WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal barrier coatings

  1. Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications. The program is directed at developing a state-of-the-art coating system with a minimum coating life of 25,000 hours at service temperatures required to meet increasing operating efficiency goals. Westinghouse has assembled a team of university and industry leaders to accomplish this goal. Westinghouse will coordinate the efforts of all program participants. Chromalloy Turbine Technologies, Inc. and Sermatech International, Inc. will be responsible for bond coat and TBC deposition technology. Praxair Specialty Powders, Inc. will be responsible for the fabrication of all bond coat and ceramic powders for the program. Southwest Research Institute will head the life prediction modelling effort; they will also be involved in coordinating nondestructive evaluation (NDE) efforts. Process modelling will be provided by the University of Arizona.

  2. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  3. Pratt & Whitney thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornstein, N. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States); Marcin, J. [Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Co., East Hartford, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficient, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems. The operating profiles of these industrial gas turbines are long, less cyclic with fewer transients-compared with those for aircraft gas turbine engines. Therefore, creep rather than thermal fatigue, becomes primary life-limiting for hot section components. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) will be used to achieve the objectives of the program. TBCs allow surface temperatures to increase without compromising the structural properties of the alloy. TBCs typically consist of a ceramic insulating layer, deposited onto the substrate with an intervening metallic layer, which imparts oxidation protection to the substrate and provides a surface to which the ceramic layer can adhere.

  4. Thermal barrier coating system having improved adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. C.; Sovey, J. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    The adherence between a ceramic thermal barrier coating and a metal bond coating is improved by ion sputtering a ceramic film on the bond cost. A ceramic thermal barrier coating is then plasma-sprayed onto this primer film. This improves the integrity and strength of the interface between the plasma-sprayed ceramic layer and metallic bond coat which insures stronger adherence between the metal and the ceramic.

  5. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation.

  6. Delamination-Indicating Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2007-01-01

    The risk of premature failure of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), typically composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), compromises the reliability of TBCs used to provide thermal protection for turbine engine components. Unfortunately, TBC delamination proceeds well beneath the TBC surface and cannot be monitored by visible inspection. Nondestructive diagnostic tools that could reliably probe the subsurface damage state of TBCs would alleviate the risk of TBC premature failure by indicating when the TBC needs to be replaced before the level of TBC damage threatens engine performance or safety. To meet this need, a new coating design for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) that are self-indicating for delamination has been successfully implemented by incorporating a europium-doped luminescent sublayer at the base of a TBC composed of YSZ. The luminescent sublayer has the same YSZ composition as the rest of the TBC except for the addition of low-level europium doping and therefore does not alter TBC performance.

  7. Thermal barrier coatings for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.; Hodge, P. E.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive NASA-Lewis program of coating development for aircraft gas turbine blades and vanes is presented. Improved ceramic layer compositions are investigated, along the MCrAlY bond films and the methods of uniform deposition of the coatings; the thermomechanical and fuel impurity tolerance limits of the coatings are being studied. Materials include the ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY system; the effects of the bond coat and zirconia composition on coating life and Mach 1 burner rig test results are discussed. It is concluded that Diesel engines can also utilize thermal barrier coatings; they have been used successfully on piston crowns and exhaust valves of shipboard engines to combat lower grade fuel combustion corrosion.

  8. Anisotropic Thermal Diffusivities of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoshima, Megumi; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to shield the blades of gas turbines from heat and wear. There is a pressing need to evaluate the thermal conductivity of TBCs in the thermal design of advanced gas turbines with high energy efficiency. These TBCs consist of a ceramic-based top coat and a bond coat on a superalloy substrate. Usually, the focus is on the thermal conductivity in the thickness direction of the TBC because heat tends to diffuse from the surface of the top coat to the substrate. However, the in-plane thermal conductivity is also important in the thermal design of gas turbines because the temperature distribution within the turbine cannot be ignored. Accordingly, a method is developed in this study for measuring the in-plane thermal diffusivity of the top coat. Yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats are prepared by thermal spraying under different conditions. The in-plane and cross-plane thermal diffusivities of the top coats are measured by the flash method to investigate the anisotropy of thermal conduction in a TBC. It is found that the in-plane thermal diffusivity is higher than the cross-plane one for each top coat and that the top coats have significantly anisotropic thermal diffusivity. The cross-sectional and in-plane microstructures of the top coats are observed, from which their porosities are evaluated. The thermal diffusivity and its anisotropy are discussed in detail in relation to microstructure and porosity.

  9. Multilayer Microlaminated Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Charles

    1997-01-01

    .... Both thermal and mechanical characteristics of the coatings can be potentially optimized, and the coating will be more tolerant towards strain damage, have better thermal insulation and provide...

  10. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  11. Thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine and diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Bailey, M. Murray

    1989-01-01

    The present state of development of thin thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines and thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines is assessed. Although current thermal barrier coatings are flying in certain gas turbine engines, additional advances will be needed for future engines. Thick thermal barrier coatings for truck diesel engines have advanced to the point where they are being seriously considered for the next generation of engine. Since coatings for truck engines is a young field of inquiry, continued research and development efforts will be required to help bring this technology to commercialization.

  12. Development of metal based thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Il

    In this work, metal-based thermal barrier coatings (MBTBCs) have been produced, using high frequency induction plasma spraying (IPS) of iron-based nanostructured alloy powders. Important advances have been made over recent years to the development of ceramic-based thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for internal combustion engines application, but they are not yet applied in mass production situations. Besides the important economic considerations, the reliability of ceramic: TBCs is also an issue, being associated with the difficulty of predicting their "in-service" lifetime. Through engineering of the nano/amorphous structure of MBTBCs, their thermal conductivity can be made as low as those of ceramic-based TBCs, with reduced mean free paths of the electrons/phonons scattering. In this work, nano/amorphous structured coatings were deposited by IPS using the following spray parameters: spraying distance (210 ˜ 270 mm), plasma gas composition (Ar/N2), IPS torch power (24kW), and powder feed-rate (16g/min.). The structure and properties of the deposited layers were characterized through SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) observations. The thermal diffusivity (alpha) properties of the MBTBCs were measured using a laser flash method. Density (rho) and specific heat (Cp) of the MBTBCs were also measured, and their thermal conductivity (k) calculated (k =alpharhoCp). The thermal conductivity of MBTBCs was found to be as low as 1.99 W/m/K. The heat treatment study showed that crystal structure changes, and grain size growth from a few nanometers to tenth of nanometers occurred at 550°C under static exposure conditions. Thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of MBTBCs was 13E-6/K, which is close to the TEC of cast iron and thus, closer to the TEC values of aluminium alloys than are conventional TBCs. Fracture toughness of MBTBCs has also been assessed by use of Vickers hardness tests, with a 500 g load for 15 s, and the results show that there are no measurable crack

  13. Combination Thermal Barrier And Wear Coatings For Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Mike; Moller, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Thermal-barrier layers covered with self-lubricating surface layers. Zirconia thermal-barrier coat applied to surface of combustion chamber in engine by plasma-arc spraying. Then PS-200 plasma-arc sprayed onto zirconia. Self-lubricating coat prevents sliding contact between thermal barrier and piston ring, effectively preventing both wear and production of additional heat via friction. Other combinations of thermal-barrier and self-lubricating, wear-resistant coating materials used as long as two materials adhere to each other, applied by use of similar or compatible processes, have similar coefficients of thermal expansion, sufficiently strong at high temperatures, and affordable.

  14. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Research and development into thermal barrier coatings for electric utility gas turbine engines is reviewed critically. The type of coating systems developed for aircraft applications are found to be preferred for clear fuel electric utility applications. These coating systems consists of a layer of plasma sprayed zirconia-yttria ceramic over a layer of MCrAly bond coat. They are not recommended for use when molten salts are presented. Efforts to understand coating degradation in dirty environments and to develop corrosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are discussed.

  15. Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Gas Turbine and Diesel Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) have been developed for advanced gas turbine and diesel engine applications to improve engine reliability and fuel efficiency. However, durability issues of these thermal barrier coatings under high temperature cyclic conditions are still of major concern. The coating failure depends not only on the coating, but also on the ceramic sintering/creep and bond coat oxidation under the operating conditions. Novel test approaches have been established to obtain critical thermomechanical and thermophysical properties of the coating systems under near-realistic transient and steady state temperature and stress gradients encountered in advanced engine systems. This paper presents detailed experimental and modeling results describing processes occurring in the ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coating systems, thus providing a framework for developing strategies to manage ceramic coating architecture, microstructure and properties.

  16. Thermophysical properties of selected powders for thermal barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    M. Drajewicz; M. Góral; M. Pytel; J. Sieniawski

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings often have the problems of spallation and cracking in service owing to their poor bond strength and high residual stresses. Functionally graded thermal barrier coatings with a gradual compositional variation from heat resistant ceramics to fracture-resistant metals are proposed to mitigate these problems.Design/methodology/approach: The results of measurements of thermal diffusivity by using one of the most modern experimental sets LFA 427 (Las...

  17. Ceramic thermal barrier coatings for commercial gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Susan Manning; Gupta, Dinesh K.; Sheffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The paper provides an overview of the short history, current status, and future prospects of ceramic thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines. Particular attention is given to plasma-sprayed and electron beam-physical vapor deposited yttria-stabilized (7 wt pct Y2O3) zirconia systems. Recent advances include improvements in the spallation life of thermal barrier coatings, improved bond coat composition and spraying techniques, and improved component design. The discussion also covers field experience, life prediction modeling, and future directions in ceramic coatings in relation to gas turbine engine design.

  18. Thermal-barrier coatings for utility gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, S. R.; Miller, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of thermal barrier coatings for use in utility gas turbines was assessed. Pressurized passage and ambient pressure doped fuel burner rig tests revealed that thermal barrier coatings are not resistant to dirty combustion environments. However, present thermal barrier coatings, such as duplex partially stabilized zirconia and duplex Ca2SiO4 have ample resistance to the thermo-mechanical stress and temperature levels anticipated for heavy duty gas turbines firing clean fuel as revealed by clean fuel pressurized passage and ambient pressure burner rig tests. Thus, it is appropriate to evaluate such coatings on blades, vanes and combustors in the field. However, such field tests should be backed up with adequate effort in the areas of coating application technology and design analysis so that the field tests yield unequivocal results.

  19. Thermal barrier coating experience in the gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, S.; Demasi-Marcin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC), provide thermal insulation and oxidation resistance in an environment consisting of hot combustion gases. TBC's consist of a two layer system. The outer ceramic layer provides good thermal insulation due to the low thermal conductivity of the ceramic coatings used, while the inner metallic bond coat layer provides needed oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy. Pratt & Whitney has over a decade of experience with several generations of TBC systems on turbine airfoils. This paper will focus on the latest TBC field experience along with a proposed durability model.

  20. INFLUENCE OF WORKPIECE SURFACE PREPARATION ON THERMAL BARRIER COATING DURABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Petrova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Article deals with the impact of workpiece surface quality on adhesive strength and durability of thermal barrier coating. The result revealed that the roughness of metal layer influences on the adhesion of ceramic coating and depends the thickness of ceramic crystals when using method of Electron beam deposition.

  1. Bond strength and stress measurements in thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gell, M.; Jordan, E. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Thermal barrier coatings have been used extensively in aircraft gas turbines for more than 15 years to insulate combustors and turbine vanes from the hot gas stream. Plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide metal temperature reductions as much as 300{degrees}F, with improvements in durability of two times or more being achieved. The introduction of TBCs deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processes in the last five years has provided a major improvement in durability and also enabled TBCs to be applied to turbine blades for improved engine performance. To meet the aggressive Advanced Turbine Systems goals for efficiency, durability and the environment, it will be necessary to employ thermal barrier coatings on turbine airfoils and other hot section components. For The successful application of TBCs to ATS engines with 2600{degrees}F turbine inlet temperatures and required component lives 10 times greater than those for aircraft gas turbine engines, it is necessary to develop quantitative assessment techniques for TBC coating integrity with time and cycles in ATS engines. Thermal barrier coatings in production today consist of a metallic bond coat, such as an MCrAlY overlay coating or a platinum aluminide (Pt-Al) diffusion coating. During heat treatment, both these coatings form a thin, tightly adherent alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) film. Failure of TBC coatings in engine service occurs by spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the bond coat to alumina or the alumina to zirconia bonds. Thus, it is the initial strength of these bonds and the stresses at the bond plane, and their changes with engine exposure, that determines coating durability. The purpose of this program is to provide, for the first time, a quantitative assessment of TBC bond strength and bond plane stresses as a function of engine time and cycles.

  2. Chemical Vapor Deposition of Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Victor E.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings extend the operating temperature range of actively cooled gas turbine components, therefore increasing thermal efficiency. Performance and lifetime of existing ceram ic coatings are limited by spallation during heating and cooling cycles. Spallation of the ceramic is a function of its microstructure, which is determined by the deposition method. This research is investigating metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of yttria stabilized zirconia to improve performance and reduce costs relative to electron beam physical vapor deposition. Coatings are deposited in an induction-heated, low-pressure reactor at 10 microns per hour. The coating's composition, structure, and response to the turbine environment will be characterized.

  3. Simulation of thermo-Elastics Properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal barrier coatings are used to protect different parts in compressors and turbines from heat. They are generally composed of two layers, one metallic layer providing resistance to heat corrosion and oxidation, and one thermally insulating ceramic layer. Two different techniques are industrially used. Plasma spray ...

  4. Study on Preparation Technologies of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ning; Li, Yang; Wang, Hao; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yunshan

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is one of the main key technology for the high-pressure turbine blades which are the main components of the high-performance aerospace engines. It offers protection for underline metallic components from corrosion, oxidation and localized melting by insulating the metal from hot gases in the engine core. The properties and lifetime of TBCs are greatly influenced by the preparation technology, which includes plasma spraying (PS), physical vapor deposition (PVD) and laser re-melting (LM). In this paper, three technologies used to prepare the TBCs are reviewed. Resulting features of coating fabricated by each technology are also discussed such as: the porosity, the thermally grown oxide (TGO), the erosion resistance, the thermal shock and so on. Especially, it is pointed out that the performances of gradient coating and nano-coating are better than the traditional coatings. In addition, it is widely accepted that laser can be applied to re-melt the PS coating and even directly clad the gradient coating. In the future, the traditional preparation technology should be improved continually in order to enhance the coating lifetime, enhance the properties of coating and lower the cost of process. Moreover, the researches on gradient-nano-structured coatings preparation are absent and should be done with emphasis since the nano-structure and gradient structure can both benefit the lifetime and properties of coatings.

  5. Stiffness of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shiladitya Paul

    2017-01-01

    .... In this paper, the Young’s modulus of TBC top coat, measured using different techniques, such as four-point bending, indentation and impulse excitation is reported, along with a brief description of how the techniques probe...

  6. Deposition stress effects on thermal barrier coating burner rig life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  7. Advanced Thermal Barrier and Environmental Barrier Coating Development at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Robinson, Craig

    2017-01-01

    This presentation summarizes NASA's advanced thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, and the coating performance improvements that has recently been achieved and documented in laboratory simulated rig test conditions. One of the emphases has been placed on the toughness and impact resistance enhancements of the low conductivity, defect cluster thermal barrier coating systems. The advances in the next generation environmental barrier coatings for SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites have also been highlighted, particularly in the design of a new series of oxide-silicate composition systems to be integrated with next generation SiC-SiC turbine engine components for 2700F coating applications. Major technical barriers in developing the thermal and environmental barrier coating systems are also described. The performance and model validations in the rig simulated turbine combustion, heat flux, steam and calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) environments have helped the current progress in improved temperature capability, environmental stability, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability of the advanced thermal and environmental barrier coating systems.

  8. Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings for Advanced Turbine Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (T/EBCs) will play a crucial role in advanced gas turbine engine systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus help achieve engine low emission and high efficiency goals. Advanced T/EBCs are being developed for the low emission SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor applications by extending the CMC liner and vane temperature capability to 1650 C (3000 F) in oxidizing and water vapor containing combustion environments. Low conductivity thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are also being developed for metallic turbine airfoil and combustor applications, providing the component temperature capability up to 1650 C (3000 F). In this paper, ceramic coating development considerations and requirements for both the ceramic and metallic components will be described for engine high temperature and high-heat-flux applications. The underlying coating failure mechanisms and life prediction approaches will be discussed based on the simulated engine tests and fracture mechanics modeling results.

  9. Thermal Fatigue Behavior of Air-Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating with Bond Coat Species in Cyclic Thermal Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ungyu Paik

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the bond coat species on the delamination or fracture behavior in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs was investigated using the yclic thermal fatigue and thermal-shock tests. The interface microstructures of each TBC showed a good condition without cracking or delamination after flame thermal fatigue (FTF for 1429 cycles. The TBC with the bond coat prepared by the air-plasma spray (APS method showed a good condition at the interface between the top and bond coats after cyclic furnace thermal fatigue (CFTF for 1429 cycles, whereas the TBCs with the bond coats prepared by the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF and low-pressure plasma spray (LPPS methods showed a partial cracking (and/or delamination and a delamination after 780 cycles, respectively. The TBCs with the bond coats prepared by the APS, HVOF and LPPS methods were fully delaminated (>50% after 159, 36, and 46 cycles, respectively, during the thermal-shock tests. The TGO thickness in the TBCs was strongly dependent on the both exposure time and temperature difference tested. The hardness values were found to be increased only after the CFTF, and the TBC with the bond coat prepared by the APS showed the highest adhesive strength before and after the FTF.

  10. Performance Evaluation and Modeling of Erosion Resistant Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to the rotorcraft engine performance and durability. The objective of this work was to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments, thus validating a new thermal barrier coating turbine blade technology for future rotorcraft applications. A high velocity burner rig based erosion test approach was established and a new series of rare earth oxide- and TiO2/Ta2O5- alloyed, ZrO2-based low conductivity thermal barrier coatings were designed and processed. The low conductivity thermal barrier coating systems demonstrated significant improvements in the erosion resistance. A comprehensive model based on accumulated strain damage low cycle fatigue is formulated for blade erosion life prediction. The work is currently aiming at the simulated engine erosion testing of advanced thermal barrier coated turbine blades to establish and validate the coating life prediction models.

  11. Perspective on thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbine applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutasim, Zaher; Brentnall, William

    1995-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) have been used in high thrust aircraft engines for many years, and have proved to be very effective in providing thermal protection and increasing engine efficiencies. TBC life requirements for aircraft engines are typically less than those required for industrial gas turbines. This paper describes current and future applications of TBC's in industrial gas turbine engines. Early testing and applications of TBC's is reviewed. Areas of concern from the engine designer's and materials engineer's perspective are identified and evaluated. This paper focuses on the key factors that are expected to influence utilization of TBC's in advanced industrial gas turbine engines. It is anticipated that reliable, durable and highly effective coating systems will be produced that will ultimately improve engine efficiency and performance.

  12. Optical Diagnostics for High-Temperature Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments, such as in jet turbine engines. Taking advantage of the translucent nature of TBCs, optical diagnostics have been developed that can provide an informed assessment of TBC health that will allow mitigating action to be taken before TBC degradation threatens performance or safety. In particular, rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers have been integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence that monitors TBC erosion, delamination, and temperature gradients. Erosion monitoring of TBC-coated specimens is demonstrated by utilizing visible luminescence that is excited from a sublayer that is exposed by erosion. TBC delamination monitoring is achieved in TBCs with a base rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayer by the reflectance-enhanced increase in luminescence produced in regions containing buried delamination cracks. TBC temperature monitoring is demonstrated using the temperature-dependent decay time for luminescence originating from the specific coating depth associated with a rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayer. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers is discussed, including co-doping strategies to produce more penetrating near-infrared luminescence. It is demonstrated that integration of the rare-earth-doped sublayers is achieved with no reduction in TBC life. In addition, results for multilayer TBCs designed to also perform as radiation barriers are also presented.

  13. The Lattice and Thermal Radiation Conductivity of Thermal Barrier Coatings: Models and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Spuckler, Charles M.

    2010-01-01

    The lattice and radiation conductivity of ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was evaluated using a laser heat flux approach. A diffusion model has been established to correlate the coating apparent thermal conductivity to the lattice and radiation conductivity. The radiation conductivity component can be expressed as a function of temperature, coating material scattering, and absorption properties. High temperature scattering and absorption of the coating systems can be also derived based on the testing results using the modeling approach. A comparison has been made for the gray and nongray coating models in the plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings. The model prediction is found to have a good agreement with experimental observations.

  14. The Development of Erosion and Impact Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are used in gas turbine engines to protect engine hot-section components in the harsh combustion environments and extend component lifetimes. For thermal barrier coatings designed for turbine airfoil applications, further improved erosion and impact resistance are crucial for engine performance and durability. Advanced erosion resistant thermal barrier coatings are being developed, with a current emphasis on the toughness improvements using a combined rare earth- and transition metal-oxide doping approach. The performance of the doped thermal barrier coatings has been evaluated in burner rig and laser heat-flux rig simulated engine erosion and thermal gradient environments. The results have shown that the coating composition optimizations can effectively improve the erosion and impact resistance of the coating systems, while maintaining low thermal conductivity and cyclic durability. The erosion and impact damage mechanisms of the thermal barrier coatings will also be discussed.

  15. Indentation methods for adhesion measurement in thermal barrier coating systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qin

    This thesis investigates the fundamentals of indentation-induced delamination of electron beam physical vapor deposition thermal barrier coatings (EB-PVD TBCs). Thermal barrier coatings are thin ceramic coatings used to insulate gas turbine components. In the as-processed state, TBCs are well-bonded to the metallic substrate they are deposited upon. However, as these coatings are exposed to high temperatures during turbine operation, they lose their adhesion. The goal of this thesis is to determine how to use indentation testing techniques, coupled with fracture mechanics principles, to track this loss of adhesion and to identify mechanisms causing it. This thesis addresses four primary topics. First, a detailed fracture mechanics analysis of indentation-induced delamination is made, including the quantification of energy release rates, interfacial toughnesses and mode mix. The second topic addressed is application of the indentation test to track toughness losses in TBC systems subjected to a variety of thermal exposures. Three subtopics are included: (1) mechanism-based tests for the isothermal dry air exposures; (2) mechanism-based tests for exposures with water vapor and (3) mechanism-based tests for cyclic thermal exposures. In the first subtopic, TGO thickening and TBC sintering are modeled. Various mechanisms that lead to toughness degradation are discussed and analyzed quantitatively. An Arrhenius analysis has been performed to understand accelerated testing methods. The second subtopic presents the results of toughness degradation and the evolution of microstructures due to isothermal exposure with water vapor. The third subtopic investigates the toughness degradation for cyclic thermal exposures in dry air. Piezospectroscopy method has been applied to track the evolution of residual stresses in the TGO layer with thermal cycles. Quantitative analysis has been provided to give insights into the effects of oxide damage during thermal cycling. The final two

  16. Thermomechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings. Thermal Barrier Coatings II - interim report; Haltbarkeit thermomechanisch belasteter Waermedaemmschichtsysteme. Waermedaemmschichtsysteme II - Zwischenbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, C.; Schmidt, A. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (DE). Inst. fuer Werkstoffkunde (IFW); Scholz, A.; Stamm, W. [Siemens Power AG, Muelheim/Ruhr (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The thermomechanical behaviour of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is being investigated by strain controlled service-type thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) tests in order to simulate creep fatigue life of coatings on gas turbine blades. A first service-type cycle with a cycle period of 20 min, a maximum temperature of 930 C and a minimum temperature of 60 C for industrial gas turbines and a second cycle with a cycle period of 8 min, a maximum temperature of 1050 C and a minimum temperature of 300 C for aero engine gas turbines are applied. A special test technique was developed for hollow test pieces with a component typical wall thickness of 1.8 mm made of a single crystal alloy. Different bondcoats (MCrAIY and PtAI) and an air plasma sprayed (APS-) topcoat as well as electron beam (EB-PVD) topcoat are under investigation. After each specific experiment microstructural investigation is used for damage characterisation. The growth of oxides together with thermal mismatch could be identified as the most important damaging effects. Data from long-term Pre-Oxidation experiments allows to adjust the thickness of the TGO for each specific TMF-experiment. The main objective is to ideal with the influence of different bond coat morphologies on the durability of the thermal barrier coating (TBC-) system. The influence of surface roughness, grain size in the bond coat as well as different bond coats (MCrAIY and PtAI) are investigated. First results show that the surface roughness may have a larger influence on the durability of the TBC-system than initially expected. In order to gain deeper understanding of the damaging mechanisms, finite elements calculations are performed to simulate critical local deformation in the TBC-system. The experiments allow deep insight into the damaging mechanisms governing TBC-systems under service-type conditions and thus are suitable for life time prediction TBC-systems. Although a lot of research has been done on this topic. The influence of

  17. Oxidation and thermal shock behavior of thermal barrier coated 18/10CrNi alloy with coating modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guergen, Selim [Vocational School of Transportation, Anadolu University, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan); Diltemiz, Seyid Fehmi [Turkish Air Force1st Air Supply and Maintenance Center Command, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan); Kushan, Melih Cemal [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Eskisehir (Turkmenistan)

    2017-01-15

    In this study, substrates of 18/10CrNi alloy plates were initially sprayed with a Ni-21Cr-10Al-1Y bond coat and then with an yttria stabilized zirconia top coat by plasma spraying. Subsequently, plasma-sprayed Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were treated with two different modification methods, namely, vacuum heat treatment and laser glazing. The effects of modifications on the oxidation and thermal shock behavior of the coatings were evaluated. The effect of coat thickness on the bond strength of the coats was also investigated. Results showed enhancement of the oxidation resistance and thermal shock resistance of TBCs following modifications. Although vacuum heat treatment and laser glazing exhibited comparable results as per oxidation resistance, the former generated the best improvement in the thermal shock resistance of the TBCs. Bond strength also decreased as coat thickness increased.

  18. Thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) for high heat flux thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher M.

    The last 30 years materials engineers have been under continual pressure to develop materials with a greater temperature potential or to produce configurations that can be effectively cooled or otherwise protected at elevated temperature conditions. Turbines and thrust chambers produce some of the harshest service conditions for materials which lead to the challenges engineers face in order to increase the efficiencies of current technologies due to the energy crisis that the world is facing. The key tasks for the future of gas turbines are to increase overall efficiencies to meet energy demands of a growing world population and reduce the harmful emissions to protect the environment. Airfoils or blades tend to be the limiting factor when it comes to the performance of the turbine because of their complex design making them difficult to cool as well as limitations of their thermal properties. Key tasks for space transportation it to lower costs while increasing operational efficiency and reliability of our space launchers. The important factor to take into consideration is the rocket nozzle design. The design of the rocket nozzle or thrust chamber has to take into account many constraints including external loads, heat transfer, transients, and the fluid dynamics of expanded hot gases. Turbine engines can have increased efficiencies if the inlet temperature for combustion is higher, increased compressor capacity and lighter weight materials. In order to push for higher temperatures, engineers need to come up with a way to compensate for increased temperatures because material systems that are being used are either at or near their useful properties limit. Before thermal barrier coatings were applied to hot-section components, material alloy systems were able to withstand the service conditions necessary. But, with the increased demand for performance, higher temperatures and pressures have become too much for those alloy systems. Controlled chemistry of hot

  19. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  20. The Numerical Modeling of Thermal Stress Distribution in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasik A.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of numerical calculations of temperature and thermal stress distribution in thermal barrier coatings deposited by thermal spraying process on the nickel based superalloy. An assumption was made to apply conventional zirconium oxide modified with yttrium oxide (8YSZ and apply pyrochlore type material with formula La2Zr2O7. The bond coat was made of NiCoCrAlY. Analysis of the distribution of temperature and stresses in ceramic coatings of different thicknesses was performed in the function of bond-coat thickness and the type of ceramic insulation layer. It was revealed that the thickness of NiCrAlY bond-coat has not significant influence on the stress distribution, but there is relatively strong effect on temperature level. The most important factor influenced on stress distribution in TBC system is related with type and properties of ceramic insulation layer.

  1. Thermal Conductivity and Elastic Modulus Evolution of Thermal Barrier Coatings under High Heat Flux Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Laser high heat flux test approaches have been established to obtain critical properties of ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) under near-realistic temperature and thermal gradients that may he encountered in advanced engine systems. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of a thin ceramic coating were continuously monitored in real time at various test temperatures. A significant thermal conductivity increase was observed during the laser simulated engine heat flux tests. For a 0.25 mm thick ZrO2-8%Y2O3 coating system, the overall thermal conductivity increased from the initial value of 1.0 W/m-K to 1. 15 W/m-K, 1. 19 W/m-K and 1.5 W/m-K after 30 hour testing at surface temperatures of 990C, 1100C, and 1320C. respectively. Hardness and modulus gradients across a 1.5 mm thick TBC system were also determined as a function of laser testing time using the laser sintering/creep and micro-indentation techniques. The coating Knoop hardness values increased from the initial hardness value of 4 GPa to 5 GPa near the ceramic/bond coat interface, and to 7.5 GPa at the ceramic coating surface after 120 hour testing. The ceramic surface modulus increased from an initial value of about 70 GPa to a final value of 125 GPa. The increase in thermal conductivity and the evolution of significant hardness and modulus gradients in the TBC systems are attributed to sintering-induced micro-porosity gradients under the laser-imposed high thermal gradient conditions. The test techniques provide a viable means for obtaining coating data for use in design, development, stress modeling, and life prediction for various thermal barrier coating applications.

  2. Life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1989-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating life models developed under the NASA Lewis Research Center's Hot Section Technology (HOST) Program are summarized. An initial laboratory model and three design-capable models are discussed. Current understanding of coating failure mechanisms are also summarized. The materials and structural aspects of thermal barrier coatings have been successfully integrated under the HOST program to produce models which may now or in the near future be used in design. Efforts on this program continue at Pratt and Whitney Aircraft where their model is being extended to the life prediction of physical vapor deposited thermal barrier coatings.

  3. Analysis of Thermal Radiation Effects on Temperatures in Turbine Engine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert; Spuckler, Charles M.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are important, and in some instances a necessity, for high temperature applications such as combustor liners, and turbine vanes and rotating blades for current and advanced turbine engines. Some of the insulating materials used for coatings, such as zirconia that currently has widespread use, are partially transparent to thermal radiation. A translucent coating permits energy to be transported internally by radiation, thereby increasing the total energy transfer and acting like an increase in thermal conductivity. This degrades the insulating ability of the coating. Because of the strong dependence of radiant emission on temperature, internal radiative transfer effects are increased as temperatures are raised. Hence evaluating the significance of internal radiation is of importance as temperatures are increased to obtain higher efficiencies in advanced engines.

  4. Thermal Conductivity in Suspension Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganvir, Ashish; Kumara, Chamara; Gupta, Mohit; Nylen, Per

    2017-01-01

    Axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS) can generate microstructures with higher porosity and pores in the size range from submicron to nanometer. ASPS thermal barrier coatings (TBC) have already shown a great potential to produce low thermal conductivity coatings for gas turbine applications. It is important to understand the fundamental relationships between microstructural defects in ASPS coatings such as crystallite boundaries, porosity etc. and thermal conductivity. Object-oriented finite element (OOF) analysis has been shown as an effective tool for evaluating thermal conductivity of conventional TBCs as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent microstructure in the model. The objective of this work was to analyze the thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs using experimental techniques and also to evaluate a procedure where OOF can be used to predict and analyze the thermal conductivity for these coatings. Verification of the model was done by comparing modeling results with the experimental thermal conductivity. The results showed that the varied scaled porosity has a significant influence on the thermal conductivity. Smaller crystallites and higher overall porosity content resulted in lower thermal conductivity. It was shown that OOF could be a powerful tool to predict and rank thermal conductivity of ASPS TBCs.

  5. Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitin Padture

    2011-12-31

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

  6. Mid-Infrared Reflectance Imaging of Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlridge, Jeffrey I.; Martin, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for mid-infrared reflectance imaging has been developed as means of inspecting for subsurface damage in thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). The apparatus is designed, more specifically, for imaging the progression of buried delamination cracks in plasma-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings on turbine-engine components. Progression of TBC delamination occurs by the formation of buried cracks that grow and then link together to produce eventual TBC spallation. The mid-infrared reflectance imaging system described here makes it possible to see delamination progression that is invisible to the unaided eye, and therefore give sufficiently advanced warning before delamination progression adversely affects engine performance and safety. The apparatus (see figure) includes a commercial mid-infrared camera that contains a liquid-nitrogen-cooled focal plane indium antimonide photodetector array, and imaging is restricted by a narrow bandpass centered at wavelength of 4 microns. This narrow wavelength range centered at 4 microns was chosen because (1) it enables avoidance of interfering absorptions by atmospheric OH and CO2 at 3 and 4.25 microns, respectively; and (2) the coating material exhibits maximum transparency in this wavelength range. Delamination contrast is produced in the midinfrared reflectance images because the introduction of cracks into the TBC creates an internal TBC/air-gap interface with a high diffuse reflectivity of 0.81, resulting in substantially higher reflectance of mid-infrared radiation in regions that contain buried delamination cracks. The camera is positioned a short distance (.12 cm) from the specimen. The mid-infrared illumination is generated by a 50-watt silicon carbide source positioned to the side of the mid-infrared camera, and the illumination is collimated and reflected onto the specimen by a 6.35-cm-diameter off-axis paraboloidal mirror. Because the collected images are of a steady-state reflected intensity (in

  7. Development and Life Prediction of Erosion Resistant Turbine Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Future rotorcraft propulsion systems are required to operate under highly-loaded conditions and in harsh sand erosion environments, thereby imposing significant material design and durability issues. The incorporation of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in high pressure turbine systems enables engine designs with higher inlet temperatures, thus improving the engine efficiency, power density and reliability. The impact and erosion resistance of turbine thermal barrier coating systems are crucial to the turbine coating technology application, because a robust turbine blade TBC system is a prerequisite for fully utilizing the potential coating technology benefit in the rotorcraft propulsion. This paper describes the turbine blade TBC development in addressing the coating impact and erosion resistance. Advanced thermal barrier coating systems with improved performance have also been validated in laboratory simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments. A preliminary life prediction modeling approach to emphasize the turbine blade coating erosion is also presented.

  8. Thermal modelling of various thermal barrier coatings in a high heat flux rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Traditional Air Plasma Sprayed (APS) ZrO2-Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC's) and Low Pressure Plasma Sprayed (LPPS) ZrO2-Y2O3/Ni-Cr-Al-Y cermet coatings were tested in a H2/O2 rocked engine. The traditional ZrO2-Y2O3 (TBC's) showed considerable metal temperature reductions during testing in the hydrogen-rich environment. A thermal model was developed to predict the thermal response of the tubes with the various coatings. Good agreement was observed between predicted temperatures and measured temperatures at the inner wall of the tube and in the metal near the coating/metal interface. The thermal model was also used to examine the effect of the differences in the reported values of the thermal conductivity of plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 ceramic coatings, the effect of 100 micron (0.004 in.) thick metallic bond coat, the effect of tangential heat transfer around the tube, and the effect or radiation from the surface of the ceramic coating. It was shown that for the short duration testing in the rocket engine, the most important of these considerations was the effect of the uncertainty in the thermal conductivity of temperatures (greater than 100 C) predicted in the tube. The thermal model was also used to predict the thermal response of the coated rod in order to quantify the difference in the metal temperatures between the two substrate geometries and to explain the previously-observed increased life of coatings on rods over that on tubes. A thermal model was also developed to predict heat transfer to the leading edge of High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP) blades during start-up of the space shuttle main engines. The ability of various TBC's to reduce metal temperatures during the two thermal excursions occurring on start-up was predicted. Temperature reductions of 150 to 470 C were predicted for 165 micron (0.0065 in.) coatings for the greater of the two thermal excursions.

  9. Deterioration of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades by Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Swar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single-stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests were performed to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity, and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two-stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDFs were developed to represent experimentally based correlations for particle surface interaction models and TBC erosion rates models. UDFs were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics and TBC erosion rates on the blade surfaces. Computational results are presented in a commercial turbine and a NASA-designed automotive turbine. The similarities between the erosion patterns in the two turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5% of the stator blade span to represent the flow cooling of the combustor liner.

  10. Blanch Resistant and Thermal Barrier NiAl Coating Systems for Advanced Copper Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Sai V. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method of forming an environmental resistant thermal barrier coating on a copper alloy is disclosed. The steps include cleansing a surface of a copper alloy, depositing a bond coat on the cleansed surface of the copper alloy, depositing a NiAl top coat on the bond coat and consolidating the bond coat and the NiAl top coat to form the thermal barrier coating. The bond coat may be a nickel layer or a layer composed of at least one of copper and chromium-copper alloy and either the bond coat or the NiAl top coat or both may be deposited using a low pressure or vacuum plasma spray.

  11. Thermal Modelling of Various Thermal Barrier Coatings in a High Flux Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    1998-01-01

    A thermal model was developed to predict the thermal response of coated and uncoated tubes tested in a H2/O2 rocket engine. Temperatures were predicted for traditional APS ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings, as well as APS and LPPS ZrO2-Y2O3/NiCrAlY cermet coatings. Good agreement was observed between predicted and measured metal temperatures at locations near the tube surface or at the inner tube wall. The thermal model was also used to quantitatively examine the effect of various coating system parameters on the temperatures in the substrate and coating. Accordingly, the effect of the presence a metallic bond coat and the effect of radiation from the surface of the ceramic layer were examined. In addition, the effect of a variation in the values of the thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer was also investigated. It was shown that a variation in the thermal conductivity of the ceramic layer, on the order of that reported in the literature for plasma sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 coatings, can result in temperature differences in the substrate greater than 100 C, a much greater effect than that due to the presence of a bond coat or radiation from the ceramic layer. The thermal model was also used to predict the thermal response of a coated rod in order to quantify the difference in the metal temperatures between the two substrate geometries in order to explain the previously-observed increased life of coatings on rods over that on tubes. It was shown that for the short duration testing in the rocket engine, the temperature in a tube could exceed that in a rod by more than 100 C. Lastly, a two-dimensional model was developed to evaluate the effect of tangential heat transfer around the tube and its impact on reducing the stagnation point temperature. It was also shown that tangential heat transfer does not significantly reduce the stagnation point temperature, thus allowing application of a simpler, one-dimensional model for comparing measured and predicted stagnation point

  12. Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier coatings under thermal shock loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual stress evolution regularity in thermal barrier ceramic coatings (TBCs under different cycles of thermal shock loading of 1100°C was investigated by the microscopic digital image correlation (DIC and micro-Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The obtained results showed that, as the cycle number of the thermal shock loading increases, the evolution of the residual stress undergoes three distinct stages: a sharp increase, a gradual change, and a reduction. The extension stress near the TBC surface is fast transformed to compressive one through just one thermal cycle. After different thermal shock cycles with peak temperature of 1100°C, phase transformation in TBC does not happen, whereas the generation, development, evolution of the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer and micro-cracks are the main reasons causing the evolution regularity of the residual stress.

  13. Environmental/Thermal Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites: Thermal Tradeoff Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. M.; Brewer, David; Shah, Ashwin R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent interest in environmental/thermal barrier coatings (EBC/TBCs) has prompted research to develop life-prediction methodologies for the coating systems of advanced high-temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Heat-transfer analysis of EBC/TBCs for CMCs is an essential part of the effort. It helps establish the resulting thermal profile through the thickness of the CMC that is protected by the EBC/TBC system. This report documents the results of a one-dimensional analysis of an advanced high-temperature CMC system protected with an EBC/TBC system. The one-dimensional analysis was used for tradeoff studies involving parametric variation of the conductivity; the thickness of the EBC/TBCs, bond coat, and CMC substrate; and the cooling requirements. The insight gained from the results will be used to configure a viable EBC/TBC system for CMC liners that meet the desired hot surface, cold surface, and substrate temperature requirements.

  14. Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit; Kumara, Chamara; Nylén, Per

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  15. Coherent gradient sensing method for measuring thermal stress field of thermal barrier coating structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coherent gradient sensing (CGS method can be used to measure the slope of a reflective surface, and has the merits of full-field, non-contact, and real-time measurement. In this study, the thermal stress field of thermal barrier coating (TBC structures is measured by CGS method. Two kinds of powders were sprayed onto Ni-based alloy using a plasma spraying method to obtain two groups of film–substrate specimens. The specimens were then heated with an oxy-acetylene flame. The resulting thermal mismatch between the film and substrate led to out-of-plane deformation of the specimen. The deformation was measured by the reflective CGS method and the thermal stress field of the structure was obtained through calibration with the help of finite element analysis. Both the experiment and numerical results showed that the thermal stress field of TBC structures can be successfully measured by CGS method.

  16. Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; Barmak, K.; Chan, H.M. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc{hor_ellipsis}). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

  17. Thermal Conductivity and Erosion Durability of Composite Two-Phase Air Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Zhu, Dongming; Dorfman, Mitchell R.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2015-01-01

    To enhance efficiency of gas turbines, new thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be designed which improve upon the thermal stability limit of 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ), approximately 1200 C. This tenant has led to the development of new TBC materials and microstructures capable of improved high temperature performance. This study focused on increasing the erosion durability of cubic zirconia based TBCs, traditionally less durable than the metastable t' zirconia based TBCs. Composite TBC microstructures composed of a low thermal conductivity/high temperature stable cubic Low-k matrix phase and a durable t' Low-k secondary phase were deposited via APS. Monolithic coatings composed of cubic Low-k and t' Low-k were also deposited, in addition to a 7YSZ benchmark. The thermal conductivity and erosion durability were then measured and it was found that both of the Low-k materials have significantly reduced thermal conductivities, with monolithic t' Low-k and cubic Low-k improving upon 7YSZ by approximately 13 and approximately 25%, respectively. The 40 wt% t' Low-k composite (40 wt% t' Low-k - 60 wt% cubic Low-k) showed a approximately 22% reduction in thermal conductivity over 7YSZ, indicating even at high levels, the t' Low-k secondary phase had a minimal impact on thermal in the composite coating. It was observed that a mere 20 wt% t' Low-k phase addition can reduce the erosion of a cubic Low-k matrix phase composite coating by over 37%. Various mixing rules were then investigated to assess this non-linear composite behavior and suggestions were made to further improve erosion durability.

  18. PLASMA THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS BASED ON ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WITH HIGH THERMAL STABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. G. Devoino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents optimization of  processes for obtaining maximum content of tetragonal phase in the initial material and thermal barrier coatings (TBC based on zirconium dioxide and hafnium oxide.  Results of the investigations on phase composition of oxide HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3  system have been given in the paper. The system represents  a microstructure which is similar to  zirconia dioxide and  transformed for its application at 1300 °C. The paper explains a mechanism of hafnium oxide influence on formation of the given microstructure. The research methodology has been based on complex metallography, X – ray diffraction and electron microscopic investigations of  structural elements of the composite plasma coating HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O system.In order to stabilize zirconium dioxide  dopant oxide should not only have an appropriate size of  metal ion, but also form a solid solution with the zirconia. This condition severely limits the number of possible stabilizers. In fact, such stabilization is possible only with the help of rare earth oxides (Y2O3, Yb2O3, CeO2, HfO2. Chemical purity of the applied materials plays a significant role for obtaining high-quality thermal barrier coatings. Hafnium oxide has been selected as powder for thermal barrier coatings instead of zirconium dioxide due to their similarities in structural modification, grating, chemical and physical properties and its high temperature structural transformations. It has been established that plasma thermal barrier HfO2 – ZrO2 – Y2O3 coatings consist of  one tetragonal phase. This phase is equivalent to a non-equilibrium tetragonal t' phase in the “zirconium dioxide stabilized with yttrium oxide” system. Affinity of  Hf+4 and Zr+4 cations leads to the formation of identical metastable phases during rapid quenching.

  19. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Infiltration and Cyclic Degradations of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Smialek, Jim; Miller, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    In a continuing effort to develop higher temperature capable turbine thermal barrier and environmental barrier coating systems, Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) resistance of the advanced coating systems needs to be evaluated and improved. This paper highlights some of NASA past high heat flux testing approaches for turbine thermal and environmental barrier coatings assessments in CMAS environments. One of our current emphases has been focused on the thermal barrier - environmental barrier coating composition and testing developments. The effort has included the CMAS infiltrations in high temperature and high heat flux turbine engine like conditions using advanced laser high heat flux rigs, and subsequently degradation studies in laser heat flux thermal gradient cyclic and isothermal furnace cyclic testing conditions. These heat flux CMAS infiltration and related coating durability testing are essential where appropriate CMAS melting, infiltration and coating-substrate temperature exposure temperature controls can be achieved, thus helping quantify the CMAS-coating interaction and degradation mechanisms. The CMAS work is also playing a critical role in advanced coating developments, by developing laboratory coating durability assessment methodologies in simulated turbine engine conditions and helping establish CMAS test standards in laboratory environments.

  20. Current status and future trends in turbine application of thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Keith D.; Gupta, Dinesh K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current status and future trends in application of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) to turbine components, and in particular to high turbine airfoils. Included are descriptions of the favorable results achieved to date with bill-of-material applications of plasma deposited TBC, and recent experience with developmental coatings applied by electron beam-physical vapor deposition.

  1. Potential benefits of a ceramic thermal barrier coating on large power generation gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating design option offers benefit in terms of reduced electricity costs when used in utility gas turbines. Options considered include: increased firing temperature, increased component life, reduced cooling air requirements, and increased corrosion resistance (resulting in increased tolerance for dirty fuels). Performance and cost data were obtained. Simple, recuperated and combined cycle applications were considered, and distillate and residual fuels were assumed. The results indicate that thermal barrier coatings could produce large electricity cost savings if these coatings permit turbine operation with residual fuels at distillate-rated firing temperatures. The results also show that increased turbine inlet temperature can result in substantial savings in fuel and capital costs.

  2. Low Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Eric [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Gell, Maurice [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are crucial to improved energy efficiency in next generation gas turbine engines. The use of traditional topcoat materials, e.g. yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), is limited at elevated temperatures due to (1) the accelerated undesirable phase transformations and (2) corrosive attacks by calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) deposits and moisture. The first goal of this project is to use the Solution Precursor Plasma Spray (SPPS) process to further reduce the thermal conductivity of YSZ TBCs by introducing a unique microstructural feature of layered porosity, called inter-pass boundaries (IPBs). Extensive process optimization accompanied with hundreds of spray trials as well as associated SEM cross-section and laser-flash measurements, yielded a thermal conductivity as low as 0.62 Wm⁻¹K⁻¹ in SPPS YSZ TBCs, approximately 50% reduction of APS TBCs; while other engine critical properties, such as cyclic durability, erosion resistance and sintering resistance, were characterized to be equivalent or better than APS baselines. In addition, modifications were introduced to SPPS TBCs so as to enhance their resistance to CMAS under harsh IGCC environments. Several mitigation approaches were explored, including doping the coatings with Al₂O₃ and TiO₂, applying a CMAS infiltration-inhibiting surface layer, and filling topcoat cracks with blocking substances. The efficacy of all these modifications was assessed with a set of novel CMAS-TBC interaction tests, and the moisture resistance was tested in a custom-built high-temperature moisture rig. In the end, the optimal low thermal conductivity TBC system was selected based on all evaluation tests and its processing conditions were documented. The optimal coating consisted on a thick inner layer of YSZ coating made by the SPPS process having a thermal conductivity 50% lower than standard YSZ coatings topped with a high temperature tolerant CMAS resistant gadolinium

  3. History of Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Engines: Emphasizing NASA's Role from 1942 to 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA has played a central role in the development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) for gas turbine applications. This report discusses the history of TBCs emphasizing the role NASA has played beginning with (1) frit coatings in the 1940s and 1950s; (2) thermally sprayed coatings for rocket application in the 1960s and early 1970s; (3) the beginnings of the modern era of turbine section coatings in the mid 1970s; and (4) failure mechanism and life prediction studies in the 1980s and 1990s. More recent efforts are also briefly discussed.

  4. SELECTION OF OXIDES FOR STABILIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM DIOXIDE WHILE OBTAINING THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Okovity

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes selection of oxides and describes in details a majority of oxide systems which are applicable for stabilization of zirconium dioxide while obtaining thermal barrier coatings with maximum amount of tetragonal phase. Methodology of investigation is based on a review of analytical information on the current state of thermal barrier coatings on the basis of zirconium dioxide stabilized by oxides of rare-earth metals. The method used for application of  zirconium dioxide thermal barrier coatings is plasma spraying. Positive results have been also obtained while applying e-beam sputtering, ion-plasma deposition and magnetron sputtering. Nevertheless preferred plasma spraying application for thermal barrier coatings still continues due to its high productivity and versatility that permits to deposit metallic and ceramic materials of the ordered chemical and phase composition.Ytterbium and cerium oxides have been selected as oxides for stabilization of zirconium dioxide in order to obtain thermal barrier coatings. The paper also considers аn oxide system of zirconium dioxide: “hafnium oxide – yttrium oxide”, representing in itself the structure which is similar to zirconium dioxide.

  5. Investigations of thermal barrier coatings of turbine parts using gas flame heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeshkin, A. R.; Bichkov, N. G.; Ilinskaja, O. I.; Nazarov, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The development of methods for the calculated and experimental investigations thermal barrier coatings and thermal state of gas-turbine engine parts with a thermal barrier coatings is actual work. The gas flame heating was demonstrated to be effectively used during investigations of a thermal ceramic barrier coatings and thermal state of such gas-turbine engine parts with a TBC as the cooled turbine blades and vanes and combustion liner components. The gas-flame heating is considered to be preferable when investigating the gas-turbine engine parts with a TBC in the special cases when both the convective and radiant components of thermal flow are of great importance. The small-size rig with gas-flame flow made it possible to conduct the comparison investigations with the purpose of evaluating the efficiency of thermal protection of the ceramic deposited thermal barrier coatings on APS and EB techniques. The developed design-experiment method was introduced in bench tests of turbine blades and combustion liner components of gas turbine engines.

  6. FAILURE MECHANISMS OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES AND llMPROVEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADNAN PARLAK

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available MechanicaJ properties of high performance ceramics have been improved to the point where their use in heat engines is possible. The high temperature strength and low thermal expansion properties of bigh performance ceramics offer an advantage over metals in the development of non-water cooling engine. However, because bard environment in diesel engine combustion chamber, solving the problem of durabiUty of TBC is important. DurabiUty of thermal barrier coatings(TBC is liınited by two main failure mechanisms: Therınal expansion nlİsmatch betwcen bond coat and top coat and bond coat oxidation. Both of these can cause failure of the ceramic top coat. Developments of recent years sholv that bond coats \\Vith higher oxidation resistance tend to have better coating system cyclic lives

  7. The oxidation behavior of classical thermal barrier coatings exposed to extreme temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina DRAGOMIRESCU

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings (TBC are designed to protect metal surfaces from extreme temperatures and improve their resistance to oxidation during service. Currently, the most commonly used systems are those that have the TBC structure bond coat (BC / top coat (TC layers. The top coat layer is a ceramic layer. Oxidation tests are designed to identify the dynamics of the thermally oxide layer (TGO growth at the interface of bond coat / top coat layers, delamination mechanism and the TBC structural changes induced by thermal conditions. This paper is a short study on the evolution of aluminum oxide protective layer along with prolonged exposure to the testing temperature. There have been tested rectangular specimens of metal super alloy with four surfaces coated with a duplex thermal barrier coating system. The specimens were microscopically and EDAX analyzed before and after the tests. In order to determine the oxide type, the samples were analyzed using X-ray diffraction. The results of the investigation are encouraging for future studies. The results show a direct relationship between the development of the oxide layer and long exposure to the test temperature. Future research will focus on changing the testing temperature to compare the results.

  8. Effect of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed YSZ Columnar Microstructure and Bond Coat Surface Preparation on Thermal Barrier Coating Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Benjamin; Quet, Aurélie; Bianchi, Luc; Schick, Vincent; Joulia, Aurélien; Malié, André; Rémy, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is identified as promising for the enhancement of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems used in gas turbines. Particularly, the emerging columnar microstructure enabled by the SPS process is likely to bring about an interesting TBC lifetime. At the same time, the SPS process opens the way to a decrease in thermal conductivity, one of the main issues for the next generation of gas turbines, compared to the state-of-the-art deposition technique, so-called electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). In this paper, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings presenting columnar structures, performed using both SPS and EB-PVD processes, were studied. Depending on the columnar microstructure readily adaptable in the SPS process, low thermal conductivities can be obtained. At 1100 °C, a decrease from 1.3 W m-1 K-1 for EB-PVD YSZ coatings to about 0.7 W m-1 K-1 for SPS coatings was shown. The higher content of porosity in the case of SPS coatings increases the thermal resistance through the thickness and decreases thermal conductivity. The lifetime of SPS YSZ coatings was studied by isothermal cyclic tests, showing equivalent or even higher performances compared to EB-PVD ones. Tests were performed using classical bond coats used for EB-PVD TBC coatings. Thermal cyclic fatigue performance of the best SPS coating reached 1000 cycles to failure on AM1 substrates with a β-(Ni,Pt)Al bond coat. Tests were also performed on AM1 substrates with a Pt-diffused γ-Ni/γ'-Ni3Al bond coat for which more than 2000 cycles to failure were observed for columnar SPS YSZ coatings. The high thermal compliance offered by both the columnar structure and the porosity allowed the reaching of a high lifetime, promising for a TBC application.

  9. Very Tough, Erosion-Resistant Turbine Airfoil Thermal Barrier Coatings Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are receiving increased attention for advanced gas turbine engine applications. These coatings are considered to be technologically important because of their ability to further increase engine operating temperatures and reduce cooling requirements, thus achieving higher engine efficiency, lower emissions, and increased performance goals. To take full advantage of the capabilities of these coatings, researchers need to use an aggressive design approach whenever possible--one that allows greater temperature reductions through the coating systems and less cooling air to the components. Advanced TBCs that have significantly lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability than current coatings have been developed for future ultra-efficient, low-emission engine systems. Multicomponent-doped, defect-clustered TBCs have been shown to offer the low conductivity and high stability required for future high-temperature engine applications.

  10. Monitoring thermally grown oxides under thermal barrier coatings using photoluminescence piezospectroscopy (PLPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Corno, A.; De Maria, L.; Rinaldi, C. [ERSE, Milan (Italy); Nalin, L.; Simms, N.J. [Cranfield Univ., Bedford (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Centre

    2010-07-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) on cooled components in industrial gas turbine has enabled higher inlet gas temperatures to be used and hence higher efficiencies to be achieved, without increasing component metal temperatures. However TBCs have a complex coating structure that during high temperature exposure and thermal cycling modifies until TBC spalling which can result in dangerous over-heating of components. This paper reports the results of a TBC exposure programme planned to monitor TGOs development in an example TBC system in terms of both stress evolution within the TGOs and TGO growth. The COST538 reference TBC system was used: an yttria stabilised zirconia TBC applied to an Amdry 995 bond coat on an CMSX-4 substrate. Samples were in the form of 10 mm diameter bars, with the TBC applied to their curved surface. Coated samples were exposed in simulated combustion gases at temperatures 850, 900 and 950 C for periods of up to 10,000 hours. Every 1000 hours samples were cooled and weighed to monitor the progression of the oxidation: selected samples NDT inspected using PLPS and/or destructive examination. Cross-sections were prepared and examined in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) at multiple locations to determine TGO thickness distributions. PLPS spectra were measured and elaborated with a system self developed in ERSE, able to calculate and map the TGO residual stress values under columnar TBCs. So the positions could be evidenced where the damage of the TBC /TGO/BC interface is higher on the exposed bars. The data of TGO thickness distributions and PLPS stress measurement distributions were compared to the exposures carried out on samples to identify and quantify trends in their development. Metallography confirmed that the PLPs technique can reliably detect interface cracking before visible EB-PVD TBC spalling. (orig.)

  11. Expanding of the fatigue life of thermal barrier coating by mixing MoSl{sub 2} to thermal sprayed layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoya, K. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Yokohama (Japan); Tobe, S. [Ashikaga Inst. of Tech., Ashikaga-shi, Tochigi-ken (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Recent trends of turbine blades of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines are to increase output power of the engines, to increase engine efficiency and to reduce environmental emission, and thus, higher operating temperatures of the engines are required. One of the technologies for increasing the operating temperature is a thermal barrier splayed coating [1,2]. The coating usually consists of a bonding coating layer of an alloy of NiCrAlY on the turbine blade and a top layer of ZrO{sub 2}-Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, namely, partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). However, conventional coating systems deteriorate during turbine operation due to thermal and mechanical stresses imposed and corrosion actions by combustion gas coming from combustion chambers. Thus, the main issue is to develop measures against high oxidation rate and low fatigue life of the bonding coating layer. An idea for enhancing oxidation resistance and fatigue life as well of thermal barrier coatings consisting of a zirconia-based coating is to provide with a self-healing capability to the coating by diffusing a suitable substance to fatigue crack surfaces formed in the coating. Excessive oxidation of the NiCrAlY layer beneath is prevented for extending fatigue life of the splayed barrier coating. Several investigations have been conducted on the matter, and a research paper [3] claims that MoSi{sub 2} in a splayed coating has a self-healing capability for cracks formed in the coating by embedding the cracks with SiO{sub 2} formed from MoSi{sub 2} at high temperatures. Thus, a new coating system containing NiCrAlY, MoSi{sub 2}, and PSZ is expected to be developed instead of a two-layer coating system of NiCrAlY and PSZ.

  12. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampath, Sanjay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  13. Loadings in thermal barrier coatings of jet engine turbine blades an experimental research and numerical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sadowski, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses complex loadings of turbine blades and protective layer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC), under real working airplane jet conditions. They obey both multi-axial mechanical loading and sudden temperature variation during starting and landing of the airplanes. In particular, two types of blades are analyzed: stationary and rotating, which are widely applied in turbine engines produced by airplane factories.

  14. Progress toward life modeling of thermal barrier coatings for aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Progress toward developing life models for simulating the behavior of thermal barrier coatings in aircraffft gas turbine engines is discussed. A preliminary laboratory model is described as are current efforts to develop engine-capable models. Current understanding of failure mechanisms is also summarized.

  15. Investigation on the Interface Characteristics of the Thermal Barrier Coating System through Flat Cylindrical Indenters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coating (TBC systems are highly advanced material systems and usually applied to insulate components from large and prolonged heat loads by utilizing thermally insulating materials. In this study, the characteristics of the interface of thermal barrier coating systems have been simulated by the finite-element method (FEM. The emphasis was put on the stress distribution at the interface which is beneath the indenter. The effect of the interface roughness, the thermally grown oxide (TGO layer's thickness, and the modulus ratio (η of the thin film with the substrate has been considered. Finite-element results showed that the influences of the interface roughness and the TGO layer's thickness on stress distribution were important. At the same time, the residual stress distribution has been investigated in detail.

  16. High Temperature Damping Behavior of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier and Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2010-01-01

    A high temperature damping test apparatus has been developed using a high heat flux CO 2 laser rig in conjunction with a TIRA S540 25 kHz Shaker and Polytec OFV 5000 Vibrometer system. The test rig has been successfully used to determine the damping performance of metallic and ceramic protective coating systems at high temperature for turbine engine applications. The initial work has been primarily focused on the microstructure and processing effects on the coating temperature-dependence damping behavior. Advanced ceramic coatings, including multicomponent tetragonal and cubic phase thermal barrier coatings, along with composite bond coats, have also been investigated. The coating high temperature damping mechanisms will also be discussed.

  17. Mixed Mode Fracture of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Effects of Anisotropy and Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis L.

    2008-01-01

    The combined mode I-mode II fracture behavior of anisotropic ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined in asymmetric flexure loading at both ambient and elevated temperatures. A fracture envelope of KI versus KII was determined for the coating material at ambient and elevated temperatures. Propagation angles of fracture as a function of KI/KII were also determined. The mixed-mode fracture behavior of the microsplat coating material was modeled using Finite Element approach to account for anisotropy and micro cracked structures, and predicted in terms of fracture envelope and propagation angle using mixed-mode fracture theories.

  18. Development of YSZ Thermal Barrier Coatings Using Axial Suspension Plasma Spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Zhou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The axial injection of the suspension in the atmospheric plasma spraying process (here called axial suspension plasma spraying is an attractive and advanced thermal spraying technology especially for the deposition of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs. It enables the growth of columnar-like structures and, hence, combines advantages of electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD technology with the considerably cheaper atmospheric plasma spraying (APS. In the first part of this study, the effects of spraying conditions on the microstructure of yttria partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ top coats and the deposition efficiency were investigated. YSZ coatings deposited on as-sprayed bond coats with 5 wt % solid content suspension appeared to have nicely-developed columnar structures. Based on the preliminary results, the nicely developed columnar coatings with variations of the stand-off distances and yttria content were subjected to thermal cycling tests in a gas burner rig. In these tests, all columnar structured TBCs showed relatively short lifetimes compared with porous APS coatings. Indentation measurements for Young’s modulus and fracture toughness on the columns of the SPS coatings indicated a correlation between mechanical properties and lifetime for the SPS samples. A simplified model is presented which correlates mechanical properties and lifetime of SPS coatings.

  19. Thermal barrier coatings on gas turbine blades: Chemical vapor deposition (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igumenov, I. K.; Aksenov, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Schemes are presented for experimental setups (reactors) developed at leading scientific centers connected with the development of technologies for the deposition of coatings using the CVD method: at the Technical University of Braunschweig (Germany), the French Aerospace Research Center, the Materials Research Institute (Tohoku University, Japan) and the National Laboratory Oak Ridge (USA). Conditions and modes for obtaining the coatings with high operational parameters are considered. It is established that the formed thermal barrier coatings do not fundamentally differ in their properties (columnar microstructure, thermocyclic resistance, thermal conductivity coefficient) from standard electron-beam condensates, but the highest growth rates and the perfection of the crystal structure are achieved in the case of plasma-chemical processes and in reactors with additional laser or induction heating of a workpiece. It is shown that CVD reactors can serve as a basis for the development of rational and more advanced technologies for coating gas turbine blades that are not inferior to standard electron-beam plants in terms of the quality of produced coatings and have a much simpler and cheaper structure. The possibility of developing a new technology based on CVD processes for the formation of thermal barrier coatings with high operational parameters is discussed, including a set of requirements for industrial reactors, high-performance sources of vapor precursors, and promising new materials.

  20. Deposition stress effects on the life of thermal barrier coatings on burner rigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J. W.; Levine, S. R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of the effect of plasma spray processing parameters on the life of a two layer thermal barrier coating was conducted. The ceramic layer was plasma sprayed at plasma arc currents of 900 and 600 amps onto uncooled tubes, cooled tubes, and solid bars of Waspalloy in a lathe with 1 or 8 passes of the plasma gun. These processing changes affected the residual stress state of the coating. When the specimens were tested in a Mach 0.3 cyclic burner rig at 1130 deg C, a wide range of coating lives resulted. Processing factors which reduced the residual stress state in the coating, such as reduced plasma temperature and increased heat dissipation, significantly increased coating life.

  1. Thermal Barrier Coatings (les Revetements anti-mur de chaleur)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-04-01

    Coatings (les Revetements anti-mur de chaleur ) U:.j> ^ST^K^NT A Papers presented at the 85th Meeting of the AGARD Structures and Materials Panel...nations in aerospace research and development; — Exchange of scientific and technical information; — Providing assistance to member nations for the...Panels which are composed of experts appointed by the National Delegates, the Consultant and Exchange Programme and the Aerospace Applications Studies

  2. Some recent trends in research and technology of advanced thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, U.; Leyens, Ch.; Fritscher, K.; Peters, M.; Saruhan-Brings, B. [Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR, Institute of Mateirals Research, Koln (Germany); Lavigne, O.; Dorvaux, J.M.; Poulain, M.; Mevrel, R.; Caliez, M. [Office National d' Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Dept. of Metallic Materials and Processing, 92 - Chatillon (France)

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) offer the potential to significantly improve efficiencies of aero engines as well as stationary gas turbines for power generation. On internally cooled turbine parts temperature gradients of the order of 100 to 150 deg. C can be achieved. Today, state-of-the-art TBCs, typically consisting of an yttria-stabilised zirconia top coat and a metallic bond coat deposited onto a superalloy substrate, are mainly used to extend lifetime. Further efficiency improvements require TBCs being an integral part of the component which, in turn, requires reliable and predictable TBC performance. Presently, TBCs produced by electron beam physical vapour deposition are favoured for high performance applications. The paper highlights critical R and D needs for advanced TBC systems with a special focus on reduced thermal conductivity and life prediction needs. (authors)

  3. Design and optimization of coating structure for the thermal barrier coatings fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying via finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The first prerequisite for fabricating the thermal barrier coatings (TBCs with excellent performance is to find an optimized coating structure with high thermal insulation effect and low residual stress. This paper discusses the design and optimization of a suitable coating structure for the TBCs prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS using the finite element method. The design and optimization processes comply with the rules step by step, as the structure develops from a simple to a complex one. The research results indicate that the suitable thicknesses of the bond-coating and top-coating are 60–120 μm and 300–420 μm, respectively, for the single ceramic layer YSZ/NiCoCrAlY APS-TBC. The embedded interlayer (50 wt.%YSZ + 50 wt.%NiCoCrAlY will further reduce the residual stress without sacrificing the thermal insulation effect. The double ceramic layer was further considered which was based on the single ceramic layer TBC. The embedded interlayer and the upper additional ceramic layer will have a best match between the low residual stress and high thermal insulation effect. Finally, the optimized coating structure was obtained, i.e., the La2Ce2O7(LC/YSZ/Interlayer/NiCoCrAlY coating structure with appropriate layer thickness is the best choice. The effective thermal conductivity of this optimized LC/YSZ/IL/BL TBC is 13.2% lower than that of the typical single ceramic layer YSZ/BL TBC.

  4. Novel Functionally Graded Thermal Barrier Coatings in Coal-Fired Power Plant Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing [Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This project presents a detailed investigation of a novel functionally graded coating material, pyrochlore oxide, for thermal barrier coating (TBC) in gas turbines used in coal-fired power plants. Thermal barrier coatings are refractory materials deposited on gas turbine components, which provide thermal protection for metallic components at operating conditions. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop a manufacturing process to produce the novel low thermal conductivity and high thermal stability pyrochlore oxide based coatings with improved high-temperature durability. The current standard TBC, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ), has service temperatures limited to <1200°C, due to sintering and phase transition at higher temperatures. In contrast, pyrochlore oxide, e.g., lanthanum zirconate (La2Zr2O7, LZ), has demonstrated lower thermal conductivity and better thermal stability, which are crucial to high temperature applications, such as gas turbines used in coal-fired power plants. Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) has collaborated with Praxair Surface Technologies (PST), and Changwon National University in South Korea to perform the proposed research. The research findings are critical to the extension of current TBCs to a broader range of high-temperature materials and applications. Several tasks were originally proposed and accomplished, with additional new opportunities identified during the course of the project. In this report, a description of the project tasks, the main findings and conclusions are given. A list of publications and presentations resulted from this research is listed in the Appendix at the end of the report.

  5. Constrained sintering of an air-plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocks, A.C.F., E-mail: alan.cocks@eng.ox.ac.uk [Department of Engineering Science, Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Fleck, N.A. [Cambridge University Engineering Department, Trumpington St., Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    A micromechanical model is presented for the constrained sintering of an air-plasma-sprayed, thermal barrier coating upon a thick superalloy substrate. The coating comprises random splats with intervening penny-shaped cracks. The crack faces make contact at asperities, which progressively sinter in-service by interfacial diffusion, accommodated by bulk creep. Diffusion is driven by the reduction in interfacial energy at the developing contacts and by the local asperity contact stress. At elevated operating temperature, both sintering and creep strains accumulate within the plane of the coating. The sensitivities of sintering rate and microstructure evolution rate to the kinetic parameters and thermodynamic driving forces are explored. It is demonstrated that the sintering response is governed by three independent timescales, as dictated by the material and geometric properties of the coating. Finally, the role of substrate constraint is assessed by comparing the rate of constrained sintering with that for free sintering.

  6. Multilayer Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures Utilizing Rare Earth Doped YSZ and Rare Earth Pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael P.; Rai, Amarendra K.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    To allow for increased gas turbine efficiencies, new insulating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) must be developed to protect the underlying metallic components from higher operating temperatures. This work focused on using rare earth doped (Yb and Gd) yttria stabilized zirconia (t' Low-k) and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores (GZO) combined with novel nanolayered and thick layered microstructures to enable operation beyond the 1200 C stability limit of current 7 wt% yttria stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) coatings. It was observed that the layered system can reduce the thermal conductivity by approximately 45 percent with respect to YSZ after 20 hr of testing at 1316 C. The erosion rate of GZO is shown to be an order to magnitude higher than YSZ and t' Low-k, but this can be reduced by almost 57 percent when utilizing a nanolayered structure. Lastly, the thermal instability of the layered system is investigated and thought is given to optimization of layer thickness.

  7. Review of hot corrosion of thermal barrier coatings of gas turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yongbao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The review was done in order to make clear the problem of the hot corrosion of the Thermal Barrier Coatings(TBCsduring gas turbine serving. This paper summarizes the factors resulting from the hot corrosion of TBCs during turbine service and classifies methods for enhancing the corrosive resistance of TBCs. A prospective methodology for improving corrosion resistance is also formulated. The main types of corrosion coating include phase reaction, oxidizing of the bond coating, salt-fog corrosion, CMAS corrosion and fuel impurity corrosion. So far, methods for improving the corrosion resistance of TBCs include developing new coating materials, anticorrosive treatment on the surface of TBCs, modifying the stacking configuration and improving the cleansing functions of the gas turbines. In the future, developing new materials with excellent performance will still be the main direction for boosting the improvement of the hot corrosion resistance of TBCs. Simultaneously, improving the tacking configuration and nanotechnology of TBC coatings are potential approaches for improving corrosion resistance. With the development of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC, the focus of the hot corrosion of TBCs may turn to that of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs.

  8. Development of reliable thermal barrier coatings for high-loaded turbine and combustor parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossmann, Hans-Peter; Witz, Gregoire; Baumann, Robert [Alstom (Switzerland) Ltd., Baden (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC), mainly consisting of 7 % Yttria stabilised Zirconia (7YSZ), have been used for decades in gas turbines. A variety of MCrAIY have been developed as bondcoat (BC), where M represents Ni, Co or a combination of both. Further elements have been added to improve BC behaviour. For application of BC/TBC, thermal spraying of fine metallic/ceramic powder is state of the art. TBC is applied by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), BC either by vacuum or low pressure plasma spraying or APS. (orig.)

  9. Development of Reliability Based Life Prediction Methods for Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin

    2001-01-01

    Literature survey related to the EBC/TBC (environmental barrier coating/thermal barrier coating) fife models, failure mechanisms in EBC/TBC and the initial work plan for the proposed EBC/TBC life prediction methods development was developed as well as the finite element model for the thermal/stress analysis of the GRC-developed EBC system was prepared. Technical report for these activities is given in the subsequent sections.

  10. Life Prediction Issues in Thermal/Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin R.; Brewer, David N.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2001-01-01

    Issues and design requirements for the environmental barrier coating (EBC)/thermal barrier coating (TBC) life that are general and those specific to the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) development program have been described. The current state and trend of the research, methods in vogue related to the failure analysis, and long-term behavior and life prediction of EBCITBC systems are reported. Also, the perceived failure mechanisms, variables, and related uncertainties governing the EBCITBC system life are summarized. A combined heat transfer and structural analysis approach based on the oxidation kinetics using the Arrhenius theory is proposed to develop a life prediction model for the EBC/TBC systems. Stochastic process-based reliability approach that includes the physical variables such as gas pressure, temperature, velocity, moisture content, crack density, oxygen content, etc., is suggested. Benefits of the reliability-based approach are also discussed in the report.

  11. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  12. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-09-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  13. Design of a Nickel-Based Bond-Coat Alloy for Thermal Barrier Coatings on Copper Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Fiedler

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To increase the lifetime of rocket combustion chambers, thermal barrier coatings (TBC may be applied on the copper chamber wall. Since standard TBC systems used in gas turbines are not suitable for rocket-engine application and fail at the interface between the substrate and bond coat, a new bond-coat material has to be designed. This bond-coat material has to be chemically compatible to the copper substrate to improve the adhesion and needs a coefficient of thermal expansion close to that of copper to reduce thermal stresses. One approach to achieve this is to modify the standard NiCrAlY alloy used in gas turbines by adding copper. In this work, the influence of copper on the microstructure of NiCrAlY-alloys is investigated with thermodynamical calculations, optical microscopy, SEM, EDX and calorimetry. Adding copper leads to the formation of a significant amount of \\(\\beta\\ and \\(\\alpha\\ Reducing the aluminum and chromium content leads furthermore to a two-phase fcc microstructure.

  14. Study on Stress Development in the Phase Transition Layer of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Chai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stress development is one of the significant factors leading to the failure of thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. In this work, stress development in the two phase mixed zone named phase transition layer (PTL, which grows between the thermally grown oxide (TGO and the bond coat (BC, is investigated by using two different homogenization models. A constitutive equation of the PTL based on the Reuss model is proposed to study the stresses in the PTL. The stresses computed with the proposed constitutive equation are compared with those obtained with Voigt model-based equation in detail. The stresses based on the Voigt model are slightly higher than those based on the Reuss model. Finally, a further study is carried out to explore the influence of phase transition proportions on the stress difference caused by homogenization models. Results show that the stress difference becomes more evident with the increase of the PTL thickness ratio in the TGO.

  15. Temperature measurement involving nanostructured thermal barrier coating using a multiwavelength pyrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    It has been reported that erroneous results were obtained when a conventional pyrometer was used to measure the surface temperature of turbine engine components. Temperatures discrepancies were observed in components which were identical, except that one had its measured surface covered by a nanostructured thermal barrier coating (TBC) whereas the other component's surface was not so coated. These components were placed in an identical environment, receiving identical heat fluxes. A pyrometer measured the TBC covered surface hundreds degrees lower. These coatings were about 25 (mu)m thick, consisting of hundreds of layers of finer structures. The TBC's had very low thermal conductivity, heat flux calculations indicated that the temperatures of the coated surface should exhibit much higher temperature than the uncoated surface. Because these coatings were transparent to radiation from the visible to the infrared region, the temperatures measured by the pyrometer should be the temperature of the covered surface. Turbo components' performance and service life depend critically on the temperatures that it would experience; it is therefore important to know accurately and confidently the real surface temperature. Out of these concerns, an investigation into the measurement of nanostructured material surface temperature was carried out.

  16. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness for jet engine components are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. Phosphor thermometry offers several advantages for mapping temperatures of air film cooled surfaces. While infrared thermography has been typically applied to study air film cooling effectiveness, temperature accuracy depends on knowing surface emissivity (which may change) and correcting for effects of reflected radiation. Because decay time-based full-field phosphor thermometry is relatively immune to these effects, it can be applied advantageously to temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces. In this presentation, an overview will be given of efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center to perform temperature mapping of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and the strengths and limitations of this method for studying air film cooling effectiveness are discussed.

  17. Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings (TTBCs) for Low Emission, High Efficiency Diesel Engine Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Brad Beardsley, Caterpillar Inc.; Dr. Darrell Socie, University of Illinois; Dr. Ed Redja, University of Illinois; Dr. Christopher Berndt, State University of New York at Stony Brook

    2006-03-02

    The objective of this program was to advance the fundamental understanding of thick thermal barrier coating (TTBC) systems for application to low heat rejection diesel engine combustion chambers. Previous reviews of thermal barrier coating technology concluded that the current level of understanding of coating system behavior is inadequate and the lack of fundamental understanding may impede the application of thermal barrier coating to diesel engines.(1) Areas of TTBC technology examined in this program include powder characteristics and chemistry; bond coating composition, coating design, microstructure and thickness as they affect properties, durability, and reliability; and TTBC "aging" effects (microstructural and property changes) under diesel engine operating conditions. Fifteen TTBC ceramic powders were evaluated. These powders were selected to investigate the effects of different chemistries, different manufacturing methods, lot-to-lot variations, different suppliers and varying impurity levels. Each of the fifteen materials has been sprayed using 36 parameters selected by a design of experiments (DOE) to determine the effects of primary gas (Ar and N2), primary gas flow rate, voltage, arc current, powder feed rate, carrier gas flow rate, and spraying distance. The deposition efficiency, density, and thermal conductivity of the resulting coatings were measured. A coating with a high deposition efficiency and low thermal conductivity is desired from an economic standpoint. An optimum combination of thermal conductivity and disposition efficiency was found for each lot of powder in follow-on experiments and disposition parameters were chosen for full characterization.(2) Strengths of the optimized coatings were determined using 4-point bending specimens. The tensile strength was determined using free-standing coatings made by spraying onto mild steel substrates which were subsequently removed by chemical etching. The compressive strengths of the coatings

  18. Method and Process Development of Advanced Atmospheric Plasma Spraying for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihm, Sebastian; Duda, Thomas; Gruner, Heiko; Thomas, Georg; Dzur, Birger

    2012-06-01

    Over the last few years, global economic growth has triggered a dramatic increase in the demand for resources, resulting in steady rise in prices for energy and raw materials. In the gas turbine manufacturing sector, process optimizations of cost-intensive production steps involve a heightened potential of savings and form the basis for securing future competitive advantages in the market. In this context, the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process for thermal barrier coatings (TBC) has been optimized. A constraint for the optimization of the APS coating process is the use of the existing coating equipment. Furthermore, the current coating quality and characteristics must not change so as to avoid new qualification and testing. Using experience in APS and empirically gained data, the process optimization plan included the variation of e.g. the plasma gas composition and flow-rate, the electrical power, the arrangement and angle of the powder injectors in relation to the plasma jet, the grain size distribution of the spray powder and the plasma torch movement procedures such as spray distance, offset and iteration. In particular, plasma properties (enthalpy, velocity and temperature), powder injection conditions (injection point, injection speed, grain size and distribution) and the coating lamination (coating pattern and spraying distance) are examined. The optimized process and resulting coating were compared to the current situation using several diagnostic methods. The improved process significantly reduces costs and achieves the requirement of comparable coating quality. Furthermore, a contribution was made towards better comprehension of the APS of ceramics and the definition of a better method for future process developments.

  19. NDE of degradation of thermal barrier coating by means of impedance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiro; Minkov, Dorian; Shoji, Tetsuo [Tohoku Univ., Research Inst. for Fracture Technology, Sendai (Japan); Sato, Minoru; Hashimoto, Hideo [Tohoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Sendai (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Nondestructive evaluation of thermal barrier coating (TBC) degradation during service operation has received a wide attention for service life prediction of advanced gas turbines. In this work, TBC on nickel base superalloy degraded at various degrees by thermal aging is investigated. Particularly, TBC and Metal-Chromium-Aluminum-Yttrium alloy (MCrAlY) (M indicates iron (Fe), cobalt (Co), nickel (Ni) or these combinations) bond coating interface where a detrimental reaction takes place and forms various reaction products during thermal aging, is studied in detail. Formation kinetics and physical properties of the reaction layer are evaluated by means of Impedance Spectroscopy (IS). Specimens aged at higher temperature and a longer aging time shows larger impedance. The impedance behavior of TBC and bond coating is found to be markedly changed by the formation of the reaction layer. Physical properties and thickness of the reaction layer are evaluated using the change of the impedance. A mechanistic interpretation of the cause of change in the physical properties and IS behavior are described. (Author)

  20. Mesoscopic Nonlinear Elastic Modulus of Thermal Barrier Coatings Determined by Cylindrical Punch Indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    Cylindrical punch indentations are performed to determine the effective modulus of a plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8Wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coating (TBC) as a function of coating depth. Cylindrical punch indentations offer significant advantages over pointed (Vickers, Berkovich, or Knoop) indentations for materials that do not exhibit linear elastic behavior. Cyclic loading with a cylindrical punch clearly shows the TBCs to exhibit nonlinear elastic behavior with significant hysteresis that is related to the compaction and internal sliding within the plasma-spray splat microstructure. In addition, the effect of a high heat flux laser treatment was shown to produce a gradient both in the effective TBC modulus and degree of loading/unloading hysteresis with depth.

  1. Use of indentation technique to measure elastic modulus of plasma-sprayed zirconia thermal barrier coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.P.; Sutaria, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.; Ferber, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Elastic modulus of an yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) was evaluated with a Knoop indentation technique. The measured elastic modulus values for the coating ranged from 68.4 {+-} 22.6 GPa at an indentation load of 50 g to 35.7 {+-} 9.8 at an indentation load of 300 g. At higher loads, the elastic modulus values did not change significantly. This steady-state value of 35.7 GPa for ZrO{sub 2} TBC agreed well with literature values obtained by the Hertzian indentation method. Furthermore, the measured elastic modulus for the TBC is lower than that reported for bulk ZrO{sub 2} ({approx} 190 GPa). This difference is believed to be due to the presence of a significant amount of porosity and microcracks in the TBCs. Hardness was also measured.

  2. Phase Stability and Thermal Conductivity of Composite Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkel, Samantha; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coatings are being developed to protect SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites in harsh combustion environments. The current coating development emphasis has been placed on the significantly improved cyclic durability and combustion environment stability in high-heat-flux and high velocity gas turbine engine environments. Environmental barrier coating systems based on hafnia (HfO2) and ytterbium silicate, HfO2-Si nano-composite bond coat systems have been processed and their stability and thermal conductivity behavior have been evaluated in simulated turbine environments. The incorporation of Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNT) into high stability (HfO2) and/or HfO2-silicon composite bond coats, along with ZrO2, HfO2 and rare earth silicate composite top coat systems, showed promise as excellent environmental barriers to protect the SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites.

  3. Liquid Feedstock Plasma Spraying: An Emerging Process for Advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markocsan, Nicolaie; Gupta, Mohit; Joshi, Shrikant; Nylén, Per; Li, Xin-Hai; Wigren, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Liquid feedstock plasma spraying (LFPS) involves deposition of ultrafine droplets of suspensions or solution precursors (typically ranging from nano- to submicron size) and permits production of coatings with unique microstructures that are promising for advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications. This paper reviews the recent progress arising from efforts devoted to development of high-performance TBCs using the LFPS approach. Advancements in both suspension plasma spraying and solution precursor plasma spraying, which constitute the two main variants of LFPS, are presented. Results illustrating the different types of the microstructures that can be realized in LFPS through appropriate process parameter control, model-assisted assessment of influence of coating defects on thermo-mechanical properties and the complex interplay between pore coarsening, sintering and crystallite growth in governing thermal conductivity are summarized. The enhancement in functional performances/lifetime possible in LFPS TBCs with multilayered architectures and by incorporating new pyrochlore chemistries such as gadolinium zirconate, besides the conventional single 8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia insulating ceramic layer, is specifically highlighted.

  4. A Robot Trajectory Optimization Approach for Thermal Barrier Coatings Used for Free-Form Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhenhua; Qi, Beichun; Tao, Chongyuan; Luo, Jie; Chen, Yuepeng; Xie, Changjun

    2017-10-01

    This paper is concerned with a robot trajectory optimization approach for thermal barrier coatings. As the requirements of high reproducibility of complex workpieces increase, an optimal thermal spraying trajectory should not only guarantee an accurate control of spray parameters defined by users (e.g., scanning speed, spray distance, scanning step, etc.) to achieve coating thickness homogeneity but also help to homogenize the heat transfer distribution on the coating surface. A mesh-based trajectory generation approach is introduced in this work to generate path curves on a free-form component. Then, two types of meander trajectories are generated by performing a different connection method. Additionally, this paper presents a research approach for introducing the heat transfer analysis into the trajectory planning process. Combining heat transfer analysis with trajectory planning overcomes the defects of traditional trajectory planning methods (e.g., local over-heating), which helps form the uniform temperature field by optimizing the time sequence of path curves. The influence of two different robot trajectories on the process of heat transfer is estimated by coupled FEM models which demonstrates the effectiveness of the presented optimization approach.

  5. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Thermal Barrier Coatings with MCrAlY Bond Coat Irradiated by High-Current Pulsed Electron Beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jie; Lv, Peng; Guan, Qingfeng; Xu, Xiaojing; Lu, Jinzhong; Wang, Zhiping; Han, Zhiyong

    2016-11-30

    Microstructural modifications of a thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat subjected to high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) and their relationships with thermal cycling behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were investigated. Microstructural observations revealed that the rough surface of air plasma spraying (APS) samples was significantly remelted and replaced by many interconnected bulged nodules after HCPEB irradiation. Meanwhile, the parallel columnar grains with growth direction perpendicular to the coating surface were observed inside these bulged nodules. Substantial Y-rich Al2O3 bubbles and varieties of nanocrystallines were distributed evenly on the top of the modified layer. A physical model was proposed to describe the evaporation-condensation mechanism taking place at the irradiated surface for generating such surface morphologies. The results of thermal cycling test showed that HCPEB-TBCs presented higher thermal cycling resistance, the spalling area of which after 200 cycles accounted for only 1% of its total area, while it was about 34% for APS-TBCs. The resulting failure mode, i.e., in particular, a mixed delamination crack path, was shown and discussed. The irradiated effects including compact remelted surface, abundant nanoparticles, refined columnar grains, Y-rich alumina bubbles, and deformation structures contributed to the formation of a stable, continuous, slow-growing, and uniform thermally grown oxide with strong adherent ability. It appeared to be responsible for releasing stress and changing the cracking paths, and ultimately greatly improving the thermal cycling behavior of HCPEB-TBCs.

  6. Linear laser fast scanning thermography NDT for artificial disbond defects in thermal barrier coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanwei; Jiao, Dacheng; Shi, Wenxiong; Xie, Huimin

    2017-12-11

    Interface disbond in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) is one of the key issues that cause their premature failure. In general, blind hole defects are often used as substitutes in transient thermography. The linear laser fast scanning thermography (LLFST) method was developed in this study and combined with several post-processing algorithms to accurately detect blind hole defects in TBCs. Through numerical simulation and experimental verification, a unique thermal response characteristic of blind holes in the cooling phase, namely a distinct "tailing" phenomenon, was summarized and utilized to recognize small defects. Validation tests indicated that blind holes with diameters of 1, 2, and 3 mm and artificial disbonds with diameters of 2 and 3 mm in TBCs are detected with high efficiency.

  7. Luminescence-Based Diagnostics of Thermal Barrier Coating Health and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are typically composed of translucent ceramic oxides that provide thermal protection for metallic components exposed to high-temperature environments in both air- and land-based turbine engines. For advanced turbine engines designed for higher temperature operation, a diagnostic capability for the health and performance of TBCs will be essential to indicate when a mitigating action needs to be taken before premature TBC failure threatens engine performance or safety. In particular, it is shown that rare-earth-doped luminescent sublayers can be integrated into the TBC structure to produce luminescence emission that can be monitored to assess TBC erosion and delamination progression, and to map surface and subsurface temperatures as a measure of TBC performance. The design and implementation of these TBCs with integrated luminescent sublayers are presented.

  8. Effects of Thermal Barrier Coatings on Approaches to Turbine Blade Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Reliance on Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC) to reduce the amount of air used for turbine vane cooling is beneficial both from the standpoint of reduced NOx production, and as a means of improving cycle efficiency through improved component efficiency. It is shown that reducing vane cooling from 10 to 5 percent of mainstream air can lead to NOx reductions of nearly 25 percent while maintaining the same rotor inlet temperature. An analysis is given which shows that, when a TBC is relied upon in the vane thermal design process, significantly less coolant is required using internal cooling alone compared to film cooling. This is especially true for small turbines where internal cooling without film cooling permits the surface boundary layer to remain laminar over a significant fraction of the vane surface.

  9. Processing and Deposition of Nanocrystalline Oxide Composites for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ying, Jackie

    2000-01-01

    .... Electrophoretic deposition was used to coat the nanocomposite powders onto nickel substrates. The effect of alumina content, powder calcination temperature, and film thickness on the thermal stability of zirconia-based coatings was examined...

  10. Thermal barrier coatings issues in advanced land-based gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, William P.; Hoffman, Eugene E.; Lee, Woo Y.; Wright, Ian G.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is aimed at fostering the development of a new generation of land-based gas turbine systems with overall efficiencies significantly beyond those of current state-of-the-art machines, as well as greatly increased times between inspection and refurbishment, improved environmental impact, and decreased cost. The proposed duty cycle of ATS machines will emphasize different criteria in the selection of materials for the critical components. In particular, thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) will be an essential feature of the hot gas path components in these machines. In fact, the goals of the ATS will require significant improvements in TBC technology, since these turbines will be totally reliant on TBC's, which will be required to function on critical components such as the first stage vanes and blades for times considerably in excess of those experienced in current applications. Issues that assume increased importance are the mechanical and chemical stability of the ceramic layer and of the metallic bond coat; the thermal expansion characteristics and compliance of the ceramic layer; and the thermal conductivity across the thickness of the ceramic layer. Obviously, the ATS program provides a very challenging opportunity for TBC's, and involves some significant opportunities to extend this technology. A significant TBC development effort is planned in the ATS program which will address these key issues.

  11. Technical and Economical Aspects of Current Thermal Barrier Coating Systems for Gas Turbine Engines by Thermal Spray and EBPVD: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Albert; Knapp, James; Taylor, Thomas; Ashary, Adil; Bolcavage, Ann; Hitchman, Neil

    2008-06-01

    The most advanced thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for aircraft engine and power generation hot section components consist of electron beam physical vapor deposition (EBPVD) applied yttria-stabilized zirconia and platinum modified diffusion aluminide bond coating. Thermally sprayed ceramic and MCrAlY bond coatings, however, are still used extensively for combustors and power generation blades and vanes. This article highlights the key features of plasma spray and HVOF, diffusion aluminizing, and EBPVD coating processes. The coating characteristics of thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coat as well as low density and dense vertically cracked (DVC) Zircoat TBC are described. Essential features of a typical EBPVD TBC coating system, consisting of a diffusion aluminide and a columnar TBC, are also presented. The major coating cost elements such as material, equipment and processing are explained for the different technologies, with a performance and cost comparison given for selected examples.

  12. Effect of thermal barrier coating with various blends of pumpkin seed oil methyl ester in DI diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthickeyan, V.; Balamurugan, P.

    2017-10-01

    The rise in oil prices, dependency on fossil fuels, degradation of non-renewable energy resources and global warming strives to find a low-carbon content alternative fuel to the conventional fuel. In the present work, Partially Stabilized Zirconia (PSZ) was used as a thermal barrier coating in piston head, cylinder head and intake and exhaust valves using plasma spray technique, which provided a rise in combustion chamber temperature. With the present study, the effects of thermal barrier coating on the blends of Pumpkin Seed Oil Methyl Ester (PSOME) were observed in both the coated and uncoated engine. Performance and emission characteristics of the PSOME in coated and uncoated engines were observed and compared. Increased thermal efficiency and reduced fuel consumption were observed for B25 and diesel in coated and uncoated engine. On comparing with the other biodiesel samples, B25 exhibited lower HC, NOx and smoke emissions in thermally coated engine than uncoated engine. After 100 h of operation, no anamolies were found in the thermally coated components except minor cracks were identified in the edges of the piston head.

  13. Effect of Damage Processes on Spallation Life in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newaz, Golam M

    2001-01-01

    .... TBCs consist of an outer ceramic layer that provides good thermal insulation due to the low thermal conductivity of the ceramic used, and the inner metallic bond coat layer that provides needed...

  14. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-12-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  15. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  16. Influence of Bondcoat Spray Process on Lifetime of Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M.; Markocsan, N.; Li, X.-H.; Östergren, L.

    2018-01-01

    Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) manufactured by suspension plasma spraying (SPS) is of high commercial interest as SPS has been shown capable of producing highly porous columnar microstructures similar to the conventionally used electron beam-physical vapor deposition. However, lifetime of SPS coatings needs to be improved further to be used in commercial applications. The bondcoat microstructure as well as topcoat-bondcoat interface topography affects the TBC lifetime significantly. The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of different bondcoat deposition processes for SPS topcoats. In this work, a NiCoCrAlY bondcoat deposited by high velocity air fuel (HVAF) was compared to commercial vacuum plasma-sprayed NiCoCrAlY and PtAl diffusion bondcoats. All bondcoat variations were prepared with and without grit blasting the bondcoat surface. SPS was used to deposit the topcoats on all samples using the same spray parameters. Lifetime of these samples was examined by thermal cyclic fatigue testing. Isothermal heat treatment was performed to study bondcoat oxidation over time. The effect of bondcoat deposition process and interface topography on lifetime in each case has been discussed. The results show that HVAF could be a suitable process for bondcoat deposition in SPS TBCs.

  17. Depth-Penetrating Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coatings Incorporating Thermographic Phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J..; Allison, Stephen W.; Beshears, David L.

    2003-01-01

    Thermographic phosphors have been previously demonstrated to provide effective non-contact, emissivity-independent surface temperature measurements. Because of the translucent nature of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), thermographic phosphor-based temperature measurements can be extended beyond the surface to provide depth-selective temperature measurements by incorporating the thermographic phosphor layer at the depth where the temperature measurement is desired. In this paper, thermographic phosphor (Y2O3:Eu) fluorescence decay time measurements are demonstrated to provide through-the-coating thickness temperature readings up to 1100 C with the phosphor layer residing beneath a 100 micron thick TBC (plasma-sprayed 8wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia). With an appropriately chosen excitation wavelength and detection configuration, it is shown that sufficient phosphor emission is generated to provide effective temperature measurements, despite the attenuation of both the excitation and emission intensities by the overlying TBC. This depth-penetrating temperature measurement capability should prove particularly useful for TBC diagnostics where a large thermal gradient is typically present across the TBC thickness. The fluorescence decay from the Y2O3:Eu layer exhibited both an initial short-term exponential rise and a longer-term exponential decay. The rise time constant was demonstrated to provide better temperature indication below 500 C while the decay time constant was a better indicator at higher temperatures.

  18. Overview on Recent Developments of Bondcoats for Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, D.; Pillai, R.; Chyrkin, A.; Quadakkers, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    The performance of MCrAlY (M = Ni, Co) bondcoats for atmospheric plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (APS-TBCs) is substantially affected by the contents of Co, Ni, Cr, and Al as well as minor additions of Y, Hf, Zr, etc., but also by manufacturing-related properties such as coating thickness, porosity, surface roughness, and oxygen content. The latter properties depend in turn on the exact technology and set of parameters used for bondcoat deposition. The well-established LPPS process competes nowadays with alternative technologies such as HVOF and APS. In addition, new technologies have been developed for bondcoats manufacturing such as high-velocity APS or a combination of HVOF and APS for application of a flashcoat. Future developments of the bondcoat systems will likely include optimization of thermal spraying methods for obtaining complex bondcoat roughness profiles required for extended APS-TBC lifetimes. Introduction of the newest generation single-crystal superalloys possessing low Cr and high Al and refractory metals (Re, Ru) contents will require definition of new bondcoat compositions and/or multilayered bondcoats to minimize interdiffusion issues. The developments of new bondcoat compositions may be substantially facilitated using thermodynamic-kinetic modeling, the vast potential of which has been demonstrated in recent years.

  19. Mechanistic Study on the Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings Induced by Volcanic Ash Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayuki

    2017-08-01

    Thermal stress generated on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by volcanic ash (VA) deposition was assessed measuring the tip deflection of a multilayered beam structure as a function of temperature. The TBC in this study was deposited onto the surface of a blade utilized in a land-based gas turbine which is composed of 8 wt.%Y2O3-ZrO2/CoNiCrAlY on a Ni-based superalloy. The VA-deposited TBC sample was heated at 1453 K, and the effect of VA deposition on TBC delamination was examined in comparison with a TBC sample without VA deposition as a reference. On the basis of the VA attack damage mechanism which was investigated via the tip deflection measurement and a comprehensive microstructure examination, a damage-coupled constitutive model was proposed. The proposed model was based on the infiltration of the molten VA inside pores and phase transformations of yttria -tabilized zirconia in the TBC system. The numerical analysis results, which were simulated utilizing the finite element code installing the developed constitutive model, showed us that VA attack on the TBC sample induced near-interfacial cracks because of a significant increasing in the coating stress.

  20. Spectral Modeling of Residual Stress and Stored Elastic Strain Energy in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donegan, Sean; Rolett, Anthony

    2013-12-31

    Solutions to the thermoelastic problem are important for characterizing the response under temperature change of refractory systems. This work extends a spectral fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique to analyze the thermoelastic behavior of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), with the intent of probing the local origins of failure in TBCs. The thermoelastic FFT (teFFT) approach allows for the characterization of local thermal residual stress and strain fields, which constitute the origins of failure in TBC systems. A technique based on statistical extreme value theory known as peaks-over-threshold (POT) is developed to quantify the extreme values ("hot spots") of stored elastic strain energy (i.e., elastic energy density, or EED). The resolution dependence of the teFFT method is assessed through a sensitivity study of the extreme values in EED. The sensitivity study is performed both for the local (point-by-point) eld distributions as well as the grain scale eld distributions. A convergence behavior to a particular distribution shape is demonstrated for the local elds. The grain scale fields are shown to exhibit a possible convergence to a maximum level of EED. To apply the teFFT method to TBC systems, 3D synthetic microstructures are created to approximate actual TBC microstructures. The morphology of the grains in each constituent layer as well as the texture is controlled. A variety of TBC materials, including industry standard materials and potential future materials, are analyzed using the teFFT. The resulting hot spots are quantified using the POT approach. A correlation between hot spots in EED and interface rumpling between constituent layers is demonstrated, particularly for the interface between the bond coat (BC) and the thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer.

  1. Erosion Performance of Gadolinium Zirconate-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings Processed by Suspension Plasma Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahade, Satyapal; Curry, Nicholas; Björklund, Stefan; Markocsan, Nicolaie; Nylén, Per; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    7-8 wt.% Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the standard thermal barrier coating (TBC) material used by the gas turbines industry due to its excellent thermal and thermo-mechanical properties up to 1200 °C. The need for improvement in gas turbine efficiency has led to an increase in the turbine inlet gas temperature. However, above 1200 °C, YSZ has issues such as poor sintering resistance, poor phase stability and susceptibility to calcium magnesium alumino silicates (CMAS) degradation. Gadolinium zirconate (GZ) is considered as one of the promising top coat candidates for TBC applications at high temperatures (>1200 °C) due to its low thermal conductivity, good sintering resistance and CMAS attack resistance. Single-layer 8YSZ, double-layer GZ/YSZ and triple-layer GZdense/GZ/YSZ TBCs were deposited by suspension plasma spray (SPS) process. Microstructural analysis was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A columnar microstructure was observed in the single-, double- and triple-layer TBCs. Phase analysis of the as-sprayed TBCs was carried out using XRD (x-ray diffraction) where a tetragonal prime phase of zirconia in the single-layer YSZ TBC and a cubic defect fluorite phase of GZ in the double and triple-layer TBCs was observed. Porosity measurements of the as-sprayed TBCs were made by water intrusion method and image analysis method. The as-sprayed GZ-based multi-layered TBCs were subjected to erosion test at room temperature, and their erosion resistance was compared with single-layer 8YSZ. It was shown that the erosion resistance of 8YSZ single-layer TBC was higher than GZ-based multi-layered TBCs. Among the multi-layered TBCs, triple-layer TBC was slightly better than double layer in terms of erosion resistance. The eroded TBCs were cold-mounted and analyzed by SEM.

  2. Delamination Mechanisms of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Choi, Sung R.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced ceramic thermal harrier coatings will play an increasingly important role In future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability issue remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. In this paper, thermal cyclic response and delamination failure modes of a ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite/BSAS thermaVenvironmenta1 barrier coating system on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites were investigated using a laser high-heat-flux technique. The coating degradation and delamination processes were monitored in real time by measuring coating apparent conductivity changes during the cyclic tests under realistic engine temperature and stress gradients, utilizing the fact that delamination cracking causes an apparent decrease in the measured thermal conductivity. The ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation driving forces under the cyclic thermal loads, in conjunction with the mechanical testing results, will be discussed.

  3. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  4. A Numerical Procedure to Obtain the Creep Parameters of the Thermal Barrier Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifeng Wen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-point bending creep test was used to understand the creep behavior of typical thin film/substrate systems—thermal barrier coating (TBC systems. Firstly, a simplified model, which does not consider the local effect, has been set up to get an analytical relationship. The important result is that creep stress exponent of materials is equal to the creep load exponent of the steady-state deflection rate of BC specimens. Secondly, in order to consider the local effect of bending, the finite element method (FEM has been carried out. FEM calculation shows that there is a steady stage of the creep deflection under a constant applied load. And the exponent of the steady-state creep deflection rate to the applied load is found to be equal to the creep stress exponent of materials. The creep constant of the materials can be obtained by a set of trials with assumed creep constants of materials and can be finally determined by the best fit method. Finally, the finite element results show that the influences of the friction, the thickness of TBCs, and the modulus ratio of TBC to the substrate on stress distribution are important.

  5. Experimental investigation of thermal barrier (8YSZ-TiO2-Al2O3 coated piston used in direct injection compression ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthusamy Jayaram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal barrier coatings are becoming increasingly important in providing protection from high temperature degradation for heat engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. The main objective of this research work is to experimentally investigate the air plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia with addition of titanium oxide and aluminum oxide thermal barrier coating on Al-13% Si piston material. The mechanical properties of the coated and uncoated samples were comparatively analyzed. The test revealed that hardness values of coated samples are ten times higher than the hardness values of uncoated samples. The microstructure and surface morphology of the coating were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The delamination behaviour of thermal barrier coating was evaluated by thermal cycle test. Finally, the performance test of the coated and uncoated engine was evaluated with the same engine operating conditions. The brake thermal efficiency is increased by 5.99%. The brake specific fuel consumption was decreased by 0.06 kg/kWh, in TBC engine with 8YSZ + Al2O3 + TiO2. The CO and HC was greatly decreased in thermal barrier coating engine. There was the greater reduction of NOx is observed due to coating because of nitrogen has absorbed by zirconia.

  6. Combined Effects of JP-8 Fuel and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Performance and Emissions of a DI Diesel Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klett, David

    1999-01-01

    .... The experiments were conducted on a Ricardo Hydra single-cylinder DI diesel engine. Thin ceramic thermal barrier coatings were applied to various combustion chamber surfaces including the piston crown, cylinder head, and cylinder liner...

  7. Combined Effects of JP-8 Fuel and Ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Performance and Emissions of a DI Diesel Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klett, David

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted on the combined effects of using JP-8 Fuel in conjunction with thin thermal barrier coatings on the specific fuel consumption and emissions of UHC, NO, and smoke of a DI diesel engine...

  8. Combined Experimental and Numerical Simulations of Thermal Barrier Coated Turbine Blades Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Awate; Tabakoff, Widen; Swar, Rohan; Shin, Dongyun; Woggon, Nthanial; Miller, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational study was conducted to investigate the erosion of thermal barrier coated (TBC) blade surfaces by alumina particles ingestion in a single stage turbine. In the experimental investigation, tests of particle surface interactions were performed in specially designed tunnels to determine the erosion rates and particle restitution characteristics under different impact conditions. The experimental results show that the erosion rates increase with increased impingement angle, impact velocity and temperature. In the computational simulations, an Euler-Lagrangian two stage approach is used in obtaining numerical solutions to the three-dimensional compressible Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the particles equations of motion in each blade passage reference frame. User defined functions (UDF) were developed to represent experimentally-based correlations for particle surface interaction models which were employed in the three-dimensional particle trajectory simulations to determine the particle rebound characteristics after each surface impact. The experimentally based erosion UDF model was used to predict the TBC erosion rates on the turbine blade surfaces based on the computed statistical data of the particles impact locations, velocities and angles relative to the blade surface. Computational results are presented for the predicted TBC blade erosion in a single stage commercial APU turbine, for a NASA designed automotive turbine, and for the NASA turbine scaled for modern rotorcraft operating conditions. The erosion patterns in the turbines are discussed for uniform particle ingestion and for particle ingestion concentrated in the inner and outer 5 percent of the stator blade span representing the flow cooling the combustor liner.

  9. Biomimetic thermal barrier coating in jet engine to resist volcanic ash deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Schulz, Uwe; Muth, Tobias; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The threat of volcanic ash to aviation safety is attracting extensive attention when several commercial jet aircraft were damaged after flying through volcanic ash clouds from the May 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helen in Washington, U.S. and especially after the air traffic disruption in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. A major hazard presented by volcanic ash to aircraft is linked to the wetting and spreading of molten ash droplets on engine component surfaces. Due to the fact ash has a lower melting point, around 1100 °C, than the gas temperature in the hot section (between 1400 to 2000 °C), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components (e.g., combustor and turbine blades), this cause the ash to melt and potentially stick to the internal components of the engine creating, substantial damage or even engine failure after ingestion. Here, inspiring form the natural surface of lotus leaf (exhibiting extreme water repellency, known as 'lotus effect'), we firstly create the multifunctional surface thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) by producing a hierarchical structure with femtosecond laser pulses. In detail, we investigate the effect of one of primary femtosecond laser irradiation process parameter (scanning speed) on the hydrophobicity of water droplets onto the two kinds of TBCs fabricated by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and air plasma spray (APS), respectively as well as their corresponding to morphology. It is found that, comparison with the original surface (without femtosecond laser ablation), all of the irradiated samples demonstrate more significant hydrophobic properties due to nanostructuring. On the basis of these preliminary room-temperature results, the wettability of volcanic ash droplets will be analysed at the high temperature to constrain the potential impact of volcanic ash on the jet engines.

  10. The Development of HfO2-Rare Earth Based Oxide Materials and Barrier Coatings for Thermal Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan James

    2014-01-01

    Advanced hafnia-rare earth oxides, rare earth aluminates and silicates have been developed for thermal environmental barrier systems for aerospace propulsion engine and thermal protection applications. The high temperature stability, low thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance and mechanical properties of these oxide material systems make them attractive and potentially viable for thermal protection systems. This paper will focus on the development of the high performance and high temperature capable ZrO2HfO2-rare earth based alloy and compound oxide materials, processed as protective coating systems using state-or-the-art processing techniques. The emphasis has been in particular placed on assessing their temperature capability, stability and suitability for advanced space vehicle entry thermal protection systems. Fundamental thermophysical and thermomechanical properties of the material systems have been investigated at high temperatures. Laser high-heat-flux testing has also been developed to validate the material systems, and demonstrating durability under space entry high heat flux conditions.

  11. Application of thermal barrier coating for improving the suitability of Annona biodiesel in a diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Senthil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annona biodiesel was produced from Annona oil through transesterification process. The aim of the present study is to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of a single cylinder, direct injection, compression ignition engine using a annona methyl ester as a fuel. They are blended together with the Neat diesel fuel such as 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and Neat biodiesel. The performance, emission and combustion characteristics are evaluated by operating the engine at different loads. The performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency, brake specific fuel consumption. The emission constituents such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and smoke were recorded. Then the piston and both exhaust and intake valves of the test engine were coated with 100 µm of NiCrAl as lining layer. Later the same parts were coated with 400 µm material of coating that was the mixture of 88% of ZrO2, 4% of MgO, and 8% of Al2O3. After the engine coating process, the same fuels is tested in the engine at the same engine operation. The same performance and emission parameters were evaluated. Finally, these parameters are compared with uncoated engine in order to find out the changes in the performance and emission parameters of the coated engine. It is concluded that the coating engine resulting in better performance, especially in considerably lower brake specific fuel consumption values. The engine emissions are lowered both through coating and annona methyl ester biodiesel expect the nitrogen oxides emission.

  12. Experimental-calculation study of ion-plasma thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades made of intermetallic nickel superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinovskii, S. A.; Matveev, P. V.; Zhivushkin, A. A.; Tikhomirova, E. A.; Belyaeva, L. A.; Balakin, S. M.

    2017-06-01

    The ion-plasma thermal barrier coatings deposited onto samples and blades made of intermetallic VKNA-1V and VKNA-25 alloys are tested in a laboratory. The external ceramic layer of the thermal barrier coatings (TBC) is formed by magnetron sputtering of zirconium alloy targets and has a columnar structure. The influence of NiCrAlY(Re, Ta, Hf) + AlNiY(Hf) + ZrYGdO TBC on the long-term strength at a test temperature of 1200°C and on the high-cycle fatigue at a temperature of 900°C is studied. Blades with TBC are subjected to thermal cycling tests in the temperature range 950 ↔ 400°C and 1050 ↔ 400°C during air cooling and in the range 950 ↔ 200°C during water cooling at 500 cycles. The temperature fields in the cross section of a blade airfoil during thermal cycling are calculated. The laws of formation of fracture zones and the development of thermal fatigue cracks under the conditions that are close to the operating conditions of nozzle TBC-containing blades are investigated.

  13. Durability and Design Issues of Thermal/environmental Barrier Coatings on Sic/sic Ceramic Matrix Composites Under 1650 C Test Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Choi, Sung R.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Ceramic thermal/environmental barrier coatings for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature requirements. Currently, advanced T/EBC systems, which typically include a high temperature capable zirconia- (or hahia-) based oxide top coat (thermal barrier) on a less temperature capable mullite/barium-strontium-aluminosilicate (BSAS)/Si inner coat (environmental barrier), are being developed and tested for higher temperature capability Sic combustor applications. In this paper, durability of several thermal/environmental barrier coating systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites was investigated under laser simulated engine thermal gradient cyclic, and 1650 C (3000 F) test conditions. The coating cracking and delamination processes were monitored and evaluated. The effects of temperature gradients and coating configurations on the ceramic coating crack initiation and propagation were analyzed using finite element analysis (FEA) models based on the observed failure mechanisms, in conjunction with mechanical testing results. The environmental effects on the coating durability will be discussed. The coating design approach will also be presented.

  14. Microstructure and creep behaviour of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, R.; Coyle, T.W.; Mostaghimi [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the creep/sintering characteristics of thermally sprayed zirconia coatings and attempt to understand the influence of microstructure on the creep resistance of deposits. The major modification, compared with more typical practice, was employment of powder feedstock with agglomerated sub-micron size particles (Nanox), which is compared to one of the best commercially available powders (HOSP). Thick plasma sprayed coatings were prepared and their physical and mechanical properties were characterized. Creep/sintering experiments were then conducted to investigate the response of the materials when exposed to high temperatures under load. The results showed that it could be possible to correlate the splat thickness to the creep behaviour of the coatings. (orig.)

  15. Aircraft engine-mounted camera system for long wavelength infrared imaging of in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, James; Cosgrove, Joseph; Scire, James; Haldeman, Charles; Agoos, Ian

    2014-12-01

    This paper announces the implementation of a long wavelength infrared camera to obtain high-speed thermal images of an aircraft engine's in-service thermal barrier coated turbine blades. Long wavelength thermal images were captured of first-stage blades. The achieved temporal and spatial resolutions allowed for the identification of cooling-hole locations. The software and synchronization components of the system allowed for the selection of any blade on the turbine wheel, with tuning capability to image from leading edge to trailing edge. Its first application delivered calibrated thermal images as a function of turbine rotational speed at both steady state conditions and during engine transients. In advance of presenting these data for the purpose of understanding engine operation, this paper focuses on the components of the system, verification of high-speed synchronized operation, and the integration of the system with the commercial jet engine test bed.

  16. Cooling Effectiveness Measurements for Air Film Cooling of Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces in a Burner Rig Environment Using Phosphor Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. In this investigation, surface temperature mapping was performed using recently developed Cr-doped GdAlO3 phosphor thermometry. Measurements were performed in the NASA GRC Mach 0.3 burner rig on a TBC-coated plate using a scaled up cooling hole geometry where both the mainstream hot gas temperature and the blowing ratio were varied. Procedures for surface temperature and cooling effectiveness mapping of the air film-cooled TBC-coated surface are described. Applications are also shown for an engine component in both the burner rig test environment as well as an engine afterburner environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  17. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coating During Interrupted High-Heat Flux Laser Testing Using Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    Upconversion luminescence imaging of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has been shown to successfully monitor TBC delamination progression during interrupted furnace cycling. However, furnace cycling does not adequately model engine conditions where TBC-coated components are subjected to significant heat fluxes that produce through-thickness temperature gradients that may alter both the rate and path of delamination progression. Therefore, new measurements are presented based on luminescence imaging of TBC-coated specimens subjected to interrupted high-heat-flux laser cycling exposures that much better simulate the thermal gradients present in engine conditions. The TBCs tested were deposited by electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and were composed of 7wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) with an integrated delamination sensing layer composed of 7YSZ co-doped with erbium and ytterbium (7YSZ:Er,Yb). The high-heat-flux exposures that produce the desired through-thickness thermal gradients were performed using a high power CO2 laser operating at a wavelength of 10.6 microns. Upconversion luminescence images revealed the debond progression produced by the cyclic high-heat-flux exposures and these results were compared to that observed for furnace cycling.

  18. Moisture-Induced Delamination Video of an Oxidized Thermal Barrier Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    PVD TBC coatings were thermally cycled to near-failure at 1150 C. Normal failure occurred after 200 to 300 1-hr cycles with only moderate weight gains (0.5 mg/sq cm). Delamination and buckling was often delayed until well after cooldown (desktop spallation), but could be instantly induced by the application of water drops, as shown in a video clip which can be viewed by clicking on figure 2 of this report. Moisture therefore plays a primary role in delayed desktop TBC failure. Hydrogen embrittlement is proposed as the underlying mechanism.

  19. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  20. Analysis of the energetic/environmental performances of gas turbine plant: Effect of thermal barrier coatings and mass of cooling air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ion V.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 is the most common material to be applied in thermal barrier coatings owing to its excellent properties: low thermal conductivity, high toughness and thermal expansion coefficient as ceramic material. Calculation has been made to evaluate the gains of thermal barrier coatings applied on gas turbine blades. The study considers a top ceramic coating Zirconia stabilized with 8 wt.% Y2O3 on a NiCoCrAlY bond coat and Inconel 738LC as substrate. For different thickness and different cooling air flow rates, a thermodynamic analysis has been performed and pollutants emissions (CO, NOx have been estimated to analyze the effect of rising the gas inlet temperature. The effect of thickness and thermal conductivity of top coating and the mass flow rate of cooling air have been analyzed. The model for heat transfer analysis gives the temperature reduction through the wall blade for the considered conditions and the results presented in this contribution are restricted to a two considered limits: (1 maximum allowable temperature for top layer (1200ºC and (2 for blade material (1000ºC. The model can be used to analyze other materials that support higher temperatures helping in the development of new materials for thermal barrier coatings.

  1. Theoretical prediction of energy release rate for interface crack initiation by thermal stress in environmental barrier coatings for ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, E.; Umeno, Y.

    2017-05-01

    As weight reduction of turbines for aircraft engines is demanded to improve fuel consumption and curb emission of carbon dioxide, silicon carbide (SiC) fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites (SiC/SiC) are drawing enormous attention as high-pressure turbine materials. For preventing degradation of SiC/SiC, environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for ceramics are deposited on the composites. The purpose of this study is to establish theoretical guidelines for structural design which ensures the mechanical reliability of EBC. We conducted finite element method (FEM) analysis to calculate energy release rates (ERRs) for interface crack initiation due to thermal stress in EBC consisting of Si-based bond coat, Mullite and Ytterbium (Yb)-silicate layers on a SiC/SiC substrate. In the FEM analysis, the thickness of one EBC layer was changed from 25 μm to 200 μm while the thicknesses of the other layers were fixed at 25 μm, 50 μm and 100 μm. We compared ERRs obtained by the FEM analysis and a simple theory for interface crack in a single-layered structure where ERR is estimated as nominal strain energy in the coating layers multiplied by a constant factor (independent of layer thicknesses). We found that, unlike the case of single-layered structures, the multiplication factor is no longer a constant but is determined by the combination of consisting coating layer thicknesses.

  2. Phosphor-Doped Thermal Barrier Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spray for In-Depth Temperature Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Peng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ-based thermal barrier coating (TBC has been integrated with thermographic phosphors through air plasma spray (APS for in-depth; non-contact temperature sensing. This coating consisted of a thin layer of Dy-doped YSZ (about 40 µm on the bottom and a regular YSZ layer with a thickness up to 300 µm on top. A measurement system has been established; which included a portable; low-cost diode laser (405 nm; a photo-multiplier tube (PMT and the related optics. Coating samples with different topcoat thickness were calibrated in a high-temperature furnace from room temperature to around 900 °C. The results convincingly showed that the current sensor and the measurement system was capable of in-depth temperature sensing over 800 °C with a YSZ top layer up to 300 µm. The topcoat thickness was found to have a strong effect on the luminescent signal level. Therefore; the measurement accuracy at high temperatures was reduced for samples with thick topcoats due to strong light attenuation. However; it seemed that the light transmissivity of YSZ topcoat increased with temperature; which would improve the sensor’s performance at high temperatures. The current sensor and the measurement technology have shown great potential in on-line monitoring of TBC interface temperature.

  3. Thermal barrier coating by electron beam-physical vapor deposition of zirconia co-doped with yttria and niobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Soares de Almeida

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The most usual ceramic material for coating turbine blades is yttria doped zirconia. Addition of niobia, as a co-dopant in the Y2O3-ZrO2 system, can reduce the thermal conductivity and improve mechanical properties of the coating. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the influence of the addition of niobia on the microstructure and thermal properties of the ceramic coatings. SEM on coatings fractured cross-section shows a columnar structure and the results of XRD show only zirconia tetragonal phase in the ceramic coating for the chemical composition range studied. As the difference NbO2,5-YO1,5 mol percent increases, the tetragonality increases. A significant reduction of the thermal conductivity, measured by laser flash technique in the zirconia coating co-doped with yttria and niobia when compared with zirconia-yttria coating was observed.

  4. Delamination evaluation of thermal barrier coating on turbine blade owing to isothermal degradation using ultrasonic C-scan image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Girl; Kim, Hak Joon; Song, Sung Jin; Seok, Chang Sung [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) is an essential element consisting of a super-alloy base and ceramic coating designed to achieve long operational time under a high temperature and pressure environment. However, the top coat of TBC can be delaminated at certain temperatures with long operation time. As the delamination of TBC is directly related to the blade damage, the coupling status of the TBC should be assured for reliable operation. Conventional studies of nondestructive evaluation have been made for detecting generation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) or qualitatively evaluating delamination in TBC. In this study, the ultrasonic C-scan method was developed to obtain the damage map inside TBC by estimating the delamination in a quantitative way. All specimens were isothermally degraded at 1,100°C with different time, having different partial delamination area. To detect partial delamination in TBC, the C-scan was performed by a single transducer using pulse-echo method with normal incidence. Partial delamination coefficients of 1 mm to 6 mm were derived by the proportion of the surface reflection signal and flaw signal which were theoretical signals using Rogers-Van Buren and Kim's equations. Using the partial delamination coefficients, the partial delamination maps were obtained. Regardless of the partial delamination coefficient, partial delamination area was increased when degradation time was increased in TBC. In addition, a decrease in partial delamination area in each TBC specimen was observed when the partial delamination coefficient was increased. From the portion of the partial delamination maps, the criterion for delamination was derived.

  5. DEGRADATION OF SM2ZR2O7 THERMAL BARRIER COATING CAUSED BY CALCIUM-MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON OXIDE (CMAS) DEPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Honglong; Sheng, Zhizhi; Tarwater, Emily; Zhang, Xingxing; Dasgupta, Sudip; Fergus, Jeffrey

    2015-03-16

    Rare earth zirconates are promising materials for use as thermal barrier coatings in gas turbine engines. Among the lanthanide zirconate materials, Sm2Zr2O7 with the pyrochlore structure has lower thermal conductivity and better corrosion resistance against calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicon oxide (CMAS). In this work, after reaction with CMAS, the pyrochlore structure transforms to the cubic fluorite structure and Ca2Sm8(SiO4)6O2 forms in elongated grain.

  6. Numerical Study of the Effects of Thermal Barrier Coating and Turbulence Intensity on Cooling Performances of a Nozzle Guide Vane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasert Prapamonthon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a numerical investigation of the combined effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC with mainstream turbulence intensity (Tu on a modified vane of the real film-cooled nozzle guide vane (NGV reported by Timko (NASA CR-168289. Using a 3D conjugate heat transfer (CHT analysis, the NGVs with and without TBC are simulated at three Tus (Tu = 3.3%, 10% and 20%. The overall cooling effectiveness, TBC effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed and discussed. The results indicate the following three interesting phenomena: (1 TBC on the pressure side (PS is more effective than that on the suction side (SS due to a fewer number of film holes on the SS; (2 for all three Tus, the variation trends of the overall cooling effectiveness are similar, and TBC plays the positive and negative roles in heat flux at the same time, and significantly increases the overall cooling effectiveness in regions cooled ineffectively by cooling air; (3 when Tu increases, the TBC effect is more significant, for example, at the highest Tu (Tu = 20% the overall cooling effectiveness can increase as much as 24% in the film cooling ineffective regions, but near the trailing edge (TE and the exits and downstream of film holes on the SS, this phenomenon is slight.

  7. Thermal stress fracture of ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal stress failures of ceramic coatings are discussed in terms of fracture mechanics concepts. The effects of transient and residual stresses on single and multiple cycle failure mechanisms are considered. A specific example of a zirconia thermal barrier coating is presented and its endurance calculated using the proposed relationships.

  8. Thermochemistry of Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminum-Silicate (CMAS) and Components of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo C. C.; Acosta, Waldo A.; Zhu, Dongming; Ghoshal, Anindya

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the degradation mechanism studies of thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) of gas turbines by molten CaO-MgO-Al(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-SiO(exp. 2) CMAS). CMAS minerals are usually referred as silicon-containing sand dust and volcano ash materials that are carried by the intake air into gas turbines, e.g. in aircraft engines, and their deposits often react at high temperatures (greater than 1200 degrees C) with the engine turbine coating systems and components. The high temperature reactions causes degradation and accelerated failure of the static and rotating components of the turbine engines. We discuss some results of the reactions between the CMAS and Rare-Earth (RE = Y, Yb, Dy, Gd, Nd and Sm) - oxide stabilized ZrO(exp. 2) or HfO(exp. 2) systems, and the stability of the resulting oxides and silicates. Plasma sprayed hollow tube samples (outside diameter = 4.7 mm, wall thickness = 0.76 mm and = 26 mm height) were half filled with CMAS powder, wrapped and sealed with platinum foil, and heat treated at 1310 degrees C for 5h. Samples were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction, and cross-section electron microscopy analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was found that CMAS penetrated the samples at the grain boundaries and dissolved the TEBC materials to form silicate phases containing the rare-earth elements. Furthermore, it was found that apatite crystalline phases were formed in the samples with total rare-earth content higher than 12 mol% in the reaction zone for the ZrO(exp. 2) system. In general, samples with the nominal compositions (30YSZ), HfO(exp. 2)-7Dy(exp. 2)O(exp. 2) and ZrO(exp. 2)-9.5Y(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-2.25Gd(exp. 2)O(exp. 3)-2.25Yb(exp. 2)O(exp. 3) exhibited lower reactivity or more resistance to CMAS than the other coating compositions of this work.

  9. Thermal barriers for compartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreutzer, Cory J.; Lustbader, Jason A.

    2017-10-17

    An aspect of the present disclosure is a thermal barrier that includes a core layer having a first surface, a second surface, and a first edge, and a first outer layer that includes a third surface and a second edge, where the third surface substantially contacts the first surface, the core layer is configured to minimize conductive heat transfer through the barrier, and the first outer layer is configured to maximize reflection of light away from the barrier.

  10. Emission reduction in SI engine using ethanol – gasoline blends on thermal barrier coated pistons

    OpenAIRE

    C.Ananda Srinivasan and C.G.Saravanan

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of ethanol and unleaded gasoline with Isoheptanol blends on multi- cylinder SI engine were investigated. The test fuels were prepared using 99.9% pure ethanol and unleaded gasoline with Isoheptanol blend, in the ratio of E 60 + 2.0 Isoheptanol, E 50 + 1.0 Isoheptanol. In this work the performance, emission and combustion tests were conducted in multi-cylinder petrol engine. The experimental results reveal an increase in brake thermal efficiency on the use of test fu...

  11. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  12. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  13. Hot corrosion behavior of nanostructured Gd2O3 doped YSZ thermal barrier coating in presence of Na2SO4 + V2O5 molten salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiong Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nickel-based superalloy DZ125 was first sprayed with a NiCrAlY bond coat and followed with a nanostructured 2 mol% Gd2O3−4.5 mol% Y2O3-ZrO2 (2GdYSZ topcoat using air plasma spraying (APS. Hot corrosion behavior of the as-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs were investigated in the presence of 50 wt% Na2SO4 + 50 wt% V2O5 as the corrosive molten salt at 900 °C for 100 h. The analysis results indicate that Gd doped YVO4 and m-ZrO2 crystals were formed as corrosion products due to the reaction of the corrosive salts with stabilizers (Y2O3, Gd2O3 of zirconia. Cross-section morphology shows that a thin layer called TGO was formed at the bond coat/topcoat interface. After hot corrosion test, the proportion of m-ZrO2 phase in nanostructured 2GdYSZ coating is lower than that of nano-YSZ coating. The result reveals that nanostructured 2GdYSZ coating exhibits a better hot corrosion resistance than nano-YSZ coating.

  14. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Cr-Doped GdAlO3 Phosphor Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the high luminescence intensity from a Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) thermographic phosphor enables non-rastered full-field temperature mapping of thermal barrier coating (TBC) surfaces to temperatures above 1000C. In this presentation, temperature mapping by Cr:GdAlO3 based phosphor thermometry of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces is demonstrated for both scaled-up cooling hole geometries as well as for actual components in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  15. Effects of Laser Remelting and Oxidation on NiCrAlY/8Y2O3-ZrO2 Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S. Q.; Zhu, C.; Zhang, Y.

    2017-12-01

    In this study, three groups of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) samples were remelted by CO2 laser with different laser energy densities (1, 5 and 10 J/mm2) to seal the surface of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings. Microscopic observations showed that the cracks size and the remelted depth in YSZ coatings increased. A 50-μm-thick dense layer was formed on the surface of YSZ coating in samples with 1 J/mm2 energy density. Microindentation tests showed that the Vickers hardness of YSZ coatings increases with the increase in laser energy density. After isothermal oxidation at 1200 °C for 200 h, thinner thermally growth oxides were found in laser remelted YSZ samples under energy density of 1 J/mm2 (6.32 ± 0.28 μm). Cyclic oxidation results showed that the weight gain per unit area of low energy density laser remelted TBCs was smaller than that of the high energy density laser remelted and as-sprayed TBCs.

  16. Thermal Fatigue Testing of ZrO2-Y2O3 Thermal Barrier Coating Systems using a High Power CO2 Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    In the present study, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation, and of coating failure, under thermal loads that simulate diesel engine conditions, are investigated. The surface cracks initiate early and grow continuously under thermal Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) and High Cycle Fatigue (HCF) stresses. It is found that, in the absence of interfacial oxidation, the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures. Significant LCF and HCF interactions have been observed in the thermal fatigue tests. The fatigue crack growth rate in the ceramic coating strongly depends on the characteristic HCF cycle number, N*(sub NCF), which is defined as the number of HCF cycles per LCF cycle. The crack growth rate is increased from 0.36 microns/LCF cycle for a pure LCF test to 2.8 microns/LCF cycle for a combined LCF and HCF test at N*(sub NCF) about 20,000. A surface wedging model has been proposed to account for the HCF crack growth in the coating systems. This mechanism predicts that HCF damage effect increases with increasing surface temperature swing, the thermal expansion coefficient and the elastic modulus of the ceramic coating, as well as with the HCF interacting depth. A good agreement has been found between the analysis and experimental evidence.

  17. Effect of Gd2O3 on the microstructure and thermal properties of nanostructured thermal barrier coatings fabricated by air plasma spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixiong Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The nanostructured 4–8 mol% Gd2O3−4.5 mol% Y2O3-ZrO2 (4–8 mol% GdYSZ coatings were developed by the atmospheric plasma spraying technique. The microstructure and thermal properties of plasma-sprayed 4–8 mol% GdYSZ coatings were investigated. The experimental results indicate that typical microstructure of the as-sprayed coatings were consisted of melted zones, nano-zones, splats, nano-pores, high-volume spheroidal pores and micro-cracks. The porosity of the 4, 6 and 8 mol% GdYSZ coatings was about 9.3%, 11.7% and 13.3%, respectively. It was observed that the addition of gadolinia to the nano-YSZ could significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of nano-YSZ. The thermal conductivity of GdYSZ decreased with increasing Gd2O3 addition. And the reduction in thermal conductivity is mainly attributed to the addition of Gd2O3, which results in the increase in oxygen vacancies, lattice distortion and porosity.

  18. Development of a thermal fatigue test method for thermal barrier coatings by laser excitation using a laser thermal shock facility; Entwicklung eines Pruefverfahrens zur laserinduzierten thermischen Ermuedung thermischer Schutzschichten mittels einer Laser-Thermoschockpruefeinrichtung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nies, Daniel

    2012-07-13

    The finite nature of fossil fuel supply and the growing environmental awareness become increasingly stronger motivations for the development of efficient gas turbines and jet engines for power generation or as engines for land-, sea- and water-based vehicles. One concept developed for this purpose are thermal barrier coatings, where the thermal load of components is reduced by applying a ceramic coating onto the components. In this work the possibility to use a laser thermal shock facility for thermo-cyclic testing of thermal barrier coatings is examined. A focused laser beam is used for heating the sample and a homogeneous temperature distribution on the sample surface is achieved by the used trajectory and radial adjusted laser power. The required improvements of the existing testing facility are explained, including the development of a new sample holder and of the testing and evaluation routines for the experiments. For the assessment of the initiation and evolution of damages, acoustic emission and thermographic methods are used. The possibilities and limits of these methods are assessed during the experiments. The work also includes an extensive temperature dependent characterisation of the ceramic material used for the thermal barrier coating. In this part, the measurement of the Young's modulus by a dynamic method is to be highlighted, as this is a rarely used technique. The characterisations show the expected values, except for a lower porosity as expected by the manufacturer and no significant phase changes during isothermal heat treatments. To reach sample surface temperatures above 1000 C, it is necessary to increase the absorption by an additional coating of magnetite. The temperature distribution on the surface is measured by an infrared camera, which is calibrated for this purpose. With the incorporated active air cooling of the sample backside, the temperature gradient can be controlled, but still leaves room for improvements. Already without

  19. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction deconvolution method for the measurement of residual stress in thermal barrier coatings as a function of depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Jacques, S D M; Chen, Y; Daisenberger, D; Xiao, P; Markocsan, N; Nylen, P; Cernik, R J

    2016-12-01

    The average residual stress distribution as a function of depth in an air plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia top coat used in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems was measured using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on station I15 at Diamond Light Source, UK, employing a series of incidence angles. The stress values were calculated from data deconvoluted from diffraction patterns collected at increasing depths. The stress was found to be compressive through the thickness of the TBC and a fluctuation in the trend of the stress profile was indicated in some samples. Typically this fluctuation was observed to increase from the surface to the middle of the coating, decrease a little and then increase again towards the interface. The stress at the interface region was observed to be around 300 MPa, which agrees well with the reported values. The trend of the observed residual stress was found to be related to the crack distribution in the samples, in particular a large crack propagating from the middle of the coating. The method shows promise for the development of a nondestructive test for as-manufactured samples.

  20. Mechanical properties of EB-PVD ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier coatings; Mechanische Eigenschaften von EB-PVD ZrO{sub 2} Waermedaemmschichten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, Carolin

    2014-08-29

    In this work, the elastic properties of thermal barrier coatings which were produced by electron-beam enhanced physical vapour deposition were investigated, as well as the dependency of the properties on the sample microstructure, the thermal treatment and the test method. For this purpose, not only commercial coatings were characterized, but also special sample material was used which consists of a 1 mm thick layer of EB-PVD TBC. This material was isothermally heat treated for different times at 950 C, 1100 C and 1200 C and then tested in a specially developed miniaturized bend test and by dynamic mechanical analysis. The sample material was tested by nanoindentation in order to measure the Young's modulus on a local scale, and the porosity of the samples was determined by microstructure analysis and porosimetry. The decrease of porosity could be connected with sintering and subsequent stiffening of the material. The test results are dependent on the tested volume. A small test volume leads to larger measured Young's moduli, while a large test volume yields lower values. The test volume also has an influence on the increase of stiffness during thermal exposure. With a small tested volume, a quicker increase of the Young's modulus was registered, which could be associated to the sintering of local structures.

  1. High Temperature Degradation of Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings (TEBCs) by CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Zhu, Dongming

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the degradation studies of thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) of gas turbines by molten CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS). CMAS minerals are usually referred as silica-containing sand dust and volcano ash materials that are carried by the intake air into gas turbines, e.g. aircraft engines. The low-melting deposits react at high temperatures (1000C) with the coating materials. This causes degradation and accelerated coating failure of the static and rotating components of the turbine engines. We discuss some preliminary results of the reactions between CMAS and Rare-Earth (RE Y, Yb, Dy, Gd, Nd and Sm) oxide stabilized ZrO2 or HfO2 systems, and the stability of the resulting oxides and silicates. Plasma sprayed hollow tube samples (outer diameter 4.7 mm, wall thickness 0.76 mm and 26 mm height) were half filled with CMAS powder, wrapped and sealed with platinum foil, and heat- treated at 1310 C for 5h. Samples were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and cross section electron microscopy analysis.

  2. Effect of thermally growth oxides (TGO) on adhesion strength for high purity yitria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) and rare - Earth lanthanum zirconates (LZ) multilayer thermal barrier coating before and after isothermal heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Salmi Mohd; Johari, Azril Dahari; Husin, Shuib

    2017-12-01

    Investigation on the effect of Thermally Growth Oxides (TGO) on the adhesion strength for thermal barrier coating (TBC) was carried out. The TBC under studied was the multilayer systems which consist of NiCrAlY bond coat and YSZ/LZ ceramic coating deposited on Ni-based superalloy substrates. The development of thermally growth oxides (TGO) for both TBC systems after isothermal heat treatment was measured. Isothermal heat treatment was carried out at 1100 ˚C for 100 hours to age the samples. ASTM D4541: Standard Test Method for Pull-off Strength of Coatings using Portable Adhesion Tester was used to measure the adhesion strength of both TBC systems before and after heat treatment. The effect of the developed TGO on the measured adhesion strength was examined and correlation between them was established individually for both TBC systems. The failure mechanism of the both system was also identified; either cohesive or adhesive or the combination of both. The results showed that TGO has more than 50% from the bond coat layer for rare-earth LZ system compared to the typical YSZ system, which was less than 10 % from the bond coat layer. This leads to the lower adhesion strength of rare-earth LZ coating system compared to typical YSZ system. Failure mechanism during the pull-off test also was found to be different for both TBC systems. The typical YSZ system experienced cohesive failure whereas the rare-earth LZ system experienced the combination of cohesive and adhesive failure.

  3. Ceramic Thermal Barriers For Dirty-Fuel Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    Report discusses performances of ceramic thermal-barrier coating materials for use in electric-utility gas-turbine engines. Variations of standard coating evaluated in search for coating resistant to dirty fuel. Variations included alterations of level of yttria, replacement of yttria by other stabilizers, controlling surface density (by plasma spray processing, infiltration, laser glazing, or sputtering), and interface treatments.

  4. Thermochemistry of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) and Advanced Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Zhu, Dongming

    2017-01-01

    CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS) oxides are constituents in a broad number of materials and minerals which have recently inferred to discussions in materials science, planetary science, geochemistry and cosmochemistry communities. In materials science, there is increasing interest in the degradation studies of thermal (TBC) and environmental (EBC) barrier coatings of gas turbines by molten CMAS. CMAS minerals usually are carried by the intake air into gas turbines, e.g. in aircraft engines, and their deposits react at high temperatures (1000C) with the coating materials. This causes degradation and accelerated failure of the static and rotating components of the turbine engines. We discuss some preliminary results of the reactions between CMAS and Rare-Earth (RE Y, Yb, Dy, Gd, Nd and Sm) oxide stabilized ZrO2 or HfO2 systems, and the stability of the resulting oxides and silicates. Plasma sprayed hollow tube samples ( 2.2 mm and 26 mm height) were half filled with CMAS powder, wrapped and sealed with platinum foil, and heat treated at 1310 C for 5h. Samples were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and cross section electron microscopy analysis.

  5. Real-Time Thermographic-Phosphor-Based Temperature Measurements of Thermal Barrier Coating Surfaces Subjected to a High-Velocity Combustor Burner Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Jenkins, Thomas P.; Allison, Stephen W.; Cruzen, Scott; Condevaux, J. J.; Senk, J. R.; Paul, A. D.

    2011-01-01

    Surface temperature measurements were conducted on metallic specimens coated with an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC) with a YAG:Dy phosphor layer that were subjected to an aggressive high-velocity combustor burner environment. Luminescence-based surface temperature measurements of the same TBC system have previously been demonstrated for specimens subjected to static furnace or laser heating. Surface temperatures were determined from the decay time of the luminescence signal of the YAG:Dy phosphor layer that was excited by a pulsed laser source. However, the furnace and laser heating provides a much more benign environment than that which exists in a turbine engine, where there are additional challenges of a highly radiant background and high velocity gases. As the next step in validating the suitability of luminescence-based temperature measurements for turbine engine environments, new testing was performed where heating was provided by a high-velocity combustor burner rig at Williams International. Real-time surface temperature measurements during burner rig heating were obtained from the decay of the luminescence from the YAG:Dy surface layer. The robustness of several temperature probe designs in the sonic velocity, high radiance flame environment was evaluated. In addition, analysis was performed to show whether the luminescence decay could be satisfactorily extracted from the high radiance background.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF PLASMA SPRAY PARAMETERS ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND PHASE COMPOSITION OF THERMAL BARRIER COATINGS MADE BY SPPS PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Valefi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the effect of plasma spray parameters, atomizing gas and substrate preheat temperature on microstructure and phase composition of YSZ coatings produced by SPPS process have been investigated. The experimental results showed that increasing the power of plasma, using hydrogen as the precursor atomizing gas and increasing substrate preheat temperature decrease the amount of non-pyrolyzed precursor in the coatings. At low plasma power most of the deposited precursor is in non-pyrolyzed state, and consequently the applied coatings are defective. The increase in substrate temperature beyond 800oC either by preheating or heat transfer from plasma torch to the substrate, prevent the coating formation. In SPPS coating formation, up to a special spray distance the optical microscopy image of the coatings showed a snowy like appearance. XRD analysis showed that in this situation the amount of un-pyrolyzed precursor is low. Beyond this spray distance, spherical particles, are obtained and XRD analysis showed that most of the precursor is in un-pyrolyzed state.

  7. Computational design and experimental validation of new thermal barrier systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    The focus of this project is on the development of a reliable and efficient ab initio based computational high temperature material design method which can be used to assist the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) bond-coat and top-coat design. Experimental evaluations on the new TBCs are conducted to confirm the new TBCs’ properties. Southern University is the subcontractor on this project with a focus on the computational simulation method development. We have performed ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics simulation on screening the top coats and bond coats for gas turbine thermal barrier coating design and validation applications. For experimental validations, our focus is on the hot corrosion performance of different TBC systems. For example, for one of the top coatings studied, we examined the thermal stability of TaZr2.75O8 and confirmed it’s hot corrosion performance.

  8. Evaluation of Normal and Nanolayer Composite Thermal Barrier Coatings in Fused Vanadate-Sulfate Salts at 1000°C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Daroonparvar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hot corrosion behavior of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ, YSZ/normal Al2O3, and YSZ/nano-Al2O3 coatings was investigated in the presence of molten mixture of Na2SO4 + V2O5 at 1000°C. Microstructural characterization showed that the creation of hot corrosion products containing YVO4 crystals and monoclinic ZrO2 is primarily related to the reaction between NaVO3 and Y2O3 during hot corrosion. The lowest amount of hot corrosion products was observed in YSZ as an inner layer of YSZ/nano-Al2O3 coating. Hence, it can be concluded that the presence of nanostructured Al2O3 layer over the conventional YSZ coating can considerably reduce the infiltration of molten corrosive salts into the YSZ layer during hot corrosion which is mainly related to the compactness of nanostructured alumina layer (including nanoregions in comparison with normal alumina layer.

  9. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coatings During Interrupted High-Heat-Flux Laser Testing using Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation showed progress made in extending luminescence-base delamination monitoring to TBCs exposed to high heat fluxes, which is an environment that much better simulates actual turbine engine conditions. This was done by performing upconversion luminescence imaging during interruptions in laser testing, where a high-power CO2 laser was employed to create the desired heat flux. Upconverison luminescence refers to luminescence where the emission is at a higher energy (shorter wavelength) than the excitation. Since there will be negligible background emission at higher energies than the excitation, this methods produces superb contrast. Delamination contrast is produced because both the excitation and emission wavelengths are reflected at delamination cracks so that substantially higher luminescence intensity is observed in regions containing delamination cracks. Erbium was selected as the dopant for luminescence specifically because it exhibits upconversion luminescence. The high power CO2 10.6 micron wavelength laser facility at NASA GRC was used to produce the heat flux in combination with forced air backside cooling. Testing was performed at a lower (95 W/sq cm) and higher (125 W/sq cm) heat flux as well as furnace cycling at 1163C for comparison. The lower heat flux showed the same general behavior as furnace cycling, a gradual, "spotty" increase in luminescence associated with debond progression; however, a significant difference was a pronounced incubation period followed by acceleration delamination progression. These results indicate that extrapolating behavior from furnace cycling measurements will grossly overestimate remaining life under high heat flux conditions. The higher heat flux results were not only accelerated, but much different in character. Extreme bond coat rumpling occurred, and delamination propagation extended over much larger areas before precipitating macroscopic TBC failure. This indicates that under the higher heat flux (and

  10. Novel hybrid polymeric materials for barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlacky, Erin Christine

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites, described as the inclusion of nanometer-sized layered silicates into polymeric materials, have been widely researched due to significant enhancements in material properties with the incorporation of small levels of filler (1--5 wt.%) compared to conventional micro- and macro-composites (20--30 wt.%). One of the most promising applications for polymer-clay nanocomposites is in the field of barrier coatings. The development of UV-curable polymer-clay nanocomposite barrier coatings was explored by employing a novel in situ preparation technique. Unsaturated polyesters were synthesized in the presence of organomodified clays by in situ intercalative polymerization to create highly dispersed clays in a precursor resin. The resulting clay-containing polyesters were crosslinked via UV-irradiation using donor-acceptor chemistry to create polymer-clay nanocomposites which exhibited significantly enhanced barrier properties compared to alternative clay dispersion techniques. The impact of the quaternary alkylammonium organic modifiers, used to increase compatibility between the inorganic clay and organic polymer, was studied to explore influence of the organic modifier structure on the nanocomposite material properties. By incorporating just the organic modifiers, no layered silicates, into the polyester resins, reductions in film mechanical and thermal properties were observed, a strong indicator of film plasticization. An alternative in situ preparation method was explored to further increase the dispersion of organomodified clay within the precursor polyester resins. In stark contrast to traditional in situ polymerization methods, a novel "reverse" in situ preparation method was developed, where unmodified montmorillonite clay was added during polyesterification to a reaction mixture containing the alkylammonium organic modifier. The resulting nanocomposite films exhibited reduced water vapor permeability and increased mechanical properties

  11. Barrier Coatings for Refractory Metals and Superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SM Sabol; BT Randall; JD Edington; CJ Larkin; BJ Close

    2006-02-23

    In the closed working fluid loop of the proposed Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP), there is the potential for reaction of core and plant structural materials with gas phase impurities and gas phase transport of interstitial elements between superalloy and refractory metal alloy components during service. Primary concerns are surface oxidation, interstitial embrittlement of refractory metals and decarburization of superalloys. In parallel with kinetic investigations, this letter evaluates the ability of potential coatings to prevent or impede communication between reactor and plant components. Key coating requirements are identified and current technology coating materials are reviewed relative to these requirements. Candidate coatings are identified for future evaluation based on current knowledge of design parameters and anticipated environment. Coatings were identified for superalloys and refractory metals to provide diffusion barriers to interstitial transport and act as reactive barriers to potential oxidation. Due to their high stability at low oxygen potential, alumina formers are most promising for oxidation protection given the anticipated coolant gas chemistry. A sublayer of iridium is recommended to provide inherent diffusion resistance to interstitials. Based on specific base metal selection, a thin film substrate--coating interdiffusion barrier layer may be necessary to meet mission life.

  12. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  13. Thermal behavior variations in coating thickness using pulse phase thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Chung, Yoonjae; Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    This paper presents a study on the use of pulsed phase thermography in the measurement of thermal barrier coating thickness with a numerical simulation. A multilayer heat transfer model was used to analyze the surface temperature response acquired from one-sided pulsed thermal imaging. The test sample comprised four layers: the metal substrate, bond coat, thermally grown oxide and the top coat. The finite element software, ANSYS, was used to model and predict the temperature distribution in the test sample under an imposed heat flux on the exterior of the TBC. The phase image was computed with the use of the software MATLAB and Thermofit Pro using a Fourier transform. The relationship between the coating thickness and the corresponding phase angle was then established with the coating thickness being expressed as a function of the phase angle. The method is successfully applied to measure the coating thickness that varied from 0.25 mm to 1.5 mm.

  14. Spacecraft thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumon, Jean-Claude; Paillous, Alain

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment AO 138-6 was located on the trailing edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility as part of the French Cooperative Payload (FRECOPA) Experiment. It was purely passive in nature: material specimens 2 x 2 cm, independently mounted in sample-holders, with their surface in the same reference plane, were exposed to space. Thirty samples were set in a vacuum-tight canister which was opened in space a few days after LDEF deployment and closed while still in orbit ten months later; twenty-four samples were directly exposed to space for the total flight duration (preflight handling, shuttle bay environment, separation from shuttle, shuttle environment, LEO environment, docking, descent, transfer to KSC). Materials included paints (conductive or nonconductive), SSM's, polymeric films, surface coatings, composite materials, and metals. After sample retrieving, inspection and measurements were carried out in atmospheric laboratory conditions on each sample: observation with binocular lenses and scanning electron microscopy, spectral relectance and transmittance using an integrating sphere in the wavelength range 280-2300 nm, emissivity by the means of a Gier & Dunkle portable reflectometer, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis-x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA-XPS), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements on some selected samples. The results obtained from flight were compared to laboratory data obtained in UV-irradiation tests when these data were available. As a general statement a good spectral concordance is observed for all samples not in the canister so long as air recoveries are taken into account. For one material, the degradation is more important for the sample in the canister than for those of the same material mounted at the surface of the tray; for most samples in the canister the degradation is slightly higher than the one which can be predicted from laboratory standard irradiations. Contamination problems having

  15. Mechanical Properties and Real-Time Damage Evaluations of Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC CMCs Subjected to Tensile Loading Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require new state-of-the art environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) to withstand increased temperature requirements and high velocity combustion corrosive combustion gasses. The present work compares the response of coated and uncoated SiC/SiC CMC substrates subjected to simulated engine environments followed by high temperature mechanical testing to asses retained properties and damage mechanisms. Our focus is to explore the capabilities of electrical resistance (ER) measurements as an NDE technique for testing of retained properties under combined high heat-flux and mechanical loading conditions. Furthermore, Acoustic Emission (AE) measurements and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) were performed to determine material damage onset and accumulation.

  16. Thermal stability of phosphate coatings on steel

    OpenAIRE

    P. Pokorny; P. Szelag; Novak, M; L. Mastny; Brozek, V.

    2015-01-01

    The work was validated thermal stability of zinc, manganese and tri-cations phosphate coatings on steel, made from commercial phosphating bath type Pragofos. Thermogravimetric data dehydration of scholzite, phosphophylite and hureaulite coatings in the temperature range 160 °C – 400 °C define the conditions for applying paints with higher firing temperature or thermal spraying ceramic coatings.

  17. Thermal stability of phosphate coatings on steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The work was validated thermal stability of zinc, manganese and tri-cations phosphate coatings on steel, made from commercial phosphating bath type Pragofos. Thermogravimetric data dehydration of scholzite, phosphophylite and hureaulite coatings in the temperature range 160 °C – 400 °C define the conditions for applying paints with higher firing temperature or thermal spraying ceramic coatings.

  18. Influence of bondcoat composition and manufacturing parameters on the lifetime of thermal barrier coatings under cyclic temperature loading; Einfluss der Bondcoatzusammensetzung und Herstellungsparameter auf die Lebensdauer von Waermedaemmschichten bei zyklischer Temperaturbelastung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subanovic, Marko

    2008-08-21

    In the present study the influence of the bond coat composition on the lifetime of thermal barrier coatings during thermal cycling was investigated. The knowledge, that the reactive elements (RE), which are essential for the improvement of the oxide scale adhesion, are ''lost'', during the bond coat processing, made it necessary to investigate systematically the influence of the different manufacturing stages on the RE distribution. After VPS (vacuum plasma spraying) with a high oxygen partial pressure in the spraying chamber, the reactive elements in the NiCoCrAl-coating were tied up in oxide precipitates, and thus their beneficial effect on the scale adhesion was inhibited. Another important observation is that the RE's are depleted during the bondcoat vacuum heat-treatment. The degree of Y-depletion depends not only on the Y-reservoir in the coating (Y-content and thickness) but also on the heat-treatment parameters, such as vacuum quality and temperature. A thin, dense alumina oxide scale with a smooth interface between bond coat and TGO doesn't necessary lead to a lifetime extension of the EB-PVD TBC's. TBC's with such oxide morphology typically failed due to crack formation and propagation along the interface between the TGO and the bondcoat. By addition of zirconium it was possible to shift the failure initiation from the interface TGO/bondcoat to the interface TBC/TGO, which can apparently accommodate more thermal strain energy before failure. The shift of the failure location was achieved by a change of the oxide morphology, which mainly relies on adjusting a non-even wavy interface between the TGO and the bond coat and formation of defected oxide layers. In contrast, a defected oxide scale with a high growth rate shortened the life time of APSTBC's. Porosity and spinel formation weakened the mechanical integrity of the oxide scale, and facilitated the crack formation and propagation of the already existing

  19. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramic based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are currently considered as a candidate material for advanced stationary gas turbine components. Crack propagation studies under bending are described that were performed on plasma sprayed ZrO2, bonded by MCrAlY layer to Ni base superalloy. The crack propagation ...

  20. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  1. Rocket Motor Joint Construction Including Thermal Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal barrier for extremely high temperature applications consists of a carbon fiber core and one or more layers of braided carbon fibers surrounding the core. The thermal barrier is preferably a large diameter ring, having a relatively small cross-section. The thermal barrier is particularly suited for use as part of a joint structure in solid rocket motor casings to protect low temperature elements such as the primary and secondary elastomeric O-ring seals therein from high temperature gases of the rocket motor. The thermal barrier exhibits adequate porosity to allow pressure to reach the radially outward disposed O-ring seals allowing them to seat and perform the primary sealing function. The thermal barrier is disposed in a cavity or groove in the casing joint, between the hot propulsion gases interior of the rocket motor and primary and secondary O-ring seals. The characteristics of the thermal barrier may be enhanced in different applications by the inclusion of certain compounds in the casing joint, by the inclusion of RTV sealant or similar materials at the site of the thermal barrier, and/or by the incorporation of a metal core or plurality of metal braids within the carbon braid in the thermal barrier structure.

  2. Quantitative analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    This work concerns the development of simulation tools for mapping of insulation properties of thermal insulation coatings based on selected functional filler materials. A mathematical model, which includes the underlying physics (i.e. thermal conductivity of a heterogeneous two-component coating...

  3. Experimental evaluation of optimization method for developing ultraviolet barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonome, Hiroki; Okajima, Junnosuke; Komiya, Atsuki; Maruyama, Shigenao

    2014-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) barrier coatings can be used to protect many industrial products from UV attack. This study introduces a method of optimizing UV barrier coatings using pigment particles. The radiative properties of the pigment particles were evaluated theoretically, and the optimum particle size was decided from the absorption efficiency and the back-scattering efficiency. UV barrier coatings were prepared with zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2). The transmittance of the UV barrier coating was calculated theoretically. The radiative transfer in the UV barrier coating was modeled using the radiation element method by ray emission model (REM2). In order to validate the calculated results, the transmittances of these coatings were measured by a spectrophotometer. A UV barrier coating with a low UV transmittance and high VIS transmittance could be achieved. The calculated transmittance showed a similar spectral tendency with the measured one. The use of appropriate particles with optimum size, coating thickness and volume fraction will result in effective UV barrier coatings. UV barrier coatings can be achieved by the application of optical engineering.

  4. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2012-10-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DEFOA- 0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed Durability Test Rig.

  5. Graphene dip coatings: An effective anticorrosion barrier on aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianhua; Hua, Lei; Li, Songmei; Yu, Mei

    2015-02-01

    The properties of graphene coating prepared via dip coating route as an effective anticorrosion barrier on aluminum in 0.5 M NaCl solutions were studied. The Raman spectra analysis indicated that the graphene dip coatings were spread consecutively and uniformly on Al substrates. The potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results indicated that the graphene dip coatings were a barrier layer between corrosive medium and Al substrate with a highly protection effective. The corrosion resistance efficiency of the substrate with the coatings was three orders of magnitude higher than that without the coatings.

  6. Thermal Coatings Seminar Series Training Part 1: Properties of Thermal Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triolo, Jack

    2015-01-01

    This course will present an overview of a variety of thermal coatings-related topics, including: coating types and availability, thermal properties measurements, environmental testing (lab and in-flight), environmental impacts, contamination impacts, contamination liabilities, determination of BOLEOL values, and what does specularity mean to the thermal engineer.

  7. Reusable Thermal Barrier for Insulation Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladee, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Filler composed of resilient, heat-resistant materials. Thermal barrier nestles snugly in gap between two tiles with minimal protrusion beyond faces of surrounding tiles. When removed from gap, barrier springs back to nearly original shape. Developed for filling spaces between tiles on Space Shuttle, also used in furnaces and kilns.

  8. Micro-thermal analysis of polyester coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, H.R.

    2010-01-01

    The application and suitability of micro-thermal analysis to detect changes in the chemical and physical properties of coating due to ageing and especially photo-degradation is demonstrated using a model polyester coating based on neopentyl glycol isophthalic acid. The changes in chemical structure

  9. Air Plasma-Sprayed La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 Composite Thermal Barrier Coating Subjected to CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (CMAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lili; Ma, Wen; Ma, Bole; Guo, Feng; Chen, Weidong; Dong, Hongying; Shuang, Yingchai

    2017-08-01

    La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were prepared by air plasma spray (APS). The La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite TBCs covered with calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate (CMAS) powder, as well as the powder mixture of CMAS and spray-dried La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite powder, were heat-treated at 1250 °C in air for 1, 4, 8, and 12 h. The phase constituents and microstructures of the reaction products were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Experimental results showed that the La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite TBCs had higher CMAS resistance than 8YSZ coating. A dense new layer developed between CMAS and La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite TBCs during interaction, and this new layer consisted mostly of apatite (Ca2La8(SiO4)6O2) and c-ZrO2. The newly developed layer effectively protected the La2Zr2O7-SrZrO3 composite TBCs from further CMAS attack.

  10. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, Kendall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pena, Maria I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  11. The Effect of Core Configuration on Thermal Barrier Thermal Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMange, Jeffrey J.; Bott, Robert H.; Druesedow, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal barriers and seals are integral components in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of nearly all aerospace vehicles. They are used to minimize heat transfer through interfaces and gaps and protect underlying temperature-sensitive components. The core insulation has a significant impact on both the thermal and mechanical properties of compliant thermal barriers. Proper selection of an appropriate core configuration to mitigate conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer through the thermal barrier is challenging. Additionally, optimization of the thermal barrier for thermal performance may have counteracting effects on mechanical performance. Experimental evaluations have been conducted to better understand the effect of insulation density on permeability and leakage performance, which can significantly impact the resistance to convective heat transfer. The effect of core density on mechanical performance was also previously investigated and will be reviewed. Simple thermal models were also developed to determine the impact of various core parameters on downstream temperatures. An extended understanding of these factors can improve the ability to design and implement these critical TPS components.

  12. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  13. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2014-04-01

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2014), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This project will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. In this project, the focus is to develop and implement novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and demonstrate our new thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments.

  14. Space stable thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Efforts to develop an engineering paint were concentrated on inorganic silicate-bonded systems as opposed to the silicone coatings. The UV-vacuum stability of potassium silicate-Zn2TiO4 paints were shown to be quite good. Reflectance optimization of these systems is being studied by maximizing thickness and pigment to binder ratio.

  15. Porcelain enamel passive thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, H.; King, H. M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the development and evaluation of a highly adherent, low solar absorptance, porcelain enamel thermal control coating applied to 6061 and 1100 aluminum for space vehicle use. The coating consists of a low index of refraction, transparent host frit and a high volume fraction of titania as rutile, crystallized in-situ, as the scattering medium. Solar absorptance is 0.21 at a coating thickness of 0.013 cm. Hemispherical emittance is 0.88. The change in solar absorptance is 0.03, as measured in-situ, after an exposure of 1000 equivalent sun hours in vacuum.

  16. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Quasi-Columnar YSZ Coatings Deposited by PS-PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiasheng; Zhao, Huayu; Zhong, Xinghua; Shao, Fang; Liu, Chenguang; Zhuang, Yin; Ni, Jinxing; Tao, Shunyan

    2017-01-01

    Columnar-structured thermal barrier coatings, owing to their high strain tolerance, are expected for their potential possibilities to substantially extend turbine lives and improve engine efficiencies. In this paper, plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) process was used to deposit yttria partially stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings with quasi-columnar structures. Thermal cyclic tests on burner rigs and thermal shock tests by heating and water-quenching method were involved to evaluate the thermal cycling and thermal shock behaviors of such kind of structured thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). Evolution of the microstructures, phase composition, residual stresses and failure behaviors of quasi-columnar YSZ coatings before and after the thermal tests was investigated. The quasi-columnar coating obtained had an average life of around 623 cycles when the spallation area reached about 10% of the total coating surface during burner rig tests with the coating surface temperature of 1250 °C. Failure of the coating is mainly due to the break and pull-out of center columnar segments.

  17. Optimization of APS-ZrO{sub 2}-thermal barrier coatings by variations of creep strength and interface roughness; Optimierung von APS-ZrO{sub 2}-Waermedaemmschichten durch Variationen der Kriechfestigkeit und der Grenzflaechenrauhigkeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweda, Mario

    2011-07-01

    Gas turbines operate at combustion chamber temperatures up to 1400 C. Therefore the blades and the combustion chamber lining, which consist of Ni-superalloys for highest loads, are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) of zirconium oxide and an underlying oxidation protection coating of MCrAlY-alloys (M=Ni, Co). At high temperature the MCrAlY-coating oxidizes and an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-scale (thermally grown oxide, TGO) forms between MCrAlY-coating and TBC, what constrains the oxidation of the base material. At plasma sprayed TBCs, the MCrAlY-coating provides a bond coat (BC) for the TBC at the same time and therefore is roughened by sandblasting before the deposition of the TBC. By the growth of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-scale and the start up and run down of the gas turbine, stresses arise in the TBC, which lead to lateral crack formation in the field of the TBC-BC-interface and finally to the spallation of the TBC. Thereby other parts of the turbine can be damaged, what causes high costs. Therefrom the aim is to delay the crack growth as strong as possible or rather to maximize the lifetime of the TBC. For this purpose the material properties of the coating components have to be optimized. In the present work, the influence of creep strength of BC and TGO and the influence of TBC-BC-interface-roughness on the lifetime and damage evolution of plasma sprayed ZrO{sub 2}-TBCs are investigated. To determine the lifetime, cylindrical specimens with plasma sprayed ZrO{sub 2}-TBC were produced and thermally cycled with a minimum and maximum temperature of 60 C and 1050 C and a dwell time at maximal temperature of 2h. To exclude the interdiffusion and thermal mismatch between BC and Ni-superalloy, a model system was used: The Ni-superalloy was left and the substrate material consists completely of a BC-like FeCrAlY-alloy. The model system was simulated by the project partner TU Braunschweig with the FE-method. The TBC-BC-interface-roughness was abstracted by a 2

  18. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  19. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  20. Thermal Conductivity and Wear Behavior of HVOF-Sprayed Fe-Based Amorphous Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Yao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To protect aluminum parts in vehicle engines, metal-based thermal barrier coatings in the form of Fe59Cr12Nb5B20Si4 amorphous coatings were prepared by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF spraying under two different conditions. The microstructure, thermal transport behavior, and wear behavior of the coatings were characterized simultaneously. As a result, this alloy shows high process robustness during spraying. Both Fe-based coatings present dense, layered structure with porosities below 0.9%. Due to higher amorphous phase content, the coating H-1 exhibits a relatively low thermal conductivity, reaching 2.66 W/(m·K, two times lower than the reference stainless steel coating (5.85 W/(m·K, indicating a good thermal barrier property. Meanwhile, the thermal diffusivity of amorphous coatings display a limited increase with temperature up to 500 °C, which guarantees a steady and wide usage on aluminum alloy. Furthermore, the amorphous coating shows better wear resistance compared to high carbon martensitic GCr15 steel at different temperatures. The increased temperature accelerating the tribological reaction, leads to the friction coefficient and wear rate of coating increasing at 200 °C and decreasing at 400 °C.

  1. Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition of barrier coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    It is intended that the book will be a practical guide to provide any reader with the basic information to help them understand what is necessary in order to produce a good barrier coated web or to improve the quality of any existing barrier product. After providing an introduction, where the terminology is outlined and some of the science is given (keeping the mathematics to a minimum), including barrier testing methods, the vacuum deposition process will be described. In theory a thin layer of metal or glass-like material should be enough to convert any polymer film into a perfect barrier material. The reality is that all barrier coatings have their performance limited by the defects in the coating. This book looks at the whole process from the source materials through to the post deposition handling of the coated material. This holistic view of the vacuum coating process provides a description of the common sources of defects and includes the possible methods of limiting the defects. This enables readers...

  2. Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Shengmin; Yang, Shizhong; Khosravi, Ebrahim

    2011-12-31

    This project (10/01/2010-9/30/2013), “Computational Design and Experimental Validation of New Thermal Barrier Systems”, originates from Louisiana State University (LSU) Mechanical Engineering Department and Southern University (SU) Department of Computer Science. This proposal will directly support the technical goals specified in DE-FOA-0000248, Topic Area 3: Turbine Materials, by addressing key technologies needed to enable the development of advanced turbines and turbine-based systems that will operate safely and efficiently using coal-derived synthesis gases. We will develop novel molecular dynamics method to improve the efficiency of simulation on novel TBC materials; we will perform high performance computing (HPC) on complex TBC structures to screen the most promising TBC compositions; we will perform material characterizations and oxidation/corrosion tests; and we will demonstrate our new Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems experimentally under Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) environments. The durability of the coating will be examined using the proposed High Temperature/High Pressure Durability Test Rig under real syngas product compositions.

  3. Silicon oxide permeation barrier coating of PET bottles and foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steves, Simon; Deilmann, Michael; Awakowicz, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Modern packaging materials such as polyethylene terephthalate (PET) have displaced established materials in many areas of food and beverage packaging. Plastic packing materials offer are various advantages concerning production and handling. PET bottles for instance are non-breakable and lightweight compared to glass and metal containers. However, PET offers poor barrier properties against gas permeation. Therefore, the shelf live of packaged food is reduced. Permeation of gases can be reduced by depositing transparent plasma polymerized silicon oxide (SiOx) barrier coatings. A microwave (2.45 GHz) driven low pressure plasma reactor is developed based on a modified Plasmaline antenna to treat PET foils or bottles. To increase the barrier properties of the coatings furthermore a RF substrate bias (13.56 MHz) is applied. The composition of the coatings is analyzed by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy regarding carbon and hydrogen content. Influence of gas phase composition and substrate bias on chemical composition of the coatings is discussed. A strong relation between barrier properties and film composition is found: good oxygen barriers are observed as carbon content is reduced and films become quartz-like. Regarding oxygen permeation a barrier improvement factor (BIF) of 70 is achieved.

  4. Thermal spray coating for corrosion under insulation (CUI) prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Mohd Fazril Irfan Ahmad; Razak, Khalil Abdul; Alias, Nur Hashimah; Othman, Nur Hidayati; Lah, Nik Khairul Irfan Nik Ab

    2017-12-01

    Corrosion under insulation (CUI) is one of the predominant issues affecting process of Oil and Gas and Petrochemical industries. CUI refers to external corrosion, but it is difficult to be detected as the insulation cover masks the corrosion problem. One of the options to prevent CUI is by utilizing the protective coating systems. Thermal spray coating (TSC) is an advanced coating system and it shows promising performance in harsh environment, which could be used to prevent CUI. However, the application of TSC is not attractive due to the high initial cost. This work evaluates the potential of TSC based on corrosion performance using linear polarization resistance (LPR) method and salt spray test (SST). Prior to the evaluation, the mechanical performance of TSC was first investigated using adhesion test and bend test. Microstructure characterization of the coating was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The LPR test results showed that low corrosion rate of 0.05 mm/years was obtained for TSC in compared to the bare steel especially at high temperature of 80 °C, where usually normal coating would fail. For the salt spray test, there was no sign of corrosion products especially at the center (fully coated region) was observed. From SEM images, no corrosion defects were observed after 336 hours of continuous exposure to salt fog test. This indicates that TSC protected the steel satisfactorily by acting as a barrier from a corrosive environment. In conclusion, TSC can be a possible solution to minimize the CUI in a long term. Further research should be done on corrosion performance and life cycle cost by comparing TSC with other conventional coating technology.

  5. Radiative Transport Modelling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    Figure 1. Schematic of multiple scatter events inside a TBC D l1 l2 l3 l4l5 5 Two random walk simulation codes were adapted and improved upon, one...one particular n = 2 scatter event. l1 lb 1 2 l2 db DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. 11 The solution to Eq. (13...development of the new model (Task 2) and in testing it (Task 3). Some model parameter definitions are shown in Figure 1. The scattering medium is

  6. Thermal Conductivity and Water Vapor Stability of Ceramic HfO2-Based Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Miller, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 are candidate thermal/environmental barrier coating materials for gas turbine ceramic matrix composite (CMC) combustor liner applications because of their relatively low thermal conductivity and high temperature capability. In this paper, thermal conductivity and high temperature phase stability of plasma-sprayed coatings and/or hot-pressed HfO2-5mol%Y2O3, HfO2-15mol%Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 were evaluated at temperatures up to 1700 C using a steady-state laser heat-flux technique. Sintering behavior of the plasma-sprayed coatings was determined by monitoring the thermal conductivity increases during a 20-hour test period at various temperatures. Durability and failure mechanisms of the HfO2-Y2O3 and La2Zr2O7 coatings on mullite/SiC Hexoloy or CMC substrates were investigated at 1650 C under thermal gradient cyclic conditions. Coating design and testing issues for the 1650 C thermal/environmental barrier coating applications will also be discussed.

  7. Microstructure Evolution and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Evans, Laura J.; McCue, Terry R.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    Environmental barrier coated SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced HfO2 and rare earth silicate environmental barrier coatings (EBCs), along with multicomponent hafnium and rare earth silicide EBC bond coats have been developed. The coating degradation mechanisms in the laboratory simulated engine thermal cycling, and fatigue-creep operating environments are also being investigated. This paper will focus on the microstructural and compositional evolutions of an advanced environmental barrier coating system on a SiC-SiC CMC substrate during the high temperature simulated durability tests, by using a Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy (WDS). The effects of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the degradation mechanisms of the environmental barrier coating systems will also be discussed. The detailed analysis results help understand the EBC-CMC system performance, aiming at the durability improvements to achieve more robust, prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings.

  8. Stress controlled gas-barrier oxide coatings on semi-crystalline polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rochat, G. [Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymeres (LTC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Leterrier, Y. [Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymeres (LTC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Fayet, P. [Tetra Pak (Suisse) SA, Tetra Pak R and D, Plasma Technology, C.P. 32, CH-1680 Romont (Switzerland); Manson, J.-A.E. [Laboratoire de Technologie des Composites et Polymeres (LTC), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jan-anders.manson@epfl.ch

    2005-07-22

    Thin silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) barrier coatings formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates were subjected to post-deposition annealing treatments in the temperature range for orientation relaxation of the polymer. The resulting change in coating internal stress state was measured by means of thermo-mechanical analyses, and its effect on the coating cohesive properties and coating/polymer adhesion was determined from the analysis of uniaxial fragmentation tests in situ in a scanning electron microscope, assuming a Weibull-type probability of failure and a perfectly plastic stress transfer at the SiO{sub x}/PET interface. The strain to failure and intrinsic fracture toughness of the ultrathin oxide coating were found to be as high as 5.7% and 10 J/m{sup 2}, respectively, and its interfacial shear strength with PET was found to be close to 100 MPa. Annealing for 10 min at 150 deg. C did not modify the oxygen permeation properties of the SiO{sub x}/PET film, which suggests that the defect population of the oxide was not affected by the thermal treatment. In contrast, the coating internal compressive stress resulting from annealing was shown to increase by 40% the apparent coating cohesive properties and adhesion to the polymer.

  9. Oxygen Barrier Coating Deposited by Novel Plasma-enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Juan; Benter, M.; Taboryski, Rafael Jozef

    2010-01-01

    . This configuration enables a gentle treatment of sensitive materials like low-density polyethylene foils and biodegradable materials. SiOx coatings deposited in the novel setup were compared with other state of the art plasma coatings and were found to possess equally good or better barrier properties. The barrier...... effect of single-layer coatings deposited under different reaction conditions was studied. The coating thickness and the carbon content in the coatings were found to be the critical parameters for the barrier property. The novel barrier coating was applied on different polymeric materials...

  10. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  11. Low emittance coatings and the thermal performance of vacuum glazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor J.; Zhao, Junfu; Wang, Jinlei; Huang, Ye [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB, N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip C. [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Norton, Brian [Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier Street, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2007-01-15

    The thermal performances of vacuum glazings employing coatings with emittance between 0.02 and 0.16 were simulated using a three-dimensional finite volume model. Physical samples of vacuum glazings with hard and soft coatings with emittance of 0.04, 0.12 and 0.16 were fabricated and their thermal performance characterised experimentally using a guarded hot box calorimeter. Good agreement was found between experimental and theoretical thermal performances for both a vacuum glazing with a soft coating (emittance 0.04) and those with hard coatings (emittance 0.12 and 0.16). Simulations showed that for a low value of emittance (e.g. 0.02), the use of two low-emittance coatings gives limited improvement in thermal performance of the glazing system. The use of a single high performance low-emittance coating in a vacuum glazing has been shown to provide excellent performance. (author)

  12. A study of the barrier properties of polyethylene coated with a nanocellulose/magnetite composite film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological, thermal and barrier properties of low-density polyethylene/polycaprolactone-modified nanocellulose hybrid materials were investigated in this paper. Nanonocelulose/magnetite (NC-Fe3O4 nanocomposite and maleic acid functionalized NC/magnetite (NCMA-Fe3O4 nanocomposite were prepared and used as filler at various concentrations (5, 10 and 15 wt. % in polycaprolactone (PCL layer. PE was coated with PCL/NC/magnetite layer. The addition of the filler did not unfavorably affect the inherent properties of the polymer, especially its barrier properties. Oxygen permeation measurements show that the oxygen barrier properties of magnetite enriched PCL film were improved due to chemical activity of added material. The highest level of barrier capacity was observed for PE samples coated with PCL based composite with NCMA-Fe3O4 micro/-nanofiller, which implies the significant contribution of nanocellulose surface modification with maleic anhydride residue to improved barrier properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45019 i br. OI172013

  13. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramic Matrix Composites - An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang; van Roode, Mark; Kashyap, Tania; Zhu, Dongming; Wiesner, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) are increasingly being considered as structural materials for advanced power generation equipment because of their light weight, higher temperature capability, and oxidation resistance. Limitations of SiC/SiC CMCs include surface recession and component cracking and associated chemical changes in the CMC. The solutions pursued to improve the life of SiC/SiC CMCs include the incorporation of coating systems that provide surface protection, which has become known as an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC). The development of EBCs for the protection of gas turbine hot section CMC components was a continuation of coating development work for corrosion protection of silicon-based monolithics. Work on EBC development for SiC/SiC CMCs has been ongoing at several national laboratories and the original gas turbine equipment manufacturers. The work includes extensive laboratory, rig and engine testing, including testing of EBC coated SiC/SiC CMCs in actual field applications. Another EBC degradation issue which is especially critical for CMC components used in aircraft engines is the degradation from glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) with other minor oxides. This paper addresses the need for and properties of external coatings on SiC/SiC CMCs to extend their useful life in service and the retention of their properties.

  14. Experimental Study of the Micro-Arc Oxide Coating Effect on Thermal Properties of an Aluminium Alloy Piston Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Yu. Dudareva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of differently sized microarc oxidation coatings, applied to the bottom of pistons made with an Al-12Si-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy, on its thermal properties by simulating the operation of a real engine. This study is based on the premise that the alumina coating thickness affects the heat transfer and temperature distribution in the piston. The analysis of thermal properties of pistons and suggestions for the optimal thermal barrier coating thickness are presented.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of the Relationship Between Microstructures and Thermal Conductivity for YSZ Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Song, Xuemei; Liu, Ziwei; Lin, Chucheng; Zeng, Yi; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebing

    2017-04-01

    The thermal conductivities of as-sprayed yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coating prepared by atmospheric plasma spraying at different temperatures are investigated based on quantitative microstructural analysis. Multiple linear regression is used to develop quantitative models which describe the relationship between multiple elements such as porosity, grain boundary density, monoclinic phase content, temperature and thermal conductivity. Results reveal that the thermal conductivity of the coating is mainly determined by the porosity and grain boundary density below 300 °C and by the monoclinic phase content above 800 °C. Furthermore, based on the significance testing analysis, the confidence interval under a confidence level of 95% at different temperatures enables researchers to predict the thermal conductivity based on microstructural information.

  16. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  17. Graphene Oxide Bionanocomposite Coatings with High Oxygen Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilke Uysal Unalan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the development of bionanocomposite coatings on poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET with outstanding oxygen barrier properties. Pullulan and graphene oxide (GO were used as main polymer phase and nanobuilding block (NBB, respectively. The oxygen barrier performance was investigated at different filler volume fractions (ϕ and as a function of different relative humidity (RH values. Noticeably, the impermeable nature of GO was reflected under dry conditions, in which an oxygen transmission rate (OTR, mL·m−2·24 h−1 value below the detection limit of the instrument (0.01 mL·m−2·24 h−1 was recorded, even for ϕ as low as 0.0004. A dramatic increase of the OTR values occurred in humid conditions, such that the barrier performance was totally lost at 90% RH (the OTR of coated PET films was equal to the OTR of bare PET films. Modelling of the experimental OTR data by Cussler’s model suggested that the spatial ordering of GO sheets within the main pullulan phase was perturbed because of RH fluctuations. In spite of the presence of the filler, all the formulations allowed the obtainment of final materials with haze values below 3%, the only exception being the formulation with the highest loading of GO (ϕ ≈ 0.03. The mechanisms underlying the experimental observations are discussed.

  18. Microstructure, Tensile Adhesion Strength and Thermal Shock Resistance of TBCs with Different Flame-Sprayed Bond Coat Materials Onto BMI Polyimide Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, H. R.; Salehi, M.; Shafyei, A.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) composed of different bond coats (Zn, Al, Cu-8Al and Cu-6Sn) with mullite top coats were flame-sprayed and air-plasma-sprayed, respectively, onto bismaleimide matrix composites. These polyimide matrix composites are of interest to replace PMR-15, due to concerns about the toxicity of the MDA monomer from which PMR-15 is made. The results showed that pores and cracks appeared at the bond coat/substrate interface for the Al-bonded TBC because of its high thermal conductivity and diffusivity resulting in transferring of high heat flux and temperature to the polymeric substrate during top coat deposition. The other TBC systems due to the lower conductivity and diffusivity of bonding layers could decrease the adverse thermal effect on the polymer substrate during top coat deposition and exhibited adhesive bond coat/substrate interfaces. The tensile adhesion test showed that the adhesion strength of the coatings to the substrate is inversely proportional to the level of residual stress in the coatings. However, the adhesion strength of Al bond-coated sample decreased strongly after mullite top coat deposition due to thermal damage at the bond coat/substrate interface. TBC system with the Cu-6Sn bond coat exhibited the best thermal shock resistance, while Al-bonded TBC showed the lowest. It was inferred that thermal mismatch stresses and oxidation of the bond coats were the main factors causing failure in the thermal shock test.

  19. Are thermal barriers "higher" in deep sea turtle nests?

    OpenAIRE

    Santidri?n Tomillo, Pilar; Fonseca, Luis; Paladino, Frank V.; Spotila, James R.; Oro, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Thermal tolerances are affected by the range of temperatures that species encounter in their habitat. Daniel Janzen hypothesized in his "Why mountain passes are higher in the tropics" that temperature gradients were effective barriers to animal movements where climatic uniformity was high. Sea turtles bury their eggs providing some thermal stability that varies with depth. We assessed the relationship between thermal uniformity and thermal tolerance in nests of three species of sea turtles. W...

  20. Solar Thermal AIR Collector Based on New Type Selective Coating

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musiy, R.Y; Midyana, G.G; Makitra, R.G; Vasyutin, J.M; Khovanets, G.I; Zaborowskiy, A.B

    2014-01-01

    Based on the best for optical performance and selective coating solar thermal air collector, which operates by solar power on the principle of simultaneous ventilation and heating facilities, is designed...

  1. Quantitative analysis of silica aerogel-based thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2015-01-01

    A mathematical heat transfer model for a silica aerogel-based thermal insulation coating was developed. The model can estimate the thermal conductivity of a two-component (binder-aerogel) coating with potential binder intrusion into the nano-porous aerogel structure. The latter is modelled using......, to get an indication of the effect of important model parameters on the thermal conductivity of an insulation coating. With relevant data available for service life exposure conditions and raw material costs, the model can also be used as an optimization algorithm....... and experimental data with shell thickness and/or thermal conductivity of the shell as adjustable parameters. However, the experimental data was not sufficiently detailed to allow a separation of the effects of the two parameters. In the ideal case of no aerogel binder intrusion, a comparison with a coating...

  2. Inorganic Zn2TiO4 thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Y.; Wilkes, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Silicate-bonded zinc orthotitanate thermal control coatings for space applications have been developed. This paper discusses preparation of the pigment, paint formulation and application, and some properties of the coatings. Very high reflectance (low solar absorptance), high emittance, and good stability in an ultraviolet-vacuum environment are indicated for this paint.

  3. Admissible stresses in thermal sprayed coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watremez, M. [Valenciennes Univ. (France). Groupe Genie Mecanique; LAMAC, Univ. de Valenciennes et du Hainaut Cambresis, C.R.I.T.T.Z.I., MAUBEUGE (France); Renaux, T.; Guerin, J.D.; Bricout, J.P. [Valenciennes Univ. (France). Groupe Genie Mecanique

    2002-07-01

    Friction materials of current railway brake discs have to support more and more frictional and thermomechanical stresses. It has been shown that some specified couple of materials, composed of a plasma sprayed disc coupled with sintered ceramic pads, leads to good behaviour in high speed train braking simulation. It's now to show coatings' reliability and reproductibility as well as limits of such solutions. To that objective, present work consists in testing coatings adhesion or cohesion. Numerical models have been developed to show that the coating's failure energy is representative of admissible stresses state in coatings. Some results are then discussed. (orig.)

  4. Innovative approaches for converting a wood hydrolysate to high-quality barrier coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryberg, Yingzhi Zhu; Edlund, Ulrica; Albertsson, Ann-Christine

    2013-08-28

    An advanced approach for the efficient and controllable production of softwood hydrolysate-based coatings with excellent oxygen-barrier performance is presented. An innovative conversion of the spray-drying technique into a coating applicator process allowed for a fast and efficient coating process requiring solely aqueous solutions of softwood hydrolysate, even without additives. Compared to analogous coatings prepared by manual application, the spray-drying produced coatings were more homogeneous and smooth, and they adhered more strongly to the substrate. The addition of glyoxal to the aqueous softwood hydrolysate solutions prior to coating formation allowed for hemicellulose cross-linking, which improved both the mechanical integrity and the oxygen-barrier performance of the coatings. A real-time scanning electron microscopy imaging assessment of the tensile deformation of the coatings allowed for a deeper understanding of the ability of the coating layer itself to withstand stress as well as the coating-to-substrate adhesion.

  5. Thermal noise reduction and absorption optimization via multimaterial coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Martin, Iain W.; Hough, Jim; Krüger, Christoph; Rowan, Sheila; Schnabel, Roman

    2015-02-01

    Future gravitational wave detectors (GWDs) such as Advanced LIGO upgrades and the Einstein Telescope are planned to operate at cryogenic temperatures using crystalline silicon (cSi) test-mass mirrors at an operation wavelength of 1550 nm. The reduction in temperature in principle provides a direct reduction in coating thermal noise, but the presently used coating stacks which are composed of silica (SiO2) and tantala (Ta2O5) show cryogenic loss peaks which results in less thermal noise improvement than might be expected. Due to low mechanical loss at low temperature amorphous silicon (aSi) is a very promising candidate material for dielectric mirror coatings and could replace Ta2O5. Unfortunately, such an aSi /SiO2 coating is not suitable for use in GWDs due to high optical absorption in aSi coatings. We explore the use of a three material based coating stack. In this multimaterial design the low absorbing Ta2O5 in the outermost coating layers significantly reduces the incident light power, while aSi is used only in the lower bilayers to maintain low optical absorption. Such a coating design would enable a reduction of Brownian thermal noise by 25%. We show experimentally that an optical absorption of only (5.3 ±0.4 ) ppm at 1550 nm should be achievable.

  6. Thermal conductive epoxy enhanced by nanodiamond-coated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bo; Jiang, Guohua

    2017-11-01

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles were coated on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by chemical reactions. Reliable bonding was formed by the combination of acyl chloride on NDs and amine group on CNTs. ND coated CNTs (CNT-ND) were dispersed into epoxy to fabricate thermal conductive resins. The results show that the surface energy of CNTs is decreased by the coated NDs, which is contributed to the excellent dispersion of CNT-NDs in the epoxy matrix. The heat-transfer channels were built by the venous CNTs cooperating with the coated NDs, which not only plays an effective role of heat conduction for CNTs and NDs, but also avoids the electrical leakage by the protection of NDs surrounding outside of CNTs. Electrical and thermal conductance measurements demonstrate that the influence of the CNT-ND incorporation on the electrical conductance is minor, however, the thermal conductivity is improved significantly for the epoxy filled with CNT-ND.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Are thermal barriers "higher" in deep sea turtle nests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santidrián Tomillo, Pilar; Fonseca, Luis; Paladino, Frank V; Spotila, James R; Oro, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Thermal tolerances are affected by the range of temperatures that species encounter in their habitat. Daniel Janzen hypothesized in his "Why mountain passes are higher in the tropics" that temperature gradients were effective barriers to animal movements where climatic uniformity was high. Sea turtles bury their eggs providing some thermal stability that varies with depth. We assessed the relationship between thermal uniformity and thermal tolerance in nests of three species of sea turtles. We considered that barriers were "high" when small thermal changes had comparatively large effects and "low" when the effects were small. Mean temperature was lower and fluctuated less in species that dig deeper nests. Thermal barriers were comparatively "higher" in leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) nests, which were the deepest, as embryo mortality increased at lower "high" temperatures than in olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) and green turtle (Chelonia mydas) nests. Sea turtles have temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD) and embryo mortality increased as temperature approached the upper end of the transitional range of temperatures (TRT) that produces both sexes (temperature producing 100% female offspring) in leatherback and olive ridley turtles. As thermal barriers are "higher" in some species than in others, the effects of climate warming on embryo mortality is likely to vary among sea turtles. Population resilience to climate warming may also depend on the balance between temperatures that produce female offspring and those that reduce embryo survival.

  8. Are thermal barriers "higher" in deep sea turtle nests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Santidrián Tomillo

    Full Text Available Thermal tolerances are affected by the range of temperatures that species encounter in their habitat. Daniel Janzen hypothesized in his "Why mountain passes are higher in the tropics" that temperature gradients were effective barriers to animal movements where climatic uniformity was high. Sea turtles bury their eggs providing some thermal stability that varies with depth. We assessed the relationship between thermal uniformity and thermal tolerance in nests of three species of sea turtles. We considered that barriers were "high" when small thermal changes had comparatively large effects and "low" when the effects were small. Mean temperature was lower and fluctuated less in species that dig deeper nests. Thermal barriers were comparatively "higher" in leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea nests, which were the deepest, as embryo mortality increased at lower "high" temperatures than in olive ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea and green turtle (Chelonia mydas nests. Sea turtles have temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD and embryo mortality increased as temperature approached the upper end of the transitional range of temperatures (TRT that produces both sexes (temperature producing 100% female offspring in leatherback and olive ridley turtles. As thermal barriers are "higher" in some species than in others, the effects of climate warming on embryo mortality is likely to vary among sea turtles. Population resilience to climate warming may also depend on the balance between temperatures that produce female offspring and those that reduce embryo survival.

  9. Model-based analysis of thermal insulation coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren

    2014-01-01

    conducted exploring the effects of the following parameters: pigment (hollow spheres) volume concentration (PVC), average sphere size or sphere size distribution, thermal conductivities of binder and sphere wall material, and sphere wall thickness. All the parameters affected the thermal conductivity...... of an epoxy coating, but simulations revealed that the most important parameters are the PVC, the sphere wall thickness, and the sphere wall material. The model can be used, qualitatively, to get an indication of the effect of important model parameters on the thermal conductivity of an HS-based coating...

  10. Thermal model of attic systems with radiant barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, K.E.

    1991-07-01

    This report summarizes the first phase of a project to model the thermal performance of radiant barriers. The objective of this phase of the project was to develop a refined model for the thermal performance of residential house attics, with and without radiant barriers, and to verify the model by comparing its predictions against selected existing experimental thermal performance data. Models for the thermal performance of attics with and without radiant barriers have been developed and implemented on an IBM PC/AT computer. The validity of the models has been tested by comparing their predictions with ceiling heat fluxes measured in a number of laboratory and field experiments on attics with and without radiant barriers. Cumulative heat flows predicted by the models were usually within about 5 to 10 percent of measured values. In future phases of the project, the models for attic/radiant barrier performance will be coupled with a whole-house model and further comparisons with experimental data will be made. Following this, the models will be utilized to provide an initial assessment of the energy savings potential of radiant barriers in various configurations and under various climatic conditions. 38 refs., 14 figs., 22 tabs.

  11. Roll-to-roll DBD plasma pretreated polyethylene web for enhancement of Al coating adhesion and barrier property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haibao; Li, Hua; Fang, Ming; Wang, Zhengduo; Sang, Lijun; Yang, Lizhen; Chen, Qiang, E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com

    2016-12-01

    Graphical abstract: The images of Al coating adhesion testes for (a) untreated and (b) roll-to-roll DBD plasma treated PE. - Highlights: • Over three-months ageing a high surface energy was still existed in roll-to-roll DBD plasma-treated PE surface. • The adhesion and barrier property of Al-coated PE web were greatly improved. • The mechanism of plasma grafting to improve the properties of Al-coated PE web was found. - Abstract: In this paper the roll-to-roll atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was used to pre-treat polyethylene (PE) web surface before the conventional thermal evaporation aluminum (Al) was performed as a barrier layer. We emphasized the plasma environment effect based on the inlet three kinds of reactive monomers. The cross hatch test was employed to assess the Al coating adhesion; and the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) was used to evaluate gas barrier property. The results showed that after roll-to-roll DBD plasma treatment all Al coatings adhered strongly on PE films and were free from pinhole defects with mirror morphology. The OTR was reduced from 2673 cm{sup 3}/m{sup 2} day for Al-coated original PE to 138 cm{sup 3}/m{sup 2} day for Al-coated allyamine (C{sub 3}H{sub 7}N) modified PE. To well understand the mechanism the chemical compositions of the untreated and DBD plasma pretreated PE films were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface topography was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). For the property of surface energy the water contact angle measurement was also carried out in the DBD plasma treated samples with deionized water.

  12. Comparative Study of Microstructure and Properties of Thermal Sprayed MCrAlY Bond Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglima, Michael William

    A series of experiments were performed in order to observe certain process-property trends in thermally sprayed MCrAlY bond coatings for thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications in gas-turbine engines. Firstly, the basis of gas-turbine operation and design is discussed with a focus on the Brayton cycle and basic thermodynamic properties with respect to both the thermal and fuel efficiency of the turbine. The high-temperature environment inside the gas-turbine engine creates an extremely corrosive medium in which the engineering components must operate with sufficient operating life times. These engineering constraints, both thermal/fuel efficiency and operating life, pose a serious problem during long operation as well as thermal cycling of a civil aerospace engine. The concept of a thermal barrier coating is introduced along with how these coatings protect the internal engineering components, mostly in the hot-section of the turbine, and increase both the efficiency as well as the operating life of the components. The method used to create TBC's is then introduced being thermal spray processing along with standard operating procedures (SOP) used during coating deposition. The main focus of the experiments was to quantify the process-property trends seen during thermal spray processing of TBC's with respect to the adhesion and thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer, as well as how sensitive these properties are to changing variables during coating deposition. The design of experiment (DOE) method was used in order to have sufficient statistical process control over the output as well as a standard method for quantifying the results. A total of three DOE's were performed using two main types of thermal spray processes being high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and atmospheric plasma spray (APS), with a total of five different types of torches which are categorized by liquid-fuel, gas-fuel, and single cathode plasma. The variables used in the proceeding experiments were

  13. Development of Thermal Barriers for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The Space Shuttle solid rocket motor case assembly joints are sealed using conventional 0-ring seals. The 5500+F combustion gases are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of insulation. Special joint-fill compounds are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flowpath to the seals. On a number of occasions. NASA has observed in several of the rocket nozzle assembly joints hot gas penetration through defects in the joint- fill compound. The current nozzle-to-case joint design incorporates primary, secondary and wiper (inner-most) 0-rings and polysulfide joint-fill compound. In the current design, 1 out of 7 motors experience hot gas to the wiper 0-ring. Though the condition does not threaten motor safety, evidence of hot gas to the wiper 0-ring results in extensive reviews before resuming flight. NASA and solid rocket motor manufacturer Thiokol are working to improve the nozzle-to-case joint design by implementing a more reliable J-leg design and a thermal barrier, This paper presents burn-resistance, temperature drop, flow and resiliency test results for several types of NASA braided carbon-fiber thermal barriers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the thermal barriers when exposed to the flame of an oxy-acetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Thermal barriers braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over 6 minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Tests were performed on two thermal barrier braid architectures, denoted Carbon-3 and Carbon-6, to measure the temperature drop across and along the barrier in a compressed state when subjected to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch. Carbon-3 and Carbon-6 thermal barriers were excellent insulators causing temperature drops through their diameter of up to a 2800 and 2560 F. respectively. Gas temperature 1/4" downstream of the thermal barrier were within the

  14. Thermal Spray Coatings for Blast Furnace Tuyere Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, A.; Sivakumar, G.; Prusty, D.; Shalini, J.; Dutta, M.; Joshi, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The components in an integrated steel plant are invariably exposed to harsh working environments involving exposure to high temperatures, corrosive gases, and erosion/wear conditions. One such critical component in the blast furnace is the tuyere, which is prone to thermal damage by splashing of molten metal/slag, erosive damage by falling burden material, and corrosion from the ensuing gases. All the above, collectively or independently, accelerate tuyere failure, which presents a potential explosion hazard in a blast furnace. Recently, thermal spray coatings have emerged as an effective solution to mitigate such severe operational challenges. In the present work, five different coatings deposited using detonation spray and air plasma spray techniques were comprehensively characterized. Performance evaluation involving thermal cycling, hot corrosion, and erosion tests was also carried out. Based on the studies, a coating system was suggested for possible tuyere applications and found to yield substantial improvement in service life during actual field trials.

  15. Preparation of a Novel Water-based Acrylic Multi-Thermal Insulation Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Xiufang YE; Dongchu CHEN; Chang, Menglei; Youtian MO; Wang, Qingxiang

    2017-01-01

    To efficiently improve the thermal insulation effect of coatings, a novel water-based acrylic multi-thermal insulation coating (multi-WATIC) combined with thermal obstruction, echo, and radiation was prepared. The category and ratio of thermal insulation functional fillers are crucial. First, water-based acrylic thermal insulation coating (WATIC) with single thermal insulation functional fillers was prepared, and the thermal insulation property tests were done. Thereafter, a novel multi-WATIC...

  16. Optical Coatings and Thermal Noise in Precision Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry, Gregory; Bodiya, Timothy P.; DeSalvo, Riccardo

    2012-01-01

    1. Theory of thermal noise in optical mirrors Y. Levin; 2. Coating technology S. Chao; 3. Compendium of thermal noises in optical mirrors V. B. Braginsky, M. L. Gorodetsky and S. P. Vyatchanin; 4. Coating thermal noise I. Martin and S. Reid; 5. Direct measurements of coating thermal noise K. Numata; 6. Methods of improving thermal noise S. Ballmer and K. Somiya; 7. Substrate thermal noise S. Rowan and I. Martin; 8. Cryogenics K. Numata and K. Yamamoto; 9. Thermo-optic noise M. Evans and G. Ogin; 10. Absorption and thermal issues P. Willems, D. Ottaway and P. Beyersdorf; 11. Optical scatter J. R. Smith and M. E. Zucker; 12. Reflectivity and thickness optimisation I. M. Pinto, M. Principe and R. DeSalvo; 13. Beam shaping A. Freise; 14. Gravitational wave detection D. Ottaway and S. D. Penn; 15. High-precision laser stabilisation via optical cavities M. J. Martin and J. Ye; 16. Quantum optomechanics G. D. Cole and M. Aspelmeyer; 17. Cavity quantum electrodynamics T. E. Northup.

  17. Hypersonic propulsion - Breaking the thermal barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The challenges of hypersonic propulsion impose unique features on the hypersonic vehicle - from large volume requirements to contain cryogenic fuel to airframe-integrated propulsion required to process sufficient quantities of air. Additional challenges exist in the design of the propulsion module that must be capable of efficiently processing air at very high enthalpies, adding and mixing fuel at supersonic speeds and expanding the exhaust products to generate thrust greater than drag. The paper explores the unique challenges of the integrated hypersonic propulsion system, addresses propulsion cycle selection to cope with the severe thermal environment and reviews the direction of propulsion research at hypervelocity speeds.

  18. Solar Thermal AIR Collector Based on New Type Selective Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musiy, R.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the best for optical performance and selective coating solar thermal air collector, which operates by solar power on the principle of simultaneous ventilation and heating facilities, is designed. It can be used for vacation homes, museums, wooden churches, warehouses, garages, houses, greenhouses etc.

  19. Recycling light metals : Optimal thermal de-coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kvithyld, A.; Meskers, C.E.M.; Gaal, S.; Reuter, M.

    2008-01-01

    Thermal de-coating of painted and lacquered scrap is one of the new innovations developed for aluminum recycling. If implemented in all recycling and optimized as suggested in this article, recovery would be improved with considerable economic impact. Generally, contaminated scrap is difficult to

  20. Morphology and thermal conductivity of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Hengbei [Materials Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)]. E-mail: hz5e@virginia.edu; Yu Fengling [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bennett, Ted D. [Department of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Wadley, Haydn N.G. [Materials Science Department, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    An electron beam directed vapor deposition method was used to grow 7 wt.% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} (7YSZ) coatings and the effects of substrate rotation upon the coating porosity, morphology, texture, and thermal conductivity were explored. As the rotation rate was increased, the texture changed from <1 1 1> to <1 0 0>. Under stationary deposition, the coatings were composed of straight columns, while low-frequency rotation resulted in wavy columns. Increases in rotation rate resulted in a gradual straightening and narrowing of the growth columns. The pore fraction slowly decreased as the rotation rate increased. The thermal conductivity was found to be inversely related to the pore fraction. The structural and thermal conductivity alterations are a result of changes to flux shadowing associated with specimen rotation in a gas jet-entrained vapor plume. The minimum thermal conductivity at a low rotation rate is 0.8 W/(m K), well below that of conventionally deposited coatings.

  1. Evaluations of Strength of Thermal Sprayed Coating for Complex Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Ohmori, Akira

    Fracture strength of WC-12Co thermal sprayed coating is investigated experimentally and analytically. In the experiments, one pair of butt cylindrical specimen with coating is subjected to combined tension with torsion stresses. Fracture loci were obtained for three kinds of thickness of the coating in σ-τ stress plane. Stress distributions at crack tip singular point on fractured surfaces are analyzed by Finite-Element-Method and approximated by the expression σ=KR-λ where R means normalized thickness coordinate. It is found that the normal stress distributions are common to all cases of testing stress conditions and so fracture condition of the brittle coating is represented as K≥Kcr in the normal stress distribution even under mixed deformation mode I and III. The delamination critical shear stress distribution could also be obtained.

  2. Investigation of thermo-physical properties of thermal insulation coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopčok, Michal; Lukovičová, Jozefa; Kačur, Jozef; Pavlendová, Gabriela

    2017-07-01

    This paper examines the thermal properties of thermal insulation coating applied to the building materials surfaces. The main objective is to determine the insulation coating impact on the heat flux transfer. The heat flux is modelled in terms of the heat transfer coefficient on the surface of a solid body. The thermal conductivity and heat transfer coefficient are obtained from the solution of the inverse heat conduction problem in 3D, based on the temperature measurements. The real temperature evolution is perturbed due to intrinsic properties of the measuring apparatus. We correct this situation via modelling a thermocouple function. Afterwards the determination procedure of the heat flux transfer parameters is a standard solution of the inverse problem based on the minimization of discrepancy between corrected measured data and computed temperature data.

  3. Ternary ceramic thermal spraying powder and method of manufacturing thermal sprayed coating using said powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogli, Evelina; Sherman, Andrew J.; Glasgow, Curtis P.

    2018-02-06

    The invention describes a method for producing ternary and binary ceramic powders and their thermal spraying capable of manufacturing thermal sprayed coatings with superior properties. Powder contain at least 30% by weight ternary ceramic, at least 20% by weight binary molybdenum borides, at least one of the binary borides of Cr, Fe, Ni, W and Co and a maximum of 10% by weight of nano and submicro-sized boron nitride. The primary crystal phase of the manufactured thermal sprayed coatings from these powders is a ternary ceramic, while the secondary phases are binary ceramics. The coatings have extremely high resistance against corrosion of molten metal, extremely thermal shock resistance and superior tribological properties at low and at high temperatures.

  4. SERS investigation of coatings on thermal modified titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amininejad, Sayed; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2) are progressively manufactured and used in a wide variety of products such as sunscreens, papers, paints and toothpastes. The increase in the production and use of Titanium dioxide nanoparticles would escalate the risk for exposure of the natural environments to these compounds. There are several techniques for identifying and quantifying nanoparticles and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) is an emerging technique which combines raman spectroscopy with nanotechnology. SERS can also be used to investigate the changes of natural coatings on nanoparticles as an important factor regarding their environmental fate and biological effects. In this work, TiO2 P25 nanoparticles are thermally modified at different temperatures to study the effects of thermal shock on the crystal structure, surface properties and subsequently the Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering from 4-Mercaptobenzoic acid molecules coated on TiO2 nanoparticles has been observed. The results show that 4-Mercaptobenzoic acid molecules coated on nanoparticles exhibit different degree SERS enhancement on the surface of different nanoparticles modified at different temperatures by thermal modification method. This research work is expected to be important for improving SERS performance of TiO2 nanoparticles for characterization of natural coatings. Keywords: SERS, TiO2, 4-Mercaptobenzoic acid

  5. Micro and nanomecanical behavior of mullite-based environmental barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Botero Vega, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mullite coatings deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been introduced and proven as excellent candidates to protect silicon carbide (SiC) from severe pitting corrosion and recession, becoming part of the new generation of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). In these coatings mullite columns nucleate from a thin vitreous silicon layer in contact with the substrate and can grow over a wide range of increasing Al/Si ratios in constant or graded compositions. This feature allows f...

  6. Intestinal Diffusion Barrier: Unstirred Water Layer or Membrane Surface Mucous Coat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Kenneth W.; Millar, David B.; Jacobs, Lucien R.; Gray, Gary M.

    1981-12-01

    The dimensions of the small intestinal diffusion barrier interposed between luminal nutrients and their membrane receptors were determined from kinetic analysis of substrate hydrolysis by integral surface membrane enzymes. The calculated equivalent thickness of the unstirred water layer was too large to be compatible with the known dimensions of rat intestine. The discrepancy could be reconciled by consideration of the mucous coat overlying the intestinal surface membrane. Integral surface membrane proteins could not be labeled by an iodine-125 probe unless the surface coat was first removed. The mucoprotein surface coat appears to constitute an important diffusion barrier for nutrients seeking their digestive and transport sites on the outer intestinal membrane.

  7. Mechanical Properties and Durability of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings in Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miladinovich, Daniel S.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings are being developed and tested for use with SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) gas turbine engine components. Several oxide and silicate based compositons are being studied for use as top-coat and intermediate layers in a three or more layer environmental barrier coating system. Specifically, the room temperature Vickers-indentation-fracture-toughness testing and high-temperature stability reaction studies with Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS or "sand") are being conducted using advanced testing techniques such as high pressure burner rig tests as well as high heat flux laser tests.

  8. Reliability and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite insulating coatings on cooled hydrogen-oxygen rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, H. G., Jr.; Schacht, R. L.; Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the structural integrity and effective thermal conductivity of three metallic-ceramic composite coatings was conducted. These coatings were plasma sprayed onto the combustion side of water-cooled, 12.7-centimeter throat diameter, hydrogen-oxygen rocket thrust chambers operating at 2.07 to 4.14 meganewtons per square meter chamber pressure. The metallic-ceramic composites functioned for six to 17 cycles and for as long as 213 seconds of rocket operations and could have probably provided their insulating properties for many additional cycles. The effective thermal conductivity of all the coatings was in the range of 0.7472 to 4.483 w/(m)(K), which makes the coatings a very effective thermal barrier. Photomicrographic studies of cross-sectioned coolant tubes seem to indicate that the effective thermal conductivity of the coatings is controlled by contact resistance between the particles, as a result of the spraying process, and not the thermal conductivity of the bulk materials.

  9. Reduction of temperature in silicon photovoltaic module using thermal radiation coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of solar cells increases under the actual operating conditions, and the conversion efficiency of solar cells decreases with increasing temperature. In this study, a thermal radiation layer was coated on the back sheet of the PV module by a spray coating method and the effect was evaluated. The thickness of the layer was 30 μm. The temperature of the PV module with the thermal radiation coating was lower than that of the PV module without the thermal radiation coating. And the operating temperature range of the PV module with the thermal radiation coating was decreased by 2~3°C. The open-circuit voltage of the PV module with the thermal radiation coating was 0.1 V higher than that of the module without the coating due to the thermal radiation coating.

  10. High-field thermal transports properties of REBCO coated conductors

    CERN Document Server

    Bonura, M

    2015-01-01

    The use of REBCO coated conductors is envisaged for many applications, extending from power cables to high-field magnets. Whatever the case, thermal properties of REBCO tapes play a key role for the stability of superconducting devices. In this work, we present the first study on the longitudinal thermal conductivity (k) of REBCO coated conductors in magnetic fields up to 19 T applied both parallelly and perpendicularly to the thermal-current direction. Copper-stabilized tapes from six industrial manufacturers have been investigated. We show that zero-field k of coated conductors can be calculated with an accuracy of ‡ 15% from the residual resistivity ratio of the stabilizer and the Cu/non-Cu ratio. Measurements performed at high fields have allowed us to evaluate the consistency of the procedures generally used for estimating in-field k in the framework of the Wiedemann-Franz law from an electrical characterization of the materials. In-field data are intended to provide primary ingredients for the ...

  11. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Frederick

    2005-12-15

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

  12. Anti-icing Behavior of Thermally Sprayed Polymer Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuluoto, Heli; Stenroos, Christian; Kylmälahti, Mikko; Apostol, Marian; Kiilakoski, Jarkko; Vuoristo, Petri

    2017-01-01

    Surface engineering shows an increasing potential to provide a sustainable approach to icing problems. Currently, several passive anti-ice properties adoptable to coatings are known, but further research is required to proceed for practical applications. This is due to the fact that icing reduces safety, operational tempo, productivity and reliability of logistics, industry and infrastructure. An icing wind tunnel and a centrifugal ice adhesion test equipment can be used to evaluate and develop anti-icing and icephobic coatings for a potential use in various arctic environments, e.g., in wind power generation, oil drilling, mining and logistic industries. The present study deals with evaluation of icing properties of flame-sprayed polyethylene (PE)-based polymer coatings. In the laboratory-scale icing tests, thermally sprayed polymer coatings showed low ice adhesion compared with metals such as aluminum and stainless steel. The ice adhesion strength of the flame-sprayed PE coating was found to have approximately seven times lower ice adhesion values compared with metallic aluminum, indicating a very promising anti-icing behavior.

  13. Thermal repellent properties of surface coating using silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. Y.; Halim, M. S.; Aminudin, E.; Guntor, N. A.

    2017-11-01

    Extensive land development in urban areas is completely altering the surface profile of human living environment. As cities growing rapidly, impervious building and paved surfaces are replacing the natural landscape. In the developing countries with tropical climate, large masses of building elements, such as brick wall and concrete members, absorb and store large amount of heat, which in turn radiate back to the surrounding air during the night time. This bubble of heat is known as urban heat island (UHI). The use of high albedo urban surfaces is an inexpensive measure that can reduce surrounded temperature. Thus, the main focus of this study is to investigate the ability of silica, SiO2, with high albedo value, to be used as a thermal-repelled surface coating for brick wall. Three different silica coatings were used, namely silicone resin, silicone wax and rain repellent and one exterior commercial paint (jota shield paint) that commercially available in the market were applied on small-scale brick wall models. An uncoated sample also had been fabricated as a control sample for comparison. These models were placed at the outdoor space for solar exposure. Outdoor environment measurement was carried out where the ambient temperature, surface temperature, relative humidity and UV reflectance were recorded. The effect of different type of surface coating on temperature variation of the surface brick wall and the thermal performance of coatings as potential of heat reduction for brick wall have been studied. Based on the results, model with silicone resin achieved the lowest surface temperature which indicated that SiO2 can be potentially used to reduce heat absorption on the brick wall and further retains indoor passive thermal comfortability.

  14. Three-Dimensional Structure Analysis and Percolation Properties of a Barrier Marine Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Xiong, Gang; Shemilt, Laura; Diaz, Ana; Nutter, John; Burdet, Nicolas; Huo, Suguo; Mancuso, Joel; Monteith, Alexander; Vergeer, Frank; Burgess, Andrew; Robinson, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Artificially structured coatings are widely employed to minimize materials deterioration and corrosion, the annual direct cost of which is over 3% of the gross domestic product (GDP) for industrial countries. Manufacturing higher performance anticorrosive coatings is one of the most efficient approaches to reduce this loss. However, three-dimensional (3D) structure of coatings, which determines their performance, has not been investigated in detail. Here we present a quantitative nano-scale analysis of the 3D spatial structure of an anticorrosive aluminium epoxy barrier marine coating obtained by serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) and ptychographic X-ray computed tomography (PXCT). We then use finite element simulations to demonstrate how percolation through this actual 3D structure impedes ion diffusion in the composite materials. We found the aluminium flakes align within 15° of the coating surface in the material, causing the perpendicular diffusion resistance of the coating to be substantially higher than the pure epoxy.

  15. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF TRANSPARENT BARRIER MODIFIED WITH ORGANIC PCMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał MUSIAŁ

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy sources are increasingly often applied in civil engineering as a mean to reduce buildings energy demand for heating. One of the ways to reduce HVAC energy demand is to limit heat transfer and excessive solar gain through building's glazed barriers. Preliminary results of the research conducted on organic PCM-modified transparent barrier are presented in this paper. Multiple publications concerning PCMs application in structural materials have recently appeared. Most of them are focused on modification of structure of non-transparent sections of buildings' envelope. Augmenting a glazed barrier with PCMs increases its heat capacity and thermal resistance. The most important feature of the assembly is the thermal buffer, a product of PCM's considerable value of specific latent heat. Research were conducted on a triple-pane transparent rectangular barrier, that constituted one of the faces of cubic chamber. Internal volume of the chamber was 1m3. The applied PCM was a mixture of saturated and non-saturated hydrocarbons. The described assembly was subjected to temperature and radiation that occur in Poland during winter. Glazing temperature, melted/total PCM ratio were measured, as well as energy demand for keeping internal temperature at constant level. Measurements were made in steady states, for various PCM layer thickness. The influence of the modification on energy demand was determined, along with the most effective and rational thickness of PCM layer to be applied. Conducted research enabled to develop a basis for further investigation of PCMs application in civil engineering.

  16. One Component Encapsulating Material Matrix as High Barrier Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the NASA need for new flexible food packaging materials with effective high barrier against oxygen and moisture to protect food, minimize weight and...

  17. Functional hydrophobin-coating of thermally hydrocarbonized porous silicon microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimbo, Luis M; Mäkilä, Ermei; Raula, Janne; Laaksonen, Timo; Laaksonen, Päivi; Strommer, Katharina; Kauppinen, Esko I; Salonen, Jarno; Linder, Markus B; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2011-12-01

    Porous silicon (PSi) particles have been widely used in modulating the dissolution rate of various types of drugs loaded within its mesopores. This material can be surface treated in order to vary its hydrophobicity and several other properties, such as drug loading degree and release rate. Hydrophobins are a family of self-assembling proteins of fungal origin which have the ability to form layers on hydrophobic materials. This type of protein layer can modify the characteristics and control the binding properties of the surface on which it assembles. In this study, we have developed a procedure to coat thermally hydrocarbonized-PSi microparticles with hydrophobin II (HFBII) in order to modify the particles' hydrophobicity and to improve their biocompatibility, while maintaining intact the advantageous drug releasing properties of the PSi. The HFBII content adsorbed onto the particles was successfully quantified by a protein assay. Drug dissolution and permeation across Caco-2 cell monolayers were also conducted, together with viability studies in AGS, Caco-2 and HT-29 cells. The characterization and coating stability assessment showed that the HFBII-coating desorbs partially from the particles' surface as the pH increases. The HFBII coating also improved the biocompatibility of the particles without compromising the enhanced drug permeation or release. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sporicidal efficacy of thermal-sprayed copper alloy coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghi, Romina; Mostaghimi, Javad; Pershin, Valerian; Ringuette, Maurice

    2017-05-01

    Approximately 200 000 Canadians acquire healthcare-associated bacterial infections each year and several-fold more acquire food-borne bacterial illnesses. Bacterial spores are particularly problematic because they can survive on surfaces for several months. Owing to its sporicidal activity, copper alloy sheet metal is sometimes used in hospital settings, but its widespread use is limited by cost and incompatibility with complex furniture and instrument designs and topographies. A potential alternative is the use of thermal spray technology to coat surfaces with copper alloys. We compared the sporicidal activity of thermally sprayed copper alloy on stainless steel with that of copper alloy sheet metal against Bacillus subtilis spores. Spores remained intact for at least 1 week on uncoated stainless steel, whereas spore fragmentation was initiated within 2 h of exposure to either copper surface. Less than 15% of spores were viable 2 h after exposure to either copper surface, as compared with stainless steel. By day 7, only degraded spores and petal-like nanoflowers were present on the copper surfaces. Nanoflowers, which are laminar arrangements of thin crystal sheets composed of carbon - copper phosphate, appeared to be derived from the degraded spores. Altogether, these results indicate that a thermal-sprayed copper alloy coating on stainless steel provides sporicidal activity similar to that afforded by copper alloy sheet metal.

  19. Laser Processing of Multilayered Thermal Spray Coatings: Optimal Processing Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Zhang, Tao; Lee, Hwasoo; Sampath, Sanjay; Hwang, David; Longtin, Jon

    2017-11-01

    Laser processing offers an innovative approach for the fabrication and transformation of a wide range of materials. As a rapid, non-contact, and precision material removal technology, lasers are natural tools to process thermal spray coatings. Recently, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) was fabricated using thermal spray and laser processing. The TEG device represents a multilayer, multimaterial functional thermal spray structure, with laser processing serving an essential role in its fabrication. Several unique challenges are presented when processing such multilayer coatings, and the focus of this work is on the selection of laser processing parameters for optimal feature quality and device performance. A parametric study is carried out using three short-pulse lasers, where laser power, repetition rate and processing speed are varied to determine the laser parameters that result in high-quality features. The resulting laser patterns are characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electrical isolation tests between patterned regions. The underlying laser interaction and material removal mechanisms that affect the feature quality are discussed. Feature quality was found to improve both by using a multiscanning approach and an optional assist gas of air or nitrogen. Electrically isolated regions were also patterned in a cylindrical test specimen.

  20. Laser Processing of Multilayered Thermal Spray Coatings: Optimal Processing Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewolde, Mahder; Zhang, Tao; Lee, Hwasoo; Sampath, Sanjay; Hwang, David; Longtin, Jon

    2017-12-01

    Laser processing offers an innovative approach for the fabrication and transformation of a wide range of materials. As a rapid, non-contact, and precision material removal technology, lasers are natural tools to process thermal spray coatings. Recently, a thermoelectric generator (TEG) was fabricated using thermal spray and laser processing. The TEG device represents a multilayer, multimaterial functional thermal spray structure, with laser processing serving an essential role in its fabrication. Several unique challenges are presented when processing such multilayer coatings, and the focus of this work is on the selection of laser processing parameters for optimal feature quality and device performance. A parametric study is carried out using three short-pulse lasers, where laser power, repetition rate and processing speed are varied to determine the laser parameters that result in high-quality features. The resulting laser patterns are characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and electrical isolation tests between patterned regions. The underlying laser interaction and material removal mechanisms that affect the feature quality are discussed. Feature quality was found to improve both by using a multiscanning approach and an optional assist gas of air or nitrogen. Electrically isolated regions were also patterned in a cylindrical test specimen.

  1. Engineered Barrier Systems Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical Column Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.E. Lowry

    2001-12-13

    The Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Thermal-Hydraulic-Chemical (THC) Column Tests provide data needed for model validation. The EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Modeling Report (PMR) will be based on supporting models for in-drift THC coupled processes, and the in-drift physical and chemical environment. These models describe the complex chemical interaction of EBS materials, including granular materials, with the thermal and hydrologic conditions that will be present in the repository emplacement drifts. Of particular interest are the coupled processes that result in mineral and salt dissolution/precipitation in the EBS environment. Test data are needed for thermal, hydrologic, and geochemical model validation and to support selection of introduced materials (CRWMS M&O 1999c). These column tests evaluated granular crushed tuff as potential invert ballast or backfill material, under accelerated thermal and hydrologic environments. The objectives of the THC column testing are to: (1) Characterize THC coupled processes that could affect performance of EBS components, particularly the magnitude of permeability reduction (increases or decreases), the nature of minerals produced, and chemical fractionation (i.e., concentrative separation of salts and minerals due to boiling-point elevation). (2) Generate data for validating THC predictive models that will support the EBS Degradation, Flow, and Transport PMR, Rev. 01.

  2. Effect of thermal dissipation by adding graphene materials to surface coating of LED lighting module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Jeong, J Y; Han, S H; Kim, J H; Kwon, K T; Hwang, M K; Kim, I T; Cho, G S

    2013-05-01

    The effect of thermal dissipation by adding graphene nano-platelets to two different commercially available thermal dissipation coatings (ceramic coating and powder coating) was studied. Steady state temperatures of each points of LED modules was monitored in a closed system, with an integral photo detection sphere where there is no external air flow. Having eliminated the contributions of thermal conduction and air flow convection, the module with a conventional heat dissipation coatings showed 8-16% enhancement of thermal dissipation compared to that of non-coated LED module. The addition of graphene is shown to have about 3% additional enhancement. By analyzing thermal resistance of each component of the LED module, the improved thermal conductivity of the graphene added coatings contributes to the enhancement of slight improvement with heat dissipation.

  3. Simulation of thermal stress in Er2O3 and Al2O3 tritium penetration barriers by finite-element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Guogang; He, Anping; Wang, Ling

    2017-09-01

    The physical vapor deposition method is an effective way to deposit Al2O3 and Er2O3 on 316L stainless steel substrates acting as tritium permeation barriers in a fusion reactor. The distribution of residual thermal stress is calculated both in Al2O3 and Er2O3 coating systems with planar and rough substrates using finite element analysis. The parameters influencing the thermal stress in the sputter process are analyzed, such as coating and substrate properties, temperature and Young’s modulus. This work shows that the thermal stress in Al2O3 and Er2O3 coating systems exhibit a linear relationship with substrate thickness, temperature and Young’s modulus. However, this relationship is inversed with coating thickness. In addition, the rough substrate surface can increase the thermal stress in the process of coating deposition. The adhesive strength between the coating and the substrate is evaluated by the shear stress. Due to the higher compressive shear stress, the Al2O3 coating has a better adhesive strength with a 316L stainless steel substrate than the Er2O3 coating. Furthermore, the analysis shows that it is a useful way to improve adhesive strength with increasing interface roughness.

  4. It takes more than a coating to get nanoparticles through the intestinal barrier in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Dajana; Ebmeyer, Johanna; Meyer, Thomas; Behr, Anne-Cathrin; Kästner, Claudia; Böhmert, Linda; Juling, Sabine; Niemann, Birgit; Fahrenson, Christoph; Selve, Sören; Thünemann, Andreas F; Meijer, Jan; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Braeuning, Albert; Lampen, Alfonso

    2017-09-01

    Size and shape are crucial parameters which have impact on the potential of nanoparticles to penetrate cell membranes and epithelial barriers. Current research in nanotoxicology additionally focuses on particle coating. To distinguish between core- and coating-related effects in nanoparticle uptake and translocation, two nanoparticles equal in size, coating and charge but different in core material were investigated. Silver and iron oxide nanoparticles coated with poly (acrylic acid) were chosen and extensively characterized by small-angle x-ray scattering, nanoparticle tracing analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Uptake and transport were studied in the intestinal Caco-2 model in a Transwell system with subsequent elemental analysis. TEM and ion beam microscopy were conducted for particle visualization. Although equal in size, charge and coating, the behavior of the two particles in Caco-2 cells was different: while the internalized amount was comparable, only iron oxide nanoparticles additionally passed the epithelium. Our findings suggest that the coating material influenced only the uptake of the nanoparticles whereas the translocation was determined by the core material. Knowledge about the different roles of the particle coating and core materials in crossing biological barriers will facilitate toxicological risk assessment of nanoparticles and contribute to the optimization of pharmacokinetic properties of nano-scaled pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of biodegradable coatings on the barrier properties of papers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rouzbeh asadi khansari

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to compare barrier property of biodegradable coatings on two base papers. Two different paper grades differing in structure (Kraft liner and printing & writing papers were used. The papers are made in Mazandaran wood and paper industry. Coating materials with 30% solid content, included clay (100 parts and cationic starch (12 parts, and they were mixed with two binders (PLA 10 parts and PVA 10 parts for two formulations. The immersion method in both levels 1 and 2 minutes and two coating formulations were applied on papers. Then, the treated samples were dried in standard conditions of temperature (25◦C and 54% humidity in the room. For that purpose, air resistance or porosity, thickness, mass, and Cobb60 were determined. As expected, time of treatment, reduced porosity and increased coating weight, but in terms of barrier properties, combination containing PVA was more effective than PLA. In comparison to the control group, all the treated samples had higher air resistance and water absorption, which the increment of water absorption is due to increased capillary in texture paper. The analysis of results showed that the immersion coating factors had considerable effects on performance of air resistance improvement and coating weight of papers. Then, calculated values of the thickness and density of coating were evaluated, which confirmed the status of water absorption. The treatments greatly increased the wettability of the surface by water.

  6. Reactive coating of soybean oil-based polymer on nanofibrillated cellulose film for water vapor barrier packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng; Xiao, Huining; Zhang, Weiwei; Gong, Glen

    2014-10-13

    Nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) easily forms a high strength film but is unable to withstand the influence of water vapor when used in high moisture situations. The water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of a NFC film was as high as 5088 g/m(2)24h (38 °C, 90% RH). The addition of beeswax latex in a NFC casting film (NFX) lowered the WVTR to 3918 g/m(2)24h. To further reduce the WVTR, a coating agent comprised of acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was applied onto the NFX film using a rod coater. A combination of the suitable AESO/APTS ratio, initiator dosing, curing time and temperature could reduce the WVTR to 188 g/m(2) 24h when the coat weight was 5 g/m(2). Moreover, the coated NFX film was highly hydrophobic along with the improved transparency and thermal stability. This biodegradable polymer-coated NFC film can be used as potential packaging barrier in certain areas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Application of High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF Spraying to the Fabrication of Yb-Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Bakan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available From the literature, it is known that due to their glass formation tendency, it is not possible to deposit fully-crystalline silicate coatings when the conventional atmospheric plasma spraying (APS process is employed. In APS, rapid quenching of the sprayed material on the substrate facilitates the amorphous deposit formation, which shrinks when exposed to heat and forms pores and/or cracks. This paper explores the feasibility of using a high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF process for the cost-effective fabrication of dense, stoichiometric, and crystalline Yb2Si2O7 environmental barrier coatings. We report our findings on the HVOF process optimization and its resultant influence on the microstructure development and crystallinity of the Yb2Si2O7 coatings. The results reveal that partially crystalline, dense, and vertical crack-free EBCs can be produced by the HVOF technique. However, the furnace thermal cycling results revealed that the bonding of the Yb2Si2O7 layer to the Silicon bond coat needs to be improved.

  8. Preparation and Thermal Characterization of Annealed Gold Coated Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afarin Bahrami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon (PSi layers were formed on a p-type Si wafer. Six samples were anodised electrically with a 30 mA/cm2 fixed current density for different etching times. The samples were coated with a 50–60 nm gold layer and annealed at different temperatures under Ar flow. The morphology of the layers, before and after annealing, formed by this method was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS measurements were carried out to measure the thermal diffusivity (TD of the PSi and Au/PSi samples. For the Au/PSi samples, the thermal diffusivity was measured before and after annealing to study the effect of annealing. Also to study the aging effect, a comparison was made between freshly annealed samples and samples 30 days after annealing.

  9. High-temperature stability of yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bustor and vehicle acreage applications [19–21]. However, silicide coatings are generally used for oxidation ... Since, Nb alloys are being used for these applications, TBC with a prior bond coat is essential for better ..... ing; notwithstanding the bond coat mitigates the thermal mis- match between the metal substrate and YSZ ...

  10. High-field thermal transport properties of REBCO coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonura, Marco; Senatore, Carmine

    2015-02-01

    The use of REBCO coated conductors (CCs) is envisaged for many applications, extending from power cables to high-field magnets. Whatever the case, thermal properties of REBCO tapes play a key role for the stability of superconducting devices. In this work, we present the first study on the longitudinal thermal conductivity (κ) of REBCO CCs in magnetic fields up to 19 T applied both parallel and perpendicularly to the thermal-current direction. Copper-stabilized tapes from six industrial manufacturers have been investigated. We show that zero-field κ of CCs can be calculated with an accuracy of +/- 15% from the residual resistivity ratio of the stabilizer and the Cu/non-Cu ratio. Measurements performed at high fields have allowed us to evaluate the consistency of the procedures generally used for estimating in-field κ in the framework of the Wiedemann-Franz law from an electrical characterization of the materials. In-field data are intended to provide primary ingredients for the thermal stability analysis of high-temperature superconductor-based magnets.

  11. Comparative study on effect of blending, thermal barrier coating (LHR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    adiabatic will enhance the overall engine performance. ..... inlet cooling water temperature of 80°C. A piezoelectric pressure transducer was mounted ..... The differences between saturated and unsaturated fatty acids of vegetable oils play an ...

  12. Containment of a silicone fluid free surface in reduced gravity using barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pline, Alexander D.; Jacobson, Thomas P.

    In support of the Surface Tension Driven Convection Experiment planned for flight aboard the Space Shuttle, tests were conducted under reduced gravity in the 2.2-sec Drop Tower and the 5.0-sec Zero-G facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The dynamics of controlling the test fluid, a 10-cSt viscosity silicone fluid in a low gravity environment were investigated using different container designs and barrier coatings. Three container edge designs were tested without a barrier coating; a square edge, a sharp edge with a 45-deg slope, and a sawtooth edge. All three edge designs were successful in containing the fluid below the edge. G-jitter experiments were made in scaled down containers subjected to horizontal accelerations. The data showed that a barrier coating is effective in containing silicone fluid under g-levels up to 10 sup -1 sub g sub 0. In addition, a second barrier coating was found which has similar anti-wetting characteristics and is also more durable.

  13. EVALUATION OF BARRIERS TO THE USE OF RADIATION CURED COATINGS IN WIDE-WEB FLEXOGRAPHIC PRINTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of a study to investigate and identify the technical, economic, and educational barriers to the use and implementation of radiation-curable coatings (primarily ultraviolet (UV) curable inks) in the wide-web flexographic printing industry. (NOTE: In suppor...

  14. EVALUATION OF BARRIERS TO THE USE OF RADIATION-CURED COATINGS IN SCREEN PRINTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an evaluation of barriers to the use of radiation-cured coatings in screen printing. In support of the Source Reduction Review Project (SRRP), maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards development, and the Pollution Prevention Act, EPA is ...

  15. Chitosan coating and films : evaluation of surface, permeation, mechanical and thermal propertiess

    OpenAIRE

    Casariego, A.; Souza, B.W.S.; L. Cruz; Díaz, R; Teixeira, J. A.; A.A. Vicente

    2008-01-01

    The potentialities of chitosan (from lobster of the cuban coasts) coating to extend the shelf life of vegetables were evaluated. To do so, the surface properties of tomato and carrot were characterized and the wettability properties of chitosan coatings were studied. In such coatings, chitosan concentration and effects of type and concentration of plasticizer or surfactant on wettability of chitosan coatings were evaluated, as well as the respective barrier and mechanical properti...

  16. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Diffusion in Environmental Barrier Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Components (CMC) components for use in turbine engines offer a number of advantages compared with current practice. However, such components are subject to degradation through a variety of mechanisms. In particular, in the hot environment inside a turbine in operation a considerable amount of water vapor is present, and this can lead to corrosion and recession. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) systems that limit the amount of oxygen and water reaching the component are required to reduce this degradation and extend component life. A number of silicate-based materials are under consideration for use in such coating systems, including Yttterbium and Yttrium di- and monosilicates. In this work, we present results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of oxygen diffusion in Yttrium disilicate, and compare with previous work on Yttterbium disilicate. Coatings may also exhibit cracking, and the cracks can provide a direct path for oxygen to reach the component. There is typically a bond coat between the coating and component surface, but the bond coat material is generally chosen for properties other than low oxygen diffusivity. Nevertheless, the degree to which the bond coat can inhibit oxygen diffusion is of interest, as it may form the final defense against oxygen impingement on the component. We have therefore performed similar simulations of oxygen diffusion through HfSiO4, a proposed bond coat material.

  17. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Jr., William S.; Pickering, J. Larry; Black, William E.

    1987-01-01

    A thermal barrier/core support for the fuel core of a nuclear reactor having a metallic cylinder secured to the reactor vessel liner and surrounded by fibrous insulation material. A top cap is secured to the upper end of the metallic cylinder that locates and orients a cover block and post seat. Under normal operating conditions, the metallic cylinder supports the entire load exerted by its associated fuel core post. Disposed within the metallic cylinder is a column of ceramic material, the height of which is less than that of the metallic cylinder, and thus is not normally load bearing. In the event of a temperature excursion beyond the design limits of the metallic cylinder and resulting in deformation of the cylinder, the ceramic column will abut the top cap to support the fuel core post.

  18. Thermal Barrier/Seal for Extreme Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Phelps, Jack; Bauer, Paul; Bond, Bruce; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large solid rocket motors, as found on the Space Shuttle, are fabricated in segments for manufacturing considerations, bolted together, and sealed using conventional Viton O-ring seals. Similarly the nine large solid rocket motor nozzles are assembled from several different segments, bolted together, and sealed at six joint locations using conventional O-ring seals. The 5500 F combustion gases are generally kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic or rubber insulation. Joint-fill compounds, including RTV (room temperature vulcanized compound) and polysulfide filler, are used to fill the joints in the insulation to prevent a direct flow-path to the O-rings. Normally these two stages of protection are enough to prevent a direct flow-path of the 900-psi hot gases from reaching the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. However, in the current design 1 out of 15 Space Shuttle solid rocket motors experience hot gas effects on the Joint 6 wiper (sacrificial) O-rings. Also worrisome is the fact that joints have experienced heat effects on materials between the RTV and the O-rings, and in two cases O-rings have experienced heat effects. These conditions lead to extensive reviews of the post-flight conditions as part of the effort to monitor flight safety. We have developed a braided carbon fiber thermal barrier to replace the joint fill compounds in the Space Shuttle solid rocket motor nozzles to reduce the incoming 5500 F combustion gas temperature and permit only cool (approximately 100 F) gas to reach the temperature-sensitive O-ring seals. Implementation of this thermal barrier provides more robust, consistent operation with shorter turn around times between Shuttle launches.

  19. Waste Package Outer Barrier Stress Due to Thermal Expansion with Various Barrier Gap Sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. M. Lewis

    2001-11-27

    The objective of this activity is to determine the tangential stresses of the outer shell, due to uneven thermal expansion of the inner and outer shells of the current waste package (WP) designs. Based on the results of the calculation ''Waste Package Barrier Stresses Due to Thermal Expansion'', CAL-EBS-ME-000008 (ref. 10), only tangential stresses are considered for this calculation. The tangential stresses are significantly larger than the radial stresses associated with thermal expansion, and at the WP outer surface the radial stresses are equal to zero. The scope of this activity is limited to determining the tangential stresses the waste package outer shell is subject to due to the interference fit, produced by having two different shell coefficients of thermal expansions. The inner shell has a greater coefficient of thermal expansion than the outer shell, producing a pressure between the two shells. This calculation is associated with Waste Package Project. The calculations are performed for the 21-PWR (pressurized water reactor), 44-BWR (boiling water reactor), 24-BWR, 12-PWR Long, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF - Short (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel), 2-MCO/2-DHLW (multi-canister overpack), and Naval SNF Long WP designs. The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that of the potential design for the types of WPs considered in this calculation. This calculation is performed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for SR (Ref.7). The calculation is documented, reviewed, and approved in accordance with AP-3.12Q, Calculations (Ref.1).

  20. Thermochemistry of Rare Earth Silicates for Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gustavo; Jacobson, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth silicates are promising candidates as environmental protective coatings (EBCs) for silica-forming ceramics and composites in combustion environments since they are predicted to have lower reactivity with the water vapor combustion products. The reactivity of rare earth silicates is assessed by the thermodynamic activity of the silica component which is best measured by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry (KEMS). Here, we discuss a novel method based on a reducing agent to increase the partial pressure of SiO(g) which is then used to calculate thermodynamic activity of silica in Y2O3-SiO2 and Yb2O3-SiO2 systems. After the KEMS measurements, samples were probed by X-ray diffraction and their phase content was calculated from Rietveld refinement.

  1. CMAS Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited via Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, B. J.; Wiesner, V. L.; Zhu, D.; Johnson, N. S.

    2017-01-01

    Materials for advanced turbine engines are expected to have temperature capabilities in the range of 1370-1500C. At these temperatures the ingestion of sand and dust particulate can result in the formation of corrosive glass deposits referred to as CMAS. The presence of this glass can both thermomechanically and thermochemically significantly degrade protective coatings on metallic and ceramic components. Plasma Spray- Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) was used to deposit advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) systems for investigation on their interaction with CMAS compositions. Coatings were exposed to CMAS and furnace tested in air from 1 to 50 hours at temperatures ranging from 1200-1500C. Coating composition and crystal structure were tracked with X-ray diffraction and microstructure with electron microscopy.

  2. Thermal Performance Study of Composite Phase Change Material with Polyacrylicand Conformal Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Shin Yiing; Munusamy, Yamuna; Ong, Kok Seng; Cornelis Metselaar, Hendrik Simon; Chee, Swee Yong; Lai, Koon Chun

    2017-07-28

    The composite PCM was prepared by blending polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and myristic acid (MA) in different weight percentages. The MA and PMMA were selected as PCM and supporting material, respectively. As liquid MA may leak out during the phase transition, this study proposes the use of two coatings, namely a polyacrylic coating and a conformal coating to overcome the leakage problem. Both coatings were studied in terms of the leakage test, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, morphology, and reliability. No leakage was found in the PCMs with coatings compared to those without under the same proportions of MA/PMMA, thus justifying the use of coatings in the present study. The chemically compatibility was confirmed by FTIR spectra: the functional groups of PCMs were in accordance with those of coatings. DSC showed that the coatings did not significantly change the melting and freezing temperatures, however, they improved the thermal stability of composite PCMs as seen in TGA analysis. Furthermore, the composite PCMs demonstrated good thermal reliability after 1000 times thermal cycling. The latent heat of melting reduced by only 0.16% and 1.02% for the PCMs coated with conformal coating and polyacrylic coating, respectively. Therefore, the proposed coatings can be considered in preparing fatty acid/PMMA blends attributed to the good stability, compatibility and leakage prevention.

  3. Mechanisms of oxygen permeation through plastic films and barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilski, Stefan; Wipperfürth, Jens; Jaritz, Montgomery; Kirchheim, Dennis; Mitschker, Felix; Awakowicz, Peter; Dahlmann, Rainer; Hopmann, Christian

    2017-10-01

    Oxygen and water vapour permeation through plastic films in food packaging or other applications with high demands on permeation are prevented by inorganic barrier films. Most of the permeation occurs through small defects (PET) are investigated and the mass transport through the polymer is simulated in a 3D approach. Calculations of single defects showed that there is no linear correlation between the defect area and the resulting permeability. The influence of adjacent defects in different distances was observed and led to flow reduction functions depending on the defect spacing and defect area. A critical defect spacing where no interaction between defects occurs was found and compared to other findings. According to the superposition principle, the permeability of single defects was added up and compared to experimentally determined oxygen permeation. The results showed the same trend of decreasing permeability with decreasing defect densities.

  4. Possibilities of utilization high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF coatings in conditions of thermal cyclic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brezinová

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The item deals with the possibilities of utilization HVOF coatings in thermal cyclic loading conditions. There were evaluated three types of coatings based on WC-Co, WC-Co-Cr and Cr3C2-25NiCr. The quality of coatings was evaluated in terms of their adhesion as sprayed and also during the cyclic thermal loading, EDX analysis and evaluation of microhardness. Construction and structure of coatings were studied using optical and electron microscopy. There was also evaluated resistance of the coatings against erosive wear.

  5. Feasibility Assessment of Thermal Barrier Seals for Extreme Transient Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The assembly joints of modem solid rocket motor cases are generally sealed using conventional O-ring type seals. The 5500+ F combustion gases produced by rocket motors are kept a safe distance away from the seals by thick layers of phenolic insulation. Special compounds are used to fill insulation gaps leading up to the seals to prevent a direct flowpath to them. Design criteria require that the seals should not experience torching or charring during operation, or their sealing ability would be compromised. On limited occasions, NASA has observed charring of the primary O-rings of the Space Shuttle solid rocket nozzle assembly joints due to parasitic leakage paths opening up in the gap-fill compounds during rocket operation. NASA is investigating different approaches for preventing torching or charring of the primary O-rings. One approach is to implement a braided rope seal upstream of the primary O-ring to serve as a thermal barrier that prevents the hot gases from impinging on the O-ring seals. This paper presents flow, resiliency, and thermal resistance for several types of NASA rope seals braided out of carbon fibers. Burn tests were performed to determine the time to burn through each of the seals when exposed to the flame of an oxyacetylene torch (5500 F), representative of the 5500 F solid rocket motor combustion temperatures. Rope seals braided out of carbon fibers endured the flame for over six minutes, three times longer than solid rocket motor burn time. Room and high temperature flow tests are presented for the carbon seals for different amounts of linear compression. Room temperature compression tests were performed to assess seal resiliency and unit preloads as a function of compression. The thermal barrier seal was tested in a subscale "char" motor test in which the seal sealed an intentional defect in the gap insulation. Temperature measurements indicated that the seal blocked 2500 F combustion gases on the upstream side with very little temperature

  6. Preparation of a Novel Water-based Acrylic Multi-Thermal Insulation Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufang YE

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently improve the thermal insulation effect of coatings, a novel water-based acrylic multi-thermal insulation coating (multi-WATIC combined with thermal obstruction, echo, and radiation was prepared. The category and ratio of thermal insulation functional fillers are crucial. First, water-based acrylic thermal insulation coating (WATIC with single thermal insulation functional fillers was prepared, and the thermal insulation property tests were done. Thereafter, a novel multi-WATIC was prepared combined with the 3 thermal insulation functional fillers together, and the formula of the novel multi-WATIC was optimized based on single factor experiments by response surface methodology (RSM. Test results showed that multi-WATIC has excellent thermal insulation property, and the fitting result obtained by RSM is in good agreement with test data.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.23.2.16090

  7. Waterproof Silicone Coatings of Thermal Insulation and Vaporization Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, Domenick E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Thermal insulation composed of porous ceramic material can be waterproofed by producing a thin silicone film on the surface of the insulation by exposing it to volatile silicone precursors at ambient conditions. When the silicone precursor reactants are multi-functional siloxanes or silanes containing alkenes or alkynes carbon groups higher molecular weight films can be produced. Catalyst are usually required for the silicone precursors to react at room temperature to form the films. The catalyst are particularly useful in the single component system e.g. dimethylethoxysilane (DNMS) to accelerate the reaction and decrease the time to waterproof and protect the insulation. In comparison to other methods, the chemical vapor technique assures better control over the quantity and location of the film being deposited on the ceramic insulation to improve the waterproof coating.

  8. Evaluation of thermal control coatings for use on solar dynamic radiators in low earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Slemp, Wayne S.; Stoyack, Joseph E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal control coatings with high thermal emittance and low solar absorptance are needed for Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar dynamic power module radiator (SDR) surfaces for efficient heat rejection. Additionally, these coatings must be durable to low earth orbital (LEO) environmental effects of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation and deep thermal cycles which occur as a result of start-up and shut-down of the solar dynamic power system. Eleven candidate coatings were characterized for their solar absorptance and emittance before and after exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation (200 to 400 nm), vacuum UV (VUV) radiation (100 to 200 nm) and atomic oxygen. Results indicated that the most durable and best performing coatings were white paint thermal control coatings Z-93, zinc oxide pigment in potassium silicate binder, and YB-71, zinc orthotitanate pigment in potassium silicate binder. Optical micrographs of these materials exposed to the individual environmental effects of atomic oxygen and vacuum thermal cycling showed that no surface cracking occurred.

  9. Investigation of Thermal Properties of Ni-Coated Graphene Nanoribbons Based on Molecular Dynamics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fulong; Kan, Yan; Tang, Kai; Liu, Sheng

    2017-08-01

    The thermal properties of graphene and Ni-coated graphene have been investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results showed that the thermal conductivity of Ni-coated graphene was lower than that of graphene. More excited low-frequency phonons resulted in this decrease. The thermal conductivity of single-layer Ni-coated graphene was 70% of that of graphene, and the thermal conductivity of double-layer Ni-coated graphene was 56% of that of graphene at room temperature. The strong dependence of size on the thermal conductivity of graphene and Ni-coated graphene is discussed in this work. The thermal conductivity of Ni-coated graphene increased with length, but the trend was less pronounced than that of the thermal conductivity of graphene. Because of boundary scattering, the thermal conductivity of Ni-coated graphene increased with increasing width. The temperature effect indicated that the thermal conductivity decreased with increasing temperature from 200 K to 700 K.

  10. Performance and Durability of Environmental Barrier Coatings on SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Bhatt, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    This presentation highlights advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) and SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) systems for next generation turbine engines. The emphasis will be placed on fundamental coating and CMC property evaluations; and the integrated system performance and degradation mechanisms in simulated laboratory turbine engine testing environments. Long term durability tests in laser rig simulated high heat flux the rmomechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions will also be presented. The results can help improve the future EBC-CMC system designs, validating the advanced EBC-CMC technologies for hot section turbine engine applications.

  11. Continuous fiber reinforced mesh bond coat for environmental barrier coating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, James; Das, Rupak; Roberts III, Herbert Chidsey; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2017-09-26

    A gas turbine blade may have a bond coat applied to its surface. A porous substrate may be applied to the bond layer and one or more protective layers may be applied to the bond layer such that the fiber mesh is embedded between the bond layer and the protective layer to prevent creep.

  12. Polymer Derived Rare Earth Silicate Nanocomposite Protective Coatings for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this Phase I SBIR program is to develop polymer derived rare earth silicate nanocomposite environmental barrier coatings (EBC) for providing...

  13. A travelling photothermal technique employing pyroelectric detection to measure thermal diffusivity of films and coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, J.; Manjusha, M. V.; Soumya, H.

    2011-10-01

    A travelling thermal wave technique employing optical excitation and pyroelectric detection of thermal waves propagating along a material film/coating on a substrate is described. The method enables direct measurement of thermal diffusivity. The technique involves measurement of the phase lag undergone by an optically excited thermal wave as it propagates along the coating. The set up has been automated for convenient and fast data acquisition and analysis. The technique has been adapted to measurement of thermal diffusivity of a commercial paint sample coated on glass and copper substrates. It is found that thermal diffusivity of the coating is independent of the thermal conductivity of the substrate. Dependence of thermal diffusivity on coating thickness shows exponential increase, with value reaching a constant at a characteristic high thickness. Measurements have been carried out on a few other samples with wide variations in thermal diffusivity, and the results compared with available reports or results obtained following other techniques. Analyses of the results show that the technique allows measurement of thermal diffusivity of coatings and films with uncertainties better than ±2.5%.

  14. Dust coatings on basaltic rocks and implications for thermal infrared spectroscopy of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Christensen, P.R.; Lucey, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Thin coatings of atmospherically deposited dust can mask the spectral characteristics of underlying surfaces on Mars from the visible to thermal infrared wavelengths, making identification of substrate and coating mineralogy difficult from lander and orbiter spectrometer data. To study the spectral effects of dust coatings, we acquired thermal emission and hemispherical reflectance spectra (5-25 μm; 2000-400 cm-1) of basaltic andesite coated with different thicknesses of air fall-deposited palagonitic soils, fine-grained ceramic clay powders, and terrestrial loess. The results show that thin coatings (10-20 μm) reduce the spectral contrast of the rock substrate substantially, consistent with previous work. This contrast reduction continues linearly with increasing coating thickness until a "saturation thickness" is reached, after which little further change is observed. The saturation thickness of the spectrally flat palagonite coatings is ~100-120 μm, whereas that for coatings with higher spectral contrast is only ~50-75 μm. Spectral differences among coated and uncoated samples correlate with measured coating thicknesses in a quadratic manner, whereas correlations with estimated surface area coverage are better fit by linear functions. Linear mixture modeling of coated samples using the rock substrate and coating materials as end-members is also consistent with their measured coating thicknesses and areal coverage. A comparison of ratios of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra of dark and bright intracrater and windstreak deposits associated with Radau crater suggests that the dark windstreak material may be coated with as much as 90% areal coverage of palagonitic dust. The data presented here also will help improve interpretations of upcoming mini-TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) observations of coated Mars surface materials.

  15. Numerically modeling Brownian thermal noise in amorphous and crystalline thin coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, Geoffrey; Demos, Nicholas; Khan, Haroon

    2018-01-01

    Thermal noise is expected to be one of the noise sources limiting the astrophysical reach of Advanced LIGO (once commissioning is complete) and third-generation detectors. Adopting crystalline materials for thin, reflecting mirror coatings, rather than the amorphous coatings used in current-generation detectors, could potentially reduce thermal noise. Understanding and reducing thermal noise requires accurate theoretical models, but modeling thermal noise analytically is especially challenging with crystalline materials. Thermal noise models typically rely on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, which relates the power spectral density of the thermal noise to an auxiliary elastic problem. In this paper, we present results from a new, open-source tool that numerically solves the auxiliary elastic problem to compute the Brownian thermal noise for both amorphous and crystalline coatings. We employ the open-source deal.ii and PETSc frameworks to solve the auxiliary elastic problem using a finite-element method, adaptive mesh refinement, and parallel processing that enables us to use high resolutions capable of resolving the thin reflective coating. We verify numerical convergence, and by running on up to hundreds of compute cores, we resolve the coating elastic energy in the auxiliary problem to approximately 0.1%. We compare with approximate analytic solutions for amorphous materials, and we verify that our solutions scale as expected with changing beam size, mirror dimensions, and coating thickness. Finally, we model the crystalline coating thermal noise in an experiment reported by Cole et al (2013 Nat. Photon. 7 644–50), comparing our results to a simpler numerical calculation that treats the coating as an ‘effectively amorphous’ material. We find that treating the coating as a cubic crystal instead of as an effectively amorphous material increases the thermal noise by about 3%. Our results are a step toward better understanding and reducing thermal noise to

  16. Numerical investigation of damage protective oxide mechanisms in thermal barrier system for aeronautical turbine blade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khelifa hocine

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of a material for a given application requires insuring a good durability in its conditions of employment, in particular environmental. It is especially true for the systems destined to work in corrosive hot atmospheres. For it, the knowledge and the understanding of the corrosion phenomena, oxidization, ageing and damage are indispensable in order to anticipate the life period of the structures and to propose the adapted protective solutions. The study of the corrosion in high temperature is therefore a greatly interdisciplinary topic, into the interface of the physico-chemistry, metallic and ceramic materials and mechanics. We propose in this work a finite element method for the simulation of EBPVD TBCs spallation. Our studies concern one of several systems that we call thermal barrier coatings, which are a Composite materials deposited in layers on the hot components to isolate them chemically and thermally at high temperatures. This is the last operational technology adapted on aircraft engines but it is still studied and not fully exploited.This comprehensive article describes the systems currently used and the problem of interaction between mechanical and environment in the turbine.

  17. An Integrated Study of a Novel Thermal Coating for Nb-Based High Temperature Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shizhong [Southern Univ. and A & M College, Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes our recent works of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation on the interfaces between niobium substrate and coatings at atomic level. Potential oxidation barrier bond coat, Nb₂AlC and high entropy alloys, and top coat candidates were synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in our labs. The simulation methods, experimental validation techniques, achievements already reached, students and postdoc training, and future improvement are briefly introduced.

  18. Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.; Halbig, Michael Charles; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Costa, Gustavo; Mccue, Terry R.

    2017-01-01

    This presentation reviews the NASA advanced environmental barrier coating (EBC) system development for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustors particularly under the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation, Fundamental Aeronautics and Transformative Aeronautics Concepts Programs. The emphases have been placed on the current design challenges of the 2700-3000F capable environmental barrier coatings for low NOX emission combustors for next generation turbine engines by using advanced plasma spray based processes, and the coating processing and integration with SiC-SiC CMCs and component systems. The developments also have included candidate coating composition system designs, degradation mechanisms, performance evaluation and down-selects; the processing optimizations using TriplexPro Air Plasma Spray Low Pressure Plasma Spray (LPPS), Plasma Spray Physical Vapor Deposition and demonstration of EBC-CMC systems. This presentation also highlights the EBC-CMC system temperature capability and durability improvements under the NASA development programs, as demonstrated in the simulated engine high heat flux, combustion environments, in conjunction with high heat flux, mechanical creep and fatigue loading testing conditions.

  19. Barrier coated drug layered particles for enhanced performance of amorphous solid dispersion dosage form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Vibha; Dantuluri, Ajay K; Bansal, Arvind K

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) may entail tailor-made dosage form design to exploit their solubility advantage. Surface phenomena dominated the performance of amorphous celecoxib solid dispersion (ACSD) comprising of amorphous celecoxib (A-CLB), polyvinylpyrrolidone, and meglumine (7:2:1, w/w). ACSD cohesive interfacial interactions hindered its capsule dosage form dissolution (Puri V, Dhantuluri AK, Bansal AK 2011. J Pharm Sci 100:2460-2468). Furthermore, ACSD underwent significant devitrification under environmental stress. In the present study, enthalpy relaxation studies revealed its free surface to contribute to molecular mobility. Based on all these observations, barrier coated amorphous CLB solid dispersion layered particles (ADLP) were developed by Wurster process, using microcrystalline cellulose as substrate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), inulin, and polyvinyl acetate phthalate (PVAP) as coating excipients. Capsule formulations of barrier coated-ADLP could achieve rapid dispersibility and high drug release. Evaluation under varying temperature and RH conditions suggested the crystallization inhibitory efficiency in order of inulin coating material. Simulated studies using DSC evidenced drug-polymer mixing at the interface as a potential mechanism for surface stabilization. In conclusion, surface modification yielded a fast dispersing robust high drug load ASD based dosage form. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Method of producing a barrier in a thermally insulated container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M.H.; Le Hardy Guiton, J.D.

    1978-10-17

    The Netherlands' Shell Internationale Research Maatschappij B.V. has developed an essentially pinhole-free barrier for LNG storage/transport tanks. The barrier consists of layers of an expoxy-resin formulation and a glass-fiber material, applied in a special sequence to produce a barrier of superior quality.

  1. Research on the Properties of Thermal Sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the flame sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B coating on aluminum alloy substrates. Before the thermal spraying process, aluminum samples were modified applying chemical, mechanical and thermal processing pre-treatment methods. The main aluminum surface treatment was removing an oxide layer from the surface and improving the exploitation properties of nickel-based coatings. The work involved coating microstructure, porosity, adhesion and microhardness tests. The dependence of the estimated exploitation properties of flame spray coatings on aluminum surface preparation methods and technological parameters of spraying has been established.Article in Lithuanian

  2. Research on the Properties of Thermal Sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the flame sprayed Ni-Cr-Si-Fe-B coating on aluminum alloy substrates. Before the thermal spraying process, aluminum samples were modified applying chemical, mechanical and thermal processing pre-treatment methods. The main aluminum surface treatment was removing an oxide layer from the surface and improving the exploitation properties of nickel-based coatings. The work involved coating microstructure, porosity, adhesion and microhardness tests. The dependence of the estimated exploitation properties of flame spray coatings on aluminum surface preparation methods and technological parameters of spraying has been established.Article in Lithuanian

  3. Modeling of Thickness and Profile Uniformity of Thermally Sprayed Coatings Deposited on Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanjun, Zhang; Wenbo, Li; Dayu, Li; Jinkun, Xiao; Chao, Zhang

    2017-11-01

    In thermal spraying processes, kinematic parameters of the robot play a decisive role in the coating thickness and profile. In this regard, some achievements have been made to optimize the spray trajectory on flat surfaces. However, few reports have focused on nonholonomic or variable-curvature cylindrical surfaces. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the coating profile, coating thickness, and scanning step, which is determined by the radius of curvature and scanning angle. A mathematical simulation model was developed to predict the thickness of thermally sprayed coatings. Experiments were performed on cylinders with different radiuses of curvature to evaluate the predictive ability of the model.

  4. Lu2O3-SiO2-ZrO2 Coatings for Environmental Barrier Application by Solution Precursor Plasma Spraying and Influence of Precursor Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Quet, Aurélie; Braidy, Nadi; Gitzhofer, François

    2014-02-01

    As environmental barrier coatings are subjected to thermal stress in gas turbine engines, the introduction of a secondary phase as zircon (ZrSiO4) is likely to increase the stress resistance of Lu2Si2O7 coatings generated by induction plasma spraying using liquid precursors. In a first step, precursor chemistry effect is investigated by the synthesis of ZrO2-SiO2 nanopowders by induction plasma nanopowder synthesis technique. Tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as silicon precursor and zirconium oxynitrate and zirconium ethoxide as zirconium precursors are mixed in ethanol and produce a mixture of tetragonal zirconia and amorphous silica nanoparticles. The use of zirconium ethoxide precursor results in zirconia particles with diameter below 50 nm because of exothermic thermal decomposition of the ethoxide and its high boiling point with respect to solvent, while larger particles are formed when zirconium oxynitrate is employed. The formation temperature of zircon from zirconia and silica oxides is found at 1425 °C. Second, coatings are synthesized in Lu2O3-ZrO2-SiO2 system. After heat treatment, the doping effect of lutetium on zirconia grains totally inhibits the zircon formation. Dense coatings are obtained with the use of zirconium ethoxide because denser particles with a homogeneous diameter distribution constitute the coating.

  5. Combating Wear of ASTM A36 Steel by Surface Modification Using Thermally Sprayed Cermet Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Shibe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal spray coatings can be applied economically on machine parts to enhance their requisite surface properties like wear, corrosion, erosion resistance, and so forth. Detonation gun (D-Gun thermal spray coatings can be applied on the surface of carbon steels to improve their wear resistance. In the present study, alloy powder cermet coatings WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr have been deposited on ASTM A36 steel with D-Gun thermal spray technique. Sliding wear behavior of uncoated ASTM A36 steel and D-Gun sprayed WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr coatings on base material is observed on a Pin-On-Disc Wear Tester. Sliding wear performance of WC-12% Co coating is found to be better than the Cr3C2-25% NiCr coating. Wear performance of both these cermet coatings is found to be better than uncoated ASTM A36 steel. Thermally sprayed WC-12% Co and Cr3C2-25% NiCr cermet coatings using D-Gun thermal spray technique is found to be very useful in improving the sliding wear resistance of ASTM A36 steel.

  6. Systems and methods for coating conduit interior surfaces utilizing a thermal spray gun with extension arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karen A.; Zatorski, Raymond A.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and methods for applying a coating to an interior surface of a conduit. In one embodiment, a spray gun configured to apply a coating is attached to an extension arm which may be inserted into the bore of a pipe. The spray gun may be a thermal spray gun adapted to apply a powder coating. An evacuation system may be used to provide a volume area of reduced air pressure for drawing overspray out of the pipe interior during coating. The extension arm as well as the spray gun may be cooled to maintain a consistent temperature in the system, allowing for more consistent coating.

  7. The Development of Environmental Barrier Coating Systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Environment Effects on the Creep and Fatigue Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Topics covered include: Environmental barrier coating system development: needs, challenges and limitations; Advanced environmental barrier coating systems (EBCs) for CMC airfoils and combustors; NASA EBC systems and material system evolutions, Current turbine and combustor EBC coating emphases, Advanced development, processing, testing and modeling, EBC and EBC bond coats: recent advances; Design tool and life prediction of coated CMC components; Advanced CMC-EBC rig demonstrations; Summary and future directions.

  8. BARRIERS TO THE USE OF RADIATION-CURABLE ADHESIVES IN THE COATED AND LAMINATED SUBSTRATE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper gives results of an investigation of barriers to the use of radiation-cured technology in the coated and laminated substrate manufacturing industry. t presents information gathered from radiation-curable coating and equipment suppliers as well as technical publications....

  9. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    high temperatures with the formation of an intermediate ... The ramp rate for loading was maintained as 2⋅5 N s–1 and the deflection ... The strain energy released at the interface of the ceramic coating and the bond coat and within the bond coat are shown in table. 2. From the load deflection curves of the bent composite.

  10. Transparent Pullulan/Mica Nanocomposite Coatings with Outstanding Oxygen Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilke Uysal Unalan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new bionanocomposite coating on poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET made of pullulan and synthetic mica. Mica nanolayers have a very high aspect ratio (α, at levels much greater than that of conventional exfoliated clay layers (e.g., montmorillonite. A very small amount of mica (0.02 wt %, which is ϕ ≈ 0.00008 in pullulan coatings dramatically improved the oxygen barrier performance of the nanocomposite films under dry conditions, however, this performance was partly lost as the environmental relative humidity (RH increased. This outcome was explained in terms of the perturbation of the spatial ordering of mica sheets within the main pullulan phase, because of RH fluctuations. This was confirmed by modelling of the experimental oxygen transmission rate (OTR data according to Cussler’s model. The presence of the synthetic nanobuilding block (NBB led to a decrease in both static and kinetic coefficients of friction, compared with neat PET (≈12% and 23%, respectively and PET coated with unloaded pullulan (≈26% reduction in both coefficients. In spite of the presence of the filler, all of the coating formulations did not significantly impair the overall optical properties of the final material, which exhibited haze values below 3% and transmittance above 85%. The only exception to this was represented by the formulation with the highest loading of mica (1.5 wt %, which is ϕ ≈ 0.01. These findings revealed, for the first time, the potential of the NBB mica to produce nanocomposite coatings in combination with biopolymers for the generation of new functional features, such as transparent high oxygen barrier materials.

  11. Thermal Barrier For Vented O-Ring Seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schick, H.; Shadlesky, Philip S.; Perry, Mark C.; Ketner, Donald M.; Salita, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Barrier allows gases to seat seal without damaging it. Ring of tungsten-wire mesh forms protective barrier between hot, pressurized combustion gases and O-rings. Mesh cools and depressurizes gases so they safely push on and thereby help to seat primary O-ring or secondary O-ring if primary O-ring fails to form seals. Barrier devised for use in rocket motor. Potential terrestrial applications includes aircraft engines, furnaces, and ducts carrying hot gases.

  12. Fracture evaluation of thermally sprayed coatings in dependence on cohesive strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, J.; Česánek, Z.

    2017-05-01

    Measuring the cohesive strength of thermally sprayed coatings is relatively difficult matter, which can be accessed in many directions. This issue is nowadays solved by use of Scratch test method. This method is not completely sufficient for the cohesive strength testing because the coating is under load of combined stresses during the Scratch test. The reason to develop this method was need for exact measurement of tensile cohesion toughness of thermally sprayed coatings, which could provide results as close to a classic tensile test as possible. Another reason for development of this method was the impossibility of direct comparison with results obtained by other methods. Tested coatings were prepared using HP / HVOF (Stellite 6, NiCrBSi, CrC-NiCr and Hastelloy C-276). These coatings were selected as commonly used in commercial sector and also on because of rising customer demand for ability to provide such coating characteristics. The tested coatings were evaluated in terms of cohesive strength (method based on tensile strength test). Final fractures were evaluated by optical microscopy together with scanning electron microscopy and EDS analysis. As expected higher cohesive strength showed metallic coatings with top results of coating Stellite 6. Carbide coatings showed approximately third of the cohesion strength in comparison with metal based coating.

  13. Characterization of thermal sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings on some biomedical implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder Pal; Singh, Harpreet; Singh, Hazoor

    2014-06-12

    To characterize two thermal sprayed coatings of different particle-sized hydroxyapatite on some biomedical implant materials. Characterization of the as-sprayed coatings was performed using x-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), and x-ray mapping techniques. Bond strength of the sprayed coatings measured as per ASTM-C633 standard and cell culture studies were performed to access the biocompatibility of the coatings. The results indicated that, HA coatings of 10 μm particle sized powder were completely amorphous, while that of 30 μm sized powder consisted of crystalline HA with minor tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) phases. This flame spray HA-A and HA-B coatings exhibited higher bond strength (67.8 and 49.3 MPa respectively) in comparison with other thermal spray HA coating techniques reported in literature. In-vitro biocompatibility studies revealed that HA-B coated specimens had good biocompatibility with a human osteosarcoma cell line KHOSNP (R-970-5). These observations show that particle size of HA powders have a significant effect on the phase composition, microstructure, roughness and biocompatibility of deposited coatings. HA-B coatings were found to be metallurgically better than the HA-A coating from the point of view of biomedical applications.

  14. Theoretical investigation on degradation behaviors of spectral properties of thermal control coatings induced by charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yuge; Ma, Wei; Xuan, Yimin, E-mail: ymxuan@mail.njust.edu.cn

    2013-10-01

    The degradation of spectral properties of thermal control coatings on spacecrafts is investigated in this paper. By studying their physical components and geometry structure, the factors which determine the spectral properties of the coatings are founded. A theoretical model for calculating the spectral absorptance of coatings is proposed based on the Mie's theory and Stratified Media theory. Mathematical expressions are introduced for accounting for the effect of the complicated environment. Based on these work, a predicting model for the degradation of spectral absorptance properties of the coatings is established. To validate this model, the predicted degradation performance of spectral properties of zinc oxide based coatings under electrons and protons exposure are compared with the experimental data. A good agreement is found at the wavelength between 250 nm and 2500 nm. Finally, a useful approach for predicting the degradation behaviors of thermal control coatings on spacecrafts in orbit is established.

  15. The Effect of Particle Size of Wollastonite Filler on Thermal Performance of Intumescent Fire Retardant Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa M.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Intumescent Fire retardant coatings (IFRC’s are one of the simplest ways to protect substrates exposed to fire. In this study, Wollastonite (W filler of two different particle sizes were used to determine the fire performance of intumescent fire retardant coating. The basic ingredients of the coating were ammonium poly-phosphate (APP as acid source, expandable graphite (EG as carbon source, melamine (MEL as blowing agent in epoxy binder, boric acid as additive and hardener as curing agent. A series of coating formulations were developed by using different weight percentages of both sized Wollastonite fillers. The coated steel substrate samples were tested for fire performance using Bunsen burner and char expansion was measured using furnace fire test. A Comparison of the coatings thermal performance was determined. Wollastonite containing filler particle size 10 μm showed better thermal performance than formulations containing filler’s particle size 44 μm.

  16. PECULIARITIES OF BORIDE COATING FORMATION MADE OF COMPOSITE METAL-THERMAL POWDER MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Galynskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has investigated an influence of compositions pertaining to complex powder metal-thermal saturating media for boriding on phase-, structure formation and properties of boride coatings in respect of carbon steel.

  17. Failure modes of vacuum plasma spray tungsten coating created on carbon fibre composites under thermal loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, T.; Bekris, N.; Coad, J. P.; Grisolia, C.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.; Matthews, G. F.; Philipps, V.; Wessel, E.

    2009-07-01

    Vacuum plasma spray tungsten (VPS-W) coating created on a carbon fibre reinforced composite (CFC) was tested under two thermal load schemes in the electron beam facility to examine the operation limits and failure modes. In cyclic ELM-like short transient thermal loads, the VPS-W coating was destroyed sub-layer by sub-layer at 0.33 GW/m 2 for 1 ms pulse duration. At longer single pulses, simulating steady-state thermal loads, the coating was destroyed at surface temperatures above 2700 °C by melting of the rhenium containing multilayer at the interface between VPS-W and CFC. The operation limits and failure modes of the VPS-W coating in the thermal load schemes are discussed in detail.

  18. Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fibre-reinforced polypropylene composite

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Phiri, G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available ?C). Figure 1 shows the processing steps followed to produce composite samples. Up to 15% fibre loading could be achieved and the sisal fibres were coated with water glass to improve fire resistance. In order to improve the adhesion between sisal... preparation process: (A) WG coated fibre, (B) High speed granulator, (C) Composite granules, (D) Single screw extruder, (E) Injection moulder and (F) Composite samples (dumbbells) Mechanical and thermal properties of water glass coated sisal fi bre...

  19. Thermal conductivity of titanium aluminum silicon nitride coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samani, M.K., E-mail: majid1@e.ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); CINTRA-CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); Ding, X.Z. [Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Amini, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering. Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore (Singapore); Khosravian, N.; Cheong, J.Y. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Chen, G. [BC Photonics Technological Company, 5255 Woodwards Rd., Richmond, BC V7E 1G9 (Canada); Tay, B.K. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); CINTRA-CNRS/NTU/THALES, UMI 3288, Research Techno Plaza, 50 Nanyang Drive, Border X Block, Level 6, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2013-06-30

    A series of physical vapour deposition titanium aluminum silicon nitride nanocomposite coating with a different (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, with a thickness of around 2.5 μm were deposited on stainless steel substrate by a lateral rotating cathode arc process in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere. The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy observation. The titanium nitride (TiN) coating shows a clear columnar structure with a predominant (111) preferential orientation. With the incorporation of Al and Si, the crystallite size in the coatings decreased gradually, and the columnar structure and (111) preferred orientation disappeared. Thermal conductivity of the as-deposited coating samples at room temperature was measured by using pulsed photothermal reflectance technique. Thermal conductivity of the pure TiN coating is about 11.9 W/mK. With increasing the (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, the coatings' thermal conductivity decreased monotonously. This reduction of thermal conductivity could be ascribed to the variation of coatings' microstructure, including the decrease of grain size and the resultant increase of grain boundaries, the disruption of columnar structure, and the reduced preferential orientation. - Highlights: • A series of titanium aluminum silicon nitride with different (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio were deposited on Fe304. • The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed. • Thermal conductivity of the samples was measured by pulsed photothermal reflectance. • With increasing the (Al + Si)/Ti atomic ratio, thermal conductivity decreased. • Reduction of thermal conductivity is ascribed to the variation of its microstructure.

  20. Preparation and performance of thermal insulation energy saving coating materials for exterior wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liang, Jinsheng; Tang, Qingguo; Chen, Gong; Chen, Yalei

    2014-05-01

    Nano zinc oxide with a high refractive index has good thermal reflection performance, hollow glass microspheres have good thermal reflection and insulation performance, and sepiolite nanofibers with many nanostructural pores have good thermal insulation performance. The dispensability of nano zinc oxide in coating materials was improved by optimizing surface silane coupling agent modification process, leading to the good thermal reflection performance. The thermal insulation performance was improved by hollow glass microspheres and sepiolite nanofibers. On this basis, the thermal insulation coating materials were prepared by exploring the effect of amount, complex mode, and other factors of the above three kinds of functional fillers on the thermal reflection and insulation performance of coating materials. The results showed that the surface modification effect of nano zinc oxide was the best when the silane coupling agent addition was 6%. The reflection and insulation performance of the coatings were the best when the additions of modified nano zinc oxide, hollow glass microspheres, and sepiolite nanofibers were 3%, 4%, and 4%, respectively. Compared with the control coating materials, the thermal insulation effect was improved obviously, which was evaluated by the -13.5 degrees C increase of maximum temperature difference between the upper and the lower surfaces.

  1. Specific Features of Chip Making and Work-piece Surface Layer Formation in Machining Thermal Coatings

    OpenAIRE

    V. M. Yaroslavtsev

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of unique engineering structural and performance properties inherent in metallic composites characterizes wear- and erosion-resistant high-temperature coatings made by thermal spraying methods. This allows their use both in manufacturing processes to enhance the wear strength of products, which have to operate under the cyclic loading, high contact pressures, corrosion and high temperatures and in product renewal.Thermal coatings contribute to the qualitative improvement of the t...

  2. Study of Selected Properties of Thermally Sprayed Coatings Containing WC and WB Hard Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brezinová Janette

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research of the essential characteristics of two kinds of advanced coatings applied by HVOF technology. One studied coating: WB-WC-Co (60-30-10% contains two types of hard particles (WC and WB, the second coating is eco-friendly alternative to the previously used WC-based coatings, called “green carbides” with the composition WC-FeCrAl (85-15%. In green carbides coating the heavy metals (Co, Ni, NiCr forming the binding matrix in conventional wear-resistant coatings are replaced by more environmentally friendly matrix based on FeCrAl alloy. On the coatings was carried out: metallographic analysis, measurement of thickness, micro-hardness, adhesion, resistance to thermal cyclic loading and adhesive wear resistance (pin-on-disk test. One thermal cycle consisted of heating the coatings to 600°C, dwell for 10 minutes, and subsequently cooling on the still air. The number of thermal cycles: 10. The base material was stainless steel AISI 316L, pretreatment prior to application of the coating: blasting with white corundum, application device JP-5000.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  4. High-temperature stable absorber coatings for linear concentrating solar thermal power plants; Hochtemperaturstabile Absorberschichten fuer linear konzentrierende solarthermische Kraftwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrandt, Christina

    2009-03-23

    This work describes the development of new absorber coatings for different applications - para-bolic trough and linear Fresnel collectors - and operating conditions - absorber in vacuum or in air. The demand for higher efficiencies of solar thermal power plants using parabolic trough technology results in higher temperatures in the collectors and on the absorber tubes. As heat losses increase strongly with increasing temperatures, the need for a lower emissivity of the absorber coating at constant absorptivity arises. The linear Fresnel application envisions ab-sorber tubes stable in air at high temperatures of about 450 C, which are to date commercially not available. This work comprises the theoretical background, the modeling and the fabrication of absorber tubes including the technology transfer to a production-size inline sputter coater. In annealing tests and accompanying optical measurements, degradation processes have been observed and specified more precisely by material characterization techniques. The simulations provided the capability of different materials used as potential IR-reflector. The highest selectivity can be achieved by applying silver which consequently has been chosen for the application in absorber coatings of the parabolic trough technology. Thin silver films how-ever need to be stabilized when used at high temperatures. Appropriate barrier layers as well as process and layer parameters were identified. A high selectivity was achieved and stability of the absorber coating for 1200 h at 500 C in vacuum has been demonstrated. For the application in air, silver was also analyzed as a potential IR-reflector. Even though the stability could be increased considerably, it nevertheless proved to be insufficient. The main factors influencing stability in a positive way are the use of higher quality polishing, additional barrier layers and adequate process parameters. This knowledge was applied for developing coatings which are stable in air at

  5. CrN-Ag nanocomposite coatings: Control of lubricant transport by diffusion barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papi, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Mulligan, C.P. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center, Benet Laboratories, Watervliet, NY 12189 (United States); Gall, D., E-mail: galld@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    1-{mu}m-thick self-lubricating CrN-Ag composite coatings containing 16 at.% Ag were deposited on Si substrates by reactive co-sputtering at T{sub s} = 400 Degree-Sign C, and were covered with CrN cap layers with a columnar microstructure and a thickness d = 0-1000 nm. Vacuum annealing at T{sub a} = 500 and 600 Degree-Sign C for 1 h causes Ag transport to the sample surface and the formation of Ag surface grains. Quantitative scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy analyses show that increasing d from 0 to 10 to 100 nm for T{sub a} = 500 Degree-Sign C leads to a decrease in the areal density of Ag surface grains from 0.86 to 0.45 to 0.04 {mu}m{sup -2}, while their lateral size remains constant at 360 {+-} 60 nm. However, increasing T{sub a} to 600 Degree-Sign C causes a doubling of the Ag grain size, and a 4-30 times larger overall Ag transport. These results are explained by kinetic barriers for Ag diffusion through the porous cap layer with a porosity that decreases with increasing d, resulting in an effective activation barrier for Ag transport that increases from 0.78 eV in the absence of a cap layer to 0.89 eV for d = 10 nm and 1.07 eV for d = 30 nm. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profile analyses of annealed layers reveal no detectable Ag within the CrN cap layer and a uniform depletion of the Ag reservoir throughout the composite coating thickness, indicating unhindered Ag transport within the composite. The overall results show that a CrN diffusion barrier cap layer is an effective approach to control Ag lubricant transport to the surface of CrN-Ag composite coatings. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CrN-Ag composite coatings are capped with CrN diffusion barriers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag diffuses to the surface during annealing at 500 or 600 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ag transport is controlled by the cap thickness d = 0-1000 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The activation energy for Ag

  6. Inhibiting electro-thermal breakdown of acrylic dielectric elastomer actuators by dielectric gel coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Thanh-Giang; Lau, Gih-Keong

    2016-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) is very localized; a spark and a pinhole (puncture) in dielectric ends up with short-circuit. This letter shows that prevention of electrothermal breakdown helps defer failure of DEAs even with conductive-grease electrodes. Dielectric gel encapsulation or coating (Dow Corning 3-4170) helps protect acrylic elastomer (VHB 4905), making it thermally more stable and delaying its thermal oxidation (burn) from 218 °C to 300 °C. Dielectric-gel-coated acrylic DEAs can withstand higher local leak-induced heating and thus achieve higher dielectric strengths than non-coated DEAs do.

  7. Advanced anticorrosive coatings prepared from electroactive polyimide/graphene nanocomposites with synergistic effects of redox catalytic capability and gas barrier properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Yeh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, electroactive polyimide (EPI/graphene nanocomposite (EPGN coatings were prepared by thermal imidization and then characterized by Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The redox behavior of the as-prepared EPGN materials was identified by in situ monitoring for cyclic voltammetry (CV studies. Demonstrating that EPGN coatings provided advanced corrosion protection of cold-rolled steel (CRS electrodes as compared to that of neat EPI coating. The superior corrosion protection of EPGN coatings over EPI coatings on CRS electrodes could be explained by the following two reasons. First, the redox catalytic capabilities of amino-capped aniline trimer (ACAT units existing in the EPGN may induce the formation of passive metal oxide layers on the CRS electrode, as indicated by scanning electron microscope (SEM and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA studies. Moreover, the well-dispersed carboxyl-graphene nanosheets embedded in the EPGN matrix hinder gas migration exponentially. This would explain enhanced oxygen barrier properties of EPGN, as indicated by gas permeability analysis (GPA studies.

  8. Properties of Whey-Protein-Coated Films and Laminates as Novel Recyclable Food Packaging Materials with Excellent Barrier Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schmid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In case of food packaging applications, high oxygen and water vapour barriers are the prerequisite conditions for preserving the quality of the products throughout their whole lifecycle. Currently available polymers and/or biopolymer films are mostly used in combination with barrier materials derived from oil based plastics or aluminium to enhance their low barrier properties. In order to replace these non-renewable materials, current research efforts are focused on the development of sustainable coatings, while maintaining the functional properties of the resulting packaging materials. This article provides an introduction to food packaging requirements, highlights prior art on the use of whey-based coatings for their barriers properties, and describes the key properties of an innovative packaging multilayer material that includes a whey-based layer. The developed whey protein formulations had excellent barrier properties almost comparable to the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymers (EVOH barrier layer conventionally used in food packaging composites, with an oxygen barrier (OTR of <2 [cm³(STP/(m²d bar] when normalized to a thickness of 100 μm. Further requirements of the barrier layer are good adhesion to the substrate and sufficient flexibility to withstand mechanical load while preventing delamination and/or brittle fracture. Whey-protein-based coatings have successfully met these functional and mechanical requirements.

  9. Lead-Free Piezoelectric Ceramic Coatings Fabricated by Thermal Spray Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Guo, Kun; Tan, Chee Kiang Ivan; Mirshekarloo, Meysam Sharifzadeh; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2017-11-01

    This paper starts from a review on the progress in fabrication of piezoelectric ceramic coatings by thermal spray method. For our experimental work, two types of lead-free piezoelectric ceramic coatings, including potassium-sodium niobate-based and bismuth sodium titanate-based, are fabricated by thermal spray process, and their structure, morphology, and piezoelectric properties are characterized. Our obtained lead-free ceramic coatings exhibit single phase of perovskite structure, relatively dense morphology, and competitive piezoelectric coefficients. The mechanism of forming the piezoelectric perovskite crystalline phase by thermal spray involving melting-recrystallization process is analyzed in comparison to that of ceramic synthesis through solid-state reaction. Suppression of volatile loss and decomposition at high temperature due to the extremely high melting and cooling rate in the thermal spray process, and the impact on the resulting structure are discussed. Significant advantages of the thermal spray method over alternative processing methods for forming piezoelectric ceramic coatings are summarized. The combination of environmentally friendly lead-free compositions and the scalable thermal spray processing method will promote more applications of piezoelectric ceramic coatings for producing distributive sensors and transducers, and forming advanced smart structures and systems.

  10. Calcium-Magnesium-Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Reactions and Degradation Mechanisms of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia L.; Zhu, Dongming

    2013-01-01

    The thermochemical reactions between calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate- (CMAS-) based road sand and several advanced turbine engine environmental barrier coating (EBC) materials were studied. The phase stability, reaction kinetics and degradation mechanisms of rare earth (RE)-silicates Yb2SiO5, Y2Si2O7, and RE-oxide doped HfO2 and ZrO2 under the CMAS infiltration condition at 1500 C were investigated, and the microstructure and phase characteristics of CMAS-EBC specimens were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Experimental results showed that the CMAS dissolved RE-silicates to form crystalline, highly non-stoichiometric apatite phases, and in particular attacking the silicate grain boundaries. Cross-section images show that the CMAS reacted with specimens and deeply penetrated into the EBC grain boundaries and formed extensive low-melting eutectic phases, causing grain boundary recession with increasing testing time in the silicate materials. The preliminary results also showed that CMAS reactions also formed low melting grain boundary phases in the higher concentration RE-oxide doped HfO2 systems. The effect of the test temperature on CMAS reactions of the EBC materials will also be discussed. The faster diffusion exhibited by apatite and RE-doped oxide phases and the formation of extensive grain boundary low-melting phases may limit the CMAS resistance of some of the environmental barrier coatings at high temperatures.

  11. The influence of mechanical vibrations on microstructure of Ni-based thermally sprayed-fused coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena ŠKAMAT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of mechanical vibrations on microstructure and properties of Ni-based thermally sprayed and fused coatings deposited on a steel substrate has been studied. Self-fluxing powder with about 73% Ni was used as a sprayed material. As-sprayed coatings were refused using conventional flame technique and with introducing of mechanical vibrations. In result coatings with quite complicated microstructure were obtained. During investigation of coatings by different methods it was found that vibratory treatment really influences the solidified microstructure. It was found that vibrations promote densimetric movement of hard particles up - towards a surface with forming of thicker so-called “hard-inclusions-free” layer near interface. Some tendency was noted that coatings, remelted under vibrations, showed better corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistance in comparison with coatings created without vibrational treatment during solidification.

  12. Durability Modeling of Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC Using Finite Element Based Progressive Failure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abdul-Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity for a protecting guard for the popular ceramic matrix composites (CMCs is getting a lot of attention from engine manufacturers and aerospace companies. The CMC has a weight advantage over standard metallic materials and more performance benefits. However, these materials undergo degradation that typically includes coating interface oxidation as opposed to moisture induced matrix which is generally seen at a higher temperature. Additionally, other factors such as residual stresses, coating process related flaws, and casting conditions may influence the degradation of their mechanical properties. These durability considerations are being addressed by introducing highly specialized form of environmental barrier coating (EBC that is being developed and explored in particular for high temperature applications greater than 1100°C. As a result, a novel computational simulation approach is presented to predict life for EBC/CMC specimen using the finite element method augmented with progressive failure analysis (PFA that included durability, damage tracking, and material degradation model. The life assessment is carried out using both micromechanics and macromechanics properties. The macromechanics properties yielded a more conservative life for the CMC specimen as compared to that obtained from the micromechanics with fiber and matrix properties as input.

  13. Investigation of environmental effects on coatings for thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashford, N. A.; Gilligan, J. E.; Zerlaut, G. A.

    1972-01-01

    Accomplishments made during study of coatings are reported. Development of structure/property theory for selecting most appropriate pigments for space vehicle paints is discussed along with improvements made in zinc-oxide pigmented potassium silicate paint.

  14. Synthesis and Behavior of Nanostructured Coatings Using Thermal Spraying

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lavernia, E

    2003-01-01

    ... (powder as well as coatings) for structure, composition, properties, and performance. One of the program's accomplishments was the successful synthesis of diverse nanostructured feedstock powders using mechanical milling in different...

  15. High-Temperature Oxidation-Resistant and Low Coefficient of Thermal Expansion NiAl-Base Bond Coat Developed for a Turbine Blade Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Many critical gas turbine engine components are currently made from Ni-base superalloys that are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC). The TBC consists of a ZrO2-based top coat and a bond coat that is used to enhance the bonding between the superalloy substrate and the top coat. MCrAlY alloys (CoCrAlY and NiCrAlY) are currently used as bond coats and are chosen for their very good oxidation resistance. TBC life is frequently limited by the oxidation resistance of the bond coat, along with a thermal expansion mismatch between the metallic bond coat and the ceramic top coat. The aim of this investigation at the NASA Glenn Research Center was to develop a new longer life, higher temperature bond coat by improving both the oxidation resistance and the thermal expansion characteristics of the bond coat. Nickel aluminide (NiAl) has excellent high-temperature oxidation resistance and can sustain a protective Al2O3 scale to longer times and higher temperatures in comparison to MCrAlY alloys. Cryomilling of NiAl results in aluminum nitride (AlN) formation that reduces the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the alloy and enhances creep strength. Thus, additions of cryomilled NiAl-AlN to CoCrAlY were examined as a potential bond coat. In this work, the composite alloy was investigated as a stand-alone substrate to demonstrate its feasibility prior to actual use as a coating. About 85 percent of prealloyed NiAl and 15 percent of standard commercial CoCrAlY alloys were mixed and cryomilled in an attritor with stainless steel balls used as grinding media. The milling was carried out in the presence of liquid nitrogen. The milled powder was consolidated by hot extrusion or by hot isostatic pressing. From the consolidated material, oxidation coupons, four-point bend, CTE, and tensile specimens were machined. The CTE measurements were made between room temperature and 1000 C in an argon atmosphere. It is shown that the CTE of the NiAl-AlN-CoCrAlY composite bond coat

  16. Duplex Al-based thermal spray coatings for corrosion protection in high temperature refinery applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana da Cunha Rocha

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of thermal spray coatings has been effective in preventing corrosion of steel and iron products. It has been used in a wide range of applications spreading from the petroleum to the food industry. In this work, the performance and effectiveness of a two-layered aluminum-based thermal spray coating applied to an ASTM A387 G11 steel was evaluated. The coating structure was comprised of an inner Al-Fe-Cr layer and an outer layer of aluminum. Coated samples were tested in the reactor zone of a fluid catalytic cracking unit (FCCU of a petrochemical plant for 2.5 years. The reactor zone temperature was about 793 K (520 °C and the environment was a mixed gas containing sulfur, oxygen and carbon. Laboratory-scale tests were also conducted on the coated samples in order to gain a better understanding of the corrosive effect of the gaseous species present in the FCCU atmosphere. Porosity present in the thermal spray coatings allowed the penetration of the atmosphere corrodents, which instigated intergranular corrosion of the steel substrate. The presence of an inner Al-Fe-Cr layer did not prevent coating spallation, which further contributed to the internal corrosion process.

  17. FeS-coated sand for removal of arsenic(III) under anaerobic conditions in permeable reactive barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y.-S.; Gallegos, T.J.; Demond, A.H.; Hayes, K.F.

    2011-01-01

    Iron sulfide (as mackinawite, FeS) has shown considerable promise as a material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions. However, as a nanoparticulate material, synthetic FeS is not suitable for use in conventional permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). This study developed a methodology for coating a natural silica sand to produce a material of an appropriate diameter for a PRB. Aging time, pH, rinse time, and volume ratios were varied, with a maximum coating of 4.0 mg FeS/g sand achieved using a pH 5.5 solution at a 1:4 volume ratio (sand: 2 g/L FeS suspension), three days of aging and no rinsing. Comparing the mass deposited on the sand, which had a natural iron-oxide coating, with and without chemical washing showed that the iron-oxide coating was essential to the formation of a stable FeS coating. Scanning electron microscopy images of the FeS-coated sand showed a patchwise FeS surface coating. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed a partial oxidation of the Fe(II) to Fe(III) during the coating process, and some oxidation of S to polysulfides. Removal of As(III) by FeS-coated sand was 30% of that by nanoparticulate FeS at pH 5 and 7. At pH 9, the relative removal was 400%, perhaps due to the natural oxide coating of the sand or a secondary mineral phase from mackinawite oxidation. Although many studies have investigated the coating of sands with iron oxides, little prior work reports coating with iron sulfides. The results suggest that a suitable PRB material for the removal of As(III) under anoxic conditions can be produced through the deposition of a coating of FeS onto natural silica sand with an iron-oxide coating. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Possibilities of surface coating for thermal insulation. [zirconium dioxide, titanium dioxide, and zircon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschel, E.; Weisser, G.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations performed for pulsating heat sources indicate a relatively thin (200-1000 micron) coating can lower temperature both inside and on the surface of a construction material. Various coating materials (including zirconium dioxide) are discussed, together with possible thermic stresses and ways to deal with the latter.

  19. Post-Plasma SiOx Coatings of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles for Enhanced Thermal Stability and Tunable Photoactivity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Patrick; Jidenko, Nicolas; Weber, Alfred P.; Borra, Jean-Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The plasma-based aerosol process developed for the direct coating of particles in gases with silicon oxide in a continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process is presented. It is shown that non-thermal plasma filaments induced in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure trigger post-DBD gas phase reactions. DBD operating conditions are first scanned to produce ozone and dinitrogen pentoxide. In the selected conditions, these plasma species react with gaseous tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) precursor downstream of the DBD. The gaseous intermediates then condense on the surface of nanoparticles and self-reactions lead to homogeneous solid SiOx coatings, with thickness from nanometer to micrometer. This confirms the interest of post-DBD injection of the organo-silicon precursor to achieve stable production of actives species with subsequent controlled thickness of SiOx coatings. SiOx coatings of spherical and agglomerated metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (Pt, CuO, TiO2) are achieved. In the selected DBD operating conditions, the thickness of homogeneous nanometer sized coatings of spherical nanoparticles depends on the reaction duration and on the precursor concentration. For agglomerates, operating conditions can be tuned to cover preferentially the interparticle contact zones between primary particles, shifting the sintering of platinum agglomerates to much higher temperatures than the usual sintering temperature. Potential applications for enhanced thermal stability and tunable photoactivity of coated agglomerates are presented. PMID:28335219

  20. Sealing of thermally-sprayed stainless steel coatings against corrosion using nickel electroplating technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hathaipat Koiprasert

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Electric arc spraying (EAS is one of the thermal spray techniques used for restoration and to providecorrosion resistance. It can be utilized to build up coatings to thicknesses of several millimeters, It is easy to use on-site. Most importantly, the cost of this technique is lower than other thermal spraying techniques thatmay be suitable for part restoration. A major disadvantage associated with the electric arc sprayed coating is its high porosity, which can be as high as 3-8% making it not appropriate for use in immersion condition. This work was carried out around the idea of using electroplating to seal off the pore of the EAS coating, with an aim to improve the corrosion resistance of the coating in immersion condition. This research compared the corrosion behavior of a stainless steel 316 electric arc sprayed coating in 2M NaOH solution at 25oC. It was found that the Ni plating used as sealant can improve the corrosion resistance of the EAS coating. Furthermore, the smoothened and plated stainless steel 316 coating has a better corrosion resistance than the plated EAS coating that was not ground to smoothen the surface before plating.

  1. Comparative evaluation of different thermally modified wood samples finishing with UV-curable and waterborne coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, René; Muszyńska, Monika; Krystofiak, Tomasz; Labidi, Jalel

    2015-12-01

    Thermally modified wood has been developed as an industrial method to improve durability and dimensional stability of wood and thus extends the range of uses and service life of wood-based products. Despite the improvements gained by treatment, surface finishing using coatings prevents esthetical changes such as color degradation or occasional growth of mold adding protection in outdoor use and extending the service life of products. The wood finishing process was carried out with commercially available waterborne and UV-curable coatings on industrially modified at 192, 200, 212 °C and unmodified European ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) wood, using an industrial rollers system and a laboratory brushing system. Changes caused by thermal treatment which could affect the surface finish were measured and compared with control samples, such as water uptake, wettability and acidity. Following the wood finishing, surface properties and esthetic changes were evaluated; as well as the coatings performance. Thermally modified wood presented improved adherence compared with unmodified wood with a significant improvement in samples modified at 212 °C, which also present the highest hardness when UV-cured. Finishes with UV-curing maintain the hydrophobic effect of thermally modified wood, whereas waterborne finishes increase the surface wettability. Thermal modification did not negatively influence on the elastic properties of the coated substrate and thus allows this material to be finished with different coating systems in the same conditions as unmodified wood.

  2. Innovation in the Process of Thermal Spraying Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczucka-Lasota B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the hybrid method connects the ultrasonic spraying method with a injector of complex cooling micro-jet system is presented. The use of properly constructed injector allows for local and selective cooling of the coating structure immediately after spraying process. The construction of injector is the subject of patent in Polen. The presented new technology gives practical possibility of control of coatings structure. This is the kind of positive feedback between the technology process and obtained product (the quality of the process increases the quality of the final product. The initial experimental investigations, presented in this paper, show, that the obtained coatings structure is: fine-dispersion of the grain, with a lower porosity, good compactness and adhesion to the substrate.

  3. Solution Processed Lanthanum Zirconium Oxide as a Primary Barrier Layer for High Ic Coated Conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Heatherly Jr, Lee [ORNL; Martin, Patrick M [ORNL; Specht, Eliot D [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Kodenkandath, Thomas [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Li, Xiaoping [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA; Rupich, Marty [American Superconductor Corporation, Westborough, MA

    2006-01-01

    High-quality lanthanum zirconium oxide (La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} or LZO) films have been deposited and processed on Ni-W substrates using a sol-gel processing approach. It has been demonstrated that crack-free coatings with thicknesses up to 100 nm can be processed in a single step, while thicker coatings (200-225 nm) were processed using a multiple coating and annealing process. Using simulated metalorganic deposition (MOD)-YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-:{angstrom}} (YBCO) processing conditions, the barrier properties of the sol-gel LZO coating with a thickness of 120 nm were found to be comparable to that of the standard 3-layer buffer stack deposited using physical vapor deposition. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profile analysis of LZO films annealed in oxygen-18 shows that LZO effectively stops the diffusion of Ni within the first 80-100 nm. Using MOD processes, a CeO{sub 2} cap layer and superconducting YBCO layer were deposited on sol-gel LZO/Ni-W. For the first time, using such an all-solution conductor architecture, a critical current (I{sub c}) of 140 A/cm with a corresponding critical current density (J{sub c}) of 1.75 MA/cm{sup 2} has been demonstrated. Using a very thin Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} seed layer ({approx}10 nm) deposited by electron beam evaporation; improved texture quality in the LZO layers has been demonstrated. The performance of the LZO deposited on these samples was evaluated using a sputtered CeO{sub 2} cap layer and MOD YBCO layer. Critical currents of up to 255 A/cm (3.2 MA/cm{sup 2}) with 0.8-{micro}m-thick YBCO films have been demonstrated, comparable to the performance of films grown using physical vapor deposited yttria stabilized zirconia as a barrier layer. Similar experiments using an MOD-CeO{sub 2} cap layer and MOD-YBCO layer yielded critical currents of 200 A/cm (2.5 MA/cm{sup 2}) with 0.8-{micro}m-thick YBCO films.

  4. Characterization of Copper Coatings Deposited by High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spray for Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimijazi, H. R.; Aghaee, M.; Salehi, M.; Garcia, E.

    2017-11-01

    Copper coatings were deposited on steel substrates by high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying. The microstructure of the feedstock copper powders and free-standing coatings were evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The x-ray diffraction pattern was utilized to determine phase compositions of powders and coatings. Oxygen content was determined by a LECO-T300 oxygen determiner. The thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured in two directions, through-thickness and in-plane by laser flash apparatus. The electrical resistivity of the coatings was measured by the four-point probe method. Oxygen content of the coatings was two times higher than that of the initial powders (0.35-0.37%). The thermal and electrical conductivities of the coatings were different depending on the direction of the measurement. The thermal and electrical conductivity of the coatings improved after annealing for 6 h at a temperature of 600°C.

  5. Thermal insulating barrier and neutron shield providing integrated protection for a nuclear reactor vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Roger B.; Fero, Arnold H.; Sejvar, James

    1997-01-01

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel to form a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive valving also includes bistable vents at the upper end of the thermal insulating barrier for releasing steam. A removable, modular neutron shield extending around the upper end of the reactor cavity below the nozzles forms with the upwardly and outwardly tapered transition on the outer surface of the reactor vessel, a labyrinthine channel which reduces neutron streaming while providing a passage for the escape of steam during a severe accident, and for the cooling air which is circulated along the reactor cavity walls outside the thermal insulating barrier during normal operation of the reactor.

  6. Electrically conductive, black thermal control coatings for spacecraft application. I - Silicate matrix formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J. L.; Odonnell, T. P.; Hribar, V. F.

    1986-01-01

    The formulation of the graphite silicate paints MH-11 and MH-11Z, which will serve as electrically conductive, heat-resistant thermal control coatings for the Galileo spacecraft's 400 Newton engine plume shield, 10 Newton thruster plume shields, and external shunt radiators, is described, and performance results for these paints are reported. The MH-11 is produced by combining a certain grade of graphite powder with a silicate base to produce a black, inorganic, electrically conductive, room temperature cure thermal control paint having high temperature capability. Zinc oxide is added to the MH-11 formulation to produce the blister resistant painta MH-11Z. The mechanical, chemical, thermal, optical, and radiation characteristics of the coatings are reported. The formulation, mixing, application, and surface preparation of the substrates are described, and a method of determining the electrical resistance of the coatings is demonstrated.

  7. Silica-sol-based spin-coating barrier layer against phosphorous diffusion for crystalline silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzum, Abdullah; Fukatsu, Ken; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Tanimoto, Kenji; Yoshinaga, Seiya; Jiang, Yunjian; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2014-12-01

    The phosphorus barrier layers at the doping procedure of silicon wafers were fabricated using a spin-coating method with a mixture of silica-sol and tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which can be formed at the rear surface prior to the front phosphorus spin-on-demand (SOD) diffusion and directly annealed simultaneously with the front phosphorus layer. The optimization of coating thickness was obtained by changing the applied spin-coating speed; from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. The CZ-Si p-type silicon solar cells were fabricated with/without using the rear silica-sol layer after taking the sheet resistance measurements, SIMS analysis, and SEM measurements of the silica-sol material evaluations into consideration. For the fabrication of solar cells, a spin-coating phosphorus source was used to form the n+ emitter and was then diffused at 930°C for 35 min. The out-gas diffusion of phosphorus could be completely prevented by spin-coated silica-sol film placed on the rear side of the wafers coated prior to the diffusion process. A roughly 2% improvement in the conversion efficiency was observed when silica-sol was utilized during the phosphorus diffusion step. These results can suggest that the silica-sol material can be an attractive candidate for low-cost and easily applicable spin-coating barrier for any masking purpose involving phosphorus diffusion.

  8. Silica-sol-based spin-coating barrier layer against phosphorous diffusion for crystalline silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzum, Abdullah; Fukatsu, Ken; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Yutaka; Tanimoto, Kenji; Yoshinaga, Seiya; Jiang, Yunjian; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ito, Seigo

    2014-01-01

    The phosphorus barrier layers at the doping procedure of silicon wafers were fabricated using a spin-coating method with a mixture of silica-sol and tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which can be formed at the rear surface prior to the front phosphorus spin-on-demand (SOD) diffusion and directly annealed simultaneously with the front phosphorus layer. The optimization of coating thickness was obtained by changing the applied spin-coating speed; from 2,000 to 8,000 rpm. The CZ-Si p-type silicon solar cells were fabricated with/without using the rear silica-sol layer after taking the sheet resistance measurements, SIMS analysis, and SEM measurements of the silica-sol material evaluations into consideration. For the fabrication of solar cells, a spin-coating phosphorus source was used to form the n(+) emitter and was then diffused at 930°C for 35 min. The out-gas diffusion of phosphorus could be completely prevented by spin-coated silica-sol film placed on the rear side of the wafers coated prior to the diffusion process. A roughly 2% improvement in the conversion efficiency was observed when silica-sol was utilized during the phosphorus diffusion step. These results can suggest that the silica-sol material can be an attractive candidate for low-cost and easily applicable spin-coating barrier for any masking purpose involving phosphorus diffusion.

  9. Saturated Resin Ectopic Regeneration by Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Chunjing Hao; Zehua Xiao; Di Xu; Chengbo Zhang; Jian Qiu; Kefu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Textile dyes are some of the most refractory organic compounds in the environment due to their complex and various structure. An integrated resin adsorption/Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma regeneration was proposed to treat the indigo carmine solution. It is the first time to report ectopic regeneration of the saturated resins by non-thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The adsorption/desorption efficiency, surface functional groups, structural properties, regeneration efficiency, ...

  10. Development and Performance Evaluations of HfO2-Si and Rare Earth-Si Based Environmental Barrier Bond Coat Systems for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic environmental barrier coatings (EBC) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will play a crucial role in future aircraft propulsion systems because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, improve component durability, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. Advanced EBC systems for SiCSiC CMC turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant material development challenges for the high temperature CMC components is to develop prime-reliant, high strength and high temperature capable environmental barrier coating bond coat systems, since the current silicon bond coat cannot meet the advanced EBC-CMC temperature and stability requirements. In this paper, advanced NASA HfO2-Si based EBC bond coat systems for SiCSiC CMC combustor and turbine airfoil applications are investigated. The coating design approach and stability requirements are specifically emphasized, with the development and implementation focusing on Plasma Sprayed (PS) and Electron Beam-Physic Vapor Deposited (EB-PVD) coating systems and the composition optimizations. High temperature properties of the HfO2-Si based bond coat systems, including the strength, fracture toughness, creep resistance, and oxidation resistance were evaluated in the temperature range of 1200 to 1500 C. Thermal gradient heat flux low cycle fatigue and furnace cyclic oxidation durability tests were also performed at temperatures up to 1500 C. The coating strength improvements, degradation and failure modes of the environmental barrier coating bond coat systems on SiCSiC CMCs tested in simulated stress-environment interactions are briefly discussed and supported by modeling. The performance enhancements of the HfO2-Si bond coat systems with rare earth element dopants and rare earth-silicon based bond coats are also highlighted. The advanced bond coat systems, when

  11. Corrosion protection of Mg/Al alloys by thermal sprayed aluminium coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A., E-mail: anpardo@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Casajus, P.; Mohedano, M.; Coy, A.E.; Viejo, F. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Torres, B. [Departamento de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Matykina, E. [Corrosion and Protection Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2009-05-15

    The protective features of thermal sprayed Al-coatings applied on AZ31, AZ80 and AZ91D magnesium/aluminium alloys were evaluated in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution by electrochemical and gravimetric measurements. The changes in the morphology and corrosion behaviour of the Al-coatings induced by a cold-pressing post-treatment were also examined. The specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and low-angle X-ray diffraction. The as-sprayed Al-coatings revealed a high degree of porosity and poor corrosion protection, which resulted in galvanic acceleration of the corrosion of the magnesium substrates. The application of a cold-pressing post-treatment produced more compact Al-coatings with better bonding at the substrate/coating interface and higher corrosion resistance regardless of the nature of the magnesium alloy.

  12. The role of nano-particles in the field of thermal spray coating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmann, Stephan; Leparoux, Marc; Rohr, Lukas

    2005-06-01

    Nano-particles play not only a key role in recent research fields, but also in the public discussions about health and safety in nanotechnology. Nevertheless, the worldwide activities in nano-particles research increased dramatically during the last 5 to 10 years. There are different potential routes for the future production of nano-particles at large scale. The main directions envisaged are mechanical milling, wet chemical reactions or gas phase processes. Each of the processes has its specific advantages and limitations. Mechanical milling and wet chemical reactions are typically time intensive and batch processes, whereas gas phase productions by flames or plasma can be carried out continuously. Materials of interest are mainly oxide ceramics, carbides, nitrides, and pure metals. Nano-ceramics are interesting candidates for coating technologies due to expected higher coating toughness, better thermal shock and wear resistance. Especially embedded nano-carbides and-nitrides offer homogenously distributed hard phases, which enhance coatings hardness. Thermal spraying, a nearly 100 years old and world wide established coating technology, gets new possibilities thanks to optimized, nano-sized and/or nano-structured powders. Latest coating system developments like high velocity flame spraying (HVOF), cold gas deposition or liquid suspension spraying in combination with new powder qualities may open new applications and markets. This article gives an overview on the latest activities in nano-particle research and production in special relation to thermal spray coating technology.

  13. Weathering of coil-coatings: UV radiation and thermal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castela, A. S.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of heat and of QUV ageing on coil coatings was tested by electrochemical impedance, and the results compared with surface analysis of the polymers by FTIR and XPS. It was shown that UV radiation is more relevant than heat to chemical degradation. A different correlation between water permeation and chemical degradation was observed depending on the coating thickness: for the thinner coatings, the higher UV degradation has corresponded to increased water absorption, whereas in the thicker coating, the bulk effect of heat was more relevant to water permeation.

    El efecto del calor y del envejecimiento, QUV, sobre recubrimiemtos de bobinas se probó mediante la impedancia electroquímica, y los resultados se compararon con análisis superficiales de los polímeros usando FTIR y XPS. Se encontró que la radiación UV es más importante que el calor en la degradación química. Una correlación diferente, entre agua infiltrada y degradación química, se observó, dependiendo del espesor del recubrimiento: para los recubrimientos más delgados, mayor degradación UV correspondió a un incremento de absorción de agua; en cambio, para los recubrimientos más gruesos, el efecto del calor fue más importante para la infiltración del agua.

  14. Calcium-magnesium Aluminosilicate (CMAS) Interactions with Advanced Environmental Barrier Coating Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesner, Valerie L.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2015-01-01

    Particulates, like sand and volcanic ash, threaten the development of robust environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) that protect next-generation silicon-based ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine engine components from harsh combustion environments during service. The siliceous particulates transform into molten glassy deposits of calcium-magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) when ingested by an aircraft engine operating at temperatures above 1200C. In this study, a sample of desert sand was melted into CMAS glass to evaluate high-temperature interactions between the sand glass and an advanced EBC material. Desert sand glass was added to the surface of hot-pressed EBC substrates, which were then heated in air at temperatures ranging from 1200C to 1500C. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to evaluate microstructure and phase compositions of specimens and the CMASEBC interface after heat treatments.

  15. Thermal shock removal of defective glass-enamel coating from cast-iron products

    OpenAIRE

    Aleutdinov, Alexander Dmitrievich; Gyngazov, Sergey Anatolievich; Mylnikova, Tatyana Stepanovna; Luchnikov, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    A setup for light beam exposure has been developed. The setup was used to consider the technology of thermal shock destruction of the coating by pulsed-periodic exposure to powerful focused light from the xenon arc lamp DKsShRB-10000. It is shown that this type of exposure can effectively remove the glass-enamel coating from iron products. The optimal mode of setup operation to efficiently remove the defective glass-enamel coating is found: the diameter of the focused light beams is 2.5-3.5 c...

  16. Further Analysis of Thermal Control Coatings on MISSE for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Mike; McNulty, Robert; Finckenor, Miria

    2009-01-01

    Many different passive thermal control materials were flown as part of the Materials on International Space Station Experiment. Engineers and scientists at the Marshall Space Flight Center have analyzed a number of these materials, including Z93P zinc oxide/potassium silicate coating, YB-71P zinc orthotitanate/potassium silicate coating, NZOT, which is a low-cost alternative to YB-71P, several electrically conductive/static dissipative thermal control coatings, as well as black coatings for part marking and automated rendezvous and capture. These were exposed to the low Earth orbital environment of atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling, and hard vacuum, though atomic oxygen exposure was very limited for some samples. Results from the one-year exposure of MISSE-3 and MISSE-4 are compared to the four-year exposure of MISSE-1 and MISSE-2. Solar absorptance, infrared emittance, and mass measurements indicate the durability of these materials to withstand the space environment. The effect of contamination from an active space station on the performance of white thermal control coatings is discussed.

  17. Mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Alves Silvério

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from soy hulls (WSH30 on the mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose (MC nanocomposites were evaluated. MC/WSH30 nanocomposite films with different filler levels (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10% were prepared by casting. Compared to neat MC film, improvements in the mechanical and barrier properties were observed, while thermal stability was retained. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared may be attributed to mechanical percolation of WSH30, formation of a continuous network of WSH30 linked by hydrogen interactions and a close association between filler and matrix.

  18. Mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose/cellulose nanocrystals nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverio, Hudson Alves; Flauzino Neto, Wilson Pires; Silva, Ingrid Souza Vieira da; Rosa, Joyce Rover; Pasquini, Daniel, E-mail: pasquini@iqufu.ufu.br, E-mail: danielpasquini2005@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Uberlandia (USU), MG (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Assuncao, Rosana Maria Nascimento de [Universidade de Uberlandia (USU), Ituiutaba, MG (brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Integradas do Pontal; Barud, Hernane da Silva; Ribeiro, Sidney Jose Lima [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Araraquara, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-11-15

    In this work, the effects of incorporating cellulose nanocrystals from soy hulls (WSH{sub 30}) on the mechanical, thermal, and barrier properties of methylcellulose (MC) nanocomposites were evaluated. MC/WSH{sub 30} nanocomposite films with different filler levels (2, 4, 6, 8, and 10%) were prepared by casting. Compared to neat MC film, improvements in the mechanical and barrier properties were observed, while thermal stability was retained. The improved mechanical properties of nanocomposites prepared may be attributed to mechanical percolation of WSH{sub 30}, formation of a continuous network of WSH{sub 30} linked by hydrogen interactions and a close association between filler and matrix. (author)

  19. N-trimethyl chitosan chloride-coated PLGA nanoparticles overcoming multiple barriers to oral insulin absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jianyong; Han, Limei; Qin, Jing; Ru, Ge; Li, Ruixiang; Wu, Lihong; Cui, Dongqi; Yang, Pei; He, Yuwei; Wang, Jianxin

    2015-07-22

    Although several strategies have been applied for oral insulin delivery to improve insulin bioavailability, little success has been achieved. To overcome multiple barriers to oral insulin absorption simultaneously, insulin-loaded N-trimethyl chitosan chloride (TMC)-coated polylactide-co-glycoside (PLGA) nanoparticles (Ins TMC-PLGA NPs) were formulated in our study. The Ins TMC-PLGA NPs were prepared using the double-emulsion solvent evaporation method and were characterized to determine their size (247.6 ± 7.2 nm), ζ-potential (45.2 ± 4.6 mV), insulin-loading capacity (7.8 ± 0.5%) and encapsulation efficiency (47.0 ± 2.9%). The stability and insulin release of the nanoparticles in enzyme-containing simulated gastrointestinal fluids suggested that the TMC-PLGA NPs could partially protect insulin from enzymatic degradation. Compared with unmodified PLGA NPs, the positively charged TMC-PLGA NPs could improve the mucus penetration of insulin in mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells, the cellular uptake of insulin via clathrin- or adsorption-mediated endocytosis in Caco-2 cells and the permeation of insulin across a Caco-2 cell monolayer through tight junction opening. After oral administration in mice, the TMC-PLGA NPs moved more slowly through the gastrointestinal tract compared with unmodified PLGA NPs, indicating the mucoadhesive property of the nanoparticles after TMC coating. Additionally, in pharmacological studies in diabetic rats, orally administered Ins TMC-PLGA NPs produced a stronger hypoglycemic effect, with 2-fold higher relative pharmacological availability compared with unmodified NPs. In conclusion, oral insulin absorption is improved by TMC-PLGA NPs with the multiple absorption barriers overcome simultaneously. TMC-PLGA NPs may be a promising drug delivery system for oral administration of macromolecular therapeutics.

  20. Effects of LDEF flight exposure on selected polymeric films and thermal control coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slemp, Wayne S.; Young, Philip R.; Shen, James Y.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of polymeric films and thermal control coatings which were exposed for five years and ten months to the low-Earth environment is reported. Changes in solar absorptance, thermal emittance, and transmission are compared to laboratory control specimens. Sputter-deposited metallic coatings are shown to eliminate atomic oxygen erosion of resin matrix composite materials. The effects of long-term atomic oxygen exposure to metallized FEP Teflon film is characterized. Chemical characterization of polymeric films indicates that although surface erosion occurs, the molecular structure of the basic polymeric film has not changed significantly in response to this exposure.

  1. Bio-based coatings as potential barriers to chemical contaminants from recycled paper and board for food packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzotti, V; Marti, A; Piergiovanni, L; Limbo, S

    2014-01-01

    Partition and diffusion experiments were carried out with paper and board samples coated with different biopolymers. The aim was to evaluate the physicochemical behaviour and barrier properties of bio-coatings against migration of typical contaminants from recycled paper packaging. Focus was directed towards water-based, renewable biopolymers, such as modified starches (cationic starch and cationic waxy starch), plant and animal proteins (gluten and gelatine), poured onto paper with an automatic applicator. Additionally, a comparison with polyethylene-laminated paper was performed. Microstructural observations of the bio-coated paper allowed the characterisation of samples. From the partitioning studies, considerable differences in the adsorption behaviour of the selected contaminants between bio-coated or uncoated paper and air were highlighted. For both the polar and non-polar compounds considered (benzophenone and diisobutyl phthalate, respectively), the lowest values of partition coefficients were found when paper was bio-coated, making it evident that biopolymers acted as chemical/physical barriers towards these contaminants. These findings are discussed considering the characteristics of the tested biopolymers. Diffusion studies into the solid food simulant poly 2,6-diphenyl-p-phenylene oxide, also known as Tenax(®), confirmed that all the tested biopolymers slowed down migration. The Weibull kinetic model was fitted to the experimental data to compare migration from paper and bio-coated paper. Values found for β, an index determining the pattern of curvature, ranged from 1.1 to 1.7 for uncoated and polyethylene paper, whereas for bio-coated papers they ranged from 2.2 to 4.9, corresponding to the presence of an evident lag phase due to barrier properties of the tested bio-coatings.

  2. Barriers to the Diffusion of Solar Thermal Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    Despite its considerable potential in household, domestic and industry sectors, the possible contribution of solar heat is often neglected in many academic and institutional energy projections and scenarios. This is best explained by the frequent failure to distinguish heat and work as two different forms of energy transfers. As a result, policy makers in many countries or States have tended to pay lesser attention to solar thermal technologies than to other renewable energy technologies.

  3. Thin-layer thermal insulation coatings based on high-filled spheroplastics with polyorganosiloxane binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukhlanov, V. Yu; Selivanov, O. G.; Trifonova, T. A.; Ilina, M. E.; Chukhlanova, N. V.

    2017-10-01

    Thermal insulation coatings, based on polyorganosiloxane as a binder and hollow glass microspheres, have been studied in this research. The developed materials are widely applied in various branches of science and engineering basically in construction. Components interaction processes are comprehensively studied. Spraying production methods of thin layer thermal insulation coatings have been researched. Ideal technological parameters for polyorganosiloxane coatings hardening depending on components ratio, ambient temperature, solvent and curative concentration have been determined. Stress related characteristics of constructional energy saving materials containing polyorganosiloxane have been researched. Components structure and ratio concerning compound extension strength properties have been revealed. Substantiation of Danneberg model application for the strength characteristics enhancing, when hollow microspheres are introduced, has been suggested. Thermal properties of coating thermal insulation have been studied. To research these characteristics standard methods applying devices IT-S-400 and IT-λ-400 have been chosen. Filler concentration increase was stated to decrease the composition heat conductivity coefficient and to the reduction of temperature dependence of this index. The authors suggested to employ the developed thermal insulation materials for construction and power engineering facilities operating under high temperature and other unfavorable environment.

  4. High Thermal Conductivity of Copper Matrix Composite Coatings with Highly-Aligned Graphite Nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoncini, Alessandro; Tagliaferri, Vincenzo; Ucciardello, Nadia

    2017-10-25

    Nanocomposite coatings with highly-aligned graphite nanoplatelets in a copper matrix were successfully fabricated by electrodeposition. For the first time, the disposition and thermal conductivity of the nanofiller has been evaluated. The degree of alignment and inclination of the filling materials has been quantitatively evaluated by polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity were extracted for the graphite nanoplatelets by the dependence of the Raman G-peak frequency on the laser power excitation. Temperature dependency of the G-peak shift has been also measured. Most remarkable is the global thermal conductivity of 640 ± 20 W·m -1 ·K -1 (+57% of copper) obtained for the composite coating by the flash method. Our experimental results are accounted for by an effective medium approximation (EMA) model that considers the influence of filler geometry, orientation, and thermal conductivity inside a copper matrix.

  5. High Thermal Conductivity of Copper Matrix Composite Coatings with Highly-Aligned Graphite Nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Simoncini

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite coatings with highly-aligned graphite nanoplatelets in a copper matrix were successfully fabricated by electrodeposition. For the first time, the disposition and thermal conductivity of the nanofiller has been evaluated. The degree of alignment and inclination of the filling materials has been quantitatively evaluated by polarized micro-Raman spectroscopy. The room temperature values of the thermal conductivity were extracted for the graphite nanoplatelets by the dependence of the Raman G-peak frequency on the laser power excitation. Temperature dependency of the G-peak shift has been also measured. Most remarkable is the global thermal conductivity of 640 ± 20 W·m−1·K−1 (+57% of copper obtained for the composite coating by the flash method. Our experimental results are accounted for by an effective medium approximation (EMA model that considers the influence of filler geometry, orientation, and thermal conductivity inside a copper matrix.

  6. Thermal Spray Coatings for Fusion Applications — Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel; Linke, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2007), s. 64-83 ISSN 1059-9630 Grant - others:-(XE) EFDA Task DV4/04 (TW0; -(XE) EFDA Task TW5-TVM-PSW Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : beryllium * boron carbide * plasma facing components * plasma sprayed coatings * thermonuclear fusion * tungsten Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.204, year: 2007

  7. Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures of Waste Water Treatment Reservoirs with Stainless Steel Coating Using Arc Thermal Spraying Technique in Acidified Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Seung; Park, Jin-Ho; Singh, Jitendra Kumar; Ismail, Mohamed A

    2016-09-03

    Waste water treatment reservoirs are contaminated with many hazardous chemicals and acids. Reservoirs typically comprise concrete and reinforcement steel bars, and the main elements responsible for their deterioration are hazardous chemicals, acids, and ozone. Currently, a variety of techniques are being used to protect reservoirs from exposure to these elements. The most widely used techniques are stainless steel plating and polymeric coating. In this study, a technique known as arc thermal spraying was used. It is a more convenient and economical method for protecting both concrete and reinforcement steel bar from deterioration in waste water treatment reservoirs. In this study, 316L stainless steel coating was applied to a concrete surface, and different electrochemical experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of coatings in different acidic pH solutions. The coating generated from the arc thermal spraying process significantly protected the concrete surface from corrosion in acidic pH solutions, owing to the formation of a double layer capacitance-a mixture of Cr 3+ enriched with Cr₂O₃ and Cr-hydroxide in inner and Fe 3+ oxide on the outer layer of the coating. The formation of this passive film is defective owing to the non-homogeneous 316L stainless steel coating surface. In the pH 5 solution, the growth of a passive film is adequate due to the presence of un-dissociated water molecules in the aqueous sulfuric acid solution. The coated surface is sealed with alkyl epoxide, which acts as a barrier against the penetration of acidic solutions. This coating exhibits higher impedance values among the three studied acidic pH solutions.

  8. Protection of Reinforced Concrete Structures of Waste Water Treatment Reservoirs with Stainless Steel Coating Using Arc Thermal Spraying Technique in Acidified Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Waste water treatment reservoirs are contaminated with many hazardous chemicals and acids. Reservoirs typically comprise concrete and reinforcement steel bars, and the main elements responsible for their deterioration are hazardous chemicals, acids, and ozone. Currently, a variety of techniques are being used to protect reservoirs from exposure to these elements. The most widely used techniques are stainless steel plating and polymeric coating. In this study, a technique known as arc thermal spraying was used. It is a more convenient and economical method for protecting both concrete and reinforcement steel bar from deterioration in waste water treatment reservoirs. In this study, 316L stainless steel coating was applied to a concrete surface, and different electrochemical experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of coatings in different acidic pH solutions. The coating generated from the arc thermal spraying process significantly protected the concrete surface from corrosion in acidic pH solutions, owing to the formation of a double layer capacitance—a mixture of Cr3+ enriched with Cr2O3 and Cr-hydroxide in inner and Fe3+ oxide on the outer layer of the coating. The formation of this passive film is defective owing to the non-homogeneous 316L stainless steel coating surface. In the pH 5 solution, the growth of a passive film is adequate due to the presence of un-dissociated water molecules in the aqueous sulfuric acid solution. The coated surface is sealed with alkyl epoxide, which acts as a barrier against the penetration of acidic solutions. This coating exhibits higher impedance values among the three studied acidic pH solutions.

  9. Corrosion And Thermal Processing In Cold Gas Dynamic Spray Deposited Austenitic Stainless Steel Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CORROSION AND THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC...THERMAL PROCESSING IN COLD GAS DYNAMIC SPRAY DEPOSITED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL COATINGS by John A Luhn June 2016 Thesis Advisor: Sarath...precipitate. The resolution of the EDS process may not have been sufficient to show very small precipitates however. SEM imaging at higher

  10. Development of barrier coatings for cellulosic-based materials by cold plasma methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Agnes Reka

    Cellulose-based materials are ideal candidates for future industries that need to be based on environmentally safe technologies and renewable resources. Wood represents an important raw material and its application as construction material is well established. Cellophane is one of the most important cellulosic material and it is widely used as packaging material in the food industry. Outdoor exposure of wood causes a combination of physical and chemical degradation processes due to the combined effects of sunlight, moisture, fungi, and bacteria. Cold-plasma-induced surface modifications are an attractive way for tailoring the characteristics of lignocellulosic substrates to prevent weathering degradation. Plasma-polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) was deposited onto wood surfaces to create water repellent characteristics. The presence of a crosslinked macromolecular structure was detected. The plasma coated samples exhibited very high water contact angle values indicating the existence of hydrophobic surfaces. Reflective and electromagnetic radiation-absorbent substances were incorporated with a high-molecular-weight polydimethylsiloxane polymer in liquid phase and deposited as thin layers on wood surfaces. The macromolecular films, containing the dispersed materials, were then converted into a three dimensional solid state network by exposure to a oxygen-plasma. It was demonstrated that both UV-absorbent and reflectant components incorporated into the plasma-generated PDMSO matrix protected the wood from weathering degradation. Reduced oxidation and less degradation was observed after simulated weathering. High water contact angle values indicated a strong hydrophobic character of the oxygen plasma-treated PDMSO-coated samples. Plasma-enhanced surface modifications and coatings were employed to create water-vapor barrier layers on cellophane substrate surfaces. HMDSO was selected as a plasma gas and oxygen was used to ablate amorphous regions. Oxygen plasma

  11. INFLUENCE OF THERMAL BARRIER TYPE CERAMIC LAYER’S CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND QUICK THERMAL SCHOCK ON THEIR POROSITY AND ADHERENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Ciofu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents several types of thermal barrier type ceramic layers and the variations concerningtheir porosity and adherence related with their chemical composition. The structural and compositionalcharacterization of the obtained layers was performed by electron microscopy, one of the most relevantinvestigation methods in order to choose the optimum composition for the external layer deposited on copperdevices. The effect of quick thermal shock on the samples porosity and on chemical elements distribution alongthe layer’s thickness was also taken into account.

  12. Study on modernization processes in the coating metal surfaces (plain bearings by thermal spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena IRIMIE

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge accumulated within the metal coating through thermal spraying allows the understanding of aspects related to the coat structure phenomena, in this case of the routs that need to be followed in order to create strong and stabile connections between the coats subsided through thermal spraying, between the particles that compose those coats, respectively. However, all this knowledge does not ensure the understanding of some practical situations that are apparently paradoxes, as for instance the absence of tin bronze adherence to ignobly steel holders, the perfect adherence of bronze to the aluminum on the same types of holders, in the context in which both elements, tin and aluminum, respectively are found in equal quantity in the two type of bonze that maintain them in solid solutions (below 10%.The parallel study in the sinter antifriction domain has offered information regarding the optimal correlation between the composition of antifriction material and the required type of application, the optimal pinches level and the way that this morphological characteristic may be influenced. By experimental research it is necessary to determine the conditions under which such coverage can be obtained by thermal spraying of the metal coatings.

  13. Corrosion Testing of Thermal Spray Coatings in a Biomass Co-Firing Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Oksa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale use of biomass and recycled fuel is increasing in energy production due to climate and energy targets. A 40% cut in greenhouse gas emission compared to 1990 levels and at least a 27% share of renewable energy consumption are set in EU Energy Strategy 2030. Burning fuels with high content of corrosive species such as chlorine and heavy metals causes deterioration of boiler components, shortened lifetime, limited availability of a plant and hence higher maintenance and investment costs and lower thermal and economic efficiency. Coatings can be applied to protect the critical boiler components against high temperature corrosion. In this study, five thermal spray coatings were tested in an actual biomass co-firing boiler for 1300 h with a measurement probe. The coatings were analyzed after the exposure by metallographic means and scanning electron microscope/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscope (SEM/EDX. The deposits formed on the specimens were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence. At 550 °C, the coatings showed excellent corrosion performance compared to reference material ferritic steel T92. At 750 °C, tube material A263 together with NiCr and NiCrTi had the highest corrosion resistance. To conclude, thermal spray coatings can offer substantial corrosion protection in biomass and recycled fuel burning power plants.

  14. Thermal properties and flame retardancy of an ether-type UV-cured polyurethane coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A new UV-reactive monomer piperazine-N,N′-bis(acryloxyethylaryl-phosphoramidate (N-PBAAP containing phosphorus and nitrogen was synthesized and used as flame retardant for an ether-type UV-cured polyurethane acrylate (PUA coating. The thermal properties of the PUA films were investigated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA in air and nitrogen atmosphere. The TGA results showed that the incorporation of N-PBAAP can obviously enhance the char residue of the PUA coatings. From the TGA and real time Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (RT-FTIR results, different degradation behaviors were observed in the PUA coatings with different N-PBAAP content. The combustibility of the PUA coatings was evaluated by microscale combustion calorimeter (MCC. The MCC results revealed that the addition of NPBAAP in the coatings can significantly reduce the peak Heat Release Rate (pHRR, Heat Release Capacity (HRC and the Total Heat Release (THR of the samples. Furthermore, dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMA was employed to examine the viscoelastic properties of the PUA films. It was found that the incorporation of N-PBAAP in the formulation can bring in more functional groups to the coatings, which results in an increase of the glass transition temperature (Tg and cross linking density (XLD of the films.

  15. Thermally Sprayable Anti-corrosion Marine Coatings Based on MAH-g-LDPE/UHMWPE Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeva Jothi, K.; Santhoskumar, A. U.; Amanulla, Syed; Palanivelu, K.

    2014-12-01

    Polymer composite coatings based on low-density polyethylene (LDPE) and ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) blends were prepared for marine coatings. The incorporation of carboxyl moiety in the polymer blends of LDPE/UHMWPE was carried out by grafting with maleic anhydride (MAH) at varying concentrations of 1-8 wt.% using reactive extrusion process. An optimum percentage of grafting of 2.1% was achieved with 5 wt.% of maleic anhydride. Further, the nanocomposites of MAH-grafted-LDPE/UHMWPE blends were prepared by incorporating cloisite 15A nanoclay at varying concentrations of 1-4 wt.%. The polymer nanocomposites were converted into fine powders suitable for thermal spray having ≤200 μ particle size using cryogenic grinding. The effect of the intact coatings applied on grit-blasted mild steel by thermal spray technique was evaluated for abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, and corrosion resistance. The corrosion resistance of the polymer nanocomposites was studied by salt spray technique and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy The abrasion resistance of coatings increases with increasing UHMWPE content in the blends. However, blends with higher concentration of UHMWPE resulted in coarse coatings with poor adhesion. The coatings with 90:10 MAH-grafted-LDPE/UHMWPE having 3 wt.% of nanoclay showed good abrasion resistance, adhesion strength, and better corrosion resistance.

  16. GaN on Diamond with Ultra-Low Thermal Barrier Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-31

    GaN-on-Diamond with Ultra -Low Thermal Barrier Resistance Xing Gu1, Cathy Lee1, Jinqiao Xie1, Edward Beam1, Michael Becker2, Timothy A. Grotjohn2...previously reported best data, and close to the limit predicted by theoretical models for GaN-diamond interfaces Keywords: GaN-on-Diamond; ultra -low...is yet to be realized, mainly due to thermal limitations. Diamond, which offers superior thermal conductivity of ~ 2000 W/ mK , is a natural choice

  17. Refractory porcelain enamel passive-thermal-control coating for high-temperature superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, H.; Auker, B. H.; Gardos, M. N.

    1973-01-01

    Study was conducted to match thermal expansion coefficients thereby preventing enamels from cracking. Report discusses various enamel coatings that are applied to two different high-temperature superalloys. Study may be of interest to manufacturers of chemical equipment, furnaces, and metal components intended for high-temperature applications.

  18. Investigation of phase-change coatings for variable thermal control of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelliher, W. C.; Young, P. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of producing a spacecraft coating system that could vary the ratio of its solar absorptance to thermal emittance to adjust automatically for changes in the thermal balance of a spacecraft. This study resulted in a new concept called the phase-change effect which uses the change that occurs in the optical properties of many materials during the phase transition from a crystalline solid to an amorphous material. A series of two-component model coatings was developed which, when placed on a highly reflecting substrate, exhibited a sharp decrease in solar absorptance within a narrow temperature range. A variable thermal control coating can have a significant amount of temperature regulation with the phase-change effect. Data are presented on several crystallite-polymer formulations, their physical and optical properties, and associated phase-change temperatures. Aspects pertaining to their use in a space environment and an example of the degree of thermal regulation attainable with these coatings is also given.

  19. Electrochemical methods for characterisation of thermal spray corrosion resistant stainless steel coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, R.; Vreijling, M.P.W.; Ferrari, G.M.; Wit, J.H.W. de

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal spray stainless steel coatings for protection of low alloyed steels against different types of corrosion is limited due to high porosity levels and oxide inclusions. In this paper electrochemical methods like corrosion potential monitoring and cyclic voltammetry are reported to

  20. Influence of coating on nanocrystalline magnetic properties during high temperature thermal ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lekdim, Atef, E-mail: atef.lekdim@univ-lyon1.fr; Morel, Laurent; Raulet, Marie-Ange

    2017-05-15

    Since their birth or mergence the late 1980s, the nanocrystalline ultrasoft magnetic materials are taking a great importance in power electronic systems conception. One of the main advantages that make them more attractive nowadays is their ability to be packaged since the reduction of the magnetostrictive constant to almost zero. In aircraft applications, due to the high component compactness and to their location (for example near the jet engine), the operating temperature increases and may reach easily 200 °C and more. Consequently, the magnetic thermal ageing may occur but is, unfortunately, weakly studied. This paper focuses on the influence of the coating (packaging type) on the magnetic nanocrystalline performances during a thermal ageing. This study is based on monitoring the magnetic characteristics of two types of nanocrystalline cores (naked and coated) during a thermal activated ageing (100, 150 and 200 °C). Based on a dedicated monitoring protocol, a large magnetic characterization has been done and analyzed. Elsewhere, X-Ray Diffraction and magnetostriction measurements were carried out to support the study of the anisotropy energies evolution with ageing. This latter is discussed in this paper to explain and give hypothesis about the ageing phenomena. - Highlights: • The coating impacts drastically the magnetic properties during thermal ageing. • Irreversible ageing phenomena after the total coating breakage. • The deteriorations are related to the storage of the magnetoelastic anisotropy.

  1. Spacecraft thermal control coatings (AO 138-6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillous, Alain; Guillaumon, Jean Claude

    1991-01-01

    The experiment A0 138-6 was located on the trailing edge of LDEF as part of the Experiment FRECOPA. Material specimens 2 x 2 cm, independently mounted in sample-holders with their surface in the same reference plane, were exposed to space. Materials include paints (conductive or not), SSMs, polymeric films, surface coatings, composite materials, and metals. The results show that for some materials the degradation was higher for samples in the canister than for those directly mounted on the tray; contamination problems were ruled out, the higher temperature experienced by the samples inside the canister probably explains this phenomenon.

  2. Design and simulation of thermal residual stresses of coatings on WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tool substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Anhai; Zhao, Jun; Zang, Jian; Zheng, Wei [Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture of MOE, School of Mechanical EngineeringShandong University, Jinan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Large thermal residual stresses in coatings during the coating deposition process may easily lead to coating delamination of coated carbide tools in machining. In order to reduce the possibility of coating delamination during the tool failure process, a theoretical method was proposed and a numerical method was constructed for the coating design of WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tools. The thermal residual stresses of multi-layered coatings were analytically modeled based on equivalent parameters of coating properties, and the stress distribution of coatings are simulated by Finite element method (FEM). The theoretically calculated results and the FEM simulated results were verified and in good agreement with the experimental test results. The effects of coating thickness, tool substrate, coating type and interlayer were investigated by the proposed geometric and FEM model. Based on the evaluations of matchability of tool substrate and tool coatings, the basic principles of tool coating design were proposed. This provides theoretical basis for the selection and design of coatings of cutting tools in high-speed machining.

  3. The Influence of Different Absorbed Coatings on Thermal Effect of Prefabricated Solar Collector Panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prefabricated solar collector panels is a kind of new permeability structure of collector panels. For this test, we adopt a certain proportion of copper oxide, magnesium oxide and iron oxide to enamel paint as absorbed panel coating and make two kinds of collector panels for different forms of color by dark green coating and black coating. By the methods of comparison, the two kinds of panel collector efficiency and heat loss coefficient UL were tested. The results showed that there was a slight difference between the heat loss coefficient of prefabricated solar collector panels, using the panel with dark green coating’s comprehensive thermal effect is well than the panel with black coating. The beautiful appearance color is more suitable for building requirements.

  4. Fly ash based geopolymer thin coatings on metal substrates and its thermal evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temuujin, Jadambaa; Minjigmaa, Amgalan; Rickard, William; Lee, Melissa; Williams, Iestyn; van Riessen, Arie

    2010-08-15

    Class F fly ash based Na-geopolymer formulations have been applied as fire resistant coatings on steel. The main variables for the coating formulations were Si: Al molar and water: cement weight ratios. We have determined that the adhesive strength of the coatings strongly depend on geopolymer composition. The ease with which geopolymer can be applied onto metal surfaces and the resultant thickness depend on the water content of the formulation. Adhesive strengths of greater than 3.5 MPa have been achieved on mild steel surfaces for compositions with Si:Al of 3.5. Microstructure evolution and thermal properties of the optimised coating formulations show that they have very promising fire resistant characteristics. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A combined approach for determining the thermal performance of radiant barriers under field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranville, Frederic; Boyer, Harry; Lauret, Philippe; Lucas, Franck [University of La Reunion, Building and Systems Physics Laboratory, 117 rue du General Ailleret, 97 430 Le Tampon (France)

    2008-05-15

    This paper deals with a combined approach for assessing the thermal performance of radiant barriers under field conditions, based both on dynamic simulations and field measurements. The methodology involves the combination of model predictions and experimental results of a complex roof including a radiant barrier installed on a dedicated test cell. During the empirical validation of the building thermal model and more particularly thanks to the results of sensitivity analysis, simplifications of the model were made. These considerations lead to successive simplified versions of the model and finally a very simplified one, which is used to determine the thermal resistance of the complex roof. We first present the detailed thermal model, elaborated with a prototype of building simulation code. We then describe the experimental test cell and put the emphasis on the details of the roof. The simplification of the detailed model is then explained and the results presented. A value of the thermal resistance is finally obtained and confirms the potential of radiant barriers for a tropical climate. (author)

  6. Abrasion, Erosion and Cavitation Erosion Wear Properties of Thermally Sprayed Alumina Based Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Matikainen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermally-sprayed alumina based materials, e.g., alumina-titania (Al2O3-TiO2, are commonly applied as wear resistant coatings in industrial applications. Properties of the coatings depend on the spray process, powder morphology, and chemical composition of the powder. In this study, wear resistant coatings from Al2O3 and Al2O3-13TiO2 powders were sprayed with plasma and high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF spray processes. Both, fused and crushed, and agglomerated and sintered Al2O3-13TiO2 powders were studied and compared to pure Al2O3. The coatings were tested for abrasion, erosion, and cavitation resistances in order to study the effect of the coating structure on the wear behavior. Improved coating properties were achieved when agglomerated and sintered nanostructured Al2O3-13TiO2 powder was used in plasma spraying. Coatings with the highest wear resistance in all tests were produced by HVOF spraying from fused and crushed powders.

  7. Study of different biocomposite coatings on Ti alloy by a subsonic thermal spraying technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Muqin [Provincial Key Laboratory of Biomaterials, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154007 (China); Zhang Rui [College of Stomatology, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154003 (China); Wang Jianping [College of Stomatology, Jiamusi University, Heilongjiang Province, 154003 (China); Yang Shiqin [State Key Laboratory Advanced Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, 150001 (China)

    2007-03-01

    A subsonic thermal spraying technique (STS) was used to make different biocomposite coatings on titanium alloys for preparing three kinds of implants: 8Ti2G, HA and 8H2B, respectively. The implants were embedded in a region of jaw of dogs whose teeth were pulled out three months previously. The dogs, in two groups, were killed 30 days and 90 days, respectively, after they were operated on. Osteointegration between the implants and host bone was investigated by x-ray, histology and the SEM technique. The results showed that the three kinds of coatings all exhibited good biocompatibility and synostosis, but their osteointegration capability showed a difference and decreased in the sequence of 8H2B, HA and 8Ti2G. The activity of coating, which promoted the reactions between implants and bone tissue, was further increased by the addition of bioglass in the 8H2B coating. Subsequently, chemical bonding was formed, and the osteointegration strength was increased. The study provided a new approach to prepare biocomposite coatings. The 8H2B implants, which formed an integral functional biocomposite coating on Ti alloys, showed a better osteointegration capability with bioactivity and pore gradient variation. A theoretical base was provided for the biocomposite coating application.

  8. Bioinspired Omniphobic Coatings with a Thermal Self-Repair Function on Industrial Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Kato, Keiko; Blois, Alexandre P; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2016-03-01

    Inspired by the wax regeneration ability of plant leaves and the slippery surfaces of the Nepenthes pitcher plants, we have developed a new form of cross-species bioinspired slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (X-SLIPS) that can self-repair under thermal stimulation even under large-area physical and chemical damage. The performance and underlying mechanism of the thermal-healing property has been studied and characterized in detail. These thermally self-healing omniphobic coatings can be applied to a broad range of metals, plastics, glass, and ceramics of various shapes and show excellent repellency toward aqueous and organic liquids.

  9. Antireflection coating of barriers to enhance electron tunnelling: exploring the matter wave analogy of superluminal optical phase velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zijun C; McKenzie, David R

    2017-10-06

    The tunnelling of electrons through barriers is important in field emission sources and in interconnects within electronic devices. Here we use the analogy between the electromagnetic wave equation and the Schrodinger equation to find potential barriers that, when added before an existing barrier, increase the transmission probability. A single pre-barrier of negative potential behaves as a dielectric "antireflection coating", as previously reported. However, we obtain an unexpected and much greater enhancement of transmission when the pre-barrier has a positive potential of height smaller than the energy of the incident electron, an unfamiliar optical case, corresponding to media with superluminal phase velocities as in dilute free electron media and anomalous dispersion at X-ray frequencies. We use a finite difference time domain algorithm to evaluate the transmission through a triangular field emission barrier with a pre-barrier that meets the new condition. We show that the transmission is enhanced for an incident wavepacket, producing a larger field emission current than for an uncoated barrier. Examples are given of available materials to enhance transmission in practical applications. The results are significant for showing how to increase electron transmission in field emission and at interconnects between dissimilar materials in all types of electronic devices.

  10. Personal thermal management by metallic nanowire-coated textile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Liu, Xiaoge; Liu, Chong; Xie, Xing; Lee, Hye Ryoung; Welch, Alex J; Zhao, Tom; Cui, Yi

    2015-01-14

    Heating consumes large amount of energy and is a primary source of greenhouse gas emission. Although energy-efficient buildings are developing quickly based on improving insulation and design, a large portion of energy continues to be wasted on heating empty space and nonhuman objects. Here, we demonstrate a system of personal thermal management using metallic nanowire-embedded cloth that can reduce this waste. The metallic nanowires form a conductive network that not only is highly thermal insulating because it reflects human body infrared radiation but also allows Joule heating to complement the passive insulation. The breathability and durability of the original cloth is not sacrificed because of the nanowires' porous structure. This nanowire cloth can efficiently warm human bodies and save hundreds of watts per person as compared to traditional indoor heaters.

  11. The evaluation of integrity and elasticity of thermally sprayed ceramic coatings by ultrasonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauppinen, P. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland). Materials and Structural Integrity

    1997-12-31

    Thermally sprayed ceramic coatings are widely used in industrial applications where the coated component is subject to, e.g. high thermal loads or mechanical wear. The mechanical properties of the coating are finally created in the coating process and the chemical composition of the powder used as raw material can only give some hints about the properties of the final coating. Several non-destructive testing techniques are available for the detection of defects in ceramic materials or for the evaluation of density and density variations. In addition to this, ultrasonic techniques can be used for quantitative evaluation of elastic properties of materials. This evaluation is based on the measurement of sound velocities of different wave modes in the material and is normally applied only to relatively simple-shaped specimens having parallel surfaces. Acoustic microscopy operating at very high (> 100 MHz) frequencies has been used to measure the sound velocities in homogeneous and thin coatings. With this type of equipment, reliable and accurate results have been achieved in laboratory measurements. A lot of development work has been carried out world-wide to develop the measurement techniques and acoustic lenses (transducers) used in acoustic microscopy. However, less attention has been paid on the development of techniques for industrial applications on-site. The present work was focused on the development of measurement techniques for industrial applications. A new type of large-aperture low-frequency transducer was designed and constructed for the measurement of sound velocities in thermally sprayed ceramic coatings. The major difference to the lenses used in acoustic microscopy is that in the new transducer no separate lens is needed for focusing the sound beam. The piezoelectric element in the new transducer is a plastic (PVDF)-film that can be shaped to create the required focus. The practical measurement of the sound velocity is based on a modification of the V

  12. Wear and corrosion behaviour of Al2O3-TiO2 coatings produced by flame thermal projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Duran, M.; Dulce-Moreno, H. J.; Ferrer-Pacheco, M.; Vargas-Galvis, F.

    2017-12-01

    Evaluated the wear resistance and the coatings corrosion behaviour of Al2O3-TiO2 prepared by thermal spraying by flame on AISI 1020 carbon steel substrates, previously coated with an alloy base Ni. For this purpose, were controlled parameters of thermal spraying and the use of powders of similar but different chemical composition is taken as a variable commercial reference for ceramic coating. SEM images allowed to know the morphology of the powders and coatings. Electrochemical techniques (Tafel) were applied to evaluate the protection against corrosion. Coatings were tested for wear with a tribometer configuration bola-disco. It was determined that the phases present in coatings are directly relate to the behaviour against corrosion and wear them. Keywords: wear, corrosion, thermal imaging.

  13. Development of ion-plated aluminide diffusion coatings for thermal cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion protection of a nickel-based superalloy and a stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsawy, Abdel Raouf

    This project was carried out at the University of Toronto and Cametoid Ltd of Whitby, Ontario. Ohno continuous casting; a novel net shape casting technique, was used to generate, Al-Y, Al-Ce, Al-La, and Al-Si-Y, in form of 1.6 to 1.7 mm diameter alloy wires. These alloy wires exhibited suitable properties for use as feed materials to an Ion Vapor Deposition facility. The deposition parameters were optimized to provide coatings with a compact and cohesive columnar structure with reduced porosity and diffusion barriers that were essential to ensure the success of the diffusion process in the subsequent stage. Solid-state diffusion heat treatment processes were developed in order to form the stable aluminide phases, AlNi and FeAl, on IN738 and S310 substrates, respectively. Experiments simulating the coating service conditions and environments encountered during the prospective aerospace and fuel cell applications were conducted to evaluate the performance of each aluminide coating developed during this study. Thermal cyclic oxidation and molten sulfate corrosion studies were performed on coated IN738 pins at 1050°C and 900°C, respectively, simulating the service environment of turbine engine blades and other hot section components. Molten carbonate corrosion behavior was investigated for coated S310 coupons that were immersed in, or covered with a thin film of molten carbonate, at 650°C, in air plus 30%CO2, to simulate the operating conditions of the cathode-side separator plates of molten carbonate fuel cells. The behavior of the reactive elements, yttrium, cerium, lanthanum, and silicon in enhancing the adhesion of the protective aluminum oxide scale was determined by weight variation experiments, structural examination and compositional analysis. The influence of the base material elements, nickel, chromium, and iron, on the formation of protective oxides was investigated. All coatings were found to provide significant improvement for thermal cyclic oxidation

  14. Development and evaluation of aerogel-filled BMI sandwich panels for thermal barrier applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dineshkumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study details a fabrication methodology envisaged to manufacture Glass/BMI honeycomb core aerogel-filled sandwich panels. Silica aerogel granules are used as core fillers to provide thermal insulation properties with little weight increase. Experimental heat transfer studies are conducted on these panels to study the temperature distribution between their two surfaces. Numerical studies are also carried out to validate the results. Despite exhibiting good thermal shielding capabilities, the Glass/BMI sandwich panels are found to oxidise at 180 ºC if exposed directly to heat. In order to increase the temperature bearing capacity and the operating temperature range for these panels, a way of coating them from outside with high temperature spray paint was tried. With a silicone-based coating, the temperature sustainability of these sandwich panels is found to increase to 350 ºC. This proved the effectiveness of the formed manufacturing process, selected high temperature coating, the coating method as well as the envisaged sandwich panel concept.

  15. Determination of elastic and thermal properties of a thin nanocrystalline diamond coating using all-optical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sermeus, J.; Verstraeten, B.; Salenbien, R. [KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Soft Matter and Biophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Pobedinskas, P.; Haenen, K. [Instituut voor Materiaalonderzoek (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Glorieux, C., E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Soft Matter and Biophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    Results are presented on the thermal and elastic properties of a thin, 1.5 μm, nanocrystalline diamond coating (NCD), deposited on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A combination of two all-optical measurement techniques, impulsive stimulated thermal scattering and grating induced laser beam deflection, was employed to launch and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The relation between the dispersive propagation velocity of SAWs to the coating-substrate geometry is exploited to determine the elastic properties of the NCD coating. The elastic properties are found to be consistent with literature values. The thermal properties of the coating were determined by monitoring the thermal diffusion induced washing away of the laser induced transient surface temperature grating. The transient thermal grating signals were fitted by the low-frequency limit of a thermoelastic model for a multilayer configuration. Similar to the dispersion of the surface acoustic wave velocity, the characteristic time of the thermal diffusion driven grating decay evolves from a coating-dominated value at short grating spacings towards a substrate-dominated value at grating spacings well exceeding the coating thickness. The grating spacing dependence of the corresponding effective thermal diffusivity was experimentally determined and fitted, leading to a value for the thermal diffusivity of the NCD coating α{sub NCD} = 8.4{sub −0.1}{sup +2.7} mm{sup 2}·s{sup −1}, which is an order of magnitude lower than that of the silicon substrate. The low value of the thermal diffusivity is interpreted with a simple touching model. - Highlights: • We investigate a thin nano-crystalline diamond coating. • We used two all optical surface acoustic wave based methods. • We found a young's modulus and density that is in line with literature. • The thermal diffusivity of the NCD coating was 2 orders of magnitude lower than the one of bulk diamond.

  16. Influence of surface morphology and microstructure on performance of CVD tungsten coating under fusion transient thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Youyun, E-mail: lianyy@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Liu, Xiang; Wang, Jianbao; Feng, Fan [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China); Lv, Yanwei; Song, Jiupeng [China National R& D Center for Tungsten Technology, Xiamen Tungsten Co. Ltd, 361026 Xiamen (China); Chen, Jiming [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • Thick CVD-W coatingswere deposited at a rapid growth rate. • The polished CVD-W coatings have highly textured structure and exhibited a very strong preferred orientation. • The polished CVD tungsten coatings show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings. • The crack formation of the polished CVD-W was almost suppressed at an elevated temperature. - Abstract: Thick tungsten coatings have been deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at a rapid growth rate. A series of tungsten coatings with different thickness and surface morphology were prepared. The surface morphology, microstructure and preferred orientation of the CVD tungsten coatings were investigated. Thermal shock analyses were performed by using an electron beam facility to study the influence of the surface morphology and the microstructure on the thermal shock resistance of the CVD tungsten coatings. Repetitive (100 pulses) ELMs-like thermal shock loads were applied at various temperatures between room temperature and 600 °C with pulse duration of 1 ms and an absorbed power density of up to 1 GW/m{sup 2}. The results of the tests demonstrated that the specific surface morphology and columnar crystal structure of the CVD tungsten have significant influence on the surface cracking threshold and crack propagation of the materials. The CVD tungsten coatings with a polished surface show superior thermal shock resistance as compared with that of the as-deposited coatings with a rough surface.

  17. Flyweight 3D Graphene Scaffolds with Microinterface Barrier-Derived Tunable Thermal Insulation and Flame Retardancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Hao, Menglong; Xu, Xiang; Xiong, Guoping; Li, Hui; Fisher, Timothy S

    2017-04-26

    In this article, flyweight three-dimensional (3D) graphene scaffolds (GSs) have been demonstrated with a microinterface barrier-derived thermal insulation and flame retardancy characteristics. Such 3D GSs were fabricated by a modified hydrothermal method and a unidirectional freeze-casting process with hierarchical porous microstructures. Because of high porosity (99.9%), significant phonon scattering, and strong π-π interaction at the interface barriers of multilayer graphene cellular walls, the GSs demonstrate a sequence of multifunctional properties simultaneously, such as lightweight density, thermal insulating characteristics, and outstanding mechanical robustness. At 100 °C, oxidized GSs exhibit a thermal conductivity of 0.0126 ± 0.0010 W/(m K) in vacuum. The thermal conductivity of oxidized GSs remains relatively unaffected despite large-scale deformation-induced densification of the microstructures, as compared to the behavior of reduced GSs (rGSs) whose thermal conductivity increases dramatically under compression. The contrasting behavior of oxidized GSs and rGSs appears to derive from large differences in the intersheet contact resistance and varying intrinsic thermal conductivity between reduced and oxidized graphene sheets. The oxidized GSs also exhibit excellent flame retardant behavior and mechanical robustness, with only 2% strength decay after flame treatment. In a broader context, this work demonstrates a useful strategy to design porous nanomaterials with a tunable heat conduction behavior through interface engineering at the nanoscale.

  18. Application techniques of coatings by thermal projection; Tecnicas de aplicacion de recubrimientos por proyeccion termica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcayo Calderon, Jesus [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1995-12-31

    The coatings applied by thermal projection have an important number of applications in different industries (chemical, oil, electric, nuclear, etc.). The main purpose of the protection by means of coatings is to alter the surface characteristics of a component so as to resist corrosive environments, abrasion and erosion, among others. The coatings can be applied by different methods, but due to the fact that its characteristics appreciably differ from the base metal, it is important the knowledge of its properties when a coating is selected for a specific use. In this article the characteristics of the applied coatings by thermal projection, the factors that affect its performance and the principal application techniques, are described. [Espanol] Los recubrimientos aplicados por proyeccion termica tienen un numero importante de aplicaciones en diferentes industrias (quimica, petrolera, electrica, nuclear, etc.). El proposito principal de la proteccion por medio de recubrimientos es alterar las caracteristicas de la superficie de un componente de manera que resista ambientes corrosivos, abrasion y erosion, entre otros. Los recubrimientos pueden aplicarse por diferentes metodos, pero debido a que sus propiedades difieren apreciablemente de las del metal base, es importante el conocimiento de sus propiedades cuando se selecciona un recubrimiento para un uso especifico. En este articulo se describen las caracteristicas de los recubrimientos aplicados por proyeccion termica, los factores que afectan su desempeno y las principales tecnicas de aplicacion.

  19. Photodetector based on Vernier-Enhanced Fabry-Perot Interferometers with a Photo-Thermal Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, George Y.; Wu, Xuan; Liu, Xiaokong; Lancaster, David G.; Monro, Tanya M.; Xu, Haolan

    2017-01-01

    We present a new type of fiber-coupled photodetector with a thermal-based optical sensor head, which enables it to operate even in the presence of strong electro-magnetic interference and in electrically sensitive environments. The optical sensor head consists of three cascaded Fabry-Perot interferometers. The end-face surface is coated with copper-oxide micro-particles embedded in hydrogel, which is a new photo-thermal coating that can be readily coated on many different surfaces. Under irradiation, photons are absorbed by the photo-thermal coating, and are converted into heat, changing the optical path length of the probing light and induces a resonant wavelength shift. For white-light irradiation, the photodetector exhibits a power sensitivity of 760 pm/mW, a power detection limit of 16.4 μW (i.e. specific detectivity of 2.2 × 105 cm.√Hz/W), and an optical damage threshold of ~100 mW or ~800 mW/cm2. The response and recovery times are 3.0 s (~90% of change within 100 ms) and 16.0 s respectively.

  20. Thermal conductivity of titanium nitride/titanium aluminum nitride multilayer coatings deposited by lateral rotating cathode arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samani, M.K., E-mail: majid1@e.ntu.edu.sg [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Ding, X.Z. [Surface Technology Group, Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 71 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 638075 (Singapore); Khosravian, N. [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Amin-Ahmadi, B. [Electron Microscopy for materials Science (EMAT), Department of Physics, University of Antwerpen, Groenenborgerlan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Yi, Yang [Data Storage Institute, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 117608 (Singapore); Chen, G. [BC Photonics Technological Company, 5255 Woodwards Rd., Richmond, BC V7E 1G9 (Canada); Neyts, E.C.; Bogaerts, A. [Research Group PLASMANT, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Tay, B.K. [Novitas, Nanoelectronics Centre of Excellence, School of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-03-02

    A series of [TiN/TiAlN]{sub n} multilayer coatings with different bilayer numbers n = 5, 10, 25, 50, and 100 were deposited on stainless steel substrate AISI 304 by a lateral rotating cathode arc technique in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere. The composition and microstructure of the coatings have been analyzed by using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and conventional and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). XRD analysis shows that the preferential orientation growth along the (111) direction is reduced in the multilayer coatings. TEM analysis reveals that the grain size of the coatings decreases with increasing bilayer number. HRTEM imaging of the multilayer coatings shows a high density misfit dislocation between the TiN and TiAlN layers. The cross-plane thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured by a pulsed photothermal reflectance technique. With increasing bilayer number, the multilayer coatings' thermal conductivity decreases gradually. This reduction of thermal conductivity can be ascribed to increased phonon scattering due to the disruption of columnar structure, reduced preferential orientation, decreased grain size of the coatings and present misfit dislocations at the interfaces. - Highlights: • TiN/TiAlN multilayer coatings with different bilayer number were deposited on SS. • The composition and microstructure of the as-deposited coatings were analyzed. • Thermal conductivity of the coatings was measured by pulsed photothermal reflectance. • Thermal conductivity depends on the coatings' microstructure and number of layers. • With increasing the bilayer number, thermal conductivity decreased.

  1. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  2. A facility for the simulation of environmental parameters and qualification of flight thermal coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paczkowski, F. N.

    1978-01-01

    There is a continuing interest and need for investigation and development of, various paints, coatings, multi-layer insulation, and electrically conductive paints and coatings used for thermal control and electrical discharge of spacecraft surfaces. Degradation of these surfaces by solar-wind energy particles and ultraviolet irradiation, as well as contamination by the outgassing of materials used in conjunction or close proximity to these surfaces, continues to be a matter of concern. The following is a description of a facility with the capability of evaluating the synergistic effects encountered in the space environment. Actual flight qualification programs are also described.

  3. The corrosion resistance of 140MXC, 530AS and 560AS coatings produced by thermal spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Alexis López Covaleda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Three commercial materials were deposited using electric arc thermal spraying: 140MXC (with Fe, W, Cr, Nb, 530AS (AISI 1015 steel and 560AS (AISI 420 steel on AISI 4340 steel. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the best strategy for improving a coating-substrate system’s corrosion resistance, using the following combinations: homogeneous single coatings, bilayers consisting of 530AS or 560AS under 140MXC and 140MXC + 530AS and 140MXC + 560AS coatings deposited simultaneously. The coatings were characterised using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion resistance was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarisation and hardness by using the Vickers test. Corrosion resistance depends on the amount of microstructure defects, the deposition strategy and the alloy elements. However, corrosion resistance was similar in single coatings of 140MXC and bilayers, having -630 V corrosion potential and 708 nA corrosion current. The details and corrosion mechanism of the coatings so produced are described in this paper.

  4. Mitigating Localized Corrosion Using Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA) Coatings on Welded 25% Cr Superduplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Lu, Q.; Harvey, M. D. F.

    2015-04-01

    Thermally sprayed aluminum (TSA) coating has been increasingly used for the protection of carbon steel offshore structures, topside equipment, and flowlines/pipelines exposed to both marine atmospheres and seawater immersion conditions. In this paper, the effectiveness of TSA coatings in preventing localized corrosion, such as pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr superduplex stainless steel (SDSS) in subsea applications, has been investigated. Welded 25% Cr SDSS (coated and uncoated) with and without defects, and surfaces coated with epoxy paint were also examined. Pitting and crevice corrosion tests, on welded 25% Cr SDSS specimens with and without TSA/epoxy coatings, were conducted in recirculated, aerated, and synthetic seawater at 90 °C for 90 days. The tests were carried out at both the free corrosion potentials and an applied cathodic potential of -1100 mV saturated calomel electrode. The acidity (pH) of the test solution was monitored daily and adjusted to between pH 7.5 and 8.1, using dilute HCl solution or dilute NaOH, depending on the pH of the solution measured during the test. The test results demonstrated that TSA prevented pitting and crevice corrosion of 25% Cr SDSS in artificial seawater at 90 °C, even when 10-mm-diameter coating defect exposing the underlying steel was present.

  5. Laser surface modification (LSM) of thermally-sprayed Diamalloy 2002 coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisario, A.; Barletta, M.; Veniali, F.

    2012-09-01

    Thermally-sprayed Diamalloy 2002 is widely used as overlay coating in several applications for their good wear and corrosion protection. Although, in the past, any effort has been produced to deposit Diamalloy 2002 with a low degree of defectiveness, some residual porosity and cracks can often affect the final property of the resulting coatings. Different techniques are commonly used to improve the performance of Diamalloy 2002. Recently, laser post-treatment seems to be one of the most promising, being an effective, non-contact, mini-invasive technology. In this respect, the present investigation deals with the application of a continuous wave high power diode laser to post-treat Diamalloy 2002 deposited by HVOF on AA 6082 T6 aluminum alloy. Different laser power and scan speed were investigated in order to identify the process window most favorable to improve the overall mechanical property of Diamalloy 2002 coatings. The changes in morphology, micro-structure and chemical composition of the coatings after laser post-treatments were investigated by inductive gage profilometry and combined SEM-EDXS. Further, the changes in the mechanical properties of the coatings were investigated in terms of hardness, elastic modulus, scratch and wear resistance. Consistent improvements in mechanical property can be achieved by Diamalloy 2002 when laser processing is performed at higher power and reduced scan speed. Yet, too much increase in power density should be always avoided as it can be detrimental to the final property of the coatings and cause high defectiveness and their failure.

  6. Synthesis of thermal and chemical resistant oxygen barrier starch with reinforcement of nano silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Satyabrata; Swain, Sarat K

    2013-09-12

    Starch/silicon carbide (starch/SiC) bionanocomposites were synthesized by solution method using different wt% of silicon carbide with starch matrix. The interaction between starch and silicon carbide was studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The structure of the bionanocomposites was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Thermal property of starch/SiC bionanocomposites was measured and a significant enhancement of thermal resistance was noticed. The oxygen barrier property of the composites was studied and a substantial reduction in permeability was observed as compared to the virgin starch. The reduction of oxygen permeability with enhancement of thermal stability of prepared bionanocomposites may enable the materials suitable for thermal resistant packaging and adhesive applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of TiO{sub 2}/aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives on the mechanical and thermal properties of polyacrylic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosrati, Rahimeh, E-mail: ra.nosrati@gmail.com; Olad, Ali, E-mail: a.olad@yahoo.com

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Novel nonocomposite coatings based on commercial polyacrylic latex were prepared. • Nanostructured TiO{sub 2}/aluminosilicate nanocomposites materials were prepared. • TiO{sub 2}/aluminosilicate nanocomposites used as additive for modification of polyacrylic latex. • Modified coatings showed better adhesion strength and hardness than unmodified polymer. • Most of modified coatings showed better tensile properties and lower T{sub g} than unmodified polymer. - Abstract: The commercial grade polyacrylic latex was modified in order to prepare a mechanical and thermal improved coating. TiO{sub 2}/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposites with montmorillonite, zeolite-A and clinoptilolite aluminosilicates were prepared and used as additive in the matrix of polyacrylic latex to achieve a coating with proper mechanical and thermal properties. X-ray diffraction patterns and FESEM were used to characterize the composition, structure, and morphology of the nanocomposite additives. Polyacrylic coatings modified by TiO{sub 2}/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives showed higher adhesion strength and hardness compared to unmodified commercial grade polyacrylic coatings. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed lower glass transition temperature for modified polyacrylic coatings than that of unmodified polyacrylic coatings. The tensile tests were also carried out for unmodified and modified polyacrylic coatings. According to the results, the modified polyacrylic based coating with TiO{sub 2}/Ag-exchanged-clinoptilolite nanocomposite additive was the best coating considering most of useful properties.

  8. Diamondlike carbon coating as a galvanic corrosion barrier between dental implant abutments and nickel-chromium superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkomur, Ahmet; Erbil, Mehmet; Akova, Tolga

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy, to investigate the effect of diamondlike carbon (DLC) coating over titanium on galvanic corrosion behavior between titanium and Ni-Cr alloy, and to evaluate the effect of DLC coating over titanium abutments on the fit and integrity of prosthetic assemblies by scanning electron microcopy (SEM). Five Ni-Cr and 10 titanium disks with a diameter of 5 mm and thickness of 3 mm were prepared. DLC coating was applied to five titanium disks. Electrode samples were prepared, and open circuit potential measurements, galvanic current measurements over platinum electrodes, and potentiodynamic polarization tests were carried out. For the SEM evaluation, 20 Ni-Cr alloy and 10 gold alloy superstructures were cast and prepared over 30 abutments. DLC coating was applied to 10 of the abutments. Following the fixation of prosthetic assemblies, the samples were embedded in acrylic resin and cross sectioned longitudinally. Internal fit evaluations were carried out through examination of the SEM images. Titanium showed more noble and electrochemically stable properties than Ni-Cr alloy. DLC coating over the cathode electrode served as an insulating film layer over the surface and prevented galvanic coupling. Results of the SEM evaluations indicated that the DLC-coated and titanium abutments showed no statistically significant difference in fit. Hence, no adverse effects on the adaptation of prosthetic components were found with the application of DLC coating over abutment surfaces. DLC coating might serve as a galvanic corrosion barrier between titanium abutments and Ni-Cr superstructures.

  9. Thermal stability and adhesion of low-emissivity electroplated Au coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorenby, Jeff W.; Hachman, John T., Jr.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Chames, Jeffrey M.; Clift, W. Miles

    2010-12-01

    We are developing a low-emissivity thermal management coating system to minimize radiative heat losses under a high-vacuum environment. Good adhesion, low outgassing, and good thermal stability of the coating material are essential elements for a long-life, reliable thermal management device. The system of electroplated Au coating on the adhesion-enhancing Wood's Ni strike and 304L substrate was selected due to its low emissivity and low surface chemical reactivity. The physical and chemical properties, interface bonding, thermal aging, and compatibility of the above Au/Ni/304L system were examined extensively. The study shows that the as-plated electroplated Au and Ni samples contain submicron columnar grains, stringers of nanopores, and/or H{sub 2} gas bubbles, as expected. The grain structure of Au and Ni are thermally stable up to 250 C for 63 days. The interface bonding is strong, which can be attributed to good mechanical locking among the Au, the 304L, and the porous Ni strike. However, thermal instability of the nanopore structure (i.e., pore coalescence and coarsening due to vacancy and/or entrapped gaseous phase diffusion) and Ni diffusion were observed. In addition, the study also found that prebaking 304L in the furnace at {ge} 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr promotes surface Cr-oxides on the 304L surface, which reduces the effectiveness of the intended H-removal. The extent of the pore coalescence and coarsening and their effect on the long-term system integrity and outgassing are yet to be understood. Mitigating system outgassing and improving Au adhesion require a further understanding of the process-structure-system performance relationships within the electroplated Au/Ni/304L system.

  10. Polylactide/Montmorillonite Hybrid Latex as a Barrier Coating for Paper Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davide Bandera; Veronika R Meyer; David Prevost; Tanja Zimmermann; Luciano F Boesel

    2016-01-01

    .... The coating latex is prepared from inexpensive materials and can be used for a solvent-free coating process. In addition, the ingredients of the latex are non-toxic; thus, the coated papers can be safely used for food packaging.

  11. Development of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Path Toward 2700 F Temperature Capability and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Harder, Bryan; Hurst, Janet B.; Good, Brian; Costa, Gustavo; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Fox, Dennis S.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced environmental barrier coating systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) turbine and combustor hot section components are currently being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance goals. One of the significant coating development challenges is to achieve prime-reliant environmental barrier coating systems to meet the future 2700F EBC-CMC temperature stability and environmental durability requirements. This presentation will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating system testing and down-selects, particularly the development path and properties towards 2700-3000F durability goals by using NASA hafnium-hafnia-rare earth-silicon-silicate composition EBC systems for the SiC-SiC CMC turbine component applications. Advanced hafnium-based compositions for enabling next generation EBC and CMCs capabilities towards ultra-high temperature ceramic coating systems will also be briefly mentioned.

  12. Determination of Thermal Properties of Graphite-Black-Coating by Photothermal and Electro-Pyroelectric Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najoua Bennaji

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we will describe and compare photothermal and Electro-pyroelectric techniques which permit the determination of thermal properties of materials. We will give a brief account of the basic aspects of the photothermal model and of a setup with an alternative detection technique with a pyroelectric transducer. The possibilities of these measuring schemes for the simultaneous measurement of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity will be illustrated with results from a study of Graphite- black-coating. Finally, we will compare those two non-destructive techniques (photothermal and Electro-pyroelectric.

  13. Thermal performance of alumina filler reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz; Ullah, Sami; Farhana Mohammad, Wan; Farth Shariff, M.

    2014-06-01

    In the modern construction, fire safety has significant consideration for the protection of people and assets. Several intumescent fire protection systems are in practice and have constrain of releasing toxic gases on degradation forms an insulating char layer protecting underlying substrate. An intumescent coating expands many times of its thickness on exposure to fire and protect the underlying substrate from fire. This study presents the results of thermal performance of an intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) developed for structural application. IFRC was developed using expandable graphite (EG), ammonium poly phosphate (APP) and melamine (MEL), epoxy resin Bisphenol-A (BPA) and hardener triethylenetetramine (TETA) were used as a binder as a curing agent. Char expansion of IFRC was measured by furnace fire test at 450°C, thermal performance was measured using a Bunsen burner at 950°C and temperature of substrate was recorded for 60 min at an interval of two min. Results showed that IFRC containing 3wt% alumina showed char expansion X19. After one hour exposure of coating to heat, substrate temperature recorded was 154°C. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) results showed the presence of high temperature compounds present in the char of coating, considered responsible to reduce the penetration of heat to the substrate.

  14. Thermal performance of glass fiber reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faiz; Ullah, Sami; Aziz, Hammad; Omar, Nor Sharifah

    2015-07-01

    The results of influence of glass fiber addition into the basic intumescent coating formulation towards the enhancement of its thermal insulation properties are presented. The intumescent coatings were formulated from expandable graphite, ammonium polyphosphate, melamine, boric acid, bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188, polyamide amine H-2310 hardener and fiberglass (FG) of length 3.0 mm. Eight intumescent formulations were developed and the samples were tested for their fire performance by burning them at 450°C, 650°C and 850°C in the furnace for two hours. The effects of each fire test at different temperatures; low and high temperature were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscope, X-Ray Diffraction technique and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis were conducted on the samples to study the morphology, the chemical components of char and the residual weight of the coatings. The formulation, FG08 containing 7.0 wt% glass fiber provided better results with enhanced thermal insulation properties of the coatings.

  15. Aluminium-12wt% silicon coating prepared by thermal spraying technique: Part 2 microstructure and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiansirisomboon, S.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available At present, thermal spray technology has been widely used as an alternative method for wear protection in materials by applying coated layer on an original worn surface. This research studied the thermal sprayed Al-12wt%Si coating prepared by flame spray technique. This material has been known as a candidate for wear resistance in particularly an automobile industry. In this research, the most suitable spraying condition had been achieved by a design of experiment which was 38 ft3/hr (1.026 m3/hr of oxygen flow rate, 27 ft3/hr (0.729 m3/hr of acetylene flow rate and 58 mm of spray distance. The as-sprayed coating had a hardness of 87.0±8.3 HV, thickness of 236.7±20.5 μm, percentage volume fraction of porosity of 14.99± 1.63 and wear rate of 1.108x10-3 ± 0.001 mm3/m. Microstructure of the coating was also investigated.

  16. Thermal performance of glass fiber reinforced intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Ullah, Sami; Aziz, Hammad, E-mail: engr.hammad.aziz03@gmail.com; Omar, Nor Sharifah [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The results of influence of glass fiber addition into the basic intumescent coating formulation towards the enhancement of its thermal insulation properties are presented. The intumescent coatings were formulated from expandable graphite, ammonium polyphosphate, melamine, boric acid, bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188, polyamide amine H-2310 hardener and fiberglass (FG) of length 3.0 mm. Eight intumescent formulations were developed and the samples were tested for their fire performance by burning them at 450°C, 650°C and 850°C in the furnace for two hours. The effects of each fire test at different temperatures; low and high temperature were evaluated. Scanning Electron Microscope, X-Ray Diffraction technique and Thermo Gravimetric Analysis were conducted on the samples to study the morphology, the chemical components of char and the residual weight of the coatings. The formulation, FG08 containing 7.0 wt% glass fiber provided better results with enhanced thermal insulation properties of the coatings.

  17. Thermal, Mechanical and Optical Features of Aluminosilicate-Coated Cotton Textiles via the Crosslinking Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alenka Ojstršek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented study focuses on the development of a pad-dry-thermofix functional coating process using a mixture of microporous aluminosilicate particles in diverse bath formulations to impart UV-ray-blocking, thermal stability and easy-care properties to the cotton fabric. The results of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and X-ray powder Diffraction (XRD revealed the presence of three different types of zeolites within the examined sample, i.e., the largest amount being zeolite A, followed by the zeolite X, and the zeolite ZSM-5. The surface characterization results of zeolite-coated/cross-linked textiles provided evidence of acceptable UV-ray-blocking properties and increased thermal stability, as well as enhanced tensile strength and breaking tenacity without considerably decreasing the whiteness degree. Moreover, the dry crease recovery angle increased for the cotton fabric cross-linked via an mDMDHEU, and decreased significantly using 30 g/L zeolites negatively influencing qualitative values. TG/DTA results have proven the enlarged thermal stability of aluminosilicate-coated cotton, although combustion was not prevented.

  18. METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser; Frank W. Zok; Carlos G. Levi; Jeffrey Hawk

    2004-02-01

    In an effort to realize minimum of a 2x increase in wear life of ground engaging components used on mining machines, two potentially cost effective processes were explored for the production of tailored, highly abrasion resistant materials: (1) hybrid pressure casting of steel composites, and (2) arc lamp fusing of thermal spray coatings. Steel composites comprised of cermet or oxide hard particles were successfully produced using pressure casting processes, although a cost effective process has not yet been identified for oxide particles. Both composites achieved project wear targets in high stress gouging wear, but the cermet composites did not meet the targets in impact wear, due to poor matrix toughness resulting from particle dissolution. Oxide composites had superior toughness and are expected to meet impact wear goals. Arc lamp processing of thermal spray coatings was successfully demonstrated to produce a metallurgical bond at the coating interface. Functionally graded materials were developed and successfully fused to allow for the accommodation of thermal process stresses in an intermediate layer. Ultimately, three functionally graded materials were identified as having high stress, three-body abrasion resistance sufficient to exceed project goals.

  19. The Effects of Using Some Common White Pigments on Thermal and Aesthetic Performances of Pigmented Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baneshi, Mehdi; Maruyama, Shigenao; Komiya, Atsuki

    A coated surface with high reflectance in the near infrared (NIR) region and low reflectance in the visible (VIS) region can both stay cool in the sun and retain its appearance by reducing the glare of reflected sunlight. To design such coatings, an optimization method that embraces both thermal and aesthetic effects is introduced. White pigments are widely used in designing cool coatings due to their relatively high reflectance of sunlight. However, using white pigments may produce glare, which can cause visual discomfort. It is possible to control these effects by controlling the size of pigment particles, volume concentration of pigments and coating thickness. Among the various white pigments that are available, we chose titanium dioxide, zinc oxide and alumina for this study. Radiative heat transfer in an anisotropic scattering, monodisperse pigmented layer was analyzed using the radiation element method by ray emission model (REM2). Both collimated and diffuse solar irradiations were considered. The CIE (International Commission on Illumination) colorimetric system was used for color analysis. Finally, the optimum values of particle size, volume fraction of pigment, and coating thickness were obtained and compared for the three mentioned pigments.

  20. Design Optimization of Liquid Fueled High Velocity Oxy- Fuel Thermal Spraying Technique for Durable Coating for Fossil Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhuri, Ahsan [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States); Love, Norman [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

    2016-11-04

    High-velocity oxy–fuel (HVOF) thermal spraying was developed in 1930 and has been commercially available for twenty-five years. HVOF thermal spraying has several benefits over the more conventional plasma spray technique including a faster deposition rate which leads to quicker turn-around, with more durable coatings and higher bond strength, hardness and wear resistance due to a homogeneous distribution of the sprayed particles. HVOF thermal spraying is frequently used in engineering to deposit cermets, metallic alloys, composites and polymers, to enhance product life and performance. HVOF thermal spraying system is a highly promising technique for applying durable coatings on structural materials for corrosive and high temperature environments in advanced ultra-supercritical coal- fired (AUSC) boilers, steam turbines and gas turbines. HVOF thermal spraying is the preferred method for producing coatings with low porosity and high adhesion. HVOF thermal spray process has been shown to be one of the most efficient techniques to deposit high performance coatings at moderate cost. Variables affecting the deposit formation and coating properties include hardware characteristics such as nozzle geometry and spraying distance and process parameters such as equivalence ratio, gas flow density, and powder feedstock. In the spray process, the powder particles experience very high speeds combined with fast heating to the powder material melting point or above. This high temperature causes evaporation of the powder, dissolution, and phase transformations. Due to the complex nature of the HVOF technique, the control and optimization of the process is difficult. In general, good coating quality with suitable properties and required performance for specific applications is the goal in producing thermal spray coatings. In order to reach this goal, a deeper understanding of the spray process as a whole is needed. Although many researchers studied commercial HVOF thermal spray

  1. Evaluation of the Shearing Strength of a WC-12Co Thermal Spray Coating by the Scraping Test Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kaneko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an experimental and analytical investigation conducted into efficacy of the scraping shear-test method in estimating the shearing adhesive strength of a thermally sprayed coating. It was found that the critical average shear stress, the apparent failure strength of WC-Co thermal spray coating, depends on both the dimensions of the test piece and the loading position around the interface between the coating and the substrate. More specifically, the apparent critical shear stress decreased as the height and width of the test piece increased. In addition, the apparent critical shear stress increased with increasing coating thickness and with decreasing loading point distance measured from the interface. Consequently, the real adhesive strength of thermally sprayed coating could not be ascertained from these experimental results. Furthermore, most of the failure initiation points were inside the coating, as opposed to at the interface. This fact means that the results of the tests do not indicate the interfacial adhesive strength, but rather the shear strength of the coating. Three-dimensional finite element method (FEM analysis showed that the distributions of the shearing stress at the loading points were virtually the same at failure, regardless of the dimensions of the test piece. These results suggest that the scraping test method needs a corresponding numerical analysis of the failure mode in order to produce reliable results and is not necessarily able to estimate the interfacial adhesive strength of thermally sprayed coating.

  2. Thermally-Conductive Metallic Coatings and Applications for Heat Removal on In-Space Cryogenic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameen, Lauren; Hervol, David; Waters, Deborah

    2017-01-01

    For large in-space cryogenic upper stages, substantial axial heat removal from a forward skirt by vapor-based heat interception may not be achieved by simple attachment methods unless sufficient thermal conductance from the skirt to the cooling fluid can be achieved. Preferable methods would allow for the addition of the cooling system to existing structure with minimal impact on the structure. Otherwise, significant modification to the basic structural design andor novel and complex attachment mechanisms with high effective thermal conductance are likely to be required. The approach being pursued by evolvable Cryogenics (eCryo) is to increase the thermal performance of a relatively simple attachment system by applying metallic or other thermally conductive material coatings to the mating surface area of the fluid channel where it is attached the skirt wall. The expectation of candidate materials is that the dramatic increase in conductivity of pure metals at temperatures close to liquid hydrogen vapor temperature will compensate for the reduced actual contact area typical of mechanical joints. Basic contact conductance data at low temperatures for candidate interface materials is required to enable the test approach. A test rig was designed at NASA Glenn Research Center to provide thermal contact resistance testing between small sample coupons coated with conductive material via electron beam evaporation, a low-temperature option that will not affect physical properties of base materials. Average coating thicknesses were 10 k. The test fixture was designed to mount directly to a cryocooler cold head within a vacuum test chamber. The purpose of this test was to determine qualitative contact conductance between various test samples. Results from this effort will be implemented in a sub-scale vapor-based heat interception test, where the applicability for increased heat removal on large structural skirts will be considered.

  3. The Improvement of Oxidation Resistance of a Re-Based Diffusion Barrier/Ni–Al Coating on the Single-Crystal Ni-Based TMS-82+ Superalloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Y.; Wang, Y.M.; Song, G.M.; Li, X.W.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidation behavior of a Re-based diffusion barrier/Ni–Al coated single-crystal (SC) Ni-based TMS-82+ superalloy was studied to compare with those of the base and Ni–Al coated superalloys under cyclic air at 1150 °C for 200 h. The base superalloy showed a negative mass gain due to extensive oxide

  4. Symbiotic bacterial communities of corals across two thermally distinct environments on the Belize Barrier Reef System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speare, L.

    2016-02-01

    Corals maintain symbiotic relationships with complex communities of algae, other eukaryotes, and bacteria, collectively called the `holobiont'. Studies suggest that differences in bacterial communities may affect coral holobiont nutrition, defense capabilities, and susceptibility to disease. Using next-generation metabarcoding of the 16S rRNA we will examine how bacterial communities differ between three coral host species (Siderastrea siderea, S. radians, and Pseudodiploria strigosa) from two distinct thermal environments of the Belize Barrier Reef System. These thermal environments differ in both mean annual temperature and thermal variation characterized here as: 1) `extreme' sites exhibiting high mean temperatures and high thermal variation, and 2) `low' sites exhibiting low mean temperatures and low thermal variation. Our results will help elucidate the complex dynamics that exist between coral-specific bacterial communities across different thermal environments. Characterizing the bacterial component of the coral holobiont can help us better recognize how species-level differences may affect overall holobiont physiology across a range of temperatures and lead to a more thorough understanding of coral disease susceptibility and overall fitness.

  5. Synergistic effects of ultraviolet radiation, thermal cycling and atomic oxygen on altered and coated Kapton surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Bruckner, Eric J.; Rodriguez, Elvin

    1992-01-01

    The photovoltaic (PV) power system for Space Station Freedom (SSF) uses solar array blankets which provide structural support for the solar cells and house the electrical interconnections. In the low earth orbital (LEO) environment where SSF will be located, surfaces will be exposed to potentially damaging environmental conditions including solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, thermal cycling, and atomic oxygen. It is necessary to use ground based tests to determine how these environmental conditions would affect the mass loss and optical properties of candidate SSF blanket materials. Silicone containing, silicone coated, and SiO(x) coated polyimide film materials were exposed to simulated LEO environmental conditions to determine their durability and whether the environmental conditions of UV, thermal cycling and oxygen atoms act synergistically on these materials. A candidate PV blanket material called AOR Kapton, a polysiloxane polyimide cast from a solution mixture, shows an improvement in durability to oxygen atoms erosion after exposure to UV radiation or thermal cycling combined with UV radiation. This may indicate that the environmental conditions react synergistically with this material, and the damage predicted by exposure to atomic oxygen alone is more severe than that which would occur in LEO where atomic oxygen, thermal cycling and UV radiation are present together.

  6. Key Durability Issues with Mullite-Based Environmental Barrier Coatings for Si-Based Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed mullite (3Al2O3.2SiO2) and mullite/yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) dual layer coatings have been developed to protect silicon -based ceramics from environmental attack. Mullite-based coating systems show excellent durability in air. However, in combustion environments, corrosive species such as molten salt or water vapor penetrate through cracks in the coating and attack the Si-based ceramics along the interface. Thus the modification of the coating system for enhanced crack-resistance is necessary for long-term durability in combustion environments. Other key durability issues include interfacial contamination and coating/substrate bonding. Interfacial contamination leads to enhanced oxidation and interfacial pore formation, while a weak coating/substrate bonding leads to rapid attack of the interface by corrosive species, both of which can cause a premature failure of the coating. Interfacial contamination can be minimized by limiting impurities in coating and substrate materials. The interface may be modified to improve the coating/substrate bond.

  7. Barrier efficiency of sponge-like La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} buffer layers for YBCO-coated conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, Leopoldo; Tan, Haiyan; Biermans, Ellen; Verbeeck, Jo; Bals, Sara; Tendeloo, Gustaaf Van [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, BE-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Batenburg, Kees J, E-mail: leopoldo.molina-luna@ua.ac.be [Vision Lab, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, BE-2020 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2011-06-15

    Solution derived La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} films have drawn much attention for potential applications as thermal barriers or low-cost buffer layers for coated conductor technology. Annealing and coating parameters strongly affect the microstructure of La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, but different film processing methods can yield similar microstructural features such as nanovoids and nanometer-sized La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} grains. Nanoporosity is a typical feature found in such films and the implications for the functionality of the films are investigated by a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and quantitative electron tomography. Chemical solution based La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} films deposited on flexible Ni-5 at.%W substrates with a {l_brace}100{r_brace}(001) biaxial texture were prepared for an in-depth characterization. A sponge-like structure composed of nanometer-sized voids is revealed by high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy in combination with electron tomography. A three-dimensional quantification of nanovoids in the La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} film is obtained on a local scale. Mostly non-interconnected highly faceted nanovoids compromise more than one-fifth of the investigated sample volume. The diffusion barrier efficiency of a 170 nm thick La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} film is investigated by STEM-EELS, yielding a 1.8 {+-} 0.2 nm oxide layer beyond which no significant nickel diffusion can be detected and intermixing is observed. This is of particular significance for the functionality of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} coated conductor architectures based on solution derived La{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} films as diffusion barriers.

  8. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M.; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad

    2015-07-01

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  9. Thermal Stability of Silver Paste Sintering on Coated Copper and Aluminum Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Chun; Chen, Chuantong; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Fu, Guicui

    2017-10-01

    The thermal stability of silver (Ag) paste sintering on coated copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) substrates has been investigated. Instead of conventional zincating or nickel plating, magnetron sputtering was used to achieve coating with titanium (Ti) and Ag. Silicon (Si) chips were bonded to coated Cu and Al substrates using a mixture of submicron Ag flakes and particles under 250°C and 0.4 MPa for 30 min. The joints were then subject to aging testing at 250°C for duration of 200 h, 500 h, and 1000 h. Two types of joints exhibited satisfactory initial shear strength above 45 MPa. However, the shear strength of the joints on Al substrate decreased to 28 MPa after 1000 h of aging, while no shear strength decline was detected for the joints on Cu substrate. Fracture surface analysis revealed that the vulnerable points of the two types of joints were (1) the Ag layer and (2) the interface between the Ti layer and Cu substrate. Based on the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and simulations, cracks in the Ag layer were identified as the cause of the shear strength degradation in the joints on Al substrate. The interface evolution of the joints on Cu substrate was ascribed to Cu migration and discontinuity points that initialized in the Ti layer. This study reveals that Al exhibited superior thermal stability with sintered Ag paste.

  10. Marangoni effects on a thin liquid film coating a sphere with axial or radial thermal gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Di; Nadim, Ali; Chugunova, Marina

    2017-07-01

    We study the time evolution of a thin liquid film coating the outer surface of a sphere in the presence of gravity, surface tension, and thermal gradients. We derive the fourth-order nonlinear partial differential equation that models the thin film dynamics, including Marangoni terms arising from the dependence of surface tension σ on temperature T. We consider two different imposed temperature distributions with axial or radial thermal gradients. We analyze the stability of a uniform coating under small perturbations and carry out numerical simulations in COMSOL for a range of parameter values. In the case of an axial temperature gradient, we find steady states either with uniform film thickness or with the fluid accumulating at the bottom or near the top of the sphere, depending on the total volume of liquid in the film, dictating whether gravity or Marangoni effects dominate. This suggests a potential method for the indirect measurement of d σ /d T by monitoring the thickness profile of the thin film. In the case of a radial temperature gradient, a stability analysis reveals the most unstable non-axisymmetric modes on an initially uniform coating film.

  11. Thermal Stability of Silver Paste Sintering on Coated Copper and Aluminum Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Chun; Chen, Chuantong; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Fu, Guicui

    2018-01-01

    The thermal stability of silver (Ag) paste sintering on coated copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) substrates has been investigated. Instead of conventional zincating or nickel plating, magnetron sputtering was used to achieve coating with titanium (Ti) and Ag. Silicon (Si) chips were bonded to coated Cu and Al substrates using a mixture of submicron Ag flakes and particles under 250°C and 0.4 MPa for 30 min. The joints were then subject to aging testing at 250°C for duration of 200 h, 500 h, and 1000 h. Two types of joints exhibited satisfactory initial shear strength above 45 MPa. However, the shear strength of the joints on Al substrate decreased to 28 MPa after 1000 h of aging, while no shear strength decline was detected for the joints on Cu substrate. Fracture surface analysis revealed that the vulnerable points of the two types of joints were (1) the Ag layer and (2) the interface between the Ti layer and Cu substrate. Based on the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and simulations, cracks in the Ag layer were identified as the cause of the shear strength degradation in the joints on Al substrate. The interface evolution of the joints on Cu substrate was ascribed to Cu migration and discontinuity points that initialized in the Ti layer. This study reveals that Al exhibited superior thermal stability with sintered Ag paste.

  12. Synergistic effects of mica and wollastonite fillers on thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zia-ul-Mustafa, M., E-mail: engr.ziamustafa@gmail.com; Ahmad, Faiz; Megat-Yusoff, Puteri S. M.; Aziz, Hammad [Mechanical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    In this study, intumescent fire retardant coatings (IFRC) were developed to investigate the synergistic effects of reinforced mica and wollastonite fillers based IFRC towards heat shielding, char expansion, char composition and char morphology. Ammonium poly-phosphate (APP) was used as acid source, expandable graphite (EG) as carbon source, melamine as blowing agent, boric acid as additive and Hardener H-2310 polyamide amine in bisphenol A epoxy resin BE-188(BPA) was used as curing agent. Bunsen burner fire test was used for thermal performance according to UL-94 for 1 h. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) was used to observe char microstructure. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to analyse char composition. The results showed that addition of clay filler in IFRC enhanced the fire protection performance of intumescent coating. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results showed the presence of boron phosphate, silicon phosphate oxide, aluminium borate in the char that improved the thermal performance of intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC). Resultantly, the presence of these developed compounds enhanced the Integrity of structural steel upto 500°C.

  13. Cellulose-nanofiber/polygalacturonic acid coatings with high oxygen barrier and targeted release properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Susanne L.; Henriksson, Marielle; Cardenas Gomez, Marite

    2014-01-01

    A bio-inspired coating consisting of pectin (polygalacturonic acid) and cationic cellulose nanofibers were successfully produced by the layer-by-layer method. The build-up and the morphology of the resulting coatings were studied with spectroscopic ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy, respec...

  14. A high performance ceria based interdiffusion barrier layer prepared by spin-coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plonczak, Pawel; Joost, Mario; Hjelm, Johan

    2011-01-01

    . The decomposition of the polymer precursor used in the spin-coating process was studied. The depositions were performed on anode supported half cells. By controlling the sintering temperature between each spin-coating process, dense and crack-free CGO films with a thickness of approximately 1 μm were obtained...

  15. Thermal Alternating Polymer Nanocomposite (TAPNC) Coating Designed to Prevent Aerodynamic Insect Fouling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Krishnan, K. Ghokulla; Robison, Robert; Loth, Eric; Berry, Douglas H.; Farrell, Thomas E.; Crouch, Jeffrey D.

    2016-12-01

    Insect residue adhesion to moving surfaces such as turbine blades and aircraft not only causes surface contamination problems but also increases drag on these surfaces. Insect fouling during takeoff, climb and landing can result in increased drag and fuel consumption for aircraft with laminar-flow surfaces. Hence, certain topographical and chemical features of non-wettable surfaces need to be designed properly for preventing insect residue accumulation on surfaces. In this work, we developed a superhydrophobic coating that is able to maintain negligible levels of insect residue after 100 high speed (50 m/s) insect impact events produced in a wind tunnel. The coating comprises alternating layers of a hydrophobic, perfluorinated acrylic copolymer and hydrophobic surface functional silicon dioxide nanoparticles that are infused into one another by successive thermal treatments. The design of this coating was achieved as a result of various experiments conducted in the wind tunnel by using a series of superhydrophobic surfaces made by the combination of the same polymer and nanoparticles in the form of nanocomposites with varying surface texture and self-cleaning hydrophobicity properties. Moreover, the coating demonstrated acceptable levels of wear abrasion and substrate adhesion resistance against pencil hardness, dry/wet scribed tape peel adhesion and 17.5 kPa Taber linear abraser tests.

  16. Surface Pre-treatment for Thermally Sprayed ZnAl15 Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.

    2017-02-01

    Pre-treatment of substrates is an important step in thermal spraying. It is widely accepted that mechanical interlocking is the dominant adhesion mechanism for most substrate-coating combinations. To prevent premature failure, minimum coating adhesion strength, surface preparation grades, and roughness parameters are often specified. For corrosion-protection coatings for offshore wind turbines, an adhesion strength ≥ 5 MPa is commonly assumed to ensure adhesion over service lifetime. In order to fulfill this requirement, Rz > 80 µm and a preparation grade of Sa3 are common specifications. In this study, the necessity of these requirements is investigated using the widely used combination of twin-wire arc-sprayed ZnAl15 on S355J2 + N as a test case. By using different blasting media and parameters, the correlation between coating adhesion and roughness parameters is analyzed. The adhesion strength of these systems is measured using a test method allowing measurements on real parts. The results are compared to DIN EN 582:1993, the European equivalent of ASTM-C633. In another series of experiments, the influence of surface pre-treatment grades Sa2.5 and Sa3 is considered. By combining the results of these three sets of experiments, a guideline for surface pre-treatment and adhesion testing on real parts is proposed for the considered system.

  17. The effect of TiO2/aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives on the mechanical and thermal properties of polyacrylic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Rahimeh; Olad, Ali

    2015-12-01

    The commercial grade polyacrylic latex was modified in order to prepare a mechanical and thermal improved coating. TiO2/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposites with montmorillonite, zeolite-A and clinoptilolite aluminosilicates were prepared and used as additive in the matrix of polyacrylic latex to achieve a coating with proper mechanical and thermal properties. X-ray diffraction patterns and FESEM were used to characterize the composition, structure, and morphology of the nanocomposite additives. Polyacrylic coatings modified by TiO2/Ag-exchanged-aluminosilicate nanocomposite additives showed higher adhesion strength and hardness compared to unmodified commercial grade polyacrylic coatings. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis showed lower glass transition temperature for modified polyacrylic coatings than that of unmodified polyacrylic coatings. The tensile tests were also carried out for unmodified and modified polyacrylic coatings. According to the results, the modified polyacrylic based coating with TiO2/Ag-exchanged-clinoptilolite nanocomposite additive was the best coating considering most of useful properties.

  18. Thermally Sprayed Aluminum Coatings for the Protection of Subsea Risers and Pipelines Carrying Hot Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataly Ce

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the effect of boiling synthetic seawater on the performance of damaged Thermally Sprayed Aluminum (TSA on carbon steel. Small defects (4% of the sample’s geometric surface area were drilled, exposing the steel, and the performance of the coating was analyzed for corrosion potential for different exposure times (2 h, 335 h, and 5000 h. The samples were monitored using linear polarization resistance (LPR in order to obtain their corrosion rate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD were used for post-test characterization. The results showed that a protective layer of Mg(OH2 formed in the damaged area, which protected the underlying steel. Additionally, no coating detachment from the steel near the defect region was observed. The corrosion rate was found to be 0.010–0.015 mm/year after 5000 h in boiling synthetic seawater.

  19. Investigation of conductive thermal control coatings by a contactless method in vacuo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehmann, W.; Shai, C. M.; Sanford, E. L.

    1977-01-01

    A technique for determining the conductance per unit area of thermal control coatings for electrostatically clean spacecraft is described. In order to simulate orbital conditions more closely, current-density-voltage (j-V) curves are obtained by a contactless method in which the paint on an aluminum substrate is the anode of a vacuum diode configuration with a tungsten filament cathode. Conductances per unit area which satisfy the International Sun Earth Explorer (ISEE) requirement were observed on black paints containing carbon and in white and green paints filled with zinc oxide which were fired in order to induce defect conductivity. Because of surface effects and the nonhomogeneous nature of paints, large discrepancies were found between measurements with the contactless method and measurements employing metallic contacts, particularly at low current densities. Therefore, measurements with metallic contacts are considered to be of questionable value in deciding the suitability of coatings for electrostatic charge control.

  20. Positioning system of a torch used in thermal spray coatings applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Absalón Torres-Barahona

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, construction and performance evaluation of a positioning system used for the deposition of coatings with molten particles, by using a torch CastoDyn Ds 8000 thermal spray with oxyacetylene combustion. The design has been done with parameters obtained in the laboratory of materials of the Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, and the information determined from the evaluation of the device, allows to control the main process variables as the projection distance, flow powder, torch speed and rotation speed of the sample holder; this has been seen in coatings made in application tests zirconia / nickel on a carbon steel substrate and analyzed with Scanning Electron Microscopy - SEM.

  1. Failures of the thermal barriers of 900 MWe reactor coolant pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrouty, P.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the anomalies encountered in the thermal barriers of the reactor coolant pumps in French 900 MWe PWR power stations. In addition to this specific problem, it demonstrates how the fortuitous discovery of a fault during a sampling test enabled faults of a generic nature to be revealed in components which were not subject to periodic inspection, the failure of which could seriously affect safety. This example demonstrates the risk which can be associated with the deterioration in areas which are not examined periodically and for which there are no preceding signs which would make early detection of deterioration possible.

  2. Optical Coating Performance and Thermal Structure Design for Heat Reflectors of JWST Electronic Control Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada, Manuel A.; Threat, Felix; Garrison, Matt; Perrygo, Chuck; Bousquet, Robert; Rashford, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) consists of an infrared-optimized Optical Telescope Element (OTE) that is cooled down to 40 degrees Kelvin. A second adjacent component to the OTE is the Integrated Science Instrument Module, or ISIM. This module includes the electronic compartment, which provides the mounting surfaces and ambient thermally controlled environment for the instrument control electronics. Dissipating the 200 watts generated from the ISIM structure away from the OTE is of paramount importance so that the spacecraft's own heat does not interfere with the infrared light detected from distant cosmic sources. This technical challenge is overcome by a thermal subsystem unit that provides passive cooling to the ISIM control electronics. The proposed design of this thermal radiator consists of a lightweight structure made out of composite materials and low-emittance metal coatings. In this paper, we will present characterizations of the coating emittance, bidirectional reflectance, and mechanical structure design that will affect the performance of this passive cooling system.

  3. Influence of coating on nanocrystalline magnetic properties during high temperature thermal ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekdim, Atef; Morel, Laurent; Raulet, Marie-Ange

    2017-05-01

    Since their birth or mergence the late 1980s, the nanocrystalline ultrasoft magnetic materials are taking a great importance in power electronic systems conception. One of the main advantages that make them more attractive nowadays is their ability to be packaged since the reduction of the magnetostrictive constant to almost zero. In aircraft applications, due to the high component compactness and to their location (for example near the jet engine), the operating temperature increases and may reach easily 200 °C and more. Consequently, the magnetic thermal ageing may occur but is, unfortunately, weakly studied. This paper focuses on the influence of the coating (packaging type) on the magnetic nanocrystalline performances during a thermal ageing. This study is based on monitoring the magnetic characteristics of two types of nanocrystalline cores (naked and coated) during a thermal activated ageing (100, 150 and 200 °C). Based on a dedicated monitoring protocol, a large magnetic characterization has been done and analyzed. Elsewhere, X-Ray Diffraction and magnetostriction measurements were carried out to support the study of the anisotropy energies evolution with ageing. This latter is discussed in this paper to explain and give hypothesis about the ageing phenomena.

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation of Flaking-Resistance in Thermal Sprayed Ceramic Coatings with X-ray Diffraction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toru; Kubohori, Toshifumi; Morimoto, Jyunji

    Thermal spraying has emerged as an important tool of increasingly sophisticated surface engineering technology. Therefore, the demand for technology that is checked non-destructively has become more insistent. This paper presents the nondestructive evaluation of fl aking-resistance in thermal sprayed Al2O3, ZrO2 and TiO2 coating. The full-width at half maximum taken from the X-ray diffraction peak profi le was used as a nondestructive evaluation method in this study. The results by the nondestructive method were compared to the results with scratch test. It was found that nondestructive evaluation of the thermal sprayed ceramic coating was effective.

  5. Foundry Coating Technology: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nwaogu, Ugochukwu Chibuzoh; Tiedje, Niels Skat

    2011-01-01

    The importance of foundry coating in improving the surface quality of castings cannot be over emphasized. The appli-cation of mould and core washes creates a high thermal integrity barrier between the metal and the mould resulting in the reduction of the thermal shock experienced by the sand system....... These thermal shock leads to series of surface de-fects such as veining/finning, metal penetration, burn-on/in, scab, rat tail, erosion etc. The use of coatings reduces the tendency of occurrence of these defects. However, the understanding of the coating, its components, characteristics and mechanism of action...... is important. In this review, a detailed description of these topics and examples are provided where necessary. A potential area of research in foundry coating development, using sol-gel process is suggested. The application of sol-gel technology in the development of foundry coatings is a novel approach....

  6. Thermal implications of interactions between insulation, solar reflectance, and fur structure in the summer coats of diverse species of kangaroo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Terence J; Maloney, Shane K

    2017-04-01

    Not all of the solar radiation that impinges on a mammalian coat is absorbed and converted into thermal energy at the coat surface. Some is reflected back to the environment, while another portion is reflected further into the coat where it is absorbed and manifested as heat at differing levels. Substantial insulation in a coat limits the thermal impact at the skin of solar radiation, irrespective where in the coat it is absorbed. In coats with low insulation, the zone where solar radiation is absorbed may govern the consequent heat load on the skin (HL-SR). Thin summer furs of four species of kangaroo from differing climatic zones were used to determine how variation in insulation and in coat spectral and structural characteristics influence the HL-SR. Coat depth, structure, and solar reflectance varied between body regions, as well as between species. The modulation of solar radiation and resultant heat flows in these coats were measured at low (1 m s-1) and high (6 m s-1) wind speeds by mounting them on a heat flux transducer/temperature-controlled plate apparatus in a wind tunnel. A lamp with a spectrum similar to solar radiation was used as a proxy for the sun. We established that coat insulation was largely determined by coat depth at natural fur lie, despite large variations in fibre density, fibre diameter, and fur mass. Higher wind speed decreased coat insulation, but depth still determined the overall level. A multiple regression analysis that included coat depth (insulation), fibre diameter, fibre density, and solar reflectance was used to determine the best predictors of HL-SR. Only depth and reflectance had significant impacts and both factors had negative weights, so, as either insulation or reflectance increased, HL-SR declined, the larger impact coming from coat reflectance. This reverses the pattern observed in deep coats where insulation dominates over effects of reflectance. Across all coats, as insulation declined, reflectance increased. An

  7. Evaluation of tribological wear and corrosion in coatings of diamalloy 4060NS deposited by thermal spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña R, S. M.; Moreno T, C. M.; Espinosa C, E. J.

    2017-12-01

    Surface engineering seeks the development of new techniques to improve the performance and life of components of machines or industrial facilities, always looking for low costs and the least possible environmental damage. Thermal projection is one of the techniques that is based on the projection of particles of compounds and alloys on properly prepared and heated substrates, these particles are driven by a stream of air passing through an oxyacetylene flame which gives the energy to the process; These coatings give the possibility to improve the properties of the materials or the maintenance of components to maximize the availability of service. In order to reduce the damage caused by wear and corrosion of a low carbon AISI 1020 steel, they were coated with a metal based alloy, studying the effect of the cobalt-chromium-silicon-tungsten carbide alloy coating (DIAMALLLOY 4060 NS). The coating was deposited with two different pressures in the gases supplied to the torch, obtaining two flames and working three thicknesses of coating that oscillate between 100-500μm, according to the number of deposited layers, making use of a projection gun Castolin Eutectic. Powder and substrate characterization was performed using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques, X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), spark emission spectroscopy and metallographic analysis. The results confirm the chemical nature and structure of the powder of the alloy and the substrate to be used, in addition, the thermal stability of the system was verified. The evaluation of the adhesion of the deposited layers was carried out by the implementation of pull-off tests according to ASTM D4541, in order to determine the type of failure that is presented. Mechanical wear was determined using a MT/60/NI microtest tribometer while electrochemical tests were performed using a suitable experimental unit for this purpose, confirming that the substrate exhibits lower wear levels when coated with

  8. Method and Apparatus for Thermal Spraying of Metal Coatings Using Pulsejet Resonant Pulsed Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thermal spraying a metal coating on a substrate is accomplished with a modified pulsejet and optionally an ejector to assist in preventing oxidation. Metal such as Aluminum or Magnesium may be used. A pulsejet is first initiated by applying fuel, air, and a spark. Metal is inserted continuously in a high volume of metal into a combustion chamber of the pulsejet. The combustion is thereafter controlled resonantly at high frequency and the metal is heated to a molten state. The metal is then transported from the combustion chamber into a tailpipe of said pulsejet and is expelled therefrom at high velocity and deposited on a target substrate.

  9. Specific Features of Chip Making and Work-piece Surface Layer Formation in Machining Thermal Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Yaroslavtsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of unique engineering structural and performance properties inherent in metallic composites characterizes wear- and erosion-resistant high-temperature coatings made by thermal spraying methods. This allows their use both in manufacturing processes to enhance the wear strength of products, which have to operate under the cyclic loading, high contact pressures, corrosion and high temperatures and in product renewal.Thermal coatings contribute to the qualitative improvement of the technical level of production and product restoration using the ceramic composite materials. However, the possibility to have a significantly increased product performance, reduce their factory labour hours and materials/output ratio in manufacturing and restoration is largely dependent on the degree of the surface layer quality of products at their finishing stage, which is usually provided by different kinds of machining.When machining the plasma-sprayed thermal coatings, a removing process of the cut-off layer material is determined by its distinctive features such as a layered structure, high internal stresses, low ductility material, high tendency to the surface layer strengthening and rehardening, porosity, high abrasive properties, etc. When coatings are machined these coating properties result in specific characteristics of chip formation and conditions for formation of the billet surface layer.The chip formation of plasma-sprayed coatings was studied at micro-velocities using an experimental tool-setting microscope-based setup, created in BMSTU. The setup allowed simultaneous recording both the individual stages (phases of the chip formation process and the operating force factors.It is found that formation of individual chip elements comes with the multiple micro-cracks that cause chipping-off the small particles of material. The emerging main crack in the cut-off layer of material leads to separation of the largest chip element. Then all the stages

  10. Electrochemical investigations of magnesium in DMEM with biodegradable polycaprolactone coating as corrosion barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degner, Julia; Singer, Ferdinand [Department of Materials Science, WW4-LKO, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martenstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Cordero, Luis; Boccaccini, Aldo R. [Department of Materials Science, WW7-BioMat, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Cauerstr. 6, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Virtanen, Sannakaisa, E-mail: Virtanen@ww.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Materials Science, WW4-LKO, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martenstr. 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are being increasingly investigated as biodegradable metallic implant materials. However, the high corrosion rate and accumulation of hydrogen gas upon degradation prevent the clinical application of many magnesium based materials. Applying polymer or ceramic coatings is a popular approach to improve the corrosion behaviour of magnesium and its alloys. In the current research, a biodegradable polymer film of polycaprolactone (PCL) is prepared in different concentrations by spin coating, in order to influence the corrosion behaviour of 99.9% pure magnesium. The resulting polymer coating was qualified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tape-test according to (ASTM D3359-09) to measure the adhesion strength of the coating on the substrate. Furthermore, coated and uncoated specimens were stored up to 30 days at 37 {sup o}C in DMEM. The corrosion behaviour was investigated by polarization curves. The PCL-films were found to be uniform and without pores, but they show a low adhesion strength on the substrate. Nevertheless, remarkable improvement of the corrosion resistance of magnesium substrate can be obtained by the polymer films, depending on the film thickness and exposition time. In summary, coating magnesium with PCL is a promising method to tailor the degradation behaviour for biomedical applications.

  11. Wettability of Y2O3: A Relative Analysis of Thermally Oxidized, Reactively Sputtered and Template Assisted Nanostructured Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan T. Manikandanath

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The wettability of reactively sputtered Y2O3, thermally oxidized Y-Y2O3 and Cd-CdO template assisted Y2O3 coatings has been studied. The wettability of as-deposited Y2O3 coatings was determined by contact angle measurements. The water contact angles for reactively sputtered, thermally oxidized and template assisted Y2O3 nanostructured coatings were 99°, 117° and 155°, respectively. The average surface roughness values of reactively sputtered, thermally oxidized and template assisted Y2O3 coatings were determined by using atomic force microscopy and the corresponding values were 3, 11 and 180 nm, respectively. The low contact angle of the sputter deposited Y2O3 and thermally oxidized Y-Y2O3 coatings is attributed to a densely packed nano-grain like microstructure without any void space, leading to low surface roughness. A water droplet on such surfaces is mostly in contact with a solid surface relative to a void space, leading to a hydrophobic surface (low contact angle. Surface roughness is a crucial factor for the fabrication of a superhydrophobic surface. For Y2O3 coatings, the surface roughness was improved by depositing a thin film of Y2O3 on the Cd-CdO template (average roughness = 178 nm, which resulted in a contact angle greater than 150°. The work of adhesion of water was very high for the reactively sputtered Y2O3 (54 mJ/m2 and thermally oxidized Y-Y2O3 coatings (43 mJ/m2 compared to the Cd-CdO template assisted Y2O3 coating (7 mJ/m2.

  12. Splenectomy attenuates severe thermal trauma-induced intestinal barrier breakdown in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-dong; Chen, Zhen-yong; Yang, Peng; Huang, Wen-guang; Jiang, Chun-fang

    2015-12-01

    The severe local thermal trauma activates a number of systemic inflammatory mediators, such as TNF-α, NF-κB, resulting in a disruption of gut barrier. The gastrointestinal tight junction (TJ) is highly regulated by membrane-associated proteins including zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1) and occludin, which can be modulated by inflammatory cytokines. As splenectomy has been shown to reduce secretion of cytokines, we hypothesized that (1) severe scald injury up-regulates TNF-α and NF-κB, meanwhile down-regulates expression of ZO-1 and occludin, leading to the increased intestinal permeability, and (2) splenectomy can prevent the burn-induced decrease in ZO-1 and occludin expression, resulting in improved intestinal barrier. Wistar rats undergoing a 30% total body surface area (TBSA) thermal trauma were randomized to receive an accessorial splenectomy meanwhile or not. Intestinal injury was assessed by histological morphological analysis, and serum endotoxin levels, TNF-α, NF-κB, ZO-1 and occludin levels were detected by Western blotting in the terminal ileum mucosal tissue. 30% TBSA burn caused a significant increase in serum endotoxin levels, but NF-κB, and TNF-α, and the average intestinal villus height and mucosal thickness were decreased significantly. Burn injury could also markedly decrease the levels of ZO-1 and occludin in terminal ileum mucosal tissue (all PSplenectomy at 7th day after burn significantly reversed the burn-induced breakdown of ZO-1 and occludin (all PSplenectomy may provide a therapeutic benefit in restoring burn-induced intestinal barrier by decreasing the release of inflammatory cytokines and recovering TJ proteins.

  13. Thermal stability of amorphous tungsten/tungsten nitride synthesis using HFCVD as a diffusion barrier for copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgary, Somayeh; Hantehzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood [Islamic Azad University, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Boochani, Arash [Islamic Azad University, Department of Physics, Kermanshah Branch, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The amorphous W/WN bi-layer with excellent thermal stability was successfully prepared by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition method on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. It was found that the W/WN bi-layer is technological importance because of its low resistivity and good diffusion barrier properties between Cu and Si up to 700 C for 30 min. The thermal stability was evaluated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The XRD results show that the Cu{sub 3}Si phase was formed by Cu diffusion through W/WN barrier for the 800 C annealed sample. The formation of the Cu-Si compounds denotes the failure of the W/WN diffusion barrier with rapid increase in sheet resistance of the film. The microstructure of the interface between W/WN and Cu reflects the stability and breakdown of the barriers. The failure of this amorphous barrier occurs with heat treatment when the deposited amorphous barrier material crystallizes. The major part of Cu diffusion in polycrystalline structure with disordered grain boundaries is controlled by grain boundaries. AFM results indicated a rapid increase in surface roughness at the diffusion barrier failure temperature. It was found that the grain size plays an important factor to control the thermally stability of the W/WN bi-layer. (orig.)

  14. Improving thermal insulation of TC4 using YSZ-based coating and SiO2 aerogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Jin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, air plasmas spray (APS was used to prepare YSZ and Sc2O3–YSZ (ScYSZ coating in order to improve the thermal insulation ability of TC4 alloy. SiO2 aerogel was also synthesized and affixed on TC4 titanium alloy to inhabit thermal flow. The microstructures, phase compositions and thermal insulation performance of three coatings were analyzed in detail. The results of thermal diffusivity test by a laser flash method showed that the thermal diffusivities of YSZ, Sc2O3–YSZ and SiO2 aerogel are 0.553, 0.539 and 0.2097×10−6 m2/s, respectively. Then, the thermal insulation performances of three kinds of coating were investigated from 20 °C to 400 °C using high infrared radiation heat flux technology. The experimental results indicated that the corresponding temperature difference between the top TC4 alloy (400 °C and the bottom surface of YSZ is 41.5 °C for 0.6 mm thickness coating. For 1 mm thickness coating, the corresponding temperature difference between the top TC4 alloys (400 °C and the bottom surface of YSZ, ScYSZ, SiO2 aerogel three specimens is 54, 54.6 and 208 °C, respectively. The coating thickness and species were found to influence the heat insulation ability. In these materials, YSZ and ScYSZ exhibited a little difference for heat insulation behavior. However, SiO2 aerogel was the best one among them and it can be taken as protection material on TC4 alloys. In outer space, SiO2 aerogel can meet the need of thermal insulation of TC4 of high-speed aircraft.

  15. Infrared Thermography as a Non-destructive Testing Solution for Thermal Spray Metal Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Paolo E.; Allesina, Giulio; Bolelli, Giovanni; Lusvarghi, Luca; Matikainen, Ville; Vuoristo, Petri

    2017-09-01

    In this work, an infrared (IR) thermographic procedure was evaluated as a non-destructive testing tool to detect damage in thermal spray metallic coatings. As model systems, polished HVOF- and HVAF-sprayed Fe-based layers deposited onto steel plates were employed. Damage by external-object impingement was simulated through a cyclic impact-test apparatus, which induced circumferential and radial cracks across all model systems, and interface cracks of different sizes in distinct samples. Damaged and undamaged plates were bulk-heated to above 100 °C using an IR lamp; their free-convection cooling was then recorded by an IR thermocamera. The intentionally induced defects were hardly detectable in IR thermograms, due to IR reflection and artificial "hot" spots induced by residuals of transfer material from the impacting counterbody. As a micrometer-thin layer of black paint was applied, surface emissivity got homogenized and any artifacts were effectively suppressed, so that failed coating areas clearly showed up as "cold spots." This effect was more apparent when large interface cracks occurred. Finite-element modeling proved the physical significance of the IR-thermography approach, showing that failed coating areas are cooled by surrounding air faster than they are heated by conduction from the hot substrate, which is due to the insulating effect of cracks.

  16. Nonradiation Cellular Thermometry Based on Interfacial Thermally Induced Phase Transformation in Polymer Coating of Optical Microfiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunyun; Guo, Tuan; Tian, Zhuang; Yu, Bo; Ding, Mingfei; Li, Xiangping; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-03-15

    A nonradiation approach based on thermoresponsive polymer coated silica microfibers has been developed. A highly thermoresponsive and biocompatible poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) was surface functionlized to conjugate to the tapered silica microfiber with waist diameter of 7.5 μm. The interfacial phase transtition of coating triggered by the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) causes a drastic molecular morphological change in the body temperature range of 35-42 °C. This surface morphological change strongly modulates optical path difference between the higher order and the fundamental mode propagating in the microfiber because of the evanescent-field interaction and, therefore, shifts the intermodal interference fringe. Owing to the nonradiation-based nature, the thermoresponsive polymer coated microfiber enables an improved thermal sensitivity of 18.74 nm/°C and, hence, a high-temperature resolution of millidegree. Furthermore, the micrometer-sized footprint enables its easy implantation in human organs for cellular thermometry and for the potential of in vivo applications.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Epoxy Resin Reinforced with Magnesium Oxide Coated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Peng Du

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium oxide coated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MgO@MWNT were fabricated and dispersed into epoxy matrix. The microstructures of MgO@MWNT and epoxy/MgO@MWNT nanocomposites were characterized by TEM and SEM. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of epoxy nanocomposites were investigated with high resistance meter and thermal conductivity meter, respectively. MgO@MWNT has core-shell structure with MgO as shell and nanotube as core, and the thickness of MgO shell is ca. 15 nm. MgO@MWNT has been dispersed well in the epoxy matrix. MgO@MWNT loaded epoxy nanocomposites still retain electrical insulation inspite of the filler content increase. However, thermal conductivity of epoxy was increased with the MgO@MWNT content increasing. When MgO@MWNT content reached 2.0 wt.%, thermal conductivity was increased by 89% compared to neat epoxy, higher than that of unmodified MWNT nanocomposites with the same loading content.

  18. High Thermal Dissipation of Al Heat Sink When Inserting Ceramic Powders by Ultrasonic Mechanical Coating and Armoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wei-Yu; Huang, Guan-Rong; Wang, Kuang-Kuo; Chen, Chin-Fu; Huang, J C

    2017-04-26

    Aluminum alloys, which serve as heat sink in light-emitting diode (LED) lighting, are often inherent with a high thermal conductivity, but poor thermal total emissivity. Thus, high emissive coatings on the Al substrate can enhance the thermal dissipation efficiency of radiation. In this study, the ultrasonic mechanical coating and armoring (UMCA) technique was used to insert various ceramic combinations, such as Al₂O₃, SiO₂, or graphite, to enhance thermal dissipation. Analytic models have been established to couple the thermal radiation and convection on the sample surface through heat flow equations. A promising match has been reached between the theoretical predictions and experimental measurements. With the adequate insertion of ceramic powders, the temperature of the Al heat sinks can be lowered by 5-11 °C, which is highly favorable for applications requiring cooling components.

  19. Review of Thermal Spray Coating Applications in the Steel Industry: Part 2—Zinc Pot Hardware in the Continuous Galvanizing Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S.; James, B.

    2010-12-01

    This two-part article series reviews the application of thermal spray coating technology in the production of steel and steel sheet products. Part 2 of this article series is dedicated to coating solutions in the continuous galvanizing line. The corrosion mechanisms of Fe- and Co-based bulk materials are briefly reviewed as a basis for the development of thermal spray coating solutions. WC-Co thermal spray coatings are commonly applied to low Al-content galvanizing hardware due to their superior corrosion resistance compared to Fe and Co alloys. The effect of phase degradation, carbon content, and WC grain size are discussed. At high Al concentrations, the properties of WC-Co coatings degrade significantly, leading to the application of oxide-based coatings and corrosion-resistant boride containing coatings. The latest results of testing are summarized, highlighting the critical coating parameters.

  20. Determination of the thermal conductivity of metallic coatings; Determinacion de la conductividad termica de recubrimientos metalicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uc Way, Manuel Eugenio

    1998-02-01

    Due to the corrosion by high temperature there is a serious problem of unavailability and efficiency of the steam generators in the thermoelectric power stations. One of the parts that is more affected by this phenomenon is the superheater tube banks. In order to diminish this problem it is intended to apply to these tubes a metallic coating nickel and chromium based (80Ni20Cr), the deposition of the coating is made by the method of thermal spraying of powders by flame. The coating thickness once it has been deposited is of the order of 500mm, it is doubtless that the thermal flow between gases of combustion and the fluid conducted in the tubes is affected. That is why it is important to know the thermal conductivity of the coating in order to evaluate the impact that it has in the operation of the steam generator. This necessity is the one that gives rise to the present thesis project, in which a technique that allows to measure the thermal conductivity of the coating is designed. The experimentation is carried out taking as departure point the ASTM norm E1225-87 and is adapted to the characteristics of the material to prove. A test piece of stainless steel 316 was designed to measure the thermal flow that traverses the coating. First the experimental installation was characterized in order to determine its reliability. Later the experimentation was made finding an average thermal conductivity of 2.09{+-}0.72 W/m K in the temperature interval of 110-180 Celsius degrees. This value is 12.3% inferior to the corresponding one of a solid metal of the same composition. If we consider that in the high temperature banks of the steam generators the thermal flow is in the interval from 15.000 to 100.000 W/m{sup 2} and a coating thickness of the order of 500mm it would cause that this material would introduce a temperature difference of 0.6 to 4 Celsius degrees, respectively. Please note that for the highest thermal flow a maximum affectation of 4 Celsuis degrees is

  1. Investigation of absorptance and emissivity of thermal control coatings on Mg–Li alloys and OES analysis during PEO process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Qixing; Ju, Pengfei; Wang, Jiankang; Su, Peibo; Li, Dongqi; Jiang, Zhaohua

    2016-01-01

    Thermal control ceramic coatings on Mg–Li alloys have been successfully prepared in silicate electrolyte system by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) method. The PEO coatings are mainly composed of crystallized Mg2SiO4 and MgO, which have typical porous structure with some bulges on the surface; OES analysis shows that the plasma temperature, which is influenced by the technique parameters, determines the formation of the coatings with different crystalline phases and morphologies, combined with “quick cooling effect” by the electrolyte; and the electron concentration is constant, which is related to the electric spark breakdown, determined by the nature of the coating and the interface of coating/electrolyte. Technique parameters influence the coating thickness, roughness and surface morphology, but do not change the coating composition in the specific PEO regime, and therefore the absorptance (αS) and emissivity (ε) of the coatings can be adjusted by the technique parameters through changing thickness and roughness in a certain degree. The coating prepared at 10 A/dm2, 50 Hz, 30 min and 14 g/L Na2SiO3 has the minimum value of αS (0.35) and the maximum value of ε (0.82), with the balance temperature of 320 K. PMID:27383569

  2. The Tribological Performance of Hardfaced/ Thermal Sprayed Coatings for Increasing the Wear Resistance of Ventilation Mill Working Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vencl

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available During the coal pulverizing, the working parts of the ventilation mill are being worn by the sand particles. For this reason, the working parts are usually protected with materials resistant to wear (hardfaced/thermal sprayed coatings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tribological performance of four different types of coatings as candidates for wear protection of the mill’s working parts. The coatings were produced by using the filler materials with the following nominal chemical composition: NiFeBSi-WC, NiCrBSiC, FeCrCTiSi, and FeCrNiCSiBMn, and by using the plasma arc welding and flame and electric arc spraying processes. The results showed that Ni-based coatings exhibited higher wear resistance than Fe-based coatings. The highest wear resistance showed coating produced by using the NiFeBSi-WC filler material and plasma transferred arc welding deposition process. The hardness was not the only characteristic that affected the wear resistance. In this context, the wear rate of NiFeBSi-WC coating was not in correlation with its hardness, in contrast to other coatings. The different wear performance of NiFeBSi-WC coating was attributed to the different type and morphological features of the reinforcing particles (WC.

  3. Thermal performance analysis of an electrochromic vacuum glazing with low emittance coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Yueping; Hyde, Trevor; Hewitt, Neil [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, School of the Built Environment, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB N. Ireland (United Kingdom); Eames, Philip C. [Centre for Research in Renewable Energy Science and Technology, University of Loughborough (United Kingdom); Norton, Brian [Dublin Energy Lab, Dublin Institute of Technology, Aungier Street, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2010-04-15

    Thermal performance of an electrochromic (EC) vacuum glazing (VG) was modelled under ASTM standard winter conditions. The EC VG comprised three 0.5 m by 0.5 m glass panes with a 0.12 mm wide evacuated space between two 4 mm thick panes sealed contiguously by a 6 mm wide indium based edge seal with either one or two low-emittance (low-e) coatings supported by a 0.32 mm diameter square pillar grid spaced at 25 mm. The third glass pane on which the 0.1 mm thick EC layer was deposited was sealed to the evacuated glass unit. The whole unit was rebated by 10 mm within a solid wood frame. The low-e coating absorbed 10% of solar energy incident on it. With the EC VG installed with the EC component facing the outdoor environment, for an incident solar radiation of 300 W m{sup -2}, simulations demonstrated that when the EC layer is opaque for winter conditions, the temperature of the inside glass pane is higher than the indoor air temperature, due to solar radiation absorbed by the low-e coatings and the EC layer, the EC VG is a heat source with heat transferred from the glazing to the interior environment. When the emittance was lower to 0.02, the outdoor and indoor glass pane temperatures of the glazing with single and two low-e coatings are very close to each other. For an insolation of 1000 W m{sup -2}, the outdoor glass pane temperature exceeds the indoor glass pane temperature, consequentially the outdoor glass pane transfers heat to the indoor glass pane. (author)

  4. TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN MULTILAYER METAL-CERAMIC COATINGS UNDER NONSTATIONARY THERMAL EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy M. Samoilenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the aircraft engine construction is determined by the increase of operation parameters of gas turbine engines, which is inevitably accompanied by an increase of operating temperatures and load for the vital elements of the turbine hot ducts. Furthermore, the requirements for reliability of the engine in general are also increasing. Achievement of these requirements is determined by the performance of the materials turbine blades are made of and is made possible by the application of high-heat Nickel alloys in combination with combined heat-shielding coatings.This article dwells on the problem of assessing the impact of non-stationary thermal effects on the temperature distribution in a multilayer heatproof coating. With the aim of assessing the working capacity of heatproof coatings we propose a method of calculating the temperature field for the blade profile and the coatingdepth, based on the solution of the basic one-dimensional differential equation of heat conduction.This method allows us to assess the performance of heatproof coating and also gives us an opportunity to choose a combination of heatproof coating layers for the specific operating conditions of a gas turbine engine’s blades.In addition, using the proposed method it is possible to evaluate the effect of non-stationary heat flux on the structure of high-temperature alloy of the engine’s turbine blades and, therefore, to evaluate the capacity with the given coating. At temperatures of 1150–1200 °C and higher in heat-resistant Nickel alloys there starts a coagulation process of the main reinforcing coherent particle phase on the basis of the intermetallic compound, long plates with wavy shapes are formed instead of the cuboids, a formation of topologically close-packed phases which are needle-like compositions happens. These processes lead to a significant deterioration of the strength characteristics of heat-resistant alloys. Making calculations according to

  5. Adhesion and thermal stability of thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) polyurethane-based paint coatings on copper substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunic, R. [FRAGMAT TIM, d.d., Spodnja Recica 77, SI-3270 Lasko (Slovenia); Kozelj, M.; Orel, B.; Surca Vuk, A.; Vilcnik, A.; Slemenik Perse, L. [Laboratory for Spectroscopy of Materials, National Institute of Chemistry, Hajdrihova 19, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Merlini, D. [COLOR, d.d., Cesta komandanta Staneta 4, SI-1215 Medvode (Slovenia); Brunold, S. [Institut fuer Solartechnik, Oberseestrasse 10, Postfach 1475, CH-8640 Rapperswil (Switzerland)

    2009-05-15

    Thickness insensitive spectrally selective (TISS) paint coatings based on a polyurethane polymeric binder deposited on copper substrates were investigated to obtain information about their service lifetime. The degradation of TISS paint coatings was performed according to the methodology worked out within Task 10 of the IEA's Solar heating and the cooling programme. The activation energy (E{sub a}) for the degradation process was derived from vibrational band changes of the polyurethane binder recorded in the infrared hemispherical reflectance spectra of TISS paint coatings exposed to different thermal loads. The results of the vibrational band analysis were correlated with cross-cut tests, showing that the coatings started to lose integrity at 190 C but protected the copper substrate against oxidation perfectly even at 200 C (15 days). An accelerated test procedure confirmed that TISS coatings could be safely used in solar collectors for at least 45 years. (author)

  6. Thermal Annealing Effect on Optical Properties of Binary TiO2-SiO2 Sol-Gel Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available TiO2-SiO2 binary coatings were deposited by a sol-gel dip-coating method using tetrabutyl titanate and tetraethyl orthosilicate as precursors. The structure and chemical composition of the coatings annealed at different temperatures were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy. The refractive indices of the coatings were calculated from the measured transmittance and reflectance spectra. An increase in refractive index with the high temperature thermal annealing process was observed. The Raman and FTIR results indicate that the refractive index variation is due to changes in the removal of the organic component, phase separation and the crystal structure of the binary coatings.

  7. Water Repellence and Oxygen and Water Vapor Barrier of PVOH-Coated Substrates before and after Surface Esterification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schmid

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates chemical grafting with fatty acid chlorides as a method for the surface modification of hydrophilic web materials. The resulting changes in the water repellence and barrier properties were studied. For this purpose, different grades of polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH were coated on regenerated cellulose films (“cellophane” and paper and then grafted with fatty acid chlorides. The PVOH grades varied in their degree of hydrolysis and average molecular weight. The surface was esterified with two fatty acid chlorides, palmitoyl (C16 and stearoyl chloride (C18, by chemical grafting. The chemical grafting resulted in water-repellent surfaces and reduced water vapor transmission rates by a factor of almost 19. The impact of the surface modification was greater for a higher degree of hydrolysis of the polyvinyl alcohol and for shorter fatty acid chains. Although the water vapor barrier for palmitoyl-grafted PVOH was higher than for stearoyl-grafted PVOH, the contact angle with water was lower. Additionally, it was shown that a higher degree of hydrolysis led to higher water vapor barrier improvement factors after grafting. Furthermore, the oxygen permeability decreased after grafting significantly, due to the fact that the grafting protects the PVOH against humidity when the humidity is applied on the grafted side. It can be concluded that the carbon chain length of the fatty acid chlorides is the limiting factor for water vapor adsorption, but the grafting density is the bottleneck for water diffusing in the polymer.

  8. Utility of Photochemical Traits as Diagnostics of Thermal Tolerance amongst Great Barrier Reef Corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Nitschke

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Light availability is considered a key factor regulating the thermal sensitivity of reef building corals, where excessive excitation of photosystem II (PSII further exacerbates pressure on photochemical pathways already compromised by heat stress. Coral symbionts acclimate to changes in light availability (photoacclimation by continually fine-tuning the photochemical operating efficiency of PSII. However, how this process adjusts throughout the warmest months in naturally heat-tolerant or sensitive species is unknown, and whether this influences the capacity to tolerate transient heat stress is untested. We therefore examined the PSII photophysiology of 10 coral species (with known thermal tolerances from shallow reef environments at Heron Island (Great Barrier Reef, Australia, in spring (October-November, 2015 vs. summer (February-March, 2016. Corals were maintained in flow-through aquaria and rapid light curve (RLC protocols using pulse amplitude modulated (PAM fluorometry captured changes in the PSII photoacclimation strategy, characterized as the minimum saturating irradiance (Ek, and the extent of photochemical ([1 – C], operating efficiency vs. non-photochemical ([1 – Q] energy dissipation. Values of Ek across species were >2-fold higher in all coral species in spring, consistent with a climate of higher overall light exposure (i.e., higher PAR from lower cloud cover, rainfall and wind speed compared with summer. Summer decreases in Ek were combined with a shift toward preferential photochemical quenching in all species. All coral species were subsequently subjected to thermal stress assays. An equivalent temperature-ramping profile of 1°C increase per day and then maintenance at 32°C was applied in each season. Despite the significant seasonal photoacclimation, the species hierarchy of thermal tolerance [maximum quantum yields of PSII (Fv/Fm, monitored at dawn and dusk] did not shift between seasons, except for Pocillopora

  9. Quantitative model of the effects of contamination and space environment on in-flight aging of thermal coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhove, Emilie; Roussel, Jean-François; Remaury, Stéphanie; Faye, Delphine; Guigue, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    The in-orbit aging of thermo-optical properties of thermal coatings critically impacts both spacecraft thermal balance and heating power consumption. Nevertheless, in-flight thermal coating aging is generally larger than the one measured on ground and the current knowledge does not allow making reliable predictions1. As a result, a large oversizing of thermal control systems is required. To address this issue, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales has developed a low-cost experiment, called THERME, which enables to monitor the in-flight time-evolution of the solar absorptivity of a large variety of coatings, including commonly used coatings and new materials by measuring their temperature. This experiment has been carried out on sunsynchronous spacecrafts for more than 27 years, allowing thus the generation of a very large set of telemetry measurements. The aim of this work was to develop a model able to semi-quantitatively reproduce these data with a restraint number of parameters. The underlying objectives were to better understand the contribution of the different involved phenomena and, later on, to predict the thermal coating aging at end of life. The physical processes modeled include contamination deposition, UV aging of both contamination layers and intrinsic material and atomic oxygen erosion. Efforts were particularly focused on the satellite leading wall as this face is exposed to the highest variations in environmental conditions during the solar cycle. The non-monotonous time-evolution of the solar absorptivity of thermal coatings is shown to be due to a succession of contamination and contaminant erosion by atomic oxygen phased with the solar cycle.

  10. INFLUENCE ОF MODIFIER THERMAL TREATMENT ОN CHARACTERISTICS ОF COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR PROTECTIVE COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ivashko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results that reveal influence of modifiers characterized by different nature and composition and subjected to heat treatment on operational characteristics of single and binary compositions. Interaction between dispersed clay particles and dependence of  coating properties on  their mass content in oligomeric and polymeric matrices have been justified in the paper. The paper contains data that prove an increase of coating hardness by 15–20 %. The coating composition includes thermally-treated dispersed clay particles.

  11. A study of coating mechanical and optical losses in view of reducing mirror thermal noise in gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaminio, R.; Franc, J.; Michel, C.; Morgado, N.; Pinard, L.; Sassolas, B.

    2010-04-01

    Mirror coatings play a crucial role in the performance of laser interferometers devoted to gravitational wave detection such as Virgo and LIGO. Mechanical losses in the coating material limit the sensitivity of the detectors due to the associated mirror thermal noise. The absorption of light in the coating induces a thermal lens in the mirror substrate which reduces the quality of the optical interference and requires sophisticated thermal compensation systems. This paper describes the work ongoing at LMA in order to reduce mechanical losses and optical absorption in the coating. The results obtained by doping Ta2O5 layers and testing different high-index materials are described. Finally the performances of different potential coatings are compared and the results obtained with a 40 kg mirror are reported. Titania doped Ta2O5 shows mechanical losses of 2 × 10-4 and absorption below 0.5 ppm. Nb2O5 appears to be the best competitor from the thermal noise point of view but it has an optical absorption four to five times larger.

  12. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques on a Hypalon Paint Coating for the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingard, Charles D.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    White Hypalon paint is brush-applied as a moisture barrier coating over cork surfaces on each of the two Space Shuttle SRBs. Fine cracks have been observed in the Hypalon coating three times historically on laboratory witness panels, but never on flight hardware. Samples of the cracked and standard ("good") Hypalon were removed from witness panel cork surfaces, and were tested in 1998 by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), TMA and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) thermal analysis techniques. The TGA data showed that at 700C, where only paint pigment solids remain, the cracked material had about 9 weight percent more material remaining than the standard material, probably indicating incomplete mixing of the paint before it was brush-applied to produce the cracked material. Use of the TMA film/fiber technique showed that the average modulus (stiffness) vs. temperature was about 3 to 6 times higher for the cracked material than for the standard material. The TMA data also showed that an increase in coating thickness for the cracked Hypalon was not a factor in the anomaly.

  13. Morphology, thermal, mechanical, and barrier properties of graphene oxide/poly(lactic acid) nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Woo; Choi, Hyun Muk [Kyonggi University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    To improve the physical and gas barrier properties of biodegradable poly(lactic acid) (PLA) film, two graphene nanosheets of highly functionalized graphene oxide (0.3 wt% to 0.7 wt%) and low-functionalized graphene oxide (0.5 wt%) were incorporated into PLA resin via solution blending method. Subsequently, we investigated the effects of material parameters such as loading level and degree of functionalization for the graphene nanosheets on the morphology and properties of the resultant nanocomposites. The highly functionalized graphene oxide (GO) caused more exfoliation and homogeneous dispersion in PLA matrix as well as more sustainable suspensions in THF, compared to low-functionalized graphene oxide (LFGO). When loaded with GO from 0.3 wt% to 0.7 wt%, the glass transition temperature, degree of crystallinity, tensile strength and modulus increased steadily. The GO gave rise to more pronounced effect in the thermal and mechanical reinforcement, relative to LFGO. In addition, the preparation of fairly transparent PLA-based nanocomposite film with noticeably improved barrier performance achieved only when incorporated with GO up to 0.7wt%. As a result, GO may be more compatible with hydrophilic PLA resin, compared to LFGO, resulting in more prominent enhancement of nanocomposites properties.

  14. Saturated Resin Ectopic Regeneration by Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjing Hao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Textile dyes are some of the most refractory organic compounds in the environment due to their complex and various structure. An integrated resin adsorption/Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD plasma regeneration was proposed to treat the indigo carmine solution. It is the first time to report ectopic regeneration of the saturated resins by non-thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The adsorption/desorption efficiency, surface functional groups, structural properties, regeneration efficiency, and the intermediate products between gas and liquid phase before and after treatment were investigated. The results showed that DBD plasma could maintain the efficient adsorption performance of resins while degrading the indigo carmine adsorbed by resins. The degradation rate of indigo carmine reached 88% and the regeneration efficiency (RE can be maintained above 85% after multi-successive regeneration cycles. The indigo carmine contaminants were decomposed by a variety of reactive radicals leading to fracture of exocyclic C=C bond, which could cause decoloration of dye solution. Based on above results, a possible degradation pathway for the indigo carmine by resin adsorption/DBD plasma treatment was proposed.

  15. Hybrid calcium phosphate coatings with the addition of trace elements and polyaspartic acid by a low-thermal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Sanzhong; Lin Xiangjin [The First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Yang Xianyan; Chen Xiaoyi; Gao Changyou; Gou Zhongru [Zhejiang-California International NanoSystems Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhang Lei; Yang Guojing, E-mail: zhrgou@zju.edu.cn [Rui' an People' s Hospital and the 3rd Hospital Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical College, Rui' an 325200 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Research in the field of orthopedic implantology is currently focused on developing methodologies to potentiate osseointegration and to expedite the reestablishment of full functionality. We have developed a simple biomimetic approach for preparing trace elements-codoped calcium phosphate (teCaP) coatings on a titanium substrate. The reaction proceeded via low-thermal incubation in trace elements (TEs)-added simulated body fluid (teSBF) at 90 and 120 deg. C. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray analyses demonstrated that the teCaP coating was the composite of hydroxyapatite and whitlockite, simultaneously doped with magnesium, strontium, zinc and silicon. The addition of polyaspartic acid and TEs into SBF significantly densified the coating. The incubation temperature is another important factor controlling the coating precipitation rate and bonding strength. An incubation temperature of 120 deg. C could accelerate the coating precipitation and improve the interface bonding strength. The in vitro cell culture investigation indicated that the teCaP coating supported the adhesion and spreading of ovariectomized rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and particularly, promoted rMSCs proliferation compared to the CaP coating prepared in SBF. Collectively, from such a biomimetic route there potentially arises a general procedure to prepare a wide range of bioactive teCaP coatings of different composition for osteoporotic osteogenic cells activation response.

  16. Influence of thermal spraying parameters on the corrosion resistance of aluminium oxide coatings deposited on steel 1020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Y.; Vera, E.; Moreno, M.; Pineda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Parameters required for the preparation of coatings of aluminium oxide deposited on AISI 1020 steels were determined according to their thickness and type of flame to differentiate their behaviour against corrosion. Commercial powders were used by the method of thermal spraying deposition. The coatings were analysed by OM (optical microscopy), the thickness was measured by means of a coating thickness gauge and electrochemical techniques variables measured was the Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and approximation Tafel potentiodynamic curves. The corrosion current for steel 1020 with Na2SO4 electrolyte of 3.5% is of the order of hundreds of A/cm2 and coated steel given in the order of A/cm2, which leads to think that the projection produces coatings uniform low closed porosity, although techniques DC indicate a significant porosity as is observable current response to the potentiodynamic curve. The observed thicknesses fall into the hundreds of microns and little uniformity was noted in this coatings. The coatings deposited by oxidizing flame was better performance in corrosion than the coating deposited by neutral flame.

  17. Durability Modeling of Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Using Finite Element Based Progressive Failure Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Abdul-Aziz; Frank Abdi; Ramakrishna T. Bhatt; Joseph E. Grady

    2014-01-01

    The necessity for a protecting guard for the popular ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) is getting a lot of attention from engine manufacturers and aerospace companies. The CMC has a weight advantage over standard metallic materials and more performance benefits. However, these materials undergo degradation that typically includes coating interface oxidation as opposed to moisture induced matrix which is generally seen at a higher temperature. Additionally, other factors such as residual stress...

  18. Ultraviolet radiation effects on the infrared damage rate of a thermal control coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of ultraviolet radiation on the infrared reflectance of ZnO silicone white thermal coatings were investigated. Narrow band ultraviolet radiation for wavelengths in the 2200A to 3500A range by a monochromator and a high pressure, 150-W Eimac xenon lamp. The sample was irradiated while in a vacuum of at least 0.000001 torr, and infrared reflectance was measured in situ with a spectroreflectometer at 19,500A. Reflectance degradation was studied as a function of wavelength, time, intensity, and dose. Damage was wavelength dependent at constant exposure, but no maximum was evident above the shortest wavelength investigated here. The degradation rate at constant intensity was an exponential function of time and varies with intensity.

  19. An Experimental Thermally Deposited Coating for Improved Bonding to Glass-fiber Posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Giselle Rodrigues; Silva, Fernanda Pereira; Oliveira-Ogliari, Aline; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Moraes, Rafael R; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa

    To determine whether an experimental thermally deposited siloxane-methacrylate coating for use in industrial scale applications would improve the bond strength of resin-based materials to glass fiber posts (GFPs) without affecting their mechanical properties. An experimental 5% (w/v) solution of methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane was prepared. Two types of GFPs (Exacto, Angelus; White Post DC, FGM) were divided into the following groups: S: silane; SA: silane and adhesive; HS: 35% H₂O₂ and silane; HSA: 35% H₂O₂, silane and adhesive; Exp: siloxane-methacrylate coating (Si-O) via post immersion in experimental solution followed by heating; Exp-S: silane after Si-O treatment; Exp-A: adhesive after Si-O treatment; and Exp-SA: silane and adhesive after Si-O treatment. The posts were positioned in a mold to allow insertion of a dual-curing resin core, serially sectioned into beams, and subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTSB) testing. The three-point bending test and SEM/EDX analysis were used to assess the mechanical and surface properties of untreated GFPs that were etched with H₂O₂ or treated with Si-O. Surface treatments affected the μTSB only for the Exacto GFPs. The highest μTBS (MPa) was observed in Exp-S and Exp-SA groups, whereas H₂O₂ etching resulted in intermediate values. The mechanical properties were not affected by surface treatments. Exacto GFPs had significantly higher flexural strength (σf) and flexural modulus (Ef) than did the White Post DC GFPs, but the latter were significantly stiffer (S) than Exacto, regardless of the surface treatment tested. H₂O₂ promoted morphological changes in post surfaces. The experimental treatment promoted deposition of Si onto the post surface, improving bond strengths of Exacto posts. The proposed novel coating technique is a viable procedure for fiber post manufacturers to improve the μTSB of resin-based materials.

  20. Fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation of an epoxy based nano intumescent fire retardant coating for structural applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Hammad, E-mail: engr.hammad.aziz03@gmail.com; Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Yusoff, P. S. M. Megat; Zia-ul-Mustafa, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Intumescent fire retardant coating (IFRC) is a passive fire protection system which swells upon heating to form expanded multi-cellular char layer that protects the substrate from fire. In this research work, IFRC’s were developed using different flame retardants such as ammonium polyphosphate, expandable graphite, melamine and boric acid. These flame retardants were bound together with the help of epoxy binder and cured together using curing agent. IFRC was then reinforced with nano magnesium oxide and nano alumina as inorganic fillers to study their effect towards fire performance, microstructure and thermal degradation. Small scale fire test was conducted to investigate the thermal insulation of coating whereas fire performance was calculated using thermal margin value. Field emission scanning electron microscopy was used to examine the microstructure of char obtained after fire test. Thermogravimetric analysis was conducted to investigate the residual weight of coating. Results showed that the performance of the coating was enhanced by reinforcement with nano size fillers as compared to non-filler based coating. Comparing both nano size magnesium oxide and nano size alumina; nano size alumina gave better fire performance with improved microstructure of char and high residual weight.

  1. High-resolution Thermal Micro-imaging Using Europium Chelate Luminescent Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseman, Timothy M; Hao, Yang; Vlasko-Vlasov, Vitalii K; Welp, Ulrich; Koshelev, Alexei E; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Divan, Ralu; Keiser, Courtney; Watanabe, Chiharu; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2017-04-16

    Micro-electronic devices often undergo significant self-heating when biased to their typical operating conditions. This paper describes a convenient optical micro-imaging technique which can be used to map and quantify such behavior. Europium thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (EuTFC) has a 612 nm luminescence line whose activation efficiency drops strongly with increasing temperature, due to T-dependent interactions between the Eu3+ ion and the organic chelating compound. This material may be readily coated on to a sample surface by thermal sublimation in vacuum. When the coating is excited with ultraviolet light (337 nm) an optical micro-image of the 612 nm luminescent response can be converted directly into a map of the sample surface temperature. This technique offers spatial resolution limited only by the microscope optics (about 1 micron) and time resolution limited by the speed of the camera employed. It offers the additional advantages of only requiring comparatively simple and non-specialized equipment, and giving a quantitative probe of sample temperature.

  2. Characterization of a rapid thermal anneal TiNxOy/TiSi2 contact barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, V. Q.

    1989-07-01

    In this paper, the physical and electrical properties of a TiNxOy/TiSi2 dual layer contact barrier are reported. The TiNxOy/TiSi2 barrier was formed by rapidly annealing a Ti thin film on Si in an N2 ambient. During this process, the Ti film surface reacts with N2 to form a TiNxOy skin layer and the bulk of the Ti film reacts with Si to form an underlying TiSi2 layer. The influences of rapid thermal anneal (RTA) conditions on the TiNxOy layer were investigated by varying the RTA temperature from 600 to 1100° C and cycle duration from 30 to 100 s. It is found that the resulting TiNxOy and TiSi2 layer thicknesses are dependent on RTA temperature and the starting Ti thickness. For a starting Ti thickness of 500Å, 150Å thick TiNxOy and 800Å thick TiSi2 are obtained after an RTA at 900° C for 30 s. The TiNxOy thickness is limited by a fast diffusion of Si into Ti to form TiSi2. When a Ti film is deposited on SiO2, Ti starts to react with SiO2 from 600° C and a significant reduction of the SiO2 thickness is observed after an RTA at 900° C. The resulting layer is composed of a surface TiNxOy layer followed by a complex layer of titanium oxide and titanium suicide. In addition, when Ti is depos-ited on TiSi2, thicker TiNxOy and TiSi2 layers are obtained after RTA. This is because the TiSi2 layer retards the diffusion of Si from the underlying substrate into the Ti layer. NMOSFETs were fabricated using the TiNxOy/TiSi2 as a contact barrier formed by RTA at 900° C for 30 s and a significant reduction of contact resistance was obtained. In addition, electromigration test at a high current density indicated that a significant improvement in mean time to failure (MTF) has been obtained with the barrier.

  3. Iridium: An Oxygen Diffusion Barrier and a Conductive Seed Layer for RABiTS-Based Coated Conductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Zhai, Hong-Ying [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL; Gapud, Albert Agcaoili [ORNL; Thompson, James R [ORNL; Martin, Patrick M [ORNL; Goyal, Amit [ORNL; Christen, David K [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    For power applications of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) coated conductors, it is necessary to electrically stabilize the conductor. An economic way to achieve this, which also benefits the engineering J{sub E}, is to grow conductive buffer layers directly on textured Cu or Ni metal surfaces. However, due to poor oxidation resistance and high reactivity/diffusivity of Cu or Ni, an insulating oxide layer usually forms at the metal/substrate interface, degrading the electrical connectivity of the entire architecture. To overcome this problem, we have developed a new conductive, nonmagnetic buffer layer architecture of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/Ir on textured Ni-based tapes. This structure serves as a barrier to both inward diffusion of oxygen and outward diffusion of metal cations. Using PLD to grow YBCO, we demonstrate ideal electrical coupling to the metal substrate. Critical current (I{sub c}) values for 1 {mu}m thick YBCO coatings exceed 100 A/cm-width at 77 K on a Ni-W RABiTS template.

  4. Thin films of spin-crossover coordination polymers with large thermal hysteresis loops prepared by nanoparticle spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Daisuke; Aketa, Naoki; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tamaki, Takashi; Inose, Tomoko; Akai, Tomoki; Toyama, Hirotaka; Sakata, Osami; Tajiri, Hiroo; Ogawa, Takuji

    2014-09-11

    This communication describes the synthesis of spin-crossover nanoparticles, which can disperse in various organic solvents without an excess amount of surfactants. The nanoparticles form homogeneous thin films on substrates by spin coating. The films show abrupt spin transitions with large thermal hysteresis loops.

  5. Experimental and analytical investigation of thermal coating effectiveness for 3 m3 LPG tanks engulfed by fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landucci, G.; Molag, M.; Reinders, J.; Cozzani, V.

    2009-01-01

    Two large-scale diesel pool fire engulfment tests were carried out on LPG tanks protected with intumescing materials to test the effectiveness of thermal coatings in the prevention of hot BLEVE accidental scenarios in the road and rail transport of LPG. A specific test protocol was defined to

  6. The combined use of enamel matrix proteins and a tetracycline-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene barrier membrane in the treatment of intra-osseous defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipos, PM; Loos, BG; Abbas, F; Timmerman, MF; van der Velden, U

    Objectives: The purpose of this split-mouth study was to evaluate the clinical response of enamel matrix proteins (EMPs, Emdogain Gel((R))) in intra-osseous defects with or without a combined application of a tetracycline-coated expanded polytetrafluoroethylene barrier membrane (e-PTFE,

  7. Thermal stability of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods with different aspect ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergely-Fülöp, Eszter, E-mail: fulop.eszter@ttk.mta.hu; Zámbó, Dániel, E-mail: zambo.daniel@ttk.mta.hu; Deák, András, E-mail: deak.andras@ttk.mta.hu

    2014-12-15

    The effect of different temperatures (up to 900 °C) on the morphology of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods was systematically investigated. Gold nanorods with different aspect ratios (AR ranging from 2.5 to 4.3) were coated with a 15 nm thick mesoporous silica shell. Silicon supported monolayers of the particles were annealed in the temperature range of 300–900 °C. The resulting changes in particle morphology were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and visible wavelength extinction spectroscopy. The silica coating generally improved the stability of the nanorods from ca. 250 °C by several hundreds degree Celsius. For nanorods with AR < 3 the shape and the aspect ratio change is only moderate up to 700 °C. At 900 °C these nanorods became spherical. For nanorods with AR>3, lower stability was found as the aspect ratio decrease was more significant and they transformed into spherical particles already at 700 °C. It was confirmed by investigating empty silica shells that the observed conformal change of the shell material when annealing core/shell particles is dictated by the deformation of the core particle. This also implies that a significant mechanical stress is exerted on the shell upon core deformation. In accordance with this, for the highest aspect ratio (AR ∼ 4) nanorod the shell breaks up at 900 °C and the gold cores were partially released and coalesced into large spherical particles. - Highlights: • Deformation of mesoporous silica-coated gold nanorods upon annealing up to 900 °C. • The silica shell protects the gold cores from turning into spheres up to 500 °C. • Decreasing thermal stability with increasing aspect ratio. • Deformation of the silica shell dictated by the shape change of the gold core. • Core induced break-up of the shell for high aspect ratio nanorods.

  8. Corrosion Resistance Properties of Aluminum Coating Applied by Arc Thermal Metal Spray in SAE J2334 Solution with Exposure Periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arc thermal metal spray coating provides excellent corrosion, erosion and wear resistance to steel substrates. This paper incorporates some results of aluminum coating applied by this method on plain carbon steel. Thereafter, coated panels were exposed to an environment known to form stable corrosion products with aluminum. The coated panels were immersed in Society of Automotive Engineers (SA