tissue perfusion. The data is validated using excised porcine liver tissues. Results The data demonstrate the size of thermal lesions is grossly overestimated when calculated using traditional temperature isocontours of 42°C and 47°C. The computational model results predicted lesion dimensions that were within 5% of the experimental measurements. Conclusion When modeling radiofrequency ablation problems, temperature isotherms may not be representative of actual tissue damage patterns.

  12. Model reduction for experimental thermal characterization of a holding furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loussouarn, Thomas; Maillet, Denis; Remy, Benjamin; Dan, Diane

    2017-09-01

    Vacuum holding induction furnaces are used for the manufacturing of turbine blades by loss wax foundry process. The control of solidification parameters is a key factor for the manufacturing of these parts. The definition of the structure of a reduced heat transfer model with experimental identification through an estimation of its parameters is required here. Internal sensors outputs, together with this model, can be used for assessing the thermal state of the furnace through an inverse approach, for a better control. Here, an axisymmetric furnace and its load have been numerically modelled using FlexPDE, a finite elements code. The internal induction heat source as well as the transient radiative transfer inside the furnace are calculated through this detailed model. A reduced lumped body model has been constructed to represent the numerical furnace. The model reduction and the estimation of the parameters of the lumped body have been made using a Levenberg-Marquardt least squares minimization algorithm, using two synthetic temperature signals with a further validation test.

  13. Pyrolysis of thermally thick wood particles - experiments and mathematical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller Andersen, S.; Thaaning Pedersen, S.; Goebel, B.; Houbak, N.; Henriksen, Ulrik [MEK - DTU, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Dall Bentzen, J. [COWI a/s, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-07-01

    A simple, dynamic, l-dimensional model describing heating, drying and pyrolysis of thermally thick wood particles with a l-dimensional geometry has been developed and implemented. The model output is the dynamic evolution of both the char yield and the amount of volatiles. The model is developed in such a simple and accessible way, that it easily can be implemented in a larger model for dimensioning and optimisation of applications where pyrolysis is a part of the overall process as for instance gasification. Experiments using a Thermo Gravimetric Analyser (TGA), built so pieces of wood can be fed into a hot atmosphere instantaneously, have been used to observe the influence of various parameters like temperature and size and wood types on the pyrolysis process. Results from the model have been compared with results from the experiments. The comparison showed good accordance when both wood particles with a well-defined geometry (a cylinder) and when beds of wood chips and wood pellets, respectively, were pyrolyzed. The model has proven that transport of heat to the wood; internal transport and accumulation of heat inside the wood and kinetics of pyrolysis are all important parameters. (au)

  14. Procedure to Determine Thermal Characteristics and Groundwater Influence in Heterogeneous Subsoil by an Enhanced Thermal Response Test and Numerical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranzabal, Nordin; Martos, Julio; Montero, Álvaro; Monreal, Llúcia; Soret, Jesús; Torres, José; García-Olcina, Raimundo

    2016-04-01

    Ground thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance are indispensable parameters for the optimal design of subsoil thermal processes and energy storage characterization. The standard method to determine these parameters is the Thermal Response Test (TRT) which results are evaluated by models considering the ground being homogeneous and isotropic. This method obtains an effective ground thermal conductivity which represents an average of the thermal conductivity along the different layers crossed by perforation. In order to obtain a ground thermal conductivity profile as a function of depth two additional key factors are required, first, a new significant data set: a temperature profile along the borehole; and second, a new analysis procedure to extract ground heterogeneity from the recorded data. This research work presents the results of an analysis procedure, complementing the standard TRT analysis, which allows to estimate the thermal conductivity profile from a temperature profile measured along the borehole during a TRT. In the analysis procedure, a 3D Finite Element Model (FEM) is used to fit simulation results with experimental data, by a set of iterative simulations. This methodology is applied to a data set obtained throughout a TRT of 1kW heat power injection in a 30m depth Borehole Heat Exchange (BHE) facility. A highly conductive layer have been detected and located at 25 m depth. In addition, a novel automated device to obtain temperature profiles along geothermal pipes with or without fluid flow is presented. This sensor system is intended to improve the standard TRT and it allows the collection of depth depending thermal characteristics of the subsoil geological structure. Currently, some studies are being conducted in double U-pipe borehole installations in order to improve previously introduced analysis procedure. From a numerical model simulation that takes into account advective effects is pretended to estimate underground water velocity

  15. Thermoelectric control of shape memory alloy microactuators: a thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Chaillet, Nicolas; Lexcellent, Christian; Bourjault, Alain

    1999-06-01

    Microtechnologies and microsystems engineering use new active materials. These materials are interesting to realize microactuators and microsensors. In this category of materials, Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) are good candidates for microactuation. SMA wires, or thin plates, can be used as active material in microfingers. These microstructures are able to provide very important forces, but have low dynamic response, especially for cooling, in confined environment. The control of the SMA phase transformations, and then the mechanical power generation, is made by the temperature. The Joule effect is an easy and efficiency way to heat the SMA wires, but cooling is not so easy. The dynamic response of the actuator depends on cooling capabilities. The thermal convection and conduction are the traditional ways to cool the SMA, but have limitations for microsystems. We are looking for a reversible way of heating and cooling SMA microactuators, based on the thermoelectric effects. Using Peltier effect, a positive or a negative electrical courant is able to pump or produce heat, in the SMA actuator. A physical model based on thermal exchanges between a Nickel/Titanium (NiTi) SMA, and Bismuth/Telluride (Te3Bi2) thermoelectric material has been developed. For simulation, we use a numerical resolution of our model, with finite elements, which takes into account the Peltier effect, the Joule effect, the convection, the conduction and the phase transformation of the SMA. We have also developed the corresponding experimental system, with two thermoelectric junctions, where the SMA actuator is one of the element of each junction. In this paper, the physical model and its numerical resolution are given, the experimental system used to validate the model is described, and experimental results are shown.

  16. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling the behavior of enhanced geothermal systems. An efficient coupling strategy is determined for numerical performance of the model. We provide new insight into the coupled modeling of fluid flow, heat transport of engineered geothermal reservoirs with focus on the thermal stress changes during the stimulation process. We further investigate the interplay of thermal and poro-elastic stress changes in the reservoir

  17. Kinetic Parameters of Thermal Decomposition Process Analyzed using a Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Ekawati, R.; Wibawa, S. C.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to show a mathematical analysis model for understanding kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition process. The mathematical model was derived based on phenomena happen during the thermal-related reaction. To get the kinetic parameters (i.e. reaction order, activation energy, and Arrhenius constant), the model was combined with the thermal characteristics of material gained from the thermal gravity (TG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) curves. As an example, the model was used for analyzing the kinetic properties of trinitrotoluene. Interestingly, identical results gained from the present model with current literatures were obtained; in which these were because the present model was derived directly from the analysis of stoichiometrical and thermal analysis of the ideal chemical reaction. Since the present model confirmed to have a good agreement with current theories, further derivation from the present mathematical model can be useful for further development.

  18. A MeV tunable gamma-ray source by Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stritt, N.; Jolie, J.; Maser, H.; Pitz, H. H.

    1996-02-01

    A tunable gamma-ray source in the MeV energy range can be obtained by Compton scattering of discrete gamma rays emitted after thermal neutron capture in an in-pile target. Here we report on the principle, on the results of Monte Carlo simulations for the photon flux and on the first realization of such a tubable gamma-ray source at the ILL high flux nuclear reactor in Grenoble (France). Two strong primary gamma rays, with energies of 6.7 and 6.4 MeV, respectively, are produced (among others) by the 48Ti(n, γ) 49Ti reaction. Compton scattering of these photons on a graphite target (scatterer) yields gamma rays of lower energy. Their energy is tunable between about 300 keV and 6 MeV by choosing the appropriate scattering angle. This tunable gamma-ray source could be a very useful tool to investigate photoexcitations in nuclei, which require gamma rays of several MeV. This new source might overcome the background problems present with bremsstrahlung sources, since it is a quasi-discrete and not a continuous source. Therefore, considerably less background is produced in the lower energetic part of the spectra.

  19. Thermal hydraulics modeling of the US Geological Survey TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaabi, Ahmed K.

    The Geological Survey TRIGA reactor (GSTR) is a 1 MW Mark I TRIGA reactor located in Lakewood, Colorado. Single channel GSTR thermal hydraulics models built using RELAP5/MOD3.3, RELAP5-3D, TRACE, and COMSOL Multiphysics predict the fuel, outer clad, and coolant temperatures as a function of position in the core. The results from the RELAP5/MOD3.3, RELAP5-3D, and COMSOL models are similar. The TRACE model predicts significantly higher temperatures, potentially resulting from inappropriate convection correlations. To more accurately study the complex fluid flow patterns within the core, this research develops detailed RELAP5/MOD3.3 and COMSOL multichannel models of the GSTR core. The multichannel models predict lower fuel, outer clad, and coolant temperatures compared to the single channel models by up to 16.7°C, 4.8°C, and 9.6°C, respectively, as a result of the higher mass flow rates predicted by these models. The single channel models and the RELAP5/MOD3.3 multichannel model predict that the coolant temperatures in all fuel rings rise axially with core height, as the coolant in these models flows predominantly in the axial direction. The coolant temperatures predicted by the COMSOL multichannel model rise with core height in the B-, C-, and D-rings and peak and then decrease in the E-, F-, and G-rings, as the coolant tends to flow from the bottom sides of the core to the center of the core in this model. Experiments at the GSTR measured coolant temperatures in the GSTR core to validate the developed models. The axial temperature profiles measured in the GSTR show that the flow patterns predicted by the COMSOL multichannel model are consistent with the actual conditions in the core. Adjusting the RELAP5/MOD3.3 single and multichannel models by modifying the axial and cross-flow areas allow them to better predict the GSTR coolant temperatures; however, the adjusted models still fail to predict accurate axial temperature profiles in the E-, F-, and G-rings.

  20. A Rat Model of Full Thickness Thermal Injury Characterized by Thermal Hyperalgesia, Mechanical Allodynia, Pronociceptive Peptide Release and Tramadol Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    4 weeks (n 2 per time point) post injury to visualize burn pathology . A board certified veterinary pathol ogist characterized the degree of burn...an animal model of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia evoked by full thickness thermal injury that shares pathological characteristics with...sections were rinsed in potassium phosphate buffered saline (KPBS) and incubated in primary antibody solution rabbit anti CGRP (1:10,000; Immunostar; Hudson

  1. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off longitudinally polarised protons at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahon, David Francis

    2010-06-15

    This thesis details the simultaneous extraction of three polarisation-dependent asymmetries in the distribution of real photons from the ep{yields}ep{gamma} interaction and its indistinguishable deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes at the HERMES fixed-target experiment at Desy. The data analysed were taken using a longitudinally polarised 27.57 GeV positron beam incident on a longitudinally polarised hydrogen gas target. The extracted asymmetries include two single-spin asymmetries A{sub UL} and A{sub LU} which depend on the polarisation of the target and beam respectively, averaged over all other polarisation states. The double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL} dependent on the product of the beam and target polarisations is extracted for the first time. The asymmetry amplitudes extracted relate to combinations of Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs), predominantly H and H. The extracted amplitudes are presented across the HERMES kinematic range alongside theoretical predictions from a GPD model based on double distributions. Large sin {phi} and cos(0{phi}) amplitudes are observed for A{sub UL} and A{sub LL} respectively, with an unexpectedly large sin(2{phi}) amplitude for A{sub UL}. The results for the A{sub UL} and A{sub LL} asymmetries are broadly compatible with theory predictions, and the extracted A{sub LU} amplitudes are compatible with HERMES results extracted from a significantly larger data set. It is foreseen that these results will form input to future global data-based GPD models which aim to provide a better understanding of GPDs. (orig.)

  2. Transient thermal modeling of permafrost conditions in Southern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Westermann

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermal modeling is a powerful tool to infer the temperature regime of the ground in permafrost areas. We present a transient permafrost model, CryoGrid 2, that calculates ground temperatures according to conductive heat transfer in the soil and in the snowpack. CryoGrid 2 is forced by operational air temperature and snow-depth products for potential permafrost areas in Southern Norway for the period 1958 to 2009 at 1 km2 spatial resolution. In total, an area of about 80 000 km2 is covered. The model results are validated against borehole temperatures, permafrost probability maps from "bottom temperature of snow" measurements and inventories of landforms indicative of permafrost occurrence. The validation demonstrates that CryoGrid 2 can reproduce the observed lower permafrost limit to within 100 m at all validation sites, while the agreement between simulated and measured borehole temperatures is within 1 K for most sites. The number of grid cells with simulated permafrost does not change significantly between the 1960s and 1990s. In the 2000s, a significant reduction of about 40% of the area with average 2 m ground temperatures below 0 °C is found, which mostly corresponds to degrading permafrost with still negative temperatures in deeper ground layers. The thermal conductivity of the snow is the largest source of uncertainty in CryoGrid 2, strongly affecting the simulated permafrost area. Finally, the prospects of employing CryoGrid 2 as an operational soil-temperature product for Norway are discussed.

  3. Entanglement, decoherence and thermal relaxation in exactly solvable models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychkovskiy, Oleg

    2011-07-01

    Exactly solvable models provide an opportunity to study different aspects of reduced quantum dynamics in detail. We consider the reduced dynamics of a single spin in finite XX and XY spin 1/2 chains. First we introduce a general expression describing the evolution of the reduced density matrix. This expression proves to be tractable when the combined closed system (i.e. open system plus environment) is integrable. Then we focus on comparing decoherence and thermalization timescales in the XX chain. We find that for a single spin these timescales are comparable, in contrast to what should be expected for a macroscopic body. This indicates that the process of quantum relaxation of a system with few accessible states can not be separated in two distinct stages - decoherence and thermalization. Finally, we turn to finite-size effects in the time evolution of a single spin in the XY chain. We observe three consecutive stages of the evolution: regular evolution, partial revivals, irregular (apparently chaotic) evolution. The duration of the regular stage is proportional to the number of spins in the chain. We observe a "quiet and cold period" in the end of the regular stage, which breaks up abruptly at some threshold time.

  4. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Stephanie A; Lopes-Berkas, Vanessa; Beam, Sheree; Anderson, Joseph C

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate the potential of bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation to result in clinically relevant improvements in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with upper lobe-predominant emphysema. However, the mechanisms by which vapor ablation results in lung volume reduction are not fully known. This study determined the 3-month safety and efficacy of vapor ablation in a canine model of emphysema and described the histopathological changes in the lung. The cranial lobes of papain-exposed dogs were treated with a vapor dose of ten calories per gram of lung tissue (n = 8) or were sham treated (n = 3). Safety was monitored peri- and postoperatively for 3 months. Animals were then sacrificed, estimates of lung volume reduction performed, and the lungs processed for histology. Vapor ablation was associated with an average of 20% volume reduction of the treated lobes and an absence of serious adverse events. The amount of lobar volume reduction was correlated with the amount of fibrosis and atelectasis in the treated lobe. Bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation at a dose of 10 cal/g results in lobar volume reduction associated with remodeling of the targeted tissue characterized by mature collagen formation in the absence of major adverse events.

  5. Modeling the thermal deformation of TATB-based explosives. Part 1: Thermal expansion of “neat-pressed” polycrystalline TATB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luscher, Darby J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-08

    We detail a modeling approach to simulate the anisotropic thermal expansion of polycrystalline (1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene) TATB-based explosives that utilizes microstructural information including porosity, crystal aspect ratio, and processing-induced texture. This report, the first in a series, focuses on nonlinear thermal expansion of “neat-pressed” polycrystalline TATB specimens which do not contain any binder; additional complexities related to polymeric binder and irreversible ratcheting behavior are briefly discussed, however detailed investigation of these aspects are deferred to subsequent reports. In this work we have, for the first time, developed a mesoscale continuum model relating the thermal expansion of polycrystal TATB specimens to their microstructural characteristics. A self-consistent homogenization procedure is used to relate macroscopic thermoelastic response to the constitutive behavior of single-crystal TATB. The model includes a representation of grain aspect ratio, porosity, and crystallographic texture attributed to the consolidation process. A quantitative model is proposed to describe the evolution of preferred orientation of graphitic planes in TATB during consolidation and an algorithm constructed to develop a discrete representation of the associated orientation distribution function. Analytical and numerical solutions using this model are shown to produce textures consistent with previous measurements and characterization for isostatic and uniaxial “die-pressed” specimens. Predicted thermal strain versus temperature for textured specimens are shown to be in agreement with corresponding experimental measurements. Using the developed modeling approach, several simulations have been run to investigate the influence of microstructure on macroscopic thermal expansion behavior. Results from these simulations are used to identify qualitative trends. Implications of the identified trends are discussed in the context of

  6. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Dwarf Galaxies. Jayashri Medhi. ∗. , H. L. Duorah, A. G. Barua & K. Duorah. Physics Department, Gauhati University, Gopinath Bardoloi Nagar, Guwahati 781 014, India. ∗ e-mail: jayashri.medhi@rediffmail.com. Received 18 May 2016; accepted 4 July ...

  7. On a low intensity 241Am Compton spectrometer for measurement ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Am γ-ray Compton spectrometer is presented. The planar spectrometer is based on a small disc source with the shortest geometry. Measurement of the momentum density of polycrystalline Al is used to evaluate the performance of the new design. The measured profile is in good agreement with the existing theoretical data ...

  8. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    OpenAIRE

    Defurne, Maxime; DVCS, Hall A

    2014-01-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q$^2$=1.9~GeV$^2$ effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed.

  9. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    CERN Document Server

    Defurne, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q$^2$=1.9 GeV$^2$ effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed.

  10. New JLab/Hall A Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Defurne, Maxime [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU/SPhN/LSN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France

    2015-08-01

    New data points for unpolarized Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering cross sections have been extracted from the E00-110 experiment at Q2=1.9 GeV2 effectively doubling the statistics available in the valence region. A careful study of systematic uncertainties has been performed.

  11. All-optical Compton gamma-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Phuoc, K Ta; Thaury, C; Malka, V; Tafzi, A; Goddet, J P; Shah, R C; Sebban, S; Rousse, A; 10.1038/nphoton.2012.82

    2013-01-01

    One of the major goals of research for laser-plasma accelerators is the realization of compact sources of femtosecond X-rays. In particular, using the modest electron energies obtained with existing laser systems, Compton scattering a photon beam off a relativistic electron bunch has been proposed as a source of high-energy and high-brightness photons. However, laser-plasma based approaches to Compton scattering have not, to date, produced X-rays above 1 keV. Here, we present a simple and compact scheme for a Compton source based on the combination of a laser-plasma accelerator and a plasma mirror. This approach is used to produce a broadband spectrum of X-rays extending up to hundreds of keV and with a 10,000-fold increase in brightness over Compton X-ray sources based on conventional accelerators. We anticipate that this technique will lead to compact, high-repetition-rate sources of ultrafast (femtosecond), tunable (X- through gamma-ray) and low-divergence (~1 degree) photons from source sizes on the order...

  12. Compton effect as a basic process in the conversion region

    CERN Document Server

    Serbo, V G

    2001-01-01

    In this small review, the following general properties of the Compton scattering as the basic process for creating gamma gamma colliders in the scheme suggested in Ginzburg et al. (Inst. Nucl. Phys. 34 (1981) 514; Nucl. Instr. and Meth. 205 (1983) 47) are considered: kinematics, photon spectrum, angular distribution, polarization of the final photons and electrons as well as some related problems.

  13. High-Redshift Compton Thick AGN with EXIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treister, Ezequiel; Urry, C.; Coppi, P.; Virani, S.

    2009-01-01

    It has been suspected for many years that a large number of heavily obscured, Compton Thick, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) should exist at all redshifts, but the exact number of them is still highly uncertain. Recent all-sky surveys with INTEGRAL and Swift are starting to constrain the number of Compton Thick AGN in the local Universe, zEXIST observations. We expect to find a total of 120 Compton Thick AGN at 0.5Compton Thick AGN can be larger by 5x, thus changing significantly our view of the cosmic accretion history. E.T. gratefully acknowledges the support provided by NASA through Chandra Postdoctoral Fellowship Award Number PF8-90055 issued by the Chandra X-ray Observatory Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of NASA under contract NAS8-03060.

  14. Modelling occupants' personal characteristics for thermal comfort prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldi, Frédéric; Robinson, Darren

    2011-09-01

    Based on results from a field survey campaign conducted in Switzerand, we show that occupants' variations in clothing choices, which are relatively unconstrained, are best described by the daily mean outdoor temperature and that major clothing adjustments occur rarely during the day. We then develop an ordinal logistic model of the probability distribution of discretised clothing levels, which results in a concise and informative expression of occupants' clothing choices. Results from both cross-validation and independent verification suggest that this model formulation may be used with confidence. Furthermore, the form of the model is readily generalisable, given the requisite calibration data, to environments where dress codes are more specific. We also observe that, for these building occupants, the prevailing metabolic activity levels are mostly constant for the whole range of surveyed environmental conditions, as their activities are relatively constrained by the tasks in hand. Occupants may compensate for this constraint, however, through the consumption of cold and hot drinks, with corresponding impacts on metabolic heat production. Indeed, cold drink consumption was found to be highly correlated with indoor thermal conditions, whilst hot drink consumption is best described by a seasonal variable. These variables can be used for predictive purposes using binary logistic models.

  15. Modelling the Thermal History of Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, James M.; Kiefer, W. S.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The asteroid 4 Vesta is widely thought to be the source of the HED (Howardite, Eucrite and Diogenite) meteorites, with this link supported by spectroscopic and dynamical studies. The availability of the HED meteorites for study and the new data being gained from the Dawn mission provides an excellent opportunity to investigate Vesta s history. In this study, modelling of Vesta has been undertaken to investigate its evolution from an unconsolidated chondritic body to a differentiated body with an iron core. In contrast to previous modelling, both heat and mass transfer are considered as coupled processes. This work draws on models of melt segregation in terrestrial environments to inform the evolution of Vesta into the differentiated body observed today. In order for a core to form in this body, a separation of the metallic iron from the silicates must take place. Temperatures in excess of the solidus temperatures for the Fe-FeS system and the silicates are therefore required. Thermal modelling has shown accretion before 2Myr leads to temperatures in excess of the silicate solidus.

  16. Inverse Compton X-ray emission from the superluminal quasar 3C 345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, S. C.; Wehrle, A. E.; Urry, C. M.; Gilmore, D. M.; Barton, E. J.; Kjerulf, B. C.; Zensus, J. A.; Rabaca, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    In quasars with strong radio cores, the inverse-Compton process is believed to be the dominant source X-ray emission. For objects with parsec-scale radio jets, simple models have predicted that components in the jet emerging from the quasar nucleus generate the observed X-ray emission. We have tested this hypothesis in detail for the quasar 3C 345 using a ROSAT X-ray observation in 1990 July, together with quasi-simultaneous very long base interferometry (VLBI) imaging of the parsec-scale jet at five frequencies. The ROSAT spectrum is well fitted by a power law with index alpha = -0.96 +/- -0.13, consistent with models in which the X-ray emission results from inverse-Compton scattering of radio radiation from high-energy electrons in compact components. We show that the radio properties of brightest `knot' in the jet (`C5') can be fitted with a homogeneous sphere model whose parameters require bulk relativistic motion of the emitting material; otherwise the predicted model whose parameters require bulk relativistic motion of the emitting material; otherwise the predicted inverse-Compton X-ray emission exceeds the observed flux. If C5 is the origin of the X-ray emission, then it has a Doppler factor delta = 7.5((sup +3 sub -2)). If the nucleus or other components contribute to the X-ray emission, then this becomes a firm lower limit to delta. The inhomogeneous jet model of Koenigl is a good fit both to the barely resolved (less than 1 pc) flat-spectrum nucleus in the radio, and also to the ROSAT X-ray spectrum. The synchrotron and inverse-Compton emitting fluid moves down a narrow cone (opening angle 2 phi approximately 5 deg) nucleus relativistically, with delta approximately 4.6. Doppler factors for the nucleus and C5, derived from our ROSAT observation, provide evidence for bulk relativistic motion in the jet. By combining these constraints with well-known superluminal motion of jet components, we can deduce geometry. For epoch 1990.5 we infer the Lorentz factor

  17. submitter Thermal, Hydraulic, and Electromagnetic Modeling of Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2016-01-01

    Modeling techniques and tailored computational tools are becoming increasingly relevant to the design and analysis of large-scale superconducting magnet systems. Efficient and reliable tools are useful to provide an optimal forecast of the envelope of operating conditions and margins, which are difficult to test even when a prototype is available. This knowledge can be used to considerably reduce the design margins of the system, and thus the overall cost, or increase reliability during operation. An integrated analysis of a superconducting magnet system is, however, a complex matter, governed by very diverse physics. This paper reviews the wide spectrum of phenomena and provides an estimate of the time scales of thermal, hydraulic, and electromagnetic mechanisms affecting the performance of superconducting magnet systems. The analysis is useful to provide guidelines on how to divide the complex problem into building blocks that can be integrated in a design and analysis framework for a consistent multiphysic...

  18. Frequency-Domain Thermal Modelling and Characterization of Power Semiconductor Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; He, Ning; Liserre, Marco

    2016-01-01

    -based thermal networks are explained from a point of view of frequency domain. Based on the discovery, a more advanced thermal model developed in the frequency domain is proposed, which can be easily established by characterizing the slope variation from the bode diagram of the typically used Foster thermal...

  19. Thermal Modeling of the Injection of Standard and Thermally Insulated Cored Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Cedeno, E.-I.; Jardy, A.; Carré, A.; Gerardin, S.; Bellot, J. P.

    2017-09-01

    Cored wire injection is a widespread method used to perform alloying additions during ferrous and non-ferrous liquid metal treatment. The wire consists of a metal casing that is tightly wrapped around a core of material; the casing delays the release of the material as the wire is immersed into the melt. This method of addition presents advantages such as higher repeatability and yield of cored material with respect to bulk additions. Experimental and numerical work has been performed by several authors on the subject of alloy additions, spherical and cylindrical geometries being mainly considered. Surprisingly this has not been the case for cored wire, where the reported experimental or numerical studies are scarce. This work presents a 1-D finite volume numerical model aimed for the simulation of the thermal phenomena which occurs when the wire is injected into a liquid metal bath. It is currently being used as a design tool for the conception of new types of cored wire. A parametric study on the effect of injection velocity and steel casing thickness for an Al cored wire immersed into a steel melt at 1863 K (1590 °C) is presented. The standard single casing wire is further compared against a wire with multiple casings. Numerical results show that over a certain range of injection velocities, the core contents' release is delayed in the multiple casing when compared to a single casing wire.

  20. Thermal Modeling of the Injection of Standard and Thermally Insulated Cored Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Cedeno, E.-I.; Jardy, A.; Carré, A.; Gerardin, S.; Bellot, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Cored wire injection is a widespread method used to perform alloying additions during ferrous and non-ferrous liquid metal treatment. The wire consists of a metal casing that is tightly wrapped around a core of material; the casing delays the release of the material as the wire is immersed into the melt. This method of addition presents advantages such as higher repeatability and yield of cored material with respect to bulk additions. Experimental and numerical work has been performed by several authors on the subject of alloy additions, spherical and cylindrical geometries being mainly considered. Surprisingly this has not been the case for cored wire, where the reported experimental or numerical studies are scarce. This work presents a 1-D finite volume numerical model aimed for the simulation of the thermal phenomena which occurs when the wire is injected into a liquid metal bath. It is currently being used as a design tool for the conception of new types of cored wire. A parametric study on the effect of injection velocity and steel casing thickness for an Al cored wire immersed into a steel melt at 1863 K (1590 °C) is presented. The standard single casing wire is further compared against a wire with multiple casings. Numerical results show that over a certain range of injection velocities, the core contents' release is delayed in the multiple casing when compared to a single casing wire.

  1. Coded-aperture Compton camera for gamma-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Aaron M.

    This dissertation describes the development of a novel gamma-ray imaging system concept and presents results from Monte Carlo simulations of the new design. Current designs for large field-of-view gamma cameras suitable for homeland security applications implement either a coded aperture or a Compton scattering geometry to image a gamma-ray source. Both of these systems require large, expensive position-sensitive detectors in order to work effectively. By combining characteristics of both of these systems, a new design can be implemented that does not require such expensive detectors and that can be scaled down to a portable size. This new system has significant promise in homeland security, astronomy, botany and other fields, while future iterations may prove useful in medical imaging, other biological sciences and other areas, such as non-destructive testing. A proof-of-principle study of the new gamma-ray imaging system has been performed by Monte Carlo simulation. Various reconstruction methods have been explored and compared. General-Purpose Graphics-Processor-Unit (GPGPU) computation has also been incorporated. The resulting code is a primary design tool for exploring variables such as detector spacing, material selection and thickness and pixel geometry. The advancement of the system from a simple 1-dimensional simulation to a full 3-dimensional model is described. Methods of image reconstruction are discussed and results of simulations consisting of both a 4 x 4 and a 16 x 16 object space mesh have been presented. A discussion of the limitations and potential areas of further study is also presented.

  2. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup

    2016-01-01

    A basic challenge in the IGBT transient simulation study is to obtain the realistic junction temperature, which demands not only accurate electrical simulations but also precise thermal impedance. This paper proposed a transient thermal model for IGBT junction temperature simulations during short...... circuits or overloads. The updated Cauer thermal model with varying thermal parameters is obtained by means of FEM thermal simulations with temperature-dependent physical parameters. The proposed method is applied to a case study of a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module. Furthermore, a testing setup is built up...

  3. Thermal infrared spectroscopy and modeling of experimentally shocked basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Staid, M.I.; Kraft, M.D.

    2007-01-01

    New measurements of thermal infrared emission spectra (250-1400 cm-1; ???7-40 ??m) of experimentally shocked basalt and basaltic andesite (17-56 GPa) exhibit changes in spectral features with increasing pressure consistent with changes in the structure of plagioclase feldspars. Major spectral absorptions in unshocked rocks between 350-700 cm-1 (due to Si-O-Si octahedral bending vibrations) and between 1000-1250 cm-1 (due to Si-O antisymmetric stretch motions of the silica tetrahedra) transform at pressures >20-25 GPa to two broad spectral features centered near 950-1050 and 400-450 cm-1. Linear deconvolution models using spectral libraries composed of common mineral and glass spectra replicate the spectra of shocked basalt relatively well up to shock pressures of 20-25 GPa, above which model errors increase substantially, coincident with the onset of diaplectic glass formation in plagioclase. Inclusion of shocked feldspar spectra in the libraries improves fits for more highly shocked basalt. However, deconvolution models of the basaltic andesite select shocked feldspar end-members even for unshocked samples, likely caused by the higher primary glass content in the basaltic andesite sample.

  4. Thermal modelling of the calorimeter used for energy measurement of LMJ laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crespy C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a 3D thermal model of the LMJ calorimeter is developed using Comsol multiphysics. The unknown thermal properties of the system are identified by comparing the model results with the measured temperature. Several model's applications, such as comparing deposition modes (electrical and optical or defining calibration procedure, are presented.

  5. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  6. Observational limits on inverse Compton processes in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran, Tsvi; Sari, Re'em; Zou, Yuan-Chuan

    2009-03-01

    Inverse Compton (IC) scattering is one of two viable mechanisms that can produce prompt non-thermal soft gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts. IC requires low-energy seed photons and a population of relativistic electrons that upscatter them. The same electrons will upscatter the gamma-ray photons to even higher energies in the TeV range. Using the current upper limits on the prompt optical emission, we show that under general conservative assumption the IC mechanism suffers from an `energy crisis'. Namely, IC will overproduce a very high energy component that would carry much more energy than the observed prompt gamma-rays, or alternatively it will require a low-energy seed that is more energetic than the prompt gamma-rays. Our analysis is general, and it makes no assumptions on the specific mechanism that produces the relativistic electron population.

  7. Software for Automated Generation of Reduced Thermal Models for Spacecraft Thermal Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermal analysis is increasingly used in the engineering of spacecrafts at every stage, including design, test, and ground-operation simulation. Currently used...

  8. Thermal Modeling of Comet-like Objects from AKARI Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Yoonsoo P.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Usui, Fumihiko

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the physical properties of the comet-like objects 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington (4015WH) and P/2006 HR30 (Siding Spring; HR30) by applying a simple thermophysical model to the near-infrared spectroscopy and broadband observation data obtained by the AKARIsatellite of JAXA when they showed no detectable comet-like activity. We selected these two targets because the tendency of thermal inertia to decrease with the size of an asteroid, which has been demonstrated in recent studies, has not been confirmed for comet-like objects. It was found that 4015WH, which was originally discovered as a comet but has not shown comet-like activity after its discovery, has effective size D = 3.74-4.39 km and geometric albedo {p}V≈ 0.040{--}0.055 with thermal inertia {{Γ }}=100{--}250 J m-2 K-1 {{{s}}}-1/2. The corresponding grain size is estimated as 1-3 mm. We also found that HR30, which was observed as a bare cometary nucleus at the time of our observation, has D=23.9{--}27.1 km and {p}V=0.035{--}0.045 with {{Γ }}=250{--}1000 J m-2 K-1 {{{s}}}-1/2. We conjecture the pole latitude -20^\\circ ≲ {β }s≲ +60^\\circ . The results for both targets are consistent with previous studies. Based on the results, we propose that comet-like objects are not clearly distinguishable from their asteroidal counterparts on the D-Γ plane.

  9. Integrated System Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Stephen W.; Borowski, Stanley K.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) has long been identified as a key enabling technology for space exploration beyond LEO. From Wernher Von Braun's early concepts for crewed missions to the Moon and Mars to the current Mars Design Reference Architecture (DRA) 5.0 and recent lunar and asteroid mission studies, the high thrust and specific impulse of NTP opens up possibilities such as reusability that are just not feasible with competing approaches. Although NTP technology was proven in the Rover / NERVA projects in the early days of the space program, an integrated spacecraft using NTP has never been developed. Such a spacecraft presents a challenging multidisciplinary systems integration problem. The disciplines that must come together include not only nuclear propulsion and power, but also thermal management, power, structures, orbital dynamics, etc. Some of this integration logic was incorporated into a vehicle sizing code developed at NASA's Glenn Research Center (GRC) in the early 1990s called MOMMA, and later into an Excel-based tool called SIZER. Recently, a team at GRC has developed an open source framework for solving Multidisciplinary Design, Analysis and Optimization (MDAO) problems called OpenMDAO. A modeling approach is presented that builds on previous work in NTP vehicle sizing and mission analysis by making use of the OpenMDAO framework to enable modular and reconfigurable representations of various NTP vehicle configurations and mission scenarios. This approach is currently applied to vehicle sizing, but is extensible to optimization of vehicle and mission designs. The key features of the code will be discussed and examples of NTP transfer vehicles and candidate missions will be presented.

  10. A numerical approach to thermal history modelling in an extensional basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunwal, Mohit; Mulchrone, Kieran; Meere, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Temperature plays an important role in many geological phenomena. In sedimentary basins, maturation of hydrocarbon source rocks depends on the temperature history after deposition. Sedimentation rate, geothermal gradient and duration of sedimentation are therefore key parameters controlling the thermal evolution. The McKenzie model is a widely accepted model for extensional basin formation which can be used for estimating post-rift subsidence, rate of sedimentation and basal heat flow. In this work, a numerical model in 1D has been implemented based on McKenzie's model and allows for the estimation of the thermal evolution of post-rift sediments and the rate of subsidence. The finite difference method is used to solve the heat equation in the sediments, crust and upper mantle. At each time step, subsidence due to thermal relaxation is calculated and added to the system. In this way the generalised moving boundary thermal diffusion problem is solved. Heat generated due to radioactivity may also be taken into account. The numerical model when compared to the McKenzie model gives significantly lower thermal subsidence estimates. Final thermal subsidence for the two models are compared with respect to the stretching factor. This model shows that significantly higher stretching is required to achieve the same level of thermal subsidence when compared to the McKenzie model. For example in the McKenzie model a 5 km of thermal subsidence is achieved with 280% stretching whereas this model requires 450% stretching.

  11. Thermal Recirculation Modeling for Power Plants in an Estuarine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Salehi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many power plants require large quantities of water for cooling purposes. The water taken from the source water body (e.g., lakes, estuaries, bays and rivers circulates through the plant and returns to the source through outfall with a higher temperature. For optimal performance of the power plant, the intake inlet and discharge outlet should be meticulously placed so that the heated water will not recirculate back into the power plant. In this study, the Flow module of the Delft3D software is employed to simulate the temperature transport within the study area in three-dimensional and nested format. Model results are used to optimize the location of intake inlets, outfall outlets and diffuser port orientations. The physical processes used in the study are tidal fluctuations, winds, river discharges, salinity and temperature. The subject power plant (power plant parameters presented in this paper are realistic; however, they do not target any specific power plant within the study area has a nominal capacity of 2600 MW and is planned to be located in Delaware Bay, USA. Existing field measurements are used to calibrate the model in a coupled two-staged fashion for main tidal constituents, currents and water temperature. The sensitivity of the model against various input parameters is tested, and conservative values are selected. The location of the intake is fixed, and the location of the outfall is changed until the thermal impact to the intake is less than 1 °C. Analysis of the results shows that there is a linear logarithmic relation between the excess temperatures at the intake inlet and horizontal eddy diffusivity. The k - ϵ turbulence closure results in higher excess temperature and a more conservative design. Extending the outfall location to the deeper portion of the estuary combined with port orientations reduces the impact by keeping the thermal plume away from the intake inlet and meeting the established criteria. It is concluded that

  12. Modeling elements of energy systems for thermal energy transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shurygin A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Heating industrial facilities and the residential sector in recent years is the economic and technical challenge. It has been noted that the efficiency of the heat generating equipment depends not only on its sophistication, fuel type, but also on work of the distributing network taking into account the thermal, hydraulic losses, characteristics and modes of use of heating objects – buildings and technological processes. Possibility of supplying maximum heat flow from the heating system considering mismatch of highs and types of resources consumed from individual consumers should be provided by the right choice of energy equipment set, as well as bandwidth of transport systems and possibility of its regulation. It is important not just to configure the system to work effectively in the current mode (usually at the maximum load, but in the entire load range, as the calculated mode often takes a relatively small portion of the operating time. Thus, the efficiency of heating systems is largely determined by the method used for its control, including the possibility of regulating the main units and elements of the system. The paper considers the factors affecting the system efficiency. Mathematical models of the system elements allowing adjust the amount of released heat energy for consumers have been presented. Separately the mathematical model of the control system of electric drive vehicles used in the system has been considered and implemented.

  13. Limiting fragmentation in a thermal model with flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Tiwari, Swatantra; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol, Indore (India)

    2016-12-15

    The property of limiting fragmentation of various observables such as rapidity distributions (dN/dy), elliptic flow (v{sub 2}), average transverse momentum (left angle p{sub T} right angle) etc. of charged particles is observed when they are plotted as a function of rapidity (y) shifted by the beam rapidity (y{sub beam}) for a wide range of energies from AGS to RHIC. Limiting fragmentation (LF) is a well-studied phenomenon as observed in various collision energies and colliding systems experimentally. It is very interesting to verify this phenomenon theoretically. We study such a phenomenon for pion rapidity spectra using our hydrodynamic-like model where the collective flow is incorporated in a thermal model in the longitudinal direction. Our findings advocate the observation of extended longitudinal scaling in the rapidity spectra of pions from AGS to lower RHIC energies, while it is observed to be violated at top RHIC and LHC energies. Prediction of LF hypothesis for Pb+Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV is given. (orig.)

  14. Mathematical Modelling of Thermal Stratification in a Cryogenic Propellant Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Gagan; Joseph, Jeswin; Agarwal, Deepak; Pisharady, J. C.; Kumar, S. Sunil

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic tanks used for space applications are filled with sub-cooled cryogenic propellants, whose liquid-vapor interface remains undisturbed for long periods of time prior to launch. During this period, substantial amount of heat leaks into the tank from external sources such as solar and ambient convective fluxes, even though the tank is well insulated. This results in thermal stratification near the liquid vapour interface. A transient, two-phase, thermodynamic model of stratification in a cryogenic tank is developed, considering propellant boundary layer flow due to natural convection close to tank wall. Continuity, momentum, energy and mass transfer equations are solved using finite difference-based formulations of SINDA/FLUINT simulator. The analytical model is validated with test results reported in literature. Subsequently, studies are carried out to investigate the effect of liquid sub-cooling in propellant tank on stratified mass and liquid temperature profile. The study shows that sub-cooling of cryogenic tank leads to significant increase in stratified mass.

  15. Thermal degradation kinetics of bixin in an aqueous model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Alessandro de O; Borsarelli, Claudio D; Mercadante, Adriana Z

    2005-03-23

    The kinetics of the thermal degradation of the natural cis carotenoid bixin in a water/ethanol (8:2) solution was studied as a function of temperature (70-125 degrees C), using high-performance liquid chromatography. The curves for the decay of bixin and formation of products (e.g., di-cis and all-trans isomers and a C17 degradation compound) did not adjust well to a first-order rate law, but very good fits were obtained using a biexponential model. This mathematical modeling gave the rate constant values for the formation of the primary products from bixin, and the energy barrier for each step was obtained. The di-cis isomers were formed immediately (15 kcal/mol) together with the decay of bixin, followed by a slow consumption, indicating their role as reaction intermediates. In fact, the di-cis isomers could easily revert to bixin (Ea approximately 3 kcal/mol) or yield the primary C17 degradation product, with an energy barrier of 6.5 kcal/mol. In turn, 24 kcal/mol was necessary for the Bix --> all-trans step, explaining its slower formation.

  16. Compact model of power MOSFET with temperature dependent Cauer RC network for more accurate thermal simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Juraj; Chvála, Aleš; Donoval, Daniel; Príbytný, Patrik; Molnár, Marián; Mikolášek, Miroslav

    2014-04-01

    A new, more accurate SPICE-like model of a power MOSFET containing a temperature dependent thermal network is described. The designed electro-thermal MOSFET model consists of several parts which represent different transistor behavior under different conditions such as reverse bias, avalanche breakdown and others. The designed model is able to simulate destruction of the device as thermal runaway and/or overcurrent destruction during the switching process of a wide variety of inductive loads. Modified thermal equivalent circuit diagrams were designed taking into account temperature dependence of thermal resistivity. The potential and limitations of the new models are presented and analyzed. The new model is compared with the standard and empirical models and brings a higher accuracy for rapid heating pulses. An unclamped inductive switching (UIS) test as a stressful condition was used to verify the proper behavior of the designed MOSFET model.

  17. Using computer simulation to improve high order thinking skills of physics teacher candidate students in Compton effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supurwoko; Cari; Sarwanto; Sukarmin; Fauzi, Ahmad; Faradilla, Lisa; Summa Dewi, Tiarasita

    2017-11-01

    The process of learning and teaching in Physics is often confronted with abstract concepts. It makes difficulty for students to understand and teachers to teach the concept. One of the materials that has an abstract concept is Compton Effect. The purpose of this research is to evaluate computer simulation model on Compton Effect material which is used to improve high thinking ability of Physics teacher candidate students. This research is a case study. The subject is students at physics educations who have attended Modern Physics lectures. Data were obtained through essay test for measuring students’ high-order thinking skills and quisioners for measuring students’ responses. The results obtained indicate that computer simulation model can be used to improve students’ high order thinking skill and can be used to improve students’ responses. With this result it is suggested that the audiences use the simulation media in learning

  18. Gaining improved chemical composition by exploitation of Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratio in XRF analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan; Rackwitz, Vanessa

    2014-07-15

    The high specificity of the coherent (Rayleigh), as well as incoherent (Compton) X-ray scattering to the mean atomic number of a specimen to be analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), is exploited to gain more information on the chemical composition. Concretely, the evaluation of the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratio from XRF spectra and its relation to the average atomic number of reference materials via a calibration curve can reveal valuable information on the elemental composition complementary to that obtained from the reference-free XRF analysis. Particularly for matrices of lower mean atomic numbers, the sensitivity of the approach is so high that it can be easily distinguished between specimens of mean atomic numbers differing from each other by 0.1. Hence, the content of light elements which are "invisible" for XRF, particularly hydrogen, or of heavier impurities/additives in light materials can be calculated "by difference" from the scattering calibration curve. The excellent agreement between such an experimental, empirical calibration curve and a synthetically generated one, on the basis of a reliable physical model for the X-ray scattering, is also demonstrated. Thus, the feasibility of the approach for given experimental conditions and particular analytical questions can be tested prior to experiments with reference materials. For the present work a microfocus X-ray source attached on an SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) system was used so that the Compton-to-Rayleigh intensity ratio could be acquired with EDX spectral data for improved analysis of the elemental composition.

  19. Spectral analysis of the Crab Nebula and GRB 160530A with the Compton Spectrometer and Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleator, Clio; Boggs, Steven E.; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Kierans, Carolyn; Lowell, Alexander; Tomsick, John; Zoglauer, Andreas; Amman, Mark; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Yang, Chien-Ying; Lin, Chih H.; Jean, Pierre; von Ballmoos, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray (0.2-5 MeV) telescope designed to study astrophysical sources including gamma-ray bursts and compact objects. As a compact Compton telescope, COSI has inherent sensitivity to polarization. COSI utilizes 12 germanium detectors to provide excellent spectral resolution. On May 17, 2016, COSI was launched from Wanaka, New Zealand and completed a successful 46-day flight on NASA’s new Superpressure balloon. To perform spectral analysis with COSI, we have developed an accurate instrument model as required for the response matrix. With carefully chosen background regions, we are able to fit the background-subtracted spectra in XSPEC. We have developed a model of the atmosphere above COSI based on the NRLMSISE-00 Atmosphere Model to include in our spectral fits. The Crab and GRB 160530A are among the sources detected during the 2016 flight. We present spectral analysis of these two point sources. Our GRB 160530A results are consistent with those from other instruments, confirming COSI’s spectral abilities. Furthermore, we discuss prospects for measuring the Crab polarization with COSI.

  20. Measurements of the Proton Spin Polarizabilities with Double-Polarized Compton Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Martel, P P; Aguar-Bartolome, P; Ahrens, J; Akondi, C S; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Barnes, W; Beck, R; Bernstein, A; Borisov, N; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Cherepnya, S; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Denig, A; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Fil'kov, L V; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gradl, W; Gurevich, G; Barrientos, P Hall; Hamilton, D; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Huber, G M; Jude, T C; Kaeser, A; Kashevarov, V L; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Krusche, B; Lazarev, A; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Mancell, J; Manley, D M; Meyer, W; Middleton, D G; Mushkarenkov, A; Nefkens, B M K; Neganov, A; Nikolaev, A; Oberle, M; Spina, H Ortega; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Polyansky, V; Prakhov, S; Rajabi, A; Reicherz, G; Rostomyan, T; Sarty, A; Schrauf, S; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Steffen, O; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Supek, I; Thiel, M; Tiator, L; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Usov, Y; Watts, D P; Witthauer, L; Werthmüller, D; Wolfes, M

    2014-01-01

    The spin polarizabilities of the nucleon describe how the spin of the nucleon responds to an incident polarized photon. The most model-independent way to measure the nucleon spin polarizabilities is through polarized Compton scattering. Double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetries on the proton were measured in the $\\Delta(1232)$ region using circularly polarized incident photons and a transversely polarized proton target at the Mainz Microtron. Fits to asymmetry data were performed using a dispersion model calculation and a baryon chiral perturbation theory calculation, and a separation of all four proton spin polarizabilities in the multipole basis was achieved. The analysis based on a dispersion model calculation yields $\\gamma_{E1E1} = -3.5 \\pm 1.2$, $\\gamma_{M1M1}= 3.16 \\pm 0.85$, $\\gamma_{E1M2} = -0.7 \\pm 1.2$, and $\\gamma_{M1E2} = 1.99 \\pm 0.29$, in units of $10^{-4}$ fm$^4$.

  1. Evaluation of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model. [Cyclic thermal injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hammersheimb, E.; Sawyer, W.

    1985-05-01

    The objective of the work performed under this directive is to assess whether gas hydrates could potentially be technically and economically recoverable. The technical potential and economics of recovering gas from a representative hydrate reservoir will be established using the cyclic thermal injection model, HYDMOD, appropriately modified for this effort, integrated with economics model for gas production on the North Slope of Alaska, and in the deep offshore Atlantic. The results from this effort are presented in this document. In Section 1, the engineering cost and financial analysis model used in performing the economic analysis of gas production from hydrates -- the Hydrates Gas Economics Model (HGEM) -- is described. Section 2 contains a users guide for HGEM. In Section 3, a preliminary economic assessment of the gas production economics of the gas hydrate cyclic thermal injection model is presented. Section 4 contains a summary critique of existing hydrate gas recovery models. Finally, Section 5 summarizes the model modification made to HYDMOD, the cyclic thermal injection model for hydrate gas recovery, in order to perform this analysis.

  2. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  3. A Combined Electro-Thermal Breakdown Model for Oil-Impregnated Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The breakdown property of oil-impregnated paper is a key factor for converter transformer design and operation, but it is not well understood. In this paper, breakdown voltages of oil-impregnated paper were measured at different temperatures. The results showed that with the increase of temperature, electrical, electro-thermal and thermal breakdown occurred successively. An electro-thermal breakdown model was proposed based on the heat equilibrium and space charge transport, and negative differential mobility was introduced to the model. It was shown that carrier mobility determined whether it was electrical or thermal breakdown, and the model can effectively explain the temperature-dependent breakdown.

  4. Two-dimensional Thermal Modeling of Lithium-ion Battery Cell Based on Electrothermal Impedance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Daniel Loan; Knap, Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    Thermal modeling of lithium-ion batteries is gaining its importance together with increasing power density and compact design of the modern battery systems in order to assure battery safety and long lifetime. Thermal models of lithium-ion batteries are usually either expensive to develop...... and accurate or equivalent thermal circuit based with moderate accuracy and without spatial temperature distribution. This work presents initial results that can be used as a fundament for the cost-efficient development of the two-dimensional thermal model of lithium-ion battery based on multipoint...

  5. Formation of cratonic lithosphere: An integrated thermal and petrological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Claude; Rudnick, Roberta

    2012-09-01

    The formation of cratonic mantle peridotite of Archean age is examined within the time frame of Earth's thermal history, and how it was expressed by temporal variations in magma and residue petrology. Peridotite residues that occupy the lithospheric mantle are rare owing to the effects of melt-rock reaction, metasomatism, and refertilization. Where they are identified, they are very similar to the predicted harzburgite residues of primary magmas of the dominant basalts in greenstone belts, which formed in a non-arc setting (referred to here as "non-arc basalts"). The compositions of these basalts indicate high temperatures of formation that are well-described by the thermal history model of Korenaga. In this model, peridotite residues of extensive ambient mantle melting had the highest Mg-numbers, lowest FeO contents, and lowest densities at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga. These results are in good agreement with Re-Os ages of kimberlite-hosted cratonic mantle xenoliths and enclosed sulfides, and provide support for the hypothesis of Jordan that low densities of cratonic mantle are a measure of their high preservation potential. Cratonization of the Earth reached its zenith at ~ 2.5-3.5 Ga when ambient mantle was hot and extensive melting produced oceanic crust 30-45 km thick. However, there is a mass imbalance exhibited by the craton-wide distribution of harzburgite residues and the paucity of their complementary magmas that had compositions like the non-arc basalts. We suggest that the problem of the missing basaltic oceanic crust can be resolved by its hydration, cooling and partial transformation to eclogite, which caused foundering of the entire lithosphere. Some of the oceanic crust partially melted during foundering to produce continental crust composed of tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG). The remaining lithosphere gravitationally separated into 1) residual eclogite that continued its descent, and 2) buoyant harzburgite diapirs that rose to underplate cratonic nuclei

  6. Modeling of Cross-Plane Interface Thermal Conductance Between Graphene Nano-Ribbons (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    to the intrinsic thermal conductance across bi-layer graphene in the limit of no edges, i.e. η∼ 1 or large bi-layer graphene flakes . On the other...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2014-0192 MODELING OF CROSS-PLANE INTERFACE THERMAL CONDUCTANCE BETWEEN GRAPHENE NANO- RIBBONS (POSTPRINT) Ajit K. Roy...MODELING OF CROSS-PLANE INTERFACE THERMAL CONDUCTANCE BETWEEN GRAPHENE NANO-RIBBONS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  7. Time-dependent analytical thermal model to investigate thermally induced stresses in quasi-CW-pumped laser rods

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bernhardi, EH

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main problems that limit the power scaling of diode-end-pumped solid-state lasers is the generation of heat inside the laser gain medium which can ultimately cause fracture. In this paper a time-dependent analytical thermal model...

  8. Microscale Modeling of Porous Thermal Protection System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Eric C.

    Ablative thermal protection system (TPS) materials play a vital role in the design of entry vehicles. Most simulation tools for ablative TPS in use today take a macroscopic approach to modeling, which involves heavy empiricism. Recent work has suggested improving the fidelity of the simulations by taking a multi-scale approach to the physics of ablation. In this work, a new approach for modeling ablative TPS at the microscale is proposed, and its feasibility and utility is assessed. This approach uses the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to simulate the gas flow through the microstructure, as well as the gas-surface interaction. Application of the DSMC method to this problem allows the gas phase dynamics---which are often rarefied---to be modeled to a high degree of fidelity. Furthermore this method allows for sophisticated gas-surface interaction models to be implemented. In order to test this approach for realistic materials, a method for generating artificial microstructures which emulate those found in spacecraft TPS is developed. Additionally, a novel approach for allowing the surface to move under the influence of chemical reactions at the surface is developed. This approach is shown to be efficient and robust for performing coupled simulation of the oxidation of carbon fibers. The microscale modeling approach is first applied to simulating the steady flow of gas through the porous medium. Predictions of Darcy permeability for an idealized microstructure agree with empirical correlations from the literature, as well as with predictions from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) when the continuum assumption is valid. Expected departures are observed for conditions at which the continuum assumption no longer holds. Comparisons of simulations using a fabricated microstructure to experimental data for a real spacecraft TPS material show good agreement when similar microstructural parameters are used to build the geometry. The approach is then applied to

  9. Mathematical modeling of photovoltaic thermal PV/T system with v-groove collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohri, M.; Fudholi, A.; Ruslan, M. H.; Sopian, K.

    2017-07-01

    The use of v-groove in solar collector has a higher thermal efficiency in references. Dropping the working heat of photovoltaic panel was able to raise the electrical efficiency performance. Electrical and thermal efficiency were produced by photovoltaic thermal (PV/T) system concurrently. Mathematical modeling based on steady-state thermal analysis of PV/T system with v-groove was conducted. With matrix inversion method, the energy balance equations are explained by means of the investigative method. The comparison results show that in the PV/T system with the V-groove collector is higher temperature, thermal and electrical efficiency than other collectors.

  10. A heating agent using a personalised thermal comfort model to Save energy

    OpenAIRE

    Auffenberg, Frederik; Stein, Sebastian; Rogers, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel, personalised thermal comfort model anda heating agent using this model to reduce energy consump-tion with minimal comfort loss. At present, heating agentstypically use simple models of user comfort when decidingon a set point temperature for the heating or cooling system.These models however generally fail to adapt to an individ-ual user's preferences, resulting in poor performance. Toaddress this issue, we propose a personalised thermal com-fort model using a Bayesian net...

  11. The Numerical Modeling of Thermal Stress Distribution in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasik A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of numerical calculations of temperature and thermal stress distribution in thermal barrier coatings deposited by thermal spraying process on the nickel based superalloy. An assumption was made to apply conventional zirconium oxide modified with yttrium oxide (8YSZ and apply pyrochlore type material with formula La2Zr2O7. The bond coat was made of NiCoCrAlY. Analysis of the distribution of temperature and stresses in ceramic coatings of different thicknesses was performed in the function of bond-coat thickness and the type of ceramic insulation layer. It was revealed that the thickness of NiCrAlY bond-coat has not significant influence on the stress distribution, but there is relatively strong effect on temperature level. The most important factor influenced on stress distribution in TBC system is related with type and properties of ceramic insulation layer.

  12. Direct modeling of near field thermal radiation in a metamaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Das, Ananda; Park, Wounjhang

    2017-05-29

    The study of near field thermal radiation is gaining renewed interest thanks in part to their great potential in energy harvesting applications. It is well known that plasmonic or polaritonic materials exhibit strongly enhanced fields near the surface, but it is not trivial to quantitatively predict their impact on thermal radiation intensity in the near field. In this paper, we present a case study for a metamaterial that supports a surface plasmon mode in the terahertz region and consequently exhibits strongly enhanced near field thermal radiation at the plasmon resonance frequency. We implemented a finite-difference time-domain method that thermally excites the metamaterial with randomly fluctuating dipoles according to the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The calculated thermal radiation from the metamaterial was then compared with the case of optical excitation by the plane wave incident on the metamaterial surface. The optical excitation couples only to the mode that satisfies the momentum matching condition while thermal excitation is not bound by it. As a result, the near field thermal radiation exhibits substantial differences compared to the optically excited surface plasmon modes. Under thermal excitation, the near field intensity at 1 µm away from metal surface of the metamaterial reaches a maximum enhancement of 43 fold over the far field at the frequency of the Brillouin zone boundary mode while the near field intensity under optical excitation reaches a maximum enhancement of 24 fold at the frequency of the Brillouin zone center mode. In addition, the peak near field intensity under thermal excitation shows a 4-fold enhancement over blackbody radiation with linear polarization radiation in the far field. The ability to precisely predict the local field intensity under thermal excitation is critical to the development of advanced energy devices that take advantage of this near field enhancement and could lead to the development of new generation of

  13. Electrochemical-Thermal Modeling and Microscale Phase Change for Passive Internal Thermal Management of Lithium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandhauer, Todd Matthew

    In the current investigation, a fully coupled electrochemical and thermal model for lithium-ion batteries is developed to investigate the effects of different thermal management strategies on battery performance. This work represents the first ever study of these coupled electrochemical-thermal phenomena in batteries from the electrochemical heat generation all the way to the dynamic heat removal in actual hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) drive cycles. In addition, a novel, passive internal cooling system that uses heat removal through liquid-vapor phase change is developed. The proposed cooling system passively removes heat almost isothermally with negligible thermal resistances between the heat source and cooling fluid, thereby allowing battery performance to improve unimpeded by thermal limitations. For the battery model, local electrochemical reaction rates are predicted using temperature-dependent data on a commercially available battery designed for high rates (C/LiFePO4) in a computationally efficient manner. Data were collected on this small battery (˜1 Ah) over a wide range of temperatures (10°C to 60°C), depths of discharge (0.15 Ah loading, which serves as the basis for the electrochemical-thermal model development. This model is then used to compare the effects of external and internal cooling on battery performance. The proposed internal cooling system utilizes microchannels inserted into the interior of the cell that contain a liquid-vapor phase change fluid for heat removal at the source of heat generation. Although there have been prior investigations of phase change at the microscales, fluid flow for pure refrigerants at low mass fluxes (G thermally driven refrigerant (R134a) flow in a representative test section geometry (3.175 mm x 160 mm) is investigated using a surrogate heat source. Heat inputs were varied over a wide range of values representative of battery operating conditions (120 calculate the two-phase frictional pressure drop in the

  14. Hybrid Compton camera/coded aperture imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Lucian [Livermore, CA; Vetter, Kai M [Alameda, CA

    2012-04-10

    A system in one embodiment includes an array of radiation detectors; and an array of imagers positioned behind the array of detectors relative to an expected trajectory of incoming radiation. A method in another embodiment includes detecting incoming radiation with an array of radiation detectors; detecting the incoming radiation with an array of imagers positioned behind the array of detectors relative to a trajectory of the incoming radiation; and performing at least one of Compton imaging using at least the imagers and coded aperture imaging using at least the imagers. A method in yet another embodiment includes detecting incoming radiation with an array of imagers positioned behind an array of detectors relative to a trajectory of the incoming radiation; and performing Compton imaging using at least the imagers.

  15. Performance evaluation of MACACO: a multilayer Compton camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Enrique; Barrio, John; Etxebeste, Ane; Ortega, Pablo G.; Lacasta, Carlos; Oliver, Josep F.; Solaz, Carles; Llosá, Gabriela

    2017-09-01

    Compton imaging devices have been proposed and studied for a wide range of applications. We have developed a Compton camera prototype which can be operated with two or three detector layers based on monolithic lanthanum bromide (LaBr3 ) crystals coupled to silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), to be used for proton range verification in hadron therapy. In this work, we present the results obtained with our prototype in laboratory tests with radioactive sources and in simulation studies. Images of a 22 Na and an 88 Y radioactive sources have been successfully reconstructed. The full width half maximum of the reconstructed images is below 4 mm for a 22 Na source at a distance of 5 cm.

  16. The Mathematical Foundations of 3D Compton Scatter Emission Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. T. Truong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical principles of tomographic imaging using detected (unscattered X- or gamma-rays are based on the two-dimensional Radon transform and many of its variants. In this paper, we show that two new generalizations, called conical Radon transforms, are related to three-dimensional imaging processes based on detected Compton scattered radiation. The first class of conical Radon transform has been introduced recently to support imaging principles of collimated detector systems. The second class is new and is closely related to the Compton camera imaging principles and invertible under special conditions. As they are poised to play a major role in future designs of biomedical imaging systems, we present an account of their most important properties which may be relevant for active researchers in the field.

  17. Development of Compton Radiography Diagnostics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tommasini, R; Hatchett, S P; Hey, D S; Izumi, N; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Delettrez, J; Glebov, V; Stoeckl, C

    2010-11-16

    An important diagnostic tool for inertial confinement fusion will be time-resolved radiographic imaging of the dense cold fuel surrounding the hot spot. The measurement technique is based on point-projection radiography at photon energies from 60-200 keV where the Compton effect is the dominant contributor to the opacity of the fuel or pusher. We have successfully applied this novel Compton Radiography technique to the study of the final compression of directly driven plastic capsules at the OMEGA facility. The radiographs have a spatial and temporal resolution of {approx}10 {micro}m and {approx}10ps, respectively. A statistical accuracy of {approx}0.5% in transmission per resolution element is achieved, allowing localized measurements of areal mass densities to 7% accuracy. The experimental results show 3D non-uniformities and lower than 1D expected areal densities attributed to drive asymmetries and hydroinstabilities.

  18. Improvement of the Stolwijk model with regard to clothing, thermal sensation and skin temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofsen, P; Vink, P

    2016-07-21

    The original Stolwijk model is not equipped with clothing, thermal sensation, comfort indices, individual characteristics and performance loss models. This study attempts to modify the model to include clothing, thermal sensation as well as the calculation of the percentage of dissatisfied as a result of general discomfort. The model is useful for the evaluation of thermal comfort in the built environment by professionals. Methods described in literature with regard of clothing, the research of Fiala as well as some in the literature recommended and validated adjustments, to improve the simulation of the skin temperature per body segment, are implemented in the here assembled Stolwijk computer model. Finally, for verification of the above adjustments, the model was compared with experiments conducted in the field of thermal sensation at various levels of temperature change. By improving the simulation of the skin temperature per body segment and by adding clothing and thermal sensation, suitable for the assessment of steady state and transient thermal conditions, and fixed with this the percentage of dissatisfied, the scope of the Stolwijk model has become larger than it was before. On the basis of the calculations and the experimental results, it was concluded that the adjusted Stolwijk model was suitable for the simulation of the thermal sensation under steady state and transient thermal conditions.

  19. Three-dimensional Thermal Model of the Mexican Subduction Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, J. C.; Pimentel, F. D. C.; Currie, C. A.; He, J.; Harris, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    Along the Mexican section of the Middle America Trench (MAT), the Cocos plate subducts beneath the North American plate. The most important feature of this subduction zone is the flat-slab section below central Mexico, extending approximately 250 km landward from the trench at a depth of 50 km. Further west, the dip changes to 45-50º. This particular geometry has several unique consequences, such as a volcanic arc that is not aligned with the trench and very shallow slab seismicity. For the mantle wedge, the abrupt change in slab geometry could lead to a three-dimensional (3D) mantle wedge flow that departs from the classical 2D subduction-driven corner flow. Evidence of 3D flow in the region comes from seismic anisotropy studies, which show that olivine fast-direction axes have a component that is parallel to the MAT. In other subduction zones, such as Costa Rica-Nicaragua and Japan, 3D flow has been observed to increase temperatures by >50º C relative to corner flow models.For this study, we have created the first 3D finite-element model of the Mexican subduction zone in order to analyze its thermal structure. Our objective is to assess the effects of 3D mantle flow and hydrothermal circulation (HC) in the subducting slab. In this region, low surface heat flow values near the trench indicate that HC may remove heat from the oceanic plate. Our model incorporates the effect of HC through conductivity proxies in the subducting crust and a 2D oceanic geotherm that includes the age variations of the Cocos plate along the MAT. For an isoviscous mantle, our model shows that the slab dip variations induce a flow that departs from 2D corner flow near the transition between the flat-slab and normal-dipping sections. The mantle flows in eastward direction toward the flat slab, and its orientation is consistent with seismic anisotropy studies. The maximum along-margin flow rate is nearly 2 cm/yr, which is >30% of the convergence rate. Temperatures at the location of this

  20. Mathematical Model for Thermal Processes of Single-Core Power Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Zalizny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a mathematical model for thermal processes that permits to calculate non-stationary thermal processes of core insulation and surface of a single-core power cable in real-time mode. The model presents the cable as four thermal homogeneous bodies: core, basic insulation, protective sheath and internal environment. Thermal processes between homogeneous bodies are described by a system of four differential equations. The paper contains a proposal to solve this system of equations with the help of a thermal equivalent circuit and the Laplace transform. All design ratios for thermal parameters and algorithm for calculating temperature of core insulation and temperature of power cable surface. These algorithms can be added in the software of microprocessor devices. The paper contains results of experimental investigations and reveals that an absolute error of the mathematical model does not exceed 3ºС.

  1. A Temperature-Dependent Thermal Model of IGBT Modules Suitable for Circuit-Level Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Wang, Huai; Ma, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Thermal impedance of IGBT modules may vary with operating conditions due to that the thermal conductivity and heat capacity of materials are temperature dependent. This paper proposes a Cauer thermal model for a 1700 V/1000 A IGBT module with temperature-dependent thermal resistances and thermal...... relevant reliability aspect performance. A test bench is built up with an ultra-fast infrared (IR) camera to validate the proposed thermal impedance model....... capacitances. The temperature effect is investigated by Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation based on the geometry and material information of the IGBT module. The developed model is ready for circuit-level simulation to achieve an improved accuracy of the estimation on IGBT junction temperature and its...

  2. Exciting Nucleons in Compton Scattering and Hydrogen-Like Atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Hagelstein, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    This PhD thesis is devoted to the low-energy structure of the nucleon (proton and neutron) as seen through electromagnetic probes, e.g., electron and Compton scattering. The research presented here is based primarily on dispersion theory and chiral effective-field theory. The main motivation is the recent proton radius puzzle, which is the discrepancy between the classic proton charge radius determinations (based on electron-proton scattering and normal hydrogen spectroscopy) and the highly p...

  3. The Compton-Schwarzschild correspondence from extended de Broglie relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lake, Matthew J. [The Institute for Fundamental Study, “The Tah Poe Academia Institute' ,Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Ministry of Education,Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Carr, Bernard [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London,Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-17

    The Compton wavelength gives the minimum radius within which the mass of a particle may be localized due to quantum effects, while the Schwarzschild radius gives the maximum radius within which the mass of a black hole may be localized due to classial gravity. In a mass-radius diagram, the two lines intersect near the Planck point (l{sub P},m{sub P}), where quantum gravity effects become significant. Since canonical (non-gravitational) quantum mechanics is based on the concept of wave-particle duality, encapsulated in the de Broglie relations, these relations should break down near (l{sub P},m{sub P}). It is unclear what physical interpretation can be given to quantum particles with energy E≫m{sub P}c{sup 2}, since they correspond to wavelengths λ≪l{sub P} or time periods τ≪t{sub P} in the standard theory. We therefore propose a correction to the standard de Broglie relations, which gives rise to a modified Schrödinger equation and a modified expression for the Compton wavelength, which may be extended into the region E≫m{sub P}c{sup 2}. For the proposed modification, we recover the expression for the Schwarzschild radius for E≫m{sub P}c{sup 2} and the usual Compton formula for E≪m{sub P}c{sup 2}. The sign of the inequality obtained from the uncertainty principle reverses at m≈m{sub P}, so that the Compton wavelength and event horizon size may be interpreted as minimum and maximum radii, respectively. We interpret the additional terms in the modified de Broglie relations as representing the self-gravitation of the wave packet.

  4. The first dedicated virtual Compton Scattering Experiment at MAMI

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, J M; Baumann, D; Berthot, J; Bertin, P Y; Breton, V; Böglin, W; Böhm, R; D'Hose, N; Caprano, T; Derber, S; Degrande, N; Ding, M; Distler, M O; Ducret, J E; Edelhoff, R; Ewald, I; Fonvieille, H; Friedrich, J; Geiges, R; Gousset, T; Guichon, P A M; Holvoet, H; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jennewein, P; Kahrau, M; Kerhoas, S; Korn, M; Kramer, H; Krygier, K W; Kunde, V; Lannoy, B; Lhuillier, D; Liesenfeld, A; Marchand, C; Marchand, D; Martino, J; Merkel, H; Merle, K; Merle, P; De Meyer, G; Mougey, J; Neuhausen, R; Offermann, E; Pospischil, T; Quéméner, G; Ravel, O; Roblin, Y; Roche, J; Rohe, D; Rosner, G; Ryckbosch, D; Sauer, P U; Schmieden, H; Schardt, S; Tamas, G; Tytgat, M; Vanderhaeghen, M; Hoorebeke, L V; Vyver, R V D; Wiele, J V D; Vernin, P; Wagner, A; Walcher, T

    2000-01-01

    We measured the absolute cross sections for photon electro-production off the proton, ep -> ep gamma, with the high resolution spectrometers at MAMI at momentum transfer q = 600 MeV/c and photon polarization epsilon=0.62. We covered the momentum range for the outgoing real photon q' = 33/111 MeV/c. >From the extracted Virtual Compton Scattering amplitude we deduce values for two structure functions related to the generalized polarizabilities of the proton.

  5. Silicon Drift Detector Readout Electronics for a Compton Camera

    OpenAIRE

    Nurdan, T. Conka; Nurdan, K; Walenta, A. H.; Besch, H J; Fiorini, C; Freisleben, B.; Pavel, N. A.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype detector for Compton camera imaging is under development. A monolithic array of 19 channel Silicon drift detector with on-chip electronics is going to be used as a scatter detector for the prototype system. Custom designed analog and digital readout electronics for this detector was first tested by using a single cell Silicon drift detector. This paper describes the readout architecture and presents the results of the measurement.

  6. Compton wavelength, Bohr radius, Balmer's formula and g-factors

    OpenAIRE

    Heyrovska, Raji

    2004-01-01

    The Balmer formula for the spectrum of atomic hydrogen is shown to be analogous to that in Compton effect and is written in terms of the difference between the absorbed and emitted wavelengths. The g-factors come into play when the atom is subjected to disturbances (like changes in the magnetic and electric fields), and the electron and proton get displaced from their fixed positions giving rise to Zeeman effect, Stark effect, etc.

  7. Attenuation studies near K-absorption edges using Compton ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have carried out photon attenuation measurements at several energies in the range from 49.38 keV to 57.96 keV around the K-absorption edges of the rare earth elements Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy and Er using 59.54 keV gamma rays from 241Am source after Compton scattering from an aluminium target. Pellets of ...

  8. Dual color x rays from Thomson or Compton sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Petrillo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the possibility of producing two-color x or γ radiation by Thomson/Compton backscattering between a high intensity laser pulse and a two-energy level electron beam, constituted by a couple of beamlets separated in time and/or energy obtained by a photoinjector with comb laser techniques and linac velocity bunching. The parameters of the Thomson source at SPARC_LAB have been simulated, proposing a set of realistic experiments.

  9. Life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating life models developed under the NASA Lewis Research Center's Hot Section Technology (HOST) Program are summarized. An initial laboratory model and three design-capable models are discussed. Current understanding of coating failure mechanisms are also summarized. The materials and structural aspects of thermal barrier coatings have been successfully integrated under the HOST program to produce models which may now or in the near future be used in design. Efforts on this program continue at Pratt and Whitney Aircraft where their model is being extended to the life prediction of physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings.

  10. ILC beam energy measurement by means of laser Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muchnoi, N. [Budker Inst. for Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Schreiber, H.J.; Viti, M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    A novel, non-invasive method of measuring the beam energy at the International Linear Collider is proposed. Laser light collides head-on with beam particles and either the energy of the Compton scattered electrons near the kinematic end-point is measured or the positions of the Compton backscattered {gamma}-rays, the edge electrons and the unscattered beam particles are recorded. A compact layout for the Compton spectrometer is suggested. It consists of a bending magnet and position sensitive detectors operating in a large radiation environment. Several options for high spatial resolution detectors are discussed. Simulation studies support the use of an infrared or green laser and quartz fiber detectors to monitor the backscattered photons and edge electrons. Employing a cavity monitor, the beam particle position downstream of the magnet can be recorded with submicrometer precision. Such a scheme provides a feasible and promising method to access the incident beam energy with precisions of 10{sup -4} or better on a bunch-to-bunch basis while the electron and positron beams are in collision. (orig.)

  11. Measurements of Compton Scattered Transition Radiation at High Lorentz Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald; Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Isbert, Joachim; Mitchell, John W.; Patterson, Donald

    2004-01-01

    X-ray transition radiation can be used to measure the Lorentz factor of relativistic particles. Standard transition radiation detectors (TRDs) typically incorporate thin plastic foil radiators and gas-filled x-ray detectors, and are sensitive up to \\gamma ~ 10^4. To reach higher Lorentz factors (up to \\gamma ~ 10^5), thicker, denser radiators can be used, which consequently produce x-rays of harder energies (>100 keV). At these energies, scintillator detectors are more efficient in detecting the hard x-rays, and Compton scattering of the x-rays out of the path of the particle becomes an important effect. The Compton scattering can be utilized to separate the transition radiation from the ionization background spatially. The use of conducting metal foils is predicted to yield enhanced signals compared to standard nonconducting plastic foils of the same dimensions. We have designed and built a Compton Scatter TRD optimized for high Lorentz factors and exposed it to high energy electrons at the CERN SPS. We pres...

  12. Electronic structure of the palladium hydride studied by compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Mizusaki, S; Yamaguchi, M; Hiraoka, N; Itou, M; Sakurai, Y

    2003-01-01

    The hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic structure of Pd have been investigated by Compton scattering experiments associated with theoretical calculations. Compton profiles (CPs) of single crystal of Pd and beta phase hydride PdH sub x (x=0.62-0.74) have been measured along the [100], [110] and [111] directions with a momentum resolution of 0.14-0.17 atomic units using 115 keV x-rays. The theoretical Compton profiles have been calculated from the wavefunctions obtained utilizing the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation for Pd and stoichiometric PdH. The experimental and the theoretical results agreed well with respect to the difference in the CPs between PdH sub x and Pd, and the anisotropy in the CPs of Pd or PdH sub x. This study provides lines of evidence that upon hydride formation the lowest valance band of Pd is largely modified due to hybridization with H 1s-orbitals and the Fermi energy is raised into the sp-band. (author)

  13. Silicon detector for a Compton Camera in Nuclear Medical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Meier, D; Jalocha, P; Sowicki, B; Kowal, M; Dulinski, W; Maehlum, G; Nygård, E; Yoshioka, K; Fuster, J A; Lacasta, C; Mikuz, M; Roe, S; Weilhammer, Peter; Hua, C H; Park, S J; Wilderman, S J; Zhang, L; Clinthorne, N H; Rogers, W L

    2001-01-01

    Electronically collimated gamma ca\\-me\\-ras based on Com\\-pton scattering in silicon pad sensors may improve imaging in nuclear medicine and bio-medical research. The work described here concentrates on the silicon pad detector developed for a prototype Compton camera. The silicon pad sensors are read out using low noise VLSI CMOS chips and novel fast triggering chips. Depending on the application a light weight and dense packaging of sensors and its readout electronics on a hybrid is required. We describe the silicon pad sensor and their readout with the newly designed hybrid. %The silicon detector of a Compton camera %may contain up to $10^5$~analogue channels requiring %a fast and low cost data acquisition system. We also describe a modular and low-cost data acquisition system (CCDAQ) based on a digital signal processor which is interfaced to the EPP port of personal computers. Using the CCDAQ and the hybrids energy spectra of gamma-ray photons from technetium ($^{\\rm 99m}_{43}$Tc) and americium ($^{241}_{...

  14. Laser-electron Compton interaction in plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hirose, T. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Physics Dept.

    1998-10-01

    A concept of high intensity femtosecond laser synchrotron source (LSS) is based on Compton backscattering of focused electron and laser beams. The short Rayleigh length of the focused laser beam limits the length of interaction to a few picoseconds. However, the technology of the high repetition rate high-average power picosecond lasers required for high put through LSS applications is not developed yet. Another problem associated with the picosecond laser pulses is undesirable nonlinear effects occurring when the laser photons are concentrated in a short time interval. To avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering, the laser beam has to be split, and the required hard radiation flux is accumulated over a number of consecutive interactions that complicates the LSS design. In order to relieve the technological constraints and achieve a practically feasible high-power laser synchrotron source, the authors propose to confine the laser-electron interaction region in the extended plasma channel. This approach permits to use nanosecond laser pulses instead of the picosecond pulses. That helps to avoid the nonlinear Compton scattering regime and allows to utilize already existing technology of the high-repetition rate TEA CO{sub 2} lasers operating at the atmospheric pressure. They demonstrate the advantages of the channeled LSS approach by the example of the prospective polarized positron source for Japan Linear Collider.

  15. THERMAL COMFORT ZONES FORSTEADY-STATE ENERGY BALANCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KAYNAKLI

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the various thermal comfort parameters including temperature, relative humidity, air velocity, metabolic activity and clothing resistance and their effect to each other are examined. The heat transfer equations given for steady state energy balance between body and environment and the empirical equations which give thermal comfort and physiological control mechanisms of body are used. According to the ASHRAE Standard 55-1992, an environment can be assumed comfortable while Predicted Percentage of Dissatisfied (PPD is less than % 10. Considering this, thermal comfort zones in various conditions are studied and results are presented and discussed

  16. THERMAL MODELS FOR THE FRESCA2 HIGH FIELD MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    Pietrowicz, S

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the thermal studies and measurement that have been realized, at CEA Saclay, for the thermal design of the Fresca 2 magnet under development in EuCARD HFM program. The first part of the report is dedicated to the numerical study of the thermal behaviour of the Fresca 2 magnet in He II. The second part of the report concerns the experimental measurement on two composite insulation systems made of cyanate ester epoxy mix and tri-functional epoxy (TGPAP-DETDA) with S-glass fiber.

  17. Modelling the Thermal History of the Parent Body of Acapulco- and Lodran-Like Achondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henke, S.; Gail, H.-P.; Trieloff, M.; Schwarz, W. H.; Hopp, J.

    2014-09-01

    We present model calculations for the internal constitution and thermal evolution of the acapulcoites and lodranites parent body and fit them to thermochronlogical data. This is successfully done assuming a body according the the onion shell model.

  18. Smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model for mesoscopic multiphase flows in the presence of thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Huan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wu, Lei; Schenter, Gregory K.; Mundy, Christopher J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2016-08-05

    Thermal fluctuations cause perturbations of fluid-fluid interfaces and highly nonlinear hydrodynamics in multiphase flows. In this work, we develop a novel multiphase smoothed dissipative particle dynamics model. This model accounts for both bulk hydrodynamics and interfacial fluctuations. Interfacial surface tension is modeled by imposing a pairwise force between SDPD particles. We show that the relationship between the model parameters and surface tension, previously derived under the assumption of zero thermal fluctuation, is accurate for fluid systems at low temperature but overestimates the surface tension for intermediate and large thermal fluctuations. To analyze the effect of thermal fluctuations on surface tension, we construct a coarse-grained Euler lattice model based on the mean field theory and derive a semi-analytical formula to directly relate the surface tension to model parameters for a wide range of temperatures and model resolutions. We demonstrate that the present method correctly models the dynamic processes, such as bubble coalescence and capillary spectra across the interface.

  19. Complete Loss and Thermal Model of Power Semiconductors Including Device Rating Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Thermal loading of power devices are closely related to the reliability performance of the whole converter system. The electrical loading and device rating are both important factors that determine the loss and thermal behaviors of power semiconductor devices. In the existing loss and thermal...... models, only the electrical loadings are focused and treated as design variables, while the device rating is normally pre-defined by experience with limited design flexibility. Consequently, a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical...

  20. A review of typical thermal fatigue failure models for solder joints of electronic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyan; Sun, Ruifeng; Wang, Yongdong

    2017-09-01

    For electronic components, cyclic plastic strain makes it easier to accumulate fatigue damage than elastic strain. When the solder joints undertake thermal expansion or cold contraction, different thermal strain of the electronic component and its corresponding substrate is caused by the different coefficient of thermal expansion of the electronic component and its corresponding substrate, leading to the phenomenon of stress concentration. So repeatedly, cracks began to sprout and gradually extend [1]. In this paper, the typical thermal fatigue failure models of solder joints of electronic components are classified and the methods of obtaining the parameters in the model are summarized based on domestic and foreign literature research.

  1. MATHEMATICAL MODEL OF PROCESS OF THERMAL REGENERATION KIESELGUHR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Antipov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, still require further refinement of the mechanisms of thermodynamic and mass transfer processes in capillary-porous media. In this paper a mathematical description of the process of thermal regeneration of diatomaceous earth.

  2. Curvature of the spectral energy distribution, the inverse Compton component and the jet in Fermi 2LAC blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, R.; Luo, D.; Du, L. M.; Wang, Z. R.; Xie, Z. H.; Yi, T. F.; Xiong, D. R.; Xu, Y. B.; Liu, W. G.; Yu, X. L.

    2016-12-01

    We fitted the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of members of a large sample of Fermi 2LAC blazars to synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) models. Our main results are as follows. (I) As suggested by previous works, the correlation between the peak frequency and curvature can be explained by statistical or stochastic particle acceleration mechanisms. For BL Lacs, we found a linear correlation between the synchrotron peak frequency and its curvature. The slope of the correlation is consistent with stochastic acceleration mechanisms and confirms the results of previous studies. For flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), we also found a linear correlation, but in this case the slope cannot be explained by previous theoretical models. (II) We found a significant correlation between IC luminosity and synchrotron luminosity. The slope of the correlation for FSRQs is consistent with the external Compton (EC) process. The slope of the correlation for BL Lacs is consistent with the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process. (III) We found several significant correlations between IC curvature and various basic parameters of blazars (black hole mass, broad-line luminosity, the Lorentz factor of the jet). We also found significant correlations between the bolometric luminosity and these basic parameters of blazars, which suggests that the origin of jets is a mixture of the mechanisms proposed by Blandford & Znajek and by Blandford & Payne.

  3. Thermal and Non-thermal Nature of the Soft Excess Emission from Sersic 159-03 observed with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Lieu, Richard; Mittaz, Jonathan P. D.; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Nevalainen, Jukka

    2005-01-01

    Several nearby clusters exhibit an excess of soft X-ray radiation which cannot be attributed to the hot virialized intra-cluster medium. There is no consensus to date on the origin of the excess emission: it could be either of thermal origin, or due to an inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background. Using high resolution XMM-Newton data of Sersic 159-03 we first show that strong soft excess emission is detected out to a radial distance of 0.9 Mpc. The data are interpreted using the two viable models available, i.e., by invoking a warm reservoir of thermal gas, or relativistic electrons which are part of a cosmic ray population. The thermal model leads to a better goodness-of-fit, and the emitting warm gas must be high in mass and low in metallicity.

  4. Development of Thermal Bridging Factors for Use in Energy Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-20

    15-10 31 • Insulating (R-values over 2 per inch, kɘ.07 W/mK): extruded polysty- rene (EPS), expanded polystyrene (XPS), polyisocyanurate (PIC), fi...Technical Report URL Universal Resource Locator UV Ultraviolet WWW World Wide Web XPS Expanded Polystyrene ERDC/CERL TR-15-10 129 References American...thermal bridge construction de- tails, begun in this work, be expanded to include typical thermal bridges in a complete range of Army construction

  5. Thermal remote sensing for reservoir modelling and management

    OpenAIRE

    Martí-Cardona, B.; Arbat-Bofill, M; Prats-Rodríguez, J.; Pipia, L.

    2016-01-01

    ASTER and Landsat images were used for mapping the water surface temperature in the Sobrón, Mequinenza and Ribarroja reservoirs in the Ebro River, Spain. The spatially continuous information in these maps reveals the impact of the reservoir on the river natural thermal gradient in two different periods of the year. It also evidences the thermal impact intensity and extent of the refrigeration flow discharge from a nuclear power plant located on the river bank. The high spatial resolution i...

  6. Thermal remote sensing for reservoir modelling and management

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    ASTER and Landsat images were used for mapping the water surface temperature in the Sobrón, Mequinenza and Ribarroja reservoirs in the Ebro River, Spain. The spatially continuous information in these maps reveals the impact of the reservoir on the river natural thermal gradient in two different periods of the year. It also evidences the thermal impact intensity and extent of the refrigeration flow discharge from a nuclear power plant located on the river bank. The high spatial resolution imag...

  7. Forty years of Fanger's model of thermal comfort: comfort for all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoof, J

    2008-06-01

    The predicted mean vote (PMV) model of thermal comfort, created by Fanger in the late 1960s, is used worldwide to assess thermal comfort. Fanger based his model on college-aged students for use in invariant environmental conditions in air-conditioned buildings in moderate thermal climate zones. Environmental engineering practice calls for a predictive method that is applicable to all types of people in any kind of building in every climate zone. In this publication, existing support and criticism, as well as modifications to the PMV model are discussed in light of the requirements by environmental engineering practice in the 21st century in order to move from a predicted mean vote to comfort for all. Improved prediction of thermal comfort can be achieved through improving the validity of the PMV model, better specification of the model's input parameters, and accounting for outdoor thermal conditions and special groups. The application range of the PMV model can be enlarged, for instance, by using the model to assess the effects of the thermal environment on productivity and behavior, and interactions with other indoor environmental parameters, and the use of information and communication technologies. Even with such modifications to thermal comfort evaluation, thermal comfort for all can only be achieved when occupants have effective control over their own thermal environment. The paper treats the assessment of thermal comfort using the PMV model of Fanger, and deals with the strengths and limitations of this model. Readers are made familiar to some opportunities for use in the 21st-century information society.

  8. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiments and Modelling for Advanced Nuclear Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. H.; Chung, M. K.; Park, C. K. and others

    2005-04-15

    The objectives of the project are to study thermal hydraulic characteristics of reactor primary system for the verification of the reactor safety and to evaluate new safety concepts of new safety design features. To meet the research goal, several thermal hydraulic experiments were performed and related thermal hydraulic models were developed with the experimental data which were produced through the thermal hydraulic experiments. Followings are main research topics; - Multi-dimensional Phenomena in a Reactor Vessel Downcomer - Condensation Load and Thermal Mixing in the IRWST - Development of Thermal-Hydraulic Models for Two-Phase Flow - Development of Measurement Techniques for Two-Phase Flow - Supercritical Reactor T/H Characteristics Analysis From the above experimental and analytical studies, new safety design features of the advanced power reactors were verified and lots of the safety issues were also resolved.

  9. Modelling and Improvement of Thermal Cycling in Power Electronics for Motor Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernica, Ionut; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    cycling of power devices in a motor drive application and modelling their impact on the thermal stress. The motor drive system together with the thermal cycling in the power semiconductors have been modelled, and after investigating the dynamic behavior of the system, adverse temperature swings......It is well known that the dynamical change of the thermal stress in the power devices is one of the major factors that have influences on the overall efficiency and reliability of power electronics. The main objective of this paper consists of identifying the main parameters that affect the thermal...... are identified during the acceleration and deceleration periods of the motor. The main causes for these adverse thermal cycles have been presented and, consequently, the influence of the deceleration slope, modulation technique and reactive current on the thermal cycles has been analyzed. Finally, the improved...

  10. A thermal network model for induction motors of hermetic reciprocating compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, T.; Deschamps, C. J.

    2015-08-01

    This paper describes a simulation model for small reciprocating compressors with emphasis on the electrical motor modelling. Heat transfer is solved through algebraic equations derived from lumped thermal energy balances applied to the compressor components. Thermal conductances between the motor components are characterized via a thermal network model. The single-phase induction motor is modelled via an equivalent circuit, allowing predictions for the motor performance and distributed losses. The predicted temperature distribution is used to evaluate the stator and rotor windings resistances. The thermal and electric models are solved in a coupled manner with a model for the compression cycle. Predictions of temperature distribution, motor efficiency, as well as isentropic and volumetric efficiencies, are compared with experimental data at different operating conditions. The model is then applied to analyse the motor temperature as a function of input voltage and stator wire diameter.

  11. Development of thermal hydraulic models for the reliable regulatory auditing code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B. D.; Song, C. H.; Lee, Y. J.; Kwon, T. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop thermal hydraulic models for use in improving the reliability of the regulatory auditing codes. The current year fall under the first step of the 3 year project, and the main researches were focused on identifying the candidate thermal hydraulic models for improvement and to develop prototypical model development. During the current year, the verification calculations submitted for the APR 1400 design certification have been reviewed, the experimental data from the MIDAS DVI experiment facility in KAERI have been analyzed and evaluated, candidate thermal hydraulic models for improvement have been identified, prototypical models for the improved thermal hydraulic models have been developed, items for experiment in connection with the model development have been identified, and preliminary design of the experiment has been carried out.

  12. Thick silicon microstrip detectors simulation for PACT: Pair and Compton Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Tatischeff, V.; Dolgorouky, Y.; Bertoli, W.; Breelle, E.

    2016-11-01

    PACT is a space borne Pair and Compton Telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV. It is based upon two main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker and a crystal-based calorimeter. In this paper we will explain the imaging technique of PACT as a Multi-layered Compton telescope (0.1-10 MeV) and its major improvements over its predecessor COMPTEL. Then we will present a simulation study to optimize the silicon tracker of PACT. This tracker is formed of thousands of identical silicon double sided strip detectors (DSSDs). We have developed a simulation model (using SILVACO) to simulate the DSSD performance while varying its thickness, impurity concentration of the bulk material, electrode pitch, and electrode width. We will present a comprehensive overview of the impact of each varied parameter on the DSSD performance, in view of the application to PACT. The considered DSSD parameters are its depletion voltage, capacitance, and leakage current. After the selection of the PACT DSSD, we will present a simulation of the performance of the PACT telescope in the 0.1-10 MeV range.

  13. Thick silicon microstrip detectors simulation for PACT: Pair and Compton Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalil, M., E-mail: khalilmohammad@hotmail.com [APC Laboratory, 10rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F. [APC Laboratory, 10rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); CEA, Centre de Saclay, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Tatischeff, V. [CSNSM, IN2P3/CNRSand Paris-Sud University, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Dolgorouky, Y.; Bertoli, W.; Breelle, E. [APC Laboratory, 10rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2016-11-01

    PACT is a space borne Pair and Compton Telescope that aims to make a sensitive survey of the gamma-ray sky between 100 keV and 100 MeV. It is based upon two main components: a silicon-based gamma-ray tracker and a crystal-based calorimeter. In this paper we will explain the imaging technique of PACT as a Multi-layered Compton telescope (0.1–10 MeV) and its major improvements over its predecessor COMPTEL. Then we will present a simulation study to optimize the silicon tracker of PACT. This tracker is formed of thousands of identical silicon double sided strip detectors (DSSDs). We have developed a simulation model (using SILVACO) to simulate the DSSD performance while varying its thickness, impurity concentration of the bulk material, electrode pitch, and electrode width. We will present a comprehensive overview of the impact of each varied parameter on the DSSD performance, in view of the application to PACT. The considered DSSD parameters are its depletion voltage, capacitance, and leakage current. After the selection of the PACT DSSD, we will present a simulation of the performance of the PACT telescope in the 0.1–10 MeV range.

  14. Stability analysis of implicit time discretizations for the Compton-scattering Fokker-Planck equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Warsa, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lowrie, Robert B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morel, Jim E [TEXAS A& M UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation is a widely used approximation for modeling the Compton scattering of photons in high energy density applications. In this paper, we perform a stability analysis of three implicit time discretizations for the Compton-Scattering Fokker-Planck equation. Specifically, we examine (i) a Semi-Implicit (SI) scheme that employs backward-Euler differencing but evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their beginning-of-time-step values, (ii) a Fully Implicit (FI) discretization that instead evaluates temperature-dependent coefficients at their end-of-time-step values, and (iii) a Linearized Implicit (LI) scheme, which is developed by linearizing the temperature dependence of the FI discretization within each time step. Our stability analysis shows that the FI and LI schemes are unconditionally stable and cannot generate oscillatory solutions regardless of time-step size, whereas the SI discretization can suffer from instabilities and nonphysical oscillations for sufficiently large time steps. With the results of this analysis, we present time-step limits for the SI scheme that prevent undesirable behavior. We test the validity of our stability analysis and time-step limits with a set of numerical examples.

  15. Simplified Building Thermal Model Used for Optimal Control of Radiant Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei He

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MPC has the ability to optimize the system operation parameters for energy conservation. Recently, it has been used in HVAC systems for saving energy, but there are very few applications in radiant cooling systems. To implement MPC in buildings with radiant terminals, the predictions of cooling load and thermal environment are indispensable. In this paper, a simplified thermal model is proposed for predicting cooling load and thermal environment in buildings with radiant floor. In this thermal model, the black-box model is introduced to derive the incident solar radiation, while the genetic algorithm is utilized to identify the parameters of the thermal model. In order to further validate this simplified thermal model, simulated results from TRNSYS are compared with those from this model and the deviation is evaluated based on coefficient of variation of root mean square (CV. The results show that the simplified model can predict the operative temperature with a CV lower than 1% and predict cooling loads with a CV lower than 10%. For the purpose of supervisory control in HVAC systems, this simplified RC thermal model has an acceptable accuracy and can be used for further MPC in buildings with radiation terminals.

  16. The Modeling and Simulation of Thermal Analysis at Hydro Generator Stator Winding Insulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Raduca

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the modelling and simulation of thermal analysis at hydro generator stator winding. The winding stator is supplied at high voltage of 11 kV for high power hydro generator. To present the thermal analysis for stator winding is presented at supply of coil by 11 kV, when coil is heat and thermal transfer in insulation at ambient temperature.

  17. Experimental modeling of weld thermal cycle of the heat affected zone (HAZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kulhánek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Contribution deals with experimental modeling of quick thermal cycles of metal specimens. In the introduction of contribution will be presented measured graphs of thermal cycle of heat affected zone (HAZ of weld. Next will be presented experimental simulation of measured thermal cycle on the standard specimens, useable for material testing. This approach makes possible to create material structures of heat affected zone of weld, big enough for standard material testing.

  18. NDE of spacecraft materials using 3D Compton backscatter x-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, E. R.; Grubsky, V.; Romanov, V.; Shoemaker, K.

    2016-02-01

    We present the results of testing of the NDE performance of a Compton Imaging Tomography (CIT) system for single-sided, penetrating 3D inspection. The system was recently developed by Physical Optics Corporation (POC) and delivered to NASA for testing and evaluation. The CIT technology is based on 3D structure mapping by collecting the information on density profiles in multiple object cross sections through hard x-ray Compton backscatter imaging. The individual cross sections are processed and fused together in software, generating a 3D map of the density profile of the object which can then be analyzed slice-by-slice in x, y, or z directions. The developed CIT scanner is based on a 200-kV x-ray source, flat-panel x-ray detector (FPD), and apodized x-ray imaging optics. The CIT technology is particularly well suited to the NDE of lightweight aerospace materials, such as the thermal protection system (TPS) ceramic and composite materials, micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shielding, spacecraft pressure walls, inflatable habitat structures, composite overwrapped pressure vessels (COPVs), and aluminum honeycomb materials. The current system provides 3D localization of defects and features with field of view 20x12x8 cm3 and spatial resolution ˜2 mm. In this paper, we review several aerospace NDE applications of the CIT technology, with particular emphasis on TPS. Based on the analysis of the testing results, we provide recommendations for continued development on TPS applications that can benefit the most from the unique capabilities of this new NDE technology.

  19. Thermal conductivity model for powdered materials under vacuum based on experimental studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Sakatani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal conductivity of powdered media is characteristically very low in vacuum, and is effectively dependent on many parameters of their constituent particles and packing structure. Understanding of the heat transfer mechanism within powder layers in vacuum and theoretical modeling of their thermal conductivity are of great importance for several scientific and engineering problems. In this paper, we report the results of systematic thermal conductivity measurements of powdered media of varied particle size, porosity, and temperature under vacuum using glass beads as a model material. Based on the obtained experimental data, we investigated the heat transfer mechanism in powdered media in detail, and constructed a new theoretical thermal conductivity model for the vacuum condition. This model enables an absolute thermal conductivity to be calculated for a powder with the input of a set of powder parameters including particle size, porosity, temperature, and compressional stress or gravity, and vice versa. Our model is expected to be a competent tool for several scientific and engineering fields of study related to powders, such as the thermal infrared observation of air-less planetary bodies, thermal evolution of planetesimals, and performance of thermal insulators and heat storage powders.

  20. Thermal models of buildings. Determination of temperatures, heating and cooling loads. Theories, models and computer programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellblad, K.

    1998-05-01

    The need to estimate indoor temperatures, heating or cooling load and energy requirements for buildings arises in many stages of a buildings life cycle, e.g. at the early layout stage, during the design of a building and for energy retrofitting planning. Other purposes are to meet the authorities requirements given in building codes. All these situations require good calculation methods. The main purpose of this report is to present the authors work with problems related to thermal models and calculation methods for determination of temperatures and heating or cooling loads in buildings. Thus the major part of the report deals with treatment of solar radiation in glazing systems, shading of solar and sky radiation and the computer program JULOTTA used to simulate the thermal behavior of rooms and buildings. Other parts of thermal models of buildings are more briefly discussed and included in order to give an overview of existing problems and available solutions. A brief presentation of how thermal models can be built up is also given and it is a hope that the report can be useful as an introduction to this part of building physics as well as during development of calculation methods and computer programs. The report may also serve as a help for the users of energy related programs. Independent of which method or program a user choose to work with it is his or her own responsibility to understand the limits of the tool, else wrong conclusions may be drawn from the results 52 refs, 22 figs, 4 tabs

  1. Thermal conductivity of granular porous media: A pore scale modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Askari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pore scale modeling method has been widely used in the petrophysical studies to estimate macroscopic properties (e.g. porosity, permeability, and electrical resistivity of porous media with respect to their micro structures. Although there is a sumptuous literature about the application of the method to study flow in porous media, there are fewer studies regarding its application to thermal conduction characterization, and the estimation of effective thermal conductivity, which is a salient parameter in many engineering surveys (e.g. geothermal resources and heavy oil recovery. By considering thermal contact resistance, we demonstrate the robustness of the method for predicting the effective thermal conductivity. According to our results obtained from Utah oil sand samples simulations, the simulation of thermal contact resistance is pivotal to grant reliable estimates of effective thermal conductivity. Our estimated effective thermal conductivities exhibit a better compatibility with the experimental data in companion with some famous experimental and analytical equations for the calculation of the effective thermal conductivity. In addition, we reconstruct a porous medium for an Alberta oil sand sample. By increasing roughness, we observe the effect of thermal contact resistance in the decrease of the effective thermal conductivity. However, the roughness effect becomes more noticeable when there is a higher thermal conductivity of solid to fluid ratio. Moreover, by considering the thermal resistance in porous media with different grains sizes, we find that the effective thermal conductivity augments with increased grain size. Our observation is in a reasonable accordance with experimental results. This demonstrates the usefulness of our modeling approach for further computational studies of heat transfer in porous media.

  2. Identification of controlled-complexity thermal therapy models derived from magnetic resonance thermometry images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Niu

    Full Text Available Medical imaging provides information valuable in diagnosis, planning, and control of therapies. In this paper, we develop a method that uses a specific type of imaging--the magnetic resonance thermometry--to identify accurate and computationally efficient site and patient-specific computer models for thermal therapies, such as focused ultrasound surgery, hyperthermia, and thermally triggered targeted drug delivery. The developed method uses a sequence of acquired MR thermometry images to identify a treatment model describing the deposition and dissipation of thermal energy in tissues. The proper orthogonal decomposition of thermal images is first used to identify a set of empirical eigenfunctions, which captures spatial correlations in the thermal response of tissues. Using the reduced subset of eigenfunction as a functional basis, low-dimensional thermal response and the ultrasound specific absorption rate models are then identified. Once identified, the treatment models can be used to plan, optimize, and control the treatment. The developed approach is validated experimentally using the results of MR thermal imaging of a tissue phantom during focused ultrasound sonication. The validation demonstrates that our approach produces accurate low-dimensional treatment models and provides a convenient tool for balancing the accuracy of model predictions and the computational complexity of the treatment models.

  3. A model for predicting thermal properties of asphalt mixtures from their constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Merlin; Roche, Alexis; Lavielle, Marc

    Numerous theoretical and experimental approaches have been developed to predict the effective thermal conductivity of composite materials such as polymers, foams, epoxies, soils and concrete. None of such models have been applied to asphalt concrete. This study attempts to develop a model to predict the thermal conductivity of asphalt concrete from its constituents that will contribute to the asphalt industry by reducing costs and saving time on laboratory testing. The necessity to do the laboratory testing would be no longer required when a mix for the pavement is created with desired thermal properties at the design stage by selecting correct constituents. This thesis investigated six existing predictive models for applicability to asphalt mixtures, and four standard mathematical techniques were used to develop a regression model to predict the effective thermal conductivity. The effective thermal conductivities of 81 asphalt specimens were used as the response variables, and the thermal conductivities and volume fractions of their constituents were used as the predictors. The conducted statistical analyses showed that the measured values of thermal conductivities of the mixtures are affected by the bitumen and aggregate content, but not by the air content. Contrarily, the predicted data for some investigated models are highly sensitive to air voids, but not to bitumen and/or aggregate content. Additionally, the comparison of the experimental with analytical data showed that none of the existing models gave satisfactory results; on the other hand, two regression models (Exponential 1* and Linear 3*) are promising for asphalt concrete.

  4. GPU-accelerated iterative reconstruction from Compton scattered data using a matched pair of conic projector and backprojector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van-Giang; Lee, Soo-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Iterative reconstruction from Compton scattered data is known to be computationally more challenging than that from conventional line-projection based emission data in that the gamma rays that undergo Compton scattering are modeled as conic projections rather than line projections. In conventional tomographic reconstruction, to parallelize the projection and backprojection operations using the graphics processing unit (GPU), approximated methods that use an unmatched pair of ray-tracing forward projector and voxel-driven backprojector have been widely used. In this work, we propose a new GPU-accelerated method for Compton camera reconstruction which is more accurate by using exactly matched pair of projector and backprojector. To calculate conic forward projection, we first sample the cone surface into conic rays and accumulate the intersecting chord lengths of the conic rays passing through voxels using a fast ray-tracing method (RTM). For conic backprojection, to obtain the true adjoint of the conic forward projection, while retaining the computational efficiency of the GPU, we use a voxel-driven RTM which is essentially the same as the standard RTM used for the conic forward projector. Our simulation results show that, while the new method is about 3 times slower than the approximated method, it is still about 16 times faster than the CPU-based method without any loss of accuracy. The net conclusion is that our proposed method is guaranteed to retain the reconstruction accuracy regardless of the number of iterations by providing a perfectly matched projector-backprojector pair, which makes iterative reconstruction methods for Compton imaging faster and more accurate. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heat transfer corrected isothermal model for devolatilization of thermally-thick biomass particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Hao; Wu, Hao; Lin, Weigang

    Isothermal model used in current computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model neglect the internal heat transfer during biomass devolatilization. This assumption is not reasonable for thermally-thick particles. To solve this issue, a heat transfer corrected isothermal model is introduced. In this model......, two heat transfer corrected coefficients: HT-correction of heat transfer and HR-correction of reaction, are defined to cover the effects of internal heat transfer. A series of single biomass devitalization case have been modeled to validate this model, the results show that devolatilization behaviors...... of both thermally-thick and thermally-thin particles are predicted reasonable by using heat transfer corrected model, while, isothermal model overestimate devolatilization rate and heating rate for thermlly-thick particle.This model probably has better performance than isothermal model when it is coupled...

  6. The use of footwear insulation values measured on a thermal foot model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuklane, Kalev

    2004-01-01

    The use of physiological data from human tests in modelling should consider background data, such as activity, environmental factors and clothing insulation on the whole body. The present paper focuses on local thermal comfort of feet with special attention on the effects of physical changes of footwear thermal properties. An alternative test method is available for footwear thermal testing besides the standard method. The possibility to use insulation values acquired on a thermal foot model in practice is shown here. The paper describes the correlation between cold and pain sensations, and foot skin temperatures of the subjects and relates these to insulation measured on a thermal foot model. Recommendations are made for footwear choice according to environmental temperature.

  7. Thermal Impedance Model of High Power IGBT Modules Considering Heat Coupling Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Thermal loading of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) modules is important for the reliability performance of power electronic systems, thus the thermal information of critical points inside module like junction temperature must be accurately modeled and predicted. Usually in the existing...... thermal models, only the self-heating effects of the chips are taken into account, while the thermal coupling effects among chips are less considered. This could result in inaccurate temperature estimation, especially in the high power IGBT modules where the chips are allocated closely to each other...... with large amount of heat generated. In this paper, both the self-heating and heat-coupling effects in the of IGBT module are investigated based on Finite Element Method (FEM) simulation, a new thermal impedance model is thereby proposed to better describe the temperature distribution inside IGBT modules...

  8. An analytically resolved model of a potato's thermal processing using Heun functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Toro, Agustín.

    2014-05-01

    A potato's thermal processing model is solved analytically. The model is formulated using the equation of heat diffusion in the case of a spherical potato processed in a furnace, and assuming that the potato's thermal conductivity is radially modulated. The model is solved using the method of the Laplace transform, applying Bromwich Integral and Residue Theorem. The temperatures' profile in the potato is presented as an infinite series of Heun functions. All computations are performed with computer algebra software, specifically Maple. Using the numerical values of the thermal parameters of the potato and geometric and thermal parameters of the processing furnace, the time evolution of the temperatures in different regions inside the potato are presented analytically and graphically. The duration of thermal processing in order to achieve a specified effect on the potato is computed. It is expected that the obtained analytical results will be important in food engineering and cooking engineering.

  9. Theoretical investigation of some thermal effects in turbulence modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathelin, Lionel [LIMSI-CNRS, Orsay (France); Bataille, Francoise [PROMES-CNRS, Perpignan (France); Ye, Zhou [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Fluid compressibility effects arising from thermal rather than dynamical aspects are theoretically investigated in the framework of turbulent flows. The Mach number is considered low and not to induce significant compressibility effects which here occur due to a very high thermal gradient within the flowfield. With the use of the Two-Scale Direct Interaction Approximation approach, essential turbulent correlations are derived in a one-point one-time framework. In the low velocity gradient limit, they are shown to directly depend on the temperature gradient, assumed large. The impact of thermal effects onto the transport equations of the turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate is also investigated, together with the transport equation for both the density and the internal energy variance.

  10. Development of models for thermal infrared radiation above and within plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paw u, Kyaw T.

    1992-01-01

    Any significant angular dependence of the emitted longwave radiation could result in errors in remotely estimated energy budgets or evapotranspiration. Empirical data and thermal infrared radiation models are reviewed in reference to anisotropic emissions from the plant canopy. The biometeorological aspects of linking longwave models with plant canopy energy budgets and micrometeorology are discussed. A new soil plant atmosphere model applied to anisotropic longwave emissions from a canopy is presented. Time variation of thermal infrared emission measurements is discussed.

  11. Thermal modeling of large prismatic LiFePO4/graphite battery. Coupled thermal and heat generation models for characterization and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damay, Nicolas; Forgez, Christophe; Bichat, Marie-Pierre; Friedrich, Guy

    2015-06-01

    This paper deals with the thermal modeling of a large prismatic Li-ion battery (LiFePO4/graphite). A lumped model representing the main thermal phenomena in the cell, in and outside the casing, is hereby proposed. Most of the parameters are determined analytically using physical and geometrical properties. The heat capacity, the internal and the interfacial thermal resistances between the battery and its cooling system are experimentally identified. On the other hand, the heat sources modeling is considered to be one of the most difficult task. In order to overcome this problem, a heat generation model is included. More specifically, the electrical losses are computed thanks to an electrical model which is represented by an equivalent electric circuit. A method is also proposed for parameter determination which is based on a quasi-steady state assumption. It also takes into account the battery heating during characterization which is the temperature variation due to heat generation during current pulses. This temperature variation is estimated thanks to the coupled thermal and heat generation models. The electrical parameters are determined as function of state of charge (SoC), temperature and current. Finally, the proposed coupled models are experimentally validated with a precision of 1 °C.

  12. Mars Propellant Liquefaction and Storage Performance Modeling using Thermal Desktop with an Integrated Cryocooler Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Pooja; Hauser, Dan; Sutherlin, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASAs current Mars architectures are assuming the production and storage of 23 tons of liquid oxygen on the surface of Mars over a duration of 500+ days. In order to do this in a mass efficient manner, an energy efficient refrigeration system will be required. Based on previous analysis NASA has decided to do all liquefaction in the propulsion vehicle storage tanks. In order to allow for transient Martian environmental effects, a propellant liquefaction and storage system for a Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) was modeled using Thermal Desktop. The model consisted of a propellant tank containing a broad area cooling loop heat exchanger integrated with a reverse turbo Brayton cryocooler. Cryocooler sizing and performance modeling was conducted using MAV diurnal heat loads and radiator rejection temperatures predicted from a previous thermal model of the MAV. A system was also sized and modeled using an alternative heat rejection system that relies on a forced convection heat exchanger. Cryocooler mass, input power, and heat rejection for both systems were estimated and compared against sizing based on non-transient sizing estimates.

  13. Thermal Decomposition Model Development of EN-7 and EN-8 Polyurethane Elastomers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keedy, Ryan Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harrison, Kale Warren [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis - gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TGA- GC/MS) experiments were performed on EN-7 and EN-8, analyzed, and reported in [1] . This SAND report derives and describes pyrolytic thermal decomposition models for use in predicting the responses of EN-7 and EN-8 in an abnormal thermal environment.

  14. Loss and thermal model for power semiconductors including device rating information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Beczkowski, Szymon

    2014-01-01

    pre-defined by experience with poor design flexibility. Consequently a more complete loss and thermal model is proposed in this paper, which takes into account not only the electrical loading but also the device rating as input variables. The quantified correlation between the power loss, thermal...

  15. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  16. Thermal Explosion in a Mechanically Activated Ti-Ni System: Mathematical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, O. V.; Shkoda, O. A.

    2017-01-01

    A mathematical model of a thermal explosion in a mechanically pre-activated Ti-Ni system is constructed in a macroscopic approximation. It is found out that preliminary mechanical activation considerably accelerates the reaction product synthesis. Using the experimental data obtained earlier, the thermal and kinetic constants of the synthesis are determined.

  17. Frequency-Domain Thermal Modelling and Characterization of Power Semiconductor Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; He, Ning; Liserre, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The thermal behavior of power electronics devices has being a crucial design consideration because it is closely related to the reliability and also the cost of the converter system. Unfortunately, the widely used thermal models based on lumps of thermal resistances and capacitances have their li......The thermal behavior of power electronics devices has being a crucial design consideration because it is closely related to the reliability and also the cost of the converter system. Unfortunately, the widely used thermal models based on lumps of thermal resistances and capacitances have...... their limits to correctly predict the device temperatures, especially when considering the thermal grease and heat sink attached to the power semiconductor devices. In this paper, frequency-domain approach is applied to the modelling of the thermal dynamics for power devices. The limits of the existing RC lump...... network. The proposed model can be used to predict not only the internal temperature behaviours of the devices but also the behaviours of heat flowing out of the devices. As a result, more correct estimation of device temperature can be achieved when considering the cooling conditions for the devices....

  18. Guiding the Design of Radiation Imagers with Experimentally Benchmarked Geant4 Simulations for Electron-Tracking Compton Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffer, Amy Beth

    -scattered electron-trajectories is with high-resolution Charged-Coupled Devices (CCDs). The proof-of-principle CCD-based ETCI experiment demonstrated the CCDs' ability to measure the Compton-scattered electron-tracks as a 2-dimensional image. Electron-track-imaging algorithms using the electron-track-image are able to determine the 3-dimensional electron-track trajectory within +/- 20 degrees. The work presented here is the physics simulations developed along side the experimental proof-of-principle experiment. The development of accurate physics modeling for multiple-layer CCDs based ETCI systems allow for the accurate prediction of future ETCI system performance. The simulations also enable quick development insights for system design, and they guide the development of electron-track reconstruction methods. The physics simulation efforts for this project looked closely at the accuracy of the Geant4 Monte Carlo methods for medium energy electron transport. In older version of Geant4 there were some discrepancies between the electron-tracking experimental measurements and the simulation results. It was determined that when comparing the electron dynamics of electrons at very high resolutions, Geant4 simulations must be fine tuned with careful choices for physics production cuts and electron physics stepping sizes. One result of this work is a CCDs Monte Carlo model that has been benchmarked to experimental findings and fully characterized for both photon and electron transport. The CCDs physics model now match to within 1 percent error of experimental results for scattered-electron energies below 500 keV. Following the improvements of the CCDs simulations, the performance of a realistic two-layer CCD-stack system was characterized. The realistic CCD-stack system looked at the effect of thin passive-layers on the CCDs' front face and back-contact. The photon interaction efficiency was calculated for the two-layer CCD-stack, and we found that there is a 90 percent probability of

  19. Predicting Formation Damage in Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Systems Utilizing a Coupled Hydraulic-Thermal-Chemical Reservoir Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Daniel; Regenspurg, Simona; Milsch, Harald; Blöcher, Guido; Kranz, Stefan; Saadat, Ali

    2014-05-01

    In aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems, large amounts of energy can be stored by injecting hot water into deep or intermediate aquifers. In a seasonal production-injection cycle, water is circulated through a system comprising the porous aquifer, a production well, a heat exchanger and an injection well. This process involves large temperature and pressure differences, which shift chemical equilibria and introduce or amplify mechanical processes. Rock-fluid interaction such as dissolution and precipitation or migration and deposition of fine particles will affect the hydraulic properties of the porous medium and may lead to irreversible formation damage. In consequence, these processes determine the long-term performance of the ATES system and need to be predicted to ensure the reliability of the system. However, high temperature and pressure gradients and dynamic feedback cycles pose challenges on predicting the influence of the relevant processes. Within this study, a reservoir model comprising a coupled hydraulic-thermal-chemical simulation was developed based on an ATES demonstration project located in the city of Berlin, Germany. The structural model was created with Petrel, based on data available from seismic cross-sections and wellbores. The reservoir simulation was realized by combining the capabilities of multiple simulation tools. For the reactive transport model, COMSOL Multiphysics (hydraulic-thermal) and PHREEQC (chemical) were combined using the novel interface COMSOL_PHREEQC, developed by Wissmeier & Barry (2011). It provides a MATLAB-based coupling interface between both programs. Compared to using COMSOL's built-in reactive transport simulator, PHREEQC additionally calculates adsorption and reaction kinetics and allows the selection of different activity coefficient models in the database. The presented simulation tool will be able to predict the most important aspects of hydraulic, thermal and chemical transport processes relevant to

  20. Thermal modeling. Application to lithium batteries; Modelisation thermique. Application aux accumulateurs lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandre, A. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Mecanique et d`Aerotechnique (ENSMA), 86 - Poitiers (France); Flament, P. [SAFT, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Marolleau, T. [SAFT, Advanced and Industrial Battery Group, 86 - Poitiers (France); Guiot, T.; Lefriec, C. [TSR Futuropolis, 86 - Chasseneuil du Poitou (France)

    1996-12-31

    The thermal modeling of electrochemical batteries is today an integral part of the design and validation operations of new products. The Li-ion pair allows to increase the power density of batteries but leads to higher heat fluxes during charging-output cycles. Thus, the thermal control has become more crucial and requires the use of modeling. SAFT and TSR companies are involved in this approach and use the ESACAP software. This paper presents this software which uses a nodal method for the modeling of the coupled thermal and electrical processes that take place inside elementary cells and batteries. (J.S.)

  1. Modeling void growth and movement with phase change in thermal energy storage canisters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Douglas; Namkoong, David; Skarda, J. Raymond Lee

    1993-01-01

    A scheme was developed to model the thermal hydrodynamic behavior of thermal energy storage salts. The model included buoyancy, surface tension, viscosity, phases change with density difference, and void growth and movement. The energy, momentum, and continuity equations were solved using a finite volume formulation. The momentum equation was divided into two pieces. The void growth and void movement are modeled between the two pieces of the momentum equations. Results showed this scheme was able to predict the behavior of thermal energy storage salts.

  2. Meson thermalization by baryon injection in D4/D6 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, Z., E-mail: z.rezaei@aut.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Tafresh University, Tafresh 39518 79611 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Particles and Accelerators, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We study meson thermalization in a strongly coupled plasma of quarks and gluons using AdS/CFT duality technique. Four dimensional large-N{sub c} QCD is considered as a theory governing this quark–gluon plasma (QGP) and D4/D6-brane model is chosen to be its holographic dual theory. In order to investigate meson thermalization, we consider a time-dependent change of baryon number chemical potential. Thermalization in gauge theory side corresponds to horizon formation on the probe flavor brane in the gravity side. The gravitational dual theory is compactified on a circle that the inverse of its radius is proportional to energy scale of dual gauge theory. It is seen that increase of this energy scale results in thermalization time dilation. In addition we study the effect of magnetic field on meson thermalization. It will be seen that magnetic field also prolongs thermalization process by making mesons more stable.

  3. Dynamic thermal modelling and analysis of press-pack IGBTs both at component-level and chip-level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busca, Cristian; Teodorescu, Remus; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    Thermal models are needed when designing power converters for Wind Turbines (WTs) in order to carry out thermal and reliability assessment of certain designs. Usually the thermal models of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) are given in the datasheet in various forms at component-level, n......Thermal models are needed when designing power converters for Wind Turbines (WTs) in order to carry out thermal and reliability assessment of certain designs. Usually the thermal models of Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) are given in the datasheet in various forms at component...

  4. Finite-element modeling of thermal gradients during non-local thermal spin injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zihao; Giles, Brandon; Jamison, John; Myers, Roberto

    A new spin Seebeck experiment has been demonstrated, in which a laser is focused on an electrically isolated Pt absorbing pad on yttrium iron garnet (YIG), thermally generating a spin current in YIG. The spins diffuse laterally and are detected non-locally on a remote Pt detector via the inverse spin Hall effect (VISHEnon - local) . This geometry is expected to remove parasitic thermal transport voltages unrelated to the magnonic spin current that could contaminate VISHEnon - local . To validate this, 3D steady-state heat conduction equations are solved to determine the stray temperature gradient at the Pt detector as a function of distance from the laser heating source. We find that the temperature gradient beneath the Pt detector vanishes when the laser is laterally displaced (along x) by 50 μm. The gradient along the interface normal follows ∇Tz (x) ~e - 1 . 76 x and the gradient parallel to the interface follows ∇Tx (x) ~e - 0 . 08 x . Both gradients decay much faster than the measured VISHEnon - local (x) ~e - 0 . 025 x demonstrating the validity of the non-local geometry in probing laterally diffused spin. This work is supported by ARO-MURI W911NF-14-1-0016.

  5. modelling of thermal degradation kinetics of ascorbic acid in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    dried, cooked, canned and frozen fruit and vegetables are a ... Samuel E. Agarry, Biochemical Engineering Research Laboratory, Department of Chemical .... Table 1: Rate Constants for Thermal Degradation of Ascorbic Acid in Potato and Pawpaw at Various. Temperatures. Food Material. T oC. ) (min. 10. 1. 3. −. −. xK. T.

  6. A micro-convection model for thermal conductivity of nanofluids

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Increase in the specific surface area as well as Brownian motion are supposed to be the most significant reasons for the anomalous enhancement in thermal conductivity of nanofluids. This work presents a semi-empirical approach for the same by emphasizing the above two effects through micro-convection. A new way of ...

  7. Fluid temperatures: Modeling the thermal regime of a river network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda Mazza; Ashley Steel

    2017-01-01

    Water temperature drives the complex food web of a river network. Aquatic organisms hatch, feed, and reproduce in thermal niches within the tributaries and mainstem that comprise the river network. Changes in water temperature can synchronize or asynchronize the timing of their life stages throughout the year. The water temperature fluctuates over time and place,...

  8. Case study for model validation : assessing a model for thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Leslie, Ian H. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Hobbs, Michael L.; Rutherford, Brian Milne; Hills, Richard Guy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Pilch, Martin M.

    2004-10-01

    A case study is reported to document the details of a validation process to assess the accuracy of a mathematical model to represent experiments involving thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. The focus of the report is to work through a validation process. The process addresses the following activities. The intended application of mathematical model is discussed to better understand the pertinent parameter space. The parameter space of the validation experiments is mapped to the application parameter space. The mathematical models, computer code to solve the models and its (code) verification are presented. Experimental data from two activities are used to validate mathematical models. The first experiment assesses the chemistry model alone and the second experiment assesses the model of coupled chemistry, conduction, and enclosure radiation. The model results of both experimental activities are summarized and uncertainty of the model to represent each experimental activity is estimated. The comparison between the experiment data and model results is quantified with various metrics. After addressing these activities, an assessment of the process for the case study is given. Weaknesses in the process are discussed and lessons learned are summarized.

  9. Thermal Error Modeling Method for a CNC Machine Tool Feed Drive System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The disadvantages of the common current thermal error modeling methods for CNC machine tool feed drive systems were analyzed, such as the requirement of many temperature sensors to reach high accuracy and poor applicability of different moving states. A new robust modeling method based on the heat transfer theory is proposed, and the procedure of the thermal tests for a feed drive system is presented. Multiple regression method and robust modeling method based on the heat transfer theory were, respectively, used to establish a thermal error model, and a pointer automatic optimizer was used to optimize the parameters in the robust model. A compensation simulation was conducted under five different moving states using these two modeling methods, and the advantages of the robust modeling method were proved. Finally, the compensation effect of the robust modeling method was verified under a random moving state on a vertical machining center.

  10. Numerical Modelling of Thermal Convection Related to Fracture Permeability - Implications for Geothermal Exploration and Basin Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsey, Lindsay; van Wees, Jan-Diederik; Pluymaekers, Maarten; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2015-04-01

    the fracture network geometry within the aquifer. In summary, convective upwellings can create significant temperature enhancements relative to conductive profile and in agreement with the observations in the LTG-01 carbonates. This enhancement is critically dependent on the aquifer thickness and geothermal gradient. Given a gradient of 39°C/km and aquifer thickness of 600 m, a temperature of 203°C can be obtained at a depth of 4500 m directly above upwelling zones. Contrarily, downwelling zones result in a temperature of 185°C at the same depth. This demonstrates the strong spatial variability of thermal anomalies in convective fractured aquifers at large depth and can have strong effects on exploration opportunity and risk of prospective areas. Numerical models can facilitate in exploration workflows to assess thermal variation and location of upwelling zones.

  11. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) Superpressure Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Steven E.

    2014-08-01

    The Compton Spectrometer and Image (COSI) is a ULDB-borne soft gamma-ray telescope (0.2-5 MeV) designed to probe the origins of Galactic positrons, uncover sites of nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy, and perform pioneering studies of gamma-ray polarization in a number of source classes. COSI uses a compact Compton telescope design, resulting from a decade of development under NASA’s ROSES program - a modern take on techniques successfully pioneered by COMPTEL on CGRO. COSI performs groundbreaking science by combining improvements in sensitivity, spectral resolution, and sky coverage. The COSI instrument and flight systems have been designed for flight on NASA’s 18 MCF superpressure balloon (SPB). We are now beginning a series science flights to fulfill the COSI science goals: a SPB in 2014 from Antarctica, followed by two 100-day ULDB flights from New Zealand.COSI is a wide-field survey telescope designed to perform imaging, spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. It employs a novel Compton telescope design utilizing a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors (GeDs) to resolve individual gamma-ray interactions with high spectral and spatial resolution. The COSI array is housed in a common vacuum cryostat cooled by a mechanical cryocooler. An active CsI Shield encloses the cryostat on the sides and bottom. The FoV of the instrument covers 25% of the full sky at a given moment.The COSI instrument builds upon considerable heritage from the previous Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) balloon instrument that underwent a successful technology demonstration flight in June 2005 from Fort Sumner, NM, a successful “first light” science flight from Fort Sumner in May 2009, and a launch campaign from Alice Springs, Australia in June 2010, where it unfortunately suffered a launch mishap. COSI has been upgraded from the previous NCT instrument by conversion to a detector configuration optimized for polarization sensitivity and addition of a cryocooler to remove

  12. COSI: The Compton Spectrometer and Imager Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John; Jean, Pierre; Chang, Hsiang-Kuang; Boggs, Steven; Zoglauer, A.; Von Ballmoos, Peter; Amman, Mark; Chiu, Jeng-Lun; Chang, Yuan-Hann.; Chou, Yi; Kierans, Carolyn; Lin, Chih-Hsun.; Lowell, Alex; Shang, Jie-Rou.; Tseng, Chao-Hsiung; Yang, Chien-Ying

    The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), which was formerly known as the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT), is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray telescope (0.2-5 MeV) designed to probe the origins of Galactic positrons, uncover sites of nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy, and perform pioneering studies of gamma-ray polarization in a number of source classes. COSI uses a compact Compton telescope design, resulting from a decade of development under NASA's ROSES program - a modern take on techniques successfully pioneered by COMPTEL on CGRO. We have rebuilt the COSI instrument and flight systems, upgraded for balloon flights and improved polarization sensitivity. We will present the redesign of COSI and the overall goals of the 5-year science program. Three science flights are planned to fulfill the COSI science goals: an LDB in 2014 from Antarctica on a superpressure balloon (SuperCOSI), followed by two 100-day ULDB flights from New Zealand. COSI is a wide-field survey telescope designed to perform imaging, spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. It employs a novel Compton telescope design utilizing a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors (GeDs) to resolve individual gamma-ray interactions with high spectral and spatial resolution. The COSI array is housed in a common vacuum cryostat cooled by a mechanical cryocooler. An active CsI shield encloses the cryostat on the sides and bottom. The FoV of the instrument covers 25% of the full sky at a given moment. The COSI instrument is mature, building upon considerable heritage from the previous NCT balloon instrument that underwent a successful technology demonstration flight in June 2005 from Fort Sumner, NM, a successful "first light" science flight from Fort Sumner in May 2009, and quickly turned around and delivered on time for a launch campaign from Alice Springs, Australia in June 2010, where it unfortunately suffered a launch mishap. The NCT instrument and Flight System are being rebuilt under the NASA

  13. Spectator-Tagged Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on Light Nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Whitney; Arrington, John; Cloët, Ian; Freese, Adam; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hattawy, Mohammad; Riordan, Seamus; Johnston, Sereres; Potteveld, David; Reimer, Paul; Ye, Zhihong; Ball, Jacques; Defurne, Maxime; Garcon, Michel; Moutarde, Herve

    2017-01-01

    The three-dimensional picture of quarks and gluons in the proton is set to be revealed through Deeply virtual Compton scattering while a critically important puzzle in the one-dimensional picture remains, namely, the origins of the EMC effect. Incoherent nuclear DVCS, i.e. DVCS on a nucleon inside a nucleus, can reveal the 3D partonic structure of the bound nucleon and shed a new light on the EMC effect. However, the Fermi motion of the struck nucleon, off-shell effects and final-state intera...

  14. Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS). User`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landron, C.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Baldwin, G.T. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1994-04-01

    The Time Projection Compton Spectrometer (TPCS) is a radiation diagnostic designed to determine the time-integrated energy spectrum between 100 keV -- 2 MeV of flash x-ray sources. This guide is intended as a reference for the routine operator of the TPCS. Contents include a brief overview of the principle of operation, detailed component descriptions, detailed assembly and disassembly procedures, guide to routine operations, and troubleshooting flowcharts. Detailed principle of operation, signal analysis and spectrum unfold algorithms are beyond the scope of this guide; however, the guide makes reference to sources containing this information.

  15. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, David Jonathan [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p ($\\vec{γ}$, γ' \\vec{p}$) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  16. Polarization Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, D J; Aniol, K A; Annand, J R M; Bertin, P Y; Bimbot, L; Bosted, P; Calarco, J R; Camsonne, A; Chang, G C; Chang, T H; Chen, J P; Seonho Choi; Chudakov, E; Danagulyan, A S; Degtyarenko, P; De Jager, C W; Deur, A; Dutta, D; Egiyan, K; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gayou, O; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Glashausser, C; Gómez, J; Hansen, J O; Hayes, D; Higinbotham, D W; Hinton, W; Horn, T; Howell, C; Hunyady, T; Hyde-Wright, C E; Jiang, X; Jones, M K; Khandaker, M; Ketikyan, A; Koubarovski, V; Krämer, K; Kumbartzki, G; Laveissière, G; Le Rose, J J; Lindgren, R A; Margaziotis, D J; Markowitz, P; McCormick, K; Meziani, Z E; Michaels, R; Moussiegt, P; Nanda, S; Nathan, A M; Nikolenko, D M; Nelyubin, V V; Norum, B E; Paschke, K; Pentchev, L; Perdrisat, C F; Piasetzky, E; Pomatsalyuk, R I; Punjabi, V A; Rachek, Igor A; Radyushkin, A V; Reitz, B; Roché, R; Roedelbronn, M; Ron, G; Sabatie, F; Saha, A; Savvinov, N; Shahinyan, A; Shestakov, Yu V; Sirca, S; Slifer, K J; Solvignon, P; Stoler, P; Tajima, S; Sulkosky, V; Todor, L; Vlahovic, B; Weinstein, L B; Wang, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Voskanyan, H; Xiang, H; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2004-01-01

    Compton scattering from the proton was investigated at s=6.9 (GeV/c)**2 and \\t=-4.0 (GeV/c)**2 via polarization transfer from circularly polarized incident photons. The longitudinal and transverse components of the recoil proton polarization were measured. The results are in excellent agreement with a prediction based on a reaction mechanism in which the photon interacts with a single quark carrying the spin of the proton and in disagreement with a prediction of pQCD based on a two-gluon exchange mechanism.

  17. Measurement of Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solovev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement is presented of elastic Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering e^+ + p -> e^+ + photon + p at HERA using data taken with the H1 detector. The cross section is measured as a function of the photon virtuality, Q^2, and the invariant mass, W, of the gamma p system, in the kinematic range 2 < Q^2 < 20 GeV^2, 30 < W < 120 GeV and |t| < 1 GeV^2, where t is the squared momentum transfer to the proton. The measurement is compared to QCD based calculations.

  18. Angle-dependent Green's functions for relativistic Compton reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xin-Min; Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Using analytic methods, we derived the first-order Green's functions, in terms of the observing angle, for the reflected spectra after a single Compton scattering of relativistic photons by a plane-parallel semiinfinite medium of cold electrons. We also calculated the total Green's functions for incident photons of 511 keV, using Monte Carlo methods. We show that both the first-order and total Green's functions have strong angular dependences and that the first-order Green's functions play a dominant role in determining the properties of the total reflected spectra.

  19. Filtered back-projection algorithm for Compton telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Donald L [Lisle, IL

    2008-03-18

    A method for the conversion of Compton camera data into a 2D image of the incident-radiation flux on the celestial sphere includes detecting coincident gamma radiation flux arriving from various directions of a 2-sphere. These events are mapped by back-projection onto the 2-sphere to produce a convolution integral that is subsequently stereographically projected onto a 2-plane to produce a second convolution integral which is deconvolved by the Fourier method to produce an image that is then projected onto the 2-sphere.

  20. Thermal layer development modeling. Final report 1 December 1975--20 June 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knasel, T.M.; Versteegen, P.L.; Powers, J.A.

    1977-06-01

    Thermal layers which may develop during the employment of nuclear weapons have been investigated theoretically. If such a layer forms, non-ideal shock wave propagation results. This in turn modifies the potential damage levels, adding risk and uncertainty to the sure-kill and sure-safe areas around the burst point. The study calculates the effective thermal layer temperature for a series of atmospheric nuclear explosions. By reinterpretation of previous evidence, good agreement between layer temperature and shock propagation behavior is evident. From additional data on soil response to strong thermal radiation, a semi-empirical model of thermal layer temperature distributions and dust generation was constructed based on first principles. This model agrees with the known values of thermal layer parameters including those of layer temperature.

  1. Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of CVI-Densified Composites at Fiber and Bundle Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Kang; Wu, Jianqing; Cheng, Laifei

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of the thermal conductivities of the unidirectional, 2D woven and 3D braided composites during the CVI (chemical vapor infiltration) process have been numerically studied by the finite element method. The results show that the dual-scale pores play an important role in the thermal conduction of the CVI-densified composites. According to our results, two thermal conductivity models applicable for CVI process have been developed. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the parameter with the most influence on the CVI-densified composites’ thermal conductivity is matrix cracking’s density, followed by volume fraction of the bundle and thermal conductance of the matrix cracks, finally by micro-porosity inside the bundles and macro-porosity between the bundles. The obtained results are well consistent with the reported data, thus our models could be useful for designing the processing and performance of the CVI-densified composites. PMID:28774130

  2. Compton suppression method and epithermal NAA in the determination of nutrients and heavy metals in Nigerian food and beverages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Y.A., E-mail: yaahmed1@gmail.co [Reactor Engineering Section, Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria (Nigeria); Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78758 (United States); Landsberger, S.; O' Kelly, D.J.; Braisted, J. [Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78758 (United States); Gabdo, H. [Physics Department, Federal College of Education, Yola (Nigeria); Ewa, I.O.B.; Umar, I.M.; Funtua, I.I. [Reactor Engineering Section, Centre for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria (Nigeria)

    2010-10-15

    We used in this study Compton suppression method and epithermal neutron activation analysis to determine the concentration of nutrients and heavy metals in Nigerian food and beverages. The work was performed at the University of Texas TRIGA Reactor by short, medium, and long irradiation protocols, using thermal flux of 1.4x10{sup 12} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and epithermal flux of 1.4x10{sup 11} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Application of Compton suppression method has reduced interferences from Compton scattered photons thereby allowing easy evaluation of Na, Cl, Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Co, Cr, Rb, Fe, and Se. The epithermal NAA method has enabled determination of Cd, As, Ba, Sr, Br, I, and V with little turn-around time. Quality Control and Quality Assurance of the method was tested by analyzing four Standard Reference Materials (non-fat powdered milk, apple leaves, citrus leaves, and peach leaves) obtained from National Institute for Standards and Technology. Our results show that sorghum, millet, and maize have high values of Zn, Mn, Fe, low values of Cd, As, and Se. Powdered milks, rice, beans, and soybeans were found to have moderate amounts of all the elements. Tobacco recorded high content of Cd, Mn, and As, whereas tea, tsobo leaves, Baobab leaves, and okro seed have more As values than others. However, biscuits, macaroni, spaghetti, and noodles show lower concentrations of all the elements. The distribution of these nutrients and heavy metals in these food and beverages shows the need to fortify biscuits and pastas with micro and macro-nutrients and reduce the use of tobacco, tea, tsobo leaves, Baobab leaves, and Okro seed to avoid intake of heavy elements.

  3. Compton suppression method and epithermal NAA in the determination of nutrients and heavy metals in Nigerian food and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Y A; Landsberger, S; O'Kelly, D J; Braisted, J; Gabdo, H; Ewa, I O B; Umar, I M; Funtua, I I

    2010-10-01

    We used in this study Compton suppression method and epithermal neutron activation analysis to determine the concentration of nutrients and heavy metals in Nigerian food and beverages. The work was performed at the University of Texas TRIGA Reactor by short, medium, and long irradiation protocols, using thermal flux of 1.4x10(12)n cm(-2)s(-1) and epithermal flux of 1.4x10(11)n cm(-2)s(-1). Application of Compton suppression method has reduced interferences from Compton scattered photons thereby allowing easy evaluation of Na, Cl, Ca, Cu, Mn, Mg, Co, Cr, Rb, Fe, and Se. The epithermal NAA method has enabled determination of Cd, As, Ba, Sr, Br, I, and V with little turn-around time. Quality Control and Quality Assurance of the method was tested by analyzing four Standard Reference Materials (non-fat powdered milk, apple leaves, citrus leaves, and peach leaves) obtained from National Institute for Standards and Technology. Our results show that sorghum, millet, and maize have high values of Zn, Mn, Fe, low values of Cd, As, and Se. Powdered milks, rice, beans, and soybeans were found to have moderate amounts of all the elements. Tobacco recorded high content of Cd, Mn, and As, whereas tea, tsobo leaves, Baobab leaves, and okro seed have more As values than others. However, biscuits, macaroni, spaghetti, and noodles show lower concentrations of all the elements. The distribution of these nutrients and heavy metals in these food and beverages shows the need to fortify biscuits and pastas with micro and macro-nutrients and reduce the use of tobacco, tea, tsobo leaves, Baobab leaves, and Okro seed to avoid intake of heavy elements. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mixed boundary-value problems for quantum hydrodynamic models with semiconductors in thermal equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Dong

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We show the existence of solutions for mixed boundary-value problems that model quantum hydrodynamics in thermal equilibrium. Also we find the semi-classical limit of the solutions.

  5. Rotor drop and following thermal growth simulations using detailed auxiliary bearing and damper models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyoung

    2006-01-01

    Catcher bearings (CBs) or auxiliary bearings provide mechanical backup protection in the events of magnetic bearing failure. This paper presents numerical analysis for a rotor drop on CBs and following thermal growths due to their mechanical rub using detailed CB and damper models. The detailed CB model is determined based on its material, geometry, speed and preload using the nonlinear Hertzian load-deflection formula, and the thermal growths of bearing components during the rotor drop are estimated using a 1D thermal model. A finite-element squeeze film damper provides the pressure profile of an annular oil film and the resulting viscous damping force. Numerical simulations of an energy storage flywheel with magnetic suspensions failed reveal that an optimal CB design using the detailed simulation models stabilizes the rotor drop dynamics and lowers the thermal growths while preventing the high-speed backward whirl. Furthermore, CB design guides based on the simulation results are presented.

  6. A Network Model for the Effective Thermal Conductivity of Rigid Fibrous Refractory Insulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Jochen; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A procedure is described for computing the effective thermal conductivity of a rigid fibrous refractory insulation. The insulation is modeled as a 3-dimensional Cartesian network of thermal conductance. The values and volume distributions of the conductance are assigned to reflect the physical properties of the insulation, its constituent fibers, and any permeating gas. The effective thermal conductivity is computed by considering the simultaneous energy transport by solid conduction, gas conduction and radiation through a cubic volume of model insulation; thus the coupling between heat transfer modes is retained (within the simplifications inherent to the model), rather than suppressed by treating these heat transfer modes as independent. The model takes into account insulation composition, density and fiber anisotropy, as well as the geometric and material properties of the constituent fibers. A relatively good agreement, between calculated and experimentally derived thermal conductivity values, is obtained for a variety of rigid fibrous insulations.

  7. Optimal time lags to use in modeling the thermal deformation of VLBI Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bail, K.; Gipson, J. M.; Juhl, J.; MacMillan, D. S.

    2013-08-01

    One of the most significant effects on VLBI antennas is thermal expansion which can change the height of the VLBI reference point by as much as 20mm. In this paper, we investigate how using a thermal expansion model in VLBI processing improves the solution, as well as the optimal time delay for the variations in temperature to introduce for the steel telescope structure and for a concrete structure. We use the software Solve and the conventional model of Nothnagel 2009 implemented in Solve. We compare different solutions processed using the R1 and R4 sessions from January 2002 to March 2011: 1) not using the thermal expansion model, 2) using it with no time delay and then 3) different time delays. We show that using the thermal deformation model improves the baseline length repeatability of the solutions by more than 1mm and for more than 75 % of the baselines, as well as reduces the WRMS per station.

  8. Transient modelling of loss and thermal dynamics in power semiconductor devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Yang, Yongheng; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    until achieving the steady-state. As a result, a systematic modelling approach is proposed in this paper, which includes the large signal models of the converter system with both electrical and thermal parts, and the corresponding transient models under frequency domain are also extracted. Based...... on the proposed models, the bandwidths of the loss or thermal response to major disturbances in the converter system can be analytically mapped, enabling more advanced tools to investigate the transient characteristics of loss and thermal dynamics in the power electronics devices.......The dynamical behavior of temperature is becoming a critical design consideration for the power electronics, because they are referred as “thermal cycling” which is the root cause of fatigues in the power electronics devices, and thus is closely related to the reliability of the converter...

  9. Numerically modeling Brownian thermal noise in amorphous and crystalline thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey; Demos, Nicholas; Khan, Haroon

    2018-01-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be one of the noise sources limiting the astrophysical reach of Advanced LIGO (once commissioning is complete) and third-generation detectors. Adopting crystalline materials for thin, reflecting mirror coatings, rather than the amorphous coatings used in current-generation detectors, could potentially reduce thermal noise. Understanding and reducing thermal noise requires accurate theoretical models, but modeling thermal noise analytically is especially challenging with crystalline materials. Thermal noise models typically rely on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates the power spectral density of the thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. In this paper, we present results from a new, open-source tool that numerically solves the auxiliary elastic problem to compute the Brownian thermal noise for both amorphous and crystalline coatings. We employ the open-source deal.ii and PETSc frameworks to solve the auxiliary elastic problem using a finite-element method, adaptive mesh refinement, and parallel processing that enables us to use high resolutions capable of resolving the thin reflective coating. We verify numerical convergence, and by running on up to hundreds of compute cores, we resolve the coating elastic energy in the auxiliary problem to approximately 0.1%. We compare with approximate analytic solutions for amorphous materials, and we verify that our solutions scale as expected with changing beam size, mirror dimensions, and coating thickness. Finally, we model the crystalline coating thermal noise in an experiment reported by Cole et al (2013 Nat. Photon. 7 644–50), comparing our results to a simpler numerical calculation that treats the coating as an ‘effectively amorphous’ material. We find that treating the coating as a cubic crystal instead of as an effectively amorphous material increases the thermal noise by about 3%. Our results are a step toward better understanding and reducing thermal noise to

  10. Thermal and Non-thermal emission in the Jets and Lobes of Cygnus A

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vries, Martijn; Wise, Michael; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Nulsen, Paul; Snios, Bradford; Hardcastle, Martin

    2017-08-01

    We present a spatially-resolved, spectral analysis aimed at detecting and characterizing the non-thermal X-ray emission from the jets and lobes in the powerful radio galaxy Cygnus A based on a new, deep 1 Msec Chandra exposure. These jets and lobes are believed to be a primary means by which energy liberated by accretion onto the central supermassive black hole is transported into the outer galaxy and are integral to understanding the mechanisms that drive AGN feedback. Despite being well-studied over the years, we still do not understand how this energy is transported, the connection between the X-ray and radio structures, and the underlying emission mechanisms that produce them. The X-ray jets in Cygnus A show a clear misalignment with the radio and it has been proposed that they are either inverse Compton-emitting relics or a separate electron population emitting X-ray synchrotron emission. Previous X-ray studies of the jets and lobes have been unsuccessful in distinguishing between these possibilities largely due to the difficulty of separating any non-thermal components from thermal emission in the surrounding hot ICM at CCD spectral resolutions.In this presentation, we report on a new statistical analysis using MCMC sampling and Bayesian model selection to characterize the X-ray emission in the jets and lobes of Cygnus A. The model includes a mixture of thermal ICM emission and distinct non-thermal components from both the eastern and western jets and lobes. Our analysis clearly favors the presence of non-thermal emission and we find a distinct asymmetry with the western lobe roughly 20% fainter and with a much steeper photon index. Combining existing radio data with our X-ray fluxes and photon indices, we determine the energy densities and pressures for both synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) emission models. For the IC model, we derive energy densities in the lobes consistent with the external pressure; however, both the eastern and western jets would be

  11. Modeling energy flexibility of low energy buildings utilizing thermal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foteinaki, Kyriaki; Heller, Alfred; Rode, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    In the future energy system a considerable increase in the penetration of renewable energy is expected, challenging the stability of the system, as both production and consumption will have fluctuating patterns. Hence, the concept of energy flexibility will be necessary in order for the consumption...... to match the production patterns, shifting demand from on-peak hours to off-peak hours. Buildings could act as flexibility suppliers to the energy system, through load shifting potential, provided that the large thermal mass of the building stock could be utilized for energy storage. In the present study...... the load shifting potential of an apartment of a low energy building in Copenhagen is assessed, utilizing the heat storage capacity of the thermal mass when the heating system is switched off for relieving the energy system. It is shown that when using a 4-hour preheating period before switching off...

  12. Orion Active Thermal Control System Dynamic Modeling Using Simulink/MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.; Yuko, James

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents dynamic modeling of the crew exploration vehicle (Orion) active thermal control system (ATCS) using Simulink (Simulink, developed by The MathWorks). The model includes major components in ATCS, such as heat exchangers and radiator panels. The mathematical models of the heat exchanger and radiator are described first. Four different orbits were used to validate the radiator model. The current model results were compared with an independent Thermal Desktop (TD) (Thermal Desktop, PC/CAD-based thermal model builder, developed in Cullimore & Ring (C&R) Technologies) model results and showed good agreement for all orbits. In addition, the Orion ATCS performance was presented for three orbits and the current model results were compared with three sets of solutions- FloCAD (FloCAD, PC/CAD-based thermal/fluid model builder, developed in C&R Technologies) model results, SINDA/FLUINT (SINDA/FLUINT, a generalized thermal/fluid network-style solver ) model results, and independent Simulink model results. For each case, the fluid temperatures at every component on both the crew module and service module sides were plotted and compared. The overall agreement is reasonable for all orbits, with similar behavior and trends for the system. Some discrepancies exist because the control algorithm might vary from model to model. Finally, the ATCS performance for a 45-hr nominal mission timeline was simulated to demonstrate the capability of the model. The results show that the ATCS performs as expected and approximately 2.3 lb water was consumed in the sublimator within the 45 hr timeline before Orion docked at the International Space Station.

  13. Dynamic thermal modelling of horizontal ground-source heat pumps

    OpenAIRE

    Guohui Gan

    2013-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for numerical simulation of the dynamic thermal performance of horizontally coupled heat exchangers for ground-source heat pumps, taking account of dynamic variations of climatic, load and soil conditions. The program was used to investigate the effects of operating and start times, installation depth and soil freezing on the heat exchanger performance. It is shown that the rate of heat extraction decreases with increasing operating time. Operating a heat...

  14. Dynamic Heat Generation Modeling and Thermal Management of Electromechanical Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Temperature of Stator (Green), Simulated Temperature of Stator (Red), and the Simulated Temperature of the Windings (Cyan...the Windings (Cyan). Note that the Simulated Temperatures of the Windings and Stator are About the Same, Indicating the Low Thermal Resistance in...of the motor. We focus on the temperatures of the winding , stator , magnet and bearing. It is noted that for every component, the temperature is

  15. Modeling Interfacial Thermal Boundary Conductance of Engineered Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-31

    interface between materials 1 & 2 with an impurity mass mint , the energy transmission of all phonon frequencies is maximized when mint = (m1 +m2)/2...properties of the source and sink. Figure 5: Phonon transmission spectra, with curves corresponding to different impurity masses, mint (left plot) or...substrate [2, 34]. The thermal decay of each sample, measured by TDTR, was compared to a multilayer solution of the heat diffusion equation to extract

  16. A numerical model for the thermal history of rocks based on confined horizontal fission tracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Klint; Hansen, Kirsten; Kunzendorf, Helmar

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model for determination of the thermal history of rocks is presented. It is shown that the thermal history may be uniquely determined as a piece-by-piece linear function on the basis of etched confined, horizontal fission track length distributions, their surface densities...... measured in transmitted light are biased favouring short tracks compared with measurements in reflected light. Testing of the model is performed on apatites from a tuffaceous sandstone from Bornholm (Denmark) yielding an estimate of the thermal history for the period of about 280 Ma back in time....

  17. Modeling the spatiotemporal variability in subsurface thermal regimes across a low-relief polygonal tundra landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vast carbon stocks stored in permafrost soils of Arctic tundra are under risk of release to the atmosphere under warming climate scenarios. Ice-wedge polygons in the low-gradient polygonal tundra create a complex mosaic of microtopographic features. This microtopography plays a critical role in regulating the fine-scale variability in thermal and hydrological regimes in the polygonal tundra landscape underlain by continuous permafrost. Modeling of thermal regimes of this sensitive ecosystem is essential for understanding the landscape behavior under the current as well as changing climate. We present here an end-to-end effort for high-resolution numerical modeling of thermal hydrology at real-world field sites, utilizing the best available data to characterize and parameterize the models. We develop approaches to model the thermal hydrology of polygonal tundra and apply them at four study sites near Barrow, Alaska, spanning across low to transitional to high-centered polygons, representing a broad polygonal tundra landscape. A multiphase subsurface thermal hydrology model (PFLOTRAN was developed and applied to study the thermal regimes at four sites. Using a high-resolution lidar digital elevation model (DEM, microtopographic features of the landscape were characterized and represented in the high-resolution model mesh. The best available soil data from field observations and literature were utilized to represent the complex heterogeneous subsurface in the numerical model. Simulation results demonstrate the ability of the developed modeling approach to capture – without recourse to model calibration – several aspects of the complex thermal regimes across the sites, and provide insights into the critical role of polygonal tundra microtopography in regulating the thermal dynamics of the carbon-rich permafrost soils. Areas of significant disagreement between model results and observations highlight the importance of field-based observations of

  18. Comparison of Observed Surface Temperatures of 4 Vesta to the KRC Thermal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, T. N.; Becker, K. J.; Anderson, J. A.; Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we will compare ob-served temperatures of the surface of Vesta using data acquired by the Dawn [1] Visible and Infrared Map-ping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [2] during the approach phase to model results from the KRC thermal model. High thermal inertia materials, such as bedrock, resist changes in temperature while temperatures of low thermal inertia material, such as dust, respond quickly to changes in solar insolation. The surface of Vesta is expected to have low to medium thermal inertia values, with the most commonly used value being extremely low at 15 TIU [4]. There are several parameters which affect observed temperatures in addition to thermal inertia: bond albedo, slope, and surface roughness. In addition to these parameters, real surfaces are rarely uniform monoliths that can be described by a single thermal inertia value. Real surfaces are often vertically layered or are mixtures of dust and rock. For Vesta's surface, with temperature extremes ranging from 50 K to 275 K and no atmosphere, even a uniform monolithic surface may have non-uniform thermal inertia due to temperature dependent thermal conductivity.

  19. Investigating the adaptive model of thermal comfort for naturally ventilated school buildings in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Kuo, Nai-Jung

    2009-03-01

    Divergence in the acceptability to people in different regions of naturally ventilated thermal environments raises a concern over the extent to which the ASHRAE Standard 55 may be applied as a universal criterion of thermal comfort. In this study, the ASHRAE 55 adaptive model of thermal comfort was investigated for its applicability to a hot and humid climate through a long-term field survey performed in central Taiwan among local students attending 14 elementary and high schools during September to January. Adaptive behaviors, thermal neutrality, and thermal comfort zones are explored. A probit analysis of thermal acceptability responses from students was performed in place of the conventional linear regression of thermal sensation votes against operative temperature to investigate the limits of comfort zones for 90% and 80% acceptability; the corresponding comfort zones were found to occur at 20.1-28.4 degrees C and 17.6-30.0 degrees C, respectively. In comparison with the yearly comfort zones recommended by the adaptive model for naturally ventilated spaces in the ASHRAE Standard 55, those observed in this study differ in the lower limit for 80% acceptability, with the observed level being 1.7 degrees C lower than the ASHRAE-recommended value. These findings can be generalized to the population of school children, thus providing information that can supplement ASHRAE Standard 55 in evaluating the thermal performance of naturally ventilated school buildings, particularly in hot-humid areas such as Taiwan.

  20. Investigating the adaptive model of thermal comfort for naturally ventilated school buildings in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Kuo, Nai-Jung

    2009-03-01

    Divergence in the acceptability to people in different regions of naturally ventilated thermal environments raises a concern over the extent to which the ASHRAE Standard 55 may be applied as a universal criterion of thermal comfort. In this study, the ASHRAE 55 adaptive model of thermal comfort was investigated for its applicability to a hot and humid climate through a long-term field survey performed in central Taiwan among local students attending 14 elementary and high schools during September to January. Adaptive behaviors, thermal neutrality, and thermal comfort zones are explored. A probit analysis of thermal acceptability responses from students was performed in place of the conventional linear regression of thermal sensation votes against operative temperature to investigate the limits of comfort zones for 90% and 80% acceptability; the corresponding comfort zones were found to occur at 20.1-28.4°C and 17.6-30.0°C, respectively. In comparison with the yearly comfort zones recommended by the adaptive model for naturally ventilated spaces in the ASHRAE Standard 55, those observed in this study differ in the lower limit for 80% acceptability, with the observed level being 1.7°C lower than the ASHRAE-recommended value. These findings can be generalized to the population of school children, thus providing information that can supplement ASHRAE Standard 55 in evaluating the thermal performance of naturally ventilated school buildings, particularly in hot-humid areas such as Taiwan.