WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal compound low-enriched-uranium

  1. Reactivity worth of the thermal column of a MTR type swimming pool research reactor using low enriched uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali Khan, L.; Ahmad, N.

    2002-01-01

    The reactivity worth of the thermal column of a typical MTR type swimming pool research reactor using low enriched uranium fuel has been determined by modeling the core using standard computer codes. It was also measured experimentally by operating the reactor in the stall and open ends. The calculated value of the reactivity worth of the thermal column is about 14% greater than the experimentally determined value

  2. Thermal-hydraulic analysis for core conversion to the use of low-enriched uranium fuels in the KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Kaichiro; Kanda, Keiji; Shibata, Toshikazu

    1985-01-01

    A feasibility study has been performed on the core conversion to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels in the KUR. Five fuel element geometries are studied. For each fuel element, the relation between the pressure drop and the flow rate, critical heat flux, and heat fluxes for the onset of flow instability and the onset of nucleate boiling are calculated using the computer code PLTEMP3.MOD1 which has been developed for this analysis. The effect of fuel material (UAl x -Al, U 3 O 8 -Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) on the peak fuel temperatures is also studied. A particular interest in the mixed core which may be constructed on the way to the use of LEU fuels, the change in the bypass flow rate due to the change in the gap between different fuel elements is investigated. (author)

  3. Structure and thermal properties of as-fabricated U-7Mo/Mg and U-10Mo/Mg low-enriched uranium research reactor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulakov, Mykola, E-mail: mykola.kulakov@cnl.ca [Fuel Development Branch, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 Canada (Canada); Saoudi, Mouna [Fuel Development Branch, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 Canada (Canada); Piro, Markus H.A. [Fuel and Fuel Channel Safety Branch, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 Canada (Canada); Donaberger, Ronald L. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 Canada (Canada)

    2017-02-15

    Aluminum-clad U-7Mo/Mg and U-10Mo/Mg pin-type mini-elements (with a core uranium loading of 4.5 gU/cm{sup 3}) have been fabricated at the Canadian Nuclear Laboratories for experimental tests and ultimately for use in research and test reactors. In this study, the microstructure and phase composition of unirradiated U-7Mo/Mg and U-10Mo/Mg fuel cores were analyzed using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and neutron powder diffraction. Thermal properties were characterized using a combination of experimental measurements and thermodynamic calculations. The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method. The temperature-dependent specific heat capacities were calculated based on the linear rule of mixture using the weight fraction of different crystalline phases and their specific heat capacity values taken from the literature. The thermal conductivity was then calculated using the measured thermal diffusivity, the measured density and the calculated specific heat capacity. The resulting thermal conductivity is practically identical for both types of fuel. The in-reactor temperatures were predicted using conjugate heat transfer simulations. - Highlights: • Neutron diffraction analysis shows that most of the γ-U(Mo) phase was retained in as-fabricated U-7Mo/Mg and U-10Mo/Mg fuel cores. • The experimental thermal conductivity of both types of fuel is practically identical. • Based on conjugate heat transfer simulations, under normal operating conditions, the in-reactor fuel centreline temperature is about 510 K.

  4. 31 CFR 540.308 - Low Enriched Uranium (LEU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Low Enriched Uranium (LEU). 540.308... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM (HEU) AGREEMENT ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 540.308 Low Enriched Uranium (LEU). The term low enriched...

  5. Experiments of JRR-4 low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuel core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirane, Nobuhiko; Ishikuro, Yasuhiro; Nagadomi, Hideki; Yokoo, Kenji; Horiguchi, Hironori; Nemoto, Takumi; Yamamoto, Kazuyoshi; Yagi, Masahiro; Arai, Nobuyoshi; Watanabe, Shukichi; Kashima, Yoichi

    2006-03-01

    JRR-4, a light-water-moderated and cooled, swimming pool type research reactor using high-enriched uranium plate-type fuels had been operated from 1965 to 1996. In order to convert to low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuels, modification work had been carried out for 2 years, from 1996 to 1998. After the modification, start-up experiments were carried out to obtain characteristics of the low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuel core. The measured excess reactivity, reactor shutdown margin and the maximum reactivity addition rate satisfied the nuclear limitation of the safety report for licensing. It was confirmed that conversion to low-enriched-uranium-silicied fuels was carried out properly. Besides, the necessary data for reactor operation were obtained, such as nuclear, thermal hydraulic and reactor control characteristics. This report describes the results of start-up experiments and burnup experiments. The first criticality of low-enriched-uranium-silicied core was achieved on 14th July 1998, and the operation for joint-use has been carried out since 6th October 1998. (author)

  6. Feasibility of Low Enriched Uranium Fuel for Space Nuclear Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The purpose of this initial study is to create a baseline with which to perform further analysis and to build a solid understanding of the neutronic characteristics of a solid core for the nuclear thermal rocket. Once consistency with work done at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is established, this paper will provide a study of other fuel types, such as low and medium-enriched uranium fuels. This paper will examine how the implementation of each fuel type affects the multiplication factor of the reactor, and will then explore different possibilities for alterations needed to accommodate their successful usage. The reactor core analysis was done using the MCNP5 code. While this study has not shown that the SNRE can be easily retrofitted for low-enriched U fuel, it has made a detailed study of the SNRE, and identified the difficulties of the implementation of low-enriched fuels in small nuclear rockets. These difficulties are the need for additional moderation and fuel mass in order to achieve a critical mass. Neither of these is insurmountable. Future work includes finding the best method by which to increase the internal moderation of the reactor balanced with appropriate sizing to prevent neutron leakage. Both of these are currently being studied. This paper will present a study of the Small Nuclear Rocket Engine (SNRE) and the feasibility of using low enriched Uranium (LEU) instead of the traditional high enriched Uranium (HEU) fuels.

  7. Simulation of transportation of low enriched uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hope, E.P.; Ades, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation of the transportation by truck of low enriched uranium solutions has been completed for NEPA purposes at the Savannah River Site. The analysis involves three distinct source terms, and establishes the radiological risks of shipment to three possible destinations. Additionally, loading accidents were analyzed to determine the radiological consequences of mishaps during handling and delivery. Source terms were developed from laboratory measurements of chemical samples from low enriched uranium feed materials being stored at SRS facilities, and from manufacturer data on transport containers. The transportation simulations were accomplished over the INTERNET using the DOE TRANSNET system at Sandia National Laboratory. The HIGHWAY 3.3 code was used to analyze routing scenarios, and the RADTRAN 4 code was used to analyze incident free and accident risks of transporting radiological materials. Loading accidents were assessed using the Savannah River Site AXAIR89Q and RELEASE 2 codes

  8. Production of Mo-99 using low-enriched uranium silicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutter, J.C.; Srinivasan, B.; Vicek, M.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    Over the last several years, uranium silicide fuels have been under development as low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets for Mo-99. The use of LEU silicide is aimed at replacing the UAl x alloy in the highly-enriched uranium dissolution process. A process to recover Mo-99 from low-enriched uranium silicide is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The uranium silicide is dissolved in alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments performed to determine the optimum dissolution procedure are discussed, and the results of dissolving a portion of a high-burnup (>40%) U 3 Si 2 miniplate are presented. Future work related to Mo-99 separation and waste disposal are also discussed

  9. Some economic aspects of the low enriched uranium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    At the Technical Committee Meeting on Economics of Low Enriched Uranium 14 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. The five technical sessions covered several economic aspects of uranium concentrates production, conversion into uranium hexafluoride and uranium enrichment and the recycling of U and Pu in LWR. Four Panel discussions were held to discuss the uranium market trends, the situation of conversion industry, the reprocessing and the uranium market, the future trends of enrichment and the economics of LWRs compared with other reactors. Refs, figs and tabs

  10. The SLOWPOKE-2 reactor with low enrichment uranium oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townes, B.M.; Hilborn, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    A SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core contains less than 1 kg of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the proliferation risk is very low. However, to overcome proliferation concerns a new low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuelled reactor core has been designed. This core contains approximately 180 fuel elements based on the Zircaloy-4 clad UOsub(2) CANDU fuel element, but with a smaller outside diameter. The physics characteristics of this new reactor core ensure the inherent safety of the reactor under all conceivable conditions and thus the basic SLOWPOKE safety philosophy which permits unattended operation is not affected

  11. Assay of low-enriched uranium using spontaneous fission neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, M.S.; Fainberg, A.

    1980-01-01

    Low-enriched uranium oxide in bulk containers can be assayed for safeguards purposes, using the neutrons from spontaneous fission of 238 U as a signature, to complement enrichment and mass measurement. The penetrability of the fast fission neutrons allows the inner portion of bulk samples to register. The measurement may also be useful for measuring moisture content, of significance in process control. The apparatus used can be the same as for neutron correlation counting for Pu assay. The neutron multiplication observed in 238 U is of intrinsic interest

  12. Active-interrogation measurements of fast neutrons from induced fission in low-enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, J.L.; Marcath, M.J.; Flaska, M.; Pozzi, S.A.; Chichester, D.L.; Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P.

    2014-01-01

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutrons to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials. -- Highlights: • We studied low-enriched uranium using active-interrogation experiments including a deuterium–tritium neutron generator and an americium–lithium isotopic neutron source. • Liquid scintillators measured induced-fission neutrons from the active-interrogation methods. • Fast-neutron (DT) and thermal-neutron (Am–Li) interrogation resulted in the measurement of trends in uranium mass and 235 U enrichment respectively. • MCNPX-PoliMi, the Monte Carlo transport code, simulated the measured induced-fission neutron trends in the liquid scintillators

  13. Active-interrogation measurements of fast neutrons from induced fission in low-enriched uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, J.L., E-mail: jldolan@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Marcath, M.J.; Flaska, M.; Pozzi, S.A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Chichester, D.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Tomanin, A.; Peerani, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Ispra (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    A detection system was designed with MCNPX-PoliMi to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238 using active interrogation. Measurements were then performed with this system at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy on low-enriched uranium samples. Liquid scintillators measured induced fission neutrons to characterize the samples in terms of their uranium mass and enrichment. Results are presented to investigate and support the use of organic liquid scintillators with active interrogation techniques to characterize uranium containing materials. -- Highlights: • We studied low-enriched uranium using active-interrogation experiments including a deuterium–tritium neutron generator and an americium–lithium isotopic neutron source. • Liquid scintillators measured induced-fission neutrons from the active-interrogation methods. • Fast-neutron (DT) and thermal-neutron (Am–Li) interrogation resulted in the measurement of trends in uranium mass and {sup 235}U enrichment respectively. • MCNPX-PoliMi, the Monte Carlo transport code, simulated the measured induced-fission neutron trends in the liquid scintillators.

  14. The low enriched uranium fuel cycle in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archinoff, G.H.

    1979-02-01

    Six fuel-cycle strategies for use in CANDU reactors are examined in terms of their uranium-conserving properties and their ease of commercialization for three assumed growth rates of installed nuclear capacity in Ontario. The fuel cycle strategies considered assume the continued use of the natural uranium cycle up to the mid-1990's. At that time, the low-enriched uranium (LEU) cycle is gradually introduced into the existing power generation grid. In the mid-2020's one of four advanced cycles is introduced. The advanced cycles considered are: mixed oxide, intermediate burn-up thorium (Pu topping), intermediate burn-up thorium (U topping), and LMFBR. For comparison purposes an all natural uranium strategy and a natural uranium-LEU strategy (with no advanced cycle) are also included. None of the strategies emerges as a clear, overall best choice. (LL)

  15. Low-enriched uranium holdup measurements in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barham, M.A.; Ceo, R.; Smith, S.E.

    1998-01-01

    Quantification of the residual nuclear material remaining in process equipment has long been a challenge to those who work with nuclear material accounting systems. Fortunately, nuclear material has spontaneous radiation emissions that can be measured. If gamma-ray measurements can be made, it is easy to determine what isotope a deposit contains. Unfortunately, it can be quite difficult to relate this measured signal to an estimate of the mass of the nuclear deposit. Typically, the measurement expert must work with incomplete or inadequate information to determine a quantitative result. Simplified analysis models, the distribution of the nuclear material, any intervening attenuation, background(s), and the source-to-detector distance(s) can have significant impacts on the quantitative result. This presentation discusses the application of a generalized-geometry holdup model to the low-enriched uranium fuel pellet fabrication plant in Ust-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan. Preliminary results will be presented. Software tools have been developed to assist the facility operators in performing and documenting the measurements. Operator feedback has been used to improve the user interfaces

  16. Low-enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Prokofiev, I.G.

    2000-01-01

    To examine the fabricability of low-enriched uranium-molybdenum powders, full-size 450 x 60 x 0.5-mm (17.7 x 2.4 x 0.020-in.) fuel zone test plates loaded to 6 g U/cm 3 were produced. U-10 wt.% Mo powders produced by two methods, centrifugal atomization and grinding, were tested. These powders were supplied at no cost to Argonne National Laboratory by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, respectively. Fuel homogeneity indicated that both of the powders produced acceptable fuel plates. Operator skill during loading of the powder into the compacting die and fuel powder morphology were found to be important when striving to achieve homogeneous fuel distribution. Smaller, 94 x 22 x 0.6-mm (3.7 x 0.87 x 0.025-in.) fuel zone, test plates were fabricated using U-10 wt.% Mo foil disks instead of a conventional powder metallurgy compact. Two fuel plates of this type are currently undergoing irradiation in the RERTR-4 high-density fuel experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor. (author)

  17. Preliminary experience and near future utilization programmes of the MPR-30 fueled by LEU [low enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbie, B.; Soentono, S.

    1987-01-01

    The MTR type reactor MPR-30 G.A. Siwabessy, located at PUSPIPTEK Serpong has recently reached its first criticality. This multipurpose reactor is supposed to be the first MTR type reactor in the world that is designed and constructed to be fueled by low enriched uranium. Preliminary experience covering the approach to the first criticality and the excess reactivity loading as well as some thermal hydraulics and power ascension tests are briefly presented and discussed. The near future utilization programmes during and after commissioning are also presented. (Author)

  18. Conversion of the Worcester Polytechnic Institute nuclear reactor to low enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, T.H. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The Training Reactor was converted to Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) aluminide fuel in 1988 and 1989. Tests on the Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU) core and LEU cores were performed and comparisons made. The testing consisted of critical loading, thermal neutron flux distribution, excess reactivity, regulating blade reactivity worth, and temperature coefficient of reactivity measurement. Comparisons between the LEU and HEU showed that the critical loading configurations were somewhat different with the HEU core consisting of 24 elements and the LEU core consisting of 21 1/3 elements with excess reactivities of 0.24% ΔK/K for the HEU and 0.16% for the LEU. Thermal neutron flux distributions showed similar trends in both the LEU and HEU cores. The regulating blade worth showed a larger LEU value due to thermal peaking in the blade region and temperature coefficients showed a more negative LEU value due to Doppler broadening. Low induced activity of the HEU fuel permitted shipment to the Westinghouse Savannah River Facility using DOT-6M type B containers on 8 August, 1989. (orig.)

  19. Operational impacts of low-enrichment uranium fuel conversion on the Ford Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal, F.E.; Brannon, C.C.; Burgard, N.E.; Burn, R.R.; Cook, G.M.; Simpson, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Michigan Department of Nuclear Engineering and the Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Project have been engaged in a cooperative effort with Argonne National Laboratory to test and analyze low-enrichment fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor (FNR). The effort was begun in 1979, as part of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program, to demonstrate on a whole-core basis the feasibility of enrichment reduction from 93% to <20% in Materials Test Reactor-type fuel designs. The first low-enrichment uranium (LEU) core was loaded into the FNR and criticality was achieved on December 8, 1981. The final LEU core was established October 11, 1984. No significant operational impacts have resulted from conversion of the FNR to LEU fuel. Thermal flux in the core has decreased slightly; thermal leakage flux has increased. Rod worths, temperature coefficient, and void coefficient have changed imperceptibly. Impressions from the operators are that power defect has increased slightly and that fuel lifetime has increased

  20. 78 FR 66898 - Low Enriched Uranium From France: Final Results of Changed Circumstances Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [A-427-818] Low Enriched Uranium From... Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce...: Andrew Huston or Mark Hoadley, AD/CVD Operations, Office VII, Enforcement and Compliance, International...

  1. Kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The effects of using different low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density, on the kinetic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Simulations were carried out to calculate prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed-neutron fraction, core excess reactivity and neutron flux spectrum. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were used to carry out these calculations. It was observed that both the silicide fuels had the same prompt neutron generation time 0.02% more than that of the original aluminide fuel, while the oxide fuel had a prompt neutron generation time 0.05% less than that of the original aluminide fuel. The effective delayed-neutron fraction decreased for all the fuels; the decrease was maximum at 0.06% for U 3 Si 2 -Al followed by 0.03% for U 3 Si-Al, and 0.01% for U 3 O 8 -Al fuel. The U 3 O 8 -Al fueled reactor gave the maximum ρ excess at BOL which was 21.67% more than the original fuel followed by U 3 Si-Al which was 2.55% more, while that of U 3 Si 2 -Al was 2.50% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The neutron flux of all the fuels was more thermalized, than in the original fuel, in the active fuel region of the core. The thermalization was maximum for U 3 O 8 -Al followed by U 3 Si-Al and then U 3 Si 2 -Al fuel.

  2. Yalina booster subcritical assembly performance with low enriched uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2011-01-01

    The YALINA Booster facility is a subcritical assembly located in Minsk, Belarus. The facility has special features that result in fast and thermal neutron spectra in different zones. The fast zone of the assembly uses a lead matrix and uranium fuels with different enrichments: 90% and 36%, 36%, or 21%. The thermal zone of the assembly contains 10% enriched uranium fuel in a polyethylene matrix. This study discusses the performance of the three YALINA Booster configurations with the different fuel enrichments. In order to maintain the same subcriticality level in the three configurations, the number of fuel rods in the thermal zone is increased as the uranium fuel enrichment in the fast zone is decreased. The maximum number of fuel rods that can be loaded in the thermal zone is about 1185. Consequently, the neutron multiplication of the configuration with 21% enriched uranium fuel in the fast zone is enhanced by changing the position of the boron carbide and the natural uranium absorber rods, located between the fast and the thermal zones, to form an annular rather than a square arrangement. (author)

  3. Yalina booster subcritical assembly performance with low enriched uranium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry, E-mail: alby@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The YALINA Booster facility is a subcritical assembly located in Minsk, Belarus. The facility has special features that result in fast and thermal neutron spectra in different zones. The fast zone of the assembly uses a lead matrix and uranium fuels with different enrichments: 90% and 36%, 36%, or 21%. The thermal zone of the assembly contains 10% enriched uranium fuel in a polyethylene matrix. This study discusses the performance of the three YALINA Booster configurations with the different fuel enrichments. In order to maintain the same subcriticality level in the three configurations, the number of fuel rods in the thermal zone is increased as the uranium fuel enrichment in the fast zone is decreased. The maximum number of fuel rods that can be loaded in the thermal zone is about 1185. Consequently, the neutron multiplication of the configuration with 21% enriched uranium fuel in the fast zone is enhanced by changing the position of the boron carbide and the natural uranium absorber rods, located between the fast and the thermal zones, to form an annular rather than a square arrangement. (author)

  4. DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

  5. Low enriched uranium fuel conversion and fuel shipping guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of reactor core physics and thermal hydraulics was completed in 1993. A supplement to the Final Safety Analysis Report describing the results of these analyses was submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission along with proposed Technical Specifications in May, 1993. Discussions with the NRC staff led to a submittal of revised proposed Technical Specifications in February, 1994. The analytical work is complete. A second portion of the grant was to develop a fuel shipping guide for university research reactors. Such a guide was developed and is available for use by the research reactor community

  6. Development of IAEA safeguards at low enrichment uranium fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.

    1988-01-01

    In this report the nuclear material at low enrichment uranium fuel fabrication plants under IAEA safeguards is studied. The current verification practices of the nuclear material and future improvements are also considered. The problems met during the implementation of the the verification measures of the nuclear material - particularly for the fuel assemblies are discussed. The additional verification activities as proposed for future improvements are also discussed including the physical inventory verification and the verification of receipts and shipments. It is concluded that the future development of the present IAEA verification practices at low enrichment uranium fuel fabrication plants would necessitate the application of quantitative measures of the nuclear material and the implementation of advanced measurement techniques and instruments. 2 fig., 4 tab

  7. Advanced fuel cycles: a rationale and strategy for adopting the low-enriched-uranium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A two-year study of alternatives to the natural uranium fuel cycle in CANDU reactors is summarized. The possible advanced cycles are briefly described. Selection criteria for choosing a cycle for development include resource utilization, economics, ease of implementaton, and social acceptability. It is recommended that a detailed study should be made with a view to the early implementation of the low-enriched uranium cycle. (LL)

  8. Report of the Working Party on the conversion of HIFAR to low enrichment uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-06-01

    This report states the effect on research reactor operations and applications of international and national political decisions relating to fuel enrichment. Technical work done in Australia and overseas to establish parameters for conversion of research reactors from High Enrichment Uranium (HEU) to Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) have been considered in developing a strategy for HIFAR. The requirements of the research groups, isotope production group and reactor operating staff have been considered. For HIFAR to continue to provide the required facilities in support of the national need, it is concluded these should be no reduction of neutron flux

  9. A comparison between thorium-uranium and low enrichment uranium cycles in the high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerles, J M

    1973-03-15

    In a previous report, it was shown that the Uranium cycle could be used as well with multi-hole block (GGA type) as with tubular elements. Now, in a F.S.V. geometry, a comparison is made between Thorium cycle and Uranium cycle. This comparison will be concerned with the physical properties of the materials, the needs of natural Uranium, the fissile material inventory and, at last, an attempt of economical considerations. In this report the cycle will be characterizd by the fertile material. So, we write ''Thorium cycle'' for Highly Enriched Uranium - Thorium cycle and ''Uranium cycle'' for low Enrichment Uranium cycle.

  10. Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer [ORNL

    2014-10-30

    Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the “complex” aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The

  11. Preliminary Evaluation of Alternate Designs for HFIR Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Valentine, Jennifer R [ORNL

    2014-11-01

    Engineering design studies of the feasibility of conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of an effort sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy s Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI)/Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. The fuel type selected by the program for the conversion of the five high-power research reactors in the U.S. that still use HEU fuel is a new U-Mo monolithic fuel. Studies by ORNL have previously indicated that HFIR can be successfully converted using the new fuel provided (1) the reactor power can be increased from 85 MW to 100 MW and (2) the fuel can be fabricated to a specific reference design. Fabrication techniques for the new fuel are under development by the program but are still immature, especially for the complex aspects of the HFIR fuel design. In FY 2012, the program underwent a major shift in focus to emphasize developing and qualifying processes for the fabrication of reliable and affordable LEU fuel. In support of this new focus and in an effort to ensure that the HFIR fuel design is as suitable for reliable fabrication as possible, ORNL undertook the present study to propose and evaluate several alternative design features. These features include (1) eliminating the fuel zone axial contouring in the previous reference design by substituting a permanent neutron absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, (2) relocating the burnable neutron absorber from the fuel plates of the inner fuel element to the side plates of the inner fuel element (the fuel plates of the outer fuel element do not contain a burnable absorber), (3) relocating the fuel zone inside the fuel plate to be centered on the centerline of the depth of the plate, and (4) reshaping the radial contour of the relocated fuel zone to be symmetric about this centerline. The present

  12. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  13. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfro, David G.; Cook, David Howard; Freels, James D.; Griffin, Frederick P.; Ilas, Germina; Sease, John D.; Chandler, David

    2012-01-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  14. Nuclear characteristics evaluation for Kyoto University Research Reactor with low-enriched uranium core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Ken; Unesaki, Hironobu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori-cho Sennan-gun Osaka (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    A project to convert the fuel of Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) is in progress as a part of RERTR program. Prior to the operation of LEU core, the nuclear characteristics of the core have been evaluated to confirm the safety operation. In the evaluation, nuclear parameters, such as the excess reactivity, shut down margin control rod worth, reactivity coefficients, were calculated, and they were compared with the safety limits. The results of evaluation show that the LEU core is able to satisfy the safety requirements for operation, i.e. all the parameters satisfy the safety limits. Consequently, it was confirmed that the LEU fuel core has the proper nuclear characteristics for the safety operation. (authors)

  15. Validity of Hansen-Roach cross sections in low-enriched uranium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, R.D.; O'Dell, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Within the nuclear criticality safety community, the Hansen-Roach 16 group cross section set has been the ''standard'' for use in k eff calculations over the past 30 years. Yet even with its widespread acceptance, there are still questions about its validity and adequacy, about the proper procedure for calculating the potential scattering cross section, σ p , for uranium and plutonium, and about the concept of resonance self shielding and its impact on cross sections. This paper attempts to address these questions. It provides a brief background on the Hansen-Roach cross sections. Next is presented a review of resonances in cross sections, self shielding of these resonances, and the use of σ p to characterize resonance self shielding. Three prescriptions for calculating σ p are given. Finally, results of several calculations of k eff on low-enriched uranium systems are provided to confirm the validity of the Hansen-Roach cross sections when applied to such systems

  16. Calculation of parameters for inspection planning and evaluation: low enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reardon, P.T.; Mullen, M.F.; Harms, N.L.

    1981-02-01

    As part of Task C.35 (Calculation of Parameters for Inspection Planning and Evaluation) of the US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has performed some quantitative analyses of IAEA inspection activities at low-enriched uranium (LEU) conversion and fuel fabrication facilities. This report presents the results and conclusions of those analyses. Implementation of IAEA safeguards at LEU conversion and fuel fabrication facilities must take into account a variety of practical problems and constraints. One of the key concerns is the problem of flow verification, especially product verification. The objective of this report is to help put the problem of flow verification in perspective by presenting the results of some specific calculations of inspection effort and probability of detection for various product measurement strategies. In order to provide quantitative information about the advantages and disadvantages of the various strategies, eight specific cases were examined

  17. Validity of Hansen-Roach cross sections in low-enriched uranium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, R.D.; O'Dell, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    Within the nuclear criticality safety community, the Hansen-Roach 16 group cross section set has been the standard for use in k eff calculations over the past 30 years. Yet even with its widespread acceptance, there are still questions about its validity and adequacy, about the proper procedure for calculating the potential scattering cross section, σ p , for uranium and plutonium, and about the concept of resonance self shielding and its impact on cross sections. This paper attempts to address these questions. It provides a brief background on the Hansen-Roach cross sections. Next is presented a review of resonances in cross sections, self shielding of these resonances, and the use of σ p to characterize resonance self shielding. Three prescriptions for calculating σ p are given. Finally, results of several calculations of k eff on low-enriched uranium systems are provided to confirm the validity of the Hansen-Roach cross sections when applied to such systems. (Author)

  18. Preliminary investigations for technology assessment of 99Mo production from LEU [low enriched uranium] targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Chaiko, D.J.; Heinrich, R.R.; Kucera, E.T.; Jensen, K.J.; Poa, D.S.; Varma, R.; Vissers, D.R.

    1986-11-01

    This paper presents the results of preliminary studies on the effects of substituting low enriched uranium (LEU) for highly enriched uranium (HEU) in targets for the production of fission product 99 Mo. Issues that were addressed are: (1) purity and yield of the 99 Mo//sup 99m/Tc product, (2) fabrication of LEU targets and related concerns, and (3) radioactive waste. Laboratory experimentation was part of the efforts for issues (1) and (2); thus far, radioactive waste disposal has only been addressed in a paper study. Although the reported results are still preliminary, there is reason to be optimistic about the feasibility of utilizing LEU targets for 99 Mo production. 37 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  19. Conversion of research and test reactors to low enriched uranium fuel: technical overview and program status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roglans-Ribas, J.

    2008-01-01

    Many of the nuclear research and test reactors worldwide operate with high enriched uranium fuel. In response to worries over the potential use of HEU from research reactors in nuclear weapons, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of HEU fuel by converting research reactors to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The Reactor Conversion program is currently under the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration's Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). 55 of the 129 reactors included in the scope have been already converted to LEU fuel or have shutdown prior to conversion. The major technical activities of the Conversion Program include: (1) the development of advanced LEU fuels; (2) conversion analysis and conversion support; and (3) technology development for the production of Molybdenum-99 (Mo 99 ) with LEU targets. The paper provides an overview of the status of the program, the technical challenges and accomplishments, and the role of international collaborations in the accomplishment of the Conversion Program objectives. Nuclear research and test reactors worldwide have been in operation for over 60 years. Many of these facilities operate with high enriched uranium fuel. In response to increased worries over the potential use of HEU from research reactors in the manufacturing of nuclear weapons, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a program - the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) - in 1978 to develop the technology necessary to reduce the use of HEU fuel in research reactors by converting them to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The reactor conversion program was initially focused on U.S.-supplied reactors, but in the early 1990s it expanded and began to collaborate with Russian institutes with the objective of converting Russian supplied reactors to the use of LEU fuel.

  20. Comparison of low enriched uranium (UAlx-Al and U-Ni) targets with different geometries for the production of molybdenum-99 in the RMB (Brazilian multipurpose reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingos, Douglas B.; Silva, Antonio T. e; Joao, Thiago G.; Silva, Jose Eduardo R. da; Angelo, Gabriel; Fedorenko, Giuliana G.; Nishiyama, Pedro J.B. de O.

    2011-01-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), now in the conception design phase, is being designed in Brazil to attend the demand of radiopharmaceuticals in the country and conduct researches in various areas. The new reactor, planned for 30 MW, will replace the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Low enriched uranium ( 235 U) UAl x dispersed in Al (plate geometry) and metallic uranium foil targets (plate and cylinder geometries) are being considered for production of Molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) by fission. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulics calculations were performed to compare the production of 99 Mo for these targets in the RMB. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes Hammer-Technion, Citation and Scale and for the thermal-hydraulics calculations were utilized the computer code MTRCR-IEAR1 and ANSYS CFX. (author)

  1. Development of industrial-scale fission {sup 99}Mo production process using low enriched uranium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Kon; Lee, Jun Sig [Radioisotope Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Beyer, Gerd J. [Grunicke Strasse 15, Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) is the most important isotope because its daughter isotope, technetium-99m ({sup 99}mTc), has been the most widely used medical radioisotope for more than 50 years, accounting for > 80% of total nuclear diagnostics worldwide. In this review, radiochemical routes for the production of {sup 99}Mo, and the aspects for selecting a suitable process strategy are discussed from the historical viewpoint of {sup 99}Mo technology developments. Most of the industrial-scale {sup 99}Mo processes have been based on the fission of {sup 235}U. Recently, important issues have been raised for the conversion of fission {sup 99}Mo targets from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium (LEU). The development of new LEU targets with higher density was requested to compensate for the loss of {sup 99}Mo yield, caused by a significant reduction of {sup 235}U enrichment, from the conversion. As the dramatic increment of intermediate level liquid waste is also expected from the conversion, an effective strategy to reduce the waste generation from the fission {sup 99}Mo production is required. The mitigation of radioxenon emission from medical radioisotope production facilities is discussed in relation with the monitoring of nuclear explosions and comprehensive nuclear test ban. Lastly, the {sup 99}Mo production process paired with the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's own LEU target is proposed as one of the most suitable processes for the LEU target.

  2. Reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor fueled with various low enriched uranium dispersion fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2009-01-01

    The reactivity feedbacks of a material test research reactor using various low enriched uranium fuels, having same uranium density were calculated. For this purpose, the original aluminide fuel (UAl x -Al) containing 4.40 gU/cm 3 of an MTR was replaced with silicide (U 3 Si-Al and U 3 Si 2 -Al) and oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) dispersion fuels having the same uranium density as of the original fuel. Calculations were carried out to find the fuel temperature reactivity feedback, moderator temperature reactivity feedback, moderator density reactivity feedback and moderator void reactivity feedback. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that the magnitudes all the respective reactivity feedbacks from 38 deg. C to 50 deg. C and 100 deg. C, at the beginning of life, of all the fuels were very close to each other. The fuel temperature reactivity feedback of the U 3 O 8 -Al was about 2% more than the original UAl x -Al fuel. The magnitudes of the moderator temperature, moderator density and moderator void reactivity feedbacks of all the fuels, showed very minor variations from the original aluminide fuel.

  3. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - Options and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the U.S. Department of Energy. (author)

  4. Low-enriched uranium high-density target project. Compendium report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, George; Brown, M. Alex; Jerden, James L.; Gelis, Artem V.; Stepinski, Dominique C.; Wiedmeyer, Stanley; Youker, Amanda; Hebden, Andrew; Solbrekken, G; Allen, C; Robertson., D; El-Gizawy, Sherif; Govindarajan, Srisharan; Hoyer, Annemarie; Makarewicz, Philip; Harris, Jacob; Graybill, Brian; Gunn, Andy; Berlin, James; Bryan, Chris; Sherman, Steven; Hobbs, Randy; Griffin, F. P.; Chandler, David; Hurt, C. J.; Williams, Paul; Creasy, John; Tjader, Barak; McFall, Danielle; Longmire, Hollie

    2016-09-01

    At present, most 99Mo is produced in research, test, or isotope production reactors by irradiation of highly enriched uranium targets. To achieve the denser form of uranium needed for switching from high to low enriched uranium (LEU), targets in the form of a metal foil (~125-150 µm thick) are being developed. The LEU High Density Target Project successfully demonstrated several iterations of an LEU-fission-based Mo-99 technology that has the potential to provide the world’s supply of Mo-99, should major producers choose to utilize the technology. Over 50 annular high density targets have been successfully tested, and the assembly and disassembly of targets have been improved and optimized. Two target front-end processes (acidic and electrochemical) have been scaled up and demonstrated to allow for the high-density target technology to mate up to the existing producer technology for target processing. In the event that a new target processing line is started, the chemical processing of the targets is greatly simplified. Extensive modeling and safety analysis has been conducted, and the target has been qualified to be inserted into the High Flux Isotope Reactor, which is considered above and beyond the requirements for the typical use of this target due to high fluence and irradiation duration.

  5. Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab

  6. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Jeffrey C.; Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F.

    2015-01-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW e and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k eff = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  7. Development of Industrial-Scale Fission 99Mo Production Process Using Low Enriched Uranium Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Kon Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum-99 (99Mo is the most important isotope because its daughter isotope, technetium-99m (99mTc, has been the most widely used medical radioisotope for more than 50 years, accounting for > 80% of total nuclear diagnostics worldwide. In this review, radiochemical routes for the production of 99Mo, and the aspects for selecting a suitable process strategy are discussed from the historical viewpoint of 99Mo technology developments. Most of the industrial-scale 99Mo processes have been based on the fission of 235U. Recently, important issues have been raised for the conversion of fission 99Mo targets from highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium (LEU. The development of new LEU targets with higher density was requested to compensate for the loss of 99Mo yield, caused by a significant reduction of 235U enrichment, from the conversion. As the dramatic increment of intermediate level liquid waste is also expected from the conversion, an effective strategy to reduce the waste generation from the fission 99Mo production is required. The mitigation of radioxenon emission from medical radioisotope production facilities is discussed in relation with the monitoring of nuclear explosions and comprehensive nuclear test ban. Lastly, the 99Mo production process paired with the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute's own LEU target is proposed as one of the most suitable processes for the LEU target.

  8. Using low-enriched uranium in research reactors: The RERTR program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelli, A.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the RERTR program is to minimize and eventually eliminate use of highway enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. The program has been very successful, and has developed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel materials and designs which can be used effectively in approximately 90 percent of the research and test reactors which used HEU when the program began. This progress would not have been possible without active international cooperation among fuel developers, commercial vendors, and reactor operators. The new tasks which the RERTR program is undertaking at this time include development of new and better fuels that will allow use of LEU fuels in all research and test reactors; cooperation with Russian laboratories, which will make it possible to minimize and eventually eliminate use of HEU in research reactors throughout the world, irrespective of its origin; and development of an LEU-based process for the production of 99 Mo. Continuation and intensification of international cooperation are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR program

  9. Shielding Studies for Reducing the associated Radiological Risks Due To Irradiated Low Enriched Uranium Foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margeanu, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    Present work estimates the radiation dose rates corresponding to irradiated Low Enriched Uranium (20 wt % 235 U) foil as part of shielding studies for radiological risks reduction after irradiation inside TRIGA 14 MW Research Reactor in an investigation on 99 Mo production possibility. Post-Irradiation Examination Laboratory's cell shielding calculations have been performed; radiation source was obtained by using ORIGEN-S code with specific cross-sections libraries. Different post-irradiation cooling times have been considered, gamma dose rates being estimated by using MAVRIC module from Scale 6 programs package, for following exposure situations (relative to Pie cell): i) front side, ii) lateral side and iii) back side. Three different calculations were performed: a) without any protection shield between operator and cell, except for the cell stainless steel wall; b) with a Lead protection shield between operator and cell and c) with a depleted Uranium shield, located inside the cell in between the radiation source and cell window. Radiation dose rates to cell external wall surface and for other eight fixed distances from cell wall were estimated. To obtain a consistent set of solutions, the study was done for various Uranium foil weights and different Lead and depleted Uranium shields thicknesses. Calculations were focused to assure that the dose rate to an operator positioned at 60 cm working distance from the cell will not exceed 0.02 mSv/h, maximum allowed dose rate for professionally exposed personnel according to Romanian regulations.

  10. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF{sub 6} and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % {sup 235}U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  11. Minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.; Turner, J.C.

    1992-12-01

    A parametric calculational analysis has been performed in order to estimate the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality of homogeneous low-enriched uranium systems. The analysis was performed using a version of the SCALE-4.0 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. Water-moderated uranyl fluoride (UO[sub 2]F[sub 2] and H[sub 2]O) and hydrofluoric-acid-moderated uranium hexaflouride (UF[sub 6] and HF) systems were considered in the analysis over enrichments of 1.4 to 5 wt % [sup 235]U. Estimates of the minimum critical volume, minimum critical mass of uranium, and the minimum mass of moderator required for criticality are presented. There was significant disagreement between the values generated in this study when compared with a similar undocumented study performed in 1983 using ANISN and the Knight-modified Hansen-Roach cross sections. An investigation into the cause of the disagreement was made, and the results are presented.

  12. Development of very-high-density low-enriched-uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Trybus, C.L.; Wiencek, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    Following a hiatus of several years and following its successful development and qualification of 4.8 g U cm -3 U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel for application with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors, the US Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program has embarked on the development of even-higher-density fuels. Our goal is to achieve uranium densities of 8-9 g cm -3 in aluminum-based dispersion fuels. Achieving this goal will require the use of high-density, γ-stabilized uranium alloy powders in conjunction with the most-advanced fuel fabrication techniques. Key issues being addressed are the reaction of the fuel alloys with aluminum and the irradiation behavior of the fuel alloys and any reaction products. Test irradiations of candidate fuels in very-small (micro) plates are scheduled to begin in the Advanced Test Reactor during June, 1997. Initial results are expected to be available in early 1998. We are performing out-of-reactor studies on the phase structure of the candidate alloys on diffusion of the matrix material into the aluminum. In addition, we are modifying our current dispersion fuel irradiation behavior model to accommodate the new fuels. Several international partners are participating in various phases of this work. (orig.)

  13. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montierth, Leland M.

    2016-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  14. Development of dissolution process for metal foil target containing low enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, B.; Hutter, J.C.; Johnson, G.K.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    About six times more low enriched uranium (LEU) metal is needed to produce the same quantity of 99 Mo as from a high enriched uranium (HEU) oxide target, under similar conditions of neutron irradiation. In view of this, the post-irradiation processing procedures of the LEU target are likely to be different from the Cintichem process procedures now in use for the HEU target. The authors have begun a systematic study to develop modified procedures for LEU target dissolution and 99 Mo separation. The dissolution studies include determination of the dissolution rate, chemical state of uranium in the solution, and the heat evolved in the dissolution reaction. From these results the authors conclude that a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acid is a suitable dissolver solution, albeit at higher concentration of nitric acid than in use for the HEU targets. Also, the dissolver vessel now in use for HEU targets is inadequate for the LEU target, since higher temperature and higher pressure will be encountered in the dissolution of LEU targets. The desire is to keep the modifications to the Cintichem process to a minimum, so that the switch from HEU to LEU can be achieved easily

  15. Moderator configuration options for a low-enriched uranium fueled Kilowatt-class Space Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Jeffrey C., E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu [Nuclear Science and Engineering Program, Colorado School of Mines (CSM), Golden, CO (United States); Mencarini, Leonardo de Holanda; Guimaraes, Lamartine N. F., E-mail: guimaraes@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: mencarini@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The Brazilian Air Force, through its Institute for Advanced Studies (Instituto de Estudos Avancados, IEAv/DCTA), and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) are studying the feasibility of a space nuclear reactor with a power of 1-5 kW{sub e} and fueled with Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). This type of nuclear reactor would be attractive to signatory countries of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) or commercial interests. A LEU-fueled space reactor would avoid the security concerns inherent with Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. As an initial step, the HEU-fueled Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) designed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory serves as a basis for a similar reactor fueled with LEU fuel. Using the computational code MCNP6 to predict the reactor neutronics performance, the size of the resulting reactor fueled with 19.75 wt% enriched uranium-10 wt% molybdenum alloy fuel is adjusted to match the excess reactivity of KRUSTY. Then, zirconium hydride moderator is added to the core to reduce the size of the reactor. This work presents the preliminary results of the computational modeling, with special emphasis on the comparison between homogeneous and heterogeneous moderator systems, in terms of the core diameter required to meet a specific multiplication factor (k{sub eff} = 1.035). This comparison illustrates the impact of moderator configuration on the size and performance of a LEU-fueled kilowatt-class space nuclear reactor. (author)

  16. Continuing investigations for technology assessment of 99Mo production from LEU [low enriched uranium] targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Currently much of the world's supply of 99m Tc for medical purposes is produced from 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product 99 Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or zircaloy. Included is a cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminium alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent 99 Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to 1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and 2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved. (Author)

  17. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  18. Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

    2006-02-01

    A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

  19. Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primm, R.T. III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N.

    2006-01-01

    A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U 3 O 8 mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties

  20. Loading and initial start-up testing of the low-enrichment uranium core for the Ohio State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talnagi, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    Conversion of the Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) from high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel elements was begun in August 1985, with funding provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the university. Conversion of the OSURR from HEU to LEU fuel was successfully completed. The reactor is operational at 10-kW steady-state thermal power. Measurements of selected core parameters have been made and compared with predicted values and previous values for the HEU core. In general, measured results agree well with predicted performance, and minor changes have been detected in certain core parameters as a result of the change to LEU fuel. Future plans include additional core testing and a possible increase in operating power

  1. Research reactor core conversion from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low enriched uranium fuels guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    In view of the proliferation concerns caused by the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and in anticipation that the supply of HEU to research and test reactors will be more restricted in the future, this document has been prepared to assist reactor operators in determining whether conversion to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel designs is technically feasible for their specific reactor, and to assist in making a smooth transition to the use of LEU fuel designs where appropriate

  2. Continuing investigations for technology assessment of 99Mo production from LEU [low enriched Uranium] targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandergrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Currently much of the world's supply of /sup 99m/Tc for medical purposes is produced from 99 Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). The need for /sup 99m/Tc is continuing to grow, especially in developing countries, where needs and national priorities call for internal production of 99 Mo. This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched Uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product 99 Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal are reported. These improvements continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or hastaloy. A cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets is reported. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in other current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent 99 Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to (1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and (2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that both concerns can be handled and that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved

  3. TYPE AF CERTIFICATE FOR TRANSPORTATION OF LOW ENRICHED URANIUM OXIDE (LEUO) FOR DISPOSAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E; Kenneth Yates, K

    2007-01-01

    Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) operates the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). SRS had the need to ship 227 drums of low enriched uranium oxide (LEUO) to a disposal site. The LEUO had been packaged nearly 25 years ago in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 17C 55-gallon drums and stored in a warehouse. Since the 235U enrichment was just above 1 percent by weight (wt%) the material did not qualify for the fissile material exceptions in 49 CFR 173.453, and therefore was categorized as 'fissile material' for shipping purposes. WSRC evaluated all existing Type AF packages and did not identify any feasible packaging. Applying for a new Type AF certificate of compliance was considered too costly for a one-time/one-way shipment for disposal. Down-blending the material with depleted uranium (to reduce enrichment below 1 wt% and enable shipment as low specific activity (LSA) radioactive material) was considered, but appropriate blending facilities do not exist at SRS. After reviewing all options, WSRC concluded that seeking a DOT Special Permit was the best option to enable shipment of the material for permanent disposal. WSRC submitted the Special Permit application to the DOT, and after one request-for-additional-information (RAI) the permit was considered acceptable. However, in an interesting development that resulted from the DOT Special Permit application process, it was determined that it was more appropriate for the DOE to issue a Type AF certificate [Ref. 1] for this shipping campaign. This paper will outline the DOT Special Permit application and Type AF considerations, and will discuss the issuance of the new DOE Type AF certificate of compliance

  4. CONCEPTUAL PROCESS DESCRIPTION FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM-MOLYBDENUM FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Curtis R. Clark; Randall J. Dunavant

    2008-02-01

    The National Nuclear Security Agency Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is tasked with minimizing the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) worldwide. A key component of that effort is the conversion of research reactors from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program, previously known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program was initiated in 1978 by the United States Department of Energy to develop the nuclear fuels necessary to enable these conversions. The program cooperates with the research reactors’ operators to achieve this goal of HEU to LEU conversion without reduction in reactor performance. The programmatic mandate is to complete the conversion of all civilian domestic research reactors by 2014. These reactors include the five domestic high-performance research reactors (HPRR), namely: the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory, the National Bureau of Standards Reactor at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Missouri University Research Reactor at the University of Missouri–Columbia, and the MIT Reactor-II at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Characteristics for each of the HPRRs are given in Appendix A. The GTRI Convert Fuel Development program is currently engaged in the development of a novel nuclear fuel that will enable these conversions. The fuel design is based on a monolithic fuel meat (made from a uranium-molybdenum alloy) clad in Al-6061 that has shown excellent performance in irradiation testing. The unique aspects of the fuel design, however, necessitate the development and implementation of new fabrication techniques and, thus, establishment of the infrastructure to ensure adequate fuel fabrication capability. A conceptual fabrication process description and rough estimates of the total facility throughput are described in this document as a basis for

  5. Criticality Calculations for a Typical Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Plant with Low Enriched Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayed, Hade; Nagy, Mohamed; Agamy, Said; Shaat, Mohmaed

    2013-01-01

    The operations with the fissile materials such as U 235 introduce the risk of a criticality accident that may be lethal to nearby personnel and can lead the facility to shutdown. Therefore, the prevention of a nuclear criticality accident should play a major role in the design of a nuclear facility. The objectives of criticality safety are to prevent a self-sustained nuclear chain reaction and to minimize the consequences. Sixty criticality accidents were occurred in the world. These are accidents divided into two categories, 22 accidents occurred in process facilities and 38 accidents occurred during critical experiments or operations with research reactor. About 21 criticality accidents including Japan Nuclear Fuel Conversion Co. (JCO) accident took place with fuel solution or slurry and only one accident occurred with metal fuel. In this study the nuclear criticality calculations have been performed for a typical nuclear fuel fabrication plant producing nuclear fuel elements for nuclear research reactors with low enriched uranium up to 20%. The calculations were performed for both normal and abnormal operation conditions. The effective multiplication factor (k eff ) during the nuclear fuel fabrication process (Uranium hexafluoride - Ammonium Diuranate conversion process) was determined. Several accident scenarios were postulated and the criticalities of these accidents were evaluated. The computer code MCNP-4B which based on Monte Carlo method was used to calculate neutron multiplication factor. The criticality calculations Monte Carlo method was used to calculate neutron multiplication factor. The criticality calculations were performed for the cases of, change of moderator to fuel ratio, solution density and concentration of the solute in order to prevent or mitigate criticality accidents during the nuclear fuel fabrication process. The calculation results are analyzed and discussed

  6. Materials safeguards and accountability in the low enriched uranium conversion-fabrication sector of the fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, R.A.; Nilson, R.; Jaech, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    Today materials accounting in the low enriched conversion-fabrication sector of the LWR fuel cycle is of increased importance. Low enriched uranium is rapidly becoming a precious metal with current dollar values in the range of one dollar per gram comparing with gold and platinum at 7-8 dollars per gram. In fact, people argue that its dollar value exceeds its safeguards value. Along with this increased financial incentive for better material control, the nuclear industry is faced with the impending implementation of international safeguards and increased public attention over its ability to control nuclear materials. Although no quantity of low enriched uranium (LEU) constitutes a practical nuclear explosive, its control is important to international safeguards because of plutonium production or further enrichment to an explosive grade material. The purpose of the paper is to examine and discuss some factors in the area of materials safeguards and accountability as they apply to the low enriched uranium conversion-fabrication sector. The paper treats four main topics: basis for materials accounting; our assessment of the proposed new IAEA requirements; adequacy of current practices; and timing and direction of future modifications

  7. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Louise G., E-mail: evanslg@ornl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De [European Commission, Euratom Safeguards Office (Luxembourg); Browne, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available {sup 241}AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify {sup 235}U content in variable PWR fuel

  8. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, Louise G.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De; Browne, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd 2 O 3 ) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available 241 AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×10 4 s −1 . Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify 235 U content in variable PWR fuel designs in the presence of up to

  9. Performance and economic penalties of some LEU [low enriched uranium] conversion options for the Australian Reactor HIFAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, D.B.; Robinson, G.S.

    1987-01-01

    Performance calculations for the conversion of HIFAR to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel have been extended to a wide range of 235 U loadings per fuel element. Using a simple approximate algorithm for the likely costs of LEU compared with highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements, the increases in annual fuelling costs for LEU compared with HEU fuel are examined for a range of conversion options involving different performance penalties. No significant operational/safety problems were found for any of the options canvassed. (Author)

  10. Reactivity feedback coefficients of a low enriched uranium fuelled material test research reactor at end-of-life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The isotopic concentration in the fuel changes as soon as it starts its operation. → The neutronic properties of a reactor also change with fuel burnup. → The reactivity feedbacks at end-of-life of a material test reactor fuelled with low enriched uranium fuel are calculated. → Codes used include WIMS-D4 and CITATION. - Abstract: The reactivity feedback coefficients at end-of-life of a material test reactor fuelled with low enriched uranium fuel were calculated. The reactor used for the study was the IAEA's 10 MW benchmark reactor. Simulations were carried out to calculate the different reactivity feedback coefficients including Doppler feedback coefficient, reactivity coefficient for change of water temperature and reactivity coefficient for change of water density. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that the magnitude of all the reactivity feedback coefficients increased at end of life of the reactor by almost 2-5%.

  11. Low enriched uranium UAl{sub X}-Al targets for the production of Molybdenum-99 in the IEA-R1 and RMB reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingos, Douglas B.; Silva, Antonio T. e; Joao, Thiago G.; Silva, Jose Eduardo R. da, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nishiyama, Pedro J.B. de O., E-mail: pedro.julio@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN/CNEN-SP in Brazil is a pool type research reactor cooled and moderated by demineralized water and having Beryllium and Graphite as reflectors. In 1997 the reactor received the operating licensing for 5 MW. A new research reactor is being planned in Brazil to replace the IEA-R1 reactor. This new reactor, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), planned for 30 MW, is now in the conception design phase. Low enriched uranium (LEU) (<20% {sup 235}U) UAl{sub x} dispersed in Al targets are being considered for production of Molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) by fission. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulics calculations were performed, respectively, to compare the production of {sup 99}Mo for these targets in IEA-R1 reactor and RMB and to determine the temperatures achieved in the UAl{sub x}-Al targets during irradiation. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION, CITATION and SCALE and for the thermal-hydraulics calculations was utilized the computer code MTRCR-IEAR1. (author)

  12. Development of Nitride Coating Using Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sumit

    High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power and can withstand high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. The design of the research reactor fuels is done for efficient heat emission, and consists of assemblies of thin-plates cladding made from aluminum alloy. The low-enriched fuels (LEU) were developed for replacing high-enriched fuels (HEU) for these reactors necessitates a significantly increased uranium density in the fuel to counterbalance the decrease in enrichment. One of the most promising new fuel candidate is U-Mo alloy, in a U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel form, due to its high uranium loading as well as excellent irradiation resistance performance, is being developed extensively to convert from HEU fuel to LEU fuel for high-performance research reactors. However, the formation of an interaction layer (IL) between U-Mo particles and the Al matrix, and the associated pore formation, under high heat flux and high burnup conditions, degrade the irradiation performance of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel. From the recent tests results accumulated from the surface engineering of low enriched uranium fuel (SELENIUM) and MIR reactor displayed that a surface barrier coating like physical vapor deposited (PVD) zirconium nitride (ZrN) can significantly reduce the interaction layer. The barrier coating performed well at low burn up but above a fluence rate of 5x 1021 ions/cm2 the swelling reappeared due to formation interaction layer. With this result in mind the objective of this research was to develop an ultrathin ZrN coating over particulate uranium-molybdenum nuclear fuel using a modified savannah 200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. This is done in support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) effort to slow down the interaction at fluence rate and reach higher burn up for high power research reactor. The low-pressure Savannah 200 ALD system is modified to be designed as a batch powder coating system using the

  13. The Impact of Climatological Conditions on Low Enriched Uranium Loading Station Operations for the HEU Blend Down Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    A computer model was developed using COREsim to perform a time motion study for the Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Loading Station operations. The project is to blend Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) with Natural Uranium (NU) to produce LEU to be shipped to Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for further processing. To cope with a project cost reduction, the LEU Loading Station concept has changed from an enclosed building with air-conditioning to a partially enclosed building without air conditioning. The LEU Loading Station is within a radiological contaminated area; two pairs of coveralls and negative pressure respirator are required. As a result, inclement weather conditions, especially heat stress, will affect and impact the LEU loading operations. The purposes of the study are to determine the climatological impacts on LEU Loading operations, resources required for committed throughputs, and to find out the optimum process pathways for multi crews working simultaneously in the space-lim ited LEU Loading Station

  14. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

  15. Fifth Supply Agreement. Agreement for the Transfer of Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The text of the Fifth Supply Agreement among the Government of Romania, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Transfer of Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor in Romania is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the text of the Agreement on 20 November 2003, which was signed by the authorized representatives of Romania and the United States, and by the Director General of the IAEA, on 24 November 2003. Pursuant to Article V of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 24 November 2003, upon signature by the representatives of Romania, the United States and the Director General of the IAEA

  16. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

  17. Detailed description of an SSAC at the facility level for a low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.J.

    1984-09-01

    Some States have expressed a need for more detailed guidance with regard to the technical elements in the design and operation of SSACs for both the national and the international objectives. To meet this need the present document has been prepared, describing the technical elements of an SSAC in considerable detail. The purpose of this document is therefore, to provide a detailed description of a system for the accounting for and control of nuclear material in a model low enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication facility which can be used by a facility operator to establish his own system in a way which will provide the necessary information for compliance with a national system for nuclear material accounting and control and for the IAEA to carry out its safeguards responsibilities

  18. A data base for PHW reactor operating on a once-through, low enriched uranium-thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lungu, S.

    1984-04-01

    The study of a detailed data base for a new once-through uranium-thorium cycle using low enriched uranium (4 and 5,5% wt. U-235) and distinct UO 2 and ThO 2 fuel channels has been performed. With reference to a standard 638 MWe CANDU-type PHWR with 380 channels, evaluation of economics, fuel behaviour and safety has been performed. The Feinberg-Galanin method (code FEINGAL) has been used for calculation of axial flux distribution. All parameters have been provided by LATREP code following up the irradiation history. Economical assessment has shown that this fuel cycle is competitive with the natural uranium fuel cycle for 1979-based values of the parameters. Fuel behaviour and safety features modelling has shown that core behaviour of the uranium-thorium reactor under abnormal and accident conditions would be at least as good as that of the standard natural uranium reactor

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of dilution of the recovered uranium with depleted uranium and low-enriched uranium to obtain fuel for VVER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, A Yu; Sulaberidze, G A; Dudnikov, A A; Nevinitsa, V A

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of the recovered uranium enrichment in a cascade of gas centrifuges with three feed flows (depleted uranium, low-enriched uranium, recovered uranium) with simultaneous dilution of U-232,234,236 isotopes was shown. A series of numerical experiments were performed for different content of U-235 in low-enriched uranium. It has been demonstrated that the selected combination of diluents can simultaneously reduce the cost of separative work and the consumption of natural uranium, not only with respect to the previously used multi-flow cascade schemes, but also in comparison to the standard cascade for uranium enrichment. (paper)

  20. Environmental assessment: Transfer of normal and low-enriched uranium billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    Under the auspices of an agreement between the U.S. and the United Kingdom, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an opportunity to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium (LEU) to the United Kingdom; thus, reducing long-term surveillance and maintenance burdens at the Hanford Site. The material, in the form of billets, is controlled by DOE's Defense Programs, and is presently stored as surplus material in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The United Kingdom has expressed a need for the billets. The surplus uranium billets are currently stored in wooden shipping containers in secured facilities in the 300 Area at the Hanford Site (the 303-B and 303-G storage facilities). There are 482 billets at an enrichment level (based on uranium-235 content) of 0.71 weight-percent. This enrichment level is normal uranium; that is, uranium having 0.711 as the percentage by weight of uranium-235 as occurring in nature. There are 3,242 billets at an enrichment level of 0.95 weight-percent (i.e., low-enriched uranium). This inventory represents a total of approximately 532 curies. The facilities are routinely monitored. The dose rate on contact of a uranium billet is approximately 8 millirem per hour. The dose rate on contact of a wooden shipping container containing 4 billets is approximately 4 millirem per hour. The dose rate at the exterior of the storage facilities is indistinguishable from background levels

  1. Validation of SCALE 4.0 -- CSAS25 module and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library for low-enriched uranium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    A version of KENO V.a and the 27-group library in SCALE-4.0 were validated for use in evaluating the nuclear criticality safety of low-enriched uranium systems. A total of 59 critical systems were analyzed. A statistical analysis of the results was performed, and subcritical acceptanced criteria are established.

  2. Validation of SCALE 4. 0 -- CSAS25 module and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library for low-enriched uranium systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, W.C.

    1993-02-01

    A version of KENO V.a and the 27-group library in SCALE-4.0 were validated for use in evaluating the nuclear criticality safety of low-enriched uranium systems. A total of 59 critical systems were analyzed. A statistical analysis of the results was performed, and subcritical acceptanced criteria are established.

  3. Comparison of low enriched uranium (UAl{sub x}-Al and U-Ni) targets with different geometries for the production of molybdenum-99 in the RMB (Brazilian multipurpose reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingos, Douglas B.; Silva, Antonio T. e; Joao, Thiago G.; Silva, Jose Eduardo R. da; Angelo, Gabriel; Fedorenko, Giuliana G., E-mail: teixeira@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nishiyama, Pedro J.B. de O., E-mail: pedro.julio@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), now in the conception design phase, is being designed in Brazil to attend the demand of radiopharmaceuticals in the country and conduct researches in various areas. The new reactor, planned for 30 MW, will replace the IEA-R1 reactor of IPEN-CNEN/SP. Low enriched uranium (<20% {sup 235}U) UAl{sub x} dispersed in Al (plate geometry) and metallic uranium foil targets (plate and cylinder geometries) are being considered for production of Molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) by fission. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulics calculations were performed to compare the production of {sup 99}Mo for these targets in the RMB. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes Hammer-Technion, Citation and Scale and for the thermal-hydraulics calculations were utilized the computer code MTRCR-IEAR1 and ANSYS CFX. (author)

  4. A cellular automaton method to simulate the microstructure and evolution of low-enriched uranium (LEU) U–Mo/Al dispersion type fuel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drera, Saleem S., E-mail: saleem.drera@gmail.com [Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Hofman, Gerard L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL 60439 (United States); Kee, Robert J. [Mechanical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); King, Jeffrey C. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • This article presents a cellular automata (CA) algorithm to synthesize the growth of intermetallic interaction layers in U–Mo/Al dispersion fuel. • The method utilizes a 3D representation of the fuel, which is discretized into separate voxels that can change identy based on derived CA rules. • The CA model is compared to ILT measurements for RERTR experimental data. • The primary objective of the model is to synthesize three-dimensional microstructures that can be used in subsequent thermal and mechanical modeling. • The CA model can be used for predictive analysis. For example, it can be used to study the dependence of temperature on interaction layer growth. - Abstract: Low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel plates for high power materials test reactors (MTR) are composed of nominally spherical uranium–molybdenum (U–Mo) particles within an aluminum matrix. Fresh U–Mo particles typically range between 10 and 100 μm in diameter, with particle volume fractions up to 50%. As the fuel ages, reaction–diffusion processes cause the formation and growth of interaction layers that surround the fuel particles. The growth rate depends upon the temperature and radiation environment. The cellular automaton algorithm described in this paper can synthesize realistic random fuel-particle structures and simulate the growth of the intermetallic interaction layers. Examples in the present paper pack approximately 1000 particles into three-dimensional rectangular fuel structures that are approximately 1 mm on each side. The computational approach is designed to yield synthetic microstructures consistent with images from actual fuel plates and is validated by comparison with empirical data on actual fuel plates.

  5. SIMMER model of a low-enriched uranium non-power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Biaut, Guillaume; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2008-01-01

    IRSN has started using the coupled neutronics-fluid dynamics code SIMMER [] to study core-disruptive accidents induced by insertions of large reactivities to produce very short period power excursions in fuel plate-type and water-moderated experimental research reactors. Until now, French safety analyses retain a bounding thermal energy released and mechanical yields, deduced from analysis of destructive in-pile test programs, to study the behavior of such reactors and design their structures and containment. Contrary to this approach, the present research program aims at modeling the design basis accident of research reactors with a low-enriched fuel using a CFD code. The objective is to analyze the effects of reactivity feedbacks and how they would limit the generated thermal energy released in the fuel. These aspects require a close coupling of the neutronics to the fluid dynamics analysis. The consequences of the nuclear power excursion, the changes of state of the fuel and the coolant, and ultimately the mechanical energy released are calculated by SIMMER. For large step-wise reactivity introductions, the Doppler effect and, at a lower extent, the fuel element thermal dilatation, which generates locally a decrease of the moderator to fuel ratio, limit the power excursion before the energy released is high enough to melt a large part of the fuel. Moreover, it has been shown that imposing an external reactivity as a step-wise or time-dependent reactivity introduction yields results quite different from those of the physical movement of control rods

  6. Optimization of the target parameters for 99Mo accumulation using low-enriched uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Starkov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the structural study of various types of the water-detonation nanodiamond liquid systems, which are obtained by small-angle scattering of thermal neutrons. It was shown that in the mass fraction range (0.3 - 1.8 % the experimental spectra are well described by a two-level model of unified exponential/power-law approach. The resulting structural parameters allowed us to estimate the aggregation number in the studied systems. Sizes of the nanodiamond particles and their clusters are found as well as the fractal dimension of the latter.

  7. Simmer model of a low-enriched uranium non-power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Biaut, Guillaume; Tobita, Yoshiharu

    2006-01-01

    IRSN has started to use the coupled neutronics - fluid dynamics code SIMMER to study core-disruptive accident induced by insertions of large reactivities sufficient to very short period power excursions in fuel plate-type and water-moderated experimental research reactors. Until now, French safety analysis retain thermal energy released and mechanical yields, deduced from analysis of destructive test programs SPERT-I and BORAX-I to demonstrate the behavior of such reactors and design their structures and containment. The present research program models the design basis accident of a low enriched fuel currently used in experimental research reactors contrary to SPERT-I or BORAX-I. The objective is to analyze the effects of counter reactivities and how these would limit the generated thermal energy in the fuel. This part demands a close coupling to the fluid dynamics analysis. The consequences of the nuclear power excursion, the changes of state of the fuel and the coolant, and ultimately the mechanical energy released are calculated by SIMMER. For large step-wise reactivity introductions, the Doppler effect limits the power excursion before energy is released high enough to melt a large part of the fuel. Moreover, it has been shown that imposing an external reactivity as a step-wise or time dependant reactivity introduction yields results quite different from those of the physical movement of control rods. (author)

  8. DIissolution of low enriched uranium from the experimental breeder reactor-II fuel stored at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-28

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is actively engaged in the development of electrochemical processing technology for the treatment of fast reactor fuels using irradiated fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) as the primary test material. The research and development (R&D) activities generate a low enriched uranium (LEU) metal product from the electrorefining of the EBR-II fuel and the subsequent consolidation and removal of chloride salts by the cathode processor. The LEU metal ingots from past R&D activities are currently stored at INL awaiting disposition. One potential disposition pathway is the shipment of the ingots to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for dissolution in H-Canyon. Carbon steel cans containing the LEU metal would be loaded into reusable charging bundles in the H-Canyon Crane Maintenance Area and charged to the 6.4D or 6.1D dissolver. The LEU dissolution would be accomplished as the final charge in a dissolver batch (following the dissolution of multiple charges of spent nuclear fuel (SNF)). The solution would then be purified and the 235U enrichment downblended to allow use of the U in commercial reactor fuel. To support this potential disposition path, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a dissolution flowsheet for the LEU using samples of the material received from INL.

  9. Converting targets and processes for fission-product molybdenum-99 from high- to low-enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Snelgrove, J.L.; Aase, S.

    1999-01-01

    Most of the world's supply of 99 Mo is produced by the fissioning of 235 U in high-enriched uranium targets (HEU, generally 93% 235 U). To reduce nuclear-proliferation concerns, the U.S. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor Program is working to convert the current HEU targets to low-enriched uranium (LEU, 235 U). Switching to LEU targets also requires modifying the separation processes. Current HEU processes can be classified into two main groups based on whether the irradiated target is dissolved in acid or base. Our program has been working on both fronts, with development of targets for acid-side processes being the furthest along. However, using an LEU metal foil target may allow the facile replacement of HEU for both acid and basic dissolution processes. Demonstration of the irradiation and 99 Mo separation processes for the LEU metal-foil targets is being done in cooperation with researchers at the Indonesian PUSPIPTEK facility. We are also developing LEU UO 2 /Al dispersion plates as substitutes for HEU UA1 x /A1 dispersion plates for base-side processes. Results show that conversion to LEU is technically feasible; working with producers is essential to lowering any economic penalty associated with conversion. (author)

  10. The Supply of Medical Radioisotopes. Market impacts of converting to low-enriched uranium targets for medical isotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westmacott, Chad; Cameron, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The reliable supply of molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) and its decay product, technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), is a vital component of modern medical diagnostic practices. At present, most of the global production of 99 Mo is from highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets. However, all major 99 Mo-producing countries have recently agreed to convert to using low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets to advance important non-proliferation goals, a decision that will have implications for the global supply chain of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc and the long-term supply reliability of these medical isotopes. This study provides the findings and analysis from an extensive examination of the 99 Mo/ 99m Tc supply chain by the OECD/NEA High-level Group on the Security of Supply of Medical Radioisotopes (HLG-MR). It presents a comprehensive evaluation of the potential impacts of converting to the use of LEU targets for 99 Mo production on the global 99 Mo/ 99m Tc market in terms of costs and available production capacity, and the corresponding implications for long-term supply reliability. In this context, the study also briefly discusses the need for policy action by governments in their efforts to ensure a stable and secure long-term supply of 99 Mo/ 99m Tc

  11. Conversion of the University of Missouri-Rolla Reactor from high-enriched uranium to low-enriched uranium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolon, A.E.; Straka, M.; Freeman, D.W.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to convert the UMR Reactor fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and to ship the HEU fuel back to the Department of Energy Savannah River Site. The actual core conversion was completed in the summer of 1992. The HEU fuel was offloaded to an onsite storage pit where it remained until July, 1996. In July, 1996, the HEU fuel was shipped to the DOE Savannah River Site. The objectives of the project have been achieved. DOE provided the following funding for the project. Several papers were published regarding the conversion project and are listed in the Attachment. In retrospect, the conversion project required much more time and effort than originally thought. Several difficulties were encountered including the unavailability of a shipping cask for several years. The authors are grateful for the generous funding provided by DOE for this project but wish to point out that much of their efforts on the conversion project went unfunded

  12. Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primm, Trent; Guida, Tracey

    2010-01-01

    Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration/Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

  13. Radionuclide inventories : ORIGEN2.2 isotopic depletion calculation for high burnup low-enriched uranium and weapons-grade mixed-oxide pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Ross, Kyle W. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Smith, James Dean; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory computer code, ORIGEN2.2 (CCC-371, 2002), was used to obtain the elemental composition of irradiated low-enriched uranium (LEU)/mixed-oxide (MOX) pressurized-water reactor fuel assemblies. Described in this report are the input parameters for the ORIGEN2.2 calculations. The rationale for performing the ORIGEN2.2 calculation was to generate inventories to be used to populate MELCOR radionuclide classes. Therefore the ORIGEN2.2 output was subsequently manipulated. The procedures performed in this data reduction process are also described herein. A listing of the ORIGEN2.2 input deck for two-cycle MOX is provided in the appendix. The final output from this data reduction process was three tables containing the radionuclide inventories for LEU/MOX in elemental form. Masses, thermal powers, and activities were reported for each category.

  14. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  15. Study on usage of low enriched uranium Russian type fuel elements for design of an experimental ADS research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.P.

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual design of an accelerator driven sub-critical experimental research reactor (ADSRR) was initiated in 1999 at the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Serbia and Montenegro. Initial results of neutronic analyses of the proposed ADSRR-H were carried out by Monte Carlo based codes and available high-enriched uranium dioxide (HEU) dispersed Russian type TVR-S fuel elements (FE) placed in a lead matrix. Beam of charged particles (proton or deuteron) would be extracted from the high-energy channel H5B of the VINCY cyclotron of the TESLA Accelerator Installation. In 2002, the Vinca Institute has, in compliance with the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program, returned fresh HEU TVR-S type FEs back to the Russian Federation. Since usage of HEU FEs in research reactors is not further recommended, a new study of an ADSRR-L conceptual design has initiated in Vinca Institute in last two years, based on assumed availability of low-enriched uranium (LEU) dispersed type TVR-S FEs. Initial results of numerical simulations of this new ADSRR-L, published for the first time in this paper, shows that such a small low neutron flux system can be used as an experimental - 'demonstration' - ADS with neutron characteristics similar to proposed well-known lead moderated and cooled power sub-critical ADS with intermediate neutron spectrum. Neutron spectrum characteristics of the ADSRR-L are compared to ones of the ADSRR-H with the same mass (7.7 g) of 235 U nuclide per TVR-S FE. (author)

  16. Environmental Assessment for the shipment of low enriched uranium billets to the United Kingdom from the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This Environmental Assessment provides the necessary information so that a decision can be made on whether a Finding of No Significant Impact Environmental Impact Statement should be prepared for the proposed action. The proposed action is to transfer 2,592 low enriched uranium billets to the United Kingdom. The billets are currently stored in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action would consist of two types of activities: loading and transportation. The loading activities would include placing the billets into the appropriate containers for transportation. The transportation activities would include the tasks required to transport the containers 215 miles (344 km) via highway to the Port of Seattle, Washington, and transfer the containers aboard an ocean cargo vessel for transportation to the United Kingdom. The Department of Energy would only be responsible for conducting the loading activities. The United Kingdom would be responsible for conducting the transportation activities in compliance with all applicable United States and international transportation laws. The tasks associated with the proposed action activities have been performed before and are well defined in terms of requirements and consequences. A risk assessment and a nuclear safety evaluation were performed to address safety issues associated with the proposed action. The risk assessment determined the exposure risk from normal operation and from the maximum credible accident that involves a truck or ship collision followed by a fire that engulfs all the billets in the shipment and the release of the radiological contents of the shipment to the environment. The criticality assessment determined the nuclear safety limits for handling, transporting and storing the shipment under incident-free and accident transport conditions

  17. Fabrication and irradiation testing of LEU [low enriched uranium] fuels at CRNL status as of 1987 September

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, D.F.; Berthiaume, L.C.; Herbert, L.N.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories' (CRNL) program to develop and test low-enriched uranium (LEU), proliferation-resistant fuels for use in research reactors is reviewed. CRNL's fuel manufacturing process has been qualified by the successful demonstration irradiation of 7 full-size rods in the NRU reactor. Now industrial-scale production equipment has been commissioned, and a fuel-fabrication campaign for 30 NRU rods and a MAPLE-X core is underway. Excess capacity could be used for commercial fuel fabrication. In the irradiation testing program, mini-elements with deliberately included core surface defects performed well in-reactor, swelling by only 7 to 8 vol% at 93 atomic percent burnup of the original U-235. The additional restraint provided by the aluminium cladding which flowed into the defects during extrusion contributed to this good performance. Mini-elements containing a variety of particle size distributions were also successfully irradiated to 93 at% burnup in NRU, as part of a study to establish the optimum particle size distribution. Swelling was found to be proportional to the percentage of fines (<44μm particles) contained in the cores. The mini-elements containing the composition normally used at CRNL had swollen by 5.8 vol%, and mini-elements with a much higher percentage of fines had swollen by 6.8 vol%, at 93 at% burnup. Also, a program to develop LEU targets for Mo-99 production, via the technology developed to fabricate dispersed silicide fuel, has started, and preliminary scoping studies are underway. (Author)

  18. Radioactive Waste Issues related to Production of Fission-based Mo-99 by using Low Enriched Uranium (LEU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Muhmood ul; Ryu, Ho Jin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    In order to produce fission-based Mo-99 from research reactors, two types of targets are being used and they are highly enriched uranium (HEU) targets with {sup 235}U enrichment more than 90wt% of {sup 235}U and low enriched uranium (LEU) targets with {sup 235}U enrichment less than 20wt% of {sup 235}U. It is worth noting that medium enriched uranium i.e. 36wt% of {sup 235}U as being used in South Africa is also regarded as non-LEU from a nuclear security point of view. In order to cope with the proliferation issues, international nuclear security policy is promoting the use of LEU targets in order to minimize the civilian use of HEU. It is noteworthy that Mo-99 yield of the LEU target is less than 20% of the HEU target, which requires approximately five times more LEU targets to be irradiated and consequently results in increased volume of waste. The waste generated from fission Mo-99 production can be mainly due to: target fabrication, assembling of target, irradiation in reactor and processing of irradiated targets. During the fission of U-235 in a reactor, a large number of radionuclides with different chemical and physical properties are formed. The waste produced from these practices may be a combination of low level waste (LLW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) comprised of all three types, i.e., solid, liquid and gas. Handling and treatment of the generated waste are dependent on its form and activity. In case of the large production facility, waste storage facility should be constructed in order to limit the radiation exposures of the workers and the environment. In this study, we discuss and compare mainly the radioactive waste generated by alkaline digestion of both HEU and LEU targets to assist in planning and deciding the choice of the technology with better arrangements for proper handling and disposal of generated waste. With the use of the LEU targets in Mo-99 production facility, significant increase in liquid and solid waste has been expected.

  19. Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2007-11-01

    This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology

  20. An assessment of the radiological consequences of the Greek Research Reactor's design basis accident with the use of low enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollas, J.G.

    1985-09-01

    An analysis of the radiological consequences of the design basis accident in the low enriched uranium fueled 5 MW Greek Research Reactor is presented. For the source term thirty-five isotopes are taken into consideration and conservative figures of fission product release are adopted. To estimate the reactor's consequences for Athens population a CRAC2 consequence model version is used. The results indicate that limiting dose and effects are respectively the thyroid dose and the thyroid effects induced in the 3,081,000 inhabitants of Athens region. (author)

  1. Parametric study of the low-enriched uranium integrated Fort-Saint-Vrain element; comparative evaluation with the interacting tubular element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerles, J.M.; Carvallo, G.; Vallepin, C.

    1971-11-01

    This paper presents a study of the influence of the different geometric and neutronic parameters on the calculation of the cycle with low-enriched uranium in a Fort-Saint-Vrain type brick. The study is divided in two parts: a stage of physics, essentially neutronics; an economical part where the costs are taken into account. At the level of studies of neutronics and costs, a parallel comparison is developed between the brick Fort-Saint-Vrain and the interacting tubular element, and even thorium. 6 refs. 29 figs [fr

  2. Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are within the

  3. Conceptual Process for the Manufacture of Low-Enriched Uranium/Molybdenum Fuel for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, J.D.; Primm, R.T. III; Miller, J.H.

    2007-09-30

    The U.S. nonproliferation policy 'to minimize, and to the extent possible, eliminate the use of HEU in civil nuclear programs throughout the world' has resulted in the conversion (or scheduled conversion) of many of the U.S. research reactors from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). A foil fuel appears to offer the best option for using a LEU fuel in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) without degrading the performance of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to outline a proposed conceptual fabrication process flow sheet for a new, foil-type, 19.75%-enriched fuel for HFIR. The preparation of the flow sheet allows a better understanding of the costs of infrastructure modifications, operating costs, and implementation schedule issues associated with the fabrication of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preparation of a reference flow sheet is one of the first planning steps needed in the development of a new manufacturing capacity for low enriched fuels for U.S. research and test reactors. The flow sheet can be used to develop a work breakdown structure (WBS), a critical path schedule, and identify development needs. The reference flow sheet presented in this report is specifically for production of LEU foil fuel for the HFIR. The need for an overall reference flow sheet for production of fuel for all High Performance Research Reactors (HPRR) has been identified by the national program office. This report could provide a starting point for the development of such a reference flow sheet for a foil-based fuel for all HPRRs. The reference flow sheet presented is based on processes currently being developed by the national program for the LEU foil fuel when available, processes used historically in the manufacture of other nuclear fuels and materials, and processes used in other manufacturing industries producing a product configuration similar to the form required in manufacturing a foil fuel. The processes in the reference flow sheet are

  4. Feasibility studies to establish at the Kazakhstan Ulba metallurgical plant the manufacturing capability to produce low-enriched uranium certified reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzminski, Jozef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nesuhoff, J [NBL; Cratto, P [NBL; Pfennigwerth, G [Y12 NATIONAL SEC. COMPLEX; Mikhailenko, A [ULBA METALLURGICAL PLANT; Maliutina, I [ULBA METALLURGICAL PLANT; Nations, J [GREGG PROTECTION SERVICES

    2009-01-01

    One of the salient features of the transition plan that the United States Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) is presently implementing in the Former Soviet Union countries is the availability of uranium certified reference materials for calibration of nondestructive assay (NDA) measurement equipment. To address this challenge, DOE/NNSA and U.S. national laboratories have focused their cooperative efforts on establishing a reliable source for manufacturing, certifying, and supplying of such standards. The Ulba Metallurgical Plant (UMP), Kazakhstan, which processes large quantities of low-enriched uranium to produce ceramic fuel pellets for nuclear-powered reactors, is well situated to become a key supplier of low-enriched uranium certified reference materials for the country and Central Asia region. We have recently completed Phase I of a feasibility study to establish at UMP capabilities of manufacturing these standards. In this paper we will discuss details of a proposed methodology for uranium down-blending, material selection and characterization, and a proposed methodology of measurement by destructive (DA) and non-destructive (NDA) analysis to form a database for material certification by the competent State authorities in the Republic of Kazakhstan. In addition, we will discuss the prospect for manufacturing of such standards at UMP.

  5. Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Reactor Vessel dpa Rates Due to Installation of a Proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Core in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An assessment of the impact on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactor vessel (RV) displacements-per-atom (dpa) rates due to operations with the proposed low enriched uranium (LEU) core described by Ilas and Primm has been performed and is presented herein. The analyses documented herein support the conclusion that conversion of HFIR to low-enriched uranium (LEU) core operations using the LEU core design of Ilas and Primm will have no negative impact on HFIR RV dpa rates. Since its inception, HFIR has been operated with highly enriched uranium (HEU) cores. As part of an effort sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conversion to LEU cores is being considered for future HFIR operations. The HFIR LEU configurations analyzed are consistent with the LEU core models used by Ilas and Primm and the HEU balance-of-plant models used by Risner and Blakeman in the latest analyses performed to support the HFIR materials surveillance program. The Risner and Blakeman analyses, as well as the studies documented herein, are the first to apply the hybrid transport methods available in the Automated Variance reduction Generator (ADVANTG) code to HFIR RV dpa rate calculations. These calculations have been performed on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Institutional Cluster (OIC) with version 1.60 of the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) computer code.

  6. Feasibility of Producing Molybdenum-99 on a Small Scale Using Fission of Low Enriched Uranium or Neutron Activation of Natural Molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This publication documents the work performed within the IAEA coordinated research project (CRP) on Developing Techniques for Small Scale Indigenous Molybdenum-99 Production Using LEU Fission or Neutron Activation. The project allowed participating institutions to receive training and information on aspects necessary for starting production of molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) on a small scale, that is, to become national level producers of this medical isotope. Stable production of 99Mo is one of the most pressing issues facing the nuclear community at present, because the medical isotope technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), which decays from 99 Mo, is one of the most widely used radionuclides in diagnostic imaging and treatment around the world. In the past five years, there have been widespread shortages of 99 Mo owing to the limited number of producers, many of which use ageing facilities. To assist in stabilizing the production of 99Mo, and to promote the use of production methods that do not rely on the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU), the IAEA initiated the abovementioned CRP on small scale 99Mo production using low enriched uranium (LEU) fission or neutron activation methods. The intention was to enable participating institutions to gain the knowledge necessary to become national level producers of 99Mo in the event of further global shortages. Some of the institutions that participated in the CRP have continued their work on 99 Mo production, and are enlisting the assistance of other CRP members and the IAEA’s technical cooperation programme to set up a small scale production capability. In total, the CRP was active for six years, and concluded in December 2011. During the CRP, fourteen IAEA Member States took part; four research coordination meetings were held, and four workshops were held on operational aspects of 99 Mo production, LEU target fabrication and waste management. Most participants carried out work related to the entire production process, from target

  7. Validation of KENO V.a. and two cross-section libraries for criticality calculations of low-enriched uranium systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easter, M.E.

    1985-07-01

    The SCALE code system, utilizing the Monte Carlo computer code KENO V.a, was employed to calculate 37 critical experiments. The critical assemblies had 235 U enrichments of 5% or less and cover a variety of geometries and materials. Values of k/sub eff/ were calculated using two different results using either of the cross-section libraries. The 16-energy-group Hansen-Roach and the 27-energy-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section libraries, available in SCALE, were used in this validation study, and both give good results for the experiments considered. It is concluded that the code and cross sections are adequate for low-enriched uranium systems and that reliable criticality safety calculations can be made for such systems provided the limits of validated applicability are not exceeded

  8. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jaluvka, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members in the Research and Test Reactor Department at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. MURR LEU conversion is part of an overall effort to develop and qualify high-density fuel within the U.S. High Performance Research Reactor Conversion (USHPRR) program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration’s Office of Material Management and Minimization (M3).

  9. A study of a zone approach to IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches

  10. Accident Analyses for Conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from Highly-Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Feldman, E. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Wilson, E. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Div., Research and Test Reactor Dept.; Foyto, L. P. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; McKibben, J. C. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Peters, N. J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Research Reactor; Cowherd, W. M. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program; Rickman, B. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program

    2014-12-01

    This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. This report contains the results of reactor accident analyses for the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). The calculations were performed as part of the conversion from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), the MURR Facility, and the Nuclear Engineering Program – College of Engineering, University of Missouri-Columbia. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support from the U. S. government. In the framework of non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MURR. This report presents the results of a study of core behavior under a set of accident conditions for MURR cores fueled with HEU U-Alx dispersion fuel or LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo

  11. A study of a zone approach to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches.

  12. Low enriched uranium foil targets with different geometries for the production of Molybdenum-99 in the BMR (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingos, Douglas B.; Silva, Antonio T. e; Joao, Thiago G.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Coelho, Talita S., E-mail: teixeira@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    A new research reactor is being planned in Brazil to take care of the demand of radiopharmaceuticals in the country and conduct research in various areas. This new reactor, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), planned for 30 MW, is now in the conception design phase. Two low enriched (<20% {sup 235}U) metallic uranium foil targets (cylinder and plate geometries) are being considered for production of Molybdenum-99 ({sup 99}Mo) by fission. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulics calculations were performed to compare the production of {sup 99}Mo for these targets in the RMB and to determine the temperatures achieved in the targets. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION, CITATION and SCALE and for the thermal-hydraulics calculations were utilized the computer codes MTRCR-IEA-R1 and ANSYS CFX. (author)

  13. Low enriched uranium foil targets with different geometries for the production of Molybdenum-99 in the BMR (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domingos, Douglas B.; Silva, Antonio T. e; Joao, Thiago G.; Muniz, Rafael O.R.; Coelho, Talita S.

    2011-01-01

    A new research reactor is being planned in Brazil to take care of the demand of radiopharmaceuticals in the country and conduct research in various areas. This new reactor, the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB), planned for 30 MW, is now in the conception design phase. Two low enriched ( 235 U) metallic uranium foil targets (cylinder and plate geometries) are being considered for production of Molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) by fission. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulics calculations were performed to compare the production of 99 Mo for these targets in the RMB and to determine the temperatures achieved in the targets. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION, CITATION and SCALE and for the thermal-hydraulics calculations were utilized the computer codes MTRCR-IEA-R1 and ANSYS CFX. (author)

  14. Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU)-fueled SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor simulation with the Monte-Carlo based MCNP 4A code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, J.R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Following the commissioning of the Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) Fuelled SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor at the Royal Military College-College Militaire Royal (RMC-CMR), excess reactivity measurements were conducted over a range of temperature and power. The results showed a maximum excess reactivity of 3.37 mk at 33 o C. Several deterministic models using computer codes like WIMS-CRNL, CITATION, TRIVAC and DRAGON have been used to try to reproduce the excess reactivity and temperature trend of both the LEU and HEU SLOWPOKE-2 reactors. The best simulations had been obtained at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal. They were able to reproduce the temperature trend of their HEU-fuelled reactor using TRIVAC calculations, but this model over-estimated the absolute value of the excess reactivity by 119 mk. Although calculations using DRAGON did not reproduce the temperature trend as well as TRIVAC, these calculations represented a significant improvement on the absolute value at 20 o C reducing the discrepancy to 13 mk. Given the advance in computer technology, a probabilistic approach was tried in this work, using the Monte-Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System MCNP 4A, to model the RMC-CMR SLOWPOKE-2 reactor.

  15. Licensing considerations in converting NRC-licensed non-power reactors from high-enriched to low-enriched uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the mid-1970s, there was increasing concern with the possibility that highly enriched uranium (HEU), widely used in non-power reactors around the world, might be diverted from its intended peaceful uses. In 1982 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a policy statement that was intended to conform with the perceived international thinking, and that addressed the two relevant areas in which NRC has statutory responsibility, namely, export of special nuclear materials for non-USA non-power reactors, and the licensing of USA-based non-power reactors not owned by the Federal government. To further address the second area, NRC issued a proposed rule for public comment that would require all NRC-licensed non-power reactors using HEU to convert to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, unless they could demonstrate a unique purpose. Currently the NRC staff is revising the proposed rule. An underlying principle guiding the staff is that as long as a change in enrichment does not lead to safety-related reactor modifications, and does not involve an unreviewed safety question, the licensee could convert the core without prior NRC approval. At the time of writing this paper, a regulatory method of achieving this principle has not been finalized. (author)

  16. Effects of high density dispersion fuel loading on the kinetic parameters of a low enriched uranium fueled material test research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Farhan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)], E-mail: mfarhan_73@yahoo.co.uk; Majid, Asad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2008-09-15

    The effects of using high density low enriched uranium on the neutronic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the low density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high density LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Since the alloying elements have different cross-sections affecting the reactor in different ways, therefore fuels U-Mo (9 w/o) which contain the same elements in same ratio were selected for analysis. Simulations were carried out to calculate core excess reactivity, neutron flux spectrum, prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed neutron fraction and feedback coefficients including Doppler feedback coefficient, and reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the excess reactivity at the beginning of life does not increase as the uranium density of fuel. Both the prompt neutron generation time and the effective delayed neutron fraction decrease as the uranium density increases. The absolute value of Doppler feedback coefficient increases while the absolute values of reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature decrease.

  17. Environmental assessment for the purchase of Russian low enriched uranium derived from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The United States is proposing to purchase from the Russian Federation low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union. The purchase would be accomplished through a proposed contract requiring the United States to purchase 15,250 metric tons (tonnes) of LEU (or 22,550 tonnes of UF 6 ) derived from blending 500 metric tones uranium (MTU) of HEU from nuclear warheads. The LEU would be in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) and would be converted from HEU in Russia. The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) is the entity proposing to undertake the contract for purchase, sale, and delivery of the LEU from the Russian Federation. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is negotiating the procedure for gaining confidence that the LEU is derived from HEU that is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons (referred to as ''transparency),'' and would administer the transparency measures for the contract. There are six environments that could potentially be affected by the proposed action; marine (ocean); US ports of entry; truck or rail transportation corridors; the Portsmouth GDP; the electric power industry; and the nuclear fuel cycle industry. These environmental impacts are discussed

  18. Licensing considerations in converting NRC-licensed non-power reactors from high-enriched to low-enriched uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R E

    1985-07-01

    During the mid-1970s, there was increasing concern with the possibility that highly enriched uranium (HEU), widely used in non-power reactors around the world, might be diverted from its intended peaceful uses. In 1982 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a policy statement that was intended to conform with the perceived international thinking, and that addressed the two relevant areas in which NRC has statutory responsibility, namely, export of special nuclear materials for non-USA non-power reactors, and the licensing of USA-based non-power reactors not owned by the Federal government. To further address the second area, NRC issued a proposed rule for public comment that would require all NRC-licensed non-power reactors using HEU to convert to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, unless they could demonstrate a unique purpose. Currently the NRC staff is revising the proposed rule. An underlying principle guiding the staff is that as long as a change in enrichment does not lead to safety-related reactor modifications, and does not involve an unreviewed safety question, the licensee could convert the core without prior NRC approval. At the time of writing this paper, a regulatory method of achieving this principle has not been finalized. (author)

  19. Acceptable standard format and content for the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan required for low-enriched uranium facilities. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joy, D.R.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a standard format suggested by the NRC for use in preparing fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plans as required by the Low Enriched Uranium Reform Amendments (10CFR 74.31). This report also describes the necessary contents of a comprehensive plan and provides example acceptance criteria which are intended to communicate acceptable means of achieving the performance capabilities of the Reform Amendments. By using the suggested format, the licensee or applicant will minimize administrative problems associated with the submittal, review and approval of the FNMC plan. Preparation of the plan in accordance with this format Will assist the NRC in evaluating the plan and in standardizing the review and licensing process. However, conformance with this guidance is not required by the NRC. A license applicant who employs a format that provides a equal level of completeness and detail may use their own format. This document is also intended for providing guidance to licensees when making revisions to their FNMC plan

  20. Environmental assessment for the purchase of Russian low enriched uranium derived from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    The United States is proposing to purchase from the Russian Federation low enriched uranium (LEU) derived from highly enriched uranium (HEU) resulting from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in the countries of the former Soviet Union. The purchase would be accomplished through a proposed contract requiring the United States to purchase 15,250 metric tons (tonnes) of LEU (or 22,550 tonnes of UF{sub 6}) derived from blending 500 metric tones uranium (MTU) of HEU from nuclear warheads. The LEU would be in the form of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and would be converted from HEU in Russia. The United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) is the entity proposing to undertake the contract for purchase, sale, and delivery of the LEU from the Russian Federation. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is negotiating the procedure for gaining confidence that the LEU is derived from HEU that is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons (referred to as ``transparency),`` and would administer the transparency measures for the contract. There are six environments that could potentially be affected by the proposed action; marine (ocean); US ports of entry; truck or rail transportation corridors; the Portsmouth GDP; the electric power industry; and the nuclear fuel cycle industry. These environmental impacts are discussed.

  1. Nuclear safety analyses and core design calculations to convert the Texas A & M University Nuclear Science Center reactor to low enrichment uranium fuel. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parish, T.A.

    1995-03-02

    This project involved performing the nuclear design and safety analyses needed to modify the license issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to allow operation of the Texas A& M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) with a core containing low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. The specific type of LEU fuel to be considered was the TRIGA 20-20 fuel produced by General Atomic. Computer codes for the neutronic analyses were provided by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the assistance of William Woodruff of ANL in helping the NSCR staff to learn the proper use of the codes is gratefully acknowledged. The codes applied in the LEU analyses were WIMSd4/m, DIF3D, NCTRIGA and PARET. These codes allowed full three dimensional, temperature and burnup dependent calculations modelling the NSCR core to be performed for the first time. In addition, temperature coefficients of reactivity and pulsing calculations were carried out in-house, whereas in the past this modelling had been performed at General Atomic. In order to benchmark the newly acquired codes, modelling of the current NSCR core with highly enriched uranium fuel was also carried out. Calculated results were compared to both earlier licensing calculations and experimental data and the new methods were found to achieve excellent agreement with both. Therefore, even if an LEU core is never loaded at the NSCR, this project has resulted in a significant improvement in the nuclear safety analysis capabilities established and maintained at the NSCR.

  2. Effects of high density dispersion fuel loading on the kinetic parameters of a low enriched uranium fueled material test research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, Farhan; Majid, Asad

    2008-01-01

    The effects of using high density low enriched uranium on the neutronic parameters of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the low density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high density LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program. Since the alloying elements have different cross-sections affecting the reactor in different ways, therefore fuels U-Mo (9 w/o) which contain the same elements in same ratio were selected for analysis. Simulations were carried out to calculate core excess reactivity, neutron flux spectrum, prompt neutron generation time, effective delayed neutron fraction and feedback coefficients including Doppler feedback coefficient, and reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature. Nuclear reactor analysis codes including WIMS-D4 and CITATION were employed to carry out these calculations. It is observed that the excess reactivity at the beginning of life does not increase as the uranium density of fuel. Both the prompt neutron generation time and the effective delayed neutron fraction decrease as the uranium density increases. The absolute value of Doppler feedback coefficient increases while the absolute values of reactivity coefficients for change of water density and temperature decrease

  3. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.

    1995-01-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. Then a statistical inference can be made from verification results for items verified during SNRIs to the entire populations, i.e. the entire strata, even if inspectors were not present when many items were received or produced. A six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division during 1993. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ''mailbox''. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. They arrived unannounced at the plant, in most cases immediately after travel from Canada, where the IAEA maintains a regional office. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by meant of nondestructive assay equipment

  4. Proposal of new 235U nuclear data to improve keff biases on 235U enrichment and temperature for low enriched uranium fueled lattices moderated by light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Haicheng; Okumura, Keisuke; Shibata, Keiichi

    2005-06-01

    The under prediction of k eff depending on 235 U enrichment in low enriched uranium fueled systems, which had been a long-standing puzzle especially for slightly enriched ones, was studied in this report. Benchmark testing was carried out with several evaluated nuclear data files, including the new uranium evaluations from preliminary ENDF/B-VII and CENDL-3.1. Another problem reviewed here was k eff underestimation vs. temperature increase, which was observed in the sightly enriched system with recent JENDL and ENDF/B uranium evaluations. Through the substitute analysis of nuclear data of 235 U and 238 U, we propose a new evaluation of 235 U data to solve both of the problems. The new evaluation was tested for various uranium fueled systems including low or highly enriched metal and solution benchmarks in the ICSBEP handbook. As a result, it was found that the combination of the new evaluation of 235 U and the 238 U data from the preliminary ENDF/B-VII gives quite good results for most of benchmark problems. (author)

  5. Field test of short-notice random inspections for inventory-change verification at a low-enriched-uranium fuel-fabrication plant: Preliminary summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Moussalli, G.; Naegele, G.; Ikonomou, P.; Hosoya, M.; Scott, P.; Fager, J.; Sanders, C.; Colwell, D.; Joyner, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    An approach of short-notice random inspections (SNRIs) for inventory-change verification can enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of international safeguards at natural or low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication plants. According to this approach, the plant operator declares the contents of nuclear material items before knowing if an inspection will occur to verify them. Additionally, items about which declarations are newly made should remain available for verification for an agreed time. This report details a six-month field test of the feasibility of such SNRIs which took place at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Commercial Nuclear Fuel Division. Westinghouse personnel made daily declarations about both feed and product items, uranium hexafluoride cylinders and finished fuel assemblies, using a custom-designed computer ''mailbox''. Safeguards inspectors from the IAEA conducted eight SNRIs to verify these declarations. Items from both strata were verified during the SNRIs by means of nondestructive assay equipment. The field test demonstrated the feasibility and practicality of key elements of the SNRI approach for a large LEU fuel fabrication plant

  6. Preliminary Accident Analyses for Conversion of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR) from Highly Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Floyd E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Olson, Arne P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wilson, Erik H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Kaichao S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Newton, Jr., Thomas H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context most research and test reactors, both domestic and international, have started a program of conversion to the use of LEU fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (U-Mo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like MITR. This report presents the preliminary accident analyses for MITR cores fueled with LEU monolithic U-Mo alloy fuel with 10 wt% Mo. Preliminary results demonstrate adequate performance, including thermal margin to expected safety limits, for the LEU accident scenarios analyzed.

  7. In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, B.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO 2 F 2 deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO 2 F 2 deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO 2 F 2 source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO 2 F 2 deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25 demolition project. The combined

  8. Communication dated 19 May 2011 received from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Agency regarding Assurance of Supply of Enrichment Services and Low Enriched Uranium for Use in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 19 May 2011 from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Agency, attaching the Proposal for the Assurance of Supply of Enrichment Services and Low Enriched Uranium for Use in Nuclear Power Plants, as described in document GOV/2011/10. As requested by the Resident Representative, the letter and its attachment are circulated herewith for information of all Member States

  9. Communication dated 19 May 2011 received from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Agency regarding Assurance of Supply of Enrichment Services and Low Enriched Uranium for Use in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a letter dated 19 May 2011 from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the Agency, attaching the Proposal for the Assurance of Supply of Enrichment Services and Low Enriched Uranium for Use in Nuclear Power Plants, as described in document GOV/2011/10. As requested by the Resident Representative, the letter and its attachment are circulated herewith for information of all Member States [es

  10. Effects of high density dispersion fuel loading on the uncontrolled reactivity insertion transients of a low enriched uranium fueled material test research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhammad, Farhan [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)], E-mail: farhan73@hotmail.com; Majid, Asad [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan)

    2009-08-15

    The effects of using high density low enriched uranium on the uncontrolled reactivity insertion transients of a material test research reactor were studied. For this purpose, the low density LEU fuel of an MTR was replaced with high density U-Mo (9w/o) LEU fuels currently being developed under the RERTR program having uranium densities of 6.57 gU/cm{sup 3}, 7.74 gU/cm{sup 3} and 8.57 gU/cm{sup 3}. Simulations were carried out to determine the reactor performance under reactivity insertion transients with totally failed control rods. Ramp reactivities of 0.25$/0.5 s and 1.35$/0.5 s were inserted with reactor operating at full power level of 10 MW. Nuclear reactor analysis code PARET was employed to carry out these calculations. It was observed that when reactivity insertion was 0.25$/0.5 s, the new power level attained increased by 5.8% as uranium density increases from 6.57 gU/cm{sup 3} to 8.90 gU/cm{sup 3}. This results in increased maximum temperatures of fuel, clad and coolant outlet, achieved at the new power level, by 4.7 K, 4.4 K and 2.4 K, respectively. When reactivity insertion was 1.35$/0.5 s, the feedback reactivities were unable to control the reactor which resulted in the bulk boiling of the coolant; the one with the highest fuel density was the first to reach the boiling point.

  11. Research and Development of Multiphysics Models in Support of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodey, Isaac T.; Curtis, Franklin G.; Arimilli, Rao V.; Ekici, Kivanc; Freels, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The findings presented in this report are results of a five year effort led by the RRD Division of the ORNL, which is focused on research and development toward the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report focuses on the tasks accomplished by the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK) team from the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering (MABE) that provided expert support in multiphysics modeling of complex problems associated with the LEU conversion of the HFIR reactor. The COMSOL software was used as the main computational modeling tool, whereas Solidworks was also used in support of computer-aided-design (CAD) modeling of the proposed LEU fuel design. The UTK research has been governed by a statement of work (SOW), which was updated annually to clearly define the specific tasks reported herein. Ph.D. student Isaac T. Bodey has focused on heat transfer and fluid flow modeling issues and has been aided by his major professor Dr. Rao V. Arimilli. Ph.D. student Franklin G. Curtis has been focusing on modeling the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena caused by the mechanical forces acting on the fuel plates, which in turn affect the fluid flow in between the fuel plates, and ultimately the heat transfer, is also affected by the FSI changes. Franklin Curtis has been aided by his major professor Dr. Kivanc Ekici. M.Sc. student Adam R. Travis has focused two major areas of research: (1) on accurate CAD modeling of the proposed LEU plate design, and (2) reduction of the model complexity and dimensionality through interdimensional coupling of the fluid flow and heat transfer for the HFIR plate geometry. Adam Travis is also aided by his major professor, Dr. Kivanc Ekici. We must note that the UTK team, and particularly the graduate students, have been in very close collaboration with Dr. James D. Freels (ORNL technical monitor and mentor) and have

  12. Research and Development of Multiphysics Models in Support of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Curtis, Franklin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Arimilli, Rao V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ekici, Kivanc [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Freels, James D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The findings presented in this report are results of a five year effort led by the RRD Division of the ORNL, which is focused on research and development toward the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report focuses on the tasks accomplished by the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK) team from the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering (MABE) that provided expert support in multiphysics modeling of complex problems associated with the LEU conversion of the HFIR reactor. The COMSOL software was used as the main computational modeling tool, whereas Solidworks was also used in support of computer-aided-design (CAD) modeling of the proposed LEU fuel design. The UTK research has been governed by a statement of work (SOW), which was updated annually to clearly define the specific tasks reported herein. Ph.D. student Isaac T. Bodey has focused on heat transfer and fluid flow modeling issues and has been aided by his major professor Dr. Rao V. Arimilli. Ph.D. student Franklin G. Curtis has been focusing on modeling the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena caused by the mechanical forces acting on the fuel plates, which in turn affect the fluid flow in between the fuel plates, and ultimately the heat transfer, is also affected by the FSI changes. Franklin Curtis has been aided by his major professor Dr. Kivanc Ekici. M.Sc. student Adam R. Travis has focused two major areas of research: (1) on accurate CAD modeling of the proposed LEU plate design, and (2) reduction of the model complexity and dimensionality through interdimensional coupling of the fluid flow and heat transfer for the HFIR plate geometry. Adam Travis is also aided by his major professor, Dr. Kivanc Ekici. We must note that the UTK team, and particularly the graduate students, have been in very close collaboration with Dr. James D. Freels (ORNL technical monitor and mentor) and have

  13. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  14. Agreement Between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the text of the Agreement on 6 March 2013. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Jamaica on 25 November 2013, the United States on 2 May 2013 and the Director General of the IAEA on 16 December 2013. Pursuant to the Article XI of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 16 December 2013, upon signature by the Director General of the IAEA and by the authorized representatives of Jamaica and the United States [fr

  15. Agreement Between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the text of the Agreement on 6 March 2013. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Jamaica on 25 November 2013, the United States on 2 May 2013 and the Director General of the IAEA on 16 December 2013. Pursuant to the Article XI of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 16 December 2013, upon signature by the Director General of the IAEA and by the authorized representatives of Jamaica and the United States

  16. Agreement Between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of Jamaica and the Government of the United States of America for Assistance in Securing Low Enriched Uranium for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the text of the Agreement on 6 March 2013. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Jamaica on 25 November 2013, the United States on 2 May 2013 and the Director General of the IAEA on 16 December 2013. Pursuant to the Article XI of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 16 December 2013, upon signature by the Director General of the IAEA and by the authorized representatives of Jamaica and the United States [es

  17. Thermal conductivity of REIn3 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucha, J

    2006-01-01

    The results of measurements of the thermal conductivity of REIn 3 (RE Pr, Nd, Dy, Ho, Tm) compounds as a function of the temperature in the interval 4-300 K in the absence and in the presence of an external magnetic field of 8 T are presented. Except for PRIn 3 all the compounds are antiferromagnetic. YIn 3 was also measured as a reference compound. The results were analysed in the paramagnetic phase, where an influence of the crystalline electric field on the thermal conductivity was found. Drastic changes in the thermal conductivity were observed and analysed in the vicinity of the Neel temperature and in the antiferromagnetic phases of the compounds. Below the Neel temperature an additional magnon contribution to the thermal conductivity was separated out

  18. Biodegradable compounds: Rheological, mechanical and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Maria Rossella; Lucia, G.; Santella, M.; Malinconico, M.; Cerruti, P.; Pantani, R.

    2015-12-01

    Recently great attention from industry has been focused on biodegradable polyesters derived from renewable resources. In particular, PLA has attracted great interest due to its high strength and high modulus and a good biocompatibility, however its brittleness and low heat distortion temperature (HDT) restrict its wide application. On the other hand, Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) is a biodegradable polymer with a low tensile modulus but characterized by a high flexibility, excellent impact strength, good thermal and chemical resistance. In this work the two aliphatic biodegradable polyesters PBS and PLA were selected with the aim to obtain a biodegradable material for the industry of plastic cups and plates. PBS was also blended with a thermoplastic starch. Talc was also added to the compounds because of its low cost and its effectiveness in increasing the modulus and the HDT of polymers. The compounds were obtained by melt compounding in a single screw extruder and the rheological, mechanical and thermal properties were investigated. The properties of the two compounds were compared and it was found that the values of the tensile modulus and elongation at break measured for the PBS/PLA/Talc compound make it interesting for the production of disposable plates and cups. In terms of thermal resistance the compounds have HDTs high enough to contain hot food or beverages. The PLA/PBS/Talc compound can be, then, considered as biodegradable substitute for polystyrene for the production of disposable plates and cups for hot food and beverages.

  19. Thermal oxidation of III-V compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, O.R.; Evans, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of two important III-V compound semiconductor materials, namely GaAs and InP, has been studied between 300 and 600 0 C. In-situ TEM, cross-sectional TEM (XTEM) and SIMS analyses were used to characterize the reaction products. The first technique allows us to access the reactions at the very moment they are occurring. XTEM provides a clearer picture of the distribution of phases in the oxidized samples. SIMS gives us information on the dopant redistribution after oxidation as well as enrichment of group V element at the oxide semiconductor interface. Based on those results, the reaction products were characterized and reaction mechanisms proposed

  20. 2nd RCM of the CRP on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analyses of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) and Technical Meeting on Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel Utilization in Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Systems. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The overall objective of the CRP is contributing to the generic R&D efforts in various fields common to innovative fast neutron system development, i.e., heavy liquid metal thermal hydraulics, dedicated transmutation fuels and associated core designs, theoretical nuclear reaction models, measurement and evaluation of nuclear data for transmutation, and development and validation of calculational methods and codes. Ultimately, the CRP’s overall objective is to make contributions towards the realization of a transmutation demonstration facility

  1. Thermal decomposition of zirconium compounds with some aromatic hydroxycarboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshel, A V; Malinko, L A; Karlysheva, K F; Sheka, I A; Shchepak, N I [AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Obshchej i Neorganicheskoj Khimii

    1980-02-01

    By the thermogravimetry method investigated are processes of thermal decomposition of different zirconium compounds with mandelic, parabromomandelic, salicylic and sulphosalicylic acids. For identification of decomposition products the specimens have been kept at the temperature of effects up to the constant weight. Taken are IR-spectra, rentgenoarams, carried out is elementary analysis of decomposition products. It is stated that thermal decomposition of the investigated compounds passes in stages; the final product of thermolysis is ZrO/sub 2/. Nonhydrolized compounds are stable at heating in the air up to 200-265 deg. Hydroxy compounds begin to decompose at lower temperature (80-100 deg).

  2. Acceptance criteria for the low enriched uranium reform amendments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emeigh, C.W.; Gundersen, G.E.; Withee, C.J.

    1984-05-01

    Revisions have been made to the material control and accounting requirements for NRC licensees authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material of low strategic significance to have material control and accounting systems able to (1) confirm the presence of special nuclear material, (2) resolve indications of missing material, and (3) aid in the investigation and recovery of missing material. This document presents criteria that can be used to aid in judging the acceptability of licensee plans that would be submitted to the NRC for implementing these capabilities. General performance objectives, system capabilities, and recordkeeping are addressed

  3. Qualification status of LEU [low enriched uranium] fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Sufficient data has been obtained from tests of high-density, low-enriched fuels for research and test reactors to declare them qualified for use. These fuels include UZrH x (TRIGA fuel) and UO 2 (SPERT fuel) for rod-type reactors and UAl x , U 3 O 8 , U 3 Si 2 , and U 3 Si dispersed in aluminium for plate-type reactors. Except for U 3 Si, the allowable fission density for LEU applications is limited only by the available 235 U. Several reactors are now using these fuels, and additional conversions are in progress. The basic performance characteristics and limits, if any, of the qualified low-enriched (and medium-enriched) fuels are discussed. Continuing and planned work to qualify additional fuels is also discussed. (Author)

  4. Conversion of research reactors to low-enrichment uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    There are at present approximately 350 research reactors in 52 countries ranging in power from less than 1 watt to 100 Megawatt and over. In the 1970's, many people became concerned about the possibility that some fuels and fuel cycles could provide an easy route to the acquisition of nuclear weapons. Since enrichment to less than 20% is internationally recognized as a fully adequate barrier to weapons usability, certain Member States have moved to minimize the international trade in highly enriched uranium and have established programmes to develop the technical means to help convert research reactors to the use of low-enrichment fuels with minimum penalties. This could involve modifications in the design of the reactor and development of new fuels. As a result of these programmes, it is expected that most research reactors can be converted to the use of low-enriched fuel

  5. Method for enhancing the thermal stability of ionic compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for enhancing the thermal stability of ionic compounds including ionic liquids, by immobilization on porous solid support materials having a pore diameter of between about 20-200 AA, wherein the solid support does not have a pore size of 90 AA.......This invention relates to a method for enhancing the thermal stability of ionic compounds including ionic liquids, by immobilization on porous solid support materials having a pore diameter of between about 20-200 AA, wherein the solid support does not have a pore size of 90 AA....

  6. Thermal behaviour of solar air heater with compound parabolic concentrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchinda, Rene

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model for computing the thermal performance of an air heater with a truncated compound parabolic concentrator having a flat one-sided absorber is presented. A computer code that employs an iterative solution procedure is constructed to solve the governing energy equations and to estimate the performance parameters of the collector. The effects of the air mass flow rate, the wind speed and the collector length on the thermal performance of the present air heater are investigated. Predictions for the performance of the solar heater also exhibit reasonable agreement, with experimental data with an average error of 7%

  7. A thermal conductivity model for U-­Si compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andersson, Anders David Ragnar [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-02

    U3Si2 is a candidate for accident tolerant nuclear fuel being developed as an alternative to UO2 in commercial light water reactors (LWRs). One of its main benefits compared to UO2 is higher thermal conductivity that increases with temperature. This increase is contrary to UO2, for which the thermal conductivity decreases with temperature. The reason for the difference is the electronic origin of thermal conductivity in U3Si2, as compared to the phonon mechanism responsible for thermal transport in UO2. The phonon thermal conductivity in UO2 is unusually low for a fluorite oxide due to the strong interaction with the spins in the paramagnetic phase. The thermal conductivity of U3Si2 as well as other U-­Si compounds has been measured experimentally [1-­4]. However, for fuel performance simulations it is also critical to model the degradation of the thermal conductivity due to damage and microstructure evolution caused by the reactor environment (irradiation and high temperature). For UO2 this reduction is substantial and it has been the topic of extensive NEAMS research resulting in several publications [5, 6]. There are no data or models for the evolution of the U3Si2 thermal conductivity under irradiation. We know that the intrinsic thermal conductivities of UO2 (semi-conductor) and U3Si2 (metal) are very different, and we do not necessarily expect the dependence on damage to be the same either, which could present another advantage for the silicide fuel. In this report we summarize the first step in developing a model for the thermal conductivity of U-­Si compounds with the goal of capturing the effect of damage in U3Si2. Next year, we will focus on lattice damage. We will also attempt to assess the impact of fission gas bubbles.

  8. Thermal expansion and thermal diffusivity properties of Co-Si solid solutions and intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, Ying; Li, Liuhui; Gu, Qianqian; Zhou, Kai; Yan, Na; Wei, Bingbo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Length change difference between rapidly and slowly solidified Co-Si alloy occurs at high temperature. • Generally CTE increases with an increasing Si content. • The thermal diffusion abilities are CoSi 2 > Co 95 Si 5 > Co 90 Si 10 > Co 2 Si > CoSi if T exceeds 565 K. • All the CTE and thermal diffusivity variations with T satisfy linear or polynomial relations. - Abstract: The thermal expansion of Co-Si solid solutions and intermetallic compounds was measured via dilatometric method, compared with the results of first-principles calculations, and their thermal diffusivities were investigated using laser flash method. The length changes of rapidly solidified Co-Si alloys are larger than those of slowly solidified alloys when temperature increases to around 1000 K due to the more competitive atom motion. The coefficient of thermal expansion (α) of Co-Si alloy increases with an increasing Si content, except that the coefficient of thermal expansion of Co 95 Si 5 influenced by both metastable structure and allotropic transformation is lower than that of Co 90 Si 10 at a higher temperature. The thermal expansion abilities of Co-Si intermetallic compounds satisfy the relationship of Co 2 Si > CoSi > CoSi 2 , and the differences of the coefficients of thermal expansion between them increase with the rise of temperature. The thermal diffusivity of CoSi 2 is evidently larger than the values of other Co-Si alloys. If temperature exceeds 565 K, their thermal diffusion abilities are CoSi 2 > Co 95 Si 5 > Co 90 Si 10 > Co 2 Si > CoSi. All the coefficient of thermal expansion and thermal diffusivity variations with temperature satisfy linear or polynomial relations.

  9. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis for production of fission molybdenum-99 at Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushtaq, A. [Isotope Production Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: mushtaqa@pinstech.org.pk; Iqbal, Massod; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tariq; Mahmood, Tayyab; Ahmad, Zahoor; Zaman, Qamar [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-02-15

    Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis for the fission molybdenum-99 production at PARR-1 has been performed. Low enriched uranium foil (<20% {sup 235}U) will be used as target material. Annular target designed by ANL (USA) will be irradiated in PARR-1 for the production of 100 Ci of molybdenum-99 at the end of irradiation, which will be sufficient to prepare required {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc generators at PINSTECH and its supply in the country. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis were performed using various codes. Data shows that annular targets can be safely irradiated in PARR-1 for production of required amount of fission molybdenum-99.

  10. Thermal decomposition of cesium-ethylene-ternary graphite intercalation compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, R.; Oishi, Y.; Arii, T.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the thermal decomposition of air-stable Cs-ethylene-ternary graphite intercalation compounds (GICs) is discussed. The air stability of Cs-GICs is improved remarkably after the absorption of ethylene into their interlayer nanospace, because the ethylene molecules oligomerize and block the movement of Cs atoms. In addition, the evaporation of Cs atoms from the Cs-ethylene-ternary GICs is observed above 400 o C under a N 2 atmosphere of 100 Pa by ion attachment mass spectrometry. Although the results indicate that Cs-ethylene-ternary GICs remain stable up to approximately 400 o C, their thermal stability is not very high as compared to that of Cs-GICs.

  11. Study of the electrical and thermal performances of photovoltaic thermal collector-compound parabolic concentrated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahed Hameed Jaaz

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of utilizing the solar energy as a very suitable source among multi-source approaches to replace the conventional energy is on the rise in the last four decades. The invention of the photovoltaic module (PV could be the corner stone in this process. However, the limited amount of energy obtained from PV was and still the main challenge of full utilization of the solar energy. In this paper, the use of the compound parabolic concentrator (CPC along with the thermal photovoltaic module (PVT where the cooling process of the CPC is conducted using a novel technique of water jet impingement has applied experimentally and physically tested. The test includes the effect of water jet impingement on the total power, electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency, and total efficiency on CPC-PVT system. The cooling process at the maximum irradiation by water jet impingement resulted in improving the electrical efficiency by 7%, total output power by 31% and the thermal efficiency by 81%. These results outperform the recent highest results recorded by the most recent work. Keywords: Photovoltaic thermal collectors, Electrical performance, Thermal performance, Compound parabolic concentrator, Jet impingement

  12. Development of heat transfer package for core thermal-hydraulic design and analysis of upgraded JRR-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudo, Yukio; Ikawa, Hiromasa; Kaminaga, Masanori

    1985-01-01

    A heat transfer package was developed for the core thermal-hydraulic design and analysis of the Japan Research Reactor-3 (JRR-3) which is to be remodeled to a 20 MWt pool-type, light water-cooled reactor with 20 % low enriched uranium (LEU) plate-type fuel. This paper presents the constitution of the developed heat transfer package and the applicability of the heat transfer correlations adopted in it, based on the heat transfer experiments in which thermal-hydraulic features of the new JRR-3 core were properly reflected. (author)

  13. Thermal expansion of superconducting fulleride and borocarbide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhart, G.J.

    1995-08-01

    In order to detact and analyze thermodynamic phase transitions, the investigation of the thermal expansion via capacitance dilatometry is a powerful experimental technique, due to the extremely high resolution (ΔL/L∝10 -8 -10 -10 ). With respect to the air sensitivity of the fullerides a dilatometer operating under inert atmosphere was designed and the thermal expansion of polycrystalline fulleride (Rb 3 C 60 , K 3 C 60 ) and borocarbide (YNi 2 B 2 C, LuNi 2 B 2 C) compounds was determined in the temperature range 5-320 K. Most effort was focused on a quantitative evaluation of the discontinuity in the thermal expansivity α at the superconducting transition. The results are discussed in the context of the Ehrenfest relation, which connects the jump in the thermal expansivity Δα with the pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature dT c /dp and the jump in the specific heat Δc p /T c at the superconducting transition. For Rb 3 C 60 and K 3 C 60 the jump in the specific heat can be derived via the Ehrenfest relation using the results of the thermal expansion measurements and the well-known pressure dependence of the superconducting transition temperature. The derived values for Rb 3 C 60 and K 3 Cu 60 are Δc p /T c ∝75mJ/molK 2 and Δc p /T c ∝64 mJ.molK 2 , respectively. The directly measured specific heat jump of K 3 C 60 gives approximately the same value of Δc p /T c , and, therefore, the use of the Ehrenfest relation on fullerides is justified. The specific heat jumps Δc p /T c , determined from theoretically derived values of the density of states at the Fermi level N(E F ) and the McMillan-parameter λ, exceed the experimental results by a factor of 1.5-2. This finding reflects the uncertainty concerning the superconducting parameters N(E F ) and λ. (orig.)

  14. Toxic pollutants emitted from thermal decomposition of phthalimide compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Kai; Mackie, John C.; Wojtalewicz, Dominika; Kennedy, Eric M. [Process Safety and Environmental Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales 2308 (Australia); Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z., E-mail: Bogdan.Dlugogorski@newcastle.edu.au [Process Safety and Environmental Protection Research Group, School of Engineering, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales 2308 (Australia)

    2011-03-15

    Phthalimide (PI) and tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) are two structurally similar compounds extensively used as intermediates for the synthesis of variety of industrial chemicals. This paper investigates the thermal decomposition of PI and THPI under oxygen rich to oxygen lean conditions, quantifying the production of toxicants and explaining their formation pathways. The experiments involved a plug flow reactor followed by silica cartridges, activated charcoal trap and a condenser, with the decomposition products identified and quantified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and micro gas chromatography ({mu}GC). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations served to obtain dissociation energies and reaction pathways, to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The oxidation of PI and THPI produced several toxic nitrogen-containing gases and volatile organic compounds, including hydrogen cyanide, isocyanic acid, nitrogen oxides, benzonitrile, maleimide and tentatively identified benzenemethanimine. The detection of dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD) and dibenzofuran (DF) suggests potential formation of the toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in fires involving PI and THPI, in presence of a chlorine source. The oxidation of THPI produced 2-cyclohexen-1-one, a toxic unsaturated ketone. The results of the present study provide the data for quantitative risk assessments of emissions of toxicants in combustion processes involving PI and THPI.

  15. Toxic pollutants emitted from thermal decomposition of phthalimide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Kai; Mackie, John C.; Wojtalewicz, Dominika; Kennedy, Eric M.; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.

    2011-01-01

    Phthalimide (PI) and tetrahydrophthalimide (THPI) are two structurally similar compounds extensively used as intermediates for the synthesis of variety of industrial chemicals. This paper investigates the thermal decomposition of PI and THPI under oxygen rich to oxygen lean conditions, quantifying the production of toxicants and explaining their formation pathways. The experiments involved a plug flow reactor followed by silica cartridges, activated charcoal trap and a condenser, with the decomposition products identified and quantified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and micro gas chromatography (μGC). The density functional theory (DFT) calculations served to obtain dissociation energies and reaction pathways, to elucidate the reaction mechanism. The oxidation of PI and THPI produced several toxic nitrogen-containing gases and volatile organic compounds, including hydrogen cyanide, isocyanic acid, nitrogen oxides, benzonitrile, maleimide and tentatively identified benzenemethanimine. The detection of dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD) and dibenzofuran (DF) suggests potential formation of the toxic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in fires involving PI and THPI, in presence of a chlorine source. The oxidation of THPI produced 2-cyclohexen-1-one, a toxic unsaturated ketone. The results of the present study provide the data for quantitative risk assessments of emissions of toxicants in combustion processes involving PI and THPI.

  16. Study of the electrical and thermal performances of photovoltaic thermal collector-compound parabolic concentrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaaz, Ahed Hameed; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Gaaz, Tayser Sumer

    2018-06-01

    The importance of utilizing the solar energy as a very suitable source among multi-source approaches to replace the conventional energy is on the rise in the last four decades. The invention of the photovoltaic module (PV) could be the corner stone in this process. However, the limited amount of energy obtained from PV was and still the main challenge of full utilization of the solar energy. In this paper, the use of the compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) along with the thermal photovoltaic module (PVT) where the cooling process of the CPC is conducted using a novel technique of water jet impingement has applied experimentally and physically tested. The test includes the effect of water jet impingement on the total power, electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency, and total efficiency on CPC-PVT system. The cooling process at the maximum irradiation by water jet impingement resulted in improving the electrical efficiency by 7%, total output power by 31% and the thermal efficiency by 81%. These results outperform the recent highest results recorded by the most recent work.

  17. Thermal degradation of the vapours of organic nitrogen compounds in the presence of the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brault, A.; Chevalier, G.; Kerfanto, M.; Loyer, H.

    1983-04-01

    Following a quick survey of the literature on the products originated during the thermal degradation of some organic nitrogen compounds, the experimental results obtained by applying a technique previously used for other organic compounds are presented. The compounds investigated include: methyl and ethylamines at the origin of the bad smells of many gaseous wastes, trilaurylamine and tetraethylenediamine sometimes used in nuclear facilities. Attention is brought on the emission of noxious products during thermal degradation in the presence of the air, at various temperatures, viz. either usual combustion gases such as carbon monoxide, or nitro-derivatives such as hydrogen cyanide present whatever the compound investigated when temperatures are below 850 0 C [fr

  18. Thermal behaviour of nicotinic acid, sodium nicotinate and its compounds with some bivalent transition metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, A.L.C.S. do; Caires, F.J., E-mail: caires.flavio@yahoo.com.br; Gomes, D.J.C.; Gigante, A.C.; Ionashiro, M.

    2014-01-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The transition metal ion nicotinates were synthesized. • The TG–DTA curves provided previously unreported information about thermal behaviour. • The gaseous products released were detected by TG–DSC coupled to FTIR. - Abstract: Solid-state M(L){sub 2}·nH{sub 2}O compounds, where M stands for bivalent transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn), L is nicotinate and n = 0–4.5, have been synthesized. Characterization and thermal behaviour of these compounds were investigated employing elemental analysis based on the mass losses observed in the TG–DTA curves, complexometry, X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG–DTA) and TG–DSC coupled to FTIR. The thermal behaviour of nicotinic acid and its sodium salt was also investigated. For the hydrated transition metal compounds, the dehydration and thermal decomposition of the anhydrous compounds occur in a single step. For the sodium nicotinate, the final residue up to 765 °C is sodium carbonate and for the transition metal nicotinates, the final residues are Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, NiO, CuO and ZnO. The results also provided information concerning the thermal stability, thermal decomposition and identification of the gaseous products evolved during the thermal decomposition of the compounds.

  19. Thermal behaviour of nicotinic acid, sodium nicotinate and its compounds with some bivalent transition metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, A.L.C.S. do; Caires, F.J.; Gomes, D.J.C.; Gigante, A.C.; Ionashiro, M.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The transition metal ion nicotinates were synthesized. • The TG–DTA curves provided previously unreported information about thermal behaviour. • The gaseous products released were detected by TG–DSC coupled to FTIR. - Abstract: Solid-state M(L) 2 ·nH 2 O compounds, where M stands for bivalent transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn), L is nicotinate and n = 0–4.5, have been synthesized. Characterization and thermal behaviour of these compounds were investigated employing elemental analysis based on the mass losses observed in the TG–DTA curves, complexometry, X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis (TG–DTA) and TG–DSC coupled to FTIR. The thermal behaviour of nicotinic acid and its sodium salt was also investigated. For the hydrated transition metal compounds, the dehydration and thermal decomposition of the anhydrous compounds occur in a single step. For the sodium nicotinate, the final residue up to 765 °C is sodium carbonate and for the transition metal nicotinates, the final residues are Mn 3 O 4 , Fe 2 O 3 , Co 3 O 4 , NiO, CuO and ZnO. The results also provided information concerning the thermal stability, thermal decomposition and identification of the gaseous products evolved during the thermal decomposition of the compounds

  20. Thermal behavior analysis of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Mang; Lee, Yoon Sang; Kim, Chang Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    According to the non-proliferation policy under the reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) program, low enriched uranium(LEU) fuel such as uranium silicide dispersion fuels are being used in research reactors. Because of a lower enrichment higher uranium density fuels are required for some high performance research reactors. Some uranium alloys with a high uranium density such as U-Mo alloys have been considered as one of the most promising candidates for a dispersion fuel due to the good irradiation performance. An international qualification program to replace the uranium silicide dispersion fuel with U-Mo dispersion fuel is being carried out under the RERTR program. Although U-Mo powders are conventionally supplied by the mechanical comminuting of as-cast U-Mo alloys, KAERI developed a centrifugal atomization method in order to simplify the preparation process and improve the properties. The centrifugally atomized powders have a rapidly solidified gamma uranium structure and a spherical shape. During the in-reactor operation of a dispersion fuel, interdiffusion or chemical reactions between the fuel particles and the matrix occurr. Intermetallic compounds in the form of UAlx are formed as a result of the diffusional reaction. Because the intermetallic compounds are less dense than the combined reactants, the volume of the fuel element increases after the reaction. In addition to the effect on the swelling performance, the reaction layers between the U-Mo and the Al matrix induces a degradation of the thermal properties of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels. It is important to investigate the thermal behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel according to reaction between the fuel particles and the matrix with the burnup and linear power. In this study, a finite element analysis was used for the calculation of the temperature distribution of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel with a burnup and linear power. Kinetics data of the reaction layers such as the growth

  1. Thermal behavior analysis of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Mang; Lee, Yoon Sang; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2004-01-01

    According to the non-proliferation policy under the reduced enrichment for research and test reactors (RERTR) program, low enriched uranium(LEU) fuel such as uranium silicide dispersion fuels are being used in research reactors. Because of a lower enrichment higher uranium density fuels are required for some high performance research reactors. Some uranium alloys with a high uranium density such as U-Mo alloys have been considered as one of the most promising candidates for a dispersion fuel due to the good irradiation performance. An international qualification program to replace the uranium silicide dispersion fuel with U-Mo dispersion fuel is being carried out under the RERTR program. Although U-Mo powders are conventionally supplied by the mechanical comminuting of as-cast U-Mo alloys, KAERI developed a centrifugal atomization method in order to simplify the preparation process and improve the properties. The centrifugally atomized powders have a rapidly solidified gamma uranium structure and a spherical shape. During the in-reactor operation of a dispersion fuel, interdiffusion or chemical reactions between the fuel particles and the matrix occurr. Intermetallic compounds in the form of UAlx are formed as a result of the diffusional reaction. Because the intermetallic compounds are less dense than the combined reactants, the volume of the fuel element increases after the reaction. In addition to the effect on the swelling performance, the reaction layers between the U-Mo and the Al matrix induces a degradation of the thermal properties of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels. It is important to investigate the thermal behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel according to reaction between the fuel particles and the matrix with the burnup and linear power. In this study, a finite element analysis was used for the calculation of the temperature distribution of the U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel with a burnup and linear power. Kinetics data of the reaction layers such as the growth

  2. Determination of Dancoff correction thermal utilization and thermal disadvantage factors of HEU and LEU cores of an MNSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofori, Y. T.

    2013-07-01

    Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1), an MNSR (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor) is to be converted from HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) to LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel, along with all current MNSRs in various other countries. The purpose of the conversion is to minimize the use of HEU for non-proliferation of high-grade nuclear fuel. In this research work, a comparative study has been performed for the determination of the Dancoff, thermal utilization and thermal disadvantage factors of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and potential low enriched uranium (LEU) cores of GHARR-1. A one group transport theory and collision probability based methodologies was used to develop mathematical formulations for thermal utilization factor and thermal disadvantage factor assuming isotropic scattering. This methodology was implemented in a FORTRAN 95 based computer program THERMCALC, which uses Bessell and BesselK as subroutines developed to calculate the modified Bessel functions I n and K n respectively using the polynomial approximation method. Furthermore, a Dancoff correction factor of 0.1519 thermal utilization factor of 0.9767 and a thermal disadvantage factor of 1.894 were obtained for the 90.2% highly enriched Uranium core of GHARR-1. The results compare favorably with literature. Thus THERMCALC can be used as a reliable tool for the calculation of Dancoff, thermal utilization and disadvantage factors of MNSR cores. Other potential LEU cores; UO 2 (with different fuel meat densities and enrichments) and U 3 Si 2 have also been analysed. UO 2 with 12.6% of Uranium-235 was chosen as the most potential LEU core for the GHARR-1. (au)

  3. Thermal Expansion of Ni3Al Intermetallic Compound: Experiment and Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hai-Peng; Lü Peng; Zhou Kai; Wei Bing-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The thermal expansion of Ni 3 Al intermetallic compound is determined by a thermal dilatometer and simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The results of the linear thermal expansion coefficients are presented from 200 K up to the maximum temperature of 1600 K. The single phase of Ni 3 Al intermetallic compound is confirmed by x-ray diffraction together with DSC melting and solidification peaks, from which the solidus and the liquidus temperatures are obtained to be 1660 and 1695 K, respectively. The measured linear thermal expansion coefficient increases from 1.5 × 10 −5 to 2.7 × 10 −5 K −1 in the experimental temperature range, in good agreement with the data obtained by the molecular dynamics simulation, just a slight difference from the temperature dependence coefficient. Furthermore, the atomic structure and position are presented to reveal the atom distribution change during thermal expansion of Ni 3 Al compound. (paper)

  4. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  5. Zero thermal expansion in NaZn13-type La(Fe,Si)13 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Huang, Rongjin; Li, Wen; Tan, Jie; Zhao, Yuqiang; Li, Shaopeng; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    2015-01-28

    A zero thermal expansion material in a pure form of NaZn13-type La(Fe,Si)13 was fabricated. Through optimizing the chemical composition, an isotropic zero thermal expansion material is achieved. The obtained materials exhibit a low expansion of |α| linear thermal expansion) over a broad temperature range (15-150 K). The present study indicates that the thermal expansion behavior of the NaZn13-type La(Fe,Si)13 compounds depends mainly on the content of Si element. This new material is desirable in many fields of industry as a reliable and low-cost zero thermal expansion material.

  6. Thermal decomposition of tributylphosphate and some related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneau, Christian; Lhomme, Veronique; Brault, Auguste; Chevalier, Gerard; Soyer, Noel.

    1981-04-01

    The difficulties encountered during the processing of effluents released by heat degradation of wastes containing tributylphosphate show the need of a better knowledge of the products released during the reactions involved. A review was made of the uses, properties and toxicity of TBP and three related compounds. Their degradation by heat was studied experimentally in various conditions (atmospheres, temperatures, ...). The analysis of the gaseous, liquid or solid products specified the reaction kineticss occuring in such conditions. A comparison of the results made it possible to assess the hazards from a plant for heat destruction of TBP and to master them according to the various possibilities [fr

  7. Thermal Plasma Decomposition Of Nickel And Cobalt Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woch M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the study on manufacturing of nickel and cobalt powders by thermal plasma decomposition of the carbonates of these metals. It was shown the dependence of process parameters and grain size of initial powder on the composition of final product which was ether metal powder, collected in the container as well as the nanopowder with crystallite size of 70 - 90 nm, collected on the inner wall of the reaction chamber. The occurrence of metal oxides in the final products was confirmed and discussed.

  8. Preliminary design study for a carbide LEU-nuclear thermal rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venneri, P.F.; Kim, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear space propulsion is a requirement for the successful exploration of the solar system. It offers the possibility of having both a high specific impulse and a relatively high thrust, allowing rapid transit times with a minimum usage of fuel. This paper proposes a nuclear thermal rocket design based on heritage NERVA rockets that makes use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The Carbide LEU Nuclear Thermal Rocket (C-LEU-NTR) is designed to fulfill the rocket requirements as set forth in the NASA 2009 Mars Mission Design Reference Architecture 5.0, that is provide 25,000 lbf of thrust, operate at full power condition for at least two hours, and have a specific impulse close to 900 s. The neutronics analysis was done using MCNP5 with the ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron library. The thermal hydraulic calculations and size optimization were completed with a finite difference code being developed at the Center for Space Nuclear Research. (authors)

  9. Thermal lens and all optical switching of new organometallic compound doped polyacrylamide gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Hussain Ali

    In this work thermal lens spectrometry (TLS) is applied to investigate the thermo-optical properties of new organometallic compound containing azomethine group, Dichloro bis [2-(2-hydroxybenzylideneamino)-5-methylphenyl] telluride platinum(II), doped polyacrylamide gel using transistor-transistor logic (TTL) modulated cw 532 nm laser beam as an excitation beam modulated at 10 Hz frequency and probe beam wavelength 635 nm at 14 mW. The technique is applied to determine the thermal diffusivities, ds/dT and the linear thermal expansion coefficient of the sample. All-optical switching effects with low background and high stability are demonstrated.

  10. Thermal analysis of a compound parabolic concentrator for refrigeration applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Naghelli; Best, Roberto [Centro de Investigacion en Energia, UNAM, Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The refrigeration system designed at the Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE), Mexico is able to produce, in optimal conditions, one hundred kilograms per day of ice by means of solar energy. A continuous absorption ammonia-water refrigeration cycle is employed. In its actual state, heat supply to the system is provided through a bank of evacuated tube solar collectors. Their principal difficulties encountered in this system are the indirect heat losses due to the coupling of the falling film generator to the solar heating subsystem that requires a heat transfer gradient and higher collector operating temperatures. Also the high initial cost of the evacuated tube collectors is a barrier for an economical feasible system. Currently, new types of solar collectors are being considered, more efficient and reliable, with a potentially lower cost. This type of collectors known as Compound Parabolic Collectors (CPC) succeed in working at the required temperatures for absorption refrigeration systems. Therefore, a new system is suggested and it is proposed to use a CPC array, where heat losses by the indirect heating system are avoided. In this work a simple method was developed in order to establish the energy balances in a CPC, with a steel tubular receiver without an evacuated glass shell. The receptor's model considers a bidimensional system in stationary state and it supposes a continuous medium. Four nonlinear, simultaneous equations were obtained to predict heat exchange among various components in the system. These equations were utilized in a computer program to analyze the collector performance under various operating conditions. Consequently, the prediction of temperature distribution with respect to position permits to calculate length and arrangement of the CPC for a determined refrigeration application. [Spanish] El sistema de refrigeracion en el Centro de Investigacion en Energia (CIE) Mexico es capaz de producir en condiciones optimas 100

  11. Thermal expansion of the heavy-fermion compound CeInCu2 at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagayama, Tomoko; Oomi, Gendo; Onuki, Yoshichika; Komatsubara, Takemi

    1994-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient α of the heavy-fermion compound CeInCu 2 has been measured at high pressure up to 2 GPa in the temperature range from 6 to 300 K. It is found that the linear term in α(T) at low temperature decreases by the application of pressure. ((orig.))

  12. Thermal design of a modern, two floor, zero energy house in a desert compound

    KAUST Repository

    Serag-Eldin, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents a thermal analysis and design of a fully equipped, air-conditioned, zero energy house located in a desert compound at 24.5° latitude. Unlike previous designs the home is two floors high, which makes the balancing of energy supply

  13. Development of very-high-density low-enriched uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snegrove, J.L.; Hofmann, G.L.; Trybus, C.L.; Wiencek, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    The RERTR (=Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program has begun an aggressive effort to develop dispersion fuels for research and test reactors with uranium densities of 8 to 9 g U/cm 3 , based on the use of γ-stabilized uranium alloys. Fabrication development teams and facilities are being put into place, and preparations for the first irradiation test are in progress. The first screening irradiations are expected to begin in late April 1997 and the first results should be available by the end of 1997. Discussions with potential international partners in fabrication development and irradiation testing have begun. (author)

  14. Development of very high-density low-enriched uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.; Trybus, C.L.; Wiencek, T.C.

    1997-02-01

    The RERTR program has recently begun an aggressive effort to develop dispersion fuels for research and test reactors with uranium densities of 8 to 9 g U/cm 3 , based on the use of γ-stabilized uranium alloys. Fabrication development teams and facilities are being put into place and preparations for the first irradiation test are in progress. The first screening irradiations are expected to begin in late April 1997 and first results should be available by end of 1997. Discussions with potential international partners in fabrication development and irradiation testing have begun

  15. Criticality of moderated and undermoderated low-enriched uranium oxide systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, G.R.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium oxide was enriched to 4.46 wt % 235 U compacted to a density of 4.68 g/cm 3 . The uranium oxide was packed into cubical aluminum cans and water added to the oxide until an H/U atomic ratio of 0.77 was achieved. A 5 x 5 x 5 array of uranium oxide cans for the experiments were used when no plastic moderator material was placed between cans. High enriched uranium drivers were used to achieve criticality. Criticality was achieved for smaller arrays without a driver when 24.5 mm plastic moderator material was placed between the cans. Twelve critical experiments are reported, six in each reflector

  16. From high enriched to low enriched uranium fuel in research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Den Berghe, S.; Leenaers, A.; Koonen, E.; Moons, F.; Sannen, L. [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    Since the 1970's, global efforts have been going on to replace the high-enriched (>90% {sup 235}U), low-density UAlx research reactor fuel with high-density, low enriched (<20% {sup 235}U) replacements. This search is driven by the attempt to reduce the civil use of high-enriched material because of proliferation risks and terrorist threats. American initiatives, such as the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program have triggered the development of reliable low-enriched fuel types for these reactors, which can replace the high enriched ones without loss of performance. Most success has presently been obtained with U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersion fuel, which is currently used in many research reactors in the world. However, efforts to search for a replacement with even higher density, which will also allow the conversion of some high flux research reactors that currently cannot change to U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (eg. BR2 in Belgium), have continued and are for the moment mainly directed towards the U(Mo) alloy fuel (7-10 w% Mo). This paper provides an overview of the past efforts and presents the current status of the U(Mo) development. (authors)

  17. Neutronic design of a LEU [low enriched uranium] core for the Ohio State University research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshadri, M.D.; Aybar, H.S.; Aldemir, T.

    1987-01-01

    The 10 kw HEU fuelled Ohio State University Reactor (OSURR) will be upgraded to operate at 500 kW with standardized 125 g 235 U LEU U 3 Si 2 fuel plates. An earlier scoping study based on two-dimensional diffusion calculations has identified the potential LEU core configurations for the conversion/upgrade of OSURR using the standardized plates in a 16-plate (+ 2 dummy plates) standard and 10-scoping study is improved for a more precise determination of the excess reactivities and safety rod worths for these potential configurations. Comparison of the results obtained by the improved model to experimental results and to the results of full-core Monte Carlo simulations shows excellent agreement. The results also indicate that the conversion/upgrade of OSURR can be realized with three possible LEU core configurations while maintaining a cold, clean shutdown margin of 1.57-1.91 % Δ k/k, depending on the configuration used. (Author)

  18. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as oxide. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials into pure HEU oxide and (2) blend the pure HEU oxide with depleted and natural uranium oxide to produce an LWR grade LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  19. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF{sub 6} and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF{sub 6} with diluent UF{sub 6} to produce LWR grade LEU-UF{sub 6}. The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry.

  20. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  1. Conversion and Blending Facility Highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranium hexafluoride. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) which will have two missions: (1) convert surplus HEU materials to pure HEU UF 6 and a (2) blend the pure HEU UF 6 with diluent UF 6 to produce LWR grade LEU-UF 6 . The primary emphasis of this blending be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The chemical and isotopic concentrations of the blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. The blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry

  2. Progress in developing very-high-density low-enriched-uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Hofman, G.L.; Meyer, M.K.; Hayes, S.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Strain, R.V.

    1999-01-01

    Preliminary results from the postirradiation examinations of microplates irradiated in the RERTR-1 and -2 experiments in the ATR have shown several binary and ternary U-Mo alloys to be promising candidates for use in aluminum-based dispersion fuels with uranium densities up to 8 to 9 g/cm 3 . Ternary alloys of uranium, niobium, and zirconium performed poorly, however, both in terms of fuel/matrix reaction and fission-gas-bubble behavior, and have been dropped from further study. Since irradiation temperatures achieved in the present experiments (approximately 70 deg. C) are considerably lower than might be experienced in a high-performance reactor, a new experiment is being planned with beginning-of-cycle temperatures greater than 200 deg. C in 8-g U/cm 3 fuel. (author)

  3. Advances of the low enriched uranium utilization project in CNA-1 during 1998 and 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, Jose M.; Higa, Manabu; Sidelnik, Jorge I.; Perez, Ramon A.; Casario, Jose A.; Alvarez, Luis A.

    1999-01-01

    In this work, a general description of advances of the Enriched Fuel Introduction Project in CNA-1 and the main tasks performed during 1998 and 1999 are presented. The program is being satisfactorily developed and during that period the number of slightly enriched fuels (LEU) introduced had significantly increased in relation to previous years. At present, there are 181 LEU fuel elements in the core and 125 LEU fuel elements have been extracted. The number of full power burnt fuel elements per day decreased from 1.31 FE/dpp in 1994 (when all fuel was natural) to 0.92 in 1998 and 0.83 in 1999, reaching the predicted value for homogeneous LEU core of 0.7. The cost of burnt fuel in 1998 was 25% lower that if only natural fuel would have been used. (author)

  4. The use of low enriched uranium fuel cycle in high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper begins with a brief review of the status of research and development of experimental VHTR in Japan. On the basis of the experience gained from these work, assessment is made of commercial HTRs. Material balance with fuel burnup is calculated for the two core models; one is HTGR for steam cycle and the other VHTR for process heat application. The results of assessment of commercial HTRs are compared with those for LWR

  5. Critical experiments on low-enriched uranium oxide system with H/U=1.25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, I.; Rothe, R.E.; Tuck, G.

    1982-01-01

    Fifteen (15) critical experiments were performed on a horizontal split table machine using 4.48%-enriched sup(235)U uranium oxide(U 3 O 8 ). The oxide was compacted to a density of 4.68g/cm 3 and placed in 152 mm cubical aluminum cans. Water was added to achive an H/U of 1.25. Various arrays of oxide cans were distributed on each half of the split table, and the separation between halves reduced until criticality occurred. The critical table separation varied from 3.59 mm to 18.40 mm. Twelve (12) experiments required the addition of a high-enriched(-93 %sup(235)U) metal or solution driver to achieve criticality. These experiments were performed in a plastic, concrete, or thin steel reflector. Three additional experiments in the plastic reflector contained either 9.3-mm- or 24.3-mm-thick plastic moderator material between the oxide cans and did not require a driver to achieve criticality. Critical uranium driver masses ranged from 9.999 kg to 14.000 kg (solution driver), and from 25.378 kg to 29.278 kg (metal driver) for 5X5X5 arrays of uranium oxide cans. Always, one or four of these 125 cans had to be removed to make room for the drivers. Therefore, the uranium oxide masses used were 1823.8 kg and 1863.5 kg. For the moderated experiments, the uranium oxide mass ranged between 574.4 kg and 1210.0 kg. (Author)

  6. Progress in converting 99Mo production from high-to-low-enriched uranium - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Wiencek, T.C.; Hofman, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    Over this past year, extraordinary progress has been made in executing our charter to assist in converting Mo-99 production worldwide from HEU to LEU. Building on the successful development of the experimental LEU-foil target, we have designed a new, economical irradiation target. We have also successfully demonstrated, in collaboration with BATAN in Indonesia, that LEU can be substituted for HEU in the Cintichem target without loss of product yield or purity; in fact, conversion may make economic sense. We are interacting with a number of commercial producers - we have begun active collaborations with the CNEA and ANSTO; we are working to define the scope of collaborations with MDS Nordion and Mallinckrodt; and IRE has offered its services to irradiate and test a target at the appropriate time. Conversion of the CNEA process is on schedule. Other papers presented at this meeting will present specific results on the demonstration of the LEU-modified Cintichem process, the development of the new target, and progress in converting the CNEA process. (author)

  7. Development program for fuel elements with low enriched uranium for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The results of HTR fuel development taking place at the THTR's can be summarized as follows for the main points of core manufacture coating matrix and fuel emenent manufacture: 1. The well known gel precipitation process was modified for the manufacture of UO 2 cores. 2. The TRISO coating (additional SiC layer between two very dense PyC layers) can be applied with the required quality on an economical 10 kg scale. 3. The particle fracture in the complete fuel element due to manufacture was lowered during the course of the project to below the target values of -6 U/U total. For testing fuel elements, the required irradiation samples were designed in agreement with the reactor constructors, were prepared and the first phase of the irradiation program was successfully completed in the context of the HBK project. (orig./HP) [de

  8. Acceptance criteria for the low enriched uranium reform amendments. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emeigh, C.W.; Gundersen, G.E.; Withee, C.J.

    1985-04-01

    Revisions have been made to the material control and accounting requirements for NRC licensees authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material of low strategic significance to have MC and A systems able to (1) confirm the presence of special nuclear material, (2) resolve indications of missing material, and (3) aid in the investigation and recovery of missing material. This document presents criteria that can be used to aid in judging the acceptability of licensee plans that would be submitted to the NRC for implementing these capabilities. General performance objectives, system capabilities, and recordkeeping are addressed

  9. The proposed use of low enriched uranium fuel in the High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vittorio, D.; Durance, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) operates the High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR). HIFAR commenced operation in the late 1950's with fuel elements containing uranium enriched to 93%. From that time the level of enrichment has gradually decreased to the current level of 60%. It is now proposed to further reduce the enrichment of HIFAR fuel to <20% by utilising LEU fuel assemblies manufactured by RISO National Laboratory, that were originally intended for use in the DR-3 reactor. Minor modifications have been made to the assemblies to adapt them for use in HIFAR. A detailed design review has been performed and initial safety analysis and reactor physics calculations are to be submitted to ARPANSA as part of a four-stage approval process. (author)

  10. From high enriched to low enriched uranium fuel in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Den Berghe, S.; Leenaers, A.; Koonen, E.; Moons, F.; Sannen, L.

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1970's, global efforts have been going on to replace the high-enriched (>90% 235 U), low-density UAlx research reactor fuel with high-density, low enriched ( 235 U) replacements. This search is driven by the attempt to reduce the civil use of high-enriched material because of proliferation risks and terrorist threats. American initiatives, such as the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program have triggered the development of reliable low-enriched fuel types for these reactors, which can replace the high enriched ones without loss of performance. Most success has presently been obtained with U 3 Si 2 dispersion fuel, which is currently used in many research reactors in the world. However, efforts to search for a replacement with even higher density, which will also allow the conversion of some high flux research reactors that currently cannot change to U 3 Si 2 (eg. BR2 in Belgium), have continued and are for the moment mainly directed towards the U(Mo) alloy fuel (7-10 w% Mo). This paper provides an overview of the past efforts and presents the current status of the U(Mo) development. (authors)

  11. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as metal. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The mission of this Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will be to blend surplus HEU metal and alloy with depleted uranium metal to produce an LEU product. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. The blended LEU will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal

  12. Elastic and thermal properties of silicon compounds from first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Haijun; Zhu, H.J. [Yancheng Institute of Technology (China). School of Materials Engineering; Cheng, W.H. [Yancheng Institute of Technology (China). Dept. of Light Chemical Engineering; Xie, L.H. [Sichuan Normal Univ., Chengdu (China). Inst. of Solid State Physics and School of Physics and Electronic Engineering

    2016-11-01

    The structural and elastic properties of V-Si (V{sub 3}Si, VSi{sub 2}, V{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, and V{sub 6}Si{sub 5}) compounds are studied by using first-principles method. The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters and formation enthalpy are in good agreement with the available experimental data and other theoretical results. The calculated results indicate that the V-Si compounds are mechanically stable. Elastic properties including bulk modulus, shear modulus, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio are also obtained. The elastic anisotropies of V-Si compounds are investigated via the three-dimensional (3D) figures of directional dependences of reciprocals of Young's modulus. Finally, based on the quasi-harmonic Debye model, the internal energy, Helmholtz free energy, entropy, heat capacity, thermal expansion coefficient, Grueneisen parameter, and Debye temperature of V-Si compounds have been calculated.

  13. In2Mo3O12: A low negative thermal expansion compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, Bojan A.; Ari, Monica; Jardim, Paula Mendes; Avillez, Roberto R. de; Rizzo, Fernando; Ferreira, Fabio Furlan

    2010-01-01

    Orthorhombic In 2 Mo 3 O 12 has low negative linear coefficient of thermal expansion (α l = -1.85 x 10 -6 o C -1 ) as evaluated by X-ray powder diffraction using a synchrotron facility. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion for orthorhombic In 2 Mo 3 O 12 is directly dependent on the inherent volume distortion parameter (υ) of InO 6 . This finding strongly corroborates the recently proposed relationship between the linear coefficient of thermal expansion in A 2 M 3 O 12 compounds (α l ) and the distortion level of AO 6 polyhedra. With the increase of inherent distortion parameter (υ) of AO 6 polyhedra, the linear coefficient of thermal expansion becomes more negative. Another important feature of AO 6 polyhedra, including InO 6 , is that their distortion increases as a function of temperature. Orthorhombic In 2 Mo 3 O 12 is stable in the studied temperature range, 370-760 o C.

  14. 3D COMSOL Simulations for Thermal Deflection of HFIR Fuel Plate in the "Cheverton-Kelley" Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    Three dimensional simulation capabilities are currently being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using COMSOL Multiphysics, a finite element modeling software, to investigate thermal expansion of High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) s low enriched uranium fuel plates. To validate simulations, 3D models have also been developed for the experimental setup used by Cheverton and Kelley in 1968 to investigate the buckling and thermal deflections of HFIR s highly enriched uranium fuel plates. Results for several simulations are presented in this report, and comparisons with the experimental data are provided when data are available. A close agreement between the simulation results and experimental findings demonstrates that the COMSOL simulations are able to capture the thermal expansion physics accurately and that COMSOL could be deployed as a predictive tool for more advanced computations at realistic HFIR conditions to study temperature-induced fuel plate deflection behavior.

  15. Differentiation of the molecular structure of nitro compounds as the basis for simulation of their thermal destruction processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korolev, V L; Pivina, Tatyana S; Sheremetev, Aleksei B [N.D.Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Porollo, A A [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati (United States); Petukhova, T V; Ivshin, Viktor P [Mari State University, Yoshkar-Ola (Russian Federation)

    2009-10-31

    Data on the experimental and theoretical studies of thermal decomposition of C- and N-nitro compounds of aliphatic, alicyclic, aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds, which formed the grounds for the development of ab initio approach to the prediction of the mechanisms of thermolysis of energetic compounds, are described systematically. The relationships between the structures and thermolysis mechanisms of compounds based on differentiation of the structural fragments depending on the functional surrounding of nitro groups are identified. Using the RRN (Recombination Reaction Network) strategy and original CASB (Computer Assisted Structure Building) software, full reaction mechanisms for the thermal destruction of nitro compounds at different thermal decomposition levels (including extensive ones) are simulated. The full set of possible mechanisms of thermal decomposition of 38 chemically different nitro compounds is presented

  16. Performance of Partially Covered N Number of Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT) - Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) Series Connected Water Heating System

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit Tripathi; Sumit Tiwari; G. N. Tiwari

    2016-01-01

    In present study, an approach is adopted where photovoltaic thermal flat plate collector is integrated with compound parabolic concentrator. Analytical expression of temperature dependent electrical efficiency of N number of partially covered Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT) - Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) water collector connected in series has been derived with the help of basic thermal energy balance equations. Analysis has been carried for winter weather condition at Delhi location, Ind...

  17. Thermal behaviour of a solar air heater with a compound parabolic concentrator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchinda, R.

    2005-11-01

    A mathematical model for computing the thermal performance of an air heater with a truncated compound parabolic concentrator having a flat one-sided absorber is presented. A computed code that employs an iterative solution procedure is constructed to solve the governing energy equations and to estimate the performance parameters of the collector. The effects of the air mass flow rate, the wind speed and the collector length on the thermal performance of the present air heater are investigated. Prediction for the performance of the solar heater also exhibits reasonable agreement with experimental data with an average error of 7%. (author)

  18. Thermal expansion and spontaneous magnetostriction of R2Co7 intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, A.V.; Bartashevich, M.I.; Deryagin, A.V.; Zadvorkin, S.M.; Tarasov, E.N.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal expansion of R 2 Co 7 (R=Y, Nd, Gd, Tb) single crystals was invesigated by the method of X-ray dilatometry. Anomalous of thermal expansion, taking place during magnetic ordering and spin reorientation were used to determine linear and volumetric magnetistriction deformations. Constants of anisotropic magnetostriction of all R 2 Co 7 compounds with nonzero orbital moment of rare earth ion were calculated on the basis of single-ion model according to deformation values and with account of temperature dependences of the magnitude and direction of magnetic moment

  19. Abnormal thermal expansion properties of cubic NaZn13-type La(Fe,Al)13 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Huang, Rongjin; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Yuqiang; Li, Shaopeng; Huang, Chuanjun; Li, Laifeng

    2015-02-28

    The cubic NaZn13-type La(Fe,Al)13 compounds were synthesized, and their linear thermal expansion properties were investigated in the temperature range of 4.2-300 K. It was found that these compounds exhibit abnormal thermal expansion behavior, i.e., pronounced negative thermal expansion (NTE) or zero thermal expansion (ZTE) behavior, below the Curie temperature due to the magnetovolume effect (MVE). Moreover, in the La(Fe,Al)13 compounds, the modification of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) as well as the abnormal thermal expansion (ATE) temperature-window is achieved through optimizing the proportion of Fe and Al. Typically, the average CTE of the LaFe13-xAlx compounds with x = 1.8 reaches as large as -10.47 × 10(-6) K(-1) between 100 and 225 K (ΔT = 125 K). Also, the ZTE temperature-window of the LaFe13-xAlx compounds with x = 2.5 and x = 2.7 could be broadened to 245 K (from 5 to 250 K). Besides, the magnetic properties of these compounds were measured and correlated with the abnormal thermal expansion behavior. The present results highlight the potential application of such La(Fe,Al)13 compounds with abnormal thermal expansion properties in cryogenic engineering.

  20. YALINA-Thermal Facility Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Sadovich, S.; Cintas, A.; Márquez Damián, J.I.; Lopasso, E.M.; Maiorino, J.R.; Carluccio, T.; Rossi, P.C.R.; Antunes, A.; Oliveira, F.L. de; Lee, S.M.; Xia, P.; Shi, Y.; Xia, H.; Zhu, Q.; Yu, T.; Wu, X.; Zhang, W.; Cao, J.; Luo, H.; Quan, Y.; Kulkarni, K.; Yadav, R.D.S.; Bajpai, A.; Degweker, S.B.; Modak, R.S.; Park, H.J.; Shim, H.J.; Kim, C.H.; Wojciechowski, A.; Zuta, M.; Pešić, M.; Avramović, I.; Beličev, P.; Gohar, Y.; Talamo, A.; Aliberti, G.

    2017-01-01

    This Section discussed the results obtained by the Member States participating in the IAEA coordinated research project on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analysis on Accelerator Driven Systems, and Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Utilization in Accelerator Driven Subcritical Assembly Systems for the YALINA Thermal facility. Member States used both Monte Carlo and deterministic computational tools to analyse the YALINA Thermal subcritical assembly, including: MCNP5, MCNPX, McCARD, PARTISN, and ERANOS computer programs. All calculations have been performed using the ENDF/B-VI (different modes) nuclear data libraries with the exception of Republic of Korea which used the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library. Generally, there is a good agreement between the results obtained by all the Member States. Deterministic codes perform space, energy, and angle discretization and materials homogenizations, which introduce approximations affecting the obtained results. In subcritical assemblies, the neutron multiplication and the detector counting rate depend strongly on the external neutron source. Cf and D-D sources provide similar results since they emit neutrons with similar average energy. D-T neutrons trigger (n,xn) reactions and have a longer mean free path, which increases the neutron leakage if the geometry dimensions of the assembly are small, as in the case of the YALINA-Thermal subcritical assembly. Close to criticality, the effect of the external neutron source diminishes since fission neutrons dominate the neutron population.

  1. Mechanistic Aspects of the Thermal Decomposition of Dicyclopentadienyltitanium(IV)diaryl Compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, C.P.; Teuben, J.H.; Liefde Meijer, H.J. de

    1975-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of a number of compounds Cp2TiR2 (R = aryl) was studied in the solid state and in various solvents. A first-order reaction was observed and activation energies of 20-30 kcal mol-1 were found depending on the nature of R. The activation energy for Cp2Ti(C6H5)2 (20-22 kcal

  2. Thermal and electron transport studies on the valence fluctuating compound YbNiAl4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, M.; Kowalczyk, A.

    2018-05-01

    We report the thermoelectric power S and thermal conductivity κ measurements on the valence fluctuating compound YbNiAl4, furthermore taking into account the impact of the applied magnetic field. We discuss our new results with revisiting the magnetic [χ(T)], transport [ρ(T)], and thermodynamic [Cp(T)] properties in order to better understand the phenomenon of thermal and electron transport in this compound. The field dependence of the magnetoresistivity data is also given. The temperature dependence of thermoelectric power S(T) was found to exhibit a similar behaviour as expected for Yb-based compounds with divalent or nearly divalent Yb ions. In addition, the values of total thermal conductivity as a function of temperature κ(T) of YbNiAl4 are fairly low compared to those of pure metals which may be linked to the fact that the conduction band is perturbed by strong hybridization. A deeper analysis of the specific heat revealed the low-T anomaly of the ratio Cp(T)/T3, most likely associated with the localized low-frequency oscillators in this alloy. In addition, the Kadowaki-Woods ratio and the Wilson ratio are discussed with respect to the electronic correlations in YbNiAl4.

  3. Investigation of thermodynamic parameters in the thermal decomposition of plastic waste-waste lube oil compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Sung Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Thermal decomposition properties of plastic waste-waste lube oil compounds were investigated under nonisothermal conditions. Polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were selected as representative household plastic wastes. A plastic waste mixture (PWM) and waste lube oil (WLO) were mixed with mixing ratios of 33, 50, and 67 (w/w) % on a PWM weight basis, and thermogravimetric (TG) experiments were performed from 25 to 600 degrees C. The Flynn-Wall method and the Ozawa-Flynn-Wall method were used for analyses of thermodynamic parameters. In this study, activation energies of PWM/WLO compounds ranged from 73.4 to 229.6 kJ/mol between 0.2 and 0.8 of normalized mass conversions, and the 50% PWM/WLO compound had lower activation energies and enthalpies among the PWM/WLO samples at each mass conversion. At the point of maximum differential mass conversion, the analyzed activation energies, enthalpies, entropies, and Gibbs free energies indicated that mixing PWM and WLO has advantages in reducing energy to decrease the degree of disorder. However, no difference in overall energy that would require overcoming both thermal decomposition reactions and degree of disorder was observed among PWM/WLO compounds under these experimental conditions.

  4. Nanostructure and thermal properties of melt compounded PE/clay nanocomposites filled with an organosilylated montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarfato, Paola; Incarnato, Loredana; Di Maio, Luciano; Dittrich, Bettina; Niebergall, Ute; Böhning, Martin; Schartel, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    In this work we report on the functionalization of a natural sodium montmorillonite (MMT) with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane by a silylation procedure and on its use as nanofiller in melt compounding of polyethylene nanocomposites. The obtained organosilylated clay showed higher interlayer spacing than the original MMT and higher thermal stability with respect to most of commercial organoclays modified with alkylammonium salts. Its addition (at 5wt%) to two different polyethylene matrices (a low density polyethylene, LDPE, and a high density polyethylene, HDPE), processed in a pilot-scale twin-screw extruder, allowed to produce hybrids with nanoscale dispersion of the filler, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. Thermogravimetric and differential scanning thermal analyses point out that the obtained nanocomposites do not show noticeable changes in the thermal behavior of both LDPE and HDPE, even if a slight reduction in the overall bulk crystallinity was observed in presence of the nanofillers

  5. Nanostructure and thermal properties of melt compounded PE/clay nanocomposites filled with an organosilylated montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarfato, Paola, E-mail: pscarfato@unisa.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno Via Giovanni Paolo II 132 – 84084 Fisciano (Italy); BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 7.5 Technical Properties of Polymeric Materials, Unter den Eichen 87 - 12205 Berlin (Germany); Incarnato, Loredana; Di Maio, Luciano [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno Via Giovanni Paolo II 132 – 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Dittrich, Bettina; Niebergall, Ute; Böhning, Martin; Schartel, Bernhard [BAM - Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, 7.5 Technical Properties of Polymeric Materials, Unter den Eichen 87 - 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-17

    In this work we report on the functionalization of a natural sodium montmorillonite (MMT) with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane by a silylation procedure and on its use as nanofiller in melt compounding of polyethylene nanocomposites. The obtained organosilylated clay showed higher interlayer spacing than the original MMT and higher thermal stability with respect to most of commercial organoclays modified with alkylammonium salts. Its addition (at 5wt%) to two different polyethylene matrices (a low density polyethylene, LDPE, and a high density polyethylene, HDPE), processed in a pilot-scale twin-screw extruder, allowed to produce hybrids with nanoscale dispersion of the filler, as demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. Thermogravimetric and differential scanning thermal analyses point out that the obtained nanocomposites do not show noticeable changes in the thermal behavior of both LDPE and HDPE, even if a slight reduction in the overall bulk crystallinity was observed in presence of the nanofillers.

  6. The growth, spectral and thermal properties of the coordination compound crystal-strontium malate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jini, T.; Saban, K.V.; Varghese, G.

    2006-01-01

    Growth of single crystals of the title compound Sr(C 4 H 4 O 5 ).3H 2 O is achieved using the gel diffusion technique. Multifaceted single crystals of size up to 4x3x3 mm 3 are obtained. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern of the grown crystal and the Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectrum in the range 400-4000 cm -1 are recorded. The vibrational bands corresponding to different functional groups are assigned. Thermal behavior of the material is investigated using Thermo Gravimetry (TG) and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). Thermal studies are indicative of a five-stage decomposition scheme. copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim. (orig.)

  7. Thermal Modeling of a Hybrid Thermoelectric Solar Collector with a Compound Parabolic Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertsatitthanakorn, C.; Jamradloedluk, J.; Rungsiyopas, M.

    2013-07-01

    In this study radiant light from the sun is used by a hybrid thermoelectric (TE) solar collector and a compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) to generate electricity and thermal energy. The hybrid TE solar collector system described in this report is composed of transparent glass, an air gap, an absorber plate, TE modules, a heat sink to cool the water, and a storage tank. Incident solar radiation falls on the CPC, which directs and reflects the radiation to heat up the absorber plate, creating a temperature difference across the TE modules. The water, which absorbs heat from the hot TE modules, flows through the heat sink to release its heat. The results show that the electrical power output and the conversion efficiency depend on the temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of the TE modules. A maximum power output of 1.03 W and a conversion efficiency of 0.6% were obtained when the temperature difference was 12°C. The thermal efficiency increased as the water flow rate increased. The maximum thermal efficiency achieved was 43.3%, corresponding to a water flow rate of 0.24 kg/s. These experimental results verify that using a TE solar collector with a CPC to produce both electrical power and thermal energy seems to be feasible. The thermal model and calculation method can be applied for performance prediction.

  8. Thermal Expansion Anomaly and Spontaneous Magnetostriction of Y2Fe14Al3 Compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Ming, Hao; Xin-Yuan, Jiang; Chun-Jing, Gao; Yan-Zhao, Wu; Yan-Yan, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    The structure and magnetic properties of Y 2 Fe 14 Al 3 compound are investigated by means of x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. The Y 2 Fe 14 Al 3 compound has a hexagonal Th 2 Ni 17 -type structure. Negative thermal expansion is found in Y 2 Fe 14 Al 3 compound in the temperature range from 403 to 491K by x-ray dilatometry. The coefficient of the average thermal expansion is α-bar = –2.54 × 10 −5 K −1 . The spontaneous magnetostrictive deformations from 283 to 470K are calculated by means of the differences between the experimental values of the lattice parameters and the corresponding values extrapolated from the paramagnetic range. The result shows that the spontaneous volume magnetostrictive deformation ω S decreases from 5.74 × 10 −3 to nearly zero with temperature increasing from 283 to 470 K, the spontaneous linear magnetostrictive deformation λ c along the c-axis is larger than the spontaneous linear magnetostrictive deformation λ a in basal-plane in the same temperature below 350 K

  9. PHB/bentonite compounds: Effect of clay modification and thermal aging on properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Tatiara G.; Costa, Anna Raffaela M.; Canedo, Eduardo L.; Carvalho, Laura H. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Wellen, Renate M.R., E-mail: tatiaraalmeida@gmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraíba (UFPB), João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2017-11-15

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) was compounded with three different Bentonite clays: natural, purified by ultrasound/sonicated and organically modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide. PHB/Bentonite masterbatches with 30% clay were prepared in a laboratory internal mixer and letdown with pure matrix to 1% and 3% w/w clay. Test samples were injection molded and characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Increase in Bentonite hydrophobic character was evinced by FTIR for organoclays. XRD of composites showed increase in clay interlayer distance and peak broadening, suggesting formation of intercalated nanocomposites. DSC showed increase in crystallinity and crystallization rate for compounds, especially for PHB/organoclay formulations. Thermal aging was conducted by exposing specimens at 115 deg C for up to 120 hours, and mechanical properties were measured according to ASTM standards. Elastic modulus increased and impact strength decreased with time and clay content; clay purification had little effect on the tensile properties. Tensile strength of thermal aged samples showed little variation, except for the organoclay nanocomposites, for which it significantly decreased with exposure time. SEM images displayed a whitened honeycomb structure and detachment of PHB/Bentonite layers which may be connected to cold crystallization and degradation processes taking place during thermal aging. (author)

  10. PHB/bentonite compounds: Effect of clay modification and thermal aging on properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Tatiara G.; Costa, Anna Raffaela M.; Canedo, Eduardo L.; Carvalho, Laura H.; Wellen, Renate M.R.

    2017-01-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) was compounded with three different Bentonite clays: natural, purified by ultrasound/sonicated and organically modified with hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide. PHB/Bentonite masterbatches with 30% clay were prepared in a laboratory internal mixer and letdown with pure matrix to 1% and 3% w/w clay. Test samples were injection molded and characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Increase in Bentonite hydrophobic character was evinced by FTIR for organoclays. XRD of composites showed increase in clay interlayer distance and peak broadening, suggesting formation of intercalated nanocomposites. DSC showed increase in crystallinity and crystallization rate for compounds, especially for PHB/organoclay formulations. Thermal aging was conducted by exposing specimens at 115 deg C for up to 120 hours, and mechanical properties were measured according to ASTM standards. Elastic modulus increased and impact strength decreased with time and clay content; clay purification had little effect on the tensile properties. Tensile strength of thermal aged samples showed little variation, except for the organoclay nanocomposites, for which it significantly decreased with exposure time. SEM images displayed a whitened honeycomb structure and detachment of PHB/Bentonite layers which may be connected to cold crystallization and degradation processes taking place during thermal aging. (author)

  11. On formation of neptunium(5) and (6) during thermal decomposition of neptunium(4) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessonov, A.A.; Afonas'eva, T.V.; Krot, N.N.

    1989-01-01

    A study was made on thermal behaviour of neptunium(4) peroxide (1), binary nitrate of neptunium(4) and ammonium (2), as well as neptunium(4) oxalate (3). It was established that 1 decomposed to NpO 2 in three stages with formation of neptunium(5) hydroxide at 80-100 deg C, transformed to Np 2 O 5 during further heating. The compound 2 is stable up to 150 deg C, and then decomposition, accompanied by intramolecular neptunium oxidation with formation of NH 4 NpO 2 (NO 3 ) 3 , takes place. This compound is transformed to Np 2 O 5 at 260-290 deg C. It was revealed that during 3 heating in the air at 270-330 deg C more than 70 % of metal could be transformed to pentavalent form, which was probably related with (NpO 2 ) 2 C 2 O 4 formation

  12. Stripping of organic compounds from wastewater as an auxiliary fuel of regenerative thermal oxidizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Meng-Wen; Chern, Jia-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Organic solvents with different volatilities are widely used in various processes and generate air and water pollution problems. In the cleaning processes of electronics industries, most volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are vented to air pollution control devices while most non-volatile organic solvents dissolve in the cleaning water and become the major sources of COD in wastewater. Discharging a high-COD wastewater stream to wastewater treatment facility often disturbs the treatment performance. A pretreatment of the high-COD wastewater is therefore highly desirable. This study used a packed-bed stripping tower in combination with a regenerative thermal oxidizer to remove the COD in the wastewater from a printed circuit board manufacturing process and to utilize the stripped organic compounds as the auxiliary fuel of the RTO. The experimental results showed that up to 45% of the COD could be removed and 66% of the RTO fuel could be saved by the combined treatment system.

  13. Quantification of Selected Vapour-Phase Compounds using Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McLaughlin DWJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A robust method for the analysis of selected vapour phase (VP compounds in mainstream smoke (MSS is described. Cigarettes are smoked on a rotary smoking machine and the VP that passes through the Cambridge filter pad collected in a TedlarA¯ bag. On completion of smoking, the bag contents are sampled onto an adsorption tube containing a mixed carbon bed. The tube is subsequently analysed on an automated thermal desorption (TD system coupled to a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector (GC-FID using a PoraPLOT-Q column. Quantification of 14 volatile compounds including the major carbonyls is achieved. Details of the method validation data are included in this paper. This method has been used to analyse the VP of cigarette MSS over a wide range of ‘tar’ deliveries and configurations with excellent repeatability. Results for the University of Kentucky reference cigarette 1R4F are in good agreement with reported values.

  14. Study of thermal decomposition and characterization of uranium compounds by thermogravimetry and differential calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, J M; Abrao, A [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Quimica

    1980-01-01

    The thermal behaviour of different types of ammonium diuranates, produced in the pilot plants of Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (Sao Paulo, Brazil), is studied. It was observed that: the contents of absorption and crystallization waters, as well as the content of absorption ammonia vary as a function of drying conditions; the contents of occluded ammonium nitrate vary according to the washing step; ammonia contents vary as a function of pH and of the original solution - greater ammonia concentrations are observed when diuranates are precipitate in uranyl nitrate solutions at higher pH's (9.0). Thermal instability of the intermediate compound varies as a function of the type of the occluded ion, NO/sup -//sub 3/ or SO sup(=)/sub 4/. The thermoanalytical curves show that the diuranates obtained by continuous precipitation have a more reproducible chemical composition than those obtained by batch precipitation.

  15. Thermal analysis and infrared emission spectroscopic study of halloysite-potassium acetate intercalation compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hongfei [School of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 China (China); School of Mining Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Liu, Qinfu [School of Geoscience and Surveying Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 China (China); Yang, Jing [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Zhang, Jinshan [School of Mining Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Frost, Ray L., E-mail: r.frost@qut.edu.au [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2010-11-20

    The thermal decomposition of halloysite-potassium acetate intercalation compound was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis and infrared emission spectroscopy. The X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that intercalation of potassium acetate into halloysite caused an increase of the basal spacing from 1.00 to 1.41 nm. The thermogravimetry results show that the mass losses of intercalation the compound occur in main three main steps, which correspond to (a) the loss of adsorbed water, (b) the loss of coordination water and (c) the loss of potassium acetate and dehydroxylation. The temperature of dehydroxylation and dehydration of halloysite is decreased about 100 {sup o}C. The infrared emission spectra clearly show the decomposition and dehydroxylation of the halloysite intercalation compound when the temperature is raised. The dehydration of the intercalation compound is followed by the loss of intensity of the stretching vibration bands at region 3600-3200 cm{sup -1}. Dehydroxylation is followed by the decrease in intensity in the bands between 3695 and 3620 cm{sup -1}. Dehydration was completed by 300 {sup o}C and partial dehydroxylation by 350 {sup o}C. The inner hydroxyl group remained until around 500 {sup o}C.

  16. Optimization of Mechanical, Dynamical and Thermal Properties of a High Performance Tread Compound for Radial Tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Hamid Reza Ghoreishy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A high performance passenger tire tread compound was optimized for its mechanical, dynamical and thermal properties. A reference compound was based on a blend of SBR and BR, sulfur and other ingredients without accelerator, carbon black and aromatic oil. The effects of CBS/TMTD and TBBS/TMTD as accelerator systems were studied with different quantities and the best accelerator system was chosen. Then, the blends of N330 and N550 carbon blacks were added in different quantities and the properties of these samples were studied to determine the best carbon black blend. Finally, the effect of different quantities of aromatic oil was investigated and the optimized quantity of aromatic oil and the final properties of tire tread compound were defined. The mechanical and dynamical tests were carried out on appropriate samples to determine tensile strength, elongation-at-break, fatigue-to-failure, abrasion resistance, hardness, resilience, dynamical-mechanical properties and temperature rise due to the heat build-up. The results showed that the compound containing 0.8 phr CBS, 0.7 phr TMTD, 40 phr N330,20 phr N550 and 15 phr aromatic oils demonstrated the best properties.

  17. Identification of characteristic aroma compounds in raw and thermally processed African giant snail (Achatina fulica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasekan, Ola; Muniady, Megala; Lin, Mee; Dabaj, Fatma

    2018-04-24

    Food flavor appreciation is one of the first signals along with food appearance and texture encountered by consumers during eating of food. Also, it is well known that flavor can strongly influence consumer's acceptability judgment. The increase in the consumption of snail meat across the world calls for the need to research into the aroma compounds responsible for the distinctive aroma notes of processed snail meat. The odorants responsible for the unique aroma notes in thermally processed giant African snail meats were evaluated by means of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA), gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) and odor activity values (OAVs) respectively. Results revealed significant differences in the aroma profiles of the raw and thermally processed snail meats. Whilst the aroma profile of the raw snail meat was dominated with the floral-like β-ionone and β-iso-methyl ionone, sweaty/cheesy-like butanoic acid, and the mushroom-like 1-octen-3-one, the boiled and fried samples were dominated with the thermally generated odorants like 2-methylpyrazine, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-acetylthiazole and 2-acetylpyridine. Finally, results have shown that sotolon, 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 2-furanmethanethiol, 2-methylbutanal, 1-octen-3-one, octanal, furanone, 2-methoxyphenol, 2-acetylpyridine, 2-acetylthiazole, and 2-methylpyrazine contributed to the overall aroma of the thermally processed snail meat.

  18. Rare-earth metal compounds with a novel ligand 2-methoxycinnamylidenepyruvate: A thermal and spectroscopic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, C.T., E-mail: claudiocarvalho@ufgd.edu.br [Federal University of Grande Dourados, UFGD, 79.804-970 Dourados, MS (Brazil); Oliveira, G.F. [Federal University of Grande Dourados, UFGD, 79.804-970 Dourados, MS (Brazil); Fernandes, J. [Federal University of Grande Dourados, UFGD, 79.804-970 Dourados, MS (Brazil); Federal University of Mato Grosso, UFMT, 78.060-900 Cuiabá, MT (Brazil); Federal University of Goiás, UFG, 74.690-900, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Institute of Chemistry, UNESP, 14.801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Siqueira, A.B. [Federal University of Mato Grosso, UFMT, 78.060-900 Cuiabá, MT (Brazil); Ionashiro, E.Y. [Federal University of Goiás, UFG, 74.690-900, Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Ionashiro, M. [Institute of Chemistry, UNESP, 14.801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-10

    Highlights: • 2-Methoxycinnamylidenepyruvate as a novel ligand for the synthesis of complexes. • Complexes with well-defined structural arrangements. • Thermal decomposition dependent on the nature of the metal ion. • Study by TG/FT-IR and TG/MS of the gaseous products released. • Potential technological application. - Abstract: Compounds of 2-methoxycinnamylidenepyruvate with trivalent lanthanide ions (Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) were obtained in solid state and studied mainly in terms of their thermal and spectroscopic properties. The analyses of the characterization were performed by thermogravimetric system coupled to a mass and infrared spectrometer (TG–DTA/MS and TG–DTA/FT-IR), X-ray powder diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (FT-IR), preliminary study of fluorescence as well as classical technique of titration with EDTA. From these results, it was possible to establish the stoichiometry, thermal behavior, hydration water content, and the gaseous products released in the thermal decomposition steps, and suggest the type of metal-ligand coordination.

  19. Cure of malignant melanoma by single thermal neutron capture treatment using melanoma-seeking compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, Yutaka; Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Nakanishi, Takafumi

    1985-01-01

    Since not only malignant melanomas but also many kinds of human cancers, for example thyroid cancer and squamous cell carcinoma, synthesize their specific protein, much attention has been paid to the establishment of selective thermal neutron capture treatment of malignant melanoma as a prototype of such cancer cells. This paper presents 10 B chlorpromazine compounds and 10 B 1 -para-boronophenylalanine ( 10 B 1 -BPA) as tumor-seeking 10 B compounds which themselves possess selective affinity for the specific metabolic activity of the target cancer cells. An overview of the following studies on the effects of 10 B 1 -BPA in the thermal neutron capture treatment of melanoma is provided: 1) in vitro studies on specific enhanced melanoma cell killing effects of 10 B 1 -BPA; 2) in vivo studies on therapeutic effects of 10 B 1 -BPA using melanoma-bearing hamsters; and 3) preclinical therapeutic experiments using spontaneously occurring malignant melanoma in Duroc pig skin, including experiments in which melanoma was successfully cured. (Namekawa, K.)

  20. Analytical and experimental analysis of YALINA-Booster and YALINA-Thermal assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Mazanik, S.; Khilmanovich, A.; Martsinkevich, B.; Routkovskaya, Ch.; Edchik, I.; Fokov, Y.; Sadovich, S.; Fedorenko, A.; Gohar, Y.; Talamo, A.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) may play an important role in future nuclear fuel cycles to reduce the longterm radiotoxicity and volume of spent nuclear fuel. It is proposed that ADS will produce energy and incinerate radioactive waste. This technology was called Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology (ADTT). The most important problems of this technology are monitoring of a reactivity level in on-line regime, a choice of neutron spectrum appropriate for incineration of Minor Actinides (MA) and transmutation of Long Lived Fission Products (LLFP) and etc. Before the designing and construction of an installation it is necessary to carry out R and D to validate codes, nuclear data libraries and other instrumentations. The YALINA facility is designed to study the ADS physics and to investigate the transmutation reaction rates of MA and LLFP. The main objective of the YALINA benchmark is to compare the results from different calculation methods with each other and experimental data. The benchmark is based on the current YALINA facility configuration, which provides the opportunity to verify the prediction capability of the different methods. The experimental data have been obtained in the frame of the ISTC Projects B1341 'Analytical and experimental evaluation of the possibility to create a universal volume source of neutrons in the sub-critical booster assembly with low enrichment uranium fuel driven by a neutron generator' and B1732P 'Analytical and experimental evaluating the possibility of creation of universal volume source of neutrons in the sub-critical booster assembly with low enriched uranium fuel driven by the neutron generator'. In this paper a comparison of the experimental and calculated data obtained for YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly with a fuel of different enrichment and for YALINA-Thermal with a different number of control rods (216, 245 and 280) will be done.

  1. Analysis of the Compounds from the BTEX Group, Emitted During Thermal Decomposition of Alkyd Resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kubecki

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Suitability of the given binding agent for the moulding sands preparation depends on the one hand on the estimation of technological properties of the sand and the mould made of it and the obtained casting quality and on the other hand on the assessment of this sand influence on the natural and working environment. Out of moulding sands used in the foundry industry, sands with organic binders deserve a special attention. These binders are based on synthetic resins, which ensure obtaining the proper technological properties and sound castings, however, they negatively influence the environment. If in the initial state these resins are not very dangerous for people and for the environment, thus under an influence of high temperatures they generate very harmful products, being the result of their thermal decomposition. Depending on the kind of the applied resin (phenol-formaldehyde, urea, furfuryl, urea–furfuryl, alkyd under an influence of a temperature such compounds as: furfuryl alcohol, formaldehyde, phenol, BTEX group (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, and also polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH can be formed and released.The aim of the study was the development of the method, selection of analytical methods and the determination of optimal conditionsof formation compounds from the BTEX group. An emission of these components constitutes one of the basic criteria of the harmfulnessassessment of binders applied for moulding and core sands. Investigations were carried out in the specially designed set up for the thermal decomposition of organic substances in a temperature range: 5000C – 13000C at the laboratory scale. The object for testing was alkyd resin applied as a binding material for moulding sands. Within investigations the minimal amount of adsorbent necessary for the adsorption of compounds released during the decomposition of the resin sample of a mass app. 15 mg was selected. Also the minimal amount of solvent needed for

  2. Phase study in Sr-Th-P-O system: Structural and thermal investigations of quaternary compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keskar, Meera; Phatak, Rohan; Sali, S.K.; Krishnan, K.; Dahale, N.D.; Kulkarni, N.K.; Kannan, S.

    2011-01-01

    The sub-solidus phase relations in Sr-Th-P-O quaternary system were determined at 1223 K in air. To confirm the formation and stability of reported phases, ternary and quaternary compounds in Sr-Th-O, Sr-P-O, Th-P-O and Sr-Th-P-O systems were synthesized by solid state reactions of SrCO 3 , ThO 2 and NH 4 H 2 PO 4 in desired molar proportions at 1223 K. A pseudo-ternary phase diagram of SrO-ThO 2 -P 2 O 5 system was drawn on the basis of the phase analysis of various phase mixtures and phase fields were established by powder X-ray diffraction. In the phase diagram, three quaternary compounds SrTh(PO 4 ) 2 , SrTh 4 (PO 4 ) 6 and Sr 7 Th(PO 4 ) 6 were identified. When heated in air at 1673 K, these compounds decompose to ThO 2 . Structures of SrTh(PO 4 ) 2 , SrTh 4 (PO 4 ) 6 and Sr 7 Th(PO 4 ) 6 were derived from X-ray powder data using the Rietveld refinement method. Thermal expansion behaviors of SrTh(PO 4 ) 2 , SrTh 4 (PO 4 ) 6 and Sr 7 Th(PO 4 ) 6 were investigated using high-temperature X-ray diffraction in the temperature range of 298-1273 K.

  3. Thermal stability of inorganic and organic compounds in atmospheric particulate matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrino, Cinzia; Marconi, Elisabetta; Tofful, Luca; Farao, Carmela; Materazzi, Stefano; Canepari, Silvia

    2012-07-01

    The thermal behaviour of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) has been investigated by using different analytical approaches to explore the added value offered by these technique in environmental studies. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), carried out on both certified material and real PM samples, has shown that several mass losses can be detected starting from 80 °C up to above 500 °C, when pyrolysis occur. Thermo-optical analysis of PM and ion chromatographic analysis of the residual have shown that the mass losses in the temperature range 80-180 °C are not justified by the release of either organic or inorganic compounds; it can be thus attributed to the release of weakly and strongly bound water. Release of water has also been evidenced in the temperature range 225-275 °C. The release of ammonium chloride and nitrate has been detected only above 80 °C. This indicates that the release of nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and ammonia, which is observed downstream of the filters during the sampling of atmospheric PM at ambient temperature, cannot be reproduced off-line, after the end of the sampling. We successfully explored one of the possible explanations, that is the desorption of HNO3, HCl and NH3 adsorbed on collected particles. NH4NO3 and NH4Cl, which can be thermally released by the filter, exhibit a different thermal behaviour from NaNO3 and NaCl, which are thermally stable up to 370 °C. This different behaviour can be used to discriminate between natural and secondary sources of atmospheric inorganic salts, as the interconversion that is observed when heating mixtures of pure salts resulted to be not relevant when heating real PM samples.

  4. Thermal Decomposition Mechanisms of Lignin Model Compounds: From Phenol to Vanillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Adam Michael

    Lignin is a complex, aromatic polymer abundant in cellulosic biomass (trees, switchgrass etc.). Thermochemical breakdown of lignin for liquid fuel production results in undesirable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that lead to tar and soot byproducts. The fundamental chemistry governing these processes is not well understood. We have studied the unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of aromatic lignin model compounds using a miniature SiC tubular reactor. Products are detected and characterized using time-of-flight mass spectrometry with both single photon (118.2 nm; 10.487 eV) and 1 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) as well as matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (300 K--1600 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time of approximately 100 micros. The expansion into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. By understanding the unimolecular fragmentation patterns of phenol (C6H5OH), anisole (C6H 5OCH3) and benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO), the more complicated thermocracking processes of the catechols (HO-C 6H4-OH), methoxyphenols (HO-C6H4-OCH 3) and hydroxybenzaldehydes (HO-C6H4-CHO) can be interpreted. These studies have resulted in a predictive model that allows the interpretation of vanillin, a complex phenolic ether containing methoxy, hydroxy and aldehyde functional groups. This model will serve as a guide for the pyrolyses of larger systems including lignin monomers such as coniferyl alcohol. The pyrolysis mechanisms of the dimethoxybenzenes (H3C-C 6H4-OCH3) and syringol, a hydroxydimethoxybenzene have also been studied. These results will aid in the understanding of the thermal fragmentation of sinapyl alcohol, the most complex lignin monomer. In addition to the model compound work, pyrolyisis of biomass has been studied via the pulsed laser ablation of poplar wood. With the REMPI scheme, aromatic lignin decomposition

  5. Laser-induced thermal coagulation enhances skin uptake of topically applied compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haak, C S; Hannibal, J; Paasch, U

    2017-01-01

    microchannels surrounded by CZ compared to channels with no CZ (CZ-20 and CZ-80>CZ-0).The thickness of CZ affected PEG distribution in skin. A thin CZ-20 favored significantly higher mean fluorescence intensities inside CZ areas compared to CZ-80 (PEG 350, 1,000, and 5,000; P ...BACKGROUND: Ablative fractional laser (AFL) generates microchannels in skin surrounded by a zone of thermally altered tissue, termed the coagulation zone (CZ). The thickness of CZ varies according to applied wavelength and laser settings. It is well-known that AFL channels facilitate uptake...... of topically applied compounds, but the importance of CZ is unknown. METHODS: Franz Cells were used to investigate skin uptake and permeation of fluorescent labeled polyethylene glycols (PEGs) with mean molecular weights (MW) of 350, 1,000, and 5,000 Da. Microchannels with CZ thicknesses ranging from 0 to 80...

  6. Non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure for ozone generation and volatile organic compounds decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pekarek, S.; Khun, J.

    2006-01-01

    The non-thermal plasma technologies based on electrical discharges play an important role in ecological applications. The classical corona discharge is however relatively low power discharge. With the aim to extend its current-voltage range we studied hollow needle-to-plate DC corona discharge enhanced by the flow of a gas through the needle electrode. With this type of the discharge we performed an extensive study of ozone generation and volatile organic compounds decomposition. We found that supply of air through the needle substantially increases current-voltage range of the discharge in comparison with classical pin-to-plate corona discharge. Consequently the ozone generation as well as toluene decomposition efficiency was increased (Authors)

  7. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of N-type polycrystalline In4Se3-x compounds via thermally induced Se deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Shu, Yu-Tian; Guo, Fu

    2014-03-01

    In4Se3-x compound is considered as a potential thermoelectric material due to its comparably low thermal conductivity among all existing ones. While most studies investigated In4Se3-x thermoelectric properties by controlling selennium or other dopants concentrations, in the current study, it was found that even for a fixed initial In/Se ratio, the resulting In/Se ratio varied significantly with different thermal processing histories (i.e., melting and annealing), which also resulted in varied thermoelectric properties as well as fracture surface morphologies of In4Se3-x polycrystalline specimens. Single phase polycrystalline In4Se3-x compounds were synthesized by combining a sequence of melting, annealing, pulverizing, and spark plasma sintering. The extension of previous thermal history was observed to significantly improve the electrical conductivity (about 121%) and figure of merit (about 53%) of In4Se3-x polycrystalline compounds. The extended thermal history resulted in the increase of Se deficiency (x) from 0.39 to 0.53. This thermally induced Se deficiency was observed to associate with increasing carrier mobility but decreasing concentration, which differs from the general trend observed for the initially adjusted Se deficiency at room temperature. Unusually large dispersed grains with nanosize layers were observed in specimens with the longest thermal history. The mechanism(s) by which previous thermal processing enhances carrier mobility and affect microstructural evolution are briefly discussed.

  8. Increase in the specific radioactivity of tritium-labeled compounds obtained by tritium thermal activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badun, G.A.; Chernysheva, M.G.; Ksenofontov, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    A method of tritium introduction into different types of organic molecules that is based on the interaction of atomic tritium with solid organic target is described. Tritium atoms are formed on the hot W-wire, which is heated by the electric current. Such an approach is called 'tritium thermal activation method'. Here we summarize the results of labeling globular proteins (lysozyme, human and bovine serum albumins); derivatives of pantothenic acid and amino acids; ionic surfactants (sodium dodecylsulfate and alkyltrimethylammonium bromides) and nonionic high-molecular weight surfactants - pluronics. For the first time it is observed that if the target-compound is fixed and its radicals are stable the specific radioactivity of the labeled product can be drastically increased (up to 400 times) when the target temperature is ca. 295 K compared with the results obtained at 77 K. The influence of labeling parameters as tritium gas pressure, exposure time and W-wire temperature was tested for each target temperature that results in the optimum labeling conditions with high specific radioactivity and chemical yield of the resulting compound. (orig.)

  9. The influence of the magnetic state on the thermal expansion in 1:2 rare earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, E.; Lindbaum, A.

    1994-01-01

    The attempt is made to demonstrate on some selected rare earth intermetallics the influence of the magnetic state on the thermal expansion. Using the X-ray powder diffraction method we investigated the thermal expansion of some selected nonmagnetic compounds (YAl 2 , YNi 2 and YCo 2 ) and some magnetic RE (rare earth) - cobalt compounds (RCo 2 ) in the temperature range from 4 up to 450 K. All these compounds crystallize in the C15-type structure (cubic Laves phase structure). By comparing the nonmagnetic Y-based compounds we could show that there is an enhanced contribution of the 3d electrons to the thermal expansion in YCo 2 . In the magnetic RCo 2 compounds the induced 3d magnetism gives rise to large volume anomalies at the magnetic ordering temperature T c . Below T c there is in addition a distortion of the cubic unit cell due to the interaction of the magnetically ordered RE ions with the anisotropic crystal field.The thermal expansion of the orthorhombic TmCu 2 , GdCu 2 and YCu 2 compounds has also been investigated for comparison. The influence of the crystal field on the thermal expansion in TmCu 2 in the paramagnetic range (TmCu 2 orders magnetically at T N =6.3 K) has been determined by comparing the thermal expansion of the nonmagnetic YCu 2 with that of TmCu 2 . The data thus obtained are compared with a theoretical model. GdCu 2 , for which the influence of the crystal field can be neglected, has been investigated in order to study the influence of the exchange interaction in the magnetically ordered state (below 42 K). ((orig.))

  10. Impact of organic-mineral matter interactions on thermal reaction pathways for coal model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Struss, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    Coal is a complex, heterogeneous solid that includes interdispersed mineral matter. However, knowledge of organic-mineral matter interactions is embryonic, and the impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction is incomplete. Clay minerals, for example, are known to be effective catalysts for organic reactions. Furthermore, clays such as montmorillonite have been proposed to be key catalysts in the thermal alteration of lignin into vitrinite during the coalification process. Recent studies by Hatcher and coworkers on the evolution of coalified woods using microscopy and NMR have led them to propose selective, acid-catalyzed, solid state reaction chemistry to account for retained structural integrity in the wood. However, the chemical feasibility of such reactions in relevant solids is difficult to demonstrate. The authors have begun a model compound study to gain a better molecular level understanding of the effects in the solid state of organic-mineral matter interactions relevant to both coal formation and processing. To satisfy the need for model compounds that remain nonvolatile solids at temperatures ranging to 450 C, model compounds are employed that are chemically bound to the surface of a fumed silica (Si-O-C{sub aryl}linkage). The organic structures currently under investigation are phenethyl phenyl ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OC{sub 6}H{sub 5}) derivatives, which serve as models for {beta}-alkyl aryl ether units that are present in lignin and lignitic coals. The solid-state chemistry of these materials at 200--450 C in the presence of interdispersed acid catalysts such as small particle size silica-aluminas and montmorillonite clay will be reported. Initial focus will be on defining the potential impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction.

  11. Thermal properties of some cerium compounds, particularly CeB6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peysson, Y.

    1986-09-01

    Using measurements of specific heat between 0.3 to 250K in the absence of a magnetic field, and from 2 to 250K for magnetic fields between 0 and 8T, it is shown that the γ 8 quadruplet is the fundamental level of the Ce 3+ ion, the γ 8-7 separation energy being of the order of 500K. Detailed analysis suggests a lifting of degeneracy of the multiplet γ 8 in the paramagnetic phase, according to usual processes. Specific heat results obtained at very low temperatures reveal the importance of a significant gap in the spin wave energy spectra. Measurements under a strong magnetic field, around the two magnetic phase transitions of CeB6 show a spectacular reinforcement of the specific heat anomaly at a temperature of the order of T Q . Thermal conductivity of CEB6 is also studied in relation to the possible existence of a Jahn-Teller effect, likely to affect heat transfer by phonons. The problem of the different components of thermal transport prompts the analysis of the Weidemann-Franz law in the Kondo net, and also the study of the thermal conductivity of the compounds CeCu6, CeA12, the alloys Ce 0 . 7 5La 0 . 25 B 6 , Ce x La 1-x Cu 6 , and the fluctuating valence system SmB 6 . In all these bodies, an important contribution of phonons to electron transfer is shown. In the dense incoherent Kondo phase, it is not possible to envisage differences from the Weidemann-Franz law greater than those observed for highly diluted Kondo alloys [fr

  12. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure and thermal processing on bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and volatile profile of mulberry juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Du, Bao-Lei; Cui, Zheng-Wei; Xu, Li-Ping; Li, Chun-Yang

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of high hydrostatic pressure and thermal processing on microbiological quality, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and volatile profile of mulberry juice. High hydrostatic pressure processing at 500 MPa for 10 min reduced the total viable count from 4.38 log cfu/ml to nondetectable level and completely inactivated yeasts and molds in raw mulberry juice, ensuring the microbiological safety as thermal processing at 85 ℃ for 15 min. High hydrostatic pressure processing maintained significantly (p hydrostatic pressure processing enhanced the volatile compound concentrations of mulberry juice while thermal processing reduced them in comparison with the control. These results suggested that high hydrostatic pressure processing could be an alternative to conventional thermal processing for production of high-quality mulberry juice.

  13. Development of a general model for determination of thermal conductivity of liquid chemical compounds at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gharagheizi, Farhad; Ilani‐Kashkouli, Poorandokht; Sattari, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, a general model for representation/presentation of the liquid thermal conductivity of chemical compounds (mostly organic) at 1 atm pressure for temperatures below normal boiling point and at saturation pressure for temperatures above the normal boiling point is developed...... using the Gene Expression Programming algorithm. Approximately 19,000 liquid thermal conductivity data at different temperatures related to 1636 chemical compounds collected from the DIPPR 801 database are used to obtain the model as well as to assess its predictive capability. The parameters...

  14. Competing orbital ordering in RVO3 compounds: High-resolution x-ray diffraction and thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sage, M. H.; Blake, G. R.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Marquina, C.

    2007-01-01

    We report evidence for the phase coexistence of orbital orderings of different symmetry in RVO 3 compounds with intermediate-size rare earths. Through a study by high-resolution x-ray powder diffraction and thermal expansion, we show that the competing orbital orderings are associated with the magnitude of the VO 6 octahedral tilting and magnetic exchange striction in these compounds and that the phase-separated state is stabilized by lattice strains

  15. Outdoor Performance Analysis of a Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT) Collector with Jet Impingement and Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC)

    OpenAIRE

    Ahed Hameed Jaaz; Husam Abdulrasool Hasan; Kamaruzzaman Sopian; Abdul Amir H. Kadhum; Tayser Sumer Gaaz; Ahmed A. Al-Amiery

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of jet impingement of water on a photovoltaic thermal (PVT) collector and compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) on electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency and power production of a PVT system. A prototype of a PVT solar water collector installed with a jet impingement and CPC has been designed, fabricated and experimentally investigated. The efficiency of the system can be improved by using jet impingement of water to decrease the temperature of the solar ce...

  16. Influence of deuterium on the magnetic susceptibility and thermal expansion of the mixed valence compound CePd3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinzierl, P.; Blaschko, O.; Fratzl, P.; Krexner, G.; Ernst, G.; Hilscher, G.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of studying mixed valent rare earth compounds by addition of interstitially solved hydrogen is discussed. First measurements of the thermal expansion and of the magnetic susceptibility of 4 K in intermediate valent CePd 3 Dsub(0.05) are presented. (orig.) [de

  17. Thermal behavior studies of the homopolynuclear coordination compound iron(III) polyoxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niculescu, Mircea; Sasca, Viorel; Muntean, Cornelia; Milea, Marius-Silviu; Roşu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The thermal decomposition of [Fe(C_2O_4)(OH)(OH_2)]_n·0.3nH_2O leads to Fe_2O_3 polymorphs. • The products were analyzed using the diffuse reflectance technique, XRD, FTIR and SEM. • The product obtained at 350 °C is a mixture of γ-Fe_2O_3 (majority) and α-Fe_2O_3 phases. • Through the calcination at 800 °C the conversion of γ-Fe_2O_3 to α-Fe_2O_3 takes place. • Precursor and conditions are important for obtaining Fe_2O_3 phases as nanoparticles. - Abstract: The thermal decomposition in dynamic oxidative atmosphere of the new homopolynuclear coordination compound [Fe(C_2O_4)(OH)(OH_2)]_n·0.3nH_2O was investigated by simultaneously using TG, DTG and DTA techniques. Solid-state decomposition products formed during heating at different temperatures (350 °C, 800 °C and 1000 °C) were analyzed by physical-chemical methods, including electronic spectroscopy (diffuse reflectance technique), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The XRD analysis data show that the final decomposition product, namely hematite (α-Fe_2O_3), is relatively well crystallized, while SEM images reveal that the particles exhibit irregular forms, their size being widely distributed between 6 nm and 4 μm.

  18. Biochemical degradation and physical migration of polyphenolic compounds in osmotic dehydrated blueberries with pulsed electric field and thermal pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanshan; Jin, Tony Z; Fan, Xuetong; Wu, Jijun

    2018-01-15

    Fresh blueberries were pretreated by pulsed electric fields (PEF) or thermal pretreatment and then were subject to osmotic dehydration. The changes in contents of anthocyanins, predominantly phenolic acids and flavonols, total phenolics, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and antioxidant activity in the blueberry samples during pretreatment and osmotic dehydration were investigated. Biochemical degradation and physical migration of these nutritive compounds from fruits to osmotic solutions were observed during the pretreatments and osmotic dehydration. PEF pretreated samples had the least degradation loss but the most migration loss of these compounds compared to thermally pretreated and control samples. Higher rates of water loss and solid gain during osmotic dehydration were also obtained by PEF pretreatment, reducing the dehydration time from 130 to 48h. PEF pretreated and dehydrated fruits showed superior appearance to thermally pretreated and control samples. Therefore, PEF pretreatment is a preferred technology that balances nutritive quality, appearance, and dehydration rate. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Gamma-radiation effect on thermal ageing of butyl rubber compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Cardoso, Elizabeth C.L.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2015-01-01

    Butyl rubber has a comprehensive use in sealing systems, especially in tires inner tubes, due to their low permeability to gases. So, it is required that butyl rubber compounds show a better performance, more and more. Butyl rubber is provided with excellent mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. Besides showing these properties, radiation exposures impart modifications in physical-chemical and morphological properties on butyl rubber materials. When exposed to gamma-radiation, rubbers suffer changes in their mechanical and physical properties, caused by material degradation. The major radiation effect in butyl rubbers is chain scission; besides, ageing promotes too the same effect with further build-up of free radicals. This work aims to the study of gamma-radiation in physical-chemical properties of butyl rubber subjected to thermal ageing. Doses used herein were: 25 kGy, 50 kGy, 100 kGy, 150 kGy and 200 KGy. Samples were evaluated before and after ageing according to traditional essays, such as: hardness, tensile strength and elongation at break. From accomplished assessments it is possible to affirm that at doses higher than 50 kGy it was observed a sharp decreasing in butyl rubber physical-chemical properties, before and after exposure to ageing. (author)

  20. Gamma-radiation effect on thermal ageing of butyl rubber compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scagliusi, Sandra R.; Cardoso, Elizabeth C.L.; Lugao, Ademar B., E-mail: srscagliusi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Butyl rubber has a comprehensive use in sealing systems, especially in tires inner tubes, due to their low permeability to gases. So, it is required that butyl rubber compounds show a better performance, more and more. Butyl rubber is provided with excellent mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. Besides showing these properties, radiation exposures impart modifications in physical-chemical and morphological properties on butyl rubber materials. When exposed to gamma-radiation, rubbers suffer changes in their mechanical and physical properties, caused by material degradation. The major radiation effect in butyl rubbers is chain scission; besides, ageing promotes too the same effect with further build-up of free radicals. This work aims to the study of gamma-radiation in physical-chemical properties of butyl rubber subjected to thermal ageing. Doses used herein were: 25 kGy, 50 kGy, 100 kGy, 150 kGy and 200 KGy. Samples were evaluated before and after ageing according to traditional essays, such as: hardness, tensile strength and elongation at break. From accomplished assessments it is possible to affirm that at doses higher than 50 kGy it was observed a sharp decreasing in butyl rubber physical-chemical properties, before and after exposure to ageing. (author)

  1. Thermal design of a modern, two floor, zero energy house in a desert compound

    KAUST Repository

    Serag-Eldin, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    The paper presents a thermal analysis and design of a fully equipped, air-conditioned, zero energy house located in a desert compound at 24.5° latitude. Unlike previous designs the home is two floors high, which makes the balancing of energy supply and demand even more challenging. The roof of the house carries an array of retractable Photovoltaic modules and cover. During day light hours the modules convert the incident sun energy into useful electrical power, while shielding the roof from direct sun-radiation. At night time, the roof cover and modules are retracted to expose the roof to the cool night-sky, thus enhancing cooling. The paper employs time-dependent modeling of Solar input and heat transfer to predict the roof, wall and window temperature distributions and cooling loads, as well as energy generated by the modules. With the aid of battery storage, the modules provide the entire energy needs of the house. The paper displays the results of energy balances for three key days of the year which demonstrate that the proposed two floor design is indeed capable of operating without external energy. © 2010 IEEE.

  2. Thermal decomposition of hydrotalcite-like compounds studied by a novel tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Ramirez, Javier; Abello, Sonia

    2006-01-01

    For the first time, we report on the application of a tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) as a novel technique to investigate the thermal decomposition of hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlcs) in air. Experiments were performed in the temperature range of 323-973 K with Mg-Al, Ni-Al, and Co-Al-HTlcs. The TEOM technique measures mass changes based on inertial forces, presenting important advantages over conventional thermogravimetric analyzers, such as the very rapid time response and the well-defined flow pattern. In general terms, excellent agreement between TEOM, TGA, and DTA techniques during HTlc decomposition was obtained. Interestingly, transition temperatures in the TEOM were lower than in TGA and DTA, particularly for removal of interlayer water but also for dehydroxylation of the brucite-like layers and decarbonation. This was attributed to the flow-through operation in the tapered element of the TEOM as compared to the recognized gas stagnancy and bypass in sample crucibles of conventional thermogravimetric analyzers. Our results conclude that the TEOM technique is suitable for temperature-programmed studies. However, due to its operation principle, blank runs are required in contrast to the more automatic operation in commercial thermogravimetric units. Besides, a careful sample loading and packing in the micro-reactor is essential for reproducible results

  3. Partition behavior of virgin olive oil phenolic compounds in oil-brine mixtures during thermal processing for fish canning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Raffaele; Paduano, Antonello; Fiore, Francesca; Della Medaglia, Dorotea; Ambrosino, Maria Luisa; Medina, Isabel

    2002-05-08

    The chemical modifications and partitioning toward the brine phase (5% salt) of major phenol compounds of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) were studied in a model system formed by sealed cans filled with oil-brine mixtures (5:1, v/v) simulating canned-in-oil food systems. Filled cans were processed in an industrial plant using two sterilization conditions commonly used during fish canning. The partitioning of phenolic compounds toward brine induced by thermal processing was studied by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the phenol fraction extracted from oils and brine. Hydroxytyrosol (1), tyrosol (2), and the complex phenolic compounds containing 1 and 2 (i.e., the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycon 3, the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycon 4, and the oleuropein aglycon 6) decreased in the oily phase after sterilization with a marked partitioning toward the brine phase. The increase of the total amount of 1 and 2 after processing, as well as the presence of elenolic acid 7 released in brine, revealed the hydrolysis of the ester bond of hydrolyzable phenolic compounds 3, 4, and 6 during thermal processing. Both phenomena (partitioning toward the water phase and hydrolysis) contribute to explain the loss of phenolic compounds exhibited by EVOO used as filling medium in canned foods, as well as the protection of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in canned-in-EVOO fish products.

  4. Chromium as a potential catalyst in the thermal formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeberg, T. [T. Oeberg Konsult AB, Lyckeby (Sweden); Bergstroem, J. [Bergstroem und Oehrstroem, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Chlorinated aromatic compounds were detected in fly ash from municipal solid waste incinerators in the late 1970s. It was later shown that this fly ash possess catalytic properties enhancing the formation of PCDD/PCDF also at moderate temperatures. Copper is a well-known active oxychlorination catalyst in the Deacon process and is postulated to be responsible for this the lowtemperature formation of chlorinated aromatics. The catalytic activity of copper has also been demonstrated in both laboratory experiments and full-scale trials. However, copper is not the only metal that is an active oxychlorination catalyst. A substantial number of other transition elements also possess similar activity and interactions are well known. It is therefore of interest to widen the scope to include the fly ash metal composition as a whole. The number of studies with other elements than copper is limited. The element composition of municipal waste is not constant, but changing both between sources and over time. These variations could provide the means to study the influence from fuel composition on the thermal formation of chlorinated aromatics, and such studies have been attempted. Unfortunately process related factors will hide correlations in the observation data, making this approach difficult. An experimental study can be more successful in providing information about the effect from fuel and fly ash composition. Previous investigations in Sweden of the influence from different separation schemes on waste fuel composition can provide data suitable for evaluating the link between element composition in the fly ash, catalytic activity and the formation of polychlorinated benzenes, phenols, dibenzo-pdioxins and dibensofurans. Here we will attempt to re-evaluate the analytical results from a series of 16 trials with different waste fuels in the same combustion plant.

  5. EXERGY AND CARBON CREDITS FOR SERIES CONNECTED N PHOTOVOLTAIC THERMAL - COMPOUND PARABOLIC CONCENTRATOR (PVT-CPC) COLLECTOR: AT CONSTANT OUTLET TEMPERATURE

    OpenAIRE

    Rohit Tripathi 1,*, G. N. Tiwari 2

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, overall energy and exergy performance of partially covered N photovoltaic thermal - compound parabolic concentrators (PVT-CPC) (25% covered by glass to glass PV module) collector connected in series have been carried out at constant outlet temperature mode. Further, comparison in performance for partially covered N photovoltaic thermal - compound parabolic concentrators (PVT-CPC) [case (i)] and N compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) collector [case (ii)] connected in s...

  6. A thermal-optical analysis comparison between symmetric tubular absorber compound parabolic concentrating solar collector with and without envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tchinda, R.

    2005-11-01

    Equations describing the heat transfer in symmetric, compound parabolic concentrating solar collectors (CPCs) with and without envelope have been established. The model takes into account the non linear behavior of these two systems. A theoretical numerical model has been developed to outline the effect of the envelope on the thermal and optical performance of CPCs. The effects of the flow rate, the plate length, the selective coating, etc. are studied. The over-all thermal loss coefficient and the enclosure absorption factor for both types are defined. It is found that the efficient configuration has an envelope. Theoretical computed values are in good agreement with the experimental values published in the literature. (author)

  7. Calibration of thermal neutron detection compound BN-1 and CR-39 in the exposure room of Triga Reactor in Ljubljana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristof, E.; Ilic, R.; Skvarc, J.; Dijanosic, R.

    1994-01-01

    Description of determination of thermal neutron fluences in the range from 1.E+02 to 1.E+12 cm -2 for calibration of the neutron sensitive compound consisting of the neutron converter BN-1 and charged particle detector CR-39 is given. The method employs two proportional BF3 detectors supplemented by a Ge(Li) gamma spectometer utilizing gold foils. The results of the measurements are also presented. (author)

  8. 78 FR 21100 - Low Enriched Uranium From France: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset Review of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ... received no response from the respondent interested parties, i.e., French uranium producers and exporters... Centralized Electronic Service System (IA ACCESS). IA ACCESS is available to registered users at http... the Internet at http://trade.gov/ia/ . The signed Decision Memorandum and electronic versions of the...

  9. 77 FR 71626 - Low Enriched Uranium From France; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... production); and factors related to the ability to shift supply among different national markets (including... proportion of the total domestic production of the product. In its original determination and its full first... conducts under Title VII of the Act, or in internal audits and investigations relating to the programs and...

  10. Latest developments in rolled fuels for materials-testing reactors: a trend towards the use of low-enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjas, Y.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of rolled fuels and the work done in this field by CERCA is described. The technology developed conforms to low enrichment requirements, whilst guaranteeing a satisfactory level of reactor performance [fr

  11. Replacement of highly enriched uranium by medium or low-enriched uranium in fuels for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.P.

    To exclude the possibility of an explosive use of the uranium obtained from an elementary chemical process, one needs to use a fuel less enriched than 20 weight percent in U 235 . This goal can be reached by two ways: 1. The low density fuels, i.e. U or U 3 O 8 /Al fuels. One has to increase their U content from 1.3 g U/cm 3 presently qualified under normal operation conditions. Several manufacturers such as CERCA in France developed these fuels with a near-term objective of about 2 g U/cm 3 and a long-term objective of 3 g U/cm 3 . 2. The high density fuels. They are the UO 2 Caramel plate type fuels now under consideration, and U 3 Si and UMo as a long-term potential

  12. Progress in developing processes for converting 99Mo production from high- to low-enriched uranium--1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, C.

    1998-01-01

    During 1998, the emphasis of our activities was focused mainly on target fabrication. Successful conversion requires a reliable irradiation target; the target being developed uses thin foils of uranium metal, which can be removed from the target hardware for dissolution and processing. This paper describes successes in (1) improving our method for heat-treating the uranium foil to produce a random-small grain structure, (2) improving electrodeposition of zinc and nickel fission-fragment barriers onto the foil, and (3) showing that these fission fragment barriers should be stable during transport of the targets following irradiation. A method was also developed for quantitatively electrodepositing uranium and plutonium contaminants in the 99 Mo. Progress was also made in broadening international cooperation in our development activities

  13. Conversion and Blending Facility highly enriched uranium to low enriched uranium as uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-05

    This Conversion and Blending Facility (CBF) will have two missions: (1) convert HEU materials to pure HEU uranyl nitrate (UNH) and (2) blend pure HEU UNH with depleted and natural UNH to produce HEU UNH crystals. The primary emphasis of this blending operation will be to destroy the weapons capability of large, surplus stockpiles of HEU. The blended LEU product can only be made weapons capable again by the uranium enrichment process. To the extent practical, the chemical and isotopic concentrations of blended LEU product will be held within the specifications required for LWR fuel. Such blended LEU product will be offered to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) to be sold as feed material to the commercial nuclear industry. Otherwise, blended LEU Will be produced as a waste suitable for storage or disposal.

  14. Investigations of uraniumsilicide-based dispersion fuels for the use of low enrichment uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazare, S.

    1982-07-01

    The work presents at the outset, a review of the preparation and properties of uranium silicides (U 3 Si and U 3 Si 2 ) in so far as these are relevant for their use as dispersants in research reactor fuels. The experimental work deals with the preparation and powder metallurgical processing of Al-clad miniature fuel element plates with U 3 Si- und U 3 Si-Al up to U-densities of 6.0 g U/cm 3 . The compatibility of these silicides with the Al-matrix under equilibrium conditions (873 K) and the influence of the reaction on the dimensional stability of the miniplates is described and discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Comparison of the thorium- and low-enriched uranium fuel cycle in the OTTO pebble bed HTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuchert, E; Maly, V

    1973-03-15

    From the study of the physical, technical and economical properties of the LOTTO and TOTTO fuel cycle the authors draw the conclusion that no fundamental reason can be found for a definite preference of one of the two cycles. Either of them can be developed to become a very attractive concept. The flexibility of this reactor allows the design performance in that way that the reactor becomes a safe system with reasonable economy. The decision for the preference of the LOTTO or TOTTO can be allowed to be governed by the requirements of the outer fuel cycle or by politics.

  16. Benchmark critical experiments on low-enriched uranium oxide systems with H/U = 0.77

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuck, G.; Oh, I.

    1979-08-01

    Ten benchmark experiments were performed at the Critical Mass Laboratory at Rockwell International's Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. They provide accurate criticality data for low-enriched damp uranium oxide (U 3 O 8 ) systems. The core studied consisted of 152 mm cubical aluminum cans containing an average of 15,129 g of low-enriched (4.46% 235 U) uranium oxide compacted to a density of 4.68 g/cm 3 and with an H/U atomic ratio of 0.77. One hundred twenty five (125) of these cans were arranged in an approx. 770 mm cubical array. Since the oxide alone cannot be made critical in an array of this size, an enriched (approx. 93% 235 U) metal or solution driver was used to achieve criticality. Measurements are reported for systems having the least practical reflection and for systems reflected by approx. 254-mm-thick concrete or plastic. Under the three reflection conditions, the mass of the uranium metal driver ranged from 29.87 kg to 33.54 kg for an oxide core of 1864.6 kg. For an oxide core of 1824.9 kg, the weight of the high concentration (351.2 kg U/m 3 ) solution driver varied from 14.07 kg to 16.14 kg, and the weight of the low concentration (86.4 kg U/m 3 ) solution driver from 12.4 kg to 14.0 kg

  17. Post-pulse detail metallographic examinations of low-enriched uranium silicide plate-type miniature fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki

    1991-10-01

    Pulse irradiation at Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) was performed using low-enriched (19.89 w% 235 U) unirradiated silicide plate-type miniature fuel which had a density of 4.8 gU/cm 3 . Experimental aims are to understand the dimensional stability and to clarify the failure threshold of the silicide plate-type miniature fuel under power transient conditions through post-pulse detail metallographic examinations. A silicide plate-type miniature fuel was loaded into an irradiation capsule and irradiated by a single pulse. Deposited energies given in the experiments were 62, 77, 116 and 154 cal/g·fuel, which lead to corresponding peak fuel plate temperatures, 201 ± 28degC, 187 ± 10degC, 418 ± 74degC and 871 ± 74degC, respectively. Below 400degC, reliability and dimensional stability of the silicide plate fuel was sustained, and the silicide plate fuel was intact. Up to 540degC, wall-through intergranular crackings occurred in the Al-3%Mg alloy cladding. With the increase of the temperature, the melting of the aluminum cladding followed by recrystallization, the denudation of fuel core and the plate-through intergranular cracking were observed. With the increase of the temperature beyond 400degC, the bowing of fuel plate became significant. Above the temperature of 640degC molten aluminum partially reacted with the fuel core, partially flowed downward under the influence of surface tension and gravity, and partially formed agglomerations. Judging from these experimental observations, the fuel-plate above 400degC tends to reduce its dimensional stability. Despite of the apparent silicide fuel-plate failure, neither generation of pressure pulse nor that of mechanical energy occurred at all. (J.P.N.)

  18. Real time alpha value measurement with Feynman-α method utilizing time series data acquisition on low enriched uranium system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonoike, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Shoichi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    As a part of the development of a subcriticality monitoring system, a system which has a time series data acquisition function of detector signals and a real time evaluation function of alpha value with the Feynman-alpha method was established, with which the kinetic parameter (alpha value) was measured at the STACY heterogeneous core. The Hashimoto's difference filter was implemented in the system, which enables the measurement at a critical condition. The measurement result of the new system agreed with the pulsed neutron method. (author)

  19. Thermal hydraulic and safety analyses for Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, I.H.; Israr, M.; Pervez, S.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic and safety analysis of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel have been performed using computer code PARET. The present core comprises of 29 standard and 5 control fuel elements. Results of the thermal hydraulic analysis show that the core can be operated at a steady-state power level of 10 MW for a flow rate of 950 m 3 /h, with sufficient safety margins against ONB (onset of nucleate boiling) and DNB (departure from nucleate boiling). Safety analysis has been carried out for various modes of reactivity insertions. The events studied include: start-up accident; accidental drop of a fuel element in the core; flooding of a beam tube with water; removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation etc. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released and clad surface temperature etc. were calculated. The results indicate that the peak clad temperatures remain well below the clad melting temperature during these accidents. It is therefore concluded that the reactor can be safely operated at 10 MW without compromising safety. (author)

  20. Prediction of Low-Thermal-Conductivity Compounds with First-Principles Anharmonic Lattice-Dynamics Calculations and Bayesian Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Atsuto; Togo, Atsushi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Tsuda, Koji; Chaput, Laurent; Tanaka, Isao

    2015-11-01

    Compounds of low lattice thermal conductivity (LTC) are essential for seeking thermoelectric materials with high conversion efficiency. Some strategies have been used to decrease LTC. However, such trials have yielded successes only within a limited exploration space. Here, we report the virtual screening of a library containing 54 779 compounds. Our strategy is to search the library through Bayesian optimization using for the initial data the LTC obtained from first-principles anharmonic lattice-dynamics calculations for a set of 101 compounds. We discovered 221 materials with very low LTC. Two of them even have an electronic band gap <1 eV , which makes them exceptional candidates for thermoelectric applications. In addition to those newly discovered thermoelectric materials, the present strategy is believed to be powerful for many other applications in which the chemistry of materials is required to be optimized.

  1. Investigation of atmospheric pressure capillary non-thermal plasmas and their applications to the degradation of volatile organic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shu-Min

    Atmospheric pressure capillary non-thermal plasma (AP-CNTP) has been investigated as a potential technology far the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Advanced Life Support Systems (ALS). AP-CNTP is a destructive technology far the removal of VOCs from air streams by active plasma species, such as electrons, ions, and excited molecules. Complete VOC destruction ideally results in the formation of water, carbon dioxide (CO2), and other by-product's may also form, including ozone (O3), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and decomposed hydrocarbons. Several organic compounds, such as BTEX, ethylene, n-heptane, isooctane, methanol and NH3, were tested in an AP-CNTP system. Parametric experiments were carried out by varying plasma discharge power, flowrates, and initial concentrations. The degradation efficiency varied depending on the chemical nature of the compounds. A plasmochemical kinetic model was derived for toluene, ethylbenzene, and m-xylene and n-heptane.

  2. Study on the characterization and thermal decomposition of uranium compounds by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, J.M.; Abrao, A.

    1981-04-01

    A contribution to the characterization of several uranium compounds obtained at the IPEN' Uranium Pilot Plant is given. Particularly, samples of ammonium diuranate (ADU) and uranium oxides were studied. The main objective was to know the stoichiometry of the ADU and the oxides resulting from its thermal transformation. ADU samples were prepared by batchwise precipitation, stationary dewatering into stove and batchwise thermal decomposition, or, alternatively, continuous precipitation, continuous filtration, continuous drying and continuous thermal decomposition inside a temperature gradient electrical furnace. All ADU were precipitated using NH 3 gas from uranul sulfate or uranyl nitrate solutions. The thermal decomposition of ADU and uranium oxides were studied in an air atmosphere by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Any correlation between the parameters of precipitation, drying, calcination and the hystory of the obtaintion of the several uraniumm compounds and their initial and final composition was looked for. Heating program was established to have the U 3 O 8 oxide as the final product. Intermediary phases were tentatively identified. Temperatures at which occurred the absorption water elimination, crystallization water elimination, evolution or oxidation of NH 3 , decomposition of NO -3 ion and oxygen evolution and the exo- and endothermic process for each sample were identified. (Author) [pt

  3. Laser-induced thermal coagulation enhances skin uptake of topically applied compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, C S; Hannibal, J; Paasch, U; Anderson, R R; Haedersdal, M

    2017-08-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) generates microchannels in skin surrounded by a zone of thermally altered tissue, termed the coagulation zone (CZ). The thickness of CZ varies according to applied wavelength and laser settings. It is well-known that AFL channels facilitate uptake of topically applied compounds, but the importance of CZ is unknown. Franz Cells were used to investigate skin uptake and permeation of fluorescent labeled polyethylene glycols (PEGs) with mean molecular weights (MW) of 350, 1,000, and 5,000 Da. Microchannels with CZ thicknesses ranging from 0 to 80 μm were generated from micro-needles (0 μm, CZ-0), and AFL (10,600 nm) applied to -80°C deep frozen skin (20 μm, CZ-20) and skin equilibrated to room temperature (80 μm, CZ-80). Channels penetrated into similar mid-dermal skin depths of 600-700 μm, and number of channels per skin area was similar. At 4 hours incubation, skin uptake of PEGs into CZ and dermis was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy at specific skin depths of 150, 400, and 1,000 μm and the transcutaneous permeation was quantified by fluorescence of receptor fluids. Overall, the highest uptake of PEGs was reached through microchannels surrounded by CZ compared to channels with no CZ (CZ-20 and CZ-80>CZ-0).The thickness of CZ affected PEG distribution in skin. A thin CZ-20 favored significantly higher mean fluorescence intensities inside CZ areas compared to CZ-80 (PEG 350, 1,000, and 5,000; P channels was significantly higher than through CZ-80 and CZ-0 at all skin depths (PEG 350, 1,000 and 5,000, 150-1,000 μm; P distribution, with highest PEG uptake achieved from microchannels surrounded by a thin CZ. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:582-591, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    OpenAIRE

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to perform a preliminary optical assessment of the external compound parabolic concentrator (XCPC) component in three concentrating solar thermal units. Each solar thermal unit consists an optical element (the non-imaging concentrating reflector) and a thermal element (the evacuated glass tube solar absorber). The three concentrating solar thermal units discussed in this work are DEWAR 58, a direct flow all-glass dewar, DEWAR 47 an indirect flow ...

  5. Synthesis and performances of novel solid–solid phase change materials with hexahydroxy compounds for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Changzhong; Liu, Wenmin; Wang, Hongwei; Peng, Kelin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Three new kinds of SSPCMs were synthesized with different skeleton materials. • The phase change properties and thermal stability of SSPCMs were investigated. • The maximum enthalpy in heating (cooling) process is 107.5 kJ/kg (102.9 kJ/kg). • The rigid groups and crosslinking structure of SSPCMs improve the thermal stability. • The SSPCMs could be applied in the temperature range of 30–70 °C. - Abstract: Three kinds of new polymeric SSPCMs with different crosslinking structures were synthesized and characterized for thermal energy storage. In the SSPCMs, three hexahydroxy compounds (sorbitol, dipentaerythritol and inositol) were individually employed as the molecular skeleton and polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used as the phase change functional chain. The molecular structure, crystalline properties, phase change behaviors, thermal reliability and stability of the synthesized SSPCMs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG), respectively. The results show that the prepared SSPCMs possess high thermal energy storage density and an applicable temperature range of 30–70 °C, and the maximum phase change enthalpy in the heating and cooling process for the SSPCMs is 107.5 kJ/kg and 102.9 kJ/kg, respectively. The prepared SSPCMs have good reusability, excellent thermal reliability and stability from the heating-cooling thermal cycle test and TG curves. The resultant SSPCMs could be potentially applied in the areas of thermal energy storage and temperature-control

  6. Effect of Boron and Phosphate compounds on Thermal and Fire Properties of wood/HDPE composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay Akbulut; Nadir Ayrilmis; Turker Dundar; Ali Durmus; Robert H. White; Murat Teker

    2011-01-01

    Melting and non-isothermal crystallization behaviors, oxidative induction time, and fire performance of the injection-molded wood flour-high density polyethylene (HDPE) composites (WPCs) incorporated with different levels (4, 8, or 12 wt %) of boron compounds [borax/boric acid (BX/BA) (0.5:0.5 wt %), zinc borate (ZB)] and phosphorus compounds [mono- and di-ammonium...

  7. Adsorptive properties and thermal stability of carbon fibers modified by boron and phosphorus compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malygin, A.A.; Postnova, A.M.; Shevchenko, G.K.

    1996-01-01

    Sorptional characteristics as regards water vapors and thermal stability of carbon fibers modified by method of molecular superposition of borohydroxide groupings have been studied. Sorptional activity in the range of low and medium relative pressures of water vapors in modified samples increases several times, while thermal stability of carbon fiber increases, as well. 14 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  8. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Development Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tony

    2015-01-01

    There are clear advantages of development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) for a crewed mission to Mars. NTP for in-space propulsion enables more ambitious space missions by providing high thrust at high specific impulse ((is) approximately 900 sec) that is 2 times the best theoretical performance possible for chemical rockets. Missions can be optimized for maximum payload capability to take more payload with reduced total mass to orbit; saving cost on reduction of the number of launch vehicles needed. Or missions can be optimized to minimize trip time significantly to reduce the deep space radiation exposure to the crew. NTR propulsion technology is a game changer for space exploration to Mars and beyond. However, 'NUCLEAR' is a word that is feared and vilified by some groups and the hostility towards development of any nuclear systems can meet great opposition by the public as well as from national leaders and people in authority. The public often associates the 'nuclear' word with weapons of mass destruction. The development NTP is at risk due to unwarranted public fears and clear honest communication of nuclear safety will be critical to the success of the development of the NTP technology. Reducing cost to NTP development is critical to its acceptance and funding. In the past, highly inflated cost estimates of a full-scale development nuclear engine due to Category I nuclear security requirements and costly regulatory requirements have put the NTP technology as a low priority. Innovative approaches utilizing low enriched uranium (LEU). Even though NTP can be a small source of radiation to the crew, NTP can facilitate significant reduction of crew exposure to solar and cosmic radiation by reducing trip times by 3-4 months. Current Human Mars Mission (HMM) trajectories with conventional propulsion systems and fuel-efficient transfer orbits exceed astronaut radiation exposure limits. Utilizing extra propellant from one additional SLS launch and available

  9. Giant negative thermal expansion in NaZn13-type La(Fe, Si, Co)13 compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongjin; Liu, Yanying; Fan, Wei; Tan, Jie; Xiao, Furen; Qian, Lihe; Li, Laifeng

    2013-08-07

    La(Fe, Si)13-based compounds are well-known magnetocaloric materials, which show a pronounced negative thermal expansion (NTE) around the Curie temperature but have not been considered as NTE materials for industrial applications. The NaZn13-type LaFe13-xSix and LaFe11.5-xCoxSi1.5 compounds were synthesized, and their linear NTE properties were investigated. By optimizing the chemical composition, the sharp volume change in La(Fe, Si)13-based compounds was successfully modified into continuous expansion. By increasing the amount of Co dopant in LaFe11.5-xCoxSi1.5, the NTE shifts toward a higher temperature region, and also the NTE operation-temperature window becomes broader. Typically, the linear NTE coefficient identified in the LaFe10.5Co1.0Si1.5 compound reaches as much as -26.1 × 10(-6) K(-1), with an operation-temperature window of 110 K from 240 to 350 K, which includes room temperature. Such control of the specific composition and the NTE properties of La(Fe, Si)13-based compounds suggests their potential application as NTE materials.

  10. Measurement of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-Ming; Xu, Xiu-Xiu; Bian, Lei; Luo, Zong-Xiu; Chen, Zong-Mao

    2015-12-01

    Determination of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air is important to understand chemical communication between plants and insects and will aid the development of semiochemicals from plants for pest control. In this study, a thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) method was developed to measure ultra-trace levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. The desorption parameters of TD, including sorbent tube material, tube desorption temperature, desorption time, and cold trap temperature, were selected and optimized. In GC-MS analysis, the selected ion monitoring mode was used for enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. This method was sufficiently sensitive to detect part-per-trillion levels of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air. Laboratory and field evaluation revealed that the method presented high precision and accuracy. Field studies indicated that the background odor of tea plantations contained some common volatile plant compounds, such as (Z)-3-hexenol, methyl salicylate, and (E)-ocimene, at concentrations ranging from 1 to 3400 ng m(-3). In addition, the background odor in summer was more abundant in quality and quantity than in autumn. Relative to previous methods, the TD-GC-MS method is more sensitive, permitting accurate qualitative and quantitative measurements of volatile plant compounds in field ambient air.

  11. Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project: Evaluation of Models to Calculate Thermal Diffusivity of Layered Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, Levi D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Andrew M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Huber, Tanja K. [Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Breitkreutz, Harald [Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany)

    2015-02-11

    The Office of Material Management and Minimization Fuel Thermo-physical Characterization Project at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is tasked with using PNNL facilities and processes to receive irradiated low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel plate samples and perform analyses in support of the Office of Material Management and Minimization Reactor Conversion Program. This work is in support of the Fuel Development Pillar that is managed by Idaho National Laboratory. A key portion of the scope associated with this project was to measure the thermal properties of fuel segments harvested from plates that were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor. Thermal diffusivity of samples prepared from the fuel segments was measured using laser flash analysis. Two models, one developed by PNNL and the other developed by the Technische Universität München (TUM), were evaluated to extract the thermal diffusivity of the uranium-molybdenum alloy from measurements made on the irradiated, layered composites. The experimental data of the “TC” irradiated fuel segment was evaluated using both models considering a three-layer and five-layer system. Both models are in acceptable agreement with one another and indicate that the zirconium diffusion barrier has a minimal impact on the overall thermal diffusivity of the monolithic U-Mo fuel.

  12. Thermal stability of LiNaR2F8 compounds (R=Ho-Lu, Y)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, P.P.; Medvedeva, L.V.; Bondareva, O.S.; Sobolev, B.P.

    1990-01-01

    Monoclinic pseudorhombic compound mentioned in the title are investigated. It is determined, that the compounds are stable within temperature narrow range: Ho - 575-693 degC, Er - 566-712deg C, Tm - 560-710 deg C, Yb - less than 685 deg C, Y - 580-712 deg C. Triangulation of LiF-NaF-YF 3 system is carried out

  13. Morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of PVC/MMT nanocomposites prepared by solution blending and solution blending + melt compounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madaleno, Liliana Andreia Oliveira; Schjødt-Thomsen, Jan; Pinto, José Cruz

    2010-01-01

    Two types of montmorillonite (MMT), natural sodium montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT), in different amounts of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 25 phr (parts per hundred resin), were dispersed in rigid poly (vinyl chloride) by two different methods solution blending...... and solution blending + melt compounding The effects on morphology, thermal and mechanical properties of the PVC/MMT nanocomposites were studied by varying the amount of Na-MMT and OMMT in both methods SEM and XRD analysis revealed that possible intercalated and exfoliated structures were obtained in all...... prepared by solution blending + melt compounding method Experimental values for 1 and 2 phr are larger than the calculated values which directly suggest that the MMT particles are exfoliated (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved...

  14. The thermal expansion of a highly crystalline hexagonal BC2N compound synthesized under high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qinghua; Liu Zhongyuan; Hu Qianku; Li Hui; He Julong; Yu Dongli; Li Dongchun; Tian Yongjun

    2006-01-01

    The thermal expansion has been investigated for a highly crystalline hexagonal BC 2 N compound synthesized by the compression of a turbostratic B-C-N precursor with iron catalyst at the high temperature of 1500 deg. C and the high pressure of 5.5 GPa. The thermal expansion in the c direction is large and linear with an expansion coefficient of 35.86 x 10 -6 K -1 up to 1000 deg. C, while in the basal plane, the a dimension displays a slight linear contraction up to 750 deg. C with a contraction coefficient of -8.76 x 10 -7 K -1 , but above 750 deg. C a linear expansion is observed with a larger expansion coefficient of 1.52 x 10 -6 K -1

  15. Flexible fabrication of biomimetic compound eye array via two-step thermal reflow of simply pre-modeled hierarchic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengzhou; Li, Mujun; Shen, Lianguan; Qiu, Jinfeng; Zhou, Youquan

    2017-06-01

    A flexible fabrication method for the biomimetic compound eye (BCE) array is proposed. In this method, a triple-layer sandwich-like coating configuration was introduced, and the required hierarchic microstructures are formed with a simple single-scan exposure in maskless digital lithography. Taking advantage of the difference of glass transition point (Tg) between photoresists of each layer, the pre-formed hierarchic microstructures are in turn reflowed to the curved substrate and the BCE ommatidia in a two-step thermal reflow process. To avoid affecting the spherical substrate formed in the first thermal reflow, a non-contact strategy was proposed in the second reflow process. The measurement results were in good agreement with the designed BCE profiles. Results also showed that the fabricated BCE had good performances in optical test. The presented method is flexible, convenient, low-cost and can easily adapt to the fabrications of other optical elements with hierarchic microstructures.

  16. Changes in guava (Psidium guajava L. var. Paluma nectar volatile compounds concentration due to thermal processing and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ivaneide Coutinho Correa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Guava nectars were formulated for approximately 10, 12, or 14 ºBrix, with 40% guava pulp. Sodium benzoate, 500 mg.kg-1 was used as preservative. The Brix value was adjusted with saturated sucrose syrup. The guava nectar was pasteurized (85 ºC/42 seconds in tubular heat exchanger and then hot filled in 500 mL white glass bottles. The products were stored either at room temperature (25 ± 5 ºC or refrigerated (5 ± 2 ºC under fluorescent light exposure and analyzed on the day after processing (time zero and also 40, 80, and 120 days of storage. Eight compounds were identified and quantified by Gas Chromatography (GC -Mass Spectrometry (MS: hexanal, (E-hex-2-enal, 1-hexenol, (Z-hex-3-enol, (Z-hex-3-enyl acetate, phenyl-3-propyl acetate, cinnamyl acetate, and acetic acid. There was no significant effect of thermal treatment on the volatile compound concentrations, except for a significant decrease (p = 0.0001 in hexanal and (Z-hex-3-enyl acetate (p = 0.0029. As for the storage time, there was a much greater decrease in the esters contents, such as (Z-hex-3-enyl and phenyl-3-propyl acetates. Cinnamyl acetate had the greatest decrease over storage time. Refrigeration was better than room temperature for guava nectar volatile compounds stability over storage time, mainly for esters compounds, which are important for the product aroma and flavor

  17. Plasmachemical synthesis and evaluation of the thermal conductivity of metal-oxide compounds "Molybdenum-uranium dioxide"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Alexandra A.; Karengin, Alexander G.; Mendoza, Orlando

    2018-03-01

    The article represents possibility to apply oxidative and reducing plasma for plasma-chemical synthesis of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» from water-salt mixtures «molybdic acid‒uranyl nitrate» and «molybdic acid‒ uranyl acetate». The composition of water-salt mixture was calculated and the conditions ensuring plasma-chemical synthesis of «Mo‒UO2» compounds were determined. Calculations were carried out at atmospheric pressure over a wide range of temperatures (300-4000 K), with the use of various plasma coolants (air, hydrogen). The heat conductivity coefficients of metal-oxide compounds «Mo‒UO2» consisting of continuous component (molybdenum matrix) are calculated. Inclusions from ceramics in the form of uranium dioxide were ordered in the matrix. Particular attention is paid to methods for calculating the coefficients of thermal conductivity of these compounds with the use of different models. Calculated results were compared with the experimental data.

  18. Generation of Maillard compounds from inulin during the thermal processing of Agave tequilana Weber Var. azul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Margalli, Norma A; López, Mercedes G

    2002-02-13

    During the cooking process of Agave tequilana Weber var. azul to produce tequila, besides the hydrolysis of inulin to generate fermentable sugars, many volatiles, mainly Maillard compounds, are produced, most of which may have a significant impact on the overall flavor of tequila. Exudates (agave juice) from a tequila company were collected periodically, and color, Brix, fructose concentration, and reducing sugars were determined as inulin breakdown took place. Maillard compounds were obtained by extraction with CH(2)Cl(2), and the extracts were analyzed by GC-MS. Increments in color, Brix, and reducing sugars were observed as a function of time, but a decrease in fructose concentration was found. Many Maillard compounds were identified in the exudates, including furans, pyrans, aldehydes, and nitrogen and sulfur compounds. The most abundant Maillard compounds were methyl-2-furoate, 2,3-dihydroxy-3,5-dihydro-6-methyl-4(H)-pyran-4-one, and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural. In addition, a series of short- and long-chain fatty acids was also found. A large number of the volatiles in A. tequilana Weber var. azul were also detected in tequila extracts, and most of these have been reported as a powerful odorants, responsible for the unique tequila flavor.

  19. Study of thermal properties and the effect of carrier concentration in the ternary compound Ag6Ge10P12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    In this work the thermal properties of the ternary semiconducting compounds (Ag6Ge10P12) have been investigated. Single crystal samples prepared by Bridgman technique low temperature cryostat are illustrated which is suitable to control temperature from liquid nitrogen up to room temperature. The work contains theoretical and experimental study on binary and ternary semiconductors. Also it illustrates the experimental results of thermoelectric properties of AG6Ge10P12 samples as well as the calculated effective mass, Fermi energy and their analysis throughout the temperature range between 80-300 K. 3 tabs.; 18 figs.; 57 refs

  20. Research technique and experimental device for thermal conductivity measurements of refractory compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Petrov, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed is a new axial technique for determining thermal conductivity coefficient of solids at temperatures above 1000 deg C with the use of internal heating of specimens by passing electric current and with experimental determining the thermal flows on the lateral side of the working section of the specimen. This method is usable for investigating the thermal conductivity of materials whose surface radiation characteristics are unknown or unstable and for carrying out experiments not only in vacuum, but also in various atmospheres. The overall fiducial error of the results of the method is evaluated at 4-5 % within the range of temperatures between 1200 and 2300 K. A description of the experimental installation is given

  1. Improvement of organic compounds labelling method with the use of thermally activated tritium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejman, L.A.; Smolyakov, V.S.; Antropova, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Use of a support (various types of papers) is recommended for organic compounds labelling by tritium gas activated at a hot tungsten filament. This improvement increases chemical and radiochemical yields and makes the experiment simpler and faster. Generally labelled triethyloxonium tetra-fluoroborate, ethyl-p-aminobenzoate, p-aminobenzoic acid (Na-salt), A-factor (a natural regulator of streptomycin biosynthesis), decapeptide angiotensin I, phospholipid 1, 2 - dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3--phosphocholine and E. coli tRNAs have been prepared by this method. Molar radioactivity of the labelled compounds is in the range of 1-200 GBg/mmole [ru

  2. Characterization of the thermalness of a fissile system with a two-group diffusion theory parameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredehoft, B.B.; Busch, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    In tabulating critical data, the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratio (H/X) is commonly used to characterize the amount of moderation in a system. Though adequate in many cases, H/X does not account for the moderating contribution of other light nuclei contained in common uranium-moderator mixtures. This ratio also does not account for enrichment of the system, which affects the resonance absorption characteristics and, therefore, the moderating behavior of that system. To alleviate these problems, a two-energy-group diffusion theory analogy to the six-factor formula was applied to define a new parameter p/(η 2 · f 2 ), which describes the moderation characteristics or the 'thermalness' of a fissioning system and includes the effects of enrichment and the presence of moderators other than hydrogen. From an analysis of several low-enriched uranium systems with different moderators, it was found that the values of p/(η 2 · f 2 ) corresponding to minimum critical mass and volume tend to center in a narrower range than do the values of H/X for the same systems. Also, the thermalness parameter does not vary with the addition of a reflector and is applicable to systems with other than hydrogenous moderators. Based on these results, the thermalness parameter p/(η 2 · f 2 ) provides an effective means of characterizing moderated systems relative to optimum conditions

  3. Thermal, spectral and antimicrobial properties of new zinc(II) isobutyrate compounds. Part I. Papaverine, phenazone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Györyová, K.; Kovářová, Jana; Andogová, E.; Zeleňák, V.; Nour El-Dien, F. A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 1 (2002), s. 119-128 ISSN 1418-2874 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OK 395 Keywords : complex compounds * isobutyrate * papaverine Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.598, year: 2002

  4. Intermolecula transfer and elimination of molecular hydrogen in thermal reactions of unsaturated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suria, Sabartanty [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-02-10

    Two reactions which are important to coal liquefaction include intermolecular transfer and the elimination of two hydrogen atoms. We have designed several model reactions to probe the viability of several hydrogen transfer and elimination pathways. This report described studies on these reactions using organic model compounds.

  5. Thermal preparation effects on the x-ray diffractograms of compounds produced during flue gas desulfurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertz, D.L.; Burns, K.H.; Keeton, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    The diffractograms of syn-gypsum and of flue gas desulfurization products indicate that CaSO 4 · 2H 2 O is converted to other phase(s) when heated to 100 degrees C. Syn-hannebachite CaSO 3 ·0.5H 2 O is unaffected by similar thermal treatment. 6 refs., 3 figs

  6. Thermal treatment and leaching of biochar alleviates plant growth inhibition from mobile organic compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel V. Gale

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent meta-analyses of plant responses to biochar boast positive average effects of between 10 and 40%. Plant responses, however, vary greatly across systems, and null or negative biochar effects are increasingly reported. The mechanisms responsible for such responses remain unclear. In a glasshouse experiment we tested the effects of three forestry residue wood biochars, applied at five dosages (0, 5, 10, 20, and 50 t/ha to a temperate forest drystic cambisol as direct surface applications and as complete soil mixes on the herbaceous pioneers Lolium multiflorum and Trifolium repens. Null and negative effects of biochar on growth were found in most cases. One potential cause for null and negative plant responses to biochar is plant exposure to mobile compounds produced during pyrolysis that leach or evolve following additions of biochars to soil. In a second glasshouse experiment we examined the effects of simple leaching and heating techniques to ameliorate potentially phytotoxic effects of volatile and leachable compounds released from biochar. We used Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME–gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS to qualitatively describe organic compounds in both biochar (through headspace extraction, and in the water leachates (through direct injection. Convection heating and water leaching of biochar prior to application alleviated growth inhibition. Additionally, growth was inhibited when filtrate from water-leached biochar was applied following germination. SPME-GC-MS detected primarily short-chained carboxylic acids and phenolics in both the leachates and solid chars, with relatively high concentrations of several known phytotoxic compounds including acetic acid, butyric acid, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol and benzoic acid. We speculate that variable plant responses to phytotoxic organic compounds leached from biochars may largely explain negative plant growth responses and also account for strongly species

  7. Giant negative thermal expansion in bonded MnCoGe-based compounds with Ni2In-type hexagonal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying-Ying; Hu, Feng-Xia; Bao, Li-Fu; Wang, Jing; Wu, Hui; Huang, Qing-Zhen; Wu, Rong-Rong; Liu, Yao; Shen, Fei-Ran; Kuang, Hao; Zhang, Ming; Zuo, Wen-Liang; Zheng, Xin-Qi; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2015-02-11

    MnCoGe-based compounds undergo a giant negative thermal expansion (NTE) during the martensitic structural transition from Ni2In-type hexagonal to TiNiSi-type orthorhombic structure. High-resolution neutron diffraction experiments revealed that the expansion of unit cell volume can be as large as ΔV/V ∼ 3.9%. The optimized compositions with concurrent magnetic and structural transitions have been studied for magnetocaloric effect. However, these materials have not been considered as NTE materials partially due to the limited temperature window of phase transition. The as-prepared MnCoGe-based compounds are quite brittle and naturally collapse into powders. By using a few percents (3-4%) of epoxy to bond the powders, we introduced residual stress in the bonded samples and thus realized the broadening of structural transition by utilizing the specific characteristics of lattice softening enforced by the stress. As a result, giant NTE (not only the linear NTE coefficient α but also the operation-temperature window) has been achieved. For example, the average α̅ as much as -51.5 × 10(-6)/K with an operating temperature window as wide as 210 K from 122 to 332 K has been observed in a bonded MnCo0.98Cr0.02Ge compound. Moreover, in the region between 250 and 305 K near room temperature, the α value (-119 × 10(-6)/K) remains nearly independent of temperature. Such an excellent performance exceeds that of most other materials reported previously, suggesting it can potentially be used as a NTE material, particularly for compensating the materials with large positive thermal expansions.

  8. Effect of boron compounds on the thermal and combustion properties of wood-plastic composites

    OpenAIRE

    Altuntaş, Ertuğrul; Karaoğul, Eyyup; Alma, Mehmet Hakkı

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the thermal properties and fire resistancesof the wood plastic composites produced with waste lignocellulosic materialswere investigated. For this purpose, lignocellulosic waste, high densitypolyethylene, (HDPE) sodium borate (borax) and boric acid was used to producethe wood-plastic composites. A twin-screw extruder was used during theproduction of the wood plastic composites. The produced composite granule waspressed at 175 °C hot press. The effects of boric acid and borax ad...

  9. Comparison of two common adsorption materials for thermal desorption gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of biogenic volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcillo, Andrea; Jakimovska, Viktorija; Widdig, Anja; Birkemeyer, Claudia

    2017-09-08

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are commonly collected from gaseous samples by adsorption to materials such as the porous polymer Tenax TA. Adsorbed compounds are subsequently released from these materials by thermal desorption (TD) and separated then by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization (FID) or mass spectrometry (MS) detection. Tenax TA is known to be particularly suitable for non-polar to semipolar volatiles, however, many volatiles from environmental and biological samples possess a rather polar character. Therefore, we tested if the polymer XAD-2, which so far is widely used to adsorb organic compounds from aqueous and organic solvents, could provide a broader coverage for (semi)polar VOCs during gas-phase sampling. Mixtures of volatile compounds covering a wide range of volatility (bp. 20-256°C) and different chemical classes were introduced by liquid spiking into sorbent tubes with one of the two porous polymers, Tenax TA or XAD-2, and analyzed by TD/GC-MS. At first, an internal standard mixture composed of 17 authentic standards was used to optimize desorption temperature with respect to sorbent degradation and loading time for calibration. Secondly, we tested the detectability of a complex standard mixture composed of 57 volatiles, most of them common constituents of the body odor of mammals. Moreover, the performance of XAD-2 compared with Tenax TA was assessed as limit of quantitation and linearity for the internal standard mixture and 33 compounds from the complex standard mixture. Volatiles were analyzed in a range between 0.01-∼250ng/tube depending on the compound and material. Lower limits of quantitation were between 0.01 and 3 ng±0.9). Interestingly, we found different kinetics for compound adsorption with XAD-2, and a partially better sensitivity in comparison with Tenax TA. For these analytes, XAD-2 might be recommended as an alternative of Tenax TA for TD/GC-MS analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Multi-Dimensional Heat Transfer Model of a Tie-Tube and Hexagonal Fuel Element for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, C. F.; Mireles, O. R.; Stewart, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Space Capable Cryogenic Thermal Engine (SCCTE) effort considers a nuclear thermal rocket design based around a Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU) design fission reactor. The reactor core is comprised of bundled hexagonal fuel elements that directly heat hydrogen for expansion in a thrust chamber and hexagonal tie-tubes that house zirconium hydride moderator mass for the purpose of thermalizing fast neutrons resulting from fission events. Created 3D steady state Hex fuel rod model with 1D flow channels. Hand Calculation were used to set up initial conditions for fluid flow. The Hex Fuel rod uses 1D flow paths to model the channels using empirical correlations for heat transfer in a pipe. Created a 2-D axisymmetric transient to steady state model using the CFD turbulent flow and Heat Transfer module in COMSOL. This model was developed to find and understand the hydrogen flow that might effect the thermal gradients axially and at the end of the tie tube where the flow turns and enters an annulus. The Hex fuel rod and Tie tube models were made based on requirements given to us by CSNR and the SCCTE team. The models helped simplify and understand the physics and assumptions. Using pipe correlations reduced the complexity of the 3-D fuel rod model and is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The 2-D axisymmetric tie tube model can be used as a reference "Virtual test model" for comparing and improving 3-D Models.

  11. Thermal efficiency improvement in high output diesel engines a comparison of a Rankine cycle with turbo-compounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weerasinghe, W.M.S.R.; Stobart, R.K.; Hounsham, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal management, in particular, heat recovery and utilisation in internal combustion engines result in improved fuel economy, reduced emissions, fast warm up and optimized cylinder head temperatures. turbo-compounding is a heat recovery technique that has been successfully used in medium and large scale engines. Heat recovery to a secondary fluid and expansion is used in large scale engines, such as in power plants in the form of heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) . The present paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of turbo-compounding and heat recovery and utilisation through a fluid power cycle, a technique that is also applicable to medium and small scale engines. In a fluid power cycle, the working fluid is stored in a reservoir and expanded subsequently. The reservoir acts as an energy buffer that improves the overall efficiency, significantly. This paper highlights the relative advantage of exhaust heat secondary power cycles over turbo-compounding with the aid of MATLAB based QSS Toolbox simulation results. Steam has been selected as the working fluid in this work for its superior heat capacity over organic fluids and gases.

  12. Hydrolytic and thermal degradation of PCL and PCL/Bentonite compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Danyelle Campos; Bezerra, Elieber Barros; Morais, Dayanne Diniz de Souza; Araujo, Edcleide Maria [Universidade Federal de Campina grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais; Wellen, Renate Maria Ramos, E-mail: wellen.renate@gmail.com [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-05-15

    Poly(ε-caprolactone)/montmorillonite (PCL/MMT) and Poly(εcaprolactone)/organo-modified montmorillonite (PCL/OMMT) compounds at 3% w/w clay content were prepared by melting mixing. The effect of MMT and OMMT on the degradability of PCL injected specimens was investigated in vacuum at 40 deg C for up to 45 days and in aqueous medium at 40 deg C for up to 45 days. Selected specimens were collected after 15, 30 and 45 days of exposure. Microstructural changes were monitored during the degradation experiment by means of melt flow rate (MFR), weight loss, X ray diffraction (XRD), mechanical properties, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PCL and its compounds revealed not to be prone to hydrolytic degradation with similar results for MFR of samples exposed in vacuum and water. Gain and loss of weight were observed during experiments, probably due to swelling mechanism taking place in two stages, with the amorphous phase being the first to be swelled followed by the crystalline one. By XRD a new peak corresponding to (002) plane was evident for PCL/OMMT. PCL proved to be resistant to degradation since experiments carried out in vacuum or in aqueous medium for up to 45 days were not enough to affect the mechanical integrity of PCL samples. (author)

  13. Hydrolytic and thermal degradation of PCL and PCL/Bentonite compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, Danyelle Campos; Bezerra, Elieber Barros; Morais, Dayanne Diniz de Souza; Araujo, Edcleide Maria; Wellen, Renate Maria Ramos

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ε-caprolactone)/montmorillonite (PCL/MMT) and Poly(εcaprolactone)/organo-modified montmorillonite (PCL/OMMT) compounds at 3% w/w clay content were prepared by melting mixing. The effect of MMT and OMMT on the degradability of PCL injected specimens was investigated in vacuum at 40 deg C for up to 45 days and in aqueous medium at 40 deg C for up to 45 days. Selected specimens were collected after 15, 30 and 45 days of exposure. Microstructural changes were monitored during the degradation experiment by means of melt flow rate (MFR), weight loss, X ray diffraction (XRD), mechanical properties, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PCL and its compounds revealed not to be prone to hydrolytic degradation with similar results for MFR of samples exposed in vacuum and water. Gain and loss of weight were observed during experiments, probably due to swelling mechanism taking place in two stages, with the amorphous phase being the first to be swelled followed by the crystalline one. By XRD a new peak corresponding to (002) plane was evident for PCL/OMMT. PCL proved to be resistant to degradation since experiments carried out in vacuum or in aqueous medium for up to 45 days were not enough to affect the mechanical integrity of PCL samples. (author)

  14. Intermediate Compound Preparation Using Modified External Gelation Method and Thermal Treatment Equipment Development for UCO Kernel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyung Chai; Eom, Sung Ho; Kim, Yeon Ku; Yeo, Seoung Hwan; Kim, Young Min; Cho, Moon Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    VHTR (Very High Temperature Gas Reactor) fuel technology is being actively developed in the US, China, Japan, and Korea for a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The concept of fuel of a VHTR is based on a sphere kernel of UO{sub 2} or UCO, with multiple coating layers to create a gas-tight particle. The fuel particle of a VHTR in the US is based on microspheres containing a UCO, mixture compound of UO{sub 2} and UC{sub 2} , coated particles with multi carbon layers and a SiC layer. This was first prepared through an internal gelation method at ORNL in the late 1970s. This study presents; (1) C-ADU gel particles were prepared using a modified sol-gel process. The particles fabricated with a KAERI-established gelation and AWD processes showed good sphericity and no cracks were found on the surfaces. (2) High temperature rotating furnace was designed and fabricated in our laboratory, and the maximum operation temperature was about 2000℃. The furnace was equipped with Mo crucible and graphite heating system, and now it is being operated. (3) Well-prepared C-ADU gel particles were converted into UCO compounds using high temperature rotating furnace, and the physical properties of the UCO kernels will be analyzed.

  15. Thermal and dynamic mechanical characterization of thermoplastic polyurethane/organoclay nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barick, A.K.; Tripathy, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    Thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanocomposites based on organically modified layered silicate (OMLS) were prepared by melt intercalation process followed by compression molding. Different percentage of organoclays was incorporated into the TPU matrix in order to examine the influence of the nanoscaled fillers on nanostructure morphology and material properties. The microscopic morphology of the nanocomposites was evaluated by wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The observation revealed that both nanoclay-polymer interactions and shear stress developed during melt mixing are responsible for the effectively organoclay dispersion in TPU matrix resulting intercalated/exfoliated morphology. Thermal stability of the nanocomposites measured by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was improved significantly with the addition of nanoclay. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis reveals that melting point of the nanocomposites increased with incorporation of nanoclay. The dynamic mechanical properties of the TPU nanocomposites were analyzed using a dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer (DMTA), which indicates that the storage modulus (E'), loss modulus (E''), and glass transition temperature (T g ) are significantly increased with increasing nanoclay content.

  16. Clathrate Hydrates for Thermal Energy Storage in Buildings: Overview of Proper Hydrate-Forming Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Castellani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasing energy costs are at the origin of the great progress in the field of phase change materials (PCMs. The present work aims at studying the application of clathrate hydrates as PCMs in buildings. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline structures in which guest molecules are enclosed in the crystal lattice of water molecules. Clathrate hydrates can form also at ambient pressure and present a high latent heat, and for this reason, they are good candidates for being used as PCMs. The parameter that makes a PCM suitable to be used in buildings is, first of all, a melting temperature at about 25 °C. The paper provides an overview of groups of clathrate hydrates, whose physical and chemical characteristics could meet the requirements needed for their application in buildings. Simulations with a dynamic building simulation tool are carried out to evaluate the performance of clathrate hydrates in enhancing thermal comfort through the moderation of summer temperature swings and, therefore, in reducing energy consumption. Simulations suggest that clathrate hydrates have a potential in terms of improvement of indoor thermal comfort and a reduction of energy consumption for cooling. Cooling effects of 0.5 °C and reduced overheating hours of up to 1.1% are predicted.

  17. Thermal expansion and magnetostriction of clathrate compound Pr3Pd20Ge6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Iwakami, O.; Ono, T.; Abe, S.; Ano, G.; Akatsu, M.; Mitsumoto, K.; Nemoto, Y.; Goto, T.; Takeda, N.; Kitazawa, H.

    2018-03-01

    In Pr3Pd20Ge6, the Pr ions are located at two different crystallographic sites, 4a and 8c site. Antiferro-quadrupole ordering (AFQ) of the 8c site occurs at 250 mK. Ac susceptibility measurement indicated that antiferromagnetic ordering (AFM) of the 4a site and Hyperfine-enhanced Pr nuclear magnetic ordering of the 8c site occur at 77 and 9 mK, respectively. To clarify the magnetic and quadrupole properties of Pr3Pd20Ge6, thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements on single crystal sample were carried out along the [001] direction up to 8 T down to 500 μK using a capacitive dilatometer. In zero field, relative length change ΔL/L in [001] direction had a dip at AFQ and abrupt decrease at AFM ordering. From thermal expansion and isothermal magnetostriction measurements, magnetic phase diagram of Pr3Pd20Ge6 along [001] direction was obtained.

  18. Reactor thermal behaviors under kinetics parameters variations in fast reactivity insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-El-Maaty, Talal [Reactors Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt)], E-mail: talal22969@yahoo.com; Abdelhady, Amr [Reactors Department, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo 13759 (Egypt)

    2009-03-15

    The influences of variations in some of the kinetics parameters affecting the reactivity insertion are considered in this study, it has been accomplished in order to acquire knowledge about the role that kinetic parameters play in prompt critical transients from the safety point of view. The kinetics parameters variations are limited to the effective delayed neutron fraction ({beta}{sub eff}) and the prompt neutron generation time ({lambda}). The reactor thermal behaviors under the variations in effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron generation time included, the reactor power, maximum fuel temperature, maximum clad temperature, maximum coolant temperature and the mass flux variations at the hot channel. The analysis is done for a typical swimming pool, plate type research reactor with low enriched uranium. The scram system is disabled during the accidents simulations. Calculations were done using PARET code. As a result of simulations, it is concluded that, the reactor (ETRR2) thermal behavior is considerably more sensitive to the variation in the effective delayed neutron fraction than to the variation in prompt neutron generation time and the fast reactivity insertion in both cases causes a flow expansion and contraction at the hot channel exit. The amplitude of the oscillated flow is a qualitatively increases with the decrease in both {beta}{sub eff} and {lambda}.

  19. Thermodynamic study on six tricyclic nitrogen heterocyclic compounds by thermal analysis and effusion techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunetti, Bruno [Istituto per lo Studio dei Materiali Nanostrutturati, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Dipartimento di Chimica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P .le A. Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Lapi, Andrea [Dipartimento di Chimica, Sapienza Università di Roma, and Istituto CNR di Metodologie Chimiche (IMC-CNR), Sezione Meccanismi di Reazione, Dipartimento di Chimica, Sapienza Università di Roma, P. le A. Moro 5, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Vecchio Ciprioti, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.vecchio@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento S.B.A.I., Sapienza Università di Roma, Via del Castro Laurenziano 7, I-00161 Rome (Italy)

    2016-07-20

    Highlights: • Melting characteristics of tricyclic N-hetero tricyclic compounds were measured by DSC. • Vapor pressures of solid and liquid compounds were measured by effusion and iso-TG. • Thermochemical data from solid and liquid phases were compared with literature. • Good agreement between experimental and literature data with only few exceptions. - Abstract: The molar sublimation and vaporization enthalpies of acridine, phenanthridine, 1,7-phenanthroline, 1,10-phenanthroline, 4,7-phenanthroline and phenazine were determined at the averages of their respective experimental temperature ranges (Δ{sub cr}{sup g}H{sup 0}{sub m} () and Δ{sub l}{sup g}H{sup 0}{sub m} (), respectively) from the temperature dependencies of vapor pressure determined using Knudsen Effusion Mass Loss (KEML), Torsion Effusion (TE) and Isothermal Thermogravimetry (ITG) above their solid and liquid phases. The fusion characteristics (melting temperatures and the molar standard enthalpies of fusion at their melting temperatures) measured by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) were compared with the available literature values. Solid and liquid vapor pressure data determined by KEML, TE and ITG techniques as well as Δ{sub cr}{sup g}H{sup 0}{sub m} () and Δ{sub l}{sup g}H{sup 0}{sub m} () values, adjusted at 298.15 K by using the values of C{sub p}(cr) and C{sub p}(l) calculated by a well-known group additivity method, were found to be fairly correlated and are consistent with the available literature data. Final Δ{sub cr}{sup g}H{sup 0}{sub m}(298.15 K) values were also provided as weighted averages of all the available data.

  20. Development and Validation of Capabilities to Measure Thermal Properties of Layered Monolithic U-Mo Alloy Plate-Type Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Pool, Karl N.; Smith, Frances N.; Steen, Franciska H.

    2014-07-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the thermal-conductivity behavior of the fuel system as a function of temperature and expected irradiation conditions. The purpose of this paper is to verify functionality of equipment installed in hot cells for eventual measurements on irradiated uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) monolithic fuel specimens, refine procedures to operate the equipment, and validate models to extract the desired thermal properties. The results presented here demonstrate the adequacy of the equipment, procedures, and models that have been developed for this purpose based on measurements conducted on surrogate depleted uranium-molybdenum (DU-Mo) alloy samples containing a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061). The results are in excellent agreement with thermal property data reported in the literature for similar U-Mo alloys as a function of temperature.

  1. Formation of polymerization compounds during thermal oxidation of cottonseed oil, partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil and their blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Arellano, D. Laboratório de Óleos e Gorduras, Departa

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Samples of cottonseed oil, partially hydrogenated cottonseed oil and their blends, with iodine values between 60 and 110, tocopherol-stripped or not by aluminium oxide treatment, were submitted to thermal oxidation, at 180 °C, for 10 hours. Samples were collected at 0, 2, 5, 8 and 10 hours, for the determination of dimers and polymers (degradation compounds and of tocopherols. The influence of the degree of hydrogenation on the formation of dimers and polymers and the role of originally present tocopherols in the protection of fats and oils against thermal degradation was verified. The degradation curves for tocopherols showed a fast destruction rate for the tocopherols present in cottonseed fats and oil (α and γ-tocopherols, with residual levels close to zero after 10 hours under thermal oxidation conditions. Nevertheless, samples with their natural tocopherols presented a slower rate of thermal degradation. The unsaturation degree was apparently more important in the protection against thermal degradation than the content of tocopherolsMuestras de aceite de algodón, aceite de algodón parcialmente hidrogenado y sus mezclas, con índices de yodo de 60 a 110, tratadas o no con óxido de aluminio, fueron sometidas a termoxidación, a 180 °C, durante 10 horas. Se retiraron muestras en los tiempos 0, 2, 5, 8 y 10 horas, para determinación de dímeros y polímeros (compuestos de degradación y de tocoferoles. Se verificó la influencia del grado de hidrogenación sobre la formación de dímeros y polímeros, y también el papel de los tocoferoles originalmente presentes en el aceite y en las grasas, en la protección contra la degradación térmica. Las curvas de degradación de los tocoferoles mostraron una destrucción bastante rápida de los tocoferoles presentes en el aceite y en las grasas de algodón (α y γ-tocoferoles, con niveles residuales próximos a cero después de 10 horas de termoxidación. Aún así, muestras con sus

  2. Outdoor Performance Analysis of a Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT) Collector with Jet Impingement and Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaaz, Ahed Hameed; Hasan, Husam Abdulrasool; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Gaaz, Tayser Sumer; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A

    2017-08-01

    This paper discusses the effect of jet impingement of water on a photovoltaic thermal (PVT) collector and compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) on electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency and power production of a PVT system. A prototype of a PVT solar water collector installed with a jet impingement and CPC has been designed, fabricated and experimentally investigated. The efficiency of the system can be improved by using jet impingement of water to decrease the temperature of the solar cells. The electrical efficiency and power output are directly correlated with the mass flow rate. The results show that electrical efficiency was improved by 7% when using CPC and jet impingement cooling in a PVT solar collector at 1:00 p.m. (solar irradiance of 1050 W/m² and an ambient temperature of 33.5 °C). It can also be seen that the power output improved by 36% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 20% without CPC in the photovoltaic (PV) module at 1:30 p.m. The short-circuit current I SC of the PV module experienced an improvement of ~28% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 11.7% without CPC. The output of the PV module was enhanced by 31% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 16% without CPC.

  3. Testing and linearity calibration of films of phenol compounds exposed to thermal neutron field for EPR dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, S; Panzeca, S; Longo, A; Altieri, S; Bentivoglio, A; Dondi, D; Marconi, R P; Protti, N; Zeffiro, A; Marrale, M

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports the preliminary results obtained by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements on films of IRGANOX® 1076 phenols with and without low content (5% by weight) of gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) exposed in the thermal column of the Triga Mark II reactor of LENA (Laboratorio Energia Nucleare Applicata) of Pavia (Italy). Thanks to their size, the phenolic films here presented are good devices for the dosimetry of beams with high dose gradient and which require accurate knowledge of the precise dose delivered. The dependence of EPR signal as function of neutron dose was investigated in the fluence range between 10(11) cm(-2) and 10(14) cm(-2). Linearity of EPR response was found and the signal was compared with that of commercial alanine films. Our analysis showed that gadolinium oxide (5% by weight) can enhance the thermal neutron sensitivity more than 18 times. Irradiated dosimetric films of phenolic compound exhibited EPR signal fading of about 4% after 10 days from irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Outdoor Performance Analysis of a Photovoltaic Thermal (PVT Collector with Jet Impingement and Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahed Hameed Jaaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effect of jet impingement of water on a photovoltaic thermal (PVT collector and compound parabolic concentrators (CPC on electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency and power production of a PVT system. A prototype of a PVT solar water collector installed with a jet impingement and CPC has been designed, fabricated and experimentally investigated. The efficiency of the system can be improved by using jet impingement of water to decrease the temperature of the solar cells. The electrical efficiency and power output are directly correlated with the mass flow rate. The results show that electrical efficiency was improved by 7% when using CPC and jet impingement cooling in a PVT solar collector at 1:00 p.m. (solar irradiance of 1050 W/m2 and an ambient temperature of 33.5 °C. It can also be seen that the power output improved by 36% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 20% without CPC in the photovoltaic (PV module at 1:30 p.m. The short-circuit current ISC of the PV module experienced an improvement of ~28% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 11.7% without CPC. The output of the PV module was enhanced by 31% when using jet impingement cooling with CPC, and 16% without CPC.

  5. Fabrication and thermal characterization of amorphous and nanocrystalline Al{sub 9}FeNi/Al{sub 3}Ti compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavoosi, Majid, E-mail: ma.tavoosi@gmail.com

    2017-01-15

    In this study, the fabrication and structural characterization of amorphous/nanocrystalline Al{sub 9}FeNi/Al{sub 3}Ti phase has been performed. In this regards, milling and annealing processes were applied on Al{sub 80}Fe{sub 10}Ti{sub 5}Ni{sub 5} (at. %) powder mixture for different periods of time. The prepared samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and differential scanning calorimetery (DSC). According to the results, supersaturated solid solution, nanocrystalline Al{sub 9}FeNi/Al{sub 3}Ti (with average crystallite size of about 7 nm) and amorphous phases indicated three different microstructures which can be formed in Al{sub 80}Fe{sub 10}Ti{sub 5}Ni{sub 5} system during milling process. The formed supersaturated solid solution and amorphous phases were unstable and transformed to Al{sub 9}FeNi/Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic compound during annealing process. It is shown that, Al{sub 9}FeNi phase in Al{sub 9}FeNi/Al{sub 3}Ti intermetallic compound can decompose into Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4} and liquid phases during a reversible peritectic reaction at 809 °C. - Highlights: • We study the effect of milling process on Al{sub 80}Fe{sub 10}Ti{sub 5}Ni{sub 5} alloy. • We study the effect of annealing on Al{sub 80}Fe{sub 10}Ti{sub 5}Ni{sub 5} supersaturated solid solution phase. • We study the effect of annealing on Al{sub 80}Fe{sub 10}Ti{sub 5}Ni{sub 5} amorphous phase. • We study the thermal behaviour of Al{sub 9}FeNi/Al{sub 3}Ti compound.

  6. Solid and liquid thermal expansion and structural observations in the quasicrystalline Cd84Yb16 compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, M.J.; Lograsso, T.A.; Sordelet, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of single-grain Cd 84 Yb 16 samples aligned along the twofold and fivefold axes has been followed from 300 to 1050 K using high-energy synchrotron X-rays. The quasicrystal phase is stable up to its melting temperature of 914 K and has a large linear thermal expansion of 37.1 ppm K -1 over this temperature range. The samples melt congruently over a temperature range of less than 1 K. The liquid is 7% less dense than the solid and, upon cooling from the melt, the quasicrystal phase directly solidifies within a 1 K interval. The amount of undercooling achieved, about 5-25 K, was dependent on the cooling rate. The total scattering function of the liquid is consistent with a dilute liquid Cd structure. These results agree with suggestions that the structure of the liquid must undergo reordering in order to form the solid phases. However, there is no compelling evidence for icosahedral short-range order in the liquid prior to the formation of the quasicrystalline structure.

  7. Synthesis of spiro-4H-pyrazole-oxindoles and fused 1H-pyrazoles via divergent, thermally induced tandem cyclization/migration of alkyne-tethered diazo compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Dong, Shanliang; Zheng, Yang; He, Ciwang; Chen, Jiaolong; Zhen, Jingsen; Qiu, Lihua; Xu, Xinfang

    2018-01-31

    A thermally induced, substrate-dependent reaction of alkynyl diazo compounds has been developed. This transformation produces spiro-4H-pyrazole-oxindoles and fused 1H-pyrazoles in good to high yields from the corresponding alpha-cyano and alpha-sulfonyl diazo compounds. The salient features of this reaction include excellent chemoselectivity and atom-economy, mild reaction conditions, simple purification and potential for large scale production.

  8. Thermal expansion and strength characteristics of interatomic bonds in melts of A3 B5 (Al Sb, In Sb, Ga Sb, In As, Ga As) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazov, V.M.; Shchelikov, O.D.

    1998-01-01

    Temperature dependence of specific volume of the A 3 B 5 compounds melts is studied thermometrically and through the method of the penetrating γ radiation. Evaluation of melts thermal expansion coefficients under different temperatures is carried out. Estimates of the Debye characteristic temperatures and mean square dynamic shifts of atoms in the close order structure of the A 3 B 5 compounds melts are conducted on the basis of the obtained results

  9. Thermal, thermo-hydraulic and thermo-mechanic analysis for fuel elements of IEA-R1 reactor at 5MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira e Silva, A.; Silva Macedo, L.V. da

    1989-01-01

    In connection with the on going conversion of IEA-R1 Research Reactor, operated by IPEN-CNEN/SP, from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, steady-state thermal and thermo-hydraulic analysis of both existing HEU and proposed LEU cores under 2 MW operating conditions have been carried out. Keeping in mind the possibility of power upgrading, steady-state thermal, thermo-hydraulic and thermomechanical analysis of proposed LEU core under 5 MW operating conditions have also been carried out. The thermal and thermo-hydraulic analysis at 2 MW show that the conversion of the existing HEU core to be proposed LEU core will not change the reactor safety margins. Although the upgrading of the reactor power to 5 MW will result in safety margins lower than in case of 2MW, these will be still sufficient for optimum operation and safe behaviour. The thermomechanical analysis at 5 MW show that the thermal stresses induced in the fuel element will satisfy the design limits for mechanical strenght and elastic stability. (author) [pt

  10. Modeling the influence of interaction layer formation on thermal conductivity of U–Mo dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hsu equation provides best thermal conductivity estimate of U–Mo dispersion fuel. • Simple model considering interaction layer formation was coupled with Hsu equation. • Interaction layer thermal conductivity is not the most important attribute. • Effective thermal conductivity is mostly influenced by interaction layer formation. • Fuel particle distribution also influences the effective thermal conductivity. - Abstract: The Global Threat Reduction Initiative Program continues to develop existing and new test reactor fuels to achieve the maximum attainable uranium loadings to support the conversion of a number of the world’s remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Currently, the program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of a fuel design that consists of a uranium–molybdenum (U–Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the dispersed phase and matrix, porosity that forms during fabrication of the fuel plates or rods, and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper develops and validates a simple model to study the influence of interaction layer formation, dispersed particle size, and volume fraction of dispersed phase in the matrix on the effective conductivity of the composite. The model shows excellent agreement with results previously presented in the literature. In particular, the thermal conductivity of the interaction layer does not appear to be as important in determining the effective conductivity of the composite, while formation of the interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect. The effective thermal conductivity of the composite can be influenced by the dispersed particle distribution by minimizing interaction

  11. Interaction of inorganic and organic compounds of physiological fluids with thermally treated Ti surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgos-Asperilla, Laura

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of the interaction between the thermally treated Ti (TT-Ti at 277 °C for 5 hours and the body fluids, ranging from the simplest to the most complex solution is analysed. Electrochemical techniques such as the measurement of the corrosion potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and the polarization curves have been used. The characterization of TT-Ti has been performed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS. The XPS reveals that the peak intensity associated with phosphate and calcium increases as immersion time does. However, the albumin covers rapidly the surface since the C peak intensity remains constant from the first day to the end of immersion time. The calcium ions have a bridging effect on the electrostatic adsorption of phosphate ions as well as that of albumin and the acidic hydroxyl groups of the oxide layer. The impedance measurement shows that the resistance of the oxide layer immersed in albumin and foetal bovine serum decrease probably due to the formation of organometallic complex. The polarization curves reveal that the presence of proteins decreases the current of anodic branch indicating that the proteins work as a barrier on the surface.Se estudia la interacción del Ti oxidado a 277 °C durante 5 horas con compuestos orgánicos e inorgánicos presentes en los fluidos fisiológicos, desde la solución más simple a la más compleja. Se han utilizado técnicas electroquímicas como la evolución del potencial de corrosión, espectroscopía de impedancia electroquímica y curvas de polarización, y la espectroscopía de fotoelectrones de rayos X (XPS. El XPS revela que la intensidad de los picos asociados a los iones fosfato y calcio aumenta con el tiempo de inmersión. Sin embargo, la albúmina cubre desde el primer día la superficie, ya que la intensidad de los picos asociados a la presencia de C permanece prácticamente constante hasta el final

  12. Synthesis and characterization of an energetic compound Cu(Mtta)2(NO3)2 and effect on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Qi; Chen, Sanping; Xie, Gang; Gao, Shengli

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new energetic compound Cu(Mtta) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 has been synthesized and structural characterized. ► Sensitivity tests reveal that the compound is insensitive to mechanical stimuli. ► Cu(Mtta) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 accelerates the decomposition of Ammonium perchlorate (AP), which is the key component of composite solid propellant. - Abstract: An energetic coordination compound Cu(Mtta) 2 (NO 3 ) 2 has been synthesized by using 1-methyltetrazole (Mtta) as ligand and its structure has been characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The central copper (II) cation was coordinated by four O atoms from two Mtta ligands and two N atoms from two NO 3 − anions to form a six-coordinated and distorted octahedral structure. 2D superamolecular layer structure was formed by the extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonds between Mtta ligands and NO 3 − anions. Thermal decomposition process of the compound was predicted based on DSC and TG-DTG analyses results. The kinetic parameters of the first exothermic process of the compound were studied by the Kissinger's and Ozawa–Doyle's methods. Sensitivity tests revealed that the compound was insensitive to mechanical stimuli. In addition, compound was explored as additive to promote the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) by differential scanning calorimetry.

  13. Advanced Multiphysics Thermal-Hydraulics Models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design studies to determine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work is part of an effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Conversion Program. HFIR is a very high flux pressurized light-water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type research reactor. HFIR s current missions are to support neutron scattering experiments, isotope production, and materials irradiation, including neutron activation analysis. Advanced three-dimensional multiphysics models of HFIR fuel were developed in COMSOL software for safety basis (worst case) operating conditions. Several types of physics including multilayer heat conduction, conjugate heat transfer, turbulent flows (RANS model) and structural mechanics were combined and solved for HFIR s inner and outer fuel elements. Alternate design features of the new LEU fuel were evaluated using these multiphysics models. This work led to a new, preliminary reference LEU design that combines a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone. Preliminary results of estimated thermal safety margins are presented. Fuel design studies and model enhancement continue.

  14. Determination of isobaric thermal expansivity of organic compounds from 0.1 to 30 MPa at 30 degrees C with an isothermal pressure scanning microcalorimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdier, Sylvain Charles Roland; Andersen, Simon Ivar

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a simple high-pressure mercury-free microcalorimetric technique that enables the compression of a fluid from 0.1 to 30 MPa. Thermal expansivities of several compounds were calculated (n-hexane, cyclohexane, heptane, and toluene) with the pressure. scanning transitiometry method...

  15. Thermal and spectroscopic study to investigate p-aminobenzoic acid, sodium p-aminobenzoate and its compounds with some lighter trivalent lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, J.A.; Nunes, W.D.G.; Colman, T.A.D.; Nascimento, A.L.C.S do; Caires, F.J.; Campos, F.X.; Gálico, D.A.; Ionashiro, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The p-aminobenzoic acid melts followed partial evaporation. • The stoichiometry of compounds was established by TG, EA and complexometry. • The TG–DTA curves provided previously unreported information about thermal behavior. - Abstract: The characterization, thermal stability and thermal decomposition of some lighter trivalent lanthanide p-aminobenzoates, Ln(C 7 H 6 NO 2 ) 3 ·H 2 O (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm), as well as the thermal behavior and spectroscopic study of p-aminobenzoic acid C 7 H 7 NO 2 and its sodium salt were investigated. The following methods were utilized: simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG–DTA) in dynamic dry air and nitrogen atmospheres; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); middle (MIR) and near (NIR) infrared region spectroscopy; evolved gas analysis (EGA); elemental analysis; complexometry; X-ray diffraction (XRD); and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DR) in the ultraviolet and visible regions. All the compounds were obtained monohydrated and the thermal decomposition occurred in two, three or four steps in an air atmosphere, and three or four steps in N 2 atmosphere. In both atmospheres (air and N 2 ) the final residues were CeO 2 , Pr 6 O 11 , Ln 2 O 3 (Ln = La, Nd, Sm). The results also provided information concerning the coordination mode and thermal behavior, as well as the identification of the gaseous products which evolved during the thermal decomposition of these compounds. The DR and NIR spectra provided information about the ligand absorption bands and the f–f transitions of the Nd 3+ , Pr 3+ and Sm 3+ ions.

  16. Thermal and spectroscopic study to investigate p-aminobenzoic acid, sodium p-aminobenzoate and its compounds with some lighter trivalent lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, J.A.; Nunes, W.D.G.; Colman, T.A.D.; Nascimento, A.L.C.S do [Instituto de Química, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Araraquara, Departamento de Química Analítica, Araraquara 14801-970, SP (Brazil); Caires, F.J. [Faculdade de Ciências, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Bauru, Departamento de Química, Bauru 17033-260, SP (Brazil); Campos, F.X. [Instituto de Química, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Araraquara, Departamento de Química Analítica, Araraquara 14801-970, SP (Brazil); Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia de Mato Grosso, Primavera do Leste 78850-000, MT (Brazil); Gálico, D.A. [Instituto de Química, UNICAMP—Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas 13083-970, SP (Brazil); Ionashiro, M., E-mail: massaoi@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Química, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Campus Araraquara, Departamento de Química Analítica, Araraquara 14801-970, SP (Brazil)

    2016-01-20

    Highlights: • The p-aminobenzoic acid melts followed partial evaporation. • The stoichiometry of compounds was established by TG, EA and complexometry. • The TG–DTA curves provided previously unreported information about thermal behavior. - Abstract: The characterization, thermal stability and thermal decomposition of some lighter trivalent lanthanide p-aminobenzoates, Ln(C{sub 7}H{sub 6}NO{sub 2}){sub 3}·H{sub 2}O (Ln = La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm), as well as the thermal behavior and spectroscopic study of p-aminobenzoic acid C{sub 7}H{sub 7}NO{sub 2} and its sodium salt were investigated. The following methods were utilized: simultaneous thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis (TG–DTA) in dynamic dry air and nitrogen atmospheres; differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); middle (MIR) and near (NIR) infrared region spectroscopy; evolved gas analysis (EGA); elemental analysis; complexometry; X-ray diffraction (XRD); and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DR) in the ultraviolet and visible regions. All the compounds were obtained monohydrated and the thermal decomposition occurred in two, three or four steps in an air atmosphere, and three or four steps in N{sub 2} atmosphere. In both atmospheres (air and N{sub 2}) the final residues were CeO{sub 2}, Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11}, Ln{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Ln = La, Nd, Sm). The results also provided information concerning the coordination mode and thermal behavior, as well as the identification of the gaseous products which evolved during the thermal decomposition of these compounds. The DR and NIR spectra provided information about the ligand absorption bands and the f–f transitions of the Nd{sup 3+}, Pr{sup 3+} and Sm{sup 3+} ions.

  17. Effects of thermal desorption on the composition of two coking plant soils: Impact on solvent extractable organic compounds and metal bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biache, Coralie [G2R UMR 7566, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); LIMOS UMR 7137, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)], E-mail: coralie.biache@g2r.uhp-nancy.fr; Mansuy-Huault, Laurence; Faure, Pierre [G2R UMR 7566, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Munier-Lamy, Colette; Leyval, Corinne [LIMOS UMR 7137, Nancy Universite, CNRS, Boulevard des Aiguillettes B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2008-12-15

    To evaluate the efficiency and the influence of thermal desorption on the soil organic compartment, contaminated soils from coking plant sites (NM and H) were compared to their counterparts treated with thermodesorption. The extractable organic matter, and the metal content and distribution with soil compartments were studied. In both thermodesorbed soils, PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) degradation exceeded 90%. However, the thermal desorption led not only to a volatilization of the organic compounds but also to the condensation of extractable organic matter. The treatments only affected the Fe and Zn distribution within the more stable fractions, whereas the organic compound degradation did not affect their mobility and availability. - Thermal desorption does not induce a metal mobilization but condensation seems to occur during the treatment.

  18. Influence of nanoparticle addition on the formation and growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in Cu/Sn–Ag–Cu/Cu solder joint during different thermal conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting Tan, Ai; Wen Tan, Ai; Yusof, Farazila

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposite lead-free solders are gaining prominence as replacements for conventional lead-free solders such as Sn–Ag–Cu solder in the electronic packaging industry. They are fabricated by adding nanoparticles such as metallic and ceramic particles into conventional lead-free solder. It is reported that the addition of such nanoparticles could strengthen the solder matrix, refine the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed and suppress the growth of IMCs when the joint is subjected to different thermal conditions such as thermal aging and thermal cycling. In this paper, we first review the fundamental studies on the formation and growth of IMCs in lead-free solder joints. Subsequently, we discuss the effect of the addition of nanoparticles on IMC formation and their growth under several thermal conditions. Finally, an outlook on the future growth of research in the fabrication of nanocomposite solder is provided. PMID:27877786

  19. Influence of nanoparticle addition on the formation and growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in Cu/Sn–Ag–Cu/Cu solder joint during different thermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting Tan, Ai; Wen Tan, Ai; Yusof, Farazila

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposite lead-free solders are gaining prominence as replacements for conventional lead-free solders such as Sn–Ag–Cu solder in the electronic packaging industry. They are fabricated by adding nanoparticles such as metallic and ceramic particles into conventional lead-free solder. It is reported that the addition of such nanoparticles could strengthen the solder matrix, refine the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed and suppress the growth of IMCs when the joint is subjected to different thermal conditions such as thermal aging and thermal cycling. In this paper, we first review the fundamental studies on the formation and growth of IMCs in lead-free solder joints. Subsequently, we discuss the effect of the addition of nanoparticles on IMC formation and their growth under several thermal conditions. Finally, an outlook on the future growth of research in the fabrication of nanocomposite solder is provided. (review)

  20. Alteration of sensitivity of intratumor quiescent and total cells to γ-rays following thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B-compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ono, Koji; Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru; Takagaki, Masao; Kinashi, Yuko; Akaboshi, Mitsuhiko

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Changes in the sensitivity of intratumor quiescent (Q) and total cells to γ-rays following thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10 B-compound were examined. Methods and Materials: 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected to SCC VII tumor-bearing mice intraperitoneally 10 times to label all the proliferating (P) tumor cells. As priming irradiation, thermal neutrons alone or thermal neutrons with 10 B-labeled sodium borocaptate (BSH) or dl-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) were administered. The tumor-bearing mice then received a series of γ-ray radiation doses, 0 through 24 h after the priming irradiation. During this period, no BrdU was administered. Immediately after the second irradiation, the tumors were excised, minced, and trypsinized. Following incubation of tumor cells with cytokinesis blocker, the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (= Q cells at the time of priming irradiation) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN frequency in the total (P + Q) tumor cells was determined from the tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU before the priming irradiation. To determine the BrdU-labeled cell ratios in the tumors at the time of the second irradiation, each group also included mice that were continuously administered BrdU until just before the second irradiation using mini-osmotic pumps which had been implanted subcutaneously 5 days before the priming irradiation. Results: In total cells, during the interval between the two irradiations, the tumor sensitivity to γ-rays relative to that immediately after priming irradiation decreased with the priming irradiation ranking in the following order: thermal neutrons only > thermal neutrons with BSH > thermal neutrons with BPA. In contrast, in Q cells, during that time the sensitivity increased in the following order: thermal neutrons only 10 B-compound, especially BPA, in thermal neutron irradiation causes the recruitment from the Q to P population

  1. Improvement of the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of high-density polyethylene by free radical trapping of rare earth compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ran, Shiya; Zhao, Li; Han, Ligang [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Guo, Zhenghong, E-mail: guozhenghong@nit.zju.edu.cn [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); Fang, Zhengping [Laboratory of Polymer Materials and Engineering, Ningbo Institute of Technology, ZhejiangUniversity, Ningbo, 315100 (China); MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecular Synthesis and Functionalization, Institute of Polymer Composites, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • Polyethylene filled with ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate was prepared. • A low Yb loading improved thermal stability of PE obviously by radical trapping. • Yb(OTf){sub 3} is expected to be an efficient thermal stabilizer for the polymer. - Abstract: A kind of rare earth compound, ytterbium trifluoromethanesulfonate (Yb(OTf){sub 3}), was introduced into high-density polyethylene (HDPE) by melt compounding to investigate the effect of Yb(OTf){sub 3} on the thermal and thermo-oxidative stability of HDPE. The results of thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the addition of Yb(OTf){sub 3} made the thermal degradation temperatures dramatically increased, the oxidative induction time (OIT) extended, and the enthalpy (ΔH{sub d}) reduced. Very low Yb(OTf){sub 3} loading (0.5 wt%) in HDPE could increase the onset degradation temperature in air from 334 to 407 °C, delay the OIT from 11.0 to 24.3 min, and decrease the ΔH{sub d} from 61.0 to 13.0 J/g remarkably. Electron spin resonance spectra (ESR), thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TGA-FTIR), rheological investigation and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) indicated that the free radicals-trapping ability of Yb(OTf){sub 3} was responsible for the improved thermal and thermo-oxidative stability.

  2. Evidence of the Disassembly of α-Cyclodextrin-octylamine Inclusion Compounds Conjugated to Gold Nanoparticles via Thermal and Photothermal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Silva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrin (CD molecules form inclusion compounds (ICs, generating dimers that are capable of encapsulating molecules derived from long-chain hydrocarbons. The aim of this study is to evaluate the structural changes experienced by ICs in solution with increasing temperatures. For this, a nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR titration was performed to determinate the stoichiometric α-cyclodextrin (α-CD:octylamine (OA 2:1 and binding constant (k = 2.16 M−2 of ICs. Solution samples of α-CD-OA ICs conjugated with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs were prepared, and 1H-NMR spectra at different temperatures were recorded. Comparatively, 1H-NMR spectra of the sample irradiated with a laser with tunable wavelengths, with plasmons of conjugated AuNPs, were recorded. In this work, we present evidence of the disassembly of ICs conjugated with AuNPs. Thermal studies demonstrated that, at 114 °C, there are reversible rearrangements of the host and guests in the ICs in a solid state. Migration movements of the guest molecules from the CD cavity were monitored via temperature-dependent 1H-NMR, and were verified comparing the chemical shifts of octylamine dissolved in deuterated dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO-d6 with the OA molecule included in α-CD dissolved in the same solvent. It was observed that, at 117 °C, OA exited the α-CD cavity. CD IC dimer disassembly was also observed when the sample was irradiated with green laser light.

  3. Reversible bulk-phase change of anthroyl compounds for photopatterning based on photodimerization in the molten state and thermal back reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2013-04-10

    As new organic materials for rewritable photopatterning, 2-anthroyl and 9-anthroyl ester compounds were synthesized. Their bulk-phase changes (we use "bulk-phase change" as complete phase change in a mass of a material neither in a surface nor in a small quantity in this study) triggered by photodimerization under melting conditions (melt-photodimerization) and subsequent thermal back reactions were investigated. All the anthroyl compounds exhibited melting points lower than ca. 160 °C, and they were nearly quantitatively converted to the corresponding photodimers by UV irradiation at temperatures of ∼5 °C higher than their respective melting points. We found that there were two kinds of bulk-phase change behaviors through the photoreaction. Two of the anthroyl compounds remained isotropic and lost fluidity during the melt-photodimerization. The obtained photodimers exhibited robust solid-state amorphous phases at room temperature. In contrast, the other three anthroyl compounds showed crystallization during the melt-photodimerization. The resulting photodimers changed from isotropic to crystalline phases, even at high temperature. Various experiments revealed that the bulk phase of the photodimers was affected not by the existence of regioisomers but by their fluidity at the photoirradiation temperature. The latter three photodimers retained enough fluidity, reflecting their high molecular mobilities at the photoirradiation temperature at which the isothermal crystallization occurred. The other two products were not able to crystallize due to low fluidity, resulting in amorphous phases. We also found that all the photodimers reverted to the corresponding monomers by thermal back reaction and recovered their initial photochemical and thermal properties. Using these reversible bulk-phase changes of the anthroyl compounds, we successfully demonstrated rewritable photopatterning in not only negative images but also positive ones, based on the optical contrast

  4. Effect of reactor radiation on the thermal conductivity of TREAT fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kun, E-mail: kunmo@anl.gov; Miao, Yinbin; Kontogeorgakos, Dimitrios C.; Connaway, Heather M.; Wright, Arthur E.; Yacout, Abdellatif M.

    2017-04-15

    The Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) at the Idaho National Laboratory is resuming operations after more than 20 years in latency in order to produce high-neutron-flux transients for investigating transient-induced behavior of reactor fuels and their interactions with other materials and structures. A parallel program is ongoing to develop a replacement core in which the fuel, historically containing highly-enriched uranium (HEU), is replaced by low-enriched uranium (LEU). Both the HEU and prospective LEU fuels are in the form of UO{sub 2} particles dispersed in a graphite matrix, but the LEU fuel will contain a much higher volume of UO{sub 2} particles, which may create a larger area of interphase boundaries between the particles and the graphite. This may lead to a higher volume fraction of graphite exposed to the fission fragments escaping from the UO{sub 2} particles, and thus may induce a higher volume of fission-fragment damage on the fuel graphite. In this work, we analyzed the reactor-radiation induced thermal conductivity degradation of graphite-based dispersion fuel. A semi-empirical method to model the relative thermal conductivity with reactor radiation was proposed and validated based on the available experimental data. Prediction of thermal conductivity degradation of LEU TREAT fuel during a long-term operation was performed, with a focus on the effect of UO{sub 2} particle size on fission-fragment damage. The proposed method can be further adjusted to evaluate the degradation of other properties of graphite-based dispersion fuel.

  5. Ab initio study of the structural, electronic, elastic and thermal properties of RMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ca, Nd and Y) intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miloud Abid, O.; Yakoubi, A. [Laboratoire d’Etudes des Matériaux et Instrumentations Expérimentales, Université Djilali Liabes de Sidi Bel-Abbes, 22000 (Algeria); Tadjer, A. [Modeling and Simulation in Materials Science Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Sidi Bel-Abbes, Sidi Bel-Abbes (Algeria); Khenata, R., E-mail: khenata_rabah@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique de la Modélisation Mathématique (LPQ3M), Université de Mascara, 29000 (Algeria); Ahmed, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM Skudai, 81310 Johor (Malaysia); Murtaza, G. [Materials Modeling Laboratory, Department of Physics, Islamia College University, Peshawar (Pakistan); Bin Omran, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Azam, Sikander [New Technologies – Research Center, University of West Bohemia, Univerzitni 8, 306 14 Pilsen (Czech Republic)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The calculated structural parameters of RMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ca, Nd and Y) compounds are found in good agreement with the experimental data. • The structural and band structure calculation reveals that these compounds are ferromagnetic brittle metals. • The elastic and thermodynamic properties for the herein studied compounds are investigated for the first time. - Abstract: Intermetallic RMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} ternary compounds have attracted considerable attention from researchers in recent years because they show strong indications for novel magnetic characteristics and they have the potential to reveal the mechanism of superlattices. The study of the paramagnetic, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases affirms the strong dependence to the distance between atomic species in these compounds. In this study, we investigated the structural, elastic, electronic and thermodynamic properties of the intermetallic RMn{sub 2}Ge{sub 2} (R = Ca, Nd and Y) compounds. To carry out this study, we used the full potential (FP) linearized (L) augmented plane wave plus local orbitals (APW + lo), a scheme of calculations developed within the frame work of density functional theory (DFT). To incorporate the exchange correlation (XC) energy and corresponding potential into the total energy calculations, local density approximation (LDA) parameterized by Perdew and Wang is taken into account. Analysis of the density of states (DOS) profile illustrates the conducting nature of these intermetallic compounds; with a predominantly contribution from the R and Mn-d states. At ambient conditions, calculations for elastic constants (C{sub 11}, C{sub 12}, C{sub 13}, C{sub 44}, C{sub 33} and C{sub 66}) are also performed, which point to their brittle character. In addition, the quasi harmonic Debye model was used to predict the thermal properties, together with relative expansion coefficients and heat capacity.

  6. The STAT7 Code for Statistical Propagation of Uncertainties In Steady-State Thermal Hydraulics Analysis of Plate-Fueled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Floyd E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Wilson, Erik [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The STAT code was written to automate many of the steady-state thermal hydraulic safety calculations for the MIT research reactor, both for conversion of the reactor from high enrichment uranium fuel to low enrichment uranium fuel and for future fuel re-loads after the conversion. A Monte-Carlo statistical propagation approach is used to treat uncertainties in important parameters in the analysis. These safety calculations are ultimately intended to protect against high fuel plate temperatures due to critical heat flux or departure from nucleate boiling or onset of flow instability; but additional margin is obtained by basing the limiting safety settings on avoiding onset of nucleate boiling. STAT7 can simultaneously analyze all of the axial nodes of all of the fuel plates and all of the coolant channels for one stripe of a fuel element. The stripes run the length of the fuel, from the bottom to the top. Power splits are calculated for each axial node of each plate to determine how much of the power goes out each face of the plate. By running STAT7 multiple times, full core analysis has been performed by analyzing the margin to ONB for each axial node of each stripe of each plate of each element in the core.

  7. Thermal expansion and magnetostriction in Pr(n+2)(n+1)Nin(n-1)+2Sin(n+1) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiles, D.C.; Song, S.H.; Snyder, J.E.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Lograsso, T.A.; Wu, D.; Pecharsky, A.O.; Mudryk, Ya.; Dennis, K.W.; McCallum, R.W.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal expansion and magnetostriction of members of a homologous series of compounds based on the alloy series Pr (n+2)(n+1) Ni n(n-1)+2 Si n(n+1) have been measured. The crystal structures of these compounds are closely interrelated because they form trigonal prismatic columns in which the number of trigonal prisms that form the base of the trigonal columns is determined by the value of n in the chemical formula. Two compositions were investigated, Pr 5 Ni 2 Si 3 and Pr 15 Ni 7 Si 10 , corresponding to n=3 and n=4, respectively. The results were analyzed and used to determine the location of magnetic phase transitions by calculating the magnetic contribution to thermal expansion using the Gruneisen-Debye theory. This allowed more precise determination of the magnetic transition temperatures than could be achieved using the total thermal expansion. The results show two phase transitions in each material, one corresponding to the Curie temperature and the other at a lower temperature exhibiting characteristics of a spin reorientation transition

  8. [Target and non-target screening of volatile organic compounds in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huilian; Jin, Jing; Li, Yun; Chen, Jiping

    2017-10-08

    A method of comprehensive screening of the target and non-target volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in industrial exhaust gas using thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS) has been developed. In this paper, two types of solid phase adsorption column were compared, and the Tenex SS TD Tube was selected. The analytes were enriched into the adsorption tube by constant flow sampling, and detected by TD-GC-MS in full scan mode. Target compounds were quantified by internal standard method, and the quantities of non-target compounds were calculated by response coefficient of toluene. The method detection limits (MDLs) for the 24 VOCs were 1.06 to 5.44 ng, and MDLs could also be expressed as 0.004 to 0.018 mg/m 3 assuming that the sampling volume was 300 mL. The average recoveries were in the range of 78.4% to 89.4% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 3.9% to 14.4% ( n =7). The established analytical method was applied for the comprehensive screening of VOCs in a waste incineration power plant in Dalian city. Twenty-nine VOCs were identified. In these compounds, only five VOCs were the target compounds set in advance, which accounted for 26.7% of the total VOCs identified. Therefore, this study further proved the importance of screening non-target compounds in the analysis of VOCs in industrial exhaust gas, and has certain reference significance for the complete determination of VOCs distribution.

  9. Effects of counterions of colorful sandwich-type zinc(II) 4‧-phenyl-terpyridine compounds on photoluminescent and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Zhou, Peng; Liang, Baohuan; Huang, Ling; Zhou, Yanling; Ma, Zhen

    2017-10-01

    Reactions between 4‧-phenyl-terpyridine (L) and several Zn(II) salts (p-toluenesulfonate, nitrate, trifluoromethane sulfonate or hexafluoroantimonate) led to the formation of the complexes [ZnL2](p-OSO2PhCH3)2 (1), [ZnL2](NO3)2 (2), [ZnL2](SO3CF3)2 (3) and [ZnL2](SbF6)2 (4), which were characterized by IR, 1H NMR, elemental analysis, UV-vis spectroscopies and single crystal X-ray diffraction, along with their TG-DTA thermal and photoluminescent properties. The four compounds show mononuclear Zn(II) structures with hexacoordinated, irregular ZnN6 octahedron geometries. Their colours and photo-luminescent properties have changed regularly depending on the counterions of the compounds.

  10. Microstructure and Thermal Properties of Polypropylene/Clay Nanocomposites with TiCl4/MgCl2/Clay Compound Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polypropylene (PP/clay nanocomposites were synthesized by in situ intercalative polymerization with TiCl4/MgCl2/clay compound catalyst. Microstructure and thermal properties of PP/clay nanocomposites were studied in detail. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra indicated that PP/clay nanocomposites were successfully prepared. Both wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM examination proved that clay layers are homogeneously distributed in PP matrix. XRD patterns also showed that the α phase was the dominate crystal phase of PP in the nanocomposites. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA examinations confirmed that thermal stability of PP/clay nanocomposites was markedly superior to pure PP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC scans showed that the melt temperature and the crystallinity of nanocomposites were slightly lower than those of pure PP due to crystals imperfections.

  11. Performance evaluation and simulation of a Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) trough Solar Thermal Power Plant in Puerto Rico under solar transient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano-Cruz, Luisa I.

    The increasing fossil fuel costs as well as the need to move in a somewhat sustainable future has led the world in a quest for exploiting the free and naturally available energy from the Sun to produce electric power, and Puerto Rico is no exception. This thesis proposes the design of a simulation model for the analysis and performance evaluation of a Solar Thermal Power Plant in Puerto Rico and suggests the use of the Compound Parabolic Concentrator as the solar collector of choice. Optical and thermal analysis of such collectors will be made using local solar radiation data for determining the viability of this proposed project in terms of the electric power produced and its cost.

  12. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis and flow channel blockage accident analysis of JRR-3 silicide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1997-03-01

    JRR-3 is a light water moderated and cooled, beryllium and heavy water reflected pool type research reactor using low enriched uranium (LEU) plate-type fuels. Its thermal power is 20 MW. The core conversion program from uranium-aluminum (UAl x -Al) dispersion type fuel (aluminide fuel) to uranium-silicon-aluminum (U 3 Si 2 -Al) dispersion type fuel (silicide fuel) is currently conducted at the JRR-3. This report describes about the steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis results and the flow channel blockage accident analysis result. In JRR-3, there are two operation mode. One is high power operation mode up to 20 MW, under forced convection cooling using the primary and the secondary cooling systems. The other is low power operation mode up to 200 kW, under natural circulation cooling between the reactor core and the reactor pool without the primary and the secondary cooling systems. For the analysis of the flow channel blockage accident, COOLOD code was used. On the other hand, steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis for both of the high power operation mode under forced convection cooling and low power operation under natural convection cooling, COOLOD-N2 code was used. From steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis results of both forced and natural convection cooling, fuel temperature, minimum DNBR etc. meet the design criteria and JRR-3 LEU silicide core has enough safety margin under normal operation conditions. Furthermore, flow channel blockage accident analysis results show that one channel flow blockage accident meet the safety criteria for accident conditions which have been established for JRR-3 LEU silicide core. (author)

  13. Use of thermal desorption gas chromatography-olfactometry/mass spectrometry for the comparison of identified and unidentified odor active compounds emitted from building products containing linseed oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, P. A.; Knudsen, Henrik Nellemose; Larsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The emission of odor active volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a floor oil based on linseed oil, the linseed oil itself and a low-odor linseed oil was investigated by thermal desorption gas chromatography combined with olfactometry and mass spectrometry (TD-GC-O/MS). The oils were applied...... to filters and conditioned in the micro emission cell, FLEC, for 1-3 days at ambient temperature, an air exchange rate of 26.9 h-1 and a 30% relative humidity. These conditions resulted in dynamic headspace concentrations and composition of the odor active VOCs that may be similar to real indoor setting...

  14. StoThermSolar - possible applications and practical experience with transparent thermal insulation compound systems; StoThermSolar - Anwendungsmoeglichkeiten und praktische Erfahrungen mit transparenten Waermedaemmverbundsystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwerger, M. [Sto AG, Stuehlingen (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Sto AG has the motto `building conscientiously`. Consciousness of the environment acts as ethic for the firm. About 2000 employees develop, produce and market environmentally suitable product systems for facades, internal walls, ceilings and floors. They extend from paint and plaster, thermal insulation compound systems, concrete repair and acoustic systems to decorative profiles of old glass. (orig./HW) [Deutsch] `Bewusst Bauen` heisst das Leitwort der Sto AG. Umweltbewusstsein als Unternehmensethik. Rund 2000 Mitarbeiter entwickeln, produzieren und vermarkten umweltgerechte Produktsysteme fuer Fassade, Innenwand, Decke und Boden. Von Farben und Putzen, Waermedaemm-Verbundsystemen, Betoninstandsetzungs- oder Akustiksystemen bis zu Deco-Profilen aus Altglas. (orig./HW)

  15. Development of low enriched uranium target plates by thermo-mechanical processing of UAl2–Al matrix for production of 99Mo in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Kanwar Liaqat; Khan, Akhlaque Ahmad; Mushtaq, Ahmad; Imtiaz, Farhan; Ziai, Maratab Ali; Gulzar, Amir; Farooq, Muhammad; Hussain, Nazar; Ahmed, Nisar; Pervez, Shahid; Zaidi, Jamshed Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Uranium aluminide predominated with UAl 2 phase was prepared by arc-melting procedures and comminuted to required particle size. UAl 2 and Al powders were blended and compacted to achieve LEU fuel density of 2.17 g/cm 3 . The picture-frame technique was used to clad the dispersions (UAl 2 –Al) with aluminum. A few target plates were fabricated by thermo-mechanical processing (hot rolling and annealing) of UAl 2 –Al matrix contained in roll billet of Al. The fabricated plates were characterized by destructive and some of non-destructive testing techniques and then annealed to achieve required phase of uranium aluminide for proper dissolution in basic media

  16. Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L.; Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M.

    1991-11-01

    A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC ampersand A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC ampersand A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion

  17. Biochemical degradation and physical migration of nutritive compounds in blueberries after PEF and thermal pretreatments and osmotic dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh blueberries were pretreated by pulsed electric fields (PEF) at 3 kV/cm or thermal pretreatment at 90 degrees C for 5 min after which they were subject to osmotic dehydration. The changes in contents of anthocyanins, predominantly phenolic acids and flavonols, total phenolics, polyphenol oxidas...

  18. Determination of a wide range of volatile organic compounds in ambient air using multisorbent adsorption/thermal desorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, J.F.; Luo, W.; Isabelle, L.M.; Bender, D.A.; Baker, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    Adsorption/thermal desorption with multisorbent air-sampling cartridges was developed for the determination of 87 method analytes including halogenated alkanes, halogenated alkenes, ethers, alcohols, nitriles, esters, ketones, aromatics, a disulfide, and a furan. The volatilities of the compounds ranged from that of dichlorofluoromethane (CFC12) to that of 1,2,3- trichlorobenzene. The eight most volatile compounds were determined using a 1.5-L air sample and a sample cartridge containing 50 mg of Carbotrap B and 280 mg of Carboxen 1000; the remaining 79 compounds were determined using a 5-L air sample and a cartridge containing 180 mg of Carbotrap B and 70 mg of Carboxen 1000. Analysis and detection were by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The minimum detectable level (MDL) concentration values ranged from 0.01 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for chlorobenzene to 0.4 ppbv for bromomethane; most of the MDL values were in the range 0.02-0.06 ppbv. No breakthrough was detected with the prescribed sample volumes. Analyte stability on the cartridges was very good. Excellent recoveries were obtained with independent check standards. Travel spike recoveries ranged from 90 to 110% for 72 of the 87 compounds. The recoveries were less than 70% for bromomethane and chloroethene and for a few compounds such as methyl acetate that are subject to losses by hydrolysis; the lowest travel spike recovery was obtained for bromomethane (62%). Blank values for all compounds were either below detection or very low. Ambient atmospheric sampling was conducted in New Jersey from April to December, 1997. Three sites characterized by low, moderate, and high densities of urbanization/traffic were sampled. The median detected concentrations of the compounds were either similar at all three sites (as with the chlorofluorocarbon compounds) or increased with the density of urbanization/traffic (as with dichloromethane, MTBE, benzene, and toluene). For toluene, the median detected

  19. Detailed investigation of thermal and electron transport properties in strongly correlated compound Ce6Pd12In5 and its nonmagnetic analog La6Pd12In5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkowski, M.; Krychowski, D.; Strydom, A. M.

    2016-11-01

    An in-depth study of thermal and electron transport properties including thermal conductivity κ(T), thermoelectric power S(T), and electrical resistivity ρ(T) of the heavy fermion Kondo lattice Ce6Pd12In5 and its nonmagnetic reference compound La6Pd12In5 is presented. The absolute κ(T) value of Ce6Pd12In5 is smaller that than of La6Pd12In5, which indicates that conduction electron-4f electron scattering has a large impact on the reduction of thermal conductivity. The isolated 4f electron contributions to the electrical resistivity ρ 4 f (T), electronic thermal resistivity displayed in the form W e l , 4 f (T) .T, and thermoelectric power S 4 f (T) reveal a low- and high-temperature -lnT behaviour characteristic of Kondo systems with strong crystal-electric field (CEF) interactions. The analysis of phonon scattering processes of lattice thermal conductivity κph(T) in (Ce, La)6Pd12In5 was performed over the whole accessible temperature range according to the Callaway model. In the scope of a theoretical approach based on the perturbation type calculation, we were able to describe our experimental data of ρ 4 f (T) and W e l , 4 f (T) .T by using the model incorporating simultaneously the Kondo effect in the presence of the CEF splitting, as it is foreseen in the framework of the Cornut-Coqblin and Bhattacharjee-Coqblin theory. Considering the fact that there are not many cases of similar studies at all, we also show the numerical calculations of temperature-dependent behaviour of spin-disorder resistivity ρs(T), magnetic resistivity ρ 4 f (T), and occupation number ⟨ N i ⟩ due to the various types of degeneracy of the ground state multiplet of Ce 3 + (J = 5/2).

  20. Influence of thermal treatment on the stability of phenolic compounds and the microbiological quality of sucrose solution following osmotic dehydration of highbush blueberry fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucner, Anna; Papiewska, Agnieszka; Klewicki, Robert; Sójka, Michał; Klewicka, Elżbieta

    2014-01-01

    Osmotic dehydration is a process of the partial removal of water which is based on immersion of material having cellular structure in a hypertonic solution. Osmotic dehydration is used as a pretreatment for the dehydration of foods before they are subjected to further processing such as freezing, freeze drying, vacuum drying. Management of spent syrup is one of the most important problems related to osmotic dewatering. Osmotic solutions are heavily polluted with of carbohydrates, remains of the dehydrated material and microorganisms. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of thermal treatment on the content of phenolic compounds and the microbiological quality of sucrose solution used in 15 cycles of osmotic dehydration of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) fruits. The tested material was 65.0 ±0.5°Brix sucrose solution used for 15 cycles of osmotic dehydration of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.). Osmotic dehydration was conducted at 40°C for 120 min using fruits previously subjected to enzymatic pretreatment. The thermal treatment of sucrose solution was conducted at 70, 80, 90, 100 and 115°C for 20, 40 and 60 s. The sucrose solution was analysed in terms of total polyphenols, particular polyphenols using high performance liquid chromatography and microbiological analysis was subjected. Thermal treatment at 70-115°C for 20 s caused degradation of 8.5% to 12.7% of polyphenols, while as much as 23.1% of polyphenols were degraded at 115°C after 60 s. The present paper proposes heating parameters that are optimal from the point of view of phenolic compound retention and microbiological quality: thermal treatment of syrup at 100°C for 40 s. Under these conditions, total polyphenols retention was 94.5%, while the retention of individual phenolic compounds varied from 89.2% to 37.2%, and that of flavan-3-ols amounted to 89.5%. The studied manner of syrup treatment eliminated the problem of syrup contamination with yeasts and molds

  1. Unravelling the distinct crystallinity and thermal properties of suberin compounds from Quercus suber and Betula pendula outer barks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Andreia F; Gandini, Alessandro; Caetano, Ana; Maria, Teresa M R; Freire, Carmen S R; Neto, Carlos Pascoal; Silvestre, Armando J D

    2016-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of suberin (a naturally occurring aromatic-aliphatic polyester ubiquitous to the vegetable realm) as a renewable source of chemicals and, in particular, to assess their physical properties. A comparison between cork and birch suberin fragments obtained by conventional depolymerisation processes (hydrolysis or methanolysis) is provided, focusing essentially on their thermal and crystallinity properties. It was found that suberin fragments obtained by the hydrolysis depolymerisation of birch had a high degree of crystallinity, as indicated by their thermal analysis and corroborated by the corresponding XRD diffractions, as opposed to hydrolysis-depolymerised cork suberin counterparts, which were essentially amorphous. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Thermal conductivity of M-Si-N (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) compounds with varying M/Si ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hintzen, H.T.J.M.; Bruls, R.J.; Delsing, A.C.A.; Itatani, K.; Tanaka, S.; With, de G.; Metselaar, R.

    2002-01-01

    The thermal cond. of M-Si-N (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba) compds. was examd. The emphasis is on MgSiN2 (a material which can be derived from AlN by replacing systematically 2Al3+ by Mg2+/Si4+), and Si3N4 (the well known b-modification as well as the recently discovered cubic modification with the spinel

  3. On the Debye temperature in the Slack approximation for an estimation of the thermal conductivity of nonmetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruls, R.; Hintzen, H.T.; Metselaar, R.

    2005-01-01

    The value of the Debye temperature of the acoustic modes, as required in the application of Slack's approximation [G. A. Slack, Solid State Physics, edited by F. Seitz, D. Turnbull, and H. Ehrenreich, (Academic, New York, 1979), Vol. 34, pp. 1-71] for the thermal conductivity, is not always available. It is shown that for these cases, the value at the minimum of the curve of the Debye temperature versus the temperature obtained from specific-heat data, gives a good approximation

  4. Treatment Efficiency by means of a Nonthermal Plasma Combined with Heterogeneous Catalysis of Odoriferous Volatile Organic Compounds Emissions from the Thermal Drying of Landfill Leachates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Almarcha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to assess the odoriferous volatile organic compounds depuration efficiency of an experimental nonthermal plasma coupled to a catalytic system used for odor abatement of real emissions from a leachate thermal drying plant installed in an urban solid waste landfill. VOC screening was performed by means of HRGC-MS analysis of samples taken at the inlet and at the outlet of the nonthermal plasma system. Odor concentration by means of dynamic olfactometry, total organic carbon, mercaptans, NH3, and H2S were also determined in order to assess the performance of the system throughout several days. Three plasma frequencies (100, 150, and 200 Hz and two catalyst temperatures (150°C and 50°C were also tested. Under conditions of maximum capacity of the treatment system, the results show VOC depuration efficiencies around 69%, with average depuration efficiencies between 44 and 95% depending on the chemical family of the substance. Compounds belonging to the following families have been detected in the samples: organic acids, alcohols, ketones, aldehydes, pyrazines, and reduced sulphur compounds, among others. Average total organic carbon removal efficiency was 88%, while NH3 and H2S removal efficiencies were 88% and 87%, respectively, and odor concentration abatement was 78%.

  5. Thermal, Mechanical and UV-Shielding Properties of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate/Cerium Dioxide Hybrid Systems Obtained by Melt Compounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Reyes-Acosta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thick and homogeneous hybrid film systems based on poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and CeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using the melt compounding method to improve thermal stability, mechanical and UV-shielding properties, as well as to propose them for use in the multifunctional materials industry. The effect of the inorganic phase on these properties was assessed by using two different weight percentages of synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles (0.5 and 1.0 wt % with the sol–gel method and thermal treatment at different temperatures (120, 235, 400, 600 and 800 °C. Thereafter, the nanoceria powders were added to the polymer matrix by single screw extrusion. The absorption in the UV region was increased with the crystallite size of the CeO2 nanoparticles and the PMMA/CeO2 weight ratio. Due to the crystallinity of CeO2 nanoparticles, the thermal, mechanical and UV-shielding properties of the PMMA matrix were improved. The presence of CeO2 nanostructures exerts an influence on the mobility of PMMA chain segments, leading to a different glass transition temperature.

  6. Characterization of Key Aroma Compounds in Raw and Thermally Processed Prawns and Thermally Processed Lobsters by Application of Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Veronika; Schieberle, Peter

    2016-08-24

    Application of aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) to an aroma distillate of blanched prawn meat (Litopenaeus vannamei) (BPM) revealed 40 odorants in the flavor dilution (FD) factor range from 4 to 1024. The highest FD factors were assigned to 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)propanal, (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, trans-4,5-epoxy-(E)-2-decenal, (E)-3-heptenoic acid, and 2-aminoacetophenone. To understand the influence of different processing conditions on odorant formation, fried prawn meat was investigated by means of AEDA in the same way, revealing 31 odorants with FD factors between 4 and 2048. Also, the highest FD factors were determined for 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and (Z)-1,5-octadien-3-one, followed by 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, (E)-3-heptenoic acid, and 2-aminoacetophenone. As a source of the typical marine, sea breeze-like odor attribute of the seafood, 2,4,6-tribromoanisole was identified in raw prawn meat as one of the contributors. Additionally, the aroma of blanched prawn meat was compared to that of blanched Norway and American lobster meat, respectively (Nephrops norvegicus and Homarus americanus). Identification experiments revealed the same set of odorants, however, with differing FD factors. In particular, 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethyl-2(5H)-furanone was found as the key aroma compound in blanched Norway lobster, whereas American lobster contained 3-methylindole with a high FD factor.

  7. Preservation of Bioactive Compounds and Quality Parameters of Watermelon Juice Enriched with L-Citrulline through Short Thermal Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha P. Tarazona-Díaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available L-citrulline is a nonessential amino acid with demonstrated health benefits for humans, and watermelon is a fruit rich in this amino acid. The juice industry is developing functional beverages through the enrichment with external bioactive compounds; this kind of industry uses conventional pasteurization because of its efficiency and simplicity. In this experiment, the effects of pasteurization (80°C for 40 s or 90 s and storage (4°C for 30 days on different parameters were evaluated in a watermelon juice (3.68 g kg−1 of natural L-citrulline enriched with external L-citrulline (12 g kg−1. Enzymatic activity (peroxidase, pectin methyl esterase, and polygalacturonase was inactivated (74 to 89%, 89 to 90%, and 11 to 15%, resp. with the pasteurization treatment, obtaining the highest degradation with the longest heating time. According to the rheology study, the juice’s elasticity was mainly affected by type of heat treatment while its viscosity was more stable and affected by storage time. A reduction in bioactive compounds content, around 10–16% for lycopene and 19–20% for L-citrulline, was observed after the pasteurization treatments, with a higher decrease with increased treatment time. Storage time also induced a reduction in lycopene and L-citrulline. The shelf life was limited by sensorial parameters.

  8. Supplemental Thermal-Hydraulic Transient Analyses of BR2 in Support of Conversion to LEU Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sikik, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) is a research and test reactor located in Mol, Belgium and is primarily used for radioisotope production and materials testing. The Materials Management and Minimization (M3) Reactor Conversion Program of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is supporting the conversion of the BR2 reactor from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The RELAP5/Mod 3.3 code has been used to perform transient thermal-hydraulic safety analyses of the BR2 reactor to support reactor conversion. A RELAP5 model of BR2 has been validated against select transient BR2 reactor experiments performed in 1963 by showing agreement with measured cladding temperatures. Following the validation, the RELAP5 model was then updated to represent the current use of the reactor; taking into account core configuration, neutronic parameters, trip settings, component changes, etc. Simulations of the 1963 experiments were repeated with this updated model to re-evaluate the boiling risks associated with the currently allowed maximum heat flux limit of 470 W/cm2 and temporary heat flux limit of 600 W/cm2. This document provides analysis of additional transient simulations that are required as part of a modern BR2 safety analysis report (SAR). The additional simulations included in this report are effect of pool temperature, reduced steady-state flow rate, in-pool loss of coolant accidents, and loss of external cooling. The simulations described in this document have been performed for both an HEU- and LEU-fueled core.

  9. Molybdenum-99-producing 37-element fuel bundle neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to a standard CANDU fuel bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichita, E., E-mail: Eleodor.Nichita@uoit.ca; Haroon, J., E-mail: Jawad.Haroon@uoit.ca

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • A 37-element fuel bundle modified for {sup 99}Mo production in CANDU reactors is presented. • The modified bundle is neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard bundle. • The modified bundle satisfies all safety criteria satisfied by the standard bundle. - Abstract: {sup 99m}Tc, the most commonly used radioisotope in diagnostic nuclear medicine, results from the radioactive decay of {sup 99}Mo which is currently being produced at various research reactors around the globe. In this study, the potential use of CANDU power reactors for the production of {sup 99}Mo is investigated. A modified 37-element fuel bundle, suitable for the production of {sup 99}Mo in existing CANDU-type reactors is proposed. The new bundle is specifically designed to be neutronically and thermal-hydraulically equivalent to the standard 37-element CANDU fuel bundle in normal, steady-state operation and, at the same time, be able to produce significant quantities of {sup 99}Mo when irradiated in a CANDU reactor. The proposed bundle design uses fuel pins consisting of a depleted-uranium centre surrounded by a thin layer of low-enriched uranium. The new molybdenum-producing bundle is analyzed using the lattice transport code DRAGON and the diffusion code DONJON. The proposed design is shown to produce 4081 six-day Curies of {sup 99}Mo activity per bundle when irradiated in the peak-power channel of a CANDU core, while maintaining the necessary reactivity and power rating limits. The calculated {sup 99}Mo yield corresponds to approximately one third of the world weekly demand. A production rate of ∼3 bundles per week can meet the global demand of {sup 99}Mo.

  10. Thermal reactivity of some nitro- and nitroso-compounds derived from 1,3,5,7-tetraazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane at contamination by ammonium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeman, Svatopluk; Shu, Yuanjie; Friedl, Zdenek; Vágenknecht, Jirí

    2005-05-20

    Thermal reactivity of 3,7-dinitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (DPT), 3,7-dinitroso-1,3,5,7-tetraazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane (DNPT), 1,3,5-trinitroso-1,3,5-triazinane (TMTA or R-salt), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (hexogen or RDX), 1,5-diacetyl-3,7-dinitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (DADN), alpha-modification of the 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (octogen or HMX) and of their mixtures with 2wt.% of ammonium nitrate (AN) has been examined by means of non-isothermal differential thermal analysis. The resulting data were analyzed according to the Kissinger method. The reactivity was expressed as the E(a)R(-1) slopes of the Kissinger relationship. A relatively high reactivity has been found with mixtures of DPT and DNPT with AN. Electronic charges q(N) at nitrogen atoms in molecules of the compounds studied were calculated by means of ab initio DFT B3LYP/6-31G** method. The relationships were confirmed between the slopes E(a)R(-1) and the q(N) values for the nitrogen atoms primarily undergoing reaction. On the basis of these relationships it is stated that the destabilizing effect of AN is due to acidolytic attack of nitric acid (resulting from dissociation of ammonium nitrate) at the nitrogen atoms with the most negative q(N) values in the molecules of the compounds studied.

  11. Antioxidant Activity and Thermal Stability of Oleuropein and Related Phenolic Compounds of Olive Leaf Extract after Separation and Concentration by Salting-Out-Assisted Cloud Point Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatopoulos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A fast, clean, energy-saving, non-toxic method for the stabilization of the antioxidant activity and the improvement of the thermal stability of oleuropein and related phenolic compounds separated from olive leaf extract via salting-out-assisted cloud point extraction (CPE was developed using Tween 80. The process was based on the decrease of the solubility of polyphenols and the lowering of the cloud point temperature of Tween 80 due to the presence of elevated amounts of sulfates (salting-out and the separation from the bulk solution with centrifugation. The optimum conditions were chosen based on polyphenols recovery (%, phase volume ratio (Vs/Vw and concentration factor (Fc. The maximum recovery of polyphenols was in total 95.9%; Vs/Vw was 0.075 and Fc was 15 at the following conditions: pH 2.6, ambient temperature (25 °C, 4% Tween 80 (w/v, 35% Na2SO4 (w/v and a settling time of 5 min. The total recovery of oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, verbascoside and apigenin-7-O-glucoside, at optimum conditions, was 99.8%, 93.0%, 87.6%, 99.3% and 100.0%, respectively. Polyphenolic compounds entrapped in the surfactant-rich phase (Vs showed higher thermal stability (activation energy (Ea 23.8 kJ/mol compared to non-entrapped ones (Ea 76.5 kJ/mol. The antioxidant activity of separated polyphenols remained unaffected as determined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl method.

  12. Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, Randy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parra, Amanda [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Russell, Marion [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lee, Wen-Yee [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick’s Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

  13. Effects of Cr Substitution on Negative Thermal Expansion and Magnetic Properties of Antiperovskite Ga1−xCrxN0.83Mn3 Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinge; Tong, Peng; Lin, Jianchao; Yang, Cheng; Zhang, Kui; Lin, Shuai; Song, Wenhai; Sun, Yuping

    2018-01-01

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) and magnetic properties were investigated for antiperovskite Ga1−xCrxN0.83Mn3 compounds. As x increases, the temperature span (ΔT) of NTE related with Γ5g antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is expanded and shifted to lower temperatures. At x = 0.1, NTE happens between 256 and 318 K (ΔT = 62 K) with an average linear coefficient of thermal expansion, αL = −46 ppm/K. The ΔT is expanded to 81 K (151–232 K) in x = 0.2 with αL = −22.6 ppm/K. Finally, NTE is no longer visible for x ≥ 0.3. Ferromagnetic order is introduced by Cr doping and continuously strengthened with increasing x, which may impede the AFM ordering and thus account for the broadening of NTE temperature window. Moreover, our specific heat measurement suggests the electronic density of states at the Fermi level is enhanced upon Cr doping, which favors the FM order rather than the AFM one. PMID:29619367

  14. Effects of Cr Substitution on Negative Thermal Expansion and Magnetic Properties of Antiperovskite Ga1-x Cr x N0.83Mn3 Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinge; Tong, Peng; Lin, Jianchao; Yang, Cheng; Zhang, Kui; Lin, Shuai; Song, Wenhai; Sun, Yuping

    2018-01-01

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) and magnetic properties were investigated for antiperovskite Ga 1- x Cr x N 0.83 Mn 3 compounds. As x increases, the temperature span (Δ T ) of NTE related with Γ 5g antiferromagnetic (AFM) order is expanded and shifted to lower temperatures. At x = 0.1, NTE happens between 256 and 318 K (Δ T = 62 K) with an average linear coefficient of thermal expansion, α L = -46 ppm/K. The Δ T is expanded to 81 K (151-232 K) in x = 0.2 with α L = -22.6 ppm/K. Finally, NTE is no longer visible for x ≥ 0.3. Ferromagnetic order is introduced by Cr doping and continuously strengthened with increasing x , which may impede the AFM ordering and thus account for the broadening of NTE temperature window. Moreover, our specific heat measurement suggests the electronic density of states at the Fermi level is enhanced upon Cr doping, which favors the FM order rather than the AFM one.

  15. Thermal cooking changes the profile of phenolic compounds, but does not attenuate the anti-inflammatory activities of black rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassy Bhawamai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Evidence on biological activities of cooked black rice is limited. This study examined the effects of washing and cooking on the bioactive ingredients and biological activities of black rice. Methods: Cooked rice was prepared by washing 0–3 times followed by cooking in a rice cooker. The acidic methanol extracts of raw and cooked rice were used for the analyses. Results: Raw black rice, both washed and unwashed, had higher contents of polyphenols, anthocyanins, and cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G, but lower protocatechuic acid (PA, than did cooked samples. Similarly, raw rice extracts were higher in ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP activities than extracts of cooked samples. Nonetheless, extracts of raw and cooked rice showed similar inhibitory potencies on nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6 productions in lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages, whereas equivalent amounts of C3G and PA did not possess such inhibitory effects. Conclusions: Thermal cooking decreased total anthocyanin and C3G contents and the FRAP antioxidative capacity, but did not affect anti-inflammatory activities of black rice. Neither C3G nor PA contributed to the anti-inflammatory activity of black rice.

  16. Enhancement of Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Poly(L-lactide Nanocomposites Filled with Synthetic Layered Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Nogueira Caio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a layered double hydroxide (LDH (Zn/Al palmitate and two layered hydroxide salts (LHS, intercalated with the anion salicylate or palmitate, on the properties of poly(L-lactide (PLLA nanocomposites were investigated. PLLA and the nanocomposites were synthesized by ring opening polymerization of the cyclic dimer of lactic acid (lactide, using tin(II 2-ethylhexanoate (stannous octanoate as catalyst. PLLA nanocomposites containing two different fillers concentrations (1 wt% and 2 wt% were produced. Compared to PLLA, almost all the nanocomposites exhibited an enhancement on thermal resistance. The sample containing 1 wt% of Zn/Al palmitate exhibited a decomposition temperature 51°C higher than neat polymer. Results of flexural properties demonstrated that the nanocomposites containing Zn/Al palmitate displayed the highest values of maximum flexural stress and elongation at break. The sample with 2 wt% of this filler revealed values of maximum flexural stress and strain at break, 15% and 157%, respectively, higher than PLLA. Contrary to PLLA, which only exhibited break point, this nanocomposite showed a less fragile behavior, as a yield point was observed. In this case, it was possible to promote a higher flexibility without reducing the flexural stress, revealing an advantage of the Zn/Al palmitate under the plasticizers that have been used so far for PLLA.

  17. Optimization study and neutronic and thermal-hydraulic design calculations of a 75 KWTH aqueous homogeneous reactor for medical isotopes production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Daniel Milian; Lorenzo, Daniel E. Milian; Garcia, Lorena P. Rodriguez; Llanes, Jesus Salomon; Hernandez, Carlos R. Garcia, E-mail: dperez@instec.cu, E-mail: dmilian@instec.cu, E-mail: lorenapilar@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Lira, Carlos A. Brayner de Oliveira, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Rodriguez, Manuel Cadavid, E-mail: mcadavid2001@yahoo.com [Tecnologia Nuclear Medica Spa, TNM (Chile)

    2015-07-01

    {sup 99m}Tc is the most common radioisotope used in nuclear medicine. It is a very useful radioisotope, which is used in about 30-40 million procedures worldwide every year. Medical diagnostic imaging techniques using {sup 99m}Tc represent approximately 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures. Although {sup 99m}Tc can be produced directly on a cyclotron or other type of particle accelerator, currently is almost exclusively produced from the beta-decay of its 66-h parent {sup 99}Mo. {sup 99}Mo production system in an Aqueous Homogeneous Reactor (AHR) is potentially advantageous because of its low cost, small critical mass, inherent passive safety, and simplified fuel handling, processing and purification characteristics. In this paper, an AHR conceptual design using Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) is studied and optimized for the production of {sup 99}Mo. Aspects related with the neutronic behavior such as optimal reflector thickness, critical height, medical isotopes production and the reactivity feedback introduced in the solution by the volumetric expansion of the fuel solution due to thermal expansion of the fuel solution and the void volume generated by radiolytic gas bubbles were evaluated. Thermal-hydraulics studies were carried out in order to show that sufficient cooling capacity exists to prevent fuel overheating. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulics calculations have been performed with the MCNPX computational code and the version 14 of ANSYS CFX respectively. The neutronic calculations demonstrated that the reactor is able to produce 370 six-day curies of {sup 99}Mo in 5 days operation cycles and the CFD simulation demonstrated that the heat removal systems provide sufficient cooling capacity to prevent fuel overheating, the maximum temperature reached by the fuel (89.29 deg C) was smaller to the allowable temperature limit (90 deg C). (author)

  18. Isotopic composition of uranium in U3O8 by neutron induced reactions utilizing thermal neutrons from critical facility and high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acharya, R.; Pujari, P.K.; Goel, Lokesh

    2015-01-01

    Uranium in oxide and metal forms is used as fuel material in nuclear power reactors. For chemical quality control, it is necessary to know the isotopic composition (IC) of uranium i.e., 235 U to 238 U atom ratio as well as 235 U atom % in addition to its total concentration. Uranium samples can be directly assayed by passive gamma ray spectrometry for obtaining IC by utilizing 185 keV (γ-ray abundance 57.2%) of 235 U and 1001 keV (γ-ray abundance 0.837%) of 234m Pa (decay product of 238 U). However, due to low abundance of 1001 keV, often it is not practiced to obtain IC by this method as it gives higher uncertainty even if higher mass of sample and counting time are used. IC of uranium can be determined using activity ratio of neutron induced fission product of 235 U to activation product of 238 U ( 239 Np). In the present work, authors have demonstrated methodologies for determination of IC of U as well as 235 U atom% in natural ( 235 U 0.715%) and low enriched uranium (LEU, 3-20 atom % of 235 U) samples of uranium oxide (U 3 O 8 ) by utilizing ratio of counts at 185 keV γ-ray or γ-rays of fission products with respect to 277 keV of 239 Np. Natural and enriched samples (about 25 mg) were neutron irradiated for 4 hours in graphite reflector position of AHWR Critical Facility (CF) using highly thermalized (>99.9% thermal component) neutron flux (∼10 7 cm -2 s -1 )

  19. The analytical utility of thermally desorbed polydimethylsilicone membranes for in-vivo sampling of volatile organic compounds in and on human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazanskaia, S; Blackburn, G; Harker, M; Taylor, D; Thomas, C L P

    2008-08-01

    A thermally-desorbed polydimethylsilicone (PDMS) membrane approach with analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed and characterised, to enable the VOC arising in, and on skin, from glandular secretions, exogenous materials, products of perfusion from blood, and microbiological metabolites to be sampled in a single procedure. In-vitro studies using a series of volatile fatty acid standards indicated that the recovery efficiency of the technique increased with decreasing volatility; for example, the recovery of hexanoic acid was 3.3 times greater than that for 2-methylpropanoic acid. The relative standard deviation of the methodology decreased with decreasing volatility; RSD = 19% for 2-methylpropanoic acid and RSD = 7% for hexanoic acid. Sampled-mass vs. response relationships were modelled satisfactorily using linear regression analysis with regression coefficients in the range 0.95 to 0.998. In-vivo reproducibility was assessed though the analysis of the responses of 1-dodecane, 3,7-dimethyloct-1-ene, 2-propenoic acid, 2-ethylhexyl ester, 2-ethylhexan-1-ol, butanoic, 2-ethylhexylester, and junipen (1,4-methanoazulene, decahydro-4,8,8-trimethyl-9-methylene-); six compounds selected at random retention times from a GC-MS chromatographic VOC profile of human skin containing several hundred resolved and partially resolved compounds. Five samples were obtained simultaneously from the forearm of a healthy male participant. The in-vivo sample masses were estimated to be in the range 50 pg to 100 ng per sample with observed RSD falling between 15% and 32%; in line with a Horwitz trend. Increasing the sample time from 5 min to 120 min generally resulted in an enrichment of the VOC recovered, and for many VOC substantial increases in sensitivity (x7) were observed over this time range as the PDMS sampling-patch approached equilibrium with the underlying skin. Nevertheless, more volatile components, 2,4,6-trimethylcarbazole for instance, were

  20. An Approach for Measuring the Sorptive Behavior of Odorants Using a Multifunction Thermal Desorber Unit: Preliminary Tests on Reduced Sulfur Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Woo Joo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sorptive behavior of reduced sulfur compounds (RSC was investigated using a combination of thermal desorber (TD unit and gas chromatography (GC. To examine the sorptive properties of RSC on textile materials, two types of experiments were conducted under experimental conditions favorable for sorptive processes. In all the experiments, gaseous standards of hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, and dimethyl disulfide were supplied to initiate the adsorption processes on textile pieces. The textile pieces were then forced to release those adsorbed RSC under a fixed condition. It was found that the extent of adsorption, if evaluated quantitatively, occurred at approximately 1/1000 to 1/100 of the level of RSC standards supplied originally to induce adsorption. It also indicated that RSC adsorption was affected very sensitively by the initial exposure durations to induce RSC adsorption with an exponential decrease in relative recovery (RR values with increasing exposure time. The relative sorptive patterns, when compared between different RSCs, were affected most sensitively by such factors as molecular weight and/or physical contact conditions.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure, thermal analysis and dielectric properties of Rb4(SO4)(HSO4)2(H3AsO4) compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhaj Salah, M.; Nouiri, N.; Jaouadi, K.; Mhiri, T.; Zouari, N.

    2018-01-01

    A new inorganic Rb4(SO4)(HSO4)2(H3AsO4) compound was prepared. It was found to crystallize in the monoclinic system (P21 space group) with the following lattice parameters: a = 5868 (1) Å, b = 13,579(2) Å, c = 11,809 (3) Å and β = 94,737 (1)°. The structure is characterized by SO42-, HSO4- and H3AsO4 tetrahedra connected by hydrogen bridge to form two types of dimmer (H(8)S(2)O4- … S(1)O42- and H(12)S(2)O4- … H3AsO4). These dimmers are interconnected by both hydrogen bonds O(14)sbnd H(14)· · ·O(4) and O(15)sbnd H(15)· · ·O(2). They are also linked by the hydrogen bridge assured by the hydrogen atoms H(2), H(3) and H(4) of the H3AsO4 group to build the chain S(1)O4⋯H3AsO4 which are parallel to the ''a'',direction. The rubidium cations are coordinated by eight oxygen atoms with Rbsbnd O distance ranging from 2893(8) to 3.415(6) Å. The existence of Osbnd H and (S/As)sbnd O bonds in the structure at room temperature has been confirmed by IR and Raman spectroscopy in the frequency ranges 4000-400 cm-1and 1200 - 50 cm-1, respectively. Thermal analysis of Rb4(HSO4)(HSO4)2(H3AsO4) showed that the transformation to high temperature phase occurs at 407 K by one-step process. Thermal decomposition of the product takes place at much higher temperatures, with an onset of approximately 522 K. The first transition detected by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was also analyzed by dielectric and conductivity measurements using the impedance spectroscopy techniques. The conductivity in the high temperature phase at 428 K is 1.04 × 10-3 Ω-1 cm-1, and the activation energy for the proton transport is 0.36 eV. The conductivity relaxation parameters associated with the high disorder protonic conduction have been examined from analysis of the M"/M"max spectrum measured in a wide temperature range. Transport properties of this material appear to be due to the proton hopping mechanism. The obtained results show that this transition is protonic by nature.

  2. X-231A demonstration of in-situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media by soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or reactive barrier destruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegrist, R.L.; Slack, W.W.; Houk, T.C.

    1998-03-01

    The overall goal of the program of activities is to demonstrate robust and cost-effective technologies for in situ remediation of DNAPL compounds in low permeability media (LPM), including adaptations and enhancements of conventional technologies to achieve improved performance for DNAPLs in LPM. The technologies sought should be potential for application at simple, small sites (e.g., gasoline underground storage tanks) as well as at complex, larger sites (e.g., DOE land treatment units). The technologies involved in the X-231A demonstration at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) utilized subsurface manipulation of the LPM through soil fracturing with thermally enhanced mass recovery or horizontal barrier in place destruction. To enable field evaluation of these approaches, a set of four test cells was established at the X-231A land treatment unit at the DOE PORTS plant in August 1996 and a series of demonstration field activities occurred through December 1997. The principal objectives of the PORTS X-231A demonstration were to: determine and compare the operational features of hydraulic fractures as an enabling technology for steam and hot air enhanced soil vapor extraction and mass recovery, in situ interception and reductive destruction by zero valent iron, and in situ interception and oxidative destruction by potassium permanganate; determine the interaction of the delivered agents with the LPM matrix adjacent to the fracture and within the fractured zone and assess the beneficial modifications to the transport and/or reaction properties of the LPM deposit; and determine the remediation efficiency achieved by each of the technology strategies

  3. Synthesis, spectral and thermal studies of some dioxouranium(VI) coordination compounds of 4[N -( 4- hydroxy -3- methoxybenzalidene ) amino] antipyrine semicarbazone and 4[N-(3,4,5- trimethoxybenzalidene) amino] antipyrine semicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Lakshman; Singh, U.P.; Chakraborti, Indranil

    2001-01-01

    In view of high coordination compounds formed by actinide metal ions, the present work describes the 8, 9 and 10-coordinated compounds of dioxouranium(IV) with 4[N-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzalidene) amino] antipyrine semicarbazone (HMBAAPS) and 4[N-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzalidene) amino] antipyrine semicarbazone (TMBAAPS) with the general composition UO 2 X 2 .L (X = Br - , I - , NCS - or ClO 4 ) and UO 2 X 2 .L (X = NO 3 - or CH 3 COO - , and L HMBAAPS or TMBAAPS). All these complexes were characterized through elemental, spectral and thermal studies. (author)

  4. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of a device for irradiation of LEU UAlx-Al targets for 99Mo production in the IEA-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Pedro Julio Batista de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), the product of radioactive decay of molybdenum-99 ( Mo), is one of the most widely used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, covering approximately 80% of all radiodiagnosis procedures in the world. Nowadays, Brazil requires an amount of about 450 Ci of 99 Mo per week. Due to the crisis and the shortage of 99 Mo supply chain that has been observed on the world since 2008, IPEN/CNEN-SP decided to develop a project to produce 99 Mo through fission of uranium-235. The objective of this dissertation was the development of neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations to evaluate the operational safety of a device for 99 Mo production to be irradiated in the IEA-Rl reactor core at 5 MW. In this device will be placed ten targets of UAl x -Al dispersion fuel with low enriched uranium (LEU) and density of 2.889 gU/cm 3 . For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION and CITATION and the maximum temperatures reached in the targets were calculated with the code MTRCR-IEA-R1. The analysis demonstrated that the device irradiation will occur without adverse consequences to the operation of the reactor. The total amount of 99 Mo was calculated with the program SCALE and considering that the time needed for the chemical processing and recovering of the 99 Mo will be five days after the irradiation, we have that the 99 Mo activity available for distribution will be 176 Ci for 3 days of irradiation, 236 Ci for 5 days of irradiation and 272 Ci for 7 days of targets irradiation. (author)'

  5. Group IB Organometallic Chemistry XXXIV: Thermal behavior and chemical reactivity of tetranuclear Me2N-substituted diarylpropenylcopper-copper anion (Vi2Cu4X2) and mixed diarylpropenyl/organocopper (Vi2Cu4R2) compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Noltes, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of configurationally pure 1, 2-diarylpropenylcopper compounds Z-Vi{2}CU{4}Br{2} and Z-Vi{2}Cu{4}R{2} [Vi @? (2-Me{2}NC{6}H{4})C@?C(Me)-(C{6}H{4}Me-4), R @? 2-Me{2}NC{6}H{4} or 4-MeC{6}H{4}C@?C] predominantly results in the formation of ViH. In contrast, only dimers (ViVi) were

  6. Innovative nuclear thermal rocket concept utilizing LEU fuel for space application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Venneri, Paolo; Choi, Jae Young; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung

    2015-01-01

    Space is one of the best places for humanity to turn to keep learning and exploiting. A Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a viable and more efficient option for human space exploration than the existing Chemical Rockets (CRs) which are highly inefficient for long-term manned missions such as to Mars and its satellites. NERVA derived NTR engines have been studied for the human missions as a mainstream in the United States of America (USA). Actually, the NERVA technology has already been developed and successfully tested since 1950s. The state-of-the-art technology is based on a Hydrogen gas (H_2) cooled high temperature reactor with solid core utilizing High-Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to reduce heavy metal mass and to use fast or epithermal neutron spectrums enabling simple core designs. However, even though the NTR designs utilizing HEU is the best option in terms of rocket performance, they inevitably provoke nuclear proliferation obstacles on all Research and Development (R and D) activities by civilians and non-nuclear weapon states, and its eventual commercialization. To surmount the security issue to use HEU fuel for a NTR, a concept of the innovative NTR engine, Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket utilizing Low-Enriched Uranium fuel (KANUTER-LEU) is presented in this paper. The design goal of KANUTER-LEU is to make use of a LEU fuel for its compact reactor, but does not sacrifice the rocket performance relative to the traditional NTRs utilizing HEU. KANUTER-LEU mainly consists of a fission reactor utilizing H_2 propellant, a propulsion system and an optional Electricity Generation System as a bimodal engine. To implement LEU fuel for the reactor, the innovative engine adopts W-UO_2 CERMET fuel to drastically increase uranium density and thermal neutron spectrum to improve neutron economy in the core. The moderator and structural material selections also consider neutronic and thermo-physical characteristics to reduce non-fission neutron loss and

  7. Synthesis, structural characterization, thermal analysis, and DFT calculation of a novel zinc (II)-trifluoro-β-diketonate 3D supramolecular nano organic-inorganic compound with 1,3,5-triazine derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirtamizdoust, Babak, E-mail: babakm.tamizdoust@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Yasouj University, Yasouj, 75918-74831 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Qom, PO Box 37185-359, Qom, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaedi, Mehrorang [Department of Chemistry, Yasouj University, Yasouj, 75918-74831 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hanifehpour, Younes, E-mail: y_hanifehpour@yu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, WCU Nano Research Center, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan, 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Mague, Joel T. [Department of Chemistry, Tulane University, New Orleans (United States); Joo, Sang Woo, E-mail: swjoo1@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, WCU Nano Research Center, Yeungnam University, Gyongsan, 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    A sonochemical method was used to synthesize a novel nano-structure of a zinc(II) organic-inorganic compound [Zn(dapt){sub 2}(ttfa){sub 2}] (1) [dapt = 2,4-diamino-6-phenyl-1,3,5-triazine and ttfa = 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate]. The new nanostructure was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis, and thermal analysis. The single-crystal X-ray structure shows that 1 is a discrete coordination compound. Strong intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds are observed in the structure with the latter forming chains of molecules running parallel to (110). The chains are further extended into a three-dimensional supramolecular structure by intermolecular C−F⋯π interactions between trifluoromethyl and triazine moieties. The coordination number of the zinc(II) ion is six (ZnN{sub 2}O{sub 4}), and the coordination sphere is tetragonally elongated octahedral. The structure of the title complex was optimized by DFT calculations. - Highlights: • A new zinc(II) 3D coordination supramolecular compound was synthesized. • Ultrasound synthesis of nano coordination compound have been reported. • The X-ray crystal structure of the compound is reported.

  8. Two new two-dimensional organically templated phosphite compounds: (C6H16N2)0.5[M(HPO3)F], M=Fe(II) and Co(II): Solvothermal synthesis, crystal structures, thermal, spectroscopic, and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Armas, Sergio; Mesa, Jose L.; Pizarro, Jose L.; Chung, U-Chan; Arriortua, Maria I.; Rojo, Teofilo

    2005-01-01

    The organically templated (C 6 H 16 N 2 ) 0.5 [M(HPO 3 )F] [M(II)=Fe (1) and Co (2)] compounds have been synthesized by using mild hydrothermal conditions under autogeneous pressure. The crystal structures have been determined from X-ray single-crystal diffraction data. The compounds are isostructural and crystallize in the C2/c monoclinic space group. The unit-cell parameters are a=5.607(1), b=21.276(4), c=11.652(1)A, β=93.74(1) deg. for the iron phase and a=5.5822(7), b=21.325(3), c=11.4910(1)A, β=93.464(9) o for the cobalt compound with Z=4. The crystal structure of these compounds consists of [M(HPO 3 )F] - anionic sheets. The layers are constructed from chains which contain [M 2 O 6 F 3 ] dimeric units linked by fluoride ions. The trans-1,4-diaminocyclohexane cations are placed in the interlayer space. The IR and Raman spectra show the bands corresponding to the phosphite oxoanion and organic dication. The Dq and Racah (B and C) parameters have been calculated from the diffuse reflectance spectra in the visible region. Dq parameter is 790cm -1 for compound (1). For phase (2) the Dq value is 725cm -1 and B and C are 930 and 4100cm -1 , respectively. The thermal evolution of the molar magnetic susceptibilities of these compounds show maxima at 20.0 and 6.0K for the iron(II) and cobalt(II) phases, respectively. These results indicate the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions in both compounds

  9. Preparation, morphologies and thermal behavior of high nitrogen compound 2-amino-4,6-diazido-s-triazine and its derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yan, Q.-L.; Musil, T.; Zeman, S.; Matyáš, R.; Shi, X.-B.; Vlček, Milan; Pelikán, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 604, 20 March (2015), s. 106-114 ISSN 0040-6031 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : azido-s-triazine * decomposition * high nitrogen compounds Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.938, year: 2015

  10. The characterisation of Manganese (IV) compounds and the study of the thermal decomposition of Potassium Chlorate alone and with Mn(IV) and other oxides and salts

    OpenAIRE

    Goldblatt, Nicholas Zalmon

    1998-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. Manganese dioxide compounds are preferred curing agents for Polysulphide resins used as sealants in industry. These are required to have consistent setting characteristics and the investigation was initiated to characterise a number of proffered compounds of this type an to establish criteria by which an informed choice could be made of an optimum curing ages for a specific set of conditio...

  11. Making of fission 99Mo from LEU silicide(s): A radiochemists' view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, Z.I.; Wolterbeek, H.Th.

    2005-01-01

    The present-day industrial scale production of 99 Mo is fission based and involves thermal-neutron irradiation in research reactors of highly enriched uranium (HEU, > 20 % 235 U) containing targets, followed by radiochemical processing of the irradiated targets resulting in the final product: a 99 Mo containing chemical compound of molybdenum. In 1978 a program (RERTR) was started to develop a substitute for HEU reactor fuel i.e. a low enriched uranium (LEU, 235 U) one. In the wake of that program studies were undertaken to convert HEU into LEU based 99 Mo production. Both new targets and radiochemical treatments leading to 99 Mo compounds were proposed. One of these targets is based on LEU silicide, U 3 Si 2 . Present paper aims at comparing LEU U 3 Si 2 and LEU U 3 Si with another LEU target i.e. target material and arriving at some preferences pertaining to 99 Mo production. (author)

  12. Group ib organometallic chemistry. XXXIV. Thermal behaviour and chemical reactivity of tetranuclear Me2N-substituted diarypropenylcopper-copper anion (Vi2Cu4X2) and mixed diarylpropenyl/organocopper (Vi2Cu4R2) compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Koten, G. van; Noltes, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of configurationally pure 1,2-diarylpropenylcopper compounds Z-Vi2CU4Br2 and Z-Vi2Cu4R2 [Vi = (2-Me2NC6H4)C=C(Me)-(C6H4Me-4), R = 2-Me2NC6H4 or 4-MeC6H4CC] predominantly results in the formation of ViH. In contrast, only dimers (ViVi) were formed on thermolysis of (Z-ViCu2OTf)η

  13. Comparison of Sampling Probe and Thermal Desorber in Hazardous Air Pollutants on Site (HAPSITE) Extended Range (ER) for Analysis of Toxic Organic (TO)-15 Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    compounds in a bag To prepare 20 ppbv TO-15 compounds in a 5 L ALTEF polypropylene bag (Jensen Inert Products , Coral Springs, FL, USA), 100 mL was taken...Bromopentafluorobenzene (BPFB; an IS)  117  5.70 6,730,000 8,500,000 11,400,000 8,876,667 1,220,000  1,200,000 1,190,000 1,203,333 Ethylbenzene   91  5.91 136 1,960,000...Trichloroethane Toluene Methyl Butyl Ketone (2-Hexanone) Dibromochloromethane 12-Dibromoethane Tetrachloroethylene Chlorobenzene Ethylbenzene p/m

  14. Phase 0: goal study for the technical and economic evaluation of the Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) concept applied to solar thermal and photovoltaic collectors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1975-06-01

    This report presents the results of a quick, six-week technical and economic evaluation of the compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) solar collector. The purpose of this effort was to provide an initial phase of a goals study that is directed toward recommending relative priorities for development of the compound parabolic concentrator concept. The findings of this study are of a very preliminary nature. Conclusions based on study findings at this depth should be considered preliminary and subject to revision and review in later phases.

  15. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyanido groups. XXIV. Crystal structure, spectroscopic and thermal properties of two Cu(II) tetracyanidoplatinate complexes with tetradentate N-donor ligands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávra, M.; Potočňák, I.; Dušek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 409, JAN (2014), s. 441-448 ISSN 0020-1693 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : structure analysis * low-dimensional compounds * cyanido group Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.046, year: 2014

  16. Comparative Experimental Analysis of the Thermal Performance of Evacuated Tube Solar Water Heater Systems With and Without a Mini-Compound Parabolic Concentrating (CPC Reflector(C < 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehong Su

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Evacuated tube solar water heater systems are widely used in China due to their high thermal efficiency, simple construction requirements, and low manufacturing costs. CPC evacuated tube solar water heaters with a geometrical concentration ratio C of less than one are rare. A comparison of the experimental rig of evacuated tube solar water heater systems with and without a mini-CPC reflector was set up, with a series of experiments done in Hefei (31°53'N, 117°15'E, China. The first and second laws of thermodynamics were used to analyze and contrast their thermal performance. The water in the tank was heated from 26.9 to 55, 65, 75, 85, and 95 °C. Two types of solar water heater systems were used, and the data gathered for two days were compared. The results show that when attaining low temperature water, the evacuated tube solar water heater system without a mini-CPC reflector has higher thermal and exergy efficiencies than the system with a mini-CPC reflector, including the average and immediate values. On the other hand, when attaining high temperature water, the system with a mini-CPC reflector has higher thermal and exergy efficiencies than the other one. The comparison presents the advantages of evacuated tube solar water heater systems with and without a mini-CPC reflector, which can be offered as a reference when choosing which solar water system to use for actual applications.

  17. Magnetocaloric effect and negative thermal expansion in hexagonal Fe doped MnNiGe compounds with a magnetoelastic AFM-FM-like transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Li, Zhe; Liu, Enke; Zhou, Haichun; Zhang, Yuanlei; Jing, Chao

    2017-01-30

    We report a detailed study of two successive first-order transitions, including a martensitic transition (MT) and an antiferromagnetic (AFM)-ferromagnetic (FM)-like transition, in Mn 1-x Fe x NiGe (x = 0, 0.06, 0.11) alloys by X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization and linear thermal expansion measurements. Such an AFM-FM-like transition occurring in the martensitic state has seldom been observed in the M(T) curves. The results of Arrott plot and linear relationship of the critical temperature with M 2 provide explicit evidence of its first-order magnetoelastic nature. On the other hand, their performances as magnetocaloric and negative thermal expansion materials were characterized. The isothermal entropy change for a field change of 30 kOe reaches an impressive value of -25.8 J/kg K at 203 K for x = 0.11 compared to the other two samples. It demonstrates that the magneto-responsive ability has been significantly promoted since an appropriate amount of Fe doping can break the local Ni-6Mn AFM configuration. Moreover, the Fe-doped samples reveal both the giant negative thermal expansion and near-zero thermal expansion for different temperature ranges. For instance, the average thermal expansion coefficient ā of x = 0.06 reaches -60.7 × 10 -6 /K over T = 231-338 K and 0.6 × 10 -6 /K over T = 175-231 K during cooling.

  18. Determination of 1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene and related compounds in marine pore water by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using disposable optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eganhouse, Robert P.; DiFilippo, Erica L

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for determination of ten DDT-related compounds in marine pore water based on equilibrium solid-phase microextraction (SPME) using commercial polydimethylsiloxane-coated optical fiber with analysis by automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD-GC/MS). Thermally cleaned fiber was directly exposed to sediments and allowed to reach equilibrium under static conditions at the in situ field temperature. Following removal, fibers were rinsed, dried and cut into appropriate lengths for storage in leak-tight containers at -20°C. Analysis by TD-GC/MS under full scan (FS) and selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes was then performed. Pore-water method detection limits in FS and SIM modes were estimated at 0.05-2.4ng/L and 0.7-16pg/L, respectively. Precision of the method, including contributions from fiber handling, was less than 10%. Analysis of independently prepared solutions containing eight DDT compounds yielded concentrations that were within 6.9±5.5% and 0.1±14% of the actual concentrations in FS and SIM modes, respectively. The use of optical fiber with automated analysis allows for studies at high temporal and/or spatial resolution as well as for monitoring programs over large spatial and/or long temporal scales with adequate sample replication. This greatly enhances the flexibility of the technique and improves the ability to meet quality control objectives at significantly lower cost.

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis, structural elucidation, spectroscopic studies, thermal behavior and luminescence properties of a new 3-d compound: FeAlF2(C10H8N2)(HPO4)2(H2O)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzidia, Nabaa; Salah, Najet; Hamdi, Besma; Ben Salah, Abdelhamid

    2017-04-01

    The study of metal phosphate has been a proactive field of research thanks to its applied and scientific importance, especially in terms of the development of optical devices such as solid state lasers as well as optical fibers. The present paper seeks to investigate the synthesis, crystal structure, elemental analysis and properties of FeAlF2(C10H8N2)(HPO4)2(H2O) compound investigated by spectroscopic studies (FT-IR and FT-Raman), thermal behavior and luminescence. The Hirshfeld surface analysis and 2-D fingerprint plot have been performed to explore the behavior of these weak interactions and crystal cohesion. This investigation shows that the molecules are connected by hydrogen bonds of the type Osbnd H⋯O and Osbnd H⋯F. In addition, the 2,2'‒bipyridine ligand plays a significant role in the construction of 3-D supramolecular framework via π‒π stacking. FT‒IR and FT‒Raman spectra were used so as to ease the responsibilities of the vibration modes of the title compound. The thermal analysis (TGA) study shows a mass loss evolution as a temperature function. Finally, the optical properties were evaluated by photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  20. High thermal conductivity materials for thermal management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David A.; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Lindsay, Lucas R.

    2018-05-29

    High thermal conductivity materials and methods of their use for thermal management applications are provided. In some embodiments, a device comprises a heat generating unit (304) and a thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) in thermal communication with the heat generating unit (304) for conducting heat generated by the heat generating unit (304) away from the heat generating unit (304), the thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) comprising a thermally conductive compound, alloy or composite thereof. The thermally conductive compound may include Boron Arsenide, Boron Antimonide, Germanium Carbide and Beryllium Selenide.

  1. Analysis of volatile organic compounds released from the decay of surrogate human models simulating victims of collapsed buildings by thermal desorption-comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapiou, A; Zorba, E; Mikedi, K; McGregor, L; Spiliopoulou, C; Statheropoulos, M

    2015-07-09

    Field experiments were devised to mimic the entrapment conditions under the rubble of collapsed buildings aiming to investigate the evolution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the early dead body decomposition stage. Three pig carcasses were placed inside concrete tunnels of a search and rescue (SAR) operational field terrain for simulating the entrapment environment after a building collapse. The experimental campaign employed both laboratory and on-site analytical methods running in parallel. The current work focuses only on the results of the laboratory method using thermal desorption coupled to comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOF MS). The flow-modulated TD-GC×GC-TOF MS provided enhanced separation of the VOC profile and served as a reference method for the evaluation of the on-site analytical methods in the current experimental campaign. Bespoke software was used to deconvolve the VOC profile to extract as much information as possible into peak lists. In total, 288 unique VOCs were identified (i.e., not found in blank samples). The majority were aliphatics (172), aromatics (25) and nitrogen compounds (19), followed by ketones (17), esters (13), alcohols (12), aldehydes (11), sulfur (9), miscellaneous (8) and acid compounds (2). The TD-GC×GC-TOF MS proved to be a sensitive and powerful system for resolving the chemical puzzle of above-ground "scent of death". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural characterization, vibrational spectroscopy accomplished with DFT calculation, thermal and dielectric behaviors in a new organic-inorganic tertrapropylammonium aquapentachlorostannate dihydrate compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajlaoui, Sondes, E-mail: hajlaouisondes@yahoo.fr [Unité de recherche de la matière condensée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000, Sfax (Tunisia); Chaabane, Iskandar [Unité de recherche de la matière condensée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000, Sfax (Tunisia); Lhoste, Jérôme; Bulou, Alain [LUNAM Université, Université du Maine, CNRS UMR 6283, Institut des Molécules et Matériaux du Mans (IMMM), Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085, Le Mans, Cedex 9 (France); Guidara, Kamel [Unité de recherche de la matière condensée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Université de Sfax, BP 1171, 3000, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2016-09-15

    In this work a novel compound tertrapropylammonium aquapentachlorostannate dihydrate was synthesized and characterized by; single crystal X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetric and dielectric measurement. The crystal structure refinement at room temperature reveled that this later belongs to the monoclinic compound with P121/c1 space group with the following unit cell parameters a = 8.2699(3) Å, b = 12.4665(4) Å, c = 22.3341(7) Å and β = 92.94(0)°. The crystal arrangement can be described by stacked organic-inorganic layers in the c direction with two independent water molecules placed between each two layers. The detailed interpretations of the vibrational properties of the studied compound were performed using density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP/LanL2DZ basis set, and has enabled us to make the detailed assignments by comparative study of the experimental and calculated Raman and IR spectra. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurement disclosed two anomalies in the temperature range 356–376 (T{sub 1}) K and at 393 K (T{sub 2}) characterized by the dehydration of the sample and probably a reconstruction of a new structure after T{sub 2} transition. The temperature dependences of dielectric permittivity show a relaxation process around T{sub 2} anomaly indicating the occurrence of the disorder at high temperature. The dependence of the exponent m(T) on temperature, extracted from the straight lines of log(ε″) with log (ω), suggests that the correlated barrier hopping is the appropriate model for the conduction mechanism. - Highlights: • The single-crystal X-ray diffraction has been performed. • The assignments of the vibration modes based on DFT were reported and discussed. • Differential scanning calorimetric reveals the presence of two endothermic peaks. • The electric permittivity was studied using the impedance measurements. • The CBH is the appropriate model for the conduction

  3. Enhanced Anti-Ultraviolet and Thermal Stability of a Pesticide via Modification of a Volatile Organic Compound (VOC-Free Vinyl-Silsesquioxane in Desert Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derong Lin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the effect of severe environmental conditions, such as intense heat, blowing sand, and ultraviolet light, conventional pesticide applications have repeatedly failed to adequately control mosquito and sandfly populations in desert areas. In this study, a vinyl silsesquioxane (VS was added to a pesticide (citral to enhance residual, thermal and anti-ultraviolet properties via three double-bond reactions in the presence of an initiator: (1 the connection of VS and citral, (2 a radical self-polymerization of VS and (3 a radical self-polymerization of citral. VS-citral, the expected and main product of the copolymerization of VS and citral, was characterized using standard spectrum techniques. The molecular consequences of the free radical polymerization were analyzed by MALDITOF spectrometry. Anti-ultraviolet and thermal stability properties of the VS-citral system were tested using scanning spectrophotometry (SSP and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The repellency of VS-citral decreased over time, from 97.63% at 0 h to 72.98% at 1 h and 60.0% at 2 h, as did the repellency of citral, from 89.56% at 0 h to 62.73% at 1 h and 50.95% at 2 h.

  4. Crystal structure and thermal expansion of the low- and high-temperature forms of Ba MIV(PO 4) 2 compounds ( M=Ti, Zr, Hf and Sn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregiroux, D.; Popa, K.; Jardin, R.; Raison, P. E.; Wallez, G.; Quarton, M.; Brunelli, M.; Ferrero, C.; Caciuffo, R.

    2009-05-01

    The crystal structure of β-BaZr(PO 4) 2, archetype of the high-temperature forms of Ba M(PO 4) 2 phosphates (with M=Ti, Zr, Hf and Sn), has been solved ab initio by Rietveld analysis from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. The phase transition appears as a topotactic modification of the monoclinic (S.G. C2/m) lamellar α-structure into a trigonal one (S.G. P3¯m1) through a simple mechanism involving the unfolding of the [Zr)]n2- layers. The thermal expansion is very anisotropic (e.g., -4.1< α i<34.0×10 -6 K -1 in the case of α-BaZr(PO 4) 2) and quite different in the two forms, as a consequence of symmetry. It stems from a complex combination of several mechanisms, involving bridging oxygen rocking in M-O-P linkages, and "bond thermal expansion".

  5. Preparation and characterizations of HDPE-EVA alloy/OMT nanocomposites/paraffin compounds as a shape stabilized phase change thermal energy storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yibing; Hu Yuan; Song Lei; Lu Hongdian; Chen Zuyao; Fan Weicheng

    2006-01-01

    A kind of shape stabilized phase change nanocomposites materials (PCNM) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE)/ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) alloy, organophilic montmorillonite (OMT), paraffin and intumescent flame retardant (IFR) are prepared using twin-screw extruder technique. The structures of the HDPE-EVA alloy/OMT nanocomposites are evidenced by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that an ordered intercalated nanomorphology of the HDPE-EVA alloy/OMT nanocomposites is formed. Then the structures of the shape stabilized PCNM are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The HDPE-EVA alloy/OMT nanocomposites act as the supporting material and form the three-dimensional network structure. The paraffin acts as a phase change material and disperses in the three-dimensional network structure. Its latent heat is given by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) method. The SEM and DSC results show that the additives of IFR have little effect on the network structure and the latent heat of shape stabilized PCNM, respectively. The thermal stability properties are characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The TGA analysis results indicate that the flame retardant shape stabilized PCNM produce a larger amount of char residue at 800 deg. C than that of shape stabilized PCNM, although the onset of weight loss of the flame retardant shape stabilized PCNM occur at a lower temperature. The formed multicellular char residue contributes to the improvement of thermal stability performance. The probable combustion mechanisms are also discussed in this paper

  6. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Owens, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Although elemental semiconductors such as silicon and germanium are standard for energy dispersive spectroscopy in the laboratory, their use for an increasing range of applications is becoming marginalized by their physical limitations, namely the need for ancillary cooling, their modest stopping powers, and radiation intolerance. Compound semiconductors, on the other hand, encompass such a wide range of physical and electronic properties that they have become viable competitors in a number of applications. Compound Semiconductor Radiation Detectors is a consolidated source of information on all aspects of the use of compound semiconductors for radiation detection and measurement. Serious Competitors to Germanium and Silicon Radiation Detectors Wide-gap compound semiconductors offer the ability to operate in a range of hostile thermal and radiation environments while still maintaining sub-keV spectral resolution at X-ray wavelengths. Narrow-gap materials offer the potential of exceeding the spectral resolutio...

  7. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of a device for irradiation of LEU UAl{sub x}-Al targets for {sup 99}Mo production in the IEA-R1 reactor; Analises neutronica e termo-hidraulica de um dispositivo para irradiacao de alvos tipo LEU de UAl{sub x}-Al para producao de {sup 99}MO no reator IEA-R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Pedro Julio Batista de Oliveira

    2012-07-01

    Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc), the product of radioactive decay of molybdenum-99 ( Mo), is one of the most widely used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, covering approximately 80% of all radiodiagnosis procedures in the world. Nowadays, Brazil requires an amount of about 450 Ci of {sup 99}Mo per week. Due to the crisis and the shortage of {sup 99}Mo supply chain that has been observed on the world since 2008, IPEN/CNEN-SP decided to develop a project to produce {sup 99}Mo through fission of uranium-235. The objective of this dissertation was the development of neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations to evaluate the operational safety of a device for {sup 99}Mo production to be irradiated in the IEA-Rl reactor core at 5 MW. In this device will be placed ten targets of UAl{sub x}-Al dispersion fuel with low enriched uranium (LEU) and density of 2.889 gU/cm{sup 3}. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION and CITATION and the maximum temperatures reached in the targets were calculated with the code MTRCR-IEA-R1. The analysis demonstrated that the device irradiation will occur without adverse consequences to the operation of the reactor. The total amount of {sup 99}Mo was calculated with the program SCALE and considering that the time needed for the chemical processing and recovering of the {sup 99}Mo will be five days after the irradiation, we have that the {sup 99}Mo activity available for distribution will be 176 Ci for 3 days of irradiation, 236 Ci for 5 days of irradiation and 272 Ci for 7 days of targets irradiation. (author)'.

  8. Investigation on the thermal properties of new thermo-reversible networks based on poly(vinyl furfural and multifunctional maleimide compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gaina

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available New thermo-reversible networks were obtained from poly(vinyl furfural and multifunctional maleimide monomers by Diels-Alder (DA and retro-DA reactions. The poly(vinyl furfural having acetalization degree of 15 and 25% were obtained by the acid-catalyzed homogenous acetalization of poly(vinyl alcohol with 2-furfural in a nonaqueous media. The thermal and viscoelastic behaviour of the cross-linked materials have been studied via differential scanning calorimetry, dynamic mechanical analysis and thermogravimetric analysis. The networks exhibit considerable swelling in those organic solvents that dissolve both poly(vinyl furfural and bismaleimides; by heating in aprotic dipolar solvents at 150°C, they become soluble.

  9. Gaseous byproducts from high-temperature thermal conversion elemental analysis of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing compounds with considerations for δ2H and δ18O analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsinger, Glendon B; Tipple, Christopher A; Stern, Libby A

    2013-07-30

    High-temperature, conversion-reduction (HTC) systems convert hydrogen and oxygen in materials into H2 and CO for δ(2)H and δ(18)O measurements by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. HTC of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing materials produces unintended byproduct gases that could affect isotope analyses by: (1) allowing isotope exchange reactions downstream of the HTC reactor, (2) creating isobaric or co-elution interferences, and (3) causing deterioration of the chromatography. This study characterizes these HTC byproducts. A HTC system (ThermoFinnigan TC/EA) was directly connected to a gas chromatograph/quadrupole mass spectrometer in scan mode (m/z 8 to 88) to identify the volatile products generated by HTC at conversion temperatures of 1350 °C and 1450 °C for a range of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing solids [keratin powder, horse hair, caffeine, ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, ammonium sulfate, urea, and three nitrated organic explosives (PETN, RDX, and TNT)]. The prominent HTC byproduct gases include carbon dioxide, hydrogen cyanide, methane, acetylene, and water for all nitrogen-bearing compounds, as well as carbon disulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide for sulfur-bearing compounds. The 1450 °C reactor temperature reduced the abundance of most byproduct gases, but increased the significant byproduct, hydrogen cyanide. Inclusion of a post-reactor chemical trap containing Ascarite II and Sicapent, in series, eliminated the majority of byproducts. This study identified numerous gaseous HTC byproducts. The potential adverse effects of these gases on isotope ratio analyses are unknown but may be mitigated by higher HTC reactor temperatures and purifying the products with a purge-and-trap system or with chemical traps. Published in 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Development of low enriched uranium target plates by thermo-mechanical processing of UAl{sub 2}–Al matrix for production of {sup 99}Mo in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Kanwar Liaqat; Khan, Akhlaque Ahmad [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) P.O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mushtaq, Ahmad, E-mail: amushtaq1@hotmail.com [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) P.O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Imtiaz, Farhan; Ziai, Maratab Ali; Gulzar, Amir; Farooq, Muhammad; Hussain, Nazar; Ahmed, Nisar; Pervez, Shahid; Zaidi, Jamshed Hussain [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH) P.O Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-02-15

    Uranium aluminide predominated with UAl{sub 2} phase was prepared by arc-melting procedures and comminuted to required particle size. UAl{sub 2} and Al powders were blended and compacted to achieve LEU fuel density of 2.17 g/cm{sup 3}. The picture-frame technique was used to clad the dispersions (UAl{sub 2}–Al) with aluminum. A few target plates were fabricated by thermo-mechanical processing (hot rolling and annealing) of UAl{sub 2}–Al matrix contained in roll billet of Al. The fabricated plates were characterized by destructive and some of non-destructive testing techniques and then annealed to achieve required phase of uranium aluminide for proper dissolution in basic media.

  11. Advances of the low enriched uranium utilization project in CNA-1 during 1998 and 1999; Avances del proyecto de utilizacion de uranio levemente enriquecido en la CNA-I en 1998 y 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Jose M; Higa, Manabu; Sidelnik, Jorge I [Nucleoelectrica Argentina SA (NASA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Perez, Ramon A [Nucleoelectrica Argentina SA (NASA), Lima (Argentina). Central Nuclear Atucha I; Casario, Jose A; Alvarez, Luis A [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Martin (Argentina). Centro Atomico Constituyentes

    1999-07-01

    In this work, a general description of advances of the Enriched Fuel Introduction Project in CNA-1 and the main tasks performed during 1998 and 1999 are presented. The program is being satisfactorily developed and during that period the number of slightly enriched fuels (LEU) introduced had significantly increased in relation to previous years. At present, there are 181 LEU fuel elements in the core and 125 LEU fuel elements have been extracted. The number of full power burnt fuel elements per day decreased from 1.31 FE/dpp in 1994 (when all fuel was natural) to 0.92 in 1998 and 0.83 in 1999, reaching the predicted value for homogeneous LEU core of 0.7. The cost of burnt fuel in 1998 was 25% lower that if only natural fuel would have been used. (author)

  12. The influence of the relative thermal expansion and electric permittivity on phase transitions in the perovskite-type bidimensional layered NH3(CH2)3NH3CdBr4 compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staśkiewicz, Beata; Staśkiewicz, Anna

    2017-07-01

    Hydrothermal method has been used to synthesized the layered hybrid compound NH3(CH2)3NH3CdBr4 of perovskite architecture. Structural, dielectric and dilatometric properties of the compound have been analyzed. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) effect in the direction perpendicular to the perovskite plane as well as an unusual phase sequence have been reported based on X-ray diffraction analysis. Electric permittivity measurements evidenced the phase transitions at Tc1=326/328 K and Tc2=368/369 K. Relative linear expansion measurements almost confirmed these temperatures of phase transitions. Anomalies of electric permittivity and expansion behavior connected with the phase transitions are detected at practically the same temperatures as those observed earlier in differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared (IR), far infrared (FIR) and Raman spectroscopy studies. Mechanism of the phase transitions is explained. Relative linear expansion study was prototype to estimate critical exponent value β for continuous phase transition at Tc1. It has been inferred that there is a strong interplay between the distortion of the inorganic network, those hydrogen bonds and the intermolecular interactions of the organic component.

  13. The Effect of Size and Crumb Rubber Composition as a Filler with Compatibilizer Pp-G-Ma in Polypropylene Blends and Sir-20 Compound on Mechanical and Thermal Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erna Frida

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Having been researched the development of thermoplastic elastomer material of polypropylene and natural rubber SIR-20 compound with Crumb Rubber as the filler. Reinforced polypropylene with size 60 mesh with 1 mm, and the composition of the Crumb rubber (30, 40, and 50 wt%. Observed mechanical properties are tensile strength, fracture elongation, Young's modulus, tear strength and impact strength. Thermal properties are analyzed by DSC and DTA/TGA. It is acquired that for the size of 60 mesh crumb rubber tensile strength, fracture elongation, Young’s modulus, tear strength and impact strength are bigger than 1mm size. The addition of 60 mesh crumb rubber increases but it decreases by adding of 50 weight%. While for crumb rubber 1 mm tensile strength, fracture elongation, tear strength and impact strength decreas. Based on analysis of DSC that the addition of crumb rubber does not make a difference boiling point significantly between samples containing crumb rubber and polypropylene Analysis TGA/DTA to an increase in enthalpy and decomposition temperature with the addition of crumb rubber used and thermal stability.

  14. Features of magnetic and thermal properties of R(Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2} (x≤0.16) quasibinary compounds with R=Dy, Ho, Er

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anikin, Maksim; Tarasov, Evgeniy; Kudrevatykh, Nikolay [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation); Inishev, Aleksander [Institute of Metal Physics, Ekaterinburg 620137 (Russian Federation); Semkin, Mikhail; Volegov, Aleksey; Zinin, Aleksander [Institute of Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    In this work the results of measurements of high field susceptibility, paraprocess susceptibility and thermal properties of R(Co{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x}){sub 2} intermetallic compounds (R=Dy, Ho, Er and x=(0−0.16)) are presented (heat capacity and magnetocaloric effect (MCE)). A magnetic structure of the Ho(Co{sub 0.88}Fe{sub 0.12}){sub 2} at 293 K and 78 K was studied by neutron powder diffraction. Some peculiarities of a high-field susceptibility were revealed at low temperatures and around the Curie point (T{sub C}). In temperature range lower than T{sub C} by (100–150) K, magnetic contributions to a zero-field heat capacity were found. Studying MCE in wide temperatures range, the large change of the entropy magnetic contribution (∆S) was observed which correlates with ∆T phenomenon. In particular, for the Er(Co{sub 0.84}Fe{sub 0.16}){sub 2} compound the ∆S value at low temperatures is six times higher than that at Curie point. The possible reasons of such behavior were discussed. - Highlights: • Magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of R(Co–Fe){sub 2} compounds have been studied. • Fe introduction induces the disorientation effect in Ho-ions magnetic ordering. • Emergence of magnetic contribution to a heat capacity at temperatures less T{sub C}. • The existence of a broad maximum on a temperature dependence of the MCE. • Direct MCE measurements at magnetic field of (0–17.5) kOe have been performed.

  15. Evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) for support of in vitro drug discovery assays: increasing scope, robustness and throughput of the LDTD technique for use with chemically diverse compound libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Iain; Smith, Aaron; Weston, Daniel J; White, Peter; Szwandt, Simon; Sealey, Laura

    2012-02-05

    Within the drug discovery environment, the key process in optimising the chemistry of a structural series toward a potential drug candidate is the design, make and test cycle, in which the primary screens consist of a number of in vitro assays, including metabolic stability, cytochrome P450 inhibition, and time-dependent inhibition assays. These assays are often carried out using multiple drug compounds with chemically diverse structural features, often in a 96 well-plate format for maximum time-efficiency, and are supported using rapid liquid chromatographic (LC) sample introduction with a tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) selected reaction monitoring (SRM) endpoint, taking around 6.5 h per plate. To provide a faster time-to-decision at this critical point, there exists a requirement for higher sample throughput and a robust, well-characterized analytical alternative. This paper presents a detailed evaluation of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD), a relatively new ambient sample ionization technique, for compound screening assays. By systematic modification of typical LDTD instrumentation and workflow, and providing deeper understanding around overcoming a number of key issues, this work establishes LDTD as a practical, rapid alternative to conventional LC-MS/MS in drug discovery, without need for extensive sample preparation or expensive, scope-limiting internal standards. Analysis of both the five and three cytochrome P450 competitive inhibition assay samples by LDTD gave improved sample throughput (0.75 h per plate) and provided comparable data quality as the IC₅₀ values obtained were within 3 fold of those calculated from the LC-MS/MS data. Additionally when applied generically to a chemically diverse library of over 250 proprietary compounds from the AstraZeneca design, make and test cycle, LDTD demonstrated a success rate of 98%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyano groups. XIV. Crystal structure, spectroscopic, thermal and magnetic properties of [CuL 2][Pt(China)4] complexes (L=ethylenediamine or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnak, Ivan; Vavra, Martin; Cizmar, Erik; Tibenska, Katarina; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Steinborn, Dirk; Wagner, Christoph; Dusek, Michal; Fejfarova, Karla; Schmidt, Harry; Muller, Thomas; Orendac, Martin; Feher, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Violet crystals of [Cu(en) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] and blue crystals of [Cu(dmen) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] were crystallized from the water-methanol solution containing CuCl 2 .2H 2 O, ethylenediamine (en) or N,N-dimethylethylenediamine (dmen) and K 2 [Pt(China) 4 ].3H 2 O. Both compounds were characterized using elemental analysis, infrared and UV-VIS spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, specific heat measurements and thermal analysis. X-ray structure analysis revealed chain-like structure in both compounds. The covalent chains are built of Cu(II) ions linked by [Pt(China) 4 ] 2- anions in the [111] and [101] direction, respectively. The Cu(II) atoms are hexacoordinated by four nitrogen atoms in the equatorial plane from two molecules of bidentate ligands L with average Cu-N distance of 2.022(2) and 2.049(4) A, respectively. Axial positions are occupied by two nitrogen atoms from bridging [Pt(China) 4 ] 2- anions at longer Cu-N distance of 2.537(2) and 2.600(5) A, respectively. Both materials are characterized by the presence of weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling. Despite the one-dimensional (1D) character of the structure, the analysis of magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(en) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] behaves as two-dimensional (2D) spatially anisotropic square lattice Heisenberg magnet, while more pronounced influence of interlayer coupling is observed in [Cu(dmen) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ]. - Graphical abstract: Chain-like structure in [Cu(en) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] (R=H) and [Cu(dmen) 2 ][Pt(China) 4 ] (R=CH 3 ) compounds

  17. Studies of behavior of the fuel compound based on the U-Zr micro-heterogeneous quasialloy during cyclic thermal tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, D. A.; Repnikov, V. M.; Soldatkin, D. M.; Solntsev, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides the description of temperature cycle testing of U-Zr heterogeneous fuel composition. The composition is essentially a niobium-doped zirconium matrix with metallic uranium filaments evenly distributed over the cross section. The test samples 150 mm long had been fabricated using a fiber-filament technology. The samples were essentially two-bladed spiral mandrel fuel elements parts. In the course of experiments the following temperatures were applied: 350, 675, 780 and 1140 °C with total exposure periods equal to 200, 30, 30 and 6 hours respectively. The fuel element samples underwent post-exposure material science examination including: geometry measurements, metallographic analysis, X-ray phase analysis and electron-microscopic analysis as well as micro-hardness measurement. It has been found that no significant thermal swelling of the samples occurs throughout the whole temperature range from 350 °C up to 1140 °C. The paper presents the structural changes and redistribution of the fuel component over the fuel element cross section with rising temperature.

  18. Thermal Mud Molecular Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersin Odabasi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal mud (peloids, which are frequently used for thermal therapy purposes consist of organic and inorganic (minerals compounds in general. Organic structure is formed after a variety of chemical processes occurring in decades and comprise of a very complex structure. Stagnant water environment, herbal diversity, microorganism multiplicity and time are crucial players to form the structure. Data regarding description of organic compounds are very limited. Nowadays, it was clearly understood that a variety of compounds those are neglected in daily practice are found in thermal mud after GC-MS and similar methods are being frequently used. Those compounds which are biologically active are humic compounds, carboxylic acids, terpenoids, steroids and fatty acids. By comprising the thermal mud, these different compound groups which are related to divers areas from cosmetology to inflammation, make the thermal mud very meaningful in the treatment of human disease. In this review, it was tried to put forward the effects of several molecule groups those consisting of the thermal mud structure. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2014; 13(3.000: 257-264

  19. Effect of Mn content on structural, optical, opto-thermal and electrical properties of ZnO:Mn sprayed thin films compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimouni, R.; Kamoun, O.; Yumak, A.; Mhamdi, A.; Boubaker, K.; Petkova, P.; Amlouk, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposing an original explanation to the difference between manganese-doped zinc oxide and undoped behavior. • Presenting an original effective electrical and fluorescence-related calculation scheme. • Outlining original AC–DC investigation protocol. - Abstract: Manganese-doped zinc oxide thin films (ZnO:Mn) at different percentages (0–3%) were deposited on glass substrates using a chemical spray technique. The effects of manganese element content on structural, optical, opto-thermal and electrical conductivity of ZnO:Mn thin films were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, optical measurement, Photoluminescence spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy. XRD analysis revealed that all films consist of single phase ZnO and were well crystallized in würtzite phase with the crystallites preferentially oriented towards (0 0 2) direction parallel to c-axis. Doping manganese resulted in a slight decrease in the optical band gap energy of the films and a noticeably change in optical constants. The UV peak positions for ZnO:Mn samples slightly red shift to the longer wavelength in comparison with the pure ZnO which can be attributed to the change in the acceptor level induced by the substitutional Mn 2+ and the band-gap narrowing of ZnO with the Mn dopant. We have performed original AC and DC conductivity studies inspired from Jonscher and small polaron models. These studies helped establishing significant correlation between temperature and activation energy and Mn content. From the spectroscopy impedance analysis we investigated the frequency relaxation phenomenon and the circuit equivalent circuit of such thin films. Finally, all results have been discussed, as an objective of the actual work, in terms of the manganese doping concentration

  20. Concentration, ozone formation potential and source analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a thermal power station centralized area: A study in Shuozhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yulong; Peng, Lin; Li, Rumei; Li, Yinghui; Li, Lijuan; Bai, Huiling

    2017-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from two sampling sites (HB and XB) in a power station centralized area, in Shuozhou city, China, were sampled by stainless steel canisters and measured by gas chromatography-mass selective detection/flame ionization detection (GC-MSD/FID) in the spring and autumn of 2014. The concentration of VOCs was higher in the autumn (HB, 96.87 μg/m 3 ; XB, 58.94 μg/m 3 ) than in the spring (HB, 41.49 μg/m 3 ; XB, 43.46 μg/m 3 ), as lower wind speed in the autumn could lead to pollutant accumulation, especially at HB, which is a new urban area surrounded by residential areas and a transportation hub. Alkanes were the dominant group at both HB and XB in both sampling periods, but the contribution of aromatic pollutants at HB in the autumn was much higher than that of the other alkanes (11.16-19.55%). Compared to other cities, BTEX pollution in Shuozhou was among the lowest levels in the world. Because of the high levels of aromatic pollutants, the ozone formation potential increased significantly at HB in the autumn. Using the ratio analyses to identify the age of the air masses and analyze the sources, the results showed that the atmospheric VOCs at XB were strongly influenced by the remote sources of coal combustion, while at HB in the spring and autumn were affected by the remote sources of coal combustion and local sources of vehicle emission, respectively. Source analysis conducted using the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model at Shuozhou showed that coal combustion and vehicle emissions made the two largest contributions (29.98% and 21.25%, respectively) to atmospheric VOCs. With further economic restructuring, the influence of vehicle emissions on the air quality should become more significant, indicating that controlling vehicle emissions is key to reducing the air pollution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of organic compound exposures, thermal comfort parameters, and HVAC system-driven air exchange rates in public school portable classrooms in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shendell, Derek Garth [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of prefabricated, portable classrooms (portables, relocatables, RCs) has increased due to class size reduction initiatives and limited resources. Classroom mechanical wall-mount heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems may function improperly or not be maintained; lower ventilation rates may impact indoor air and environmental quality (IEQ). Materials in portables may off-gas volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde, as a function of age, temperature, and humidity. For a pilot study, public K-12 schools located in or serving target areas within five Los Angeles County communities were identified. In two communities where school districts (SD) consented, 1-3 randomly selected portables, one newer and one older, and one main building control classroom from each participating school were included. Sampling was conducted over a five-day school week in the cooling and heating seasons, or repeated twice in the cooling season. Measurements included passive samplers for VOCs, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and air exchange rate (AER) calculation; indoor air temperature and humidity; technician walk-through surveys; an interview questionnaire above HVAC system operation and maintenance (O and M). For an intervention study evaluating advanced HVAC technologies in comparison to the common conventional technology, and materials for source reduction of VOCs, four RC were manufactured and located in pairs at two schools in two recruited Northern California SD in different climate zones. RCs were built with the two HVAC systems, cabinetry and conduit for monitoring equipment, and standard or advanced interior finish materials. Each RC was its own control in a case-crossover design--HVAC systems alternately operated for 1-2 week intervals in the 2001-02 school year, with IEQ monitoring including aldehyde and indoor air temperature and humidity data. Measured classroom AER were low, formaldehyde concentrations were below the state

  2. Low-temperature thermal decomposition of dioxin-like compounds in fly ash: combination of chemical analysis with in vitro bioassays (EROD and DR-CALUX).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnisch, Peter A; Hosoe, Kazunori; Shiozaki, Ken; Ozaki, Hironori; Nakamura, Kazuo; Sakai, Shin-Ichi

    2002-12-01

    To investigate the dechlorination of fly ash during low-temperature treatment under oxygen-deficient conditions (thermocatalyic treatment or Hagenmaier process), six fly ash samples from six different incineration plants were treated in a laboratory experiment or in the actual plant, either under ideal (400 degrees C, 120 min) or intermediate (300 degrees C, 30 min) conditions. The aim of the present study was to confirm the decrease in the I-TEQ (international toxicity equivalency) of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/-furans (PCDD/Fs) and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (co-PXBs) and, also for the first time, the decrease in the sum of dioxin-like toxicity (bioassay- or bio-TEQ) of all kinds of other dioxin-like Ah receptor agonists (such as PXDD/Fs, PXBs, PXN, X = Br, F) measured by two state-of-the-art cell-based Ah receptor-dependent bioassays: H4IIE-Ethoxy-Resorufin-o-Deethylase (EROD) and H4IIE-luc/DR-Chemical Activated Luciferase expression (DR-CALUX). The treatment efficiency was calculated on the basis of the reduction in the I-TEQ and bio-TED values. For these fly ash samples, the treatment efficiency, as measured by chemical analysis, was higher than 99%, and 85%-99%, in the case of the bio-TED values, indicating that these Ah receptor binding toxic compounds were sufficiently decomposed. Bio-TEQ values for untreated fly ash samples (n = 6) were on average 1.2 times (range 0.7-1.9), for the H4IIE-EROD assay, and 2.8 times (1.1-4.9), for the DR-CALUX assay, higher than I-TEQ values measured by chemical analyses (sum of PCDD/Fs and co-PCBs). In the case of these fly ash samples treated under ideal conditions and therefore low in contaminants, the bio-TEQ values were on average 1.4 times (range 0.9-1.8), for the H4IIE-EROD assay, and 5.1 times (range 1.2-12), for the DR-CALUX assay, higher than the I-TEQ values.

  3. Organolanthanoid compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, H.

    1984-01-01

    Up to little more than a decade ago organolanthanoid compounds were still a curiosity. Apart from the description of an isolated number of cyclopentadienyl and indenyl derivatives, very few significant contributions had been made to this interesting sector of organometallic chemistry. However, subsequent systematic studies using modern preparative and analytical techniques, together with X-ray single crystal structure determinations, enabled the isolation and characterization of a large number of very interesting homoleptic and heteroleptic compounds in which the lanthanoid is bound to hydrogen, to substituted or unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl groups, to allyl or alkynyl groups, or even to phosphorus ylides, trimethylsilyl, and carbonylmetal groups. These compounds, which are all extremely sensitive to oxygen and water, open up new possibilities in the field of catalysis and have great potential in organic synthesis - as recent studies with pentamethylcyclopentadienyl derivatives, organolanthanoid(II) compounds, and hexamethyllanthanoid complexes have already shown. (orig.) [de

  4. [Synthetic Studies of Bioactive Heterocyclic Natural Products and Fused Heterocyclic Compounds Based on the Thermal Electrocyclic or Azaelectocyclic Reaction of 6π-Electron or Aza-6π-electron Systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Since 1979, synthetic studies of bioactive heterocyclic natural products and condensed heteroaromatic compounds based on the thermal electrocyclic reaction of 6π-electron or aza-6π-electron systems incorporating the double bond of the principal aromatic or heteroaromatic ring have been conducted by our research group. In this review, five types of electrocyclic and azaelectrocyclic reaction are described: 1) the synthesis of the carbazole alkaloids hyellazole and 6-chlorohyellazole through the electrocyclic reaction of 2,3-bisalkenylindoles; 2) synthetic studies of the pyridocarbazole alkaloids ellipticine and olivacine through the electrocyclic reactions of the indole-2,3- and pyridine-3,4-quinodimethane intermediates; 3) synthetic studies of polysubstituted carbazole alkaloids through the allene-mediated electrocyclic reactions involving the indole 2,3-bond; 4) synthetic studies of fused pyridine rings through the azaelectrocyclic reaction of the 1-aza-6π-electron system using the oxime or oxime ether; and 5) synthetic studies of fused pyridine rings through the azaelectrocyclic reaction of the 2-aza-6π-electron system using a carbodiimide or isocyanate.

  5. Multipurpose Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Specially formulated derivatives of an unusual basic compound known as Alcide may be the answer to effective treatment and prevention of the disease bovine mastitis, a bacterial inflammation of a cow's mammary gland that results in loss of milk production and in extreme cases, death. Manufactured by Alcide Corporation the Alcide compound has killed all tested bacteria, virus and fungi, shortly after contact, with minimal toxic effects on humans or animals. Alcide Corporation credits the existence of the mastitis treatment/prevention products to assistance provided the company by NERAC, Inc.

  6. Polymer compound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    1995-01-01

    A Polymer compound comprising a polymer (a) that contains cyclic imidesgroups and a polymer (b) that contains monomer groups with a 2,4-diamino-1,3,5-triazine side group. According to the formula (see formula) whereby themole percentage ratio of the cyclic imides groups in the polymer compoundwith

  7. Mesoionic Compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organic Chemistry. Kamatak University,. Dharwad. Her research interests are synthesis, reactions and synthetic utility of sydnones. She is currently working on electrochemical and insecticidal/antifungal activities for some of these compounds. Keywords. Aromaticity, mesoionic hetero- cycles, sydnones, tandem re- actions.

  8. Observation of the structural, optical and magnetic properties during the transformation from hexagonal NiS nano-compounds to cubic NiO nanostructures due to thermal oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linganiso, E.C., E-mail: elinganiso@csir.co.za [National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Mwakikunga, B.W., E-mail: bmwakikunga@csir.co.za [National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Coville, N.J. [DST/NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, Molecular Sciences Institute, School of Chemistry, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag 3, Johannesburg, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Mhlanga, S.D. [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 17011, Doornfontein, 2028 Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2015-04-25

    Graphical abstract: The transition temperature of 350 °C for the formation of c-NiO from h-NiS oxidation was obtained from structural and optical property studies and by calculating the number of spins obtained from the EPR data. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) shows that this pure NiS has both ferromagnetic ordering and paramagnetic domains. Further, the transition temperature of −9 °C of the pure α-NiS nano-alloys was confirmed by performing electrical measurements on the as-synthesized material. - Highlights: • Single hexagonal phase NiS obtained by microwave assisted hydrothermal synthesis. • NiS nanoalloys show both ferromagnetic and paramagnetic domains by VSM. • Structural evolution of annealed NiS and temperature dependent NiS oxidation presented. • Phase transition from NiS to NiO studied and correlated to the EPR spin population data and crystallite size. • Ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ordering observed for the raw NiS nanostructures. - Abstract: Single phase α-NiS nano-compounds with uniformly distributed hierarchical networks were synthesized by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique. The materials were evaluated for thermal stability under an oxidative environment and at temperatures between 150 °C and 600 °C. NiS materials showed stability at 300 °C and NiO formation was observed from 350 °C to 600 °C. The annealing effect on the crystalline size and IR absorption of the annealed samples is reported by XRD and FTIR studied. The EPR properties of the annealed materials were studied and compared to the oxidized materials. The transition temperature of 350 °C for the formation of NiO from NiS oxidation was confirmed by calculating the number of spins obtained from the EPR data. Vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) shows that this pure NiS has both ferromagnetic ordering and paramagnetic domains. Further, the transition temperature of −9 °C of the pure α-NiS nano-compounds was confirmed by performing electrical

  9. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  10. Synthesis, characterization, thermal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Bal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work explains the synthesis of a new azo-Schiff base compound, derived from condensation between N-ethylcarbazole-3-carbaldehyde and 1,3-diaminopropane, followed by azo coupling reaction with the diazonium salt of 2-amino-4-methyl phenol. The newly synthesized azo-Schiff base was further reacted with the acetate salts of Copper, Cobalt and Nickel to give three coordination compounds. All synthesized compounds have been characterized through spectral analysis. The coordination compounds have been examined for their thermal and catalytic features. Good and moderate yields were obtained for the oxidation of styrene and cyclohexene. Thermal features of the ligand and its complexes have been explained and the results obtained have supported the proposed structures.

  11. Thermal-Hydraulic Simulations of Single Pin and Assembly Sector for IVG- 1M Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Garner, P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hanan, N. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-15

    inner pin just before the enrichment change. The 600 mm case demonstrated a peak clad surface temperature of 370.4 K, while the 800 mm case had a temperature of 391.6 K. These temperatures are well below the necessary temperatures for boiling to occur at the rated pressure. Fuel temperatures are also well below the melting point. Future bundle work will include simulations of the proposed low-enriched uranium (LEU) design. Two transient scenarios were also investigated for the single-pin geometries. Both were “model” problems that were focused on pure thermal-hydraulic behavior, and as such were simple power changes that did not incorporate neutron kinetics modeling. The first scenario was a high-power, ramp increase, while the second scenario was a low-power, step increase. A cylindrical RELAP model was also constructed to investigate its accuracy as compared to the higher-fidelity CFD. Comparisons between the two codes showed good agreement for peak temperatures in the fuel and at the cladding surface for both cases. In the step transient, temperatures at four axial levels were also computed. These showed greater but reasonable discrepancy, with RELAP outputting higher temperatures. These results provide some evidence that RELAP can be used with confidence in modeling transients for IVG.

  12. Temperature effects in the valence fluctuation of europium intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, O.L.T. de; Troper, A.; Gomes, A.A.

    1978-03-01

    A previously reported model for valence fluctuations in europium compound in order to account for thermal occupation effect. Experimental results are critically discussed and new experiments are suggested

  13. Compound odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas have been extensively reported in the dental literature, and the term refers to tumors of odontogenic origin. Though the exact etiology is still unknown, the postulated causes include: local trauma, infection, inheritance and genetic mutation. The majority of the lesions are asymptomatic; however, may be accompanied with pain and swelling as secondary complaints in some cases. Here, we report a case of a compound odontome in a 14 year old patient.

  14. Thermal transfer recording media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, T.; Taniguchi, M.; Fukushima, H.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Shinozuka, M.; Seikohsha, K. K. Suwa

    1988-08-01

    The recording media consist of more than or one coloring layer and a layer containing a flame retardant to ensure noncombustibility and good thermal transfer. Thus, a PET film was coated on a side with a compound containing Vylon 290 (polyester resin), AFR-1021 (decabromodiphenyl oxide) 8 and Polysafe 60 (Sb oxide), and coated on the other side with a compound containing carnauba wax, HNP-9 (paraffin wax), EV-410 (ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer), and Cu phthalocyanine to give a thermal transfer recording medium which showed good noncombustibility and antiblocking properties, and provided high quality images.

  15. Lattice anisotropy in uranium ternary compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maskova, S.; Adamska, A.M.; Havela, L.

    2012-01-01

    Several U-based intermetallic compounds (UCoGe, UNiGe with the TiNiSi structure type and UNiAl with the ZrNiAl structure type) and their hydrides were studied from the point of view of compressibility and thermal expansion. Confronted with existing data for the compounds with the ZrNiAl structure...

  16. Magnesium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  17. Compound odontoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcelo Vargas Pinto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontomas are the most common types of odontogenic tumors, as they are considered more as a developmental anomaly (hamartoma than as a true neoplasia. The aim of the present study is to describe a clinical case of compound odontoma, analyzing its most commonsigns, its region of location, the decade of life and patient’s gender, disorders that may occur as well as the treatment proposed. In order to attain this objective, the method was description of the present clinical case and bibliographic revision, arriving at the result that the treatment for this type of lesion invariably is surgical removal (enucleation and curettage and the prognosis is excellent. The surgical result was followed up in the post-operative period by radiographic exam, and it was possible to conclude that there was complete cicatrization and tissue repair.

  18. Magnesium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 57 percent of magnesium compounds produced in the United States in 2011. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties LLC from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Magnesia LLC in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Magnesia. Intrepid Potash Wendover LLC and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma Inc. in Delaware and Premier Magnesia in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its brine operation in Michigan.

  19. Direct thermal dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlinger, Edward

    1990-07-01

    Direct thermal dyes are members of a class of compounds referred to in the imaging industry as color formers or leuco dyes. The oldest members of that class have simple triarylmethane structures, and have been employed for years in various dyeing applications. More complex triarylmethane compounds, such as phthalides and fluorans, are now used in various imaging systems to produce color. Color is derived from all of these compounds via the same mechanism, on a molecular level. That is, an event of activation produces a highly resonating cationic system whose interaction with incident light produces reflected light of a specific color. The activation event in the case of a direct thermal system is the creation of a melt on the paper involving dye and an acidic developer. The three major performance parameters in a thermal system are background color, image density, and image stability. The three major dye physical parameters affecting thermal performance are chemical constituency, purity, and particle size. Those dyes having the best combination of characteristics which can also be manufactured economically dominate the marketplace. Manufacturing high performance dyes for the thermal market involves multi-step, convergent reaction sequences performed on large scale. Intermediates must be manufactured at the right time, and at the right quality to be useful.

  20. The effect of radiation-thermal treatment on the physicochemical properties of the Ni-Mo/Al2O3 hydrotreatment catalyst. II. UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra of surface compounds after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovetskii, Yu.I.; Miroshinichenko, I.I.; Lunin, V.V.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation-thermal damage of the surface and the active metal phases of hydrodesulfurization Ni-Mo/Al 2 O 3 catalysts by a fast electron beam of up to 2.0 MeV energy was studied. UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra of the industrial and model coked systems after radiation-thermal treatment were measured. 14 refs., 2 figs

  1. Reducing Contact Resistance Errors In Measuring Thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Values of thermal conductivity (k) of glass beads, quartz sand, stone dust and clay were determined using a thermal probe with and without heat sink compounds (arctic silver grease (ASG) and white grease (WG)) at different water contents, bulk densities and particle sizes. The heat sink compounds (HSC) increased k at ...

  2. Isotopically modified compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter the nomenclature of isotopically modified compounds in Slovak language is described. This chapter consists of following parts: (1) Isotopically substituted compounds; (2) Specifically isotopically labelled compounds; (3) Selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (4) Non-selectively isotopically labelled compounds; (5) Isotopically deficient compounds.

  3. Organic electronic devices using phthalimide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Azad M.; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-09-07

    Organic electronic devices comprising a phthalimide compound. The phthalimide compounds disclosed herein are electron transporters with large HOMO-LUMO gaps, high triplet energies, large reduction potentials, and/or thermal and chemical stability. As such, these phthalimide compounds are suitable for use in any of various organic electronic devices, such as OLEDs and solar cells. In an OLED, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as a host in the emissive layer, as a hole blocking material, or as an electron transport material. In a solar cell, the phthalimide compounds may serve various functions, such as an exciton blocking material. Various examples of phthalimide compounds which may be suitable for use in the present invention are disclosed.

  4. Neutronics and thermal-hydraulics analysis of KUHFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, W L [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Mishima, K [KURRI, Osaka (Japan)

    1983-08-01

    control rod worth with reduced enrichment has not yet determined, but only a small decrease in worth is expected. These BOL boron poisoned fuels are also used as the fresh fuel feed for the equilibrium fuel cycle studies contained in this report. The first three cases shown have matching cycle lengths in the equilibrium cycle, while the last case has a considerably longer cycle length. These results are similarly reflected in the 'Maximum Cycle Lengths' shown for unpoisoned BOL cores. Thus, the first three case can be considered comparable. The last case might be considered as an option for an extended cycle length design. The cycle length for this case is increased by about 21%. Obviously, by decreasing the uranium density in the fuel meat (to 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}), the cycle length for this design could be reduced to match that of the other cases. Thermal-hydraulic calculations have been carried out in order to study the safety aspects of the use of reduced enrichment uranium fuel for the KUHFR. The calculations were based on what is outlined in the Safety Analysis Report for the KUHFR and also the IAEA Guidebook for the RERTR program. Only a few combinations of hydraulic parameters have been tested because the reactor safety cannot be discussed without any nuclear physics considerations. For example, any variations in fuel coolant channels may change not only flow velocities but also power peaking factors which may affect the assessment of reactor safety. For this reason, the thermal-hydraulic calculations were carried out only for those specific cases on which neutronics analysis has been already performed. Low enriched uranium (LEU) cases are also included in this study as initial feasibility studies for potential conversion. The computer code PLTEMP has been developed to calculate the flow distribution in the core, fuel plate temperatures and DNB heat fluxes.

  5. Thermal investigation of alkali metal hexacyanoruthenate (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okorskaya, A.P.; Sergeeva, A.N.; Pavlenko, L.I.; Semenishin, D.I.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability of Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs hexacyanoruthenates has been investigated. It has been established, that thermal decomposition of complexes depends upon outer spherical cations; complex compound stability decreasing with the rize of cation ionization potential. According to their thermal stability, alkali metal hexacyanoruthenates can be placed in the following row: Li < Na < K < Rb < Cs. Decomposition of Na, Rb and Cs complexes is accompanied by formation of thermally stable cyanides of these metals

  6. Synthesis, crystal structure determination, thermal and magnetic properties of the new Cu{sub 0.73}Ni{sub 0.27}(HSeO{sub 3}){sub 2} compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentech, I., E-mail: hentechimen@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire des Sciences des Matériaux et de l' Environnement, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, BP 1171, Université de Sfax, 3000 (Tunisia); CMTR, ICMPE, UMR7182, CNRS – Université Paris Est Créteil, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, F-94320 Thiais (France); Zehani, K. [CMTR, ICMPE, UMR7182, CNRS – Université Paris Est Créteil, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, F-94320 Thiais (France); Kabadou, A.; Ben Salah, A.; Loukil, M. [Laboratoire des Sciences des Matériaux et de l' Environnement, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, BP 1171, Université de Sfax, 3000 (Tunisia); Bessais, L. [CMTR, ICMPE, UMR7182, CNRS – Université Paris Est Créteil, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, F-94320 Thiais (France)

    2017-01-15

    A novel three-dimensional Cu{sub 0.73}Ni{sub 0.27}(HSeO{sub 3}){sub 2} compound was prepared from an aqueous solution. This compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/n space group and with the following cell parameters: a=6.4379(3) Å; b=7.3555(3) Å; c=5.7522(3) Å; β=93.4341(1)°; V=271.90(2) Å{sup 3} and Z=2. The reported material has been structurally characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and confirmed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectroscopy (MEB/EDS) analysis. The copper/nickel atom is surrounded by an octahedron coordination of oxygen atoms from sex hydrogenoselenites anions. The presence of (HSeO{sub 3}){sup −} has been further confirmed by IR spectroscopy and this compound exhibits a phase transition at 356 K, this transition has been detected by differential scanning calorimetry and TG-DTA measurement. The magnetic property of this material was determined. The ferromagnetic ordering is further confirmed by the magnetic field dependence of the magnetization (Hysteresis loop) at 10 K. The substitution of Cu by Ni induces a ferro-paramagnetic transition at T=31 K. Field cooled (FC) and Zero field cooled (ZFC) magnetization measurements under an applied field of 100 Oe in the temperature range of 10–300 K were performed. These measurements have been resulted the blocking temperature (T{sub B}) at around 25 K. - Highlights: • A novel three-dimensional Cu{sub 0.73}Ni{sub 0.27}(HSeO{sub 3}){sub 2} compound was prepared from an aqueous solution. • Magnetic measurements reveal the occurrence of weak ferromagnetism at low temperature for this compound. • The substitution of Cu by Ni induces a ferro-paramagnetic transition at T=31 K.

  7. Rubber compounding and processing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This chapter presents an overview on the compounding and processing techniques of natural rubber compounds. The introductory portion deals with different types of rubbers and principles of rubber compounding. The primary and secondary fillers used...

  8. Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) Development Risk Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tony

    2014-01-01

    nuclear radiation from Fukushima" which focus on mis-information and fear mongering. Nuclear power and NTR are powerful resources that can open many doors for future prosperity and capability. With great power comes great responsibility. Radiation and its effects need to be better understood, quantified, and communicated. A human mission to mars has its own risks of deep space radiation and is considered a considerable risk at 400 milli-Sieverts per year in deep space and 245 milli-Sieverts per year on the surface of Mars as measured by the Mars Curiosity mission. Although these quantities of ionizing radiation are within the astronaut career limit, it exceeds the yearly average amounts of ionizing radiation. Astronaut crews have experienced these levels of radiation before, but for durations shorter than a year, and a mission to Mars could possibly be 3 years in length. There is also evidence that people can comfortably handle higher levels of ionizing radiation where the radiation occurs naturally like Ramsar, Iran when people can experience 270 milli-Sieverts per year. A risk posture that the development, test, and flight of an NTR will meet opposition from groups who oppose nuclear energy must be likely and the impact can be sever to the effort. Active risk mitigation must be taken for an NTR full-scale development project. The NTR design must take into account safety for transport and off nominal conditions. Nuclear fuel element must consider containment of fission products and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) that may meet less opposition should be considered for safety and security reasons. Even though testing was conducted on Rover/NERVA safely and successfully in the 60's with exhaust sent heavenward in to open air, modern testing of NTR must consider full containment and no release of ionizing radiation to the public and must meet the current requirement of no more than 0.1 milli-Sieverts per year to the public. 0.1 milli-Sieverts is equivalent to eating one banana or

  9. Thermal Plasma decomposition of fluoriated greenhouse gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Seok; Watanabe, Takayuki [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Park, Dong Wha [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Fluorinated compounds mainly used in the semiconductor industry are potent greenhouse gases. Recently, thermal plasma gas scrubbers have been gradually replacing conventional burn-wet type gas scrubbers which are based on the combustion of fossil fuels because high conversion efficiency and control of byproduct generation are achievable in chemically reactive high temperature thermal plasma. Chemical equilibrium composition at high temperature and numerical analysis on a complex thermal flow in the thermal plasma decomposition system are used to predict the process of thermal decomposition of fluorinated gas. In order to increase economic feasibility of the thermal plasma decomposition process, increase of thermal efficiency of the plasma torch and enhancement of gas mixing between the thermal plasma jet and waste gas are discussed. In addition, noble thermal plasma systems to be applied in the thermal plasma gas treatment are introduced in the present paper.

  10. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...

  11. Low thermal conductivity skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleurial, J P; Caillat, T; Borshchevsky, A

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

  12. Preparation, thermal and flammability properties of a novel form-stable phase change materials based on high density polyethylene/poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate)/organophilic montmorillonite nanocomposites/paraffin compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yibing; Song Lei; He Qingliang; Yang Dandan; Hu Yuan

    2008-01-01

    The paraffin is one of important thermal energy storage materials with many desirable characteristics (i.e., high heat of fusion, varied phase change temperature, negligible supercooling, self-nucleating, no phase segregation and cheap, etc.), but has low thermal stability and flammable. Hence, a novel form-stable phase change materials (PCM) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE)/poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA)/organophilic montmorillonite (OMT) nanocomposites and paraffin are prepared by twin-screw extruder technique. The structures of the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites and the form-stable PCM are evidenced by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The results of XRD and TEM show that the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites form the ordered intercalated nanomorphology. The form-stable PCM consists of the paraffin, which acts as a dispersed phase change material and the HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites, which acts as the supporting material. The paraffin disperses in the three-dimensional net structure formed by HDPE-EVA/OMT nanocomposites. The thermal stability, latent heat and flammability properties are characterized by thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), dynamic Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and cone calorimeter, respectively. The TGA and dynamic FTIR analyses indicate that the incorporation of suitable amount of OMT into the form-stable PCM increase the thermal stability. The DSC results show that the latent heat of the form-stable PCM has a certain degree decrease. The cone calorimeter shows that the heat release rate (HRR) has remarkably decreases with loading of OMT in the form-stable PCM, contributing to the improved flammability properties

  13. Thermal stability of polyoxometalate compound of Keggin K8[2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O supported with SiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunita Sari M A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis through sol-gel method and characterization of polyoxometalate compound of K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O supported with SiO2 have been done. The functional groups of polyoxometalate compound  was characterized by FT-IR spectrophotometer for the fungtional groups and the degree’s of crystalinity  using XRD. The acidity of K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O/SiO2 was determined qualitative analysis using ammonia and pyridine adsorption and the quantitative analysis using potentiometric titration method. The results of FT-IR spectrum of K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O appeared at  wavenumber 987.55 cm-1 (W=O, 864.11 cm-1 (W-Oe-W, 756.1 cm-1 (W-Oc-W, 3425.58 cm-1 (O-H, respectively and spectrum of  K8[b2-SiW11O39]SiO2 appeared at wavenumber  956.69 cm-1 (W=O, 864.11 cm-1 (W-Oe-W, 3448.72 cm-1 (O-H, respectively. The diffraction of XRD pattern of K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O and K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O/SiO2 compounds show high crystalinity. The acidic properties showed K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O/SiO2 more acidic compared to K8[b2-The SiW11O39]∙nH2O. The qualitative analysis showed pyridine compound adsorbed more of polyoxometalate compound of K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O/SiO2. Analysis of stability showed that the K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O/SiO2 at temperature 500°C has structural changes compare to 200-400oC which was indicated from vibration at wavenumber 800-1000 cm-1. Keywords : K8[b2-SiW11O39]∙nH2O, polyoxometalate, SiO2.

  14. Degradation of based EPDM dielectric compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galembeck, F.

    1988-01-01

    The stability of an EPDM compound used as power cables insulation was studied under various conditions of thermal stress. Changes in the dielectric and tensile strenght of the samples were found after the aging. Samples of the EPDM compound were analysed by spectroscopic (photoacoustic, IR) methods showing alterations in its components: Pb 3 O 4 is reduced to PbO and exsuded paraffin is oxidized. Methane is prevalent in the gaseous mixture released by the heated compound and analysed by Gas Chromatography. (author) [pt

  15. Toxicological study of a polyphenyl-type chemical compound used by the thermal transfer department; Etude toxicologique d'un produit chimique du type polyphenyle utilise par la section des transferts thermiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, R.; Alix, D.

    1961-07-01

    This note reports an experimentation of toxicological tests performed on two mice breed by different ways (skin absorption, respiratory route, digestive tract) in order to assess the toxicology of a chemical compound containing a bi-phenyl eutectic and bi-phenyl oxide. The authors describe effects noticed among mice depending on the absorption way. They notice the caustic action of the product, but that an accidental absorption through the digestive tract would not result in an acute and severe intoxication. As far as chronic intoxication is concerned, daily inhalations do not seem to have any haematological impact on mice.

  16. Sanskrit Compound Processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Mittal, Vipul; Kulkarni, Amba

    Sanskrit is very rich in compound formation. Typically a compound does not code the relation between its components explicitly. To understand the meaning of a compound, it is necessary to identify its components, discover the relations between them and finally generate a paraphrase of the compound. In this paper, we discuss the automatic segmentation and type identification of a compound using simple statistics that results from the manually annotated data.

  17. New hydrotalcite-like compounds containing yttrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.M.; Barriga, C.; Ulibarri, M.A. [Universidad de Cordoba (Spain)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of hydrotalcite-type compounds containing yttrium was carried out by the coprecipitation of Mg(II), Al(III), and Y(III) cations at 60 degrees C with strong alkaline solutions. Thermal treatments were applied and changes studied.

  18. N-Nitroso Compound Precursors in some Nigerian Forage Crops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N-Nitroso Compound Precursors in some Nigerian Forage Crops. ... were analyzed as their sulphonamides by gas chromatography interfaced with a chemiluminescence detector-Thermal Energy Analyzer modified for use in nitrogen mode.

  19. Crystal structure and thermal expansion of the low- and high-temperature forms of BaMIV(PO4)2 compounds (M=Ti, Zr, Hf and Sn)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregiroux, D.; Popa, K.; Jardin, R.; Raison, P.E.; Wallez, G.; Quarton, M.; Brunelli, M.; Ferrero, C.; Caciuffo, R.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of β-BaZr(PO 4 ) 2 , archetype of the high-temperature forms of BaM(PO 4 ) 2 phosphates (with M=Ti, Zr, Hf and Sn), has been solved ab initio by Rietveld analysis from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data. The phase transition appears as a topotactic modification of the monoclinic (S.G. C2/m) lamellar α-structure into a trigonal one (S.G. P3-barm1) through a simple mechanism involving the unfolding of the [Zr(PO 4 ) 2 ] n 2- layers. The thermal expansion is very anisotropic (e.g., -4.1 i -6 K -1 in the case of α-BaZr(PO 4 ) 2 ) and quite different in the two forms, as a consequence of symmetry. It stems from a complex combination of several mechanisms, involving bridging oxygen rocking in M-O-P linkages, and 'bond thermal expansion'. - Graphical abstract: The layered high-temperature form of BaM(PO 4 ) 2 , only expands along the c-axis.

  20. Spectral and thermal investigation of tetrabenzoylacetonatobenzoylacetonediuranyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyuk, N.N.; Dik, T.A.; Klavsut', G.N.; Umrejko, D.S.

    1989-01-01

    Uranium(6) compound with benzoylacetone (NBA) of [(UO 2 ) 2 (NBA)(BA) 4 ] composition was prepared by the method of electrochemical synthesis in oxidizing medium. Spectral and thermal investigation (data of IR, Raman spectra, TG, DTA) was conducted to show that four NBA molecules entered the compound as acidoligands and one NBA molecule (being a bridge) - as neutral ligand in keto-form. Mechanism of thermal decomposition was suggested and kinetic parameters of thermolysis of examined substance were calculated

  1. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.; Howard, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The patent concerns high temperature thermal insulation of large vessels, such as the primary vessel of a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor. The thermal insulation consists of multilayered thermal insulation modules, and each module comprises a number of metal sheet layers sandwiched between a back and front plate. The layers are linked together by straps and clips to control the thickness of the module. (U.K.)

  2. Modeling Thermal and Stress Behavior of the Fuel-clad Interface in Monolithic Fuel Mini-plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Gregory K.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Burkes, Douglas E.; Wachs, Daniel M.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, a fuel development and qualification program is in process with the objective of qualifying very high density low enriched uranium fuel that will enable the conversion of high performance research reactors with operational requirements beyond those supported with currently available low enriched uranium fuels. The high density of the fuel is achieved by replacing the fuel meat with a single monolithic low enriched uranium-molybdenum fuel foil. Doing so creates differences in the mechanical and structural characteristics of the fuel plate because of the planar interface created by the fuel foil and cladding. Furthermore, the monolithic fuel meat will dominate the structural properties of the fuel plate rather than the aluminum matrix, which is characteristic of dispersion fuel types. Understanding the integrity and behavior of the fuel-clad interface during irradiation is of great importance for qualification of the new fuel, but can be somewhat challenging to determine with a single technique. Efforts aimed at addressing this problem are underway within the fuel development and qualification program, comprised of modeling, as-fabricated plate characterization, and post-irradiation examination. An initial finite element analysis model has been developed to investigate worst-case scenarios for the basic monolithic fuel plate structure, using typical mini-plate irradiation conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor. Initial analysis shows that the stress normal to the fuel-clad interface dominates during irradiation, and that the presence of small, rounded delaminations at the interface is not of great concern. However, larger and/or fuel-clad delaminations with sharp corners can create areas of concern, as maximum principal cladding stress, strain, displacement, and peak fuel temperature are all significantly increased. Furthermore, stresses resulting from temperature gradients that cause the plate to bow or buckle in

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure, thermal analysis and dielectric properties of [(C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 9} compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigui, W., E-mail: walatrigui@yahoo.fr; Oueslati, A.; Chaabane, I.; Hlel, F.

    2015-07-15

    A new organic–inorganic tri-tetrabutylammonium nonachlorobibismuthate(III) compound was prepared. It was found to crystallize in the monoclinic system (P2{sub 1}/n space group) with the following lattice parameters: a=11.32(2) Å, b=22.30(3) Å, c=28.53(2) Å and β=96.52(0)°. The [Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 9}]{sup 3−} anions are surrounded by six [(C{sub 4}H{sub 9})N]{sup +} cations, forming an octahedral configuration. These octahedra are sharing corners in order to provide the tri-dimensional network cohesion. The differential scanning calorimetry reveals four order-disorder reversible phase transitions located at 214, 238, 434 and 477 K. The Raman and infrared spectra confirm the presence of both cationic [(C{sub 4}H{sub 9})N]{sup +} and anionic [Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 9}]{sup 3−} parts. The dielectric parameters, real and imaginary dielectric permittivity (ε′ and ε″), and dielectric loss tangent (tg δ), were measured in the frequency range of 209 kHz–5 MHz at different temperatures. The variations of dielectric dispersion (ε') and dielectric absorption (ε″) with frequency show a distribution of relaxation times, which is probably related to the change in the dynamical state of the [(C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sup +} cations and the [Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 9}]{sup 3−} anions. - Graphical abstract: Projection of the atomic arrangement of the [(C{sub 4}H{sub 9}){sub 4}N]{sub 3}Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 9} compound along the b axis. - Highlights: • The structure of the (TBA){sub 3}Bi{sub 2}Cl{sub 9} compound was solved and reported. • The cristal belongs to the monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/n space group. • DSC discloses four order–disorder reversible phases transitions. • The temperature-dependent permittivity ε' and ε″ has been investigated.

  4. Preparation and optical and electrical evaluation of bulk SiO2 sonogel hybrid composites and vacuum thermal evaporated thin films prepared from molecular materials derived from (Fe, Co) metallic phthalocyanines and 1,8 dihydroxiantraquinone compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Vergara, Maria Elena; Morales-Saavedra, Omar G.; Ontiveros-Barrera, Fernando G.; Torres-Zuniga, Vicente; Ortega-Martinez, Roberto; Ortiz Rebollo, Armando

    2009-01-01

    Semiconducting molecular material of PcFe(CN)L1 and PcCo(CN)L1 (L1 = 1,8 dihydroxianthraquinone), PcFe(CN)L2 and PcCo(CN)L2 (L2 = double potassium salt of 1,8 dihydroxianthraquinone) have been successfully used to prepare thin film and bulk sol-gel hybrid optical materials. These samples were developed according to the vacuum thermal evaporation technique and the catalyst-free sonogel route, respectively. Thin films samples were deposited on Corning glass substrates and crystalline silicon wafers and were characterized by infrared (FTIR), Raman and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies. IR-spectroscopy and Raman studies unambiguously confirmed that the molecular material thin films exhibit the same intra-molecular bonds, which suggests that the thermal evaporation process does not alter these bonds significantly. These results show that it is possible to deposit molecular materials of PcFe(CN)L2 and PcCo(CN)L2 on Corning glass substrates and silicon wafers. From the UV-vis studies the optical band gap (E g ) was evaluated. The effect of temperature on conductivity was also evaluated in these samples. Finally, the studied molecular systems dissolved at different concentrations in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were successfully embedded into a highly pure SiO 2 sonogel network generated via sonochemical reactions to form several solid state, optically active sol-gel hybrid glasses. By this method, homogeneous and stable hybrid monoliths suitable for optical characterization can be produced. The linear optical properties of these amorphous bulk structures were determined by the Brewster angle method and by absorption-, Raman- and photoluminescent (PL)-spectroscopies, respectively

  5. Preparation and optical and electrical evaluation of bulk SiO{sub 2} sonogel hybrid composites and vacuum thermal evaporated thin films prepared from molecular materials derived from (Fe, Co) metallic phthalocyanines and 1,8 dihydroxiantraquinone compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Vergara, Maria Elena [Coordinacion de Ingenieria Mecatronica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac Mexico Norte. Avenida Universidad Anahuac 46, Col. Lomas Anahuac, 52786 Huixquilucan, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Morales-Saavedra, Omar G. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, CCADET-UNAM, A.P. 70-186, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: omar.morales@ccadet.unam.mx; Ontiveros-Barrera, Fernando G.; Torres-Zuniga, Vicente; Ortega-Martinez, Roberto [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, CCADET-UNAM, A.P. 70-186, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz Rebollo, Armando [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, IIM-UNAM, A.P. 70-360, Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-02-25

    Semiconducting molecular material of PcFe(CN)L1 and PcCo(CN)L1 (L1 = 1,8 dihydroxianthraquinone), PcFe(CN)L2 and PcCo(CN)L2 (L2 = double potassium salt of 1,8 dihydroxianthraquinone) have been successfully used to prepare thin film and bulk sol-gel hybrid optical materials. These samples were developed according to the vacuum thermal evaporation technique and the catalyst-free sonogel route, respectively. Thin films samples were deposited on Corning glass substrates and crystalline silicon wafers and were characterized by infrared (FTIR), Raman and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopies. IR-spectroscopy and Raman studies unambiguously confirmed that the molecular material thin films exhibit the same intra-molecular bonds, which suggests that the thermal evaporation process does not alter these bonds significantly. These results show that it is possible to deposit molecular materials of PcFe(CN)L2 and PcCo(CN)L2 on Corning glass substrates and silicon wafers. From the UV-vis studies the optical band gap (E{sub g}) was evaluated. The effect of temperature on conductivity was also evaluated in these samples. Finally, the studied molecular systems dissolved at different concentrations in tetrahydrofuran (THF) were successfully embedded into a highly pure SiO{sub 2} sonogel network generated via sonochemical reactions to form several solid state, optically active sol-gel hybrid glasses. By this method, homogeneous and stable hybrid monoliths suitable for optical characterization can be produced. The linear optical properties of these amorphous bulk structures were determined by the Brewster angle method and by absorption-, Raman- and photoluminescent (PL)-spectroscopies, respectively.

  6. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsky, G.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal insulation for vessels and piping within the reactor containment area of nuclear power plants is disclosed. The thermal insulation of this invention can be readily removed and replaced from the vessels and piping for inservice inspection, can withstand repeated wettings and dryings, and can resist high temperatures for long periods of time. 4 claims, 3 figures

  7. Spectroscopic, thermal and biological studies of coordination

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectroscopic, thermal and biological studies of coordination compounds of sulfasalazine drug: Mn(II), Hg(II), Cr(III), ZrO(II), VO(II) and Y(III) transition metal ... The thermal decomposition of the complexes as well as thermodynamic parameters ( *}, *, * and *) were estimated using Coats–Redfern and ...

  8. Effect of different drying techniques on the volatile compounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the volatile compounds, thermal stability and morphological characteristics of stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni) leaves after sun, oven and microwave drying. Methods: Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with a spectral analysis manager was used to separate the volatile compounds. Dried stevia ...

  9. Radiation method of sulfide compound transformation in petroleum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadirov, N.K.; Zajkina, R.F.; Zajkin, Yu.A.; Mamonova, T.B.; Bakirova, S.F.

    1997-01-01

    Processes of sulphuric compounds transformation for petroleum and heavy residuals under radiation and thermal treatment action are studied. It is shown that sulphuric compounds are concentrated in heavy fractions as a result of radiation processing. Heavy petroleum products irradiation provokes considerable decrease in the content of mercaptans, disulphides and sulphides, which transfer to sulphoxides and sulphones appearing during radiation-induced oxidation process. (author)

  10. Time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy for the study of solid state reactions: synthesis of nanocrystalline barium titanate and thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachlorometallate compounds; Zeitaufgeloeste Roentgenabsorptionspektroskopie zur Untersuchung von Festkoerperreaktionen: Synthese von nanokristallinem Bariumtitanat und thermische Zersetzung von Ammoniumhexachlorometallat-Verbindungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumpf, H.

    2001-07-01

    This report presents investigations on the mechanism of two different types of solid-state reactions: At first, barium titanate nanopowders were prepared through a combined polymerization and pyrolysis of a metallo-organic precursor. The mean particle size d{sub m} could be adjusted by choosing appropriate reaction temperatures and tempering atmospheres. In the present in situ study of this particular solid-phase reaction, X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the Ti K and Ba L{sub 3}-edges was applied in the preparation route of BaTiO{sub 3} nanopowders. A pronounced distortion of the lattice symmetry was found to occur in very fine BaTiO{sub 3} nanopowders (d{sub m} < 20 nm). Secondly, in situ XANES investigations were carried out at the Cl K, Pd L{sub 3}, Rh L{sub 3}, and Pt L{sub 3}-edges to study the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachlorometallates. The results exceed structural information obtained by in situ X-ray diffraction methods and thermal analysis. Feff8 multiple scattering simulations have been carried out to disclose new intermediate phases of unknown reference compounds. (orig.)

  11. Low-dimensional compounds containing cyano groups. XVII. Crystal structure, spectroscopic, thermal and magnetic properties of [Cu(bmen)2][Pt(CN)4] (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potocnak, Ivan; Vavra, Martin; Cizmar, Erik; Kajnakova, Marcela; Radvakova, Alena; Steinborn, Dirk; Zvyagin, Sergei A.; Wosnitza, Jochen; Feher, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis, structural analysis, spectroscopic studies, susceptibility and specific-heat measurements of {[Cu(bmen) 2 ][Pt(CN) 4 ]} n (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine) are presented. X-ray crystal-structure analysis revealed that the [Pt(CN) 4 ] 2- building blocks are combined with [Cu(bmen) 2 ] 2+ units to form a chain-like structure along the a axis. The Cu(II) atoms are hexacoordinated by four nitrogen atoms in the equatorial plane belonging to two molecules of bidentate bmen ligands with average Cu-N distance of 2.043(18) A. The axial positions are occupied by two nitrogen atoms from bridging [Pt(CN) 4 ] 2- anions at a longer axial Cu-N distance of 2.490(4) A. The compound is characterized by the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J/k B =0.6 K. Despite the one-dimensional (1D) character of the structure, the analysis of the magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(bmen) 2 ][Pt(CN) 4 ] behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) square-lattice Heisenberg magnet with weak interlayer coupling. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis, structural analysis, spectroscopic studies, susceptibility and specific-heat measurements of {[Cu(bmen) 2 ][Pt(CN) 4 ]} n (bmen=N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine) are presented. X-ray crystal-structure analysis revealed that the [Pt(CN) 4 ] 2- building blocks are combined with [Cu(bmen) 2 ] 2+ units to form a chain-like structure. The compound is characterized by the presence of a weak antiferromagnetic exchange coupling J/k B =-0.6 K. Despite the one-dimensional character of the structure, the analysis of the magnetic properties and specific heat at very low temperatures shows that [Cu(bmen) 2 ][Pt(CN) 4 ] behaves as a two-dimensional square-lattice Heisenberg magnet with weak interlayer coupling

  12. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likozar, Blaz, E-mail: blaz.likozar@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Major, Zoltan, E-mail: zoltan.major@jku.at [Polymer Competence Center Leoben GmbH, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Roseggerstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 x 10{sup 28} m{sup -3}), density (maximally 1.16 g cm{sup -3}), and tear strength (11.2 kN m{sup -1}), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  13. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likozar, Blaž; Major, Zoltan

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 × 1028 m-3), density (maximally 1.16 g cm-3), and tear strength (11.2 kN m-1), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  14. A Silsesquioxane Organically Modified with 4-Amino-5-(4-pyridyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol: Thermal Behavior and Its Electrochemical Detection of Sulfhydryl Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Do Carmo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The octakis(3-chloropropylsilsesquioxane (SS was organofunctionalized with 4-amino-5-4(pyridyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol. The product formed (SA was undergo another reactions in two steps, first with copper and so hexacyanoferrate (III to form CuHSA. The organofunctionalized silsesquioxane was characterized by the following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR in solid state, and thermogravimetric analysis in air and nitrogen atmosphere. The composite CuHSA was incorporated into a graphite paste electrode and the electrochemical behavior studies were conducted with cyclic voltammetry. The cyclic voltammogram of the modified graphite paste electrode with CuHSA showed one redox couple with formal potential Eθ′=0.75 V versus Ag/AgCl(sat (KCl 1.0 mol L−1; v = 20 mV s−1 attributed to the redox process Fe(II(CN6/Fe(III(CN6 of the binuclear complex formed. The redox couple presents an electrocatalytic response of sulfhydryl compounds such as n-acetylcysteine and l-cysteine. For determination of n-acetylcysteine and l-cysteine the modified graphite paste electrode showed a linear region in the concentration range of 2 to 20 mmol L−1. The modified electrode was chemically and electrochemically stable and showed good reproducibility.

  15. Morphology, mechanical, cross-linking, thermal, and tribological properties of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites prepared by melt compounding: The effect of acrylonitrile content and hydrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likozar, Blaz; Major, Zoltan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to prepare nanocomposites by mixing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile elastomers (NBR and HNBR). Utilization of transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques (SAXS and WAXS) for advanced morphology observation of conducting filler-reinforced nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber composites is reported. Principal results were increases in hardness (maximally 97 Shore, type A), elastic modulus (maximally 981 MPa), tensile strength (maximally 27.7 MPa), elongation at break (maximally 216%), cross-link density (maximally 7.94 x 10 28 m -3 ), density (maximally 1.16 g cm -3 ), and tear strength (11.2 kN m -1 ), which were clearly visible at particular acrylonitrile contents both for unhydrogenated and hydrogenated polymers due to enhanced distribution of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and their aggregated particles in the applied rubber matrix. Conclusion was that multi-walled carbon nanotubes improved the performance of nitrile and hydrogenated nitrile rubber nanocomposites prepared by melt compounding.

  16. Evidence for the presence of U-Mo-Al ternary compounds in the U-Mo/Al interaction layer grown by thermal annealing: a coupled micro X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palancher, H.; Martin, P.; Nassif, V.

    2007-01-01

    The systematic presence of the ternary phases U 6 Mo 4 Al 43 and UMo 2 Al 20 is reported in a U-Mo/Al interaction layer grown by thermal annealing. This work shows, therefore, the low Mo solubility in UAl 3 and UAl 4 binary phases; it contradicts the hypothesis of the formation of (U,Mo)Al 3 and (U,Mo)Al 4 solid solutions often admitted in the literature. Using μ-XAS (micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy) at the Mo K edge and μ-XRD (micro X-ray diffraction), the heterogeneity of the interaction layer obtained on a γ-U 0.85 Mo 0.15 /Al diffusion couple has been precisely investigated. The UMo 2 Al 20 phase has been identified at the closest location from the Al side. Moreover, μ-XRD mapping performed on an annealed fuel plate enabled the characterization of the four phases resulting from the γ-U 0.85 Mo 0.15 /Al and (U 2 Mo+α-U)/Al interactions. A strong correlation between the concentrations of UAl 4 and UMo 2 Al 20 and those of UAl 3 and U 6 Mo 4 Al 43 has been shown. (orig.)

  17. A bitumen compound for pavements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanadzava, K.; Simagata, R.

    1982-08-17

    A bitumen compound is proposed which is produced through addition of finely ground coal ash to a bituminous material and subsequent homogenization of the mixture. The following may be used as the bituminous material: solid petroleum bitumen (a penetration of 10 to 150), soft petroleum bitumen (a penetration of 150 to 500), a semioxidized bitumen, a mixture of semioxidized and directly distilled bitumen, bitumen diluted by a petroleum distillate, bituminous mixtures which include rubber, tar, synthetic resins and so on. It is best to use wastes from central thermal electric power plants (TETs), which operate on coal, with a great content of oxides of aluminum, iron and calcium, as the coal ash. The ash is added to the bitumen in a volume of 10 to 40 percent. The compound may include a surfactant (PAV), dispersers, additives which increase the stability to layering and others. The compound is marked by increased resistance to softening in the summer, reduced brittleness at low temperatures and good adhesion to a filler.

  18. Lattice anisotropy in uranium ternary compounds: UTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mašková, S.; Adamska, A.M.; Havela, L.; Kim-Ngan, N.-T.H.; Przewoźnik, J.; Daniš, S.; Kothapalli, K.; Kolomiets, A.V.; Heathman, S.; Nakotte, H.; Bordallo, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Compressibility and thermal expansion of several U-based compounds were established. ► The direction of the U–U bonds is the “soft” crystallographic direction. ► Highest coefficient of linear thermal expansion is in the direction of the U–U bonds. ► The closer the U atoms are together the better they can be compressed together. - Abstract: Several U-based intermetallic compounds (UCoGe, UNiGe with the TiNiSi structure type and UNiAl with the ZrNiAl structure type) and their hydrides were studied from the point of view of compressibility and thermal expansion. Confronted with existing data for the compounds with the ZrNiAl structure type a common pattern emerges. The direction of the U–U bonds with participation of the 5f states is distinctly the “soft” crystallographic direction, exhibiting also the highest coefficient of linear thermal expansion. The finding leads to an apparent paradox: the closer the U atoms are together in a particular direction the better they can be additionally compressed together by applied hydrostatic pressure.

  19. Method of manufacturing a thermally insulating body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliams, J.A.; Morgan, D.E.; Jackson, J.D.

    1988-10-11

    A method of manufacturing a microporous thermally insulating body comprises mixing together a finely divided microporous insulating material such as silica aerogel or pyrogenic silica and a solid ammonia-generating compound in particulate form, and compressing the mixture to form a thermally insulating body. The ammonia-generating compound is dispersed evenly throughout the insulating material and may comprise, for example, ammonium carbonate, ammonium acetate or urea. Preferably, the ammonia-generating compound comprises a mixture of about one third by weight of ammonium carbonate and about two thirds by weight of ammonium bicarbonate together with a small proportion of magnesium oxide. Experiments are described which illustrate the manufacturing process. 6 tabs.

  20. Phonon model of perovskite thermal capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesler, Ya.A.; Poloznikova, M.Eh.; Petrov, K.I.

    1983-01-01

    A model for calculating the temperature curve of thermal capacity of perovskite family crystals on the basis of vibrational spectra is proposed. Different representatives of the perovskite family: cubic SrTiO 3 , tetragonal BaTiO 3 and orthorbombic CaTiO 3 and LaCrO 3 are considered. The total frequency set is used in thermal capacity calcUlations. Comparison of the thermal capacity values of compounds calculated on the basis of the proposed model with the experimental values shows their good agreement. The method is also recommended for other compounds with the perovskite-like structure

  1. Thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal expansion of fuel pellet is an important property which limits the lifetime of the fuels in reactors, because it affects both the pellet and cladding mechanical interaction and the gap conductivity. By fitting a number of available measured data, recommended equations have been presented and successfully used to estimate thermal expansion coefficient of the nuclear fuel pellet. However, due to large scatter of the measured data, non-consensus data have been omitted in formulating the equations. Also, the equation is strongly governed by the lack of appropriate experimental data. For those reasons, it is important to develop theoretical methodologies to better describe thermal expansion behaviour of nuclear fuel. In particular, first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations have been certainly contributed to predict reliable thermal expansion without fitting the measured data. Furthermore, the two theoretical techniques have improved on understanding the change of fuel dimension by describing the atomic-scale processes associated with lattice expansion in the fuels. (author)

  2. Thermal Properties and Thermal Analysis:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Safa; Tonchev, Dan

    The chapter provides a summary of the fundamental concepts that are needed to understand the heat capacity C P, thermal conductivity κ, and thermal expansion coefficient α L of materials. The C P, κ, and α of various classes of materials, namely, semiconductors, polymers, and glasses, are reviewed, and various typical characteristics are summarized. A key concept in crystalline solids is the Debye theory of the heat capacity, which has been widely used for many decades for calculating the C P of crystals. The thermal properties are interrelated through Grüneisen's theorem. Various useful empirical rules for calculating C P and κ have been used, some of which are summarized. Conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a powerful and convenient thermal analysis technique that allows various important physical and chemical transformations, such as the glass transition, crystallization, oxidation, melting etc. to be studied. DSC can also be used to obtain information on the kinetics of the transformations, and some of these thermal analysis techniques are summarized. Temperature-modulated DSC, TMDSC, is a relatively recent innovation in which the sample temperature is ramped slowly and, at the same time, sinusoidally modulated. TMDSC has a number of distinct advantages compared with the conventional DSC since it measures the complex heat capacity. For example, the glass-transition temperature T g measured by TMDSC has almost no dependence on the thermal history, and corresponds to an almost step life change in C P. The new Tzero DSC has an additional thermocouple to calibrate better for thermal lags inherent in the DSC measurement, and allows more accurate thermal analysis.

  3. Site preferences of actinide cations in [NZP] compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, H. T.; Spearing, D. R.; Smith, D. M.; Hampel, F. G.; Veirs, D. K.; Scheetz, B. E.

    2000-07-01

    Compounds adopting the sodium dizirconium tris(phosphate) (NaZr2(PO4)3) structure type belong to the [NZP] structural family of compounds. [NZP] compounds possess desirable properties that would permit their application as hosts for the actinides. These properties include compositional flexibility (i.e., three structural sites that can accommodate a variety of different cations), high thermal stability, negligible thermal expansion, and resistance to radiation damage. Experimental data indicate that [NZP] compounds resist dissolution and release of constituents over a wide range of experimental conditions. Moreover, [NZP] compounds may be synthesized by both conventional and novel methods and may be heat treated or sintered at modest temperatures (800 °C-1350 °C) in open or restricted systems.

  4. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking...... into account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...... under specific conditions. At operation level, only few variables are taken into account with unpredictable effects on the assessment of comfort indices. In this paper, the main criteria for the design and assessment of thermal comfort are discussed in order to help building and HVAC systems designers...

  5. Photocatalytic fluoroalkylation reactions of organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Barata Vallejo, Sebastian; Bonesi, Sergio Mauricio; Postigo, Jose Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalytic methods for fluoroalkyl-radical generation provide more convenient alternatives to the classical perfluoroalkyl-radical (Rf) production through chemical initiators, such as azo or peroxide compounds or the employment of transition metals through a thermal electron transfer (ET) initiation process. The mild photocatalytic reaction conditions tolerate a variety of functional groups and, thus, are handy to the late-stage modification of bioactive molecules. Transition metal-photoc...

  6. Experimental study and kinetic modeling of the thermal degradation of aromatic volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene and xylene-para) in methane flames; Etude experimentale et modelisation cinetique de la degradation thermique des composes organiques volatils aromatiques benzenes, toluene et para-xylene dans des flammes de methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupont, L.

    2001-02-01

    This study treats of the thermal degradation of a family of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in laminar premixed methane flames at low pressure. The experimental influence of benzene, toluene and xylene-para on the structure of a reference methane flame has been studied. The molar fraction profiles of the stable and reactive, aliphatic, aromatic and cyclic species have been established by the coupling of the molecular beam sampling/mass spectroscopy technique with the gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy technique. Temperature profiles have been measured using a covered thermocouple. A detailed kinetic mechanism of oxidation of these compounds in flame conditions has been developed. Different available sub-mechanisms have been used as references: the GDF-Kin 1.0 model for the oxidation of methane and the models of Tan and Franck (1996) and of Lindstedt and Maurice (1996) in the case of benzene and toluene. In the case of para-xylene, a model has been developed because no mechanisms was available in the literature. These different mechanisms have been refined, completed or adjusted by comparing the experimental results with those obtained by kinetic modeling. The complete kinetic mechanism, comprising 156 chemical species involved in 1072 reactions allows to reproduce all the experimental observations in a satisfactory manner. The kinetic analysis of reactions velocity has permitted to determine oxidation kinetic schemes for benzene, toluene, xylene-para and for the cyclopentadienyl radical, main species at the origin of the rupture of the aromatic cycle. Reactions of recombination with the methyl radicals formed during methane oxidation, of the different aromatic or aliphatic radicals created during the oxidation of aromatics, play an important role and lead to the formation of several aromatic pollutants (ethyl-benzene for instance) or aliphatic pollutants (butadiene or penta-diene for instance) in flames. (J.S.)

  7. Matrix thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-01-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  8. Matrix thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  9. Matrix thermalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Evnin, Oleg [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Thanon Phayathai, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Nguyen, Kévin [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2017-02-08

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  10. Stable isotopes labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The catalogue on stable isotopes labelled compounds offers deuterium, nitrogen-15, and multiply labelled compounds. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) the application of stable isotopes, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  11. Ultrasound assisted extraction of bioactive compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Drmić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many novel and innovative techniques are nowadays researched and explored in order to replace or improve classical, thermal processing technologies. One of newer technique is technique of minimal food processing, under what we assume ultrasound processing. Ultrasound technology can be very useful for minimal food processing because transmission of acoustic energy through product is fast and complete, which allows reduction in total processing time, and therefore lower energy consumption. Industrial processing is growing more and more waste products, and in desire of preservation of global recourses and energy efficiency, several ways of active compounds extraction techniques are now explored. The goal is to implement novel extraction techniques in food and pharmaceutical industry as well in medicine. Ultrasound assisted extraction of bioactive compounds offers increase in yield, and reduction or total avoiding of solvent usage. Increase in temperature of treatment is controlled and restricted, thereby preserving extracted bioactive compounds. In this paper, several methods of ultrasound assisted extraction of bioactive compounds from plant materials are shown. Ultrasound can improve classic mechanisms of extraction, and thereby offer novel possibilities of commercial extraction of desired compounds. Application of sonochemistry (ultrasound chemistry is providing better yield in desired compounds and reduction in treatment time.

  12. Modern materials based on refractory compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosolapova, T.Ya.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed are the existing methods for synthesizing powders of binary refractory compounds and high-productivity techniques which hold promise as regards the manufacture of highly disperse and pure powders. Plasmochemical synthesis is shown to be an effective method for obtaining practically all carbides, nitrides and borides. A description is given of three main methods for obtaining single crystals of refractory compounds (TiN, TiC, ZrC, ZrB 2 , NbC) fairly perfect in structure and composition. These processes include deposition from vapour-gas phase, melting in arc plasma and crystallization from solutions in metallic melts. The advantages have been shown of the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis of refractory compounds, ensuring the manufacture of products, close in composition to stoichiometric ones simultaneously with forming of items. Mechanical, thermal, abrasive, and resistive characteristics of the above materials are presented

  13. Caracterização mecânica e térmica da borracha natural formulada e vulcanizada dos clones: GT 1, IAN 873, PB 235 e RRIM 600 Mechanical and thermal characterization of compounds of natural rubber of the clones: GT 1, IAN 873, PB 235 and RRIM 600

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Dall'Antonia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho estudou-se o desempenho mecânico e térmico de compostos de borracha natural (Hevea brasiliensis de 4 diferentes clones (GT 1, IAN 873, PB 235 e RRIM 600 cultivados no Estado de São Paulo, assim como de uma mistura destes clones e de uma borracha comercial, GEB-1. Estas borrachas foram formuladas e vulcanizadas com tempos de 5, 7 e 9 minutos. A caracterização foi realizada por calorimetria exploratória diferencial, termogravimetria, ensaios de resistência à tração, análise dinâmico-mecânica, medidas de dureza Shore A, microscopia eletrônica de varredura e espectroscopia na região do infravermelho. Os resultados permitiram concluir que o tempo de vulcanização e o tipo de clone não influenciaram na temperatura de transição vítrea (Tg dos compostos. Os valores de Tg obtidos por DMA foram de cerca de -62 °C, e os resultados ensaios de dureza apresentaram valores próximos de 60 para todos os compostos estudados. Os ensaios de resistência à tração mostraram que o melhor desempenho mecânico foi obtido pelo clone RRIM 600. De acordo com os resultados obtidos neste trabalho, todos os clones atingiram as propriedades reportadas na literatura, podendo ser utilizados, em princípio, nas indústrias de artefatos de borracha separadamente ou na forma de mistura.The objective of this work was to study the mechanical and thermal performance of natural rubber (Hevea brasiliensis compounds of different types of clones (GT 1, IAN 873, PB 235 and RRIM 600, as well as a mixture made from these clones and a commercial rubber GEB-1. These rubbers were formulated and prepared in a two-roll mill and vulcanized at different times (5, 7 and 9 minutes. The evaluation of the mechanical and thermal performance of different natural rubber compounds was carried out by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, thermogravimetry analysis (TGA, mechanical properties (tensile and hardness tests, dynamic mechanic thermal analysis (DMTA

  14. Compounding around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Pharmaceutical compounding is universal in its prevalence. Variations in disease patterns, culture, and tradition; the role of government in health care; and the availability of essential equipment and required agents shape a compounding profile unique to each country worldwide. In the following reflections, pharmacists form Argentina, Belgium, Colombia, Germany, Puerto Rico, Spain, and the United States describe their experiences in the compounding setting unique to their practice and their nation. The unifying theme in their comments is the dedication of each contributor to enabling recovery and ensuring the good health of his or her clients.

  15. Thermal insulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durston, J.G.; Birch, W.; Facer, R.I.; Stuart, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors. In the arrangement described the reactor vessel is clad with thermal insulation comprising a layer of insulating blocks spaced from the wall and from each other; each block is rigidly secured to the wall, and the interspaces are substantially closed against convectional flow of liquid by resilient closure members. A membrane covering is provided for the layer of blocks, with venting means to allow liquid from the reactor vessel to penetrate between the covering and the layer of blocks. The membrane covering may comprise a stainless steel sheet ribbed in orthogonal pattern to give flexibility for the accommodation of thermal strain. The insulating blocks may be comprised of stainless steel or cellular or porous material and may be hollow shells containing ceramic material or gas fillings. (U.K.)

  16. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  17. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become

  18. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  19. MEA 86 Compound data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data file contains the full raw parameter data for the 86 compounds tested in the developmental MEA assay, as well as Area Under the Curve (AUC) calculations...

  20. Unlock your Compound Management

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen Eller

    2016-01-01

    Pharmaceutical industry faces the increased demand for innovative medicines against various diseases. In this regard, the compound library in pharmaceutical industry is the most valuable asset. However, the compound distribution from the library into the screening plates is often still done manually and binds highly qualified resources to very time-consuming, tedious and error-prone tasks. To overcome these challenges, Chemspeed launched the first automated true one-to-one gravimetric "pi...

  1. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  2. Thermal behaviour of zinc(II) 5-chlorosalicylate complex compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Györyová, K.; Chomič, J.; Kovářová, Jana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 2 (2005), s. 375-380 ISSN 1388-6150 Grant - others:Slovak Ministry of Education(SK) VEGA 1/2474/05 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : caffeine * chlorosalicylate complexes * nicotinamide Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.425, year: 2005

  3. Optical and thermal performance of a three-dimensional compound ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cost of conventional fuels have forced the scientific and engineering community to ... and revive interest on renewable, solar energy utilization options. ... the intensity of direct solar radiation at normal incidence, Pyrheliometer was used. A wind.

  4. Recovery of phosphorus compounds from thermally-processed wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowska-Kosacka, A.; Pawłowski, L.; Niedbala, G.; Cel, W.

    2018-05-01

    Depletion of phosphorus deposits is one of the most serious global problems, which may soon lead to a crisis in food production. It is estimated that if the current living standard is maintained, the available reserves will be depleted in 130 years. Considering the principle of sustainable development, searching for alternative phosphorus sources is extremely important. The work presented the results of the research on the possibility of utilizing wastes as a source of phosphorus. The studies were conducted on poultry manure. The physicochemical properties of phosporus-rich wastes were determined as well. The fertilizing properties of ashes from poultry manure combustion – obtained from different systems, i.e. caged and barn production. The assimilability of phosphorus from the obtained ashes was determined. Potential applications of phosphorus-rich ashes were proposed as well.

  5. Antimicrobial azobenzene compounds and their potential use in biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, L.; Concilio, S.; Iannelli, P.; De Santis, F.; Porta, A.; Piotto, S.

    2016-04-01

    We recently synthesized a class of active compounds with azobenzene structure [1] and lowest in silico toxicity values. The antimicrobial activity of these molecules and their thermal stability are very promising and indicate that they may have interesting and therapeutically significant applications. This work aims to develop new materials with antibacterial and antifungal activity inserting different percentages of synthetic antimicrobial azo compounds in commercial polymer matrices. We realized thin films using solvent casting and melt compounding techniques. The obtained materials retained the proprieties of the pure matrices. This means that azo dye dissolved in the matrix does not influence the thermal behavior and the morphology of the material. Tested films exhibited the capability to inhibit biofilms formation of S. aureus and C. albicans. Spectrophotometric investigation of the azo compound released from the polymer matrices confirmed that the realized materials might be interesting for biomedical tools, antibacterial surfaces, and films for active packaging.

  6. Thermochemical and thermophysical properties of minor actinide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Takano, Masahide; Otobe, Haruyoshi; Nishi, Tsuyoshi; Akabori, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Burning or transmutation of minor actinides (MA: Np, Am, Cm) that are classified as the high-level radioactive waste in the current nuclear fuel cycle is an option for the advanced nuclear fuel cycle. Although the thermochemical and thermophysical properties of minor actinide compounds are essential for the design of MA-bearing fuels and analysis of their behavior, the experimental data on minor actinide compounds are limited. To support the research and development of the MA-bearing fuels, the property measurements were carried out on minor actinide nitrides and oxides. The lattice parameters and their thermal expansions were measured by high-temperature X-ray diffractometry. The specific heat capacities were measured by drop calorimetry and the thermal diffusivities by laser-flash method. The thermal conductivities were determined by the specific heat capacities, thermal diffusivities and densities. The oxygen potentials were measured by electromotive force method.

  7. Review on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Shalini; Dave, Pragnesh N.

    2013-01-01

    In this review data from the literature on thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate (AN) and the effect of additives to their thermal decomposition are summarized. The effect of additives like oxides, cations, inorganic acids, organic compounds, phase-stablized CuO, etc., is discussed. The effect of an additive mainly occurs at the exothermic peak of pure AN in a temperature range of 200°C to 140°C.

  8. Finding New Thermoelectric Compounds Using Crystallographic Data: Atomic Displacement Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Mandrus, D.G.; Sales, B.C.; Sharp, J.W.

    1999-08-29

    A new structure-property relationship is discussed which links atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and the lattice thermal conductivity of clathrate-like compounds. For many clathrate-like compounds, in which one of the atom types is weakly bound and ''rattles'' within its atomic cage, room temperature ADP information can be used to estimate the room temperature lattice thermal conductivity, the vibration frequency of the ''rattler'', and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Neutron data and X-ray crystallography data, reported in the literature, are used to apply this analysis to several promising classes of thermoelectric materials.

  9. Finding New Thermoelectric Compounds Using Crystallographic Data: Atomic Displacement Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakoumakos, B.C.; Mandrus, D.G.; Sales, B.C.; Sharp, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    A new structure-property relationship is discussed which links atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and the lattice thermal conductivity of clathrate-like compounds. For many clathrate-like compounds, in which one of the atom types is weakly bound and ''rattles'' within its atomic cage, room temperature ADP information can be used to estimate the room temperature lattice thermal conductivity, the vibration frequency of the ''rattler'', and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Neutron data and X-ray crystallography data, reported in the literature, are used to apply this analysis to several promising classes of thermoelectric materials

  10. Volatile organic compounds in emissions from brown-coal-fired residential stoves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engewald, W.; Knobloch, T.; Efer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds were determined in stack-gas emissions from the residential burning of brown-coal briquets using adsorptive enrichment on hydrophobic adsorbents, thermal desorption and capillary-gas chromatographic analysis. 152 compounds were identified and quantified. Quantitative emission factors of the identified individual compounds were determined in relation to the amount of the fuel used. These factors permit assessment of the pollution of the city of Leipzig with volatile organic compounds resulting from the burning of indigenous lignite. (orig.) [de

  11. Thermogravimetric control of intermediate compounds in uranium metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasco Sanchez, L.; Fernandez Cellini, R.

    1959-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of some intermediate compounds in the metallurgy of the uranium as uranium peroxide, ammonium uranate, uranium and ammonium penta-fluoride, uranium tetrafluoride and uranous oxide has been study by means of the Chevenard's thermo balance. Some data on pyrolysis of synthetic mixtures of intermediate compounds which may occasionally appear during the industrial process, are given. Thermogravimetric methods of control are suggested, usable in interesting products in the uranium metallurgy. (Author) 20 refs

  12. Processing and Properties of PCL/Cotton Linter Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Bezerra,Elieber Barros; França,Danyelle Campos; Morais,Dayanne Diniz de Souza; Rosa,Morsyleide de Freitas; Morais,João Paulo Saraiva; Araújo,Edcleide Maria; Wellen,Renate Maria Ramos

    2017-01-01

    Biodegradable compounds of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)/ cotton linter were melting mixed with filling content ranging from 1% to 5% w/w. Cotton linter is an important byproduct of textile industry; in this work it was used in raw state and after acid hydrolysis. According to the results of torque rheometry no decaying of viscosity took place during compounding, evidencing absence of breaking down in molecular weight. The thermal stability increased by 20% as observed in HDT for PCL/cotton...

  13. Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnick, F.M.; Guidotti, R.A.; McCarthy, D.K.

    A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)/sub 3/Cl, Ca/sub 5/(CrO/sub 4/)OH, and Cr/sub 2/O/sub 5/. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

  14. Synthesis of graphene nanoplatelets from peroxosulfate graphite intercalation compounds

    OpenAIRE

    MELEZHYK A.V.; TKACHEV A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonic exfoliation of expanded graphite compound obtained by cold expansion of graphite intercalated with peroxodisulfuric acid was shown to allow the creation of graphene nanoplatelets with thickness of about 5-10 nm. The resulting graphene material contained surface oxide groups. The expanded graphite intercalation compound was exfoliated by ultrasound much easier than thermally expanded graphite. A mechanism for the cleavage of graphite to graphene nanoplatelets is proposed. It include...

  15. Theoretical Study of the Compound Parabolic Trough Solar Collector

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Subhi S. Mahammed; Dr. Hameed J. Khalaf; Tadahmun A. Yassen

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical design of compound parabolic trough solar collector (CPC) without tracking is presented in this work. The thermal efficiency is obtained by using FORTRAN 90 program. The thermal efficiency is between (60-67)% at mass flow rate between (0.02-0.03) kg/s at concentration ratio of (3.8) without need to tracking system.The total and diffused radiation is calculated for Tikrit city by using theoretical equations. Good agreement between present work and the previous work.

  16. Compound process fuel cycle concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Tetsuo

    2005-01-01

    Mass flow of light water reactor spent fuel for a newly proposed nuclear fuel cycle concept 'Compound Process Fuel Cycle' has been studied in order to assess the capacity of the concept for accepting light water reactor spent fuels, taking an example for boiling water reactor mixed oxide spent fuel of 60 GWd/t burn-up and for a fast reactor core of 3 GW thermal output. The acceptable heavy metal of boiling water reactor mixed oxide spent fuel is about 3.7 t/y/reactor while the burn-up of the recycled fuel is about 160 GWd/t and about 1.6 t/y reactor with the recycled fuel burn-up of about 300 GWd/t, in the case of 2 times recycle and 4 times recycle respectively. The compound process fuel cycle concept has such flexibility that it can accept so much light water reactor spent fuels as to suppress the light water reactor spent fuel pile-up if not so high fuel burn-up is expected, and can aim at high fuel burn-up if the light water reactor spent fuel pile-up is not so much. Following distinctive features of the concept have also been revealed. A sort of ideal utilization of boiling water reactor mixed oxide spent fuel might be achieved through this concept, since both plutonium and minor actinide reach equilibrium state beyond 2 times recycle. Changes of the reactivity coefficients during recycles are mild, giving roughly same level of reactivity coefficients as the conventional large scale fast breeder core. Both the radio-activity and the heat generation after 4 year cooling and after 4 times recycle are less than 2.5 times of those of the pre recycle fuel. (author)

  17. Fluorine-18 labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleijn, J.P. de

    1978-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis deals with the problems involved in the adaption of reactor-produced fluorine-18 to the synthesis of 18 F-labelled organic fluorine compounds. Several 18 F-labelling reagents were prepared and successfully applied. The limitations to the synthetic possibilities of reactor-produced fluoride- 18 become manifest in the last part of the thesis. An application to the synthesis of labelled aliphatic fluoro amino acids has appeared to be unsuccessful as yet, although some other synthetic approaches can be indicated. Seven journal articles (for which see the availability note) are used to compose the four chapters and three appendices. The connecting text gives a survey of known 18 F-compounds and methods for preparing such compounds. (Auth.)

  18. Chloric organic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moalem, F.

    2000-01-01

    Since many years ago, hazardous and toxic refuses which are results of human activities has been carelessly without any Biological and Engineering facts and knowledge discharged into our land and water. The effects of discharging those materials in environment are different. Some of refuse materials shows short and other has long-time adverse effects in our environment, Among hazardous organic chemical materials, chlorine, consider, to be the main element. Organic materials with chlorine is called chlorine hydrocarbon as a hazardous compound. This paper discuss the hazardous materials especially chloric organic compound and their misuse effects in environment and human being

  19. Medicinal gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parish, R.V.; Cottrill, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    A major use of gold compounds in the pharmaceutical industry is for anti-arthritic agents. The disease itself is not understood and little is known about the way in which the drugs act, but detailed pictures of the distribution of gold in the body are available, and some of the relevant biochemistry is beginning to emerge. The purpose of this article is to give a survey of the types of compounds presently employed in medicine, of the distribution of gold in the body which results from their use, and of some relevant chemistry. Emphasis is placed on results obtained in the last few years

  20. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter