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Sample records for thermal area utah

  1. Magnetotelluric models of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

    1980-09-01

    The Roosevelt Hot Springs (RHS) thermal area, which includes a hotwater-dominated fracture zone prospect, near the eastern margin of the Basin-Range tectonic province, conceivably possesses a whole family of resistivity structures that includes the following: deep hot brine reservoirs, deep-seated partially molten heat sources in the crust or upper mantle that drive the convective system, near-surface hydrothermal alteration zones, wet sedimentary fill in valleys, and a regional, apparently one-dimensional resistivity profile of the crust and upper mantle. This complex resistivity makeup, particular to RHS but probably similar to that at other geothermal areas in the Great Basin, must be treated as being fully three-dimensional (3-D). In an attempt to understand these structures, broadband (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -2/ Hz) tensor magnetotelluric (MT) data were obtained including apparent resistivities (rho/sub a/), impedance phases (phi) and vertical magnetic field transfer functions for 93 sites in the vicinity of this resource area.

  2. STANSBURY ROADLESS AREAS, UTAH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Martin L.; Kness, Richard F.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey of the Stansbury Roadless Areas, Utah was conducted and showed that there is little likelihood for the occurrence of metallic mineral resources in the areas. Limestone and dolomite underlie approximately 50 acres in the roadless areas and constitute a nonmetallic mineral resource of undetermined value. The oil and gas potential is not known and cannot be assessed without exploratory geophysical and drilling programs. There are no known geothermal resources. An extensive program of geophysical exploration and exploratory drilling would be necessary to determine the potential for oil and gas in the Stansbury Roadless Areas.

  3. Light stable isotope study of the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Southwestern Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrs D.T.; Bowman, J.R.

    1980-05-01

    The isotopic composition of hydrogen, oxygen, and carbon has been determined for regional cold springs, thermal fluids, and rocks and minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area. The geothermal system has developed within plutonic granitic rocks and amphibolite facies gneiss, relying upon fracture-controlled permeability for the migration of the thermal fluids. Probably originating as meteoric waters in the upper elevations of the Mineral Mountains, the thermal waters sampled in the production wells display an oxygen isotopic shift of at least +1.2. Depletions of delta /sup 18/O in wole rock, K-feldspar, and biotite have a positive correlation with alteration intensity. W/R mass ratios, calculated from the isotopic shifts of rock and water, range up to 3.0 in a producing horizon of one well, although the K-feldspar has experienced only 30% exchange with the thermal waters. While veinlet quartz has equilibrated with the thermal waters, the /sup 18/O values of K-mica clay, an alteration product of plagioclase, mimic the isotopic composition of K-feldspar and whole rock. This suggests that locally small W/R ratios enable plagioclase to influence its alteration products by isotopic exchange.

  4. Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, W.T.; Bryant, N.L.; Dedolph, R.E.; Ballantyne, J.M.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Rohrs, D.T.; Mason, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    Hot spring deposits in the Roosevelt thermal area consist of opaline sinter, and siliceous-sinter-cemented alluvium. Alluvium, granite to granodiorite plutonic rocks, and amphibolite facies gneiss have been altered by acid-sulfate water to alunite and opal at the surface, and to kaolinite, alunite, montmorillonite, and muscovite to a depth of 60 m. Marcasite and pyrite occur below the water table at about 30m. Deeper alteration sampled to a depth of 2.26 km consists of muscovite, chlorite, calcite, K-feldspar, albite, and epidote with pyrite and sparse chalcopyrite. Thermal water is dilute (ionic strength 0.1 to 0.2) sodium chloride brine. Surface water contains 10 times as much calcium and 100 times as much magnesium as the deep water. Sulfate varies from 48 to 200 mg/l. Present-day spring temperature is 25/sup 0/C but in 1950 the spring temperature was 85/sup 0/C. Computed Na-K-Ca temperature is 241/sup 0/C for the present-day spring, 274/sup 0/C for a well and 283/sup 0/C for the 1957 spring. Quartz saturation temperatures are 170/sup 0/C for the present-day spring, 283/sup 0/C for the well, and 213/sup 0/C for the 1957 spring. A plausible model for development of the near-surface alteration consists of hydrothermal fluid which convectively rises along major fractures. Water cools by conduction and steam separation, and hydrogen ion is produced by oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. The low pH water percolates from the surface downward and reacts with rocks to produce alunite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and muscovite as hydrogen is consumed.

  5. Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goode, Harry D.

    1978-11-01

    Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms

  6. Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah: Petrographic characterization of the alteration to 2 kilometers depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballantyne, J.M.; Parry, W.T.

    1978-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration in drill cuttings from Thermal Power drillhole 14-2, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal area, has been studied petrographically. The hole is sited in alluvium approximately 1.6 km southeast of the old Resort and was rotary drilled to a depth of 1866.0 m. The exact hole location is 2310 FNL, 350 FWL, Sec. 2, Twp 27S, Rge 9W, elevation 1908.5 m. Core was extracted from 792.5 to 795.5 m. Thin sections were made from samples at 15.2 m intervals of drill cuttings collected at 1.5 or 3.0 m intervals during drilling. Thin sections were made of 1.5 or 3.0 m intervals from 274.3 to 304.8 m, 487.9 to 581.2 m, and 868.7 to 899.2 m. These intervals were chosen for close spaced sampling on the basis of increases in temperature, porosity, conductivity and acoustic velocity shown in geophysical logs. A total of 153 thin sections of cuttings were made, and an additional 9 sections were made from the core. Depths of thin section samples are listed in the appendix. A visual estimate of the percentage of each rock type was made for each thin section.

  7. Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    With its myriad of canyons, unusual rock formations and ancient lakebeds, Utah is a geologist's playground. This true-color image of Utah was acquired on June 20, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The dark aquamarine feature in the northern part of the state is the Great Salt Lake. Fourteen thousand years ago, the Great Salt Lake was part of Lake Bonneville, which covered much of northern and western Utah. The extent of the lakebed can be seen in light tan covering much of northern and western Utah and extending into Idaho. (Click for more details on the history of Lake Bonneville.) Other remnants of Lake Bonneville include the Great Salt Lake Desert (the white expanse to the left of the Great Salt Lake) and Lake Utah (the lake to the south of Salt Lake City). The white color of the Great Salt Lake Desert is due to the mineral deposits left by Lake Bonneville as it drained out into the Snake River and then proceeded to dry up. The dark bands running through the center and northeastern part of the state are the western edge of the Rockies. The dark color is likely due to the coniferous vegetation that grows along the range. The tallest mountains in the Utah Rockies are the Uinta Mountains, which can be seen in the northeastern corner of the state bordering Colorado and Wyoming. The white fishbone pattern in the center of the Uinta Mountains is snow that hadn't yet melted. To the southeast, one can see the reddish-orange rocks of the northernmost section of the Colorado Plateau. Utah's well-known desert attractions, including Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Glen Canyon, are located in this region. The long, narrow lake is Lake Powell, created after the construction of Glen Canyon Dam in the 1950s. Image courtesy NASA MODIS Science Team

  8. Pliocene diatoms from the Bryce Canyon Area, Utah

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.

    The diatomite deposits were collected at 6,650 foot elevation near Hillsdale (vicinity of Bryce Canyon National Park), Utah, Preliminary investigation showed that the deposits were of pliocene age and probably equivalent to the Salt Lake group...

  9. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment: Task 6 Topical Report, Utah Clean Coal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.J.; Deo, M.; Edding, E.G.; Hradisky, M.; Kelly, K.E.; Krumm, R.; Sarofim, Adel; Wang, D.

    2014-08-15

    The long-term objective of this task is to develop a transformational energy production technology by in- situ thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas and/or liquid transportation fuels while leaving much of the coal’s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This task focused on three areas: Experimental. The Underground Coal Thermal Treatment (UCTT) team focused on experiments at two scales, bench-top and slightly larger, to develop data to understand the feasibility of a UCTT process as well as to develop validation/uncertainty quantification (V/UQ) data for the simulation team. Simulation. The investigators completed development of High Performance Computing (HPC) simulations of UCTT. This built on our simulation developments over the course of the task and included the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)- based tools to perform HPC simulations of a realistically sized domain representative of an actual coal field located in Utah. CO2 storage. In order to help determine the amount of CO2 that can be sequestered in a coal formation that has undergone UCTT, adsorption isotherms were performed on coals treated to 325, 450, and 600°C with slow heating rates. Raw material was sourced from the Sufco (Utah), Carlinville (Illinois), and North Antelope (Wyoming) mines. The study indicated that adsorptive capacity for the coals increased with treatment temperature and that coals treated to 325°C showed less or similar capacity to the untreated coals.

  10. Field guide to geologic excursions in southwestern Utah and adjacent areas of Arizona and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, William R.; Lund, William R.

    2002-01-01

    This field guide contains road logs for field trips planned in conjunction with the 2002 Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the Geological Society of America held at Southern Utah University in Cedar City, Utah. There are a total of eight field trips, covering various locations and topics in southwestern Utah and adjacent areas of Arizona and Nevada. In addition, the field guide contains a road log for a set of Geological Engineering Field Camp Exercises run annually by the University of Missouri at Rolla in and around Cedar City. Two of the field trips address structural aspects of the geology in southwestern Utah and northwestern Arizona; two trips deal with ground water in the region; and along with the Field Camp Exercises, one trip, to the Grand Staircase, is designed specifically for educators. The remaining trips examine the volcanology and mineral resources of a large area in and around the Tusher Mountains in Utah; marine and brackish water strata in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument; and the Pine Valley Mountains, which are cored by what may be the largest known laccolith in the world. The "Three Corners" area of Utah, Arizona, and Nevada is home to truly world-class geology, and I am confident that all of the 2002 Rocky Mountain Section meeting attendees will find a field trip suited to their interests.

  11. Water availability for development of major tar sands areas in Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keefer, T.N.; McQuivey, R.S.

    1979-05-01

    The Sutron Corporation, under contract with Colorado State University, has conducted a study for the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) to determine the availability of water for future extraction of viscous petroleum (bitumen) from the six major tar sands deposits in Utah. Specifically, the areas are: Asphalt Ridge and Whiterocks, which lie immediately west of Vernal, Utah; P.R. Spring, a large area extending from the Colorado River to the White River along Utah's eastern border; Hill Creek, adjacent to P.R. Spring to the west; Sunnyside, immediately across the Green River from Hill Creek between the Price and Green Rivers; and Tar Sand Triangle, near the confluence of the Colorado and Dirty Devil Rivers. The study, conducted between September and December of 1978, was a fact-finding effort involving the compilation of information from publications of the US Geological Survey (USGS), Utah State Engineer, Utah Department of Natural Resources, and other federal and state agencies. The information covers the general physiographic and geologic features of the total area, the estimated water requirements for tar sands development, the availability of water in each of the six areas, and the legal and sociological restraints and impacts. The conclusions regarding water availability for tar sands development in each of the six areas and specific recommendations related to the development of each area are presented also.

  12. Utah State Prison Space Heating with Geothermal Heat - Resource Assessment Report Crystal Hot Springs Geothermal Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-12-01

    Reported herein is a summary of work conducted under the Resource Assessment Program-Task 2, for the Utah State Prison Geothermal Space Heating Project at Crystal Hot Springs, Draper, Utah. Assessment of the geothermal resource in and around the Utah State Prison property began in october of 1979 with an aeromagnetic and gravity survey. These tasks were designed to provide detailed subsurface structural information in the vicinity of the thermal springs so that an informed decision as to the locations of test and production holes could be made. The geophysical reconnaissance program provided the structural details needed to focus the test drilling program on the most promising production targets available to the State Prison. The subsequent drilling and well testing program was conducted to provide information to aid fin the siting and design of a production well and preliminary design activities. As part of the resource assessment portion of the Utah State Prison Geothermal Project, a program for periodic geophysical monitoring of the Crystal Hot Springs resource was developed. The program was designed to enable determination of baseline thermal, hydraulic, and chemical characteristics in the vicinity of Crystal Hot Springs prior to production and to provide a history of these characteristics during resource development.

  13. Joint Geophysical Imaging of the Utah Area Using Seismic Body Waves, Surface Waves and Gravity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H.; Maceira, M.; Toksoz, M. N.; Burlacu, R.; Yang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    We present a joint geophysical imaging method that makes use of seismic body wave arrival times, surface wave dispersion measurements, and gravity data to determine three-dimensional (3D) Vp and Vs models. An empirical relationship mapping densities to Vp and Vs for earth materials is used to link them together. The joint inversion method takes advantage of strengths of individual data sets and is able to better constrain the velocity models from shallower to greater depths. Combining three different data sets to jointly invert for the velocity structure is equivalent to a multiple-objective optimization problem. Because it is unlikely that the different “objectives” (data types) would be optimized by the same parameter choices, some trade-off between the objectives is needed. The optimum weighting scheme for different data types is based on relative uncertainties of individual observations and their sensitivities to model parameters. We will apply this joint inversion method to determine 3D Vp and Vs models of the Utah area. The seismic body wave arrival times are assembled from waveform data recorded by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) regional network for the past 7 years. The surface wave dispersion measurements are obtained from the ambient noise tomography study by the University of Colorado group using EarthScope/USArray stations. The gravity data for the Utah area is extracted from the North American Gravity Database managed by the University of Texas at El Paso. The preliminary study using the seismic body wave arrival times indicates strong low velocity anomalies in middle crust beneath some known geothermal sites in Utah. The joint inversion is expected to produce a reasonably well-constrained velocity structure of the Utah area, which is helpful for characterizing and exploring existing and potential geothermal reservoirs.

  14. Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation: Tooele Army Depot, Utah. Volume 2. South Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-29

    Classification) Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation, Toefle Army Depot., Utah; Volume ’fl-South Area Q2 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Andris Lapins CPG, Li 3a...Health Agency AFSC Air Force Systems Command ALS Above land surface AMCR Army Material Command Regulation ASTM American Society of Testing and...southeastern, southwestern, and northwestern perimeter area of S-TEAD and to conduct aquifer testing on selected wells, such that potential travel

  15. Paired, facing monoclines in the Sanpete-Sevier Valley area, central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkind, I.J.

    1992-01-01

    Several major monoclines that trend northward through the Sanpete-Sevier Valley area of central Utah are paired and face one another. This pairing of monoclines may have occurred when near-horizontal sedimentary and volcanic strata subsided into voids created as salt was removed from a salt diapir concealed beneath valley fill. Removal was mostly by dissolution or extrusion during Neogene time. The paired monoclines, thus, are viewed as collapse features rather than as normal synclinal folds. -from Author

  16. Ground water in Utah's densely populated Wasatch Front area - The challenge and the choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Don

    1985-01-01

    Utah's Wasatch Front area comprises about 4,000 square miles in the north-central part of the State. I n 1980, the area had a population of more than 1.1 million, or about 77 percent of Utah's total population. It contains several large cities, including Salt Lake City, Ogden, and Provo, and is commonly called Utah's urban corridor.Most of the water supply for the Wasatch Front area comes from streams that originate in the Wasatch Range and nearby Uinta Mountains; however, ground water has played an important role in the economic growth of the area. The principal source of ground water is the unconsolidated fill (sedimentary deposits) in the valleys of the Wasatch Front area northern Juab, Utah, Goshen, and Salt Lake Valleys; the East Shore area (a valley area east of the Great Salt Lake), and the Bear River Bay area. Maximum saturated thickness of the fill in the principal ground-water reservoirs in these valleys exceeds 6,000 feet, and the estimated volume of water that can be withdrawn from just the upper 100 feet of the saturated fill is about 8 million acre-feet. In most places the water is fresh, containing less than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids; in much of the Bear River Bay area and most of Goshen Valley (and locally in the other valleys), the water is slightly to moderately saline, with 1,000 to 10,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids.The principal ground-water reservoirs receive recharge at an annual rate that is estimated to exceed 1 million acre-feet chiefly as seepage from consolidated rocks in the adjacent mountains from canals, ditches, and irrigated land, directly from precipitation, and from streams. Discharge during 1980 (which was chiefly from springs, seepage to streams, evapotranspiration, and withdrawal by wells) was estimated to be about 1.1 million acre-feet. Withdrawal from wells, which began within a few years after the arrival of the Mormon pioneers in the Salt Lake Valley in 1847, and had increased to about 320

  17. Geothermal Technologies Program: Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-06-01

    Geothermal Technologies Program Utah fact sheet describes the geothermal areas and use in Utah, focusing on power generation as well as direct use, including geothermally heated greenhouses, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths.

  18. Low-temperature geothermal water in Utah: A compilation of data for thermal wells and springs through 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackett, R.E.

    1994-07-01

    The Geothermal Division of DOE initiated the Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources and Technology Transfer Program, following a special appropriation by Congress in 1991, to encourage wider use of lower-temperature geothermal resources through direct-use, geothermal heat-pump, and binary-cycle power conversion technologies. The Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT), the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI), and the Idaho Water Resources Research Institute organized the federally-funded program and enlisted the help of ten western states to carry out phase one. This first phase involves updating the inventory of thermal wells and springs with the help of the participating state agencies. The state resource teams inventory thermal wells and springs, and compile relevant information on each sources. OIT and UURI cooperatively administer the program. OIT provides overall contract management while UURI provides technical direction to the state teams. Phase one of the program focuses on replacing part of GEOTHERM by building a new database of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal systems for use on personal computers. For Utah, this involved (1) identifying sources of geothermal date, (2) designing a database structure, (3) entering the new date; (4) checking for errors, inconsistencies, and duplicate records; (5) organizing the data into reporting formats; and (6) generating a map (1:750,000 scale) of Utah showing the locations and record identification numbers of thermal wells and springs.

  19. Unpublished Digital Geologic Hazards Map of the Zion National Park Study Area, Utah (NPS, GRD, GRI, ZION, ZION geohazards digital map) adapted from a Utah Geological Survey Special Study Map by Lund, Knudsen, and Sharrow (2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Digital Geologic Hazards Map of the Zion National Park Study Area, Utah is composed of GIS data layers and GIS tables in a 10.0 file geodatabase...

  20. Basal area growth for aspen suckers under simulated browsing on Cedar Mountain, southern Utah, western United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    K. Tshireletso; J. C. Malechek; D. L. Bartos

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of season and intensity of clipping using simulated browsing on suckers' (Populus tremulaides Michx.) basal area growth on Cedar Mountain, Southern Utah, Western United States of America. Three randomly selected stands measuring 70 m x 70 m were clear-felled in mid-July, 2005, and fenced. Simulated browsing...

  1. Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-11

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future

  2. Potential areas of ground-water discharge in the Basin and Range carbonate-rock aquifer system, White Pine County, Nevada, and adjacent parts of Nevada and Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data represent potential areas of ground-water discharge for selected hydrographic areas in eastern Nevada and western Utah. The data are based on phreatophyte...

  3. Ground-water conditions in the east shore area, Box Elder, Davis, and Weber Counties, Utah 1960-69

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolke, E.L.; Waddell, K.M.

    1972-01-01

    This report is one of a series that is prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, which describes water resources in selected areas in Utah. The period of study on which this report was based was from July 1968 to March 1970, but the period of record covered by the report is from 1960 to 1969. The purposes of this study were to determine changes in ground-water development in the East Shore area and to determine the effects of those changes on the ground-water system since the area was last studied (Smith and Gates, 1963). The study was also made to obtain additional information to guide further development of ground water in the area, in order to meet growing needs for municipal, industrial, and agriculture water supplies.

  4. Hydrogeologic reconnaissance of part of the headwaters area of the Price River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Robert M.

    1963-01-01

    The area investigated comprises 33 square miles in the Price River drainage basin ad is in the High Plateaus section of Utah. Precipitation on most of the area ranges from about 20 to 23 inches per year, and the average annual precipitation for the entire area was assumed to be 22 inches, of which approximately 65 percent is lost by evapotranspiration. The geologic formations underlying the area are the Blackhawk and Price River Formations of Cretaceous age, the North Horn Formation of Cretaceous and Tertiary age, the Flagstaff Limestone and Colton Formation of tertiary age, and unconsolidated deposits of probable Quaternary age.Some ground water issues from springs and seeps and is used by stock and the cities of Price and Helper. The annual discharge from the springs and seeps in the area averages about 3,000 acre-feet. Two deep wells supply about 400 acre-feet per year for use at a steam-generating plant. The aquifers penetrated by the wells are in the Flagstaff Limestone and the North Horn formation, the deepest aquifer being about 1,500 feet below the land surface. Most of the ground water in the area is suitable for municipal and industrial use.The surface discharge from the area is approximately 6,000 acre-feet per year. By means of a water budget, it is calculated that approximately 4,000 acre-feet per year leaves the area by subsurface flow. Further development of ground water on a large scale can be accomplished only by the use of wells. It is possible, however, that part of any newly developed supply from wells may be drawn from existing spring discharge or streamflow.

  5. Utah: basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    This GEOTHERM sample file contains 643 records for Utah. Records may be present which are duplicates for the same analyses. A record may contain data on location, sample description, analysis type (water, condensate, or gas), collection condition, flow rates, and the chemical and physical properties of the fluid. Stable and radioactive isotopic data are occasionally available. Some records may contain only location and temperature. This compilation should contain all the chemical data for geothermal fluids in Utah available as of December, 1981. 7 refs. (ACR)

  6. Simulation analysis of the unconfined aquifer, Raft River geothermal area, Idaho-Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, William D.

    1979-01-01

    This study covers about 1,000 mi2 (2,600 km2 ) of the southern Raft River drainage basin in south-central Idaho and northwest Utah. The main area of interest, approximately 200 mi2 (520 km2 ) of semiarid agricultural and rangeland in the southern Raft River Valley that includes the known Geothermal Resource Area near Bridge, Idaho, was modelled numerically to evaluate the hydrodynamics of the unconfined aquifer. Computed and estimated transmissivity values range from 1,200 feet squared per day (110 meters squared per day) to 73,500 feet squared per day (6,830 meters squared per day). Water budgets, including ground-water recharge and discharge for approximate equilibrium conditions, have been computed by several previous investigators; their estimates of available ground-water recharge range from about 46,000 acre-feet per year (57 cubic hectometers per year) to 100,000 acre-feet per year (123 cubic hectometers per year).Simulation modeling of equilibrium conditions represented by 1952 water levels suggests: (1) recharge to the water-table aquifer is about 63,000 acre-feet per year (77 cubic hectometers per year); (2) a significant volume of ground water is discharged through evapotranspiration by phreatophytes growing on the valley bottomlands; (3) the major source of recharge may be from upward leakage of water from a deeper, confined reservoir; and (4) the aquifer transmissivity probably does not exceed about 12,000 feet squared per day (3,100 meters squared per day). Additional analysis carried out by simulating transient conditions from 1952 to 1965 strongly suggests that aquifer transmissivity does not exceed about 7,700 feet squared per day (700 meters squared per day). The model was calibrated using slightly modified published pumpage data; it satisfactorily reproduced the historic water-level decline over the period 1952-65.

  7. Hydrologic reconnaissance of the Sevier Lake area, west-central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilberg, Dale E.

    1991-01-01

    The hydrologic system of the Sevier Lake area, at the terminus of the Sevier Lake drainage basin in west-central Utah, was studied during 1987-88 to determine baseline hydrologic conditions prior to anticipated development.  Sevier Lake was reestablished during 1983-87 on the normally dry playa as a result of record volumes of surface-water runoff, but the lake was receding during the study.  In June 1985, the lake reached a maximum depth of about 13 feet, with a water-surface altitude of 4,527 feet above sea level.The basin-fill aquifer includes a coarse-grained facies at higher altitudes of the alluvial slopes, and a fine-grained facies at lower altitudes around Sevier Lake.  Water levels indicate a potential for lateral groundwater movement away from the lake and toward the northwest, west, and south.Transmissivity of the coarse-grained facies, determined from one well, was 4,120 feet squared per day. Transmissivity values for the fine-grained facies ranged from 1 X 10-3 to 5 X 10-2 foot squared per day, determined from slug tests of shallow wells near the shoreline of the lake, and 5.2 feet squared per day determined from a well in the lakebed.The predominant constituents of water sampled in the Sevier Lake area are sodium, sulfate, and chloride. The concentration of dissolved solids ranges from 480 to 120,000 milligrams per liter. Smaller concentrations of dissolved solids were determined for water from wells completed in the coarse-grained facies, and larger concentrations were determined for water from wells completed in the fine-grained facies.

  8. Preliminary hydrologic evaluation of the North Horn Mountain coal-resource area, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, M.J.; Tooley, John E.; Price, Don

    1981-01-01

    North Horn Mountain is part of a deeply dissected plateau in central Utah which is characterized by deep, narrow, steep-walled canyons with local relief of more than 1,000 feet. Geologic units exposed in the North Horn Mountain area range in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene and contain two mineable seams of Cretaceous coal. The area is in the drainage basin of the San Rafael River, in the Colorado River Basin. Runoff from the mountain is ephemeral. This runoff to the San Rafael River is by way of Cottonwood and Perron Creeks and represents less than 10 percent of their average annual runoff. Probable peak discharges (100-year flood) for the ephemeral streams draining North Horn Mountain are estimated to range from 200 to 380 cubic feet per second.The chemical quality of surface water in the area is good. The water is generally of a calcium magnesium bicarbonate type with average dissolved solids less than 500 milligrams per liter. Annual sediment yield in most of the area ranges from 0.1 to 0.2 acre-foot per square mile but locally is as high as 1.0 acre-foot per square mile. Most of the sediment is eroded during cloudbursts.Most of the ground water above the coal on North Horn Mountain probably is in perched aquifers. These aquifers support the flow of small seeps and springs. In some areas, the regional water table appears to extend upward into the coal. The principal source of recharge is precipitation that probably moves to aquifers along faults, joints, or fractures. This movement is apparently quite rapid. The dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water in the North Horn Mountain area range from less than 500 to about 1,000 milligrams per liter.Coal mining on North Horn Mountain should have minor "effects on the quantity and quality of surface water. The maximum predicted decrease in the annual flow of Ferron and Cottonwood Creeks is less than U percent. The sediment loads of affected streams could be significantly increased if construction were to

  9. Preliminary Report on the White Canyon Area, San Juan County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, William Edward Barnes; Trites, A.F.; Beroni, E.P.; Feeger, J.A.

    1952-01-01

    The White Canyon area in San Juan County, Utah, contains known deposits of copper-uranium ore and is currently being mapped and studied by the Geological Survey. To date, approximately 75 square miles, or about 20 percent of the area, has been mapped on a scale 1 inch=1 mile. The White Canyon area is underlain by more than 2,000 feet of sedimentary rocks, Carboniferous to Jurassic(?) in age. The area is on the flank of the Elk Ridge anticline, and the strata have a regional dip of 1 deg to 2 deg SW. The Shinarump conglomerate of Late Triassic age is the principal ore-bearing formation. The Shinarump consists of lenticular beds of sandstone, conglomeratic sandstone, clay, and siltstone, and ranges in thickness from a feather edge to as much as 75 feet. Locally the sandstones contain silicified and carbonized wood and fragments of charcoal. These vegetal remains are especially common in channel-fill deposits. Jointing is prominent in the western part of the area, and apparently affects all formations. Adjacent to the joints some of the redbeds in the sequence are bleached. Deposits of copper-uranium minerals have been found in the Moenkopi, Shinarump, and Chinle formations, but the only production of ore has been from the Shinarump conglomerate. The largest concentration of these minerals is in the lower third of the Shinarump, and the deposits seem to be controlled in part by ancient channel fills and in part by fractures. Locally precipitation of the copper and uranium minerals apparently has been aided by charcoal and clays. Visible uranium minerals include both hard and soft pitchblende and secondary hydrosulfates, phosphates, and silicates. In addition, unidentified uranium compounds are present in carbonized wood and charcoal, and in veinlets of hydrocarbons. Base-metal sulfides have been identified in all prospects that extend beyond the oxidized zone. Secondary copper minerals in the oxidized zone include the hydrous sulfates and carbonates, and possibly

  10. Hydrology and snowmelt simulation of Snyderville Basin, Park City, and adjacent areas, Summit County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lynette E.; Mason, James L.; Susong, David D.

    1998-01-01

    Increasing residential and commercial development is placing increased demands on the ground- and surface-water resources of Snyderville Basin, Park City, and adjacent areas in the southwestern corner of Summit County, Utah. Data collected during 1993-95 were used to assess the quantity and quality of the water resources in the study area.Ground water within the study area is present in consolidated rocks and unconsolidated valley fill. The complex geology makes it difficult to determine the degree of hydraulic connection between different blocks of consolidated rocks. Increased ground-water withdrawal during 1983- 95 generally has not affected ground-water levels. Ground-water withdrawal in some areas, however, caused seasonal fluctuations and a decline in ground-water levels from 1994 to 1995, despite greater-than-normal recharge in the spring of 1995.Ground water generally has a dissolved-solids concentration that ranges from 200 to 600 mg/L. Higher sulfate concentrations in water from wells and springs near Park City and in McLeod Creek and East Canyon Creek than in other parts of the study area are the result of mixing with water that discharges from the Spiro Tunnel. The presence of chloride in water from wells and springs near Park City and in streams and wells near Interstate Highway 80 is probably caused by the dissolution of applied road salt. Chlorofluorocarbon analyses indicate that even though water levels rise within a few weeks of snowmelt, the water took 15 to 40 years to move from areas of recharge to areas of discharge.Water budgets for the entire study area and for six subbasins were developed to better understand the hydrologic system. Ground-water recharge from precipitation made up about 80 percent of the ground-water recharge in the study area. Ground-water discharge to streams made up about 40 percent of the surface water in the study area and ground-water discharge to springs and mine tunnels made up about 25 percent. Increasing use of

  11. Hydrology of area 53, Northern Great Plains and Rocky Mountain coal provinces, Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, N.E.; Norris, J.M.; Kuhn, Gerhard; ,

    1984-01-01

    Hydrologic information and analysis are needed to aid in decisions to lease Federally owned coal and for the preparation of the necessary Environmental Assessments and Impact Study Reports. This need has become even more critical with the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-87). This report, one in a series of nationwide coal province reports, presents information thematically by describing single hydrologic topics through the use of brief texts and accompanying maps, graphs, or other illustrations. The report broadly characterizes the hydrology of Area 53 in northwestern Colorado, south-central Wyoming, and northeastern Utah. The report area, located primarily in the Wyoming Basin and Colorado Plateau physiographic provinces, consists of 14,650 square miles of diverse geology, topography, and climate. This diversity results in contrasting hydrologic characteristics. The two major rivers, the Yampa and the White Rivers, originate in humid granitic and basaltic mountains, then flow over sedimentary rocks underlying semiarid basins to their respective confluences with the Green River. Altitudes range from 4,800 to greater than 12,000 feet above sea level. Annual precipitation in the mountains, as much as 60 inches, is generally in the form of snow. Snowmelt produces most streamflow. Precipitation in the lower altitude sedimentary basins, ranging from 8 to 16 inches, is generally insufficient to sustain streamflow; therefore, most streams originating in the basins (where most of the streams in coal-mining areas originate) are ephemeral. Streamflow quality is best in the mountains where dissolved-solids concentrations generally are small. As streams flow across the sedimentary basins, mineral dissolution from the sedimentary rocks and irrigation water with high mineral content increase the dissolved-solids concentrations in a downstream direction. Due to the semiarid climate of the basins, soils are not adequately leached

  12. Soil temperature investigations using satellite acquired thermal-infrared data in semi-arid regions. Thesis. Final Report; [Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, R. L.; Petersen, G. W.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal-infrared data from the Heat Capacity Mapping Mission satellite were used to map the spatial distribution of diurnal surface temperatures and to estimate mean annual soil temperatures (MAST) and annual surface temperature amplitudes (AMP) in semi-arid east central Utah. Diurnal data with minimal snow and cloud cover were selected for five dates throughout a yearly period and geometrically co-registered. Rubber-sheet stretching was aided by the WARP program which allowed preview of image transformations. Daytime maximum and nighttime minimum temperatures were averaged to generation average daily temperature (ADT) data set for each of the five dates. Five ADT values for each pixel were used to fit a sine curve describing the theoretical annual surface temperature response as defined by a solution of a one-dimensinal heat flow equation. Linearization of the equation produced estimates of MAST and AMP plus associated confidence statistics. MAST values were grouped into classes and displayed on a color video screen. Diurnal surface temperatures and MAST were primarily correlated with elevation.

  13. Serologic survey for diseases in free-ranging coyotes (Canis latrans) from two ecologically distinct areas of Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjo, Wendy M; Gese, Eric M; Bromley, Cassity; Kozlowski, Adam; Williams, Elizabeth S

    2003-04-01

    The influence of habitat and associated prey assemblages on the prevalence of canine diseases in coyotes (Canis latrans) has received scant attention. From December 1997 through December 1999, we captured 67 coyotes in two ecologically distinct areas of Utah (USA): Deseret Land and Livestock Ranch and US Army Dugway Proving Ground. These areas differ in habitat and prey base. We collected blood samples and tested for evidence of various canine diseases. Prevalence of antibodies against canine parvovirus (CPV) was 100% in the Deseret population and 93% in the Dugway population. All juveniles in both populations had been exposed. We found no difference in the prevalence of antibodies against canine distemper virus (CDV) between the two populations (7% versus 12%; P = 0.50). However, we did find an increase in antibodies with age in the Deseret population (P = 0.03). Evidence of exposure to canine adenovirus (CAV) was found in both populations (52% and 72%; P = 0.08). Prevalence of CAV antibodies was influenced by age on both areas (Deseret: P = 0.003; Dugway: P = 0.004). Antibodies to Francisella tularensis were low on both areas (2% and 4%). We found a significant difference (P = 0.001) in the prevalence of exposure to Yersinia pestis between the two populations: 73% in Deseret compared to 11% in Dugway. This difference is most likely due to the prey species available in the two ecologically distinct study areas.

  14. Reconnaissance of the chemical quality of water in western Utah, Part I: Sink Valley area, drainage basins of Skull, Rush, and Government Creek Valleys, and the Dugway Valley-Old River Bed area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, K.M.

    1967-01-01

    This report presents data collected during the first part of an investigation that was started in 1963 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Geological and Mineralogical Survey. The investigation has the purpose of providing information about the chemical quality of water in western Utah that will help interested parties to evaluate the suitability of the water for various uses in a broad area of Utah where little information of this type previously has been available. The area studied includes the Sink Valley area, the drainage basins of Skull, Rush, and Government Creek Valleys, and the Dugway Valley-Old River Bed area (fig. 1). Osamu Hattori and G. L. Hewitt started the investigation, and the author completed it and prepared the report.

  15. Assessment of Geothermal Resource Potential at a High-Priority Area on the Utah Testing and Training Range–South (UTTR–S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard P. Smith, PhD., PG; Robert P. Breckenridge, PhD.; Thomas R. Wood, PhD.

    2012-04-01

    Field investigations conducted during 2011 support and expand the conclusion of the original Preliminary Report that discovery of a viable geothermal system is possible in the northwestern part of the Utah Testing and Training Range-South (UTTR-S), referred to henceforth as Focus Area 1. The investigations defined the southward extent of the Wendover graben into and near Focus Area 1, enhanced the understanding of subsurface conditions, and focused further geothermal exploration efforts towards the northwestern-most part of Focus Area 1. Specifically, the detailed gravity survey shows that the Wendover graben, first defined by Cook et al. (1964) for areas north of Interstate Highway 80, extends and deepens southwest-ward to the northwest corner of Focus Area 1. At its deepest point, the intersection with a northwest-trending graben there is favorable for enhanced permeability associated with intersecting faults. Processing and modeling of the gravity data collected during 2011 provide a good understanding of graben depth and distribution of faults bounding the graben and has focused the interest area of the study. Down-hole logging of temperatures in wells made available near the Intrepid, Inc., evaporation ponds, just north of Focus Area 1, provide a good understanding of the variability of thermal gradients in that area and corroborate the more extensive temperature data reported by Turk (1973) for the depth range of 300-500 m. Moderate temperature gradients in the northern part of the Intrepid area increase to much higher gradients and bottom-hole temperatures southeastward, towards graben-bounding faults, suggesting upwelling geothermal waters along those faults. Water sampling, analysis, and temperature measurements of Blue Lakes and Mosquito Willey's springs, on the western boundary of Focus Area 1, also show elevated temperatures along the graben-bounding fault system. In addition, water chemistry suggests origin of those waters in limestone rocks

  16. Three-Dimensional Joint Geophysical Imaging Using an Advanced Multivariate Inversion Technique: the Method and its Application to the Utah area, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijiang; Maceira, Monica; Benson, Thomas; Nafi Toksoz, M.

    2010-05-01

    We present an advanced multivariate inversion technique to generate a realistic, comprehensive, and high-resolution 3D model of the seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle. The model satisfies several independent geophysical datasets including seismic surface wave dispersion measurements, gravity, and seismic arrival time. The joint inversion method takes advantage of strengths of individual data sets and is able to better constrain the seismic velocity models from shallower to greater depths. To combine different geophysical datasets into a common system, we design an optimal weighting scheme that is based on relative uncertainties of individual observations, their sensitivities to model parameters, and the trade-off of different data fitting. We apply this joint inversion method to determine the 3D Vp and Vs models of the Utah area. The seismic body wave arrival times are assembled from waveform data recorded by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) regional network and the EarthScope/USArray network. The surface wave dispersion measurements are obtained from the ambient noise tomography study by the University of Colorado group using EarthScope/USArray stations. The gravity data for the Utah area is extracted from the North American Gravity Database managed by the University of Texas at El Paso. The joint inversions using two individual data sets such as seismic arrival time and gravity data, as well as seismic surface wave and gravity data indicate strong low velocity anomalies in middle crust beneath some known geothermal sites in Utah. The joint inversion of all three data sets will be presented and is expected to produce a reasonably well-constrained velocity structure of the Utah area, which is helpful for characterizing and exploring existing and potential geothermal reservoirs.

  17. Picnic Tables within the Designated Picnic Area at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (pcnctbl)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This coverage contains the individual picnic areas (as points where the picnic tables are generally located) within the only designated picnic area at Cedar Breaks...

  18. Mineral Resources of the Mill Creek Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Grand County, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    United States Geological Survey

    1990-01-01

    At the request of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, approximately 9,780 acres of the Mill Creek Canyon Wilderness Study Area (UT-060-139A) was evaluated for identified mineral resources (known) and mineral resource potential (undiscovered). In this report, the area studied is referred to as the "wilderness study area" or "the study area." Field work was conducted in 1988 to assess the mineral resources and resource potential of the area. No mineral resources were identified in the Mill C...

  19. Undivided Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous deposits in the Kaiparowits Plateau study area, southern Utah (kaibkwg)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a polygon coverage and shapefile that defines areas that are underlain by the Osiris Tuff and Wasatch Fm. (Tert.), Pine Hollow Fm. (Tert.?), Canaan Peak Fm....

  20. Ground-water resources and simulated effects of withdrawals in the East Shore area of Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David W.; Appel, Cynthia L.; Lambert, Patrick M.; Puryear, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    The ground-water resources in the East Shore area of Great Salt Lake, Utah, were studied to better define the ground-water system; to document changes in ground-water levels, quality, and storage; and to simulate effects of an increase in ground-water withdrawals. The East Shore aquifer system is in basin-fill deposits, and is primarily a confined system with unconfined parts near the mountain front.Recharge to and discharge from the East Shore aquifer system were estimated to average about 160,000 acre-feet per year during 1969-84, with minor amounts of water being removed from storage during that period.  Major sources of ground-water recharge are seepage from surface water in natural channels and irrigation canals, and subsurface inflow from consolidated rock to the basin-fill deposits. Discharge of ground water is primarily to wells, water courses, springs, and as diffuse seepage to Great Salt Lake. Average annual surface-water inflow to the study area was estimated to be 860,000 acre-feet for the period 1969-84. Annual withdrawal of ground water for municipal and industrial use increased from about 10,000 acre-feet in 1960 to more than 30,000 acre-feet in 1980 to supply a population that increased from 175,000 in 1960 to 290,000 in 1980.Long-term trends of ground-water levels indicate a steady decline at most observation wells since 1952, despite near normal or increased precipitation since the late 1960's.  Water levels declined as much as 50 feet near the principal pumping center in the east-central part of the study area. They declined as much as 35 feet more than five miles from the pumping center.  The increase in withdrawals and subsequent water-level declines have caused about 700 wells within 30 square miles to cease flowing since 1954.A numerical model of the East Shore aquifer system in the Weber Delta area was constructed and calibrated using water-level data and changes in ground-water withdrawals for 1955-85. Predictive simulations were made

  1. Variable Surface Area Thermal Radiator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Due to increased complexity of spacecraft and longer expected life, more sophisticated and complex thermal management schemes are needed that will be capable of...

  2. Comparison of ASTER- and AVIRIS-Derived Mineraland Vegetation Maps of the White Horse Replacement Alunite Deposit and Surrounding Area, Marysvale Volcanic Field, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents and compares mineral and vegetation maps of parts of the Marysvale volcanic field in west-central Utah that were published in a recent paper describing the White Horse replacement alunite deposit. Detailed, field-verified maps of the deposit were produced from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data acquired from a low-altitude Twin Otter turboprop airborne platform. Reconnaissance-level maps of surrounding areas including the central and northern Tushar Mountains, Pahvant Range, and portions of the Sevier Plateau to the east were produced from visible, near-infrared, and shortwave-infrared data acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor carried aboard the Terra satellite platform. These maps are also compared to a previously published mineral map of the same area generated from AVIRIS data acquired from the high-altitude NASA ER-2 jet platform. All of the maps were generated by similar analysis methods, enabling the direct comparison of the spatial scale and mineral composition of surface geologic features that can be identified using the three types of remote sensing data. The high spatial (2-17 meter) and spectral (224 bands) resolution AVIRIS data can be used to generate detailed mineral and vegetation maps suitable for geologic and geoenvironmental studies of individual deposits, mines, and smelters. The lower spatial (15-30 meter) and spectral (9 bands) resolution ASTER data are better suited to less detailed mineralogical studies of lithology and alteration across entire hydrothermal systems and mining districts, including regional mineral resource and geoenvironmental assessments. The results presented here demonstrate that minerals and mineral mixtures can be directly identified using AVIRIS and ASTER data to elucidate spatial patterns of mineralogic zonation; AVIRIS data can enable the generation of maps with significantly greater detail and accuracy. The

  3. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future

  4. Elko 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area: Nevada and Utah. Data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fay, W.M.

    1980-07-01

    Results of ground water and surface sediment reconnaissance in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Elko 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle are presented. The target sampling density was one site per 12 square kilometers. This resulted in 1713 sediment samples being collected; however, dry conditions and sparce population contributed to the relatively small number of ground water (154) samples collected. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water sites include (1) water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity), (2) physical measurements where applicable (water temperature, well description, and scintillometer reading), and (3) elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include (1) stream water chemistry measurements (where available) for pH, conductivity, and alkalinity, and (2) elemental analyses (U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (coordinates, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Areal distribution maps, histograms, and cumulative frequency plots for most elements, U/Th and U/Hf ratios, and scintillometer readings for sediment samples are included.

  5. Chemical quality of surface water in the Flaming Gorge Reservoir area, Wyoming and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, R.J.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    1973-01-01

    Construction of Flaming Gorge Dam on the Green River by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation started in 1959, and storage began in November 1962. A reconnaissance study was made during the period 1966-68 to determine the effects of the reservoir on the chemical quality of the effluent water and to describe the quality of the impounded water and inflowing water.The major inflow to the reservoir is from the Green River, which contributes an average of 81 percent of the water and 59 percent of the inflow load of dissolved solids. Together, Blacks Fork and Henrys Fork contribute an average of about 16 percent of the water and about 23 percent of the dissolved-solids load, whereas minor tributaries contribute approximately 3 percent of the total inflow water to the reservoir, but about 18 percent of the total incoming load of dissolved solids.The concentration of dissolved solids in the reservoir in October 1966 was about 150 mg/l (milligrams per liter) greater than the concentration of the 1962-66 inflow and in September 1968 about 95 mg/l greater than the concentration of the 1962-68 inflow. The increased concentration is due. mostly to leaching of minerals from the reservoir bottom. For the 1963-68 water years, about 1.2 million tons of dissolved solids was leached from inundated areas. The major observable difference between the chemical composition of the inflow during 1963-66 and that of the reservoir in 1966 is an increase in the percentage of sulfate and a decrease in the percentage of bicarbonate. Impoundment of water in Flaming Gorge Reservoir during the 1963-68 water years caused the concentration of dissolved solids in the river system to increase by 130 mg/l, or about 32 percent over what would have occurred without the reservoir. Evaporation accounted for an increase of 15 mg/l, and leaching accounted for an increase of 115 mg/l.

  6. OBSERVED ASTEROID SURFACE AREA IN THE THERMAL INFRARED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, C. R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wright, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid’s surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.

  7. Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

    1979-09-01

    Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

  8. Geology and mineral resources of the Southwestern and South-Central Wyoming Sagebrush Focal Area, Wyoming, and the Bear River Watershed Sagebrush Focal Area, Wyoming and Utah: Chapter E in Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna B.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Benson, Mary Ellen; Yager, Douglas B.; Anderson, Eric D.; Bleiwas, Donald I.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Dicken, Connie L.; Drake, Ronald M.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Giles, Stuart A.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Haacke, Jon E.; Horton, John D.; Parks, Heather L.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; Williams, Colin F.

    2016-10-04

    SummaryThe U.S. Department of the Interior has proposed to withdraw approximately 10 million acres of Federal lands from mineral entry (subject to valid existing rights) from 12 million acres of lands defined as Sagebrush Focal Areas (SFAs) in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming (for further discussion on the lands involved see Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089–A). The purpose of the proposed action is to protect the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and its habitat from potential adverse effects of locatable mineral exploration and mining. The U.S. Geological Survey Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA) project was initiated in November 2015 and supported by the Bureau of Land Management to (1) assess locatable mineral-resource potential and (2) to describe leasable and salable mineral resources for the seven SFAs and Nevada additions.This chapter summarizes the current status of locatable, leasable, and salable mineral commodities and assesses the potential of locatable minerals in the Southwestern and South-Central Wyoming and Bear River Watershed, Wyoming and Utah, SFAs.

  9. Evaluation of hypocenter location techniques with applications to southern Utah: regional earthquake distributions and seismicity of geothermal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wechsler, D.J.; Smith, R.B.

    1979-12-01

    Three techniques for the computation of earthquake hypocenter locations were compared through empirical results of synthetic test cases utilizing four different computer programs. The three approaches: (1) the single event method, (2) the master event method, and (3) the joint hypocenter determination method, were analyzed with respect to their application to regional (epicenter-to-station distances from 10 to 500 km) and local (epicentral distances from 0 to 70 km) seismic network recording situations. It was found that the joint hypocenter technique can significantly correct for inadequacies in assumed velocity models by simultaneous computation of station adjustments. Earthquakes located using the joint hypocenter technique are located more precisely with respect to each other. The joint epicenter location technique was then applied to relocations of epicenters in southern Utah below 40/sup 0/N latitude with the intent of resolving some spatial relationships of epicenter occurrence on this regional scale. Earthquakes in Utah occur in a diffuse zone 150 km to 200 km wide that coincides with the physiographic boundary of the Colorado Plateau. Swarm activity is prevalent where the zone changes from a north-south to a southwest orientation, but except for a cluster northwest of Cedar City, the only major alignments of epicenters are north-south.

  10. Dissolved-solids loads discharged from irrigated areas near Manila, Utah, May 2007-October 2012, and relation of loads to selected variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.; Gerner, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The Manila/Washam Salinity Project (MWSP) is a cooperative effort by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and local farmers and ranchers to reduce the transport of dissolved solids to Flaming Gorge Reservoir from irrigated agricultural lands near Manila, Utah. To estimate dissolved-solids loads from the MWSP area, discharge and water quality from Birch Spring Draw and other selected outflows and inflows were monitored from May 2007 to October 2012. An average annual May–April streamflow of 5,960 acre-feet discharged from Birch Spring Draw at site BSD-2 to Flaming Gorge Reservoir during 2007–12, containing an average dissolved-solids load of 14,660 tons. An average May–April net dissolved-solids load of 24,300 tons per year discharged from the MWSP area, estimated from the relation between streamflow and dissolved-solids concentration at site BSD-2 and other measured inflows and outflows.

  11. Geology and mineral resources of the Sheldon-Hart Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Oregon and Nevada), the Southeastern Oregon and North-Central Nevada, and the Southern Idaho and Northern Nevada (and Utah) Sagebrush Focal Areas: Chapter B in Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikre, Peter G.; Benson, Mary Ellen; Bleiwas, Donald I.; Colgan, Joseph P.; Cossette, Pamela M.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Dicken, Connie L.; Drake, Ronald M.; du Bray, Edward A.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Glen, Jonathan M.G.; Haacke, Jon E.; Hall, Susan M.; Hofstra, Albert H.; John, David A.; Ludington, Stephen; Mihalasky, Mark J.; Rytuba, James J.; Shaffer, Brian N.; Stillings, Lisa M.; Wallis, John C.; Williams, Colin F.; Yager, Douglas B.; Zürcher, Lukas

    2016-10-04

    SummaryThe U.S. Department of the Interior has proposed to withdraw approximately 10 million acres of Federal lands from mineral entry (subject to valid existing rights) from 12 million acres of lands defined as Sagebrush Focal Areas (SFAs) in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming (for further discussion on the lands involved see Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089–A). The purpose of the proposed action is to protect the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and its habitat from potential adverse effects of locatable mineral exploration and mining. The U.S. Geological Survey Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA) project was initiated in November 2015 and supported by the Bureau of Land Management to (1) assess locatable mineral-resource potential and (2) to describe leasable and salable mineral resources for the seven SFAs and Nevada additions.This chapter summarizes the current status of locatable, leasable, and salable mineral commodities and assesses the potential of selected locatable minerals in lands proposed for withdrawal that span the Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, and Utah borders. In this report, the four study areas evaluated were (1) the Sheldon-Hart Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex SFA in Washoe County, Nevada, and Harney and Lake Counties, Oregon; (2) the Southeastern Oregon and North-Central Nevada SFA in Humboldt County, Nevada, and Harney and Malheur Counties, Oregon; (3) the Southern Idaho and Northern Nevada SFA in Cassia, Owyhee, and Twin Falls Counties, Idaho, Elko County, Nevada, and Box Elder County, Utah; and (4) the Nevada additions in Humboldt and Elko Counties, Nevada.

  12. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Birken, Adam S.; Derrick, V. Noah; Fisher, Martel J.; Holt, Christopher M.; Downhour, Paul; Smith, Lincoln; Eacret, Robert J.; Gibson, Travis L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Whittier, Nickolas R.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2013-01-01

    This is the fiftieth in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2012. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water. usgs.gov/publications/GW2013.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2011 are reported in Burden and others (2012) and available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/ publications/GW2012.pdf

  13. Provisional maps of thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, based on satellite thermal infrared imaging and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Heasler, Henry; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Maps that define the current distribution of geothermally heated ground are useful toward setting a baseline for thermal activity to better detect and understand future anomalous hydrothermal and (or) volcanic activity. Monitoring changes in the dynamic thermal areas also supports decisions regarding the development of Yellowstone National Park infrastructure, preservation and protection of park resources, and ensuring visitor safety. Because of the challenges associated with field-based monitoring of a large, complex geothermal system that is spread out over a large and remote area, satellite-based thermal infrared images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were used to map the location and spatial extent of active thermal areas, to generate thermal anomaly maps, and to quantify the radiative component of the total geothermal heat flux. ASTER thermal infrared data acquired during winter nights were used to minimize the contribution of solar heating of the surface. The ASTER thermal infrared mapping results were compared to maps of thermal areas based on field investigations and high-resolution aerial photos. Field validation of the ASTER thermal mapping is an ongoing task. The purpose of this report is to make available ASTER-based maps of Yellowstone’s thermal areas. We include an appendix containing the names and characteristics of Yellowstone’s thermal areas, georeferenced TIFF files containing ASTER thermal imagery, and several spatial data sets in Esri shapefile format.

  14. Temporal dynamics of flooding, evaporation, and desiccation cycles and observations of salt crust area change at the Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brenda B.; Kipnis, Evan L.; Raming, Logan W.

    2017-12-01

    The Bonneville Salt Flats (BSF) in Utah is a dynamic saline playa environment responding to natural and anthropogenic forces. Over the last century, the saline groundwater from below BSF has been harvested to produce potash via evaporative mining, mostly used as agricultural fertilizers, while the surface halite crust has provided a significant recreational site for land speed racing. Perceptions of changes in the salt crust through time have spurred debates about land use and management; however, little is known about the timescales of natural change as the salt crust responds to climatic parameters that drive flooding, evaporation, and desiccation (FED) cycles that control surface salt growth and dissolution. Climate data over the last 30 years are examined to identify annual patterns in surface water balance at BSF to identify annual and seasonal climate constraints on FED cycles. Landsat satellite data from 1986 to the present are used to map the areal extent of the surface halite salt crust at BSF at the end of the desiccation season (between August 15 and October 30) annually. Overall, the observed area of the desiccation-stage BSF halite crust has varied from a maximum of 156 km2 in 1993 to a minimum of 72 km2 in 2014 with an overall trend of declining area of halite observed over the 30 years of analysis. Climatic variables that influence FED cycles and seasonal salt dissolution and precipitation have also varied through this time period; however, the relationship between surface water fluxes and salt crust area do not clearly correlate, suggesting that other processes are influencing the extent of the salt. Intra-annual analyses of salt area and weather illustrate the importance of ponded surface water, wind events, and microtopography in shaping a laterally extensive but thin and ephemeral halite crust. Examination of annual to decadal changes in salt crust extent and environmental parameters at BSF provides insights into the processes driving change and

  15. LEAF AREA INDEX RETRIEVED FROM THERMAL HYPERSPECTRAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Neinavaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Leaf area index (LAI is an important essential biodiversity variable due to its role in many terrestrial ecosystem processes such as evapotranspiration, energy balance, and gas exchanges as well as plant growth potential. A novel approach presented here is the retrieval of LAI using thermal infrared (8–14 μm, TIR measurements. Here, we evaluate LAI retrieval using TIR hyperspectral data. Canopy emissivity spectral measurements were recorded under controlled laboratory conditions using a MIDAC (M4401-F illuminator Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer for two plant species during which LAI was destructively measured. The accuracy of retrieval for LAI was then assessed using partial least square regression (PLSR and narrow band index calculated in the form of normalized difference index from all possible combinations of wavebands. The obtained accuracy from the PLSR for LAI retrieval was relatively higher than narrow-band vegetation index (0.54 2 < 0.74. The results demonstrated that LAI may successfully be estimated from hyperspectral thermal data. The study highlights the potential of hyperspectral thermal data for retrieval of vegetation biophysical variables at the canopy level for the first time.

  16. Ten Utah Painters

    OpenAIRE

    Whitlock, Andrew

    1984-01-01

    Today the art world is rich and diverse with regional as well as national art centers. As in the past, art is alive and well in Utah. The show Ten Utah Painters invites us to see and experiece what some of Utah's best contemporary artists are doing. Their paintings invite us to look and to enjoy but also to learn and open up our visual senses to a broader vista.

  17. Status of Utah Bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-27

    DAVIS DUCHESNE EMERY GARFIELD GRAND IRON JUAB KANE MILLARD MORGAN PIUTE RICH SALT LAKE SAN JUAN SANPETE SEVIER SUMMIT TOOELE UINTAH UTAH WASATCH...LAKESAN JUANSANPETE SEVIER SUMMIT TOOELEUINTAH UTAH WASATCH WASHINGTON WAYNE WEBER Townsend’s Big‐eared bat  Figure 26b. Proportion of Townsend’s...KANE MILLARDMORGAN PIUTE RICH SALT LAKE SAN JUAN SANPETE SEVIER SUMMIT TOOELE UINTAH UTAH WASATCH WASHINGTON WAYNE WEBER big brown bat  Figure 26c

  18. 2016 Cartographic Boundary File, 2010 Urban Areas (UA) within 2010 County and Equivalent for Utah, 1:500,000

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The 2016 cartographic boundary KMLs are simplified representations of selected geographic areas from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master Address File / Topologically...

  19. Stratigraphic cross section of measured sections and drill holes of the Neslan Formation and adjacent formations, Book Cliffs Area, Colorado and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshbaum, Mark A.; Spear, Brianne D.

    2012-01-01

    This study updates a stratigraphic cross section published as plate 2 in Kirschbaum and Hettinger (2004) Digital Data Series 69-G (http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-069/dds-069-g/). The datum is a marine/tidal ravinement surface within the Cozzette Sandstone Member of the Iles Formation and the Thompson Canyon Sandstone and Sulphur Canyon Sandstone Beds of the Neslen Formation. One of the cores shown was included on the original cross section, and new core descriptions have been added to the upper part of the cored interval. A new core description (S178) is included in this report. Cores are stored in the U.S. Geological Survey Core Research Facility at the Denver Federal Center, Colorado. The following information has also been added to help define the stratigraphic framework: 1) At least five claystones interpreted as altered volcanic ashes have been identified and may give future workers a correlation tool within the largely continental section. 2) Thickness and general geometry of the Sego Sandstone, Buck Tongue of the Mancos Shale, and Castlegate Sandstone have been added to provide additional stratigraphic context. 3) The geometry in the Sego Sandstone, Buck Tongue of the Mancos Shale, and Castlegate Sandstone has been added to provide additional stratigraphic context. 4) Ammonite collections are from Gill and Hail. The zone of Didymoceras nebrascense projected into the East Salt Wash area is based on correlation of the flooding surface at the base of the Cozzette Member to this point as shown in Kirschbaum and Hettinger. 5) A leaf locality of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science is shown in its approximate stratigraphic position near Thompson Canyon. 6) A dinosaur locality of the Natural History Museum of Utah is shown in the Horse Canyon area measured section at the stratigraphic position where it was extracted.

  20. M-X Environmental Technical Report. Environmental Characteristics of Alternative Designated Deployment Areas, Native Americans (Nevada/Utah).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-22

    mahogany Basketry designs ( dye ); arrows; bows; digging sticks Echinocactus devil’s pincushion Awls Epicampes grass Coiled basketry foundation Equisetum...greasewood Arrows; digging sticks Scirpus tule Sleeping mats Shepherdia buffalo berry Basketry designs ( dye ) Sphaeralcea desert mallow Pottery...irrigation, rejection of plans for watered recreational areas, flow restrictions on showers, automatic faucet shutoffs, the use of waterless toilets, and

  1. The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackett, R.E.; Shubat, M.A.; Bishop, C.E. (Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Chapman, D.S.; Forster, C.B.; Schlinger, C.M. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1990-03-01

    Geological, geophysical and geochemical studies contributed to conceptual hydrologic model of the blind'' (no surface expression), moderate-temperature (greater than 130{degree}C) Newcastle geothermal system, located in the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone of southwestern Utah. Temperature gradient measurements define a thermal anomaly centered near the surface trace of the range-bounding Antelope Range fault with and elongate dissipative plume extending north into the adjacent Escalante Valley. Spontaneous potential and resistivity surveys sharply define the geometry of the dominant upflow zone (not yet explored), indicating that most of the thermal fluid issues form a short segment along the Antelope Range fault and discharges into a gently-dipping aquifer. Production wells show that this aquifer lies at a depth between 85 and 95 meter. Electrical surveys also show that some leakage of thermal fluid occurs over a 1.5 km (minimum) interval along the trace of the Antelope Range fault. Major element, oxygen and hydrogen isotopic analyses of water samples indicate that the thermal fluid is a mixture of meteoric water derived from recharge areas in the Pine Valley Mountains and cold, shallow groundwater. A northwest-southeast trending system of faults, encompassing a zone of increased fracture permeability, collects meteoric water from the recharge area, allows circulation to a depth of 3 to 5 kilometers, and intersects the northeast-striking Antelope Range fault. We postulate that mineral precipitates form a seal along the Antelope Range fault, preventing the discharge of thermal fluids into basin-fill sediments at depth, and allowing heated fluid to approach the surface. Eventually, continued mineral deposition could result in the development of hot springs at the ground surface.

  2. Potential effects of coal mining and road construction on the water quality of Scofield Reservoir and its drainage area, central Utah, October 1982 to October 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D.W.; Thompson, K.R.; Wangsgard, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    Studies were done during 1983-84 to determine the effect of coal mining in Pleasant Valley and construction of State Road 264 in Eccles Canyon on the water quality of local streams and on Scofield Reservoir. Streamflow during 1983-84 set high-flow records in all gaged streams and transported considerable sediment and associated trace metals and nutrients to Scofield Reservoir. Concentrations of most toxic substances were not sufficient to constitute a hazard in the streams or reservoir; however, concentrations of total phosphorus in the streams commonly exceeded water-quality criterion for phosphate as phosphorus of 0.05 milligram per liter, established by the State as an indicator of pollution. Data from Eccles Canyon creek, which is in an actively mined area, were compared to data from Boardinghouse Canyon creek, which is in a nearby canyon with no active mining or construction activities. Concentrations of iron, manganese, and zinc were substantially larger in Eccles Canyon creek than in Boardinghouse Canyon creek. Loads of suspended sediment during storms and base-flow conditions also were larger in Eccles Canyon creek. Concentrations of ammonia nitrogen, total phosphorus, mercury, and zinc in water from Scofield Reservoir occasionally exceeded Utah State water- quality standards and criteria for protection of aquatic wildlife that were in effect during 1983- 84. In combination with the generally cooler spring temperatures, shortened growing season, and greater flushing rate for the reservoir, the large inflow of water into the reservoir prevented the occurrence of blue-green blooms common in earlier years. Large concentrations of orthophosphorus and manganese were released from sediment cores, and concentrations of manganese in the hypolimnion frequently exceeded the Federal drinking-water standard.

  3. FLOODPLAIN, UTAH COUNTY, UTAH, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  4. Hydrology and numerical simulation of groundwater flow and streamflow depletion by well withdrawals in the Malad-Lower Bear River Area, Box Elder County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolp, Bernard J.; Brooks, Lynette E.; Solder, John

    2017-03-28

    The Malad-Lower Bear River study area in Box Elder County, Utah, consists of a valley bounded by mountain ranges and is mostly agricultural or undeveloped. The Bear and Malad Rivers enter the study area with a combined average flow of about 1,100,000 acre-feet per year (acre-ft/yr), and this surface water dominates the hydrology. Groundwater occurs in consolidated rock and basin fill. Groundwater recharge occurs from precipitation in the mountains and moves through consolidated rock to the basin fill. Recharge occurs in the valley from irrigation. Groundwater discharge occurs to rivers, springs and diffuse seepage areas, evapotranspiration, field drains, and wells. Groundwater, including springs, is a source for municipal and domestic water supply. Although withdrawal from wells is a small component of the groundwater budget, there is concern that additional groundwater development will reduce the amount of flow in the Malad River. Historical records of surface-water diversions, land use, and groundwater levels indicate relatively stable hydrologic conditions from the 1960s to the 2010s, and that current groundwater development has had little effect on the groundwater system. Average annual recharge to and discharge from the groundwater flow system are estimated to be 164,000 and 228,000 acre-ft/yr, respectively. The imbalance between recharge and discharge represents uncertainties resulting from system complexities, and the possibility of groundwater inflow from surrounding basins.This study reassesses the hydrologic system, refines the groundwater budget, and creates a numerical groundwater flow model that is used to analyze the effects of groundwater withdrawals on surface water. The model uses the detailed catalog of locations and amounts of groundwater recharge and discharge defined during this study. Calibrating the model to adequately simulate recharge, discharge, and groundwater levels results in simulated aquifer properties that can be used to understand

  5. A New Look at the Magnetostratigraphy and Paleomagnetism of the Upper Triassic to Lower Jurassic Moenave Formation, St. George Area, Southwestern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoo-Hurley, L. L.; Geissman, J. W.; Lucas, S. G.; Roy, M.

    2006-12-01

    Paleomagnetic data from rocks exposed on and off the Colorado Plateau provide poles that young westward during the Late Triassic (to about 52^{O} E longitude) and young eastward during the Early Jurassic. This pattern has been used to posit the existence of a J-1 cusp in the North American APW path at the Triassic- Jurassic boundary (TJB), at about 199.6 Ma. Considerable debate has focused on the morphology and placement of the J-1 cusp due to poorly exposed and/or incompletely sampled sections, debates about the magnitude of Colorado Plateau rotation, and disagreements regarding stratigraphic relationships. Red beds of the Whitmore Point (~25 m of mostly lacustrine deposits) and Dinosaur Canyon (~55 m of hematitic fluvial sandstones and siltstones) members of the Moenave Formation (MF) are inferred to have been deposited across the TJB based on palynostratigraphy and vertebrate biostratigraphy. Two previously unsampled sections (Leeds and Warner Valley) of the MF are well exposed near St. George, Utah, and located in the transition zone that defines the western boundary of the Colorado Plateau. Preliminary data from samples collected from the Whitmore Point and Dinosaur Canyon members yield exclusively normal polarity magnetizations, which is consistent with previous studies and the normal polarity TJB magnetozone. Thermal demagnetization response suggests that the remanence is carried mainly in hematite. The degree of hematite pigmentation varies in both sections, and several Leeds sites show a weak overprint component that unblocks by 400^{O}-450^{O} C, with a higher unblocking temperature components, consistent with an Early Triassic Late Jurassic age that fully unblock around 670^{O}-680^{O} C. Individual beds (treated as specific sites) in part of the Dinosaur Canyon Member yield site mean directions with declinations between about 020 and 030, and may define the easternmost position (i.e. 60-50^{O} E latitude) of the NAMAPW path and thus the approximate the

  6. Thermal comfort of people in the hot and humid area of China-impacts of season, climate, and thermal history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Chen, H; Wang, J; Meng, Q

    2016-10-01

    We conducted a climate chamber study on the thermal comfort of people in the hot and humid area of China. Sixty subjects from naturally ventilated buildings and buildings with split air conditioners participated in the study, and identical experiments were conducted in a climate chamber in both summer and winter. Psychological and physiological responses were observed over a wide range of conditions, and the impacts of season, climate, and thermal history on human thermal comfort were analyzed. Seasonal and climatic heat acclimatization was confirmed, but they were found to have no significant impacts on human thermal sensation and comfort. The outdoor thermal history was much less important than the indoor thermal history in regard to human thermal sensation, and the indoor thermal history in all seasons of a year played a key role in shaping the subjects' sensations in a wide range of thermal conditions. A warmer indoor thermal history in warm seasons produced a higher neutral temperature, a lower thermal sensitivity, and lower thermal sensations in warm conditions. The comfort and acceptable conditions were identified for people in the hot and humid area of China. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Geology and mineral resources of the North-Central Idaho Sagebrush Focal Area: Chapter C in Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Karen; Zürcher, Lukas; Hofstra, Albert H.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Benson, Mary Ellen; Box, Stephen E.; Anderson, Eric D.; Bleiwas, Donald I.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Drake, Ronald M.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Giles, Stuart A.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Haacke, Jon E.; Horton, John D.; John, David A.; Robinson,, Gilpin R.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; San Juan, Carma A.; Shaffer, Brian N.; Smith, Steven M.; Williams, Colin F.

    2016-10-04

    SummaryThe U.S. Department of the Interior has proposed to withdraw approximately 10 million acres of Federal lands from mineral entry (subject to valid existing rights) from 12 million acres of lands defined as Sagebrush Focal Areas (SFAs) in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming (for further discussion on the lands involved see Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089–A). The purpose of the proposed action is to protect the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and its habitat from potential adverse effects of locatable mineral exploration and mining. The U.S. Geological Survey Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA) project was initiated in November 2015 and supported by the Bureau of Land Management to (1) assess locatable mineral-resource potential and (2) to describe leasable and salable mineral resources for the seven SFAs and Nevada additions.This chapter summarizes the current status of locatable, leasable, and salable mineral commodities and assesses the potential of locatable minerals in the North-Central Idaho SFA, which extends from east-central to south-central Idaho. The geologically complex area is composed of many different rock units that locally contain potential mineral resources.

  8. Geology and mineral resources of the North-Central Montana Sagebrush Focal Area: Chapter D in Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Zientek, Michael L.; Hearn, B. Carter; Parks, Heather L.; Jenkins, M. Christopher; Anderson, Eric D.; Benson, Mary Ellen; Bleiwas, Donald I.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Denning, Paul D.; Dicken, Connie L.; Drake, Ronald M.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Folger, Helen W.; Giles, Stuart A.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Granitto, Matthew; Haacke, Jon E.; Horton, John D.; Kelley, Karen D.; Ober, Joyce A.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; San Juan, Carma A.; Sangine, Elizabeth S.; Schweitzer, Peter N.; Shaffer, Brian N.; Smith, Steven M.; Williams, Colin F.; Yager, Douglas B.

    2016-10-04

    SummaryThe U.S. Department of the Interior has proposed to withdraw approximately 10 million acres of Federal lands from mineral entry (subject to valid existing rights) from 12 million acres of lands defined as Sagebrush Focal Areas (SFAs) in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming (for further discussion on the lands involved see Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089–A). The purpose of the proposed action is to protect the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and its habitat from potential adverse effects of locatable mineral exploration and mining. The U.S. Geological Survey Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA) project was initiated in November 2015 and supported by the Bureau of Land Management to (1) assess locatable mineral-resource potential and (2) to describe leasable and salable mineral resources for the seven SFAs and Nevada additions.This chapter summarizes the current status of locatable, leasable, and salable mineral commodities and assesses the potential of locatable minerals in the North-Central Montana SFA. The proposed withdrawal area that is evaluated in this report is located in north-central Montana, and includes parts of Fergus, Petroleum, Phillips, and Valley Counties.

  9. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Birken, Adam S.; Gerner, Steven J.; Carricaburu, John P.; Derrick, V. Noah; Downhour, Paul; Smith, Lincoln; Eacret, Robert J.; Gibson, Travis L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Whittier, Nickolas R.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.; Fisher, Martel J.

    2014-01-01

    This is the fifty-first in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2013. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water. usgs.gov/publications/GW2014.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2012 are reported in Burden and others (2013) and are available online at http://ut.water.usgs. gov/publications/GW2013.pdf

  10. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.

    2016-01-01

    This is the fifty-third in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to new wells constructed for withdrawal of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2015. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2016.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2014 are reported in Burden and others (2015) and are available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2015.pdf

  11. Groundwater conditions in Utah, Spring of 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.

    2017-01-01

    This is the fifty-fourth in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to new wells constructed for withdrawal of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2016. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2017.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2015 are reported in Burden and others (2016) and are available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2016.pdf.

  12. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Holt, Christopher M.; Fisher, Martel J.; Downhour, Paul; Smith, Lincoln; Eacret, Robert J.; Gibson, Travis L.; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Whittier, Nickolas R.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2012-01-01

    This is the forty-ninth in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2011. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http:// www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs. gov/publications/GW2012.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2010 are reported in Burden and others (2011) and available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/ publications/GW2011.pdf.

  13. Hydrographic Areas Within the Basin and Range Carbonate-Rock Aquifer System, White Pine County, Nevada and Adjacent Areas in Nevada and Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of sub delineations of the hydrographic area (HA) boundaries and polygons drawn at 1:1,000,000 scale for the Great Basin supplemented by...

  14. Areas where geologic conditions are more favorable for current underground mining technology in the Kaiparowits Plateau study area, southern Utah (kaisumg )

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a coverage that shows areas in the Kaiparowits Plateau where geologic conditions in the Calico and A-sequences are more favorable for current underground...

  15. Preliminary study of the oil shales of the Green River formation in the tri-state area of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming to investigate their utility for disposal of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-05-01

    Results are presented of a preliminary study of the oil shales of the Green River formation in the tri-state area of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming to investigate their utility for possible disposal of radioactive waste material. The objective of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and to obtain a broad overview of the physical and economic factors which would have an effect on the suitability of the oil shale formations for possible disposal of radioactive waste material. These physical and economic factors are discussed in sections on magnitude of the oil shales, waste disposal relations with oil mining, cavities requirements, hydrological aspects, and study requirements. (JRD)

  16. Recent exploration and development of geothermal energy resources in the Escalante desert region, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackett, Robert E.; Ross, Howard P.

    1994-01-01

    Development of geothermal resources in southwest Utah's Sevier thermal area continued in the early 1990s with expansion of existing power-generation facilities. Completion of the Bud L. Bonnett geothermal power plant at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area brought total power generation capacity of the facility to 13.5 MWe (gross). At Cove Fort-Sulphurdate, recent declines in steam pressures within the shallow, vapor-dominated part of the resource prompted field developers to complete additional geothermal supply wells into the deeper, liquid-dominated portion of the resource. At Roosevelt Hot Springs near Milford, Intermountain Geothermal Company completed an additional supply well for Utah Power and Light Company's single-flash, Blundell plant. with the increased geothermal fluid supply from the new well, the Blundell plant now produces about 26 MWe (gross). The authors conducted several geothermal resource studies in undeveloped thermal areas in southwest Utah. Previous studies at Newcastle revealed a well-defined, self-potential minimum coincident with the intersection of major faults and the center of the heatflow anomaly. A detailed self-potential survey at Wood's Ranch, an area in northwest Iron County where thermal water was encountered in shallow wells, revealed a large (5,900 ?? 2,950 feet [1,800 ?? 900 m]) northeast-oriented self-potential anomaly which possibly results from the flow of shallow thermal fluid. Chemical geothermometry applied to Wood's Ranch water samples suggest reservoir temperatures between 230 and 248??F (110 and 120??C). At the Thermo Hot Springs geothermal area near Minersville, detailed self-potential surveys have also revealed an interesting 100 mV negative anomaly possibly related to the upward flow of hydrothermal fluid.

  17. Significance of new potassium-argon ages from the Goldens Ranch and Moroni Formations, Sanpete-Sevier Valley area, central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkind, I.J.; Marvin, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Exposures of volcanic-sedimentary strata are widely distributed within central Utah. We believe that these volcanic and stratified sedimentary rocks, known by different formational names in different parts of this region, are, in fact, segments of one and the same suite of rocks that formed during the early and middle Tertiary. Potassium-argon ages indicate that both the Goldens Ranch and Moroni Formations formed during the late Eocene to middle Oligocene. The geochronology and stratigraphic relations are stong evidence that the Goldens Ranch and Moroni Formations are correlative, and that they are one and the same depositional unit. We recognize two sequences of repeated deformation: one that occurred prior to deposition and consolidation of the Goldens Ranch and Moroni Formations, and a second that occurred after these formations were emplaced, in essence, after early Oligocene time. In our view, multiple episodes of salt diapirism explain the structural complexity in central Utah. -from Authors

  18. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.

    2011-01-01

    This is the forty-eighth in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2010. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http:// www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs. gov/publications/GW2011.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2009 are reported in Burden and others (2010) and available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/ publications/GW2010.pdf.Analytical results associated with water samples collected from each area of groundwater development were compared to State of Utah Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and secondary drinking-water standards of routinely measureable substances present in water supplies. The MCLs and secondary drinking-water standards can be accessed online at http://www.rules.utah

  19. Alfalfa Weevil in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Edward W.

    1989-01-01

    The alfalfa weevil is a major pest throughout Utah. It is a beetle with one generation per year. Eggs hatch in the spring, and the grub-like immature weevils (larvae) feed by chewing on the alfalfa foliage. In high numbers, alfalfa weevils can cause severe damage to Utah alfalfa. In any given year, however, the weevils are few enough in number in many fields to cause only minor damage.

  20. Thermal Comfort Level Assessment in Urban Area of Petrolina-PE County, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Vieira de Azevedo

    Full Text Available Abstract This study evaluated the thermal conditions of urban areas in Petrolina-PE, from continuous data collected in urban and rural areas for the year of 2012. The results characterized urban heat islands (UHI with varying intensity in urban areas, especially UHI = 5.3 °C (high intensity occurred on April 28, 2012. It was evident that the constituent elements of urban areas contribute to the formation and expansion of UHI bringing thermal discomfort for its inhabitants. An adaptation to Thom’s equation for calculating the Thermal Discomfort Index (DIT, was used to obtain the maximum (DITx and minimum (DITm thermal discomfort. In the urban area, the DITm indicated thermal comfort in 23.0% of the days and partial comfort in 77.0% of days surveyed. Already, the DITx characterized 71.6% of days with partial comfort and 28.4% of days with thermal discomfort. In the rural area, The DITm indicated that 41.5% of days were thermally comfortable and 58.5% of days had partial comfort. However, the DITx pointed 87.7% of the days of this environment with partial thermal comfort and 12.3% of thermally uncomfortable days. Finally, the results showed that afforestation of urban area constitutes to an effective and efficient way to mitigate thermal discomfort.

  1. Management of Sodic Soils in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    James, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    Sodic soils are soils with excess sodium. Sodic soils are encountered with increasing frequency in Utah, usually in the lower, flatter areas of our valleys. Sodic soils probably developed over many years when the water table was high and the soils were to wet for cultivation.

  2. Hydrology of Northern Utah Valley, Utah County, Utah, 1975-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Jay R.; Gardner, Philip M.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2009-01-01

    The ground-water resources of northern Utah Valley, Utah, were assessed during 2003-05 to describe and quantify components of the hydrologic system, determine a hydrologic budget for the basin-fill aquifer, and evaluate changes to the system relative to previous studies. Northern Utah Valley is a horst and graben structure with ground water occurring in both the mountain-block uplands surrounding the valley and in the unconsolidated basin-fill sediments. The principal aquifer in northern Utah Valley occurs in the unconsolidated basin-fill deposits where a deeper unconfined aquifer occurs near the mountain front and laterally grades into multiple confined aquifers near the center of the valley. Sources of water to the basin-fill aquifers occur predominantly as either infiltration of streamflow at or near the interface of the mountain front and valley or as subsurface inflow from the adjacent mountain blocks. Sources of water to the basin-fill aquifers were estimated to average 153,000 (+/- 31,500) acre-feet annually during 1975-2004 with subsurface inflow and infiltration of streamflow being the predominant sources. Discharge from the basin-fill aquifers occurs in the valley lowlands as flow to waterways, drains, ditches, springs, as diffuse seepage, and as discharge from flowing and pumping wells. Ground-water discharge from the basin-fill aquifers during 1975-2004 was estimated to average 166,700 (+/- 25,900) acre-feet/year where discharge to wells for consumptive use and discharge to waterways, drains, ditches, and springs were the principal sources. Measured water levels in wells in northern Utah Valley declined an average of 22 feet from 1981 to 2004. Water-level declines are consistent with a severe regional drought beginning in 1999 and continuing through 2004. Water samples were collected from 36 wells and springs throughout the study area along expected flowpaths. Water samples collected from 34 wells were analyzed for dissolved major ions, nutrients, and

  3. Reconnaissance of the hydrothermal resources of Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Geologic factors in the Basin and Range province in Utah are more favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources than in other areas on the Colorado Plateaus or in the Middle Rocky Mountains. These geologic factors are principally crustal extension and crustal thinning during the last 17 million years. Basalts as young as 10,000 years have been mapped in the area. High-silica volcanic and intrusive rocks of Quaternary age can be used to locate hydrothermal convection systems. Drilling for hot, high-silica, buried rock bodies is most promising in the areas of recent volcanic activity. Southwestern Utah has more geothermal potential than other parts of the Basin and Range province in Utah. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area, and the area to the north as far as 60 kilometers from them probably have the best potential for geothermal development for generation of electricity. Other areas with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C are Thermo, Monroe, Red Hill (in the Monroe-Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Area), Joseph Hot Springs, and the Newcastle area. The rates of heat and water discharge are high at Crater, Meadow, and Hatton Hot Springs, but estimated reservoir temperatures there are less than 150/sup 0/C. Additional exploration is needed to define the potential in three additional areas in the Escalante Desert. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Geologic application of thermal inertia imaging using HCMM data. [Walker Lane, Nevada; San Rafael, Utah; and Death Valley and Pisgah Crater, Lavic Lake Region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, A. B.; Schieldge, J. P.; Abrams, M. J.; Alley, R. E.; Levine, C. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Three test sites in the western US were selected to discriminate among surface geologic materials on the basis of their thermal properties as determined from HCMM data. Attempts to determine quantitatively accurate thermal inertia values from HCMM digital data met with only partial success due to the effects of sensor miscalibrations, radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and varying meteorology and elevation across a scene. In most instances, apparent thermal inertia was found to be an excellent qualitative representation of true thermal inertia. Computer processing of digital day and night HCMM data allowed construction of geologically useful images. At some test sites, more information was provided by data than LANDSAT data. Soil moisture effects and differences in spectrally dark materials were more effectively displayed using the thermal data.

  5. USING OF THERMAL STRUCTURE MAPS FOR VEGETATION MAPPING (CASE OF ALTACHEYSKY WILDLIFE AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Abramova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal infrared imagery contains considerable amount of qualitative information about ground objects and landscapes. In spite of it, this type of data is often used to derive quantitative information such as land or sea surface temperatures. This paper describes the examination of Altacheysky wildlife area situated in the southern part of Buryatia Republic, Mukhorshibirsky district based on Landsat imagery and ground observations. Ground observations were led to study the vegetation cover of the area. Landsat imagery were used to make multitemporal thermal infrared image combined of 7 ETM+ scenes and to make multispectral image combined of different zones of a OLI scene. Both images were classified. The multitemporal thermal infrared classification result was used to compose thermal structure map of the wildlife area. Comparison of the map, multispectral image classification result and ground observations data reveals that thermal structure map describes better the particularities of Altacheysky wildlife area vegetation cover.

  6. Outdoor thermal comfort and behaviour in urban area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inavonna, I.; Hardiman, G.; Purnomo, A. B.

    2018-01-01

    Outdoor comfort is important due to the public spaces functions. Open spaces provide thermal comfort and a pleasant experience to improve the city life quality effectively. The influence of thermal comfort in outdoor activities is a complex problem. This paper presents a literature review and discussion of aspects of physical, psychology, and social behaviour toward outdoor thermal comfort. The valuation is determined not only by the “physical state” but also by the “state of mind”. The assessment is static and objective (i.e., physical and physiological characteristics) that it should be measured. Furthermore, an effective model to provide the knowledge of climatic conditions, as well as the dynamic and subjective aspects (i.e., psychological and social characteristics and behaviour), requires a comprehensive interview and observation. The model will be examined to describe the behaviour that is a reflection of perception and behaviour toward the environment. The adaptation process will constantly evolve so that it becomes a continuous cause between human behaviour and the spatial setting of the formation, which is eventually known as places and not just spaces. This evolutionary process is a civic art form.

  7. Selected data from thermal-spring areas, southwestern Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, R.B.; Brosten, T.M.; Midtlyng, N.A.

    1978-05-01

    During 1975 to 1977 the Montana district of the US Geological Survey collected and assembled data describing the flow, temperature, and chemical characteristics of thermal and related waters. The work was part of an assessment of the geothermal resources of southwestern Montana, excluding Yellowstone Park. Representative data are presented here from 24 thermal springs and 3 deep wells where water temperatures exceed 38/sup 0/C (100/sup 0/F). Initially, the data base included references reported by Waring (1965). The data base also included unpublished chemical analyses of water samples and related data collected during 1959 to 1973 by the Montana State Board of Health (now Montana Department of Health and Environmental Sciences), the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, and by graduate students for theses. Results of analyses and engineering reports were collected from landowners, and additional published and unpublished data were collected by Geological Survey investigators during 1967 to 1975. Tabulation of the data revealed wide discrepancies in reported parameters for some sites. Inadequate description of the sampling sites limited the value of much of the previously reported data, because most of the thermal springs were characterized by multiple outlets. Field measurements of rate, specific conductance, pH, and temperature of flow at the various outlets, particularly those having the highest temperatures, were compared with previously reported determinations.

  8. CORRELATIONS OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BETWEEN STRATIGRAPHIC UNITS IN THE BROADER AREA OF ZAGREB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miron Kovačić

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Thermal conductivity (KTV of geological formations is one of the parameters responsible for the propagation of the heat under the earth surface. During geothermal investigations in the broader area of the Croatian capital of Zagreb the thermal conductivity was measured on the rock samples from the surface and the boreholes. The results of the measurements are presented in this work and used as a basis for calculations of the thermal conductivity of distinct geological formations within the investigated area. It was found out that the values of the thermal conductivity of the rocks in the investigated area vary greatly. The measurements are within the well known scope for certain rock types. The thermal conductivity of the rocks from the Tertiary units corresponds with the average values being typical for such kind of rocks, while the basement carbonate rocks are characterized by the values being by 1 W/K-1m-1 higher than the average. After comparing the thermal conductivity of the stratigraphic units in the broader area of Zagreb it has been established that the values of the thermal conductivity of geological formations in the investigated area are also very different, and that they generally rise with their age. The relative relationships show that the Quaternary, Pliocene and Tertiary sedimentary rocks act as thermal insulators, while Triassic rocks behave as the heat conductor (the paper is published in Croatian.

  9. Utah Bouguer Gravity Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 2.5 kilometer Bouguer anomaly grid for the state of Utah. Number of columns is 196 and number of rows is 245. The order of the data is from the lower left to the...

  10. Development of ground-motion prediction equations relevant to shallow-mining-induced seismicity in the Trial Mountain area, Emery County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.

    2005-01-01

    To provide a basis for assessing the seismic hazard to the Joes Valley Dam due to future coal mining in the nearby Cottonwood Tract, central Utah, we developed ground-motion prediction relations using data recorded by a seismic network, established and operated by the University of Utah Seismograph Stations. The network was centered on the Trail Mountain coal mine, located adjacent to the Cottonwood Tract. From late 2000 until early 2001, this network recorded numerous mining-induced events with magnitudes as large as 2.17. The ground motion from these events, recorded at hypocentral distances ranging from about 500 m to approximately 10 km, were well suited to developing new ground-motion prediction relations, especially when augmented by data from a M 4.2 earthquake in the Willow Creek mine, about 50 km north of Trail Mountain. Using a two-stage regression analysis, we determined prediction relations for peak acceleration, peak velocity, and pseudovelocity response spectra, at 5% damping, for periods of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 s. To illustrate the potential seismic hazard at the Joes Valley dam, we used these ground-motion relations to predict a peak velocity of 6.8 cm/s due to an earthquake with the probable maximum magnitude of 3.9, at a hypocentral distance of 1 km, recorded at a rock site typical for this region. This result does not take into account the site response at the dam.

  11. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifty-second in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to new wells constructed for withdrawal of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas that are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2014. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www.waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2015.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2013 are reported in Burden and others (2014) and are available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/GW2014.pdf.The water-level change maps in this report show the difference between water levels measured in the same well at two distinct times: in the spring of 1985 and the spring of 2015. Throughout the state, many groundwater levels were near their peak in or around 1985 following a multiple-year period of above average precipitation in the early 1980s. Conversely

  12. Constraining thrust-belt thermal histories from partially reset zircon (U-Th)/He datasets: An "inheritance envelope" approach with examples from the Sevier belt of central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenthner, W.; Reiners, P. W.; DeCelles, P. G.; Kendall, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Low-temperature thermochronology has become an established tool for deciphering the time-temperature (t-T) histories of sedimentary units involved in basin burial and thrust-belt exhumation. However, thermochronologic datasets from detrital samples can be complex and difficult to interpret if these samples contain grains with different pre-depositional t-T histories that are only partially reset. Here, we present an approach for interpreting complex detrital zircon (U-TH)/He datasets to constrain the maximum foreland basin burial temperatures and timing of thrust-belt related exhumation in the Sevier belt of central Utah. Using forward modeling of t-T paths, we combine the radiation-damage based kinetic model for He diffusion in zircon with a series of pre-depositional He ages to construct "inheritance envelopes" that encompass a wide range of age variation. A forward model is successful if an inheritance envelope captures or bounds the observed age variation in a given dataset. We highlight this approach with two datasets collected from sedimentary units in the Oquirrh Mountains and Wasatch Range near Provo, UT. For the Oquirrh Mtns. dataset, large observed age variation is modeled using a maximum burial temperature of ~173 °C, and an initial Sevier-belt related exhumation event at 110 Ma. The Wasatch Range samples are more straight-forward, with a lack of partially reset ages but some observed variation caused by radiation damage effects. For these samples, our model results constrain a maximum burial temperature of ~230 °C, with a subsequent exhumation event at 100 Ma. Combined, these results suggest a steady eastward migration of exhumation in the Sevier belt during the Late Cretaceous and demonstrate that our inheritance envelope approach is most sensitive to maximum burial temperatures and the timing of initial exhumation.

  13. CORRELATIONS OF THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY BETWEEN STRATIGRAPHIC UNITS IN THE BROADER AREA OF ZAGREB

    OpenAIRE

    Miron Kovačić

    2007-01-01

    Thermal conductivity (KTV) of geological formations is one of the parameters responsible for the propagation of the heat under the earth surface. During geothermal investigations in the broader area of the Croatian capital of Zagreb the thermal conductivity was measured on the rock samples from the surface and the boreholes. The results of the measurements are presented in this work and used as a basis for calculations of the thermal conductivity of distinct geological formations within the i...

  14. D Object Classification Based on Thermal and Visible Imagery in Urban Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, H.; Samadzadegan, F.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial distribution of land cover in the urban area especially 3D objects (buildings and trees) is a fundamental dataset for urban planning, ecological research, disaster management, etc. According to recent advances in sensor technologies, several types of remotely sensed data are available from the same area. Data fusion has been widely investigated for integrating different source of data in classification of urban area. Thermal infrared imagery (TIR) contains information on emitted radiation and has unique radiometric properties. However, due to coarse spatial resolution of thermal data, its application has been restricted in urban areas. On the other hand, visible image (VIS) has high spatial resolution and information in visible spectrum. Consequently, there is a complementary relation between thermal and visible imagery in classification of urban area. This paper evaluates the potential of aerial thermal hyperspectral and visible imagery fusion in classification of urban area. In the pre-processing step, thermal imagery is resampled to the spatial resolution of visible image. Then feature level fusion is applied to construct hybrid feature space include visible bands, thermal hyperspectral bands, spatial and texture features and moreover Principle Component Analysis (PCA) transformation is applied to extract PCs. Due to high dimensionality of feature space, dimension reduction method is performed. Finally, Support Vector Machines (SVMs) classify the reduced hybrid feature space. The obtained results show using thermal imagery along with visible imagery, improved the classification accuracy up to 8% respect to visible image classification.

  15. The Characteristic and Classification of Thermal Spring in Ramsar area, North of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedsoltan, Farnaz; Ansari, Mohammad Reza; Gafari, Mohammad Reza

    2010-05-01

    Ramsar area is located across and between Alborze Mountain and Caspine Sea in North of Iran. About 30 spas are located south of the Ramsar and Sadatshar town. They are almost in between 20 to 70 m elevation. Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Tertiary rocks and alluvial deposit are exposed around the Ramsar area. In tertiary, acidic Plutonism was active and intrusion into the Paleozoic and Mesozoic formations. Quaternary and Alluvium deposits are exposed and extending on the Jurassic formations in Ramsar plain and have thickness lower than 10 m in show springs. The annual precipitation in the Ramsar region is 976 mm. There has not any proper Thermal spring management in Ramsar area yet. This could post some serious problem on improper management of Thermal spring sites, where its environment has been put into jeopardy. This study aims to provide a way to classify the Thermal springs in Ramsar area. The result of this study help in the classification of Thermal spring sites for official planning improvement of administration and sustainable development of natural resources of the area. The study makes use of the Department Applied Geosciences in Islamic Azad University and GIS data of a total of 9 Thermal springs in the attempt to set up a classification system of Thermal springs in Ramsar area. These data include surface temperature, conductivity, alkalinity, acidity, TDS, pH values, Ca, Cl, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, SiO2, SO4 contents, their locations, usages and other relevant information. The surface temperature of Thermal springs are between 19oC - 65oC and SiO2 geothermometer shows estimated reservoir temperature range from 86 o C - 96 o C. Most of the water from these Thermal springs is relatively turbidness and their composition is sodium choloride. The Thermal springs in this area generally exhibit high SiO2 and Na content; strong smell of sulfur. In addition, there are 30 Thermal springs located in Ramsar area and that show high concentration of Cl, Ca, Na, K and Mg. There

  16. Thermal stability of porous sol-gel phosphosilicates and their surface area stabilisation by lanthanum addition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falco, Lorena; De Mendonca, Mariana Van Den Tempel; Mercadal, Juan J.; Zarubina, Valeriya; Melián-Cabrera, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The thermal stability of porous sol-gel phosphosilicates was studied by comparing the textural features upon calcination between 400 and 550 °C. A significant loss of surface area and pore volume were observed; the first is due to thermal coarsening of the nanoparticles, and the pore volume

  17. [Thermal-spring parks within the ambit of protected areas: general trends in morphology and botany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, F; Battista, A; Ricci, B; Di Lascio, F; Gurgo, A M; Mastroianni, S

    1996-04-01

    It is remembered that, in contemporary era, the thermal parks arose in U.S.A. and in Canada: they represent the first example of national parks in the world. Are described legislation, classifications and various types of protected areas. The species of recommended plants for the formation, increase and/or improvement of italian thermal are mentioned.

  18. Load frequency control of three area interconnected hydro-thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    The performances of the controllers are simulated using MATLAB/SIMULINK package. ... Automatic Generation Control (AGC) scheme in electric power systems. ..... The Application of ANN Technique to Load-frequency Control for Three- area.

  19. Urban area thermal monitoring: Liepaja case study using satellite and aerial thermal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbe, Linda; Caune, Vairis; Korats, Gundars

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore large (60 m/pixel) and small scale (individual building level) temperature distribution patterns from thermal remote sensing data and to conclude what kind of information could be extracted from thermal remote sensing on regular basis. Landsat program provides frequent large scale thermal images useful for analysis of city temperature patterns. During the study correlation between temperature patterns and vegetation content based on NDVI and building coverage based on OpenStreetMap data was studied. Landsat based temperature patterns were independent from the season, negatively correlated with vegetation content and positively correlated with building coverage. Small scale analysis included spatial and raster descriptor analysis for polygons corresponding to roofs of individual buildings for evaluating insulation of roofs. Remote sensing and spatial descriptors are poorly related to heat consumption data, however, thermal aerial data median and entropy can help to identify poorly insulated roofs. Automated quantitative roof analysis has high potential for acquiring city wide information about roof insulation, but quality is limited by reference data quality and information on building types, and roof materials would be crucial for further studies.

  20. Libraries in Utah: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/utah.html Libraries in Utah To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Provo Utah Valley Hospital Medical Library ILL 1134 North 500 West Provo, UT 84604- ...

  1. Characterization of human thermal comfort in urban areas of brazilian semiarid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Vieira de Azevedo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Experimental studies were conducted aiming to characterize the thermal conditions in urban areas of the Brazilian semiarid for identifying the level of human thermal comfort in urban areas of the municipalities of Mossoró-RN, Serra Talhada-PE, Petrolina-PE and Juazeiro-BA. The results showed that the constituent elements of urban areas contribute to human thermal discomfort index (DIT. Both the wet and dry seasons showed up an uncomfortable condition in Mossoró on May 15th and on 23rd, 2008 (rural area and on May 25rd, 2008 (urban area. By applying Thom's equation for obtaining the DIT, it was observed that the urban areas reported thermal comfort conditions always inferior to those observed in the rural areas. The results indicate conditions of partial comfort for the all areas surveyed. However, the incidence of human thermal discomfort related to the minimum, average and maximum air temperatures are, probably associated to the formation of urban heat islands. In addition, the afforestation is an effective mechanism of mitigating the adverse effects of these structures with better quality of life to the population. Therefore, it can be stated that the Brazilian semiarid region has specific urban climate, which is influenced by the design characteristics of the urban structure and buildings.

  2. James Webb Space Telescope Core 2 Test - Cryogenic Thermal Balance Test of the Observatorys Core Area Thermal Control Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Paul; Parrish, Keith; Thomson, Shaun; Marsh, James; Comber, Brian

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, will be the largest astronomical telescope ever sent into space. To observe the very first light of the early universe, JWST requires a large deployed 6.5-meter primary mirror cryogenically cooled to less than 50 Kelvin. Three scientific instruments are further cooled via a large radiator system to less than 40 Kelvin. A fourth scientific instrument is cooled to less than 7 Kelvin using a combination pulse-tube Joule-Thomson mechanical cooler. Passive cryogenic cooling enables the large scale of the telescope which must be highly folded for launch on an Ariane 5 launch vehicle and deployed once on orbit during its journey to the second Earth-Sun Lagrange point. Passive cooling of the observatory is enabled by the deployment of a large tennis court sized five layer Sunshield combined with the use of a network of high efficiency radiators. A high purity aluminum heat strap system connects the three instrument's detector systems to the radiator systems to dissipate less than a single watt of parasitic and instrument dissipated heat. JWST's large scale features, while enabling passive cooling, also prevent the typical flight configuration fully-deployed thermal balance test that is the keystone of most space missions' thermal verification plans. This paper describes the JWST Core 2 Test, which is a cryogenic thermal balance test of a full size, high fidelity engineering model of the Observatory's 'Core' area thermal control hardware. The 'Core' area is the key mechanical and cryogenic interface area between all Observatory elements. The 'Core' area thermal control hardware allows for temperature transition of 300K to approximately 50 K by attenuating heat from the room temperature IEC (instrument electronics) and the Spacecraft Bus. Since the flight hardware is not available for test, the Core 2 test uses high fidelity and flight-like reproductions.

  3. Groundwater conditions in Utah, spring of 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Cederberg, Jay R.; Fisher, Martel J.; Freeman, Michael L.; Downhour, Paul; Enright, Michael; Eacret, Robert J.; Guzman, Manuel; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Swenson, Robert L.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2010-01-01

    This is the forty-seventh in a series of annual reports that describe groundwater conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing groundwater conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, groundwater withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of groundwater. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing groundwater conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of groundwater development in the State for calendar year 2009. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is also available online at http://www. waterrights.utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/ publications/GW2010.pdf. Groundwater conditions in Utah for calendar year 2008 are reported in Burden and others (2009) and available online at http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/ GW2009.pdf.Analytical results associated with water samples collected from each area of groundwater development were compared to State of Utah maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) and secondary drinking-water standards of routinely measureable substances present in water supplies. The MCLs and secondary

  4. Preliminary Reconnaissance of West Astringent Creek Thermal Area, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairley, J. P., Jr.; Villegas, G.; Aunan, M. M.; Lindsey, C.; Sorensen, A.; Larson, P. B.

    2016-12-01

    The West Astringent Creek Thermal Area (WACTA) is one of the newest thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park (YNP). Thermal activity in the headwaters region of Astringent Creek, on the southeast edge of Sour Creek Dome, was rst noted in 1985; subsequent developments included the appearance of a high-temperature (104C) hydrothermal fumarole (which later metamorphosed into a mud volcano) and an area of tree-kill due to rising ground temperatures [Hutchinson, 1996]. We conducted a preliminary exploration of the hydrothermal area through visual evaluation of the spatial extent, location of the features, and nature of the hydrothermal area. 16 features were chosen based upon the following criteria: 1) initial appearance, 2) location in the thermal area, 3) location with respect to each other, and 4) accessibility. From these features we collected in-situ temperature and pH, as well as aqueous samples for geochemical analysis of cations, and deuterium and oxygen isotopes. With the information collected we will make a brief description of the thermal area and present a basis to conduct future research to obtain an amplified characterization of the WACTA.

  5. Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Rowland, Ryan C.; Fisher, Martel J.; Freeman, Michael L.; Downhour, Paul; Nielson, Ashley; Eacret, Robert J.; Myers, Andrew; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Swenson, Robert L.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.

    2009-01-01

    This is the forty-sixth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing ground-water conditions. This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of ground water. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of ground-water development in the State for calendar year 2008. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is available online at http://www.waterrights. utah.gov/techinfo/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/publications/ GW2009.pdf.

  6. Thermal insulation and clothing area factors of typical Arabian Gulf clothing ensembles for males and females: measurements using thermal manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-ajmi, F F; Loveday, D L; Bedwell, K H; Havenith, G

    2008-05-01

    The thermal insulation of clothing is one of the most important parameters used in the thermal comfort model adopted by the International Standards Organisation (ISO) [BS EN ISO 7730, 2005. Ergonomics of the thermal environment. Analytical determination and interpretation of thermal comfort using calculation of the PMV and PPD indices and local thermal comfort criteria. International Standardisation Organisation, Geneva.] and by ASHRAE [ASHRAE Handbook, 2005. Fundamentals. Chapter 8. American Society of Heating Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers, Inc., 1791 Tullie Circle N.E., Atlanta, GA.]. To date, thermal insulation values of mainly Western clothing have been published with only minimal data being available for non-Western clothing. Thus, the objective of the present study is to measure and present the thermal insulation (clo) values of a number of Arabian Gulf garments as worn by males and females. The clothing ensembles and garments of Arabian Gulf males and females presented in this study are representative of those typically worn in the region during both summer and winter seasons. Measurements of total thermal insulation values (clo) were obtained using a male and a female shape thermal manikin in accordance with the definition of insulation as given in ISO 9920. In addition, the clothing area factors (f cl) determined in two different ways were compared. The first method used a photographic technique and the second a regression equation as proposed in ISO 9920, based on the insulation values of Arabian Gulf male and female garments and ensembles as they were determined in this study. In addition, fibre content, descriptions and weights of Arabian Gulf clothing have been recorded and tabulated in this study. The findings of this study are presented as additions to the existing knowledge base of clothing insulation, and provide for the first time data for Arabian Gulf clothing. The analysis showed that for these non-Western clothing designs, the

  7. Acoustic and Thermal Testing of an Integrated Multilayer Insulation and Broad Area Cooling Shield System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jessica J.; Foster, Lee W.

    2013-01-01

    A Multilayer Insulation (MLI) and Broad Area Cooling (BAC) shield thermal control system shows promise for long-duration storage of cryogenic propellant. The NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project is investigating the thermal and structural performance of this tank-applied integrated system. The MLI/BAC Shield Acoustic and Thermal Test was performed to evaluate the MLI/BAC shield's structural performance by subjecting it to worst-case launch acoustic loads. Identical thermal tests using Liquid Nitrogen (LN2) were performed before and after the acoustic test. The data from these tests was compared to determine if any degradation occurred in the thermal performance of the system as a result of exposure to the acoustic loads. The thermal test series consisted of two primary components: a passive boil-off test to evaluate the MLI performance and an active cooling test to evaluate the integrated MLI/BAC shield system with chilled vapor circulating through the BAC shield tubes. The acoustic test used loads closely matching the worst-case envelope of all launch vehicles currently under consideration for CPST. Acoustic test results yielded reasonable responses for the given load. The thermal test matrix was completed prior to the acoustic test and successfully repeated after the acoustic test. Data was compared and yielded near identical results, indicating that the MLI/BAC shield configuration tested in this series is an option for structurally implementing this thermal control system concept.

  8. USING OF THE MULTITEMPORAL THERMAL INFRARED SATELLITE IMAGERY FOR NATURAL AREAS MAPPING (CASE OF MENDELEEV VOLCANO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Grishchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper authors examine the mountain group of Mendeleev volcano situated on the Kunashir island, Kuril archipelago, Russia. Ground observations were led to examine the vegetation cover of the area as well as its typical landscapes. The other type of used data is Landsat imagery. Images were combined into multitemporal thermal infrared and multispectral pictures, which were classified to reveal the heterogeneity of the study area. Ground observations and comparison of the classification results with landscape map derive that the multitemporal thermal infrared image classification result describes better the vegetation cover structure of the area and particularity of its typical landscapes distribution. It leads to the proposition that miltitemporal thermal infrared imagery can be used to refine landscape and vegetation cover contours. 

  9. Underground water in the valleys of Utah Lake and Jordan River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, George Burr

    1906-01-01

    The valleys of Utah Lake and Jordan River are situated in north-central Utah, in the extreme eastern part of the Great Basin. The lofty Wasatch Range (Pl. I), the westernmost of the Rocky Mountain system, limits the valleys on the east, and relatively low basin ranges - the Oquirrh, Lake, and East Tintic mountains - determine them on the west. The valleys trend north and south, and are almost separated by the low east-west Traverse Range, the slopes of which constitute a dam for Utah Lake, which drains through Jordan River to Great Salt Lake.The area under consideration is the most populous and flourishing part of the State, Salt Lake City and Provo, the first and third cities in the State, and many other thriving settlements are there located. At Bingham Junction and Murray a number of smelters treat the ores from near-by mines, but agriculture is the main industry. Water for irrigation is supplied by mountain streams, and intensive farming is successfully pursued. The practice of irrigation was begun by the Mormon pioneers in 1847, and has been discussed in several publications; little attention, however, has been given to the underground water resources, and, so far as the writer is aware, they have not before been described. The present paper outlines conditions of occurrence of the subterranean waters and describes their development in the valleys of Utah Lake and Jordan River.

  10. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the first project year (July 1 through September 30, 2002). This work included producing general descriptions of Utah's major petroleum provinces, gathering field data, and analyzing best practices in the Utah Wyoming thrust belt. Major Utah oil reservoirs and/or source rocks are found in Devonian through Permian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. Stratigraphic traps include carbonate buildups and fluvial-deltaic pinchouts, and structural traps include basement-involved and detached faulted anticlines. Best practices used in Utah's oil fields consist of waterflood, carbon-dioxide flood, gas-injection, and horizontal drilling programs. Nitrogen injection and horizontal

  11. 9 CFR 381.304 - Operations in the thermal processing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... area. 381.304 Section 381.304 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... (or operating process schedules) for daily production, including minimum initial temperatures and... timed functions or events shall have at least a 1-minute safety factor over the specified thermal...

  12. 9 CFR 318.304 - Operations in the thermal processing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... area. 318.304 Section 318.304 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE...) Posting of processes. Process schedules (or operating process schedules) for daily production, including... factor over the specified thermal processing operation times. Temperature/time recording devices shall...

  13. Mapping surface flow in low gradient areas with thermal remote sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prinds, Christian; Petersen, Rasmus Jes; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    Thermal infrared (TIR) imagery has long been used for mapping groundwater-surface water interactions and mainly for locating areas of groundwater seepage in lakes and shorelines (Rundquist et al. 1985, Banks et al. 1996). In this study, we used the method for locating discharge from tile drains i...

  14. Research Natural Areas on National Forest System lands in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Western Wyoming: A guidebook for scientists, managers, and educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela G. Evenden; Melinda Moeur; J. Stephen Shelly; Shannon F. Kimball; Charles A. Wellner

    2001-01-01

    This guidebook is intended to familiarize land resource managers, scientists, educators, and others with Research Natural Areas (RNAs) managed by the USDA Forest Service in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Intermountain West. This guidebook facilitates broader recognition and use of these valuable natural areas by describing the RNA network, past and current research...

  15. The Lincoln Highway in Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This guidebook is on the Lincoln Highway in the state of Utah. Its purpose is to describe as closely as possible the original route of the Highway, the major changes...

  16. Utah Heavy Oil Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Bauman; S. Burian; M. Deo; E. Eddings; R. Gani; R. Goel; C.K. Huang; M. Hogue; R. Keiter; L. Li; J. Ruple; T. Ring; P. Rose; M. Skliar; P.J. Smith; J.P. Spinti; P. Tiwari; J. Wilkey; K. Uchitel

    2009-10-20

    The Utah Heavy Oil Program (UHOP) was established in June 2006 to provide multidisciplinary research support to federal and state constituents for addressing the wide-ranging issues surrounding the creation of an industry for unconventional oil production in the United States. Additionally, UHOP was to serve as an on-going source of unbiased information to the nation surrounding technical, economic, legal and environmental aspects of developing heavy oil, oil sands, and oil shale resources. UHOP fulGilled its role by completing three tasks. First, in response to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Section 369(p), UHOP published an update report to the 1987 technical and economic assessment of domestic heavy oil resources that was prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission. The UHOP report, entitled 'A Technical, Economic, and Legal Assessment of North American Heavy Oil, Oil Sands, and Oil Shale Resources' was published in electronic and hard copy form in October 2007. Second, UHOP developed of a comprehensive, publicly accessible online repository of unconventional oil resources in North America based on the DSpace software platform. An interactive map was also developed as a source of geospatial information and as a means to interact with the repository from a geospatial setting. All documents uploaded to the repository are fully searchable by author, title, and keywords. Third, UHOP sponsored Give research projects related to unconventional fuels development. Two projects looked at issues associated with oil shale production, including oil shale pyrolysis kinetics, resource heterogeneity, and reservoir simulation. One project evaluated in situ production from Utah oil sands. Another project focused on water availability and produced water treatments. The last project considered commercial oil shale leasing from a policy, environmental, and economic perspective.

  17. Heat pain detection threshold is associated with the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2017-01-01

    participants was included and tested on 2 separate study days with BTS (45°C, 3 minutes), HPDT, and pain during thermal stimulation (45°C, 1 minute). Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were quantified after monofilament pinprick stimulation. The pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) and hospital anxiety and depression......INTRODUCTION: The area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization (BTS) of the skin and heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT) may both have predictive abilities in regards to pain sensitivity and clinical pain states. The association between HPDT and secondary hyperalgesia...... scale (HADS) were also applied. RESULTS: A significant association between HPDT and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia (parea of secondary hyperalgesia due to a 1-degree increase in HPDT was estimated to be -27.38 cm(2), 95% confidence interval (CI...

  18. Thermal structure of the KArukaya and Takara Geothermal areas, Yakedake Volcano, Gifu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriyama, J.

    1980-10-01

    The hydrothermal water balance of the Yakedake volcano and the vicinity is considered quantitatively. From the observed results of boreholes, the thermal and geological structures of the Karukaya and Takara geothermal areas are also presented. The hydrothermal activity is intense in the western half on the base of the volcano and the Nakanoyu area. The total hot water flow from the discharge area (high temperature zone; Shinhodaka and others) amounts to 2.07*10/sup 4/ l/min, about 60 percent of the hot water discharges from the Shinhodaka area. There are some large basins (Abodaira and others) in which the rocks are mainly volcanic tuff and pumice showing very high permeability for water. The total area of the water recharge zone amounts to 18.2*10/sup 6/m/sup 2/. The ratio of the total hot spring water volume to the total precipitation in the recharge area is 0.21. The cold water is permeated in the basins and, in the deep depth of the volcano, is heated by the thermal energy from the magma reservoir and the hot water is flowed through a fractured zone to the ground-surface as natural hot springs in the discharge area. The results from three deep boreholes give thermal conductivity of core samples ranging from 3.81 to 4.09 w m/sup -1//degree/C/sup -1/ in the Karukaya and Takara areas. The corresponding surface heat flows by vertical heat conduction become 2.35 and 1.86 w/m/sup 2/ in the Karukaya and the Takara areas, respectively. Refs.

  19. iUTAH Summer Research: Analyzing diel variations of MeHg in the Provo River, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, G. L.; Packer, B. N.; Carling, G. T.; Checketts, H. N.; Shepherd Barkdull, N.

    2016-12-01

    iUTAH is an interdisciplinary research program aimed at strengthening science for Utah's water future and funded by the National Science Foundation. iUTAH is comprised of three research areas with an overarching goal of understanding how Utah's water system operates as an integrated physical, chemical, biological, and social system. During the Summer of 2016, I participated in the iUTAH (Innovative Urban Transitions and Aridregion Hydro-sustainability) iFellows undergraduate research program. iUTAH provided the opportunity to conduct research at Brigham Young University with graduate students studying trace metal dynamics in the Provo River, Utah, USA. This report presents the chemical system evaluation of methylmercury (MeHg) during diurnal variations from snowmelt runoff. Water samples were collected during peak discharge from Soapstone Basin, a site along the Upper Provo River watershed, every hour over a 24-hour (diel) period. Sampling began at 1200 hours on June 1 and ended at 1100 hours on June 2, 2016. The results of the Provo River MeHg analysis showed dissolved MeHg had a concentration variance of 0.027 ng/L and particulate MeHg had a concentration variance of 0.056 ng/L. The variances during the diel cycle represent more than a two-fold change in concentration. The hourly MeHg concentration levels demonstrated an inverse relationship with gage height indicative of dilution. The purpose of the study is to develop a more thorough understanding of short-term variances over time and the potential affect on long-term interpretations of MeHg fluctuations in the river. The Provo River flows through Jordanelle Reservoir where there is a mercury advisory for two fish species. MeHg is a bioaccumulative neurotoxin that humans are primarily exposed to by the consumption of contaminated fish. The strong correlation between the levels of MeHg in water and fish make the river concentrations an important factor.

  20. Is heat pain detection threshold associated with the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Wetterslev, Jørn; Pipper, Christian Bressen

    2016-01-01

    investigates different aspects of the human pain response. Brief thermal sensitization induces a mild burn injury, resulting in development of primary hyperalgesia at the site of stimulation, and secondary hyperalgesia surrounding the site of stimulation. Central sensitization is believed to play an important...... if HPDT, a known quantitative sensory test, is associated with areas of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (Identifier: NCT02527395 ). Danish Research Ethics Committee (Identifier: H-8-2014-012). Danish Data Protection Agency (Identifier: 30-1436)....... role in the development of secondary hyperalgesia; however, a possible association of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization and other heat pain models remains unknown. Our aim with this study is to investigate how close the heat pain detection threshold is associated...

  1. Thermal evaluation for exposed stone house with quantitative and qualitative approach in mountainous area, Wonosobo, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermawan, Hermawan; Prianto, Eddy

    2017-12-01

    A building can be considered as having a good thermal performance if it can make the occupant comfortable. Thermal comfort can be seen from the occupant's respond toward the architectural elements and the environment, such as lighting, the room crowding, air temperature, humidity, oxygen level, and occupant's behaviours. The objective of this research is to analyse the thermal performance of four different orientation houses in mountainous area. The research was conducted on the four expose stone houses with four different orientations in the slope of Sindoro Mountain which has relative cool temperature, about 26°C. The measurement of the elements above was done quantitatively and qualitatively for 24 hours. The results are as follows. First, the most comfortable house is west-orientation house. Second, based on the quantitative and qualitative observation, there is no significant difference (±5 %). Third, the occupant's behaviours (caring and genen) also become factors influencing occupant's comfort.

  2. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Dolores Project area, southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah, 1990-91

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, D.L.; Krueger, R.P.; Osmundson, B.C.; Jensen, E.G.

    1995-01-01

    Water, bottom-sediment, and biota samples were collected in 1990-91 to identify water-quality problems associated with irrigation drainage in the Dolores Project area. Concentrations of cadmium, mercury, and selenium in some water samples exceeded aquatic-life criteria. Selenium was associated with irrigaton drainage from the Dolores Project, but other trace elements may be transported into the area in the irrigation water supply. Selenium concentrations exceeded the chronic aquatic-life criterion in water samples from lower McElmo Creek and Navajo Wash, which drain the Montezuma Valley, from newly irrigated areas, and from the Mancos River. The maximum selenium con- centration in water was 88 micrograms per liter from Navajo Wash. Concentrations of herbicides in water were less than concentrations harmful to aquatic life. Selenium concentrations in four bottom-sediment samples exceeded the baseline concentrations for soils in the Western United States. The largest selenium concentrations in biota were in samples from Navajo Wash, from newly irrigated areas north of the Montezuma Valley, and from the Mancos River basin. Selenium concentrations in aquatic-invertebrate samples from the newly irrigated areas exceeded a guideline for food items consumed by fish and wildlife. Selenium concen- trations in whole-body suckers were larger in the San Juan River downstream from the Dolores Project than upstream from the project at Four Corners. Selenium concentrations in fathead minnow samples from two sites were at adverse-effect levels. Mercury concentrations in warm-water game fish in reservoirs in the study area may be of concern to human health. Some concentrations of other trace elements exceeded background concentrations, but the concentrations were not toxicologically significant or the toxicologic significance is not known.

  3. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

    2003-09-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to

  4. Thermal structure of the yakedake volcano, Japan: Karukaya and Takara geothermal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Jun

    1981-07-01

    The hydrothermal water balance and the thermal structure of Yakedake volcano and its vicinity are considered quantitatively. The hydrothermal activity is intense in the valleys at the western foot of the volcano and the Nakanoyu area. The total hot water flow from the discharge area amounts to 2.07 × 10 41/min , about 60% of which discharges from the Shinhodaka area alone. There are some large basins (Abodaira and others) in which the rocks are mainly tuff breccia and volcanic products showing very high permeability for water. The total area of the water recharge zone amounts to 18.2 × 10 6m 3. A model for the hydrothermal system within Yakedake volcano is proposed and from the results of boreholes, the thermal and geological structures of the Karukaya and Takara geothermal areas are also presented. Attempts were also made to estimate the subsurface temperature distribution from the observed near-surface ground temperatures. Results of three-dimensional conduction model calculations indicate that the subsurface temperatures are high in the central part of the crater and in the areas with self-flowing springs along the rivers. The obtained isotherms encircle the volcanic center of Yakedake.

  5. Thermal structure of the Yakedake Volcano, Japan: Karukaya and Takara geothermal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriyama, J.

    1981-07-01

    The hydrothermal water balance and the thermal structure of Yakedake volcano and its vicinity are considered quantitatively. The hydrothermal activity is intense in the valleys at the western foot of the volcano and the Nakanoyu area. The total hot water flow from the discharge area amounts to 2.07 x 10/sup 4/ l/min, about 60% of which discharges from the Shinhodaka area alone. There are some large basins (Abodaira and others) in which the rocks are mainly tuff breccia and volcanic products showing very high permeability for water. The total area of the water recharge zone amounts to 18.2 x 10/sup 6/m/sup 3/. A model for the hydrothermal system within Yakedake volcano is proposed and from the results of boreholes, the thermal and geological structures of the Karukaya and Takara geothermal areas are also presented. Attempts were also made to estimate the subsurface temperature distribution from the observed near-surface ground temperatures. Results of three-dimensional conduction model calculations indicate that the subsurface temperatures are high in the central part of the crater and in the areas with self-flowing springs along the rivers. The obtained isotherms encircle the volcanic center of Yakedake.

  6. Geology of the Oquirrh Mountains, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    United States Geological Survey

    1999-01-01

    The Oquirrh Mountains are located in north-central Utah, immediately south of the Great Salt Lake, in the easternmost part of the Basin and Range physiographic province. The range consists of northerly-trending aligned peaks 56 kilometers long flanked on the west by Tooele and Rush Valleys and on the east by Jordan and Cedar Valleys. The range hosts several of the more prominent base- and precious-metal and desseminated-gold mining areas in the western United States. The 130-year old Bingh...

  7. Floodplain Mapping, Utah County, Utah, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  8. SUCCESS Utah Polarization Diversity LIDAR data set

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The SUCCESS_UTAH_PDL data set contains ground-based measurements made by the University of Utah Polarization Diversity LIDAR at the CART site during the April-May...

  9. Utah System of Higher Education 2015-16 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah System of Higher Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    This annual report describes Utah System of Higher Education's progress in the 2015-2016 academic year in the following areas: (1) Strategic plan; (2) Enrollment and completion; (3) Paying for college; (4) Funding higher education; (5) College preparation; (6) Concurrent enrollment and math; (7) Outreach and access; and (8) Industry and the…

  10. Thermal neutron equivalent doses assessment around KFUPM neutron source storage area using NTDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Haddad, M.N.; Al-Jarrallah, M.I.; Nassar, R

    2002-07-01

    Area passive neutron dosemeters based on nuclear track detectors (NTDs) have been used for 13 days to assess accumulated low doses of thermal neutrons around neutron source storage area of the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Moreover, the aim of this study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the storage area. NTDs were mounted with the boron converter on their surface as one compressed unit. The converter is a lithium tetraborate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) layer for thermal neutron detection via {sup 10}B(N,{alpha}){sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H nuclear reactions. The area passive dosemeters were installed on 26 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. The calibration factor for NTD-based area passive neutron dosemeters was found to be 8.3 alpha tracks.cm{sup -2}.{mu}Sv{sup -1} using active snoopy neutron dosemeters in the KFUPM neutron irradiation facility. The results show the variation of accumulated dose with locations around the storage area. The range of dose rates varied from as low as 40 nSv.h{sup -1} up to 11 {mu}Sv.h{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosemeter was able to detect accumulated doses as low as 40 nSv.h{sup -1}, which could not be detected with the available active neutron dosemeters. The results of the study also indicate that an additional shielding is required to bring the dose rates down to background level. The present investigation suggests extending this study to find the contribution of doses from fast neutrons around the neutron source storage area using NTDs through proton recoil. The significance of this passive technique is that it is highly sensitive and does not require any electronics or power supplies, as is the case in active systems. (author)

  11. Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Gardner, Joe F.

    1999-01-01

    This document is intended as a source of general information and facts about Great Salt Lake, Utah. This U.S. Geological Survey information sheet answers frequently asked questions about Great Salt Lake. Topics include: History, salinity, brine shrimp, brine flies, migratory birds, and recreation. Great Salt Lake, the shrunken remnant of prehistoric Lake Bonneville, has no outlet. Dissolved salts accumulate in the lake by evaporation. Salinity south of the causeway has ranged from 6 percent to 27 percent over a period of 22 years (2 to 7 times saltier than the ocean). The high salinity supports a mineral industry that extracts about 2 million tons of salt from the lake each year. The aquatic ecosystem consists of more than 30 species of organisms. Harvest of its best-known species, the brine shrimp, annually supplies millions of pounds of food for the aquaculture industry worldwide. The lake is used extensively by millions of migratory and nesting birds and is a place of solitude for people. All this occurs in a lake that is located at the bottom of a 35,000-square-mile drainage basin that has a human population of more than 1.5 million.

  12. Hydrogeologic and geochemical characterization of groundwater resources in Deep Creek Valley and adjacent areas, Juab and Tooele Counties, Utah, and Elko and White Pine Counties, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Philip M.; Masbruch, Melissa D.

    2015-09-18

    The water resources of Deep Creek Valley were assessed during 2012–13 with an emphasis on better understanding the groundwater flow system and groundwater budget. Surface-water resources are limited in Deep Creek Valley and are generally used for agriculture. Groundwater is the predominant water source for most other uses and to supplement irrigation. Most groundwater withdrawal in Deep Creek Valley occurs from the unconsolidated basin-fill deposits, in which conditions are generally unconfined near the mountain front and confined in the lower-altitude parts of the valley. Productive aquifers are also present in fractured bedrock that occurs along the valley margins and beneath the basin-fill deposits. The consolidated-rock and basin-fill aquifers are hydraulically connected in many areas with much of the recharge occurring in the consolidated-rock mountain blocks and most of the discharge occurring from the lower-altitude basin-fill deposits.

  13. Potential effects of existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals on water levels and natural groundwater discharge in Snake Valley and surrounding areas, Utah and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Brooks, Lynette E.

    2017-04-14

    Several U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) agencies are concerned about the cumulative effects of groundwater development on groundwater resources managed by, and other groundwater resources of interest to, these agencies in Snake Valley and surrounding areas. The new water uses that potentially concern the DOI agencies include 12 water-right applications filed in 2005, totaling approximately 8,864 acre-feet per year. To date, only one of these applications has been approved and partially developed. In addition, the DOI agencies are interested in the potential effects of three new water-right applications (UT 18-756, UT 18-758, and UT 18-759) and one water-right change application (UT a40687), which were the subject of a water-right hearing on April 19, 2016.This report presents a hydrogeologic analysis of areas in and around Snake Valley to assess potential effects of existing and future groundwater development on groundwater resources, specifically groundwater discharge sites, of interest to the DOI agencies. A previously developed steady-state numerical groundwater-flow model was modified to transient conditions with respect to well withdrawals and used to quantify drawdown and capture (withdrawals that result in depletion) of natural discharge from existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals. The original steady-state model simulates and was calibrated to 2009 conditions. To investigate the potential effects of existing and proposed groundwater withdrawals on the groundwater resources of interest to the DOI agencies, 10 withdrawal scenarios were simulated. All scenarios were simulated for periods of 5, 10, 15, 30, 55, and 105 years from the start of 2010; additionally, all scenarios were simulated to a new steady state to determine the ultimate long-term effects of the withdrawals. Capture maps were also constructed as part of this analysis. The simulations used to develop the capture maps test the response of the system, specifically the reduction of natural

  14. Hydraulic assessment of the Buda Thermal Karst area and its vulnerability (Budapest, Hungary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czauner, Brigitta; Erőss, Anita; Erhardt, Ildikó; Ötvös, Viktória; Simon, Szilvia; Mádl-Szőnyi, Judit

    2017-04-01

    Thermal and medicinal water resources of Budapest (Hungary), the "City of Spas", are provided by the Buda Thermal Karst area. Assessment of its vulnerability requires the understanding of the discharge phenomena and thus the groundwater flow conditions in the area. Accordingly, BTK has already been the objective of several hydrogeological investigations, including numerical simulations as well, which led to conceptual models. The aim of the present study was the hydraulic evaluation of the flow systems based on the complex analysis of real, i.e. measured, archival hydraulic data of wells in order to i) get acquainted with the real flow systems, and ii) hydraulically confirm or disprove the previous conceptual models, in particular the applicability of gravity-driven regional groundwater flow concept and hydraulic continuity, separation of the natural discharge zones, and hypogenic karstification. Considering the data distribution, pressure vs. elevation profiles, tomographic fluid-potential maps, and hydraulic cross-sections were constructed for the first time in this area. As a result, gravitational flow systems and the modifying effects of aquitard units and faults were identified. Consequently, the differences in temperature, hydrochemistry, discharge distribution (one and two-components), and related cave forming processes between the Central (Rózsadomb) and Southern (Gellért Hill) natural discharge areas could be explained, as well as the hydraulic behaviour of the Northeastern Margin-fault of the Buda Hills could be determined. Regarding the on-going hypogenic karstification processes, regional upward flow conditions were confirmed along the main discharge zone of the Danube. Identification of gravity as the main fluid flow driving force, as well as the hydraulic effects of heterogeneities can significantly contribute to the recognition of the risk factors regarding the vulnerability of the Buda Thermal Karst area. The research was supported by the

  15. Lead shot: its settlement, oxidation, and general availability to waterfowl in Utah marshes.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In an attempt to further knowledge in the area of lead poisoning of waterfowl from spent shot pellets, students from the Utah Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit...

  16. Infrared detection of moist areas in monumental buildings based on thermal inertia analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Mazzoldi, Andrea

    1991-03-01

    This paper presents a technique to detect the moisture conditions of walls supporting frescoes in order to detach its in case and to understand causes of the surface wetting. An important feature of the testing procedure is to be nondestructive and appropriate to analyze large surfaces as it is based on thermographic image processing. The goal is to classify the wall surface on the basis of its moisture condition. We choose the thermal inertia as the most suitable parameter for this purpose, because the heat capacity of a porous body increases to a great extent by varying its water content. The test works modifying the wall inner thermal conditions and detecting temperature variations of the fresco, in time and space domain. For this purpose a convective thermal flux is uniformly applied to the surface while an infrared camera views it. In such a way temperature gradients appear, whose maximum directional variation curves are used to segment the surface and the mean temperature time difference is used to label each area. The key point of the proposed procedure is the freedom from the knowledge of the wall composition and its thermal and hydrologic dynamic status, depending on weather history. Other topics as the environmental radiometric reflection and emission, the 'Narcissus effect' in thermograms mosaic composition and the perspective distortions are considered. Experimental results on a XVI century church at Padua, Italy) are presented.

  17. Three GIS datasets defining areas permissive for the occurrence of uranium-bearing, solution-collapse breccia pipes in northern Arizona and southeast Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Goldman, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Some of the highest grade uranium (U) deposits in the United States are hosted by solution-collapse breccia pipes in the Grand Canyon region of northern Arizona. These structures are named for their vertical, pipe-like shape and the broken rock (breccia) that fills them. Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of these structures exist. Not all of the breccia pipes are mineralized; only a small percentage of the identified breccia pipes are known to contain an economic uranium deposit. An unresolved question is how many undiscovered U-bearing breccia pipes of this type exist in northern Arizona, in the region sometimes referred to as the “Arizona Strip”. Two principal questions remain regarding the breccia pipe U deposits of northern Arizona are: (1) What processes combined to form these unusual structures and their U deposits? and (2) How many undiscovered U deposits hosted by breccia pipes exist in the region? A piece of information required to answer these questions is to define the area where these types of deposits could exist based on available geologic information. In order to determine the regional processes that led to their formation, the regional distribution of U-bearing breccia pipes must be considered. These geospatial datasets were assembled in support of this goal.

  18. Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

    2003-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively

  19. Ultra-low thermal conductivities in large-area Si-Ge nanomeshes for thermoelectric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Taborda, Jaime Andres; Muñoz Rojo, Miguel; Maiz, Jon; Neophytou, Neophytos; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2016-09-21

    In this work, we measure the thermal and thermoelectric properties of large-area Si0.8Ge0.2 nano-meshed films fabricated by DC sputtering of Si0.8Ge0.2 on highly ordered porous alumina matrices. The Si0.8Ge0.2 film replicated the porous alumina structure resulting in nano-meshed films. Very good control of the nanomesh geometrical features (pore diameter, pitch, neck) was achieved through the alumina template, with pore diameters ranging from 294 ± 5nm down to 31 ± 4 nm. The method we developed is able to provide large areas of nano-meshes in a simple and reproducible way, being easily scalable for industrial applications. Most importantly, the thermal conductivity of the films was reduced as the diameter of the porous became smaller to values that varied from κ = 1.54 ± 0.27 W K(-1)m(-1), down to the ultra-low κ = 0.55 ± 0.10 W K(-1)m(-1) value. The latter is well below the amorphous limit, while the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the material were retained. These properties, together with our large area fabrication approach, can provide an important route towards achieving high conversion efficiency, large area, and high scalable thermoelectric materials.

  20. Thermally induced mode loss evolution in the coiled ytterbium doped large mode area fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingchao; Leng, Jinyong; Zhou, Pu; Jiang, Zongfu

    2017-09-18

    We propose a model to calculate the thermally induced mode loss evolution in the coiled ytterbium doped large mode area (LMA) fiber. The mode loss evolution in the coiled conventional step index LMA 20/400 fiber is investigated. Meanwhile, a model of fiber amplifier considering thermally induced mode loss evolution is established. The higher order mode (HOM) suppression between a co-pumping scheme and counter-pumping scheme under the heat load are compared. The simulation shows that the HOM loss decreases quasi-exponentially with the heat load and the bending radius of the ytterbium doped fiber (YDF) should be optimized according to the heat load to achieve effectively single mode operation. Besides, the counter-pumping fiber amplifier shows much better HOM suppression than the co-pumping fiber amplifier. The results in this paper will provide guidance in the design of novel ytterbium doped LMA fiber and the optimization of the high power single mode fiber amplifier.

  1. Drone with thermal infrared camera provides high resolution georeferenced imagery of the Waikite geothermal area, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, M. C.; Rowland, J. V.; Luketina, K. M.

    2016-10-01

    Drones are now routinely used for collecting aerial imagery and creating digital elevation models (DEM). Lightweight thermal sensors provide another payload option for generation of very high-resolution aerial thermal orthophotos. This technology allows for the rapid and safe survey of thermal areas, often present in inaccessible or dangerous terrain. Here we present a 2.2 km2 georeferenced, temperature-calibrated thermal orthophoto of the Waikite geothermal area, New Zealand. The image represents a mosaic of nearly 6000 thermal images captured by drone over a period of about 2 weeks. This is thought by the authors to be the first such image published of a significant geothermal area produced by a drone equipped with a thermal camera. Temperature calibration of the image allowed calculation of heat loss (43 ± 12 MW) from thermal lakes and streams in the survey area (loss from evaporation, conduction and radiation). An RGB (visible spectrum) orthomosaic photo and digital elevation model was also produced for this area, with ground resolution and horizontal position error comparable to commercially produced LiDAR and aerial imagery obtained from crewed aircraft. Our results show that thermal imagery collected by drones has the potential to become a key tool in geothermal science, including geological, geochemical and geophysical surveys, environmental baseline and monitoring studies, geotechnical studies and civil works.

  2. Effectiveness of airborne multispectral thermal data for karst groundwater resources recognition in coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatti, Stefano; Fusilli, Lorenzo; Palombo, Angelo; Santini, Federico; Pascucci, Simone

    2013-04-01

    Currently the detection, use and management of groundwater in karst regions can be considered one of the most significant procedures for solving water scarcity problems during periods of low rainfall this because groundwater resources from karst aquifers play a key role in the water supply in karst areas worldwide [1]. In many countries of the Mediterranean area, where karst is widespread, groundwater resources are still underexploited, while surface waters are generally preferred [2]. Furthermore, carbonate aquifers constitute a crucial thermal water resource outside of volcanic areas, even if there is no detailed and reliable global assessment of thermal water resources. The composite hydrogeological characteristics of karst, particularly directions and zones of groundwater distribution, are not up till now adequately explained [3]. In view of the abovementioned reasons the present study aims at analyzing the detection capability of high spatial resolution thermal remote sensing of karst water resources in coastal areas in order to get useful information on the karst springs flow and on different characteristics of these environments. To this purpose MIVIS [4, 5] and TASI-600 [6] airborne multispectral thermal imagery (see sensors' characteristics in Table 1) acquired on two coastal areas of the Mediterranean area interested by karst activity, one located in Montenegro and one in Italy, were used. One study area is located in the Kotor Bay, a winding bay on the Adriatic Sea surrounded by high mountains in south-western Montenegro and characterized by many subaerial and submarine coastal springs related to deep karstic channels. The other study area is located in Santa Cesarea (Italy), encompassing coastal cold springs, the main local source of high quality water, and also a noticeable thermal groundwater outflow. The proposed study shows the preliminary results of the two airborne deployments on these areas. The preprocessing of the multispectral thermal imagery

  3. Cacao roasting in rural areas of Peru using concentrated solar thermal energy: experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veynandt François

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar food processing is gaining interest for income generation. Our solar cacao roaster, designed for rural areas, consists in a horizontal rotating drum, opened at one end to collect solar radiation from Scheffler concentrators of 2.7 or 8 m2. The experimental results presented bring knowledge on the system's behavior and optimal operation. The influence of the most significant parameters is studied: quantity of cacao, absorptivity of drum's coating, thermal insulation, inclination and rotational speed of the drum. Cacao temperature and direct solar irradiance are monitored to evaluate the performance in roasting time per kilogram of cacao.

  4. Anaglyph, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This anaglyph image provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed

  5. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-22

    Energy used by Utah single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  6. Multispectral thermal airborne TASI-600 data to study the Pompeii (IT) archaeological area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombo, Angelo; Pascucci, Simone; Pergola, Nicola; Pignatti, Stefano; Santini, Federico; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The management of archaeological areas refers to the conservation of the ruins/buildings and the eventual prospection of new areas having an archaeological potential. In this framework, airborne remote sensing is a well-developed geophysical tool for supporting the archaeological surveys of wide areas. The spectral regions applied in archaeological remote sensing spans from the VNIR to the TIR. In particular, the archaeological thermal imaging considers that materials absorb, emit, transmit, and reflect the thermal infrared radiation at different rate according to their composition, density and moisture content. Despite its potential, thermal imaging in archaeological applications are scarce. Among them, noteworthy are the ones related to the use of Landsat and ASTER [1] and airborne remote sensing [2, 3, 4 and 5]. In view of these potential in Cultural Heritage applications, the present study aims at analysing the usefulness of the high spatial resolution thermal imaging on the Pompeii archaeological park. To this purpose TASI-600 [6] airborne multispectral thermal imagery (32 channels from 8 to 11.5 nm with a spectral resolution of 100nm and a spatial resolution of 1m/pixel) was acquired on December the 7th, 2015. Airborne survey has been acquired to get useful information on the building materials (both ancient and of consolidation) characteristics and, whenever possible, to retrieve quick indicators on their conservation status. Thermal images will be, moreover, processed to have an insight of the critical environmental issues impacting the structures (e.g. moisture). The proposed study shows the preliminary results of the airborne deployments, the pre-processing of the multispectral thermal imagery and the retrieving of accurate land surface temperatures (LST). LST map will be analysed to describe the thermal pattern of the city of Pompeii and detect any thermal anomalies. As far as the ongoing TASI-600 sensors pre-processing, it will include: (a) radiometric

  7. Hydrology and numerical simulation of groundwater movement and heat transport in Snake Valley and surrounding areas, Juab, Miller, and Beaver Counties, Utah, and White Pine and Lincoln Counties, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masbruch, Melissa D.; Gardner, Philip M.; Brooks, Lynette E.

    2014-01-01

    Snake Valley and surrounding areas, along the Utah-Nevada state border, are part of the Great Basin carbonate and alluvial aquifer system. The groundwater system in the study area consists of water in unconsolidated deposits in basins and water in consolidated rock underlying the basins and in the adjacent mountain blocks. Most recharge occurs from precipitation on the mountain blocks and most discharge occurs from the lower altitude basin-fill deposits mainly as evapotranspiration, springflow, and well withdrawals.The Snake Valley area regional groundwater system was simulated using a three-dimensional model incorporating both groundwater flow and heat transport. The model was constructed with MODFLOW-2000, a version of the U.S. Geological Survey’s groundwater flow model, and MT3DMS, a transport model that simulates advection, dispersion, and chemical reactions of solutes or heat in groundwater systems. Observations of groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration, springflow, mountain stream base flow, and well withdrawals; groundwater-level altitudes; and groundwater temperatures were used to calibrate the model. Parameter values estimated by regression analyses were reasonable and within the range of expected values.This study represents one of the first regional modeling efforts to include calibration to groundwater temperature data. The inclusion of temperature observations reduced parameter uncertainty, in some cases quite significantly, over using just water-level altitude and discharge observations. Of the 39 parameters used to simulate horizontal hydraulic conductivity, uncertainty on 11 of these parameters was reduced to one order of magnitude or less. Other significant reductions in parameter uncertainty occurred in parameters representing the vertical anisotropy ratio, drain and river conductance, recharge rates, and well withdrawal rates.The model provides a good representation of the groundwater system. Simulated water-level altitudes range over

  8. Retrieval of leaf area index in different plant species using thermal hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neinavaz, Elnaz; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Groen, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is an important variable of terrestrial ecosystems because it is strongly correlated with many ecosystem processes (e.g., water balance and evapotranspiration) and directly related to the plant energy balance and gas exchanges. Although LAI has been accurately predicted using visible and short-wave infrared hyperspectral data (0.3-2.5 μm), LAI estimation using thermal infrared (TIR, 8-14 μm) measurements has not yet been addressed. The novel approach of this study is to evaluate the retrieval of LAI using TIR hyperspectral data. The leaf area indices were destructively acquired for four plant species: Azalea japonica, Buxussempervirens, Euonymus japonicus, and Ficus benjamina. Canopy emissivity spectral measurements were obtained under controlled laboratory conditions using a MIDAC (M4401-F) spectrometer. The LAI retrieval was assessed using a partial least squares regression (PLSR), artificial neural networks (ANNs), and narrow band indices calculated from all possible combinations of waveband pairs for three vegetation indices including simple difference, simple ratio, and normalized difference. ANNs retrieved LAI more accurately than PLSR and vegetation indices (0.67 < R2 < 0.95 versus 11.54% < RMSEcv < 31.23%). The accuracy of LAI retrieval did not differ significantly between the vegetation indices. The results revealed that wavebands from the 8-12 μm region contain relevant information for LAI estimation, irrespective of the chosen vegetation index. Moreover, they demonstrated that LAI may be successfully predicted from TIR hyperspectral data, even for higher values of LAI (LAI ⩾ 5.5). The study showed the significance of using PLSR and ANNs as multivariate methods compared to the univariate technique (e.g., narrow band vegetation indices) when hyperspectral thermal data is utilized. We thus demonstrated for the first time the potential of hyperspectral thermal data to accurately retrieve LAI.

  9. Irrigation drainage: Green River basin, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Doyle W.; Waddell, Bruce; Miller, Jerry B.

    1988-01-01

    A reconnaissance of wildlife areas in the middle Green River basin of Utah during 1986-87 determined that concentrations of selenium in water and biological tissues were potentially harmful to wildlife at the Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area and in the Ouray National Wildlife Refuge. Concentations of selenium in irrigation drainage entering Stewart Lake ranged from 14 to 140 micrograms per liter; liver tissue from coots collected from the lake contained selenium concentrations of as much as 26 micrograms per gram and samples of tissue from carp contained as much as 31 micrograms per gram. Concentrations of selenium in a pond at the Ouray National Wildlife Refuge, which receives irrigation water and shallow ground water, were as much as 93 micrograms per liter. Liver tissue from coots collected from this pond contained selenium concentrations of as much as 43 micrograms per gram; eggs of water birds contained as much as 120 micrograms per gram.

  10. Utah ski patrol: assessing training types and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagalyn, Emily B; McDevitt, Marion C; Ernst, Ryan

    2014-12-01

    Skiers and snowboarders incur a variety of injuries and medical emergencies each year at ski resorts. The ski patrol is primarily responsible for initial triage, assessment and stabilization of these problems. The purpose of this study was to subjectively evaluate the type of training, resources, and equipment available to local ski patrols within Utah. Ski patrol directors at ski resorts in Utah were asked to complete a voluntary computerized survey. Of the 14 ski areas in Utah, ski patrol directors representing 8 resorts responded. The majority of patrols in Utah use Outdoor Emergency Care (OEC) as their primary education and certification source. Most programs also include site-specific training in addition to basic certification. All responding resorts had basic first responder equipment, including splinting devices, basic airway management, and hemorrhage control. Six of 8 responding resorts had affiliated clinics, and all had access to aeromedical transport. All of the responding ski patrol directors believed the current training level was adequate. Utah area ski patrollers frequently see trauma-related injuries and have the resources to assess and provide initial immobilization techniques. Many resorts have affiliated clinics with advanced providers, and all have access to aeromedical support to rapidly transfer patients to trauma centers. Medical directors may be of use for training as well as developing extended scope of practice protocols for advanced airway use or medication administration. Patrols may benefit from additional resort-specific training that addresses other frequently seen injuries or illnesses. Copyright © 2014 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Geothermal studies at the University of Utah Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-07-01

    The University of Utah Research Institute (WRI) is a self-supporting corporation organized in December 1972 under the Utah Non-Profit Corporation Association Act. Under its charter, the Institute is separate in its operations and receives no direct financial support from either the University of Utah or the State of Utah. The charter includes provisions for WRI to conduct both public and proprietary scientific work for governmental agencies, academic institutions, private industry, and individuals. WRI is composed of five divisions, shown in Figure 1: the Earth Science Laboratory (ESL), the Environmental Studies Laboratory (EVSL), the Center for Remote Sensing and Cartography (CRSC), the Engineering Technology Laboratory (ETL) and the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory (APL). The Earth Science Laboratory has a staff of geologists, geochemists and geophysicists who have a broad range of experience in geothermal research and field projects as well as in mineral and petroleum exploration. The Environmental Studies Laboratory offers a variety of technical services and research capabilities in the areas of air quality and visibility, acid precipitation, surface and groundwater contamination, and environmentally caused stress in vegetation. The Center for Remote Sensing and Cartography offers applied research and services with a full range of remote sensing and mapping capability, including satellite and airborne imagery processing and interpretation. The Engineering Technology Laboratory is currently studying the interaction of the human body with electromagnetic radiation. The Atmospheric Physics Laboratory is developing hygroscopic droplet growth theory and orographic seeding models for dispersal of fog.

  12. Conductive heat flows in research drill holes in thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donald E.

    1978-01-01

    In convection systems with boiling springs, geysers, fumaroles, and other thermal features, the modes of heat flow become increasingly complex as a single liquid phase at depth rises into the near-surface environment where heat flows by convection of liquid and vapor and by conduction in high thermal gradients. This paper is mainly concerned with the changing patterns of conductive heat flow as related to channels of subsurface convective flow and to horizontal distance from spring vents. The primary data consist of temperatures measured in 13 cored drill holes as drilling progressed. Some temperatures plot convincingly on straight-line segments that suggest conductive gradients in rocks of nearly constant thermal conductivity. Temperature gradients and the conductive component of total heat flow nearly always decrease drastically downward; the gradient and heat flow of the lowest depth interval recognized in each hole is commonly only about 10 percent of the highest interval; the changes in gradient at interval boundaries are commonly interpreted as channels of near-boiling water or of cooler meteoric water. Temperature reversals are probably related to inflowing cooler water rather than to transient effects from recent changes. Some temperatures plot on curved segments that probably indicate dispersed convective upflow and boiling of water in ground penetrated by the drill hole. Other similar curved segments are too low in temperature for local boiling and are probably on the margins of hot upflow zones, reflecting conductive cooling of flowing water. The conifers of Yellowstone National Park (mainly lodgepole pine) seem to have normal growth characteristics where near-surface conductive heat flow is below about 200 heat-flow units (1 HFU = 10-6 cal/cm2 = 41.8 mW/m2). Most areas of abnormal "stunted" trees (low ratio of height to base diameter, and low density of spacing) are characterized by conductive heat flows of about 250 to 350 HFU. The critical factor

  13. Measuring the response of canopy emissivity spectra to leaf area index variation using thermal hyperspectral data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neinavaz, Elnaz; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Groen, Thomas A.

    2016-12-01

    One of the plant biophysical factors affecting the canopy spectral reflectance of plants in the optical domain to receive research attention in recent decades is leaf area index (LAI). Although it is expected that the value of LAI affects the emission of radiation, it not known how. To our knowledge, the effect of LAI on plant canopy emissivity spectra has not yet been investigated in the thermal infrared region (TIR 8-14 μm). The overall aim of this study was to demonstrate the effect of LAI on canopy emissivity spectra of different species at the nadir position. The 279 spectral wavebands in the TIR domain were measured under controlled laboratory condition using a MIDAC spectrometer for four plant species. The corresponding LAI of each measurement was destructively calculated. We found a positive correlation between canopy emissivity spectra at various LAI values, indicating that emissivity increases concomitantly with LAI value. The canopy emissivity spectra of the four species were found to be statistically different at various wavebands even when the LAI values of the species were similar. It seems that other biophysical or biochemical factors also contribute to canopy emissivity spectra: this merits further investigation. We not only quantify the role of LAI on canopy emissivity spectra for the first time, but also demonstrate the potential of using hyperspectral thermal data to estimate LAI of plant species.

  14. Automatic Generation Control Study in Two Area Reheat Thermal Power System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritam, Anita; Sahu, Sibakanta; Rout, Sushil Dev; Ganthia, Sibani; Prasad Ganthia, Bibhu

    2017-08-01

    Due to industrial pollution our living environment destroyed. An electric grid system has may vital equipment like generator, motor, transformers and loads. There is always be an imbalance between sending end and receiving end system which cause system unstable. So this error and fault causing problem should be solved and corrected as soon as possible else it creates faults and system error and fall of efficiency of the whole power system. The main problem developed from this fault is deviation of frequency cause instability to the power system and may cause permanent damage to the system. Therefore this mechanism studied in this paper make the system stable and balance by regulating frequency at both sending and receiving end power system using automatic generation control using various controllers taking a two area reheat thermal power system into account.

  15. Testing and evaluation of large-area heliostats for solar thermal applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, J.W.; Houser, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Two heliostats representing the state-of-the-art in glass-metal designs for central receiver (and photovoltaic tracking) applications were tested and evaluated at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico from 1986 to 1992. These heliostats have collection areas of 148 and 200 m{sup 2} and represent low-cost designs for heliostats that employ glass-metal mirrors. The evaluation encompassed the performance and operational characteristics of the heliostats, and examined heliostat beam quality, the effect of elevated winds on beam quality, heliostat drives and controls, mirror module reflectance and durability, and the overall operational and maintenance characteristics of the two heliostats. A comprehensive presentation of the results of these and other tests is presented. The results are prefaced by a review of the development (in the United States) of heliostat technology.

  16. Thermal Resistances in the Everest Area derived from Satellite Imagery using a Nonlinear Energy Balance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rounce, D.; McKinney, D. C.

    2013-12-01

    Debris cover has a large impact on sub-debris ablation rates and glacier evolution. A thin debris layer may enhance ablation by reducing albedo increasing radiation absorption, while thicker debris insulates the glacier causing ablation to decrease. Debris thickness, thermal conductivity, and meteorological conditions may be measured in the field, but they require extensive fieldwork (Brock et al., 2010; Nicholson and Benn, 2012). This has forced many simplifications and assumptions in models. Satellite imagery combined with an energy balance model has been used with to extract information about debris cover remotely (Nakawo and Rana, 1999; Zhang et al., 2011). The spatial distribution of thermal resistances derived from these studies have agreed well with field values; however, the values were considerably lower than the field values. The difference has been attributed to the mixed pixel effect. Foster et al. (2012) developed an energy balance model that agrees well with debris thickness measured in the field. The model requires knowledge of the thermal conductivity and utilizes a relationship between air and surface temperature to lower sensible heat fluxes. We derive thermal resistances of debris-covered glaciers from satellite imagery in the Everest area. Previous satellite studies have assumed a linear debris temperature gradient, which is valid for time periods of 24 hours or greater (Nicholson and Benn, 2006); however, gradients during the day are nonlinear (Nicholson and Benn, 2006; Reid and Brock, 2010). Landsat 7 imagery is used to account for the non-linear gradient, using the ratio of temperature gradient in the upper 10cm versus the entire debris thickness. These values are derived from temperature profiles on Ngozumpa Glacier (Nicholson, 2004). Meteorological data are obtained from the Pyramid Station. The derived thermal resistances agree well with those found on debris-covered glaciers in the Everest region. Brock, B., Mihalcea, C., Kirkbride, M

  17. Thermal properties and unfrozen water content of frozen volcanic ash as a modelling input parameters in mountainous volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, E.

    2016-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are one of the major causes of the burial of ice and snow in volcanic areas. This has been demonstrated on volcanoes, e.g. in Iceland, Russia, USA and Chile, where the combination of a permafrost-favorable climate and a thin layer of tephra is sufficient to reduce the sub-tephra layer snow ablation substantially, even to zero, causing ground ice formation and permafrost aggradation. Many numerical models that have been used to investigate and predict the evolution of cold regions as the result of climatic changes are lacking the accurate data of the thermal properties —thermal conductivity, heat capacity, thermal diffusivity—of soils or debris layers involved. The angular shape of the fragments that make up ash and scoria makes it inappropriate to apply existing models to estimate bulk thermal conductivity. The lack of experimental data on the thermal conductivity of volcanic deposits will hinder the development of realistic models. The decreasing thermal conductivity of volcanic ash in the frozen state is associated with the development and presence of unfrozen water films that may have a direct mechanical impact on the movement or slippage between ice and particle, and thus, change the stress transfer. This becomes particularly significant during periods of climate change when enhanced temperatures and associated melting could weaken polythermal glaciers and affect areas with warm and discontinuous permafrost, and induce ice or land movements, perhaps on a catastrophic scale. In the presentation, we will summarize existing data regarding: (i) the thermal properties and unfrozen water content in frozen volcanic ash and cinder, (ii) the effects of cold temperatures on weathering processes of volcanic glass, (iii) the relationship between the mineralogy of frozen volcanic deposits and their thermal properties —and then discusses their significance in relation to the numerical modelling of glaciers and permafrost's thermal behavior.

  18. Overview with methods and procedures of the U.S. Geological Survey mineral-resource assessment of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming: Chapter A in Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Warren C.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Zientek, Michael L.; Frost, Thomas P.

    2016-08-19

    This report, chapter A of Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089, provides an overview of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA). The report also describes the methods, procedures, and voluminous fundamental reference information used throughout the assessment. Data from several major publicly available databases and other published sources were used to develop an understanding of the locatable, leaseable, and salable mineral resources of this vast area. This report describes the geologic, mineral-occurrence, geochemical, geophysical, remote-sensing, and Bureau of Land Management mineral-case-status data used for the assessment, along with the methods for evaluating locatable mineral-resource potential. The report also discusses energy-resource data (oil and gas, coal, and geothermal) used in the assessment. Appendixes include summary descriptive mineral-deposit models that provide the criteria necessary to assess for the pertinent locatable minerals and market-demand commodity profiles for locatable mineral commodities relevant to the project. Datasets used in the assessment are available as USGS data releases.

  19. Thermal Activity Monitoring of an Active Volcano Using Landsat 8/OLI-TIRS Sensor Images: A Case Study at the Aso Volcanic Area in Southwest Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Md Bodruddoza Mia; Yasuhiro Fujimitsu; Jun Nishijima

    2017-01-01

    .... For the first time, Landsat 8 TIRS thermal data were used in this study area to evaluate and monitor the recent thermal status of this volcano, situated in Southwest Japan, from 2013 to 2016 using four sets of images...

  20. Effects of street canyon design on pedestrian thermal comfort in the hot-humid area of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufeng; Du, Xiaohan; Shi, Yurong

    2017-08-01

    The design characteristics of street canyons were investigated in Guangzhou in the hot-humid area of China, and the effects of the design factors and their interactions on pedestrian thermal comfort were studied by numerical simulations. The ENVI-met V4.0 (BASIC) model was validated by field observations and used to simulate the micrometeorological conditions and the standard effective temperature (SET) at pedestrian level of the street canyons for a typical summer day of Guangzhou. The results show that the micrometeorological parameters of mean radiant temperature (MRT) and wind speed play key roles in pedestrian thermal comfort. Street orientation has the largest contribution on SET at pedestrian level, followed by aspect ratio and greenery, while surface albedo and interactions between factors have small contributions. The street canyons oriented southeast-northwest or with a higher aspect ratio provide more shade, higher wind speed, and better thermal comfort conditions for pedestrians. Compared with the east-west-oriented street canyons, the north-south-oriented street canyons have higher MRTs and worse pedestrian thermal comfort due to their wider building spacing along the street. The effects of greenery change with the road width and the time of the day. Street canyon design is recommended to improve pedestrian thermal comfort. This study provides a better understanding of the effects of street canyon design on pedestrian thermal comfort and is a useful guide on urban design for the hot-humid area of China.

  1. Thermal and Economic Analysis of Renovation Strategies for a Historic Building in Mediterranean Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Cirami

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Around 30% of the European building stock was built before 1950, when no regulations about energy efficiency were in force. Since only a small part of them has been renovated by now, the energy performance of this building stock is on average quite poor, resulting in a significant impact on the energy balance of European countries, as confirmed by data published by ISTAT (Italian National Statistical Institute. However, energy retrofit in historic edifices is a quite demanding issue as any intervention must take into account the need to preserve existing building materials and appearances while also allowing reversibility and low invasiveness. As an example, in these buildings it is not possible to apply an ETICS (External Thermal Insulation Composite System, since this would alter the historic and architectural value of the façade. On the other hand, internal insulation would have the drawback of reducing the net useful floor area, which also implies a loss of economic value. Moreover, internal insulation may induce overheating risks and mold formation. In this paper, all these issues are investigated with reference to an existing historic building located in southern Italy, showing that a retrofit strategy aimed at energy savings and cost-effectiveness is still possible if suitable materials and solutions are adopted.

  2. Reconnaissance of major redhead duck production areas in six western states

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — On May 20, 1979 I flew commercial from the Twin Cities, Minnesota to Salt Lake City, Utah to begin a whirlwind tour of major redhead production areas in Utah,...

  3. Hydrogeochemistry and geothermometry of deep thermal water in the carbonate formation in the main urban area of Chongqing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pingheng; Cheng, Qun; Xie, Shiyou; Wang, Jianli; Chang, Longran; Yu, Qin; Zhan, Zhaojun; Chen, Feng

    2017-06-01

    Many geothermal reservoirs in Chongqing in southwestern China are located in carbonate rock aquifers and exploited through drilling. Water samples from 36 geothermal wells have been collected in the main urban area of Chongqing. Chemical types of the thermal water samples are Ca·Mg-SO4 and Ca-SO4. High contents of Ca2+ and SO42- in the thermal water samples are derived from the dissolution of evaporates. Furthermore, the HCO3- concentration is constrained by the common ion effect. Drilling depth has no effect on the physical and chemical characteristics according to the results of a t-test. The geothermal reservoir's temperature can be estimated to be 64.8-93.4 °C (average 82 °C) using quartz and improved SiO2 geothermometers. Values of δD and δ18O for the thermal water samples indicate that the thermal water resources originate from local precipitation with a recharge elevation between 838 and 1130 m and an annual air temperature between 10.4 and 13.9 °C. A conceptual model of regional scale groundwater flow for the thermal water is proposed. The thermal water mainly originates from the meteoric water recharged in the elevated areas of northeastern Tongluoshan and Huayingshan by means of percolation through exposed carbonate before becoming groundwater. The groundwater is heated at depth and moves southwest along the fault and the anticlinal core in a gravity-driven regime. The thermal water is exposed in the form of artesian hot springs in river cutting and low-elevation areas or in wells.

  4. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in

  5. Assessment of fast and thermal neutron ambient dose equivalents around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abu-Jarad, F. [Radiation Protection Unit, Environmental Protection Department, Saudi Aramco, P. O. Box 13027, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Qureshi, M.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    A set of five {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources are utilized in research and teaching at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Three of these sources have an activity of 16Ci each and the other two are of 5Ci each. A well-shielded storage area was designed for these sources. The aim of the study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the KFUPM neutron source storage area. Poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) Nuclear track detectors (NTDs) based fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters have been utilized side by side for 33 days to assess accumulated low ambient dose equivalents of fast and thermal neutrons at 30 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. Fast neutron measurements have been carried out using bare NTDs, which register fast neutrons through recoils of protons, in the detector material. NTDs were mounted with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters on their surfaces for thermal neutron detection via B10(n,{alpha})Li6 and Li6(n,{alpha})H3 nuclear reactions. The calibration factors of NTD both for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were determined using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) with and without a polyethylene moderator. The calibration factors for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were found to be 1.33 proton tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1} and 31.5 alpha tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1}, respectively. The results show variations of accumulated dose with the locations around the storage area. The fast neutron dose equivalents rates varied from as low as 182nSvh{sup -1} up to 10.4{mu}Svh{sup -1} whereas those for thermal neutron ranged from as low as 7nSvh{sup -1} up to 9.3{mu}Svh{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosimeter was able to detect dose rates as low as 7 and 182nSvh{sup -1} from accumulated dose for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively, which were not possible to detect with the available active neutron

  6. The comparison of vernacular residences' thermal comfort in coastal with that in mountainous regions of tropical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermawan, Prianto, Eddy; Setyowati, Erni; Sunaryo

    2017-11-01

    Adaptive thermal comfort is the latest theory used to analyze thermal acceptability of the naturally ventilated buildings for occupants in tropical areas. Vernacular residences are considered capable to meet the thermal comfort for the occupants. The combination between adaptive and passive theory is still rarely conducted. This study aims to compare the adaptive and passive thermal comfort for occupants of vernacular residences in mountainous and coastal regions using AMV (Actual Mean Vote) and PMV (Predicted Mean Vote). This research uses a quantitative method with a statistical analysis on variables of air temperature, globe temperature, velocity, relative humidity, age, weight, and height. AMV data are collected based on questionnaires with ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, Air conditioning Engineering) standards. The samples consist of 100 vernacular residences of both coastal and mountainous regions. The results show that there are AMV and PMV differences in each region. The AMV values in those vernacular residences in mountainous and coastal regions are respectively -0.4982 and 0.1673. It indicates that the occupants of vernacular residences in coastal regions accept the thermal conditions better. Thus, it can be concluded that vernacular residences in coastal areas comfort the occupants more.

  7. Utah Wolf Management Plan, Utah Division of Wildlife Resources Publication #: 05-17

    OpenAIRE

    The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources; The Utah Wolf Working Group

    2005-01-01

    This plan will guide management of wolves in Utah during an interim period from delisting until 2015, or until it is determined that wolves have established1 in Utah, or assumptions of the plan (political, social, biological, or legal) change. During this interim period, arriving wolves will be studied to determine where they are most likely to settle without conflict. The goal of this plan is to manage, study, and conserve wolves moving into Utah while avoiding conflicts with the wildlife...

  8. REPORT OF A STUDY OF THE FEASIBILITY OF A JUNIOR COLLEGE IN ROOSEVELT, UTAH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHEELWRIGHT, LORIN F.; AND OTHERS

    FEASIBILITY STUDIES COMPLETED IN THE ROOSEVELT, UTAH, AREA INDICATE THAT THE EXISTING POST-HIGH SCHOOL INSTITUTIONS MEET THE NEEDS OF THE AREA WELL. ESTIMATES OF POTENTIAL ENROLLMENT INDICATE THAT FEWER THAN 300 REGULAR STUDENTS FROM THE REGION CAN BE EXPECTED IN ANY YEAR FOR AT LEAST A DECADE AHEAD. ALSO A MAJOR PROPORTION OF THE STUDENTS, WHICH…

  9. Long term investigation of thermal behaviour of 110 kV underground transmission lines in the Belgrade area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sredojevic, M.R.; Naumov, R.M.; Popovic, D.P. [Nikola Tesla Electrical Engineering Inst., Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Simic, M.D. [Electrical Utility Co., Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1997-12-31

    The paper describes the procedure for applying a special cable backfill material, developed and manufactured at the Institute ``Nikola Tesla`` for the thermal stabilisation and reduction of hot spot cable operating temperature, on specific hot spots of 110 kV underground transmission lines in the Belgrade area. The results presented in this paper are an important contribution to the proof of the justification and necessity of defining and introducing in practice new procedures for the thermal stabilisation and reduction of operating temperature of existing, as well as of new, underground transmission cable lines to be built. (author)

  10. Thermal effect-resilient design of large mode area double-cladding Yb-doped photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coscelli, Enrico; Poli, Federica; Johansen, Mette Marie

    2013-01-01

    The effects of thermally-induced refractive index change on the guiding properties of different large mode area fibers have been numerically analyzed. A simple but accurate model has been applied to obtain the refractive index change in the fiber cross-section, and a full-vector modal solver based...... on the finite-element method has been used to calculate the guided modes of the fibers operating at high power levels. The results demonstrate that resonant structures added to the fiber cross-section can be exploited to provide efficient suppression of high-order modes with a good resilience to thermal effects....

  11. Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 12. Stable isotopic evaluation of thermal water occurrences in the Weiser and Little Salmon River drainage basins and adjacent areas, west-central Idaho with attendant gravity and magnetic data on the Weiser area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, J.C.; Bideganeta, K.; Palmer, M.A.

    1984-12-01

    Fifteen thermal springs, two thermal wells, and eight cold springs in the Weiser and Little Salmon river drainages were sampled for deuterium and oxygen-18 analysis during the fall of 1981. The straight-line fit of delta D and delta /sup 18/O versus latitude and longitude observed in the data is what would be expected if the recharge areas for the thermal and non-thermal waters were in close proximity to their respective discharge points. The discrete values of delta D and delta /sup 18/O for each thermal discharge suggest that none of the sampled thermal systems have common sources. The depleted deuterium and oxygen-18 contents of most thermal relative to non-thermal waters sampled suggests that the thermal waters might be Pleistocene age precipitation. The isotopic data suggest little or no evidence for mixing of thermal and non-thermal water for the sampled discharges. Thermal waters from Weiser, Crane Creek, Cove Creek, and White Licks hot springs show enrichment in oxygen-18 suggesting that these waters have been at elevated temperatures relative to other sampled thermal discharges in the area. Gravity and magnetic data gathered by the Idaho State University Geology Department in the Weiser Hot Springs area suggest that southeastward plunging synclinal-anticlinal couples, which underlie the hot springs, are cut south of the springs by a northeast trending boundary fault.

  12. Geoinformatics and Data Fusion in the Southwestern Utah Mineral Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesel, T.; Enright, R.

    2012-12-01

    Data Fusion is a technique in remote sensing that combines separate geophysical data sets from different platforms to yield the maximum information of each set. Data fusion was employed on multiple sources of data for the purposes of investigating an area of the Utah Mineral Belt known as the San Francisco Mining District. In the past many mineral deposits were expressed in or on the immediate surface and therefore relatively easy to locate. More modern methods of investigation look for evidence beyond the visible spectrum to find patterns that predict the presence of deeply buried mineral deposits. The methods used in this study employed measurements of reflectivity or emissivity features in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum for different materials, elevation data collected from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and indirect measurement of the magnetic or mass properties of deposits. The measurements were collected by various spaceborne remote sensing instruments like Landsat TM, ASTER and Hyperion and ground-based statewide geophysical surveys. ASTER's shortwave infrared bands, that have been calibrated to surface reflectance using the atmospheric correction tool FLAASH, can be used to identify products of hydrothermal alteration like kaolinite, alunite, limonite and pyrophyllite using image spectroscopy. The thermal infrared bands once calibrated to emissivity can be used to differentiate between felsic, mafic and carbonate rock units for the purposes of lithologic mapping. To validate results from the extracted spectral profiles existing geological reports were used for ground truth data. Measurements of electromagnetic spectra can only reveal the composition of surface features. Gravimetric and magnetic information were utilized to reveal subsurface features. Using Bouguer anomaly data provided by the USGS an interpreted geological cross section can be created that indicates the shape of local igneous intrusions and the depth of

  13. METHOD OF PHYSIOTHERAPY MEDICAL PROCEDURES FOR THERMAL IMPACT ON SELECTED AREAS WITH HUMAN HANDS THERMOELECTRIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Sulin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The device for thermal impact on separate zones of a hand of the person executed on the basis of thermoelectric converters of energy is considered. The advantages consisting in high environmental friendliness, noiselessness, reliability, functionality, universality are noted it. The technique of carrying out medical (preventive physiotherapeutic procedures, the hands of the person consisting in contrast thermal impact on a site with various level of heating and cooling, and also lasting expositions is described.

  14. Hydrologic Data Sites for Iron County, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map shows the USGS (United States Geologic Survey), NWIS (National Water Inventory System) Hydrologic Data Sites for Iron County, Utah. The scope and purpose of...

  15. Seismic retrofit guidelines for Utah highway bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Much of Utahs population dwells in a seismically active region, and many of the bridges connecting transportation lifelines predate the rigorous seismic design standards that have been developed in the past 10-20 years. Seismic retrofitting method...

  16. Selected hydrologic data for Juab Valley, Utah, 1935-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiger, Judy I.

    1995-01-01

    This report contains selected hydrologic data collected in Juab Valley, Utah, from 1935 to 1994. The study area is in eastern Juab County in central Utah. The area is bounded on the east by the Wasatch Range and San Pitch Mountains and on the west by Long Ridge and West Hills. A ground-water divide exists south of Levan Ridge, a topographic divide that separates the valley into northern and southern parts. The area is in the Basin and Range Physiographic Province described by Fenneman (1931) and includes about 171 square miles of basin-fill deposits (pl. 1).Most of the data in this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Central Utah Water Conservancy District and the East Juab Water Conservancy District. Some of the earlier data were published previously by Bjorklund (1967) and Bjorklund and Robinson (1968). Some well-location names have been changed from those published previously because new larger-scale maps allow location to be plotted more accurately. The changes are footnoted in the tables.The purpose of this report is to provide hydrologic data for use by the general public and by officials managing the water resources of the area and to supplement interpretive reports for the area. Selected well, spring, surface-water, and rock-sample data are reported in tables 1 to 10. Selected data, including well depth and water level, are reported for 283 wells, and results of chemical analyses are reported for samples from 74 wells, 15 springs, and 7 surface-water sites. The numbering system used in Utah for hydrologic data sites is shown in figure 1. Locations of the hydrologic-data sites and the rock-sample site are shown on plate 1. Discharge-measurement sites on Salt Creek, on selected canals, and in the West Creek area are shown in figure 2.These data could not have been collected without the cooperation of local residents and officials of irrigation companies and municipalities that permitted access to their wells, springs

  17. Application of satellite images analysis to assess the variability of the surface thermal heat island distribution in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudała, Janina; Nádudvari, Ádám; Bronder, Joachim; Fudała, Marta

    2018-01-01

    One of the elements of the urban plans for adapting to climate change is to identify the range the urban heat island (UHI). To a relatively rare ground station network air temperature, one of the possible methods to identify this phenomenon in cities is the analysis of satellite images, and in particular the thermal images surface cities in conjunction with the land-use structure. In the publication is presented the application of indirect methods of determining surface characteristics of heat island in the cities of Upper Silesia Agglomeration on the basis of the analysis of the thermal images from the satellite Landsat for the period 1986-2016. It presents ways to interpret these images depending on the needs of determination the areas sensitive to the impact of the (UHI) and define the areas where adaptation actions to the climate change should be undertaken.

  18. Application of satellite images analysis to assess the variability of the surface thermal heat island distribution in urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fudała Janina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the elements of the urban plans for adapting to climate change is to identify the range the urban heat island (UHI. To a relatively rare ground station network air temperature, one of the possible methods to identify this phenomenon in cities is the analysis of satellite images, and in particular the thermal images surface cities in conjunction with the land-use structure. In the publication is presented the application of indirect methods of determining surface characteristics of heat island in the cities of Upper Silesia Agglomeration on the basis of the analysis of the thermal images from the satellite Landsat for the period 1986-2016. It presents ways to interpret these images depending on the needs of determination the areas sensitive to the impact of the (UHI and define the areas where adaptation actions to the climate change should be undertaken.

  19. Ultrathin, Washable, and Large-Area Graphene Papers for Personal Thermal Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yang; Dun, Chaochao; Xu, Junwei; Mu, Jiuke; Li, Peiyun; Gu, Liwen; Hou, Chengyi; Hewitt, Corey A; Zhang, Qinghong; Li, Yaogang; Carroll, David L; Wang, Hongzhi

    2017-09-29

    Freestanding, flexible/foldable, and wearable bifuctional ultrathin graphene paper for heating and cooling is fabricated as an active material in personal thermal management (PTM). The promising electrical conductivity grants the superior Joule heating for extra warmth of 42 °C using a low supply voltage around 3.2 V. Besides, based on its high out-of-plane thermal conductivity, the graphene paper provides passive cooling via thermal transmission from the human body to the environment within 7 s. The cooling effect of graphene paper is superior compared with that of the normal cotton fiber, and this advantage will become more prominent with the increased thickness difference. The present bifunctional graphene paper possesses high durability against bending cycles over 500 times and wash time over 1500 min, suggesting its great potential in wearable PTM. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Hydrogeology of the Markagunt Plateau, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2010-01-01

    The Markagunt Plateau, in southwestern Utah, lies at an altitude of about 9,500 feet and is capped primarily by Quaternary-age basalt that overlies Eocene-age freshwater limestone of the Claron Formation. Over large parts of the Markagunt Plateau, dissolution of the Claron limestone and subsequent collapse of the overlying basalt have produced a terrain characterized by sinkholes as much as 1,000 feet across and 100 feet deep. Numerous large springs discharge from the basalt and underlying limestone on the plateau, including Mammoth Spring, one of the largest springs in Utah, with a discharge that can exceed 300 cubic feet per second. Discharge from Mammoth Spring is from the Claron Formation; however, recharge to the spring largely takes place by both focused and diffuse infiltration through the basalt that caps the limestone. Results of dye tracing to Mammoth Spring indicate that recharge originates largely southwest of the spring outside of the Mammoth Creek watershed, as well as from losing reaches along Mammoth Creek. Maximum groundwater travel time to the spring from dye-tracer tests during the snowmelt runoff period was about 1 week. Specific conductance and water temperature data from the spring show an inverse relation to discharge during snowmelt runoff and rainfall events, also indicating short groundwater residence times. Results of major-ion analyses for samples collected from Mammoth and other springs on the plateau indicate calcium-bicarbonate type water containing low (less than 200 mg/L) dissolved-solids concentrations. Investigations in the Navajo Lake area along the southern margin of the plateau have shown that water losing to sinkholes bifurcates and discharges to both Cascade and Duck Creek Springs, which subsequently flow into the Virgin and Sevier River basins, respectively. Groundwater travel times to these springs, on the basis of dye tracing, were about 8.5 and 53 hours, respectively. Similarly, groundwater travel time from Duck Creek

  1. Ground-water data, Sevier Desert, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Reed W.; Feltis, Richard D.

    1964-01-01

    This report is intended to serve two purposes: (1) to make available to the public basic ground-water data useful in planning and studying development of water resources, and (2) to supplement an interpretive report that will be published later.Records were collected during the period 1935-64 by the U.S. Geological survey in cooperation with the Utah State Engineer as part of the investigation of ground-water conditions in the Sevier Desert, in Juab and Millard Counties, Utah. The interpretive material will be published in a companion report by R. W. Mower and R. D. Feltis.This report is most useful in predicting conditions likely to be found in areas that are being considered as well sites. The person considering the new well can spot the proposed site on plate 1 and examine the records of nearby wells as shown in the tables and figures. From table 1 he can note such things as depth, diameter, water level, yield, use of water, temperature of water, and depth of perforations. By comparing the depth of perforations with the drillers' logs in table 3 he can note the type of material that yields water to the wells. Table 2 and figure 2 show the historic fluctuations and trends of water levels in the vicinity. From table 4 he can note the chemical quality of the water from wells in the vicinity. Table 5 shows the amount of water discharged during 1951-63 from the pumped irrigation, public supply, and industrial wells. If the reader decides from his examination that conditions are favorable, he can place an application to drill a well with the state Engineer. If the State Engineer believes unappropriated water is available, the application may be approved after minimum statutory requirements have been satisfied.The report is also useful when planning large-scale developments of water supply. This and other uses of the report will be helped by use of the interpretive report upon its release.

  2. Simulation of thermal indoor climate in buildings by using human Projected Area Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jørgen Erik

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays many new and old buildings in Denmark have large glass surfaces. This is a consequence of the technical development of windows with low U-values that has made it possible to build houses with windows from floor to ceiling in northern climates. On the other hand if one is sitting close to...... for dynamic building thermal analysis. The method is demonstrated in a newer apartment with windows from floor to ceiling and shows how impotent it is to include the radiant effect from the glass sur-faces and how it influences the indoor thermal climate significantly.......Nowadays many new and old buildings in Denmark have large glass surfaces. This is a consequence of the technical development of windows with low U-values that has made it possible to build houses with windows from floor to ceiling in northern climates. On the other hand if one is sitting close...... to these large windows on a cold winter day it is recognized that this can cause thermal discomfort. The calculation of this discomfort needs to be taken properly into account in the simulation of the thermal indoor climate and energy consumption of the rooms. The operative temperature can be used as a simple...

  3. Investigation of thermal effect on exterior wall surface of building material at urban city area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Dzinun, Hazlini; Ponraj, M.; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Noor, Zainura Zainun [Institute of Environmental Water Resources and Management (IPASA), Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Remaz, Dilshah [Faculty of Built Environment, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Iwao, Kenzo [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the investigation of heat impact on the vertical surfaces of buildings based on their thermal behavior. The study was performed based on four building materials that is commonly used in Malaysia; brick, concrete, granite and white concrete tiles. The thermal performances on the building materials were investigated using a surface temperature sensor, data logging system and infrared thermography. Results showed that the brick had the capability to absorb and store heat greater than other materials during the investigation period. The normalized heat (total heat/solar radiation) of the brick was 0.093 and produces high heat (51% compared to granite), confirming a substantial amount of heat being released into the atmosphere through radiation and convection. The most sensitive material that absorbs and stores heat was in the following order: brick > concrete > granite > white concrete tiles. It was concluded that the type of exterior wall material used in buildings had significant impact to the environment.

  4. Thermal investigation on high power dfb broad area lasers at 975 nm, with 60% efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostallino, R.; Garcia, M.; Deshayes, Y.; Larrue, A.; Robert, Y.; Vinet, E.; Bechou, L.; Lecomte, M.; Parillaud, O.; Krakowski, M.

    2016-03-01

    The demand of high power diode lasers in the range of 910-980nm is regularly growing. This kind of device for many applications, such as fiber laser pumping [1], material processing [1], solid-state laser pumping [1], defense and medical/dental. The key role of this device lies in the efficiency (𝜂𝐸) of converting input electrical power into output optical power. The high value of 𝜂𝐸 allows high power level and reduces the need in heat dissipation. The requirement of wavelength stabilization with temperature is more obvious in the case of multimode 975nm diode lasers used for pumping Yb, Er and Yb/Er co-doped solid-state lasers, due to the narrow absorption line close to this wavelength. Such spectral width property (stabilization (0.07 𝑛𝑚 • °𝐶-1), provided by a uniform distributed feedback grating (DFB) introduced by etching and re-growth process techniques, is achievable in high power diode lasers using optical feedback. This paper reports on the development of the diode laser structure and the process techniques required to write the gratings taking into account of the thermal dissipation and optical performances. Performances are particularly determined in terms of experimental electro-optical characterizations. One of the main objectives is to determine the thermal resistance of the complete assembly to ensure the mastering of the diode laser temperature for operating condition. The classical approach to determine junction temperature is based on the infrared thermal camera, the spectral measurement and the pulse electrical method. In our case, we base our measurement on the spectral measurement but this approach is not well adapted to the high power diodes laser studied. We develop a new measurement based on the pulse electrical method and using the T3STERequipment. This method is well known for electronic devices and LEDs but is weakly developed for the high power diodes laser. This crucial

  5. 20-year study of Barn Owl (Tyto alba) reproduction in northern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl D. Marti

    1997-01-01

    I studied reproduction of the Barn Owl (Tyto alba) in northern Utah from 1977 through 1996 documenting 451 nesting attempts by at least 500 individuals. The study site was a narrow valley bounded by the Wasatch Mountains and the Great Salt Lake. This area was formerly shrubsteppe desert, but that community is now entirely supplanted by irrigated...

  6. Golden eagle indifference to heli-skiing and military helicopters in northern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teryl G. Grubb; David K. Delaney; William W. Bowerman; Michael R. Wierda

    2010-01-01

    In 2006-2007, during Wasatch Powderbird Guides (WPG) permit renewal for heli-skiing in the Tri-Canyon Area (TCA) of the Wasatch Mountains, Utah, USA, we recorded 303 helicopter passes between 0 m and 3,000 m (horizontal distance) near >30 individual golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in 22 nesting territories, through passive observation and active experimentation...

  7. Peculiar features of modeling of thermal processes of the cutting area in the SOLIDWORKS SIMULATION system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepchin Ya.A.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Management of thermo-physical process of cutting zone by changing certain parameters of the cutting regime, tool geometry or coolant using allows to achieve a higher level of handling performance. The forecasting of thermal processes during metal cutting is characterized by the multifactor of the model and the nonlinearity of the connection between the temperature field of the cutting zone and the processing parameters. Therefore realistic modeling of these processes with regard to the maximum number of influencing factors which will minimize the time and cost of experimental studies is very important. The research investigates the use of computer-aided design SolidWorks Simulation system to analyze the thermal processes occurring in the cutting zone during finishing turning of hardened circular steel cutting blade of superhard material. While modeling, the distribution of heat generated in cut (in the zone of plastic deformation of the workpiece and on the surfaces of friction of the cutting blade with chips and the treated surface is observed by four flows: to the tool, chips, workpiece and the environment. The limiting conditions for the existence of the developed model-geometric, physical and temporal limits are defined. Simulation is performed in steady and transient modes. Control of adequacy of simulation results is made. The conclusions of the analysis of opportunities of CAD SolidWorks Simulation System for research of thermal processes the cutting zone are drawn.

  8. Seepage water of northern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Samuel

    1897-01-01

    The term “seepage water” is used by the irrigators of the West to designate the water which reaches the lowest grounds or the stream channels, swelling the latter by imperceptible degrees and keeping up the flow long after the rains have ceased and the snow has melted. The word “seepage” is applied particularly to the water which begins to appear in spots below irrigation canals and cultivated fields, usually some months or even years after irrigation has been introduced, and which tends to convert the lowlands into marshes and gives rise to springs, which in turn may be employed in watering other fields.The importance of a thorough knowledge of the behavior of seepage water is obvious when consideration is given to the close relationship which exists between the available water supply and the material prosperity of the arid region where irrigation is practiced. This is particularly true of Utah, where every readily available source of supply has long since been utilized and where the rapidly increasing agricultural population necessitates the complete utilization of all fresh waters.

  9. Epoxy composites filled with high surface area-carbon fillers: Optimization of electromagnetic shielding, electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhir, P.; Paddubskaya, A.; Plyushch, A.; Volynets, N.; Maksimenko, S.; Macutkevic, J.; Kranauskaite, I.; Banys, J.; Ivanov, E.; Kotsilkova, R.; Celzard, A.; Fierro, V.; Zicans, J.; Ivanova, T.; Merijs Meri, R.; Bochkov, I.; Cataldo, A.; Micciulla, F.; Bellucci, S.; Lambin, Ph.

    2013-10-01

    A comprehensive analysis of electrical, electromagnetic (EM), mechanical, and thermal properties of epoxy resin composites filled with 0.25-2.0 wt. % of carbon additives characterized by high surface area, both nano-sized, like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon black (CBH), and micro-sized exfoliated graphite (EG), was performed. We found that the physical properties of both CNTs- and CBH-based epoxy resin composites increased all together with filler content and even more clearly for CBH than for CNTs. In the case of EG-based composites, good correlation between properties and filler amount was observed for concentrations below 1.5 wt. %. We conclude that CBH and, to a lower extent, EG could replace expensive CNTs for producing effective EM materials in microwave and low-frequency ranges, which are, in addition, mechanically and thermally stable.

  10. Dendrochronology of Utah Juniper (Juniperus osteosperma (Torr.) Little)

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin Derose; Matthew F. Bekker; Roger Kjelgren; Brendan M. Buckley; James H. Speer; Eric B. Allen

    2016-01-01

    Utah juniper was a foundational species for the discipline of dendrochronology, having been used in the early 20th Century investigations of Mesa Verde, but has been largely ignored by dendrochronologists since. Here we present dendrochronological investigations of Utah juniper core and cross-sectional samples from four sites in northern Utah. We demonstrate that,...

  11. Utah Article Delivery: A New Model for Consortial Resource Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Carol A.; Lee, Daniel R.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the UTAD (Utah Article Delivery) Pilot Project, an innovative resource-sharing service that provides journal articles to the Utah higher education community, developed by the Utah Academic Library Consortium (UALC) in partnership with EBSCO Document Services. Highlights include goals, options considered, challenges, and evaluation. The…

  12. 75 FR 12562 - Central Utah Project Completion Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-16

    ...: Department of the Interior, Office of the Assistant Secretary-- Water and Science; Utah Reclamation... River and its interface with Utah Lake related to flow, food supply and shelter. A compounding factor is... Utah Lake; Expedite recovery of the endangered June sucker by re- establishing essential June sucker...

  13. A Comparison of Multiple Datasets for Monitoring Thermal Time in Urban Areas over the U.S. Upper Midwest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Krehbiel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Traditional studies of urban climate used air temperature observations from local urban/rural weather stations in order to analyze the general pattern of higher temperatures in urban areas compared with corresponding rural regions, also known as the Urban Heat Island (UHI effect. More recently, satellite remote sensing datasets of land surface temperature have been exploited to monitor UHIs. While closely linked, air temperature and land surface temperature (LST observations do not measure the same variables. Here we analyze land surface temperature vs. air temperature-based characterization and seasonality of the UHI and the surface UHI (SUHI from 2003 to 2012 over the Upper Midwest region of the United States using LST from MODIS, and air temperature from the Daymet modeled gridded daily air temperature dataset, and compare both datasets to ground station data from first-order weather stations of the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN located in eleven urban areas spanning our study region. We first convert the temperature data to metrics of nocturnal, diurnal, and daily thermal time and their annual accumulations to draw conclusions on nighttime vs. daytime and seasonal dynamics of the UHI. In general, the MODIS LST-derived results are able to capture urban–rural differences in daytime, nighttime, and daily thermal time while the Daymet air temperature-derived results show very little urban–rural differences in thermal time. Compared to the GHCN ground station air temperature-derived observations, MODIS LST-derived results are closer in terms of urban–rural differences in nighttime thermal time, while the results from Daymet are closer to the observations from GHCN during the daytime. We also found differences in the seasonal dynamics of UHIs measured by air temperature observations and SUHIs measured by LST observations.

  14. Seepage study of the Sevier River and the Central Utah, McIntyre, and Leamington Canals, Juab and Millard Counties, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, L.R.; Cruff, R.W.; Holmes, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    A study of the gains or losses of the Sevier River and the Central Utah, McIntyre, and Leamington Canals in the Leamington area, in Juab and Millard Counties, Utah, was made to determine changes in those reaches. Three to seven sets of seepage measurements made during 1980 were used in the analysis. Adjustments for fluctuations in flow were made from information obtained from water-stage recorders operated at selected locations during the time of each seepage run.The study showed an overall net gain of about 9 cubic feet per second (0.25 cubic meter per second) in the Sevier River and about 1.3 cubic feet per second (0.04 cubic meter per second) in the Leamington Canal. It also showed a net loss of about 1 cubic feet per second (0.20 cubic meter per second) in the Central Utah Canal and about 0.8 cubic foot per second (0.02 cubic meter per second) in the McIntyre Canal. The gains in the Sevier River and Leamington Canal probably come chiefly as return seepage of water lost from the Central Utah and McIntyre Canals.

  15. Geochemistry of thermal fluids in NW Honduras: New perspectives for exploitation of geothermal areas in the southern Sula graben

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaccioni, Bruno; Franco, Tassi; Alberto, Renzulli; Orlando, Vaselli; Marco, Menichetti; Salvatore, Inguaggiato

    2014-06-01

    The results of a geochemical survey on thermal waters and, for the first time for this site, gas discharges in five geothermal sites (Azacualpa "La Cueva", Río Ulua, Río Gualcarque, El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente) in NW Honduras are here presented and discussed. El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente, in the southern part of the Sula graben are very close to a Quaternary basaltic field, whereas Azacualpa "La Cueva", Río Ulua and Río Gualcarque, located to the southwest of the Yojoa Lake, direcly emerge from the Cretaceous limestone deposits. The measured temperatures range between 37.5 and 104.8 °C. "Mature", alkaline, Na-SO4 thermal waters discharge from Azacualpa "La Cueva", while those from El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente are "immature" and show a Na-HCO3 composition. Chemical equilibria of waters and gases from the Azacualpa "La Cueva" thermal springs indicate temperatures ranging from 150 to 200 °C. Conversely, gas discharges from El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente have attained a partial chemical equilibrium in the liquid phase at slightly higher temperatures (200-250 °C), although gas-gas faster reactions involving CO seem to be adjusted in an isothermally separated vapor phase. Unlike Azacualpa, SiO2 geothermometer at El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente indicates equilibrium temperatures for the liquid phase much lower than those calculated for the gas phase (≤ 120 °C). We conclude that thermal waters from the Azacualpa area likely represent the direct emergence of a water dominated reservoir having temperatures ≤ 150-200 °C. By contrast, at El Olivar and Laguna de Agua Caliente hot springs are supplied by a boiling shallow aquifer fed by a vapor phase rising from a steam-dominated zone. The above geochemical model is consistent with a geothermal reservoir hosted within the Cretaceous carbonate sequences of the Yojoa Group in the whole investigated sites. The reservoir extensively crops out in the Azacualpa area whereas the

  16. 76 FR 69296 - University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of Renewed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION University of Utah, University of Utah TRIGA Nuclear Reactor, Notice of Issuance of Renewed... Test Reactor Licensing Branch, Division of Policy and Rulemaking, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation... University of Utah (UU, the licensee), which authorizes continued operation of the UU TRIGA Nuclear Reactor...

  17. Dynamics of Soil Heat Flux in Lowland Area: Estimating the Soil Thermal Conductivy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, T.; Silveira, M. V.; Roberti, D. R.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, it is shown soil thermal conductivity estimates in a flooded irrigated rice culture located at the Paraíso do Sul city for two distinct periods. The thermal conductivity is higher when the heat storage is higher and the soil surface temperature is lower. The soil thermal conductivity is also dependant on the soil texture, porosity and moisture. Therefore, it varies from soil to soil and in the same soil, depending on its soil moisture. For approximately 80% of its growing season, lowland flooded irrigated rice ecosystems stay under a 5 - 10 cm water layer. It affects the partitioning of the energy and water balance components. Furthermore this planting technique differs substantially from any other upland non-irrigated or irrigated crop ecosystems where the majority of observational studies have been conducted. In the present work, the dynamic of soil heat flux (G) is analyzed and the soil thermal conductivity (Ks) is estimated using experimental data form soil heat flux and soil temperature in a rice paddy farm in a subtropical location in Southern Brazil. In this region, rice grows once a year at river lowlands and wetlands while the ground is kept bare during the remaining of the year. The soil type is Planossolo Hidromórfico Distrófico, characterized as a mix between sandy and clay soil. The soil heat flux (G) was experimentally estimated with the sensor Hukseflux (HFP01SC-L) at 7 cm bellow the soil surface. The soil temperature at 5 cm and 10 cm was experimentally estimated using the sensor STP01. The experimental soil heat flux was compared with estimated soil heat flux by two forms: (1) using a know Ks from literature for this type of soil in saturated conditions (Ks=1.58); (2) using Ks estimated using the inversion of the equation Qg=-ks* ((T10-T5)/ (Z2-Z1)), where T10 and T5 are the temperature in 10 and 5 cm above the soil and Z2-Z1 is the difference between the positions in temperature measurement. The study period for estimating the Ks

  18. Geothermal potential and origin of natural thermal fluids in the northern Lake Abaya area, Main Ethiopian Rift, East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minissale, A.; Corti, G.; Tassi, F.; Darrah, T. H.; Vaselli, O.; Montanari, D.; Montegrossi, G.; Yirgu, G.; Selmo, E.; Teclu, A.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the occurrence, chemical composition, origin and geothermal significance of thermal springs and fumaroles naturally discharging in the area located north of the Lake Abaya (western margin of the Main Ethiopian Rift, East Africa) are reviewed in relation with recent tectonics. All thermal springs showed a dominantly Na-HCO3 composition, consistent with observations dating from at least 1972, and most of them displayed a narrow range of δD and δ18O isotopic compositions for water similar to regional meteoric origins. These observations suggest that water-rock interaction processes occur in all aquifers and dominate the contributions of water that actively circulate within thermal fluids, and also suggest a similar elevation of groundwater recharge throughout the study area. Most of the thermal springs are dominated by a CO2-rich gas phase and discharge along the active faults bordering the western edge of the Main Ethiopian Rift valley. The δ13C values of CO2 and the 3He/4He isotopic ratios are consistent with the presence of mantle-derived fluids similar to what is observed in many other areas along the kinematically active African Rift, especially within Ethiopia. The application of geothermometric techniques in the liquid and the gas phases suggests the presence of a deep reservoir in which the fluids equilibrated at a maximum temperature of approximately 180 °C. Additionally, the presence of fumaroles at boiling temperatures and water/mud boiling pools in several places suggests that the geothermal reservoir is positioned at a relatively shallow depth and likely located in the western side of the study area. The analysis of data collected throughout time reveals that the waters of Lake Abaya have experienced an increase in salinity of 20% paralleled contemporaneously with a decrease in pH and δ18O and δD of water in the last 40 years; these changes do not appear to be related to climate change-induced increases in temperature or evaporation

  19. Geochemistry and hydrothermal alteration at selected Utah hot springs. Final report: Volume 3 (revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, W.T.; Benson, N.L.; Miller, C.D.

    1976-07-01

    Application of Na-K-Ca geothermometry to warm springs in Utah indicates several areas with sufficiently high apparent temperatures to be of interest as geothermal exploration targets. A zone of warm springs in the Bonneville Basin show Na-K-Ca temperatures from 150/sup 0/C to 233/sup 0/C. Examination of Great Salt Lake, Bonneville sediment pore water, and Jordan Valley well-water chemistry indicates that mixing a small percent of these fluids with warm spring water can cause substantial errors in Na-K-Ca temperature estimates. Other saline deposits which may influence Na-K-Ca temperature estimates are the Paradox formation in southeastern Utah, the Muddy Creek formation in southwestern Utah, the Arapien shale in central Utah, the Preuss formation in northeastern Utah, and Playa salts in much of western Utah. The Roosevelt KGRA is the most attractive target identified by Na-K-Ca geothermometry. Hydrothermal alteration, heavy metal distribution, and water chemistry provide additional characterization of the Roosevelt system. Chemistry of a cool water seep (25/sup 0/C) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 241/sup 0/C and SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 125/sup 0/C. A Phillips well flowing from below 1500' (457m) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 262/sup 0/C, SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 262/sup 0/C, and K of 1.5 times the surface spring value. The near surface alteration assemblage is best explained in terms of a decrease in pH of near surface fluids as sulfide oxidizes. Increasing potassium and pH with depth indicates that a K-feldspar stable zone may be intersected with deeper drilling. Geology and alteration were mapped in the Monroe KGRA. (JGB)

  20. Preliminary determination of geothermal working area based on Thermal Infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoes Nugroho, Indra; Kurniawahidayati, Beta; Syahputra Mulyana, Reza; Saepuloh, Asep

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing is one of the methods for geothermal exploration. This method can be used to map the geological structures, manifestations, and predict the geothermal potential area. The results from remote sensing were used as guidance for the next step exploration. Analysis of target in remote sensing is an efficient method to delineate geothermal surface manifestation without direct contact to the object. The study took a place in District Merangin, Jambi Province, Indonesia. The area was selected due to existing of Merangin volcanic complex composed by Mounts Sumbing and Hulunilo with surface geothermal manifestations presented by hot springs and hot pools. The location of surface manifestations could be related with local and regional structures of Great Sumatra Fault. The methods used in this study were included identification of volcanic products, lineament extraction, and lineament density quantification. The objective of this study is to delineate the potential zones for sitting the geothermal working site based on Thermal Infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors. The lineament-related to geological structures, was aimed for high lineament density, is using ALOS - PALSAR (Advanced Land Observing Satellite - The Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar) level 1.1. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) analysis was used to predict the vegetation condition using Landsat 8 OLI-TIRS (The Operational Land Imager – Thermal Infrared Sensor). The brightness temperature was extracted from TIR band to estimate the surface temperature. Geothermal working area identified based on index overlay method from extracted parameter of remote sensing data was located at the western part of study area (Graho Nyabu area). This location was identified because of the existence of high surface temperature about 30°C, high lineament density about 4 - 4.5 km/km2 and low NDVI values less than 0.3.

  1. Effects of Unstable Thermal Stratification on Vertical Fluxes of Heat and Momentum in Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Moral, Andres; Santiago, Jose Luis; Martilli, Alberto

    2017-04-01

    A Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes microscale model is used for the simulation of the effect of unstable thermal stratification on the flow within an aligned configuration of building-like cubes as used in Santiago et al. (Urban Clim 9:115-133, 2014). The spatially-averaged results show increased dispersive fluxes, turbulent length scales and sectional drag coefficient. An extension of K-theory is presented to parametrize the sum of the turbulent and dispersive fluxes, and the length scale and drag coefficient increases are parametrized as functions of the ratio of buoyant and inertial forces. This approach improves the results of urban canopy parametrization simulations inside and above the urban canyon and represents the first attempt to account for the dispersive fluxes and the effect of solar radiation on the flow.

  2. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling.

  3. A Multi-scale Approach to Urban Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluch, Renne; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2005-01-01

    An environmental consequence of urbanization is the urban heat island effect, a situation where urban areas are warmer than surrounding rural areas. The urban heat island phenomenon results from the replacement of natural landscapes with impervious surfaces such as concrete and asphalt and is linked to adverse economic and environmental impacts. In order to better understand the urban microclimate, a greater understanding of the urban thermal pattern (UTP), including an analysis of the thermal properties of individual land covers, is needed. This study examines the UTP by means of thermal land cover response for the Salt Lake City, Utah, study area at two scales: 1) the community level, and 2) the regional or valleywide level. Airborne ATLAS (Advanced Thermal Land Applications Sensor) data, a high spatial resolution (10-meter) dataset appropriate for an environment containing a concentration of diverse land covers, are used for both land cover and thermal analysis at the community level. The ATLAS data consist of 15 channels covering the visible, near-IR, mid-IR and thermal-IR wavelengths. At the regional level Landsat TM data are used for land cover analysis while the ATLAS channel 13 data are used for the thermal analysis. Results show that a heat island is evident at both the community and the valleywide level where there is an abundance of impervious surfaces. ATLAS data perform well in community level studies in terms of land cover and thermal exchanges, but other, more coarse-resolution data sets are more appropriate for large-area thermal studies. Thermal response per land cover is consistent at both levels, which suggests potential for urban climate modeling at multiple scales.

  4. Norway spruce needles as bioindicator of air pollution in the area of influence of the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant, Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Sayegh Petkovsek, Samar [ERICo Velenje, Ecological Research and Industrial Cooperation Institute, Koroska 58, 3320 Velenje (Slovenia)], E-mail: samar.petkovsek@erico.si; Batic, Franc [Agronomy Department, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Jamnikarjeva 101, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Ribaric Lasnik, Cvetka [Institute of Environment and Spatial Planning, Ipavceva 18, 3000 Celje (Slovenia)

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports the results of total sulphur content, photosynthetic pigments, ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and {alpha}-tocopherol (vitamin E) analysed in current-year needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in the area influenced by sulphur emissions from the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (STPP), Slovenia, in the period 1991-2004. Ten differently polluted sampling sites in the emission area of STPP were selected. After desulphurization of emission gases from STPP total sulphur content in needles decreased and vitality parameters of needles increased. Moreover, a strong correlation between the average annual emissions of SO{sub 2} from STPP and average annual sulphur content (increase) or average annual chlorophyll content (decrease) in current-year needles was found. The results showed that spruce needles may be an useful bioindicator for detecting changes in the emission rates of SO{sub 2}. - Total sulphur content in needles is a well proved indicator of sulphur burden in the environment.

  5. Norway spruce needles as bioindicator of air pollution in the area of influence of the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant, Slovenia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samar Al Sayegh Petkovsek; Franc Batic; Cvetka Ribaric Lasnik [ERICo Velenje, Velenje (Slovenia). Ecological Research and Industrial Cooperation Institute

    2008-01-15

    This paper reports the results of total sulphur content, photosynthetic pigments, ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and {alpha}-tocopherol (vitamin E) analysed in current-year needles of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) in the area influenced by sulphur emissions from the Sostanj Thermal Power Plant (STPP), Slovenia, in the period 1991-2004. Ten differently polluted sampling sites in the emission area of STPP were selected. After desulphurization of emission gases from STPP total sulphur content in needles decreased and vitality parameters of needles increased. Moreover, a strong correlation between the average annual emissions of SO{sub 2} from STPP and average annual sulphur content (increase) or average annual chlorophyll content (decrease) in current-year needles was found. The results showed that spruce needles may be an useful bioindicator for detecting changes in the emission rates of SO{sub 2}.

  6. Numerical Modeling of the Effect of Thawing of Soil in the Area of Placing Tanks for Storage Fuel of Thermal Power Plants and Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovnikov V.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the numerical modeling of heat transfer in the area placing of the tank for storage fuel of thermal power plant and boiler with considering the influence of thawing of the soil. We have established that the thawing of the soil in the area of placing of the tank for storage fuel of thermal power plant and boiler have little effect on the change of heat loss.

  7. Stereo Pair, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Winter Olympics are hosted by Salt Lake City at several venues within the city, in nearby cities, and within the adjacent Wasatch Mountains. This image pair provides a stereoscopic map view of north central Utah that includes all of these Olympic sites. In the south, next to Utah Lake, Provo hosts the ice hockey competition. In the north, northeast of the Great Salt Lake, Ogden hosts curling and the nearby Snowbasin ski area hosts the downhill events. In between, southeast of the Great Salt Lake, Salt Lake City hosts the Olympic Village and the various skating events. Further east, across the Wasatch Mountains, the Park City ski resort hosts the bobsled, ski jumping, and snowboarding events. The Winter Olympics are always hosted in mountainous terrain. This view shows the dramatic landscape that makes the Salt Lake City region a world-class center for winter sports.This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR

  8. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelling, H.H. (comp.)

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  9. Utah Science Vol. 62 No. 1, 2003

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    2 PUTTING FAT ON THE TASTE MAP 8 GAINING WEIGHT AND LOSING YOUR MIND 18 THINKING LIKE YOUR ANIMALS 12 SEEDS -new people, grants and contracts in science 15 SYNTHESIS -science at Utah State 24 SEEK -discoveries in science 25 SEARCH -science on the web

  10. Utah Youth Suicide Study: Psychological Autopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskos, Michelle; Olson, Lenora; Halbern, Sarah; Keller, Trisha; Gray, Doug

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a psychological autopsy study to further understand youth suicide in Utah. While traditional psychological autopsy studies primarily focus on the administration of psychometric measures to identify any underlying diagnosis of mental illness for the suicide decedent, we focused our interviews to identify which contacts in the…

  11. Project Horizon: How Utah Is Reducing Recidivism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Daimar

    2000-01-01

    Project Horizon, Utah's statute to reduce the economic and social cost of recidivism, shifted funding for correctional education to the state education agency. Parolees who participated in Project Horizon had an 18-20 percent lower recidivism rate than nonparticipants and found post-release jobs 89 percent of the time. (JOW)

  12. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelling, H.H. (comp.)

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  13. 40 CFR 81.345 - Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... County Salt Lake County (part) Remainder of Salt Lake County San Juan County Sanpete County Sevier County... Morgan County Piute County Rich County San Juan County Sanpete County Sevier County Summit County Tooele... Sanpete County Sevier County Summit County Tooele County Uintah County Utah County Wasatch County...

  14. 78 FR 9807 - Utah Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-12

    ... did not respond to our request. State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) Under 30 CFR 732.17(h)(4), we are required to request comments from the SHPO... Utah program. We find that good cause exists under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3) to make this final rule effective...

  15. Assessing spatial associations between thermal stress and mortality in Hong Kong: a small-area ecological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Thuan-Quoc; Zheng, Qishi; Lai, Poh-Chin; Wong, Paulina Pui-Yun; Chau, Patsy Yuen-Kwan; Jahn, Heiko J; Plass, Dietrich; Katzschner, Lutz; Kraemer, Alexander; Wong, Chit-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Physiological equivalent temperature (PET) is a widely used index to assess thermal comfort of the human body. Evidence on how thermal stress-related health effects vary with small geographical areas is limited. The objectives of this study are (i) to explore whether there were significant patterns of geographical clustering of thermal stress as measured by PET and mortality and (ii) to assess the association between PET and mortality in small geographical areas. A small area ecological cross-sectional study was conducted at tertiary planning units (TPUs) level. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) and monthly deaths at TPUs level for 2006 were calculated for cause-specific diseases. A PET map with 100 m × 100 m resolution for the same period was derived from Hong Kong Urban Climatic Analysis Map data and the annual and monthly averages of PET for each TPU were computed. Global Moran's I and local indicator of spatial association (LISA) analyses were performed. A generalized linear mixed model was used to model monthly deaths against PET adjusted for socio-economic deprivation. We found positive spatial autocorrelation between PET and ASMR. There were spatial correlations between PET and ASMR, particularly in the north of Hong Kong Island, most parts of Kowloon, and across New Territories. A 1°C change in PET was associated with an excess risk (%) of 2.99 (95% CI: 0.50-5.48) for all natural causes, 4.75 (1.14-8.36) for cardiovascular, 7.39 (4.64-10.10) for respiratory diseases in the cool season, and 4.31 (0.12 to 8.50) for cardiovascular diseases in the warm season. Variations between TPUs in PET had an important influence on cause-specific mortality, especially in the cool season. PET may have an impact on the health of socio-economically deprived population groups. Our results suggest that targeting policy interventions at high-risk areas may be a feasible option for reducing PET-related mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Gardening guide for high-desert urban landscapes of Great Basin regions in Nevada and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidi Kratsch; Rick Heflebower

    2013-01-01

    Some Great Basin urban areas in Utah and Nevada exhibit climatic conditions that make it difficult for all but the toughest landscape plants to thrive without providing supplemental water. These areas are found at elevations from 4,000 feet to 6,000 feet in USDA cold-hardiness zones 6 and 7. Soils are often poor and gravelly, containing less than 1 percent organic...

  17. Multi-method, multi-scale geophysical observations in the Obsidian Pool Thermal Area, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Pasquet, S.; Sims, K. W. W.; Dickey, K.

    2016-12-01

    Despite the prominence of Yellowstone as the world's most active hydrothermal province, relatively little is known about the plumbing systems that link deeper hydrothermal fluids to the charismatic hot springs, geysers and mud pots at the surface. We present the results of a multi-method, multi-scale geophysical investigation of the Obsidian Pool Thermal Area (OPTA) in Yellowstone National Park. OPTA hosts acid-sulfate hot springs and mud pots with relatively low pH. We present the results of seismic refraction, electrical resistivity, time-domain EM (TEM), soil conductivity meter (EMI), and GPR data acquired in July 2016. There is a strong contrast in physical properties in the upper 50 m of the subsurface between the low-lying hydrothermal area and surrounding hills: the hydrothermal area has much lower seismic velocities ( 1 km/s vs 3 km/s) and electrical resistivity ( 20 ohm-m vs 300 ohm-m). A prominent zone of very low resistivity (<10 ohm-m) exists at about 20 m depth beneath all hydrothermal features. Poisson's ratio, calculated from P-wave refraction tomography and surface wave inversions, shows low values beneath the "frying pan," where gas is emerging in small fumaroles, suggesting that Poisson's ratio is an effective "gas detector" in hydrothermal areas. Near-surface resistivity mapped from EMI shows a strong correlation with hydrothermal areas previously mapped by heat flow, with areas of high heat flow generally having low resistivity near the surface. Two exceptions are (1) the "frying pan," which shows a central area of high resistivity (corresponding to escaping gas) surrounding by a halo of low resistivity, and (2) a broad area of low resistivity connecting the hydrothermal centers to the lake, which may be clay deposits. TEM data penetrate up to 200 m in depth and suggest that a reservoir of hydrothermal fluids may underlie the entire area, including beneath the forested hills, at depths greater than 100 m, but that they rise toward the surface in

  18. Simulations of a Cold-Air Pool in Utah's Salt Lake Valley: Sensitivity to Land Use and Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Christopher S.; Crosman, Erik T.; Horel, John D.

    2017-02-01

    Obtaining realistic land-surface states for initial and boundary conditions is important for the numerical weather prediction of many atmospheric phenomena. Here we investigate model sensitivity to land use and snow cover for a persistent wintertime cold-air pool in northern Utah during 1-8 January 2011. A Weather Research and Forecast model simulation using the 1993 United States Geological Survey land-use and North American Mesoscale model reanalysis snow-cover datasets is compared to an improved configuration using the modified 2011 National Land Cover Database and a more realistic representation of snow cover. The improved surface specification results in an increase (decrease) in urban land cover (Great Salt Lake surface area), and changes to the snow-cover initialization, depth, extent, and albedo. The results obtained from the model simulations are compared to observations collected during the Persistent Cold-Air Pool Study. The changes in land use and snow cover and the resulting impacts on the surface albedo and surface heat fluxes contributed to near-surface air temperature increases of 1-2°C in urban areas and decreases of 2-4°C in areas surrounding the Great Salt Lake. Although wind speeds in the boundary layer were overestimated in both simulations, shallow thermally-driven and terrain-forced flows were generally lessened in intensity and breadth in response to the decreased areal extent of the Great Salt Lake and increases in the urban footprint.

  19. Development of concepts for the management of thermal resources in urban areas - Assessment of transferability from the Basel (Switzerland) and Zaragoza (Spain) case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epting, Jannis; García-Gil, Alejandro; Huggenberger, Peter; Vázquez-Suñe, Enric; Mueller, Matthias H.

    2017-05-01

    The shallow subsurface in urban areas is increasingly used by shallow geothermal energy systems as a renewable energy resource and as a cheap cooling medium, e.g. for building air conditioning. In combination with further anthropogenic activities, this results in altered thermal regimes in the subsurface and the so-called subsurface urban heat island effect. Successful thermal management of urban groundwater resources requires understanding the relative contributions of the different thermal parameters and boundary conditions that result in the "present thermal state" of individual urban groundwater bodies. To evaluate the "present thermal state" of urban groundwater bodies, good quality data are required to characterize the hydraulic and thermal aquifer parameters. This process also involved adequate monitoring systems which provide consistent subsurface temperature measurements and are the basis for parameterizing numerical heat-transport models. This study is based on previous work already published for two urban groundwater bodies in Basel (CH) and Zaragoza (ES), where comprehensive monitoring networks (hydraulics and temperature) as well as calibrated high-resolution numerical flow- and heat-transport models have been analyzed. The "present thermal state" and how it developed according to the different hydraulic and thermal boundary conditions is compared to a "potential natural state" in order to assess the anthropogenic thermal changes that have already occurred in the urban groundwater bodies we investigated. This comparison allows us to describe the various processes concerning groundwater flow and thermal regimes for the different urban settings. Furthermore, the results facilitate defining goals for specific aquifer regions, including future aquifer use and urbanization, as well as evaluating the thermal use potential for these regions. As one example for a more sustainable thermal use of subsurface water resources, we introduce the thermal management

  20. Liquefaction in the 15 April 2010 Mw 4.5 Randolph, Utah, Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duross, C. B.; Pankow, K. L.

    2010-12-01

    The 15 April 2010 Mw 4.5 (Ml 4.9) Randolph, Utah, earthquake occurred 9 km northeast of Randolph near the base of the Crawford Mountains, which formed by movement on the Quaternary-active Crawford Mountains fault. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)/St. Louis University moment tensor solution indicates the quake occurred on a normal fault striking 339° and dipping 66° southwest (which we prefer) or an alternative plane striking 210° and dipping 35° southeast. The quake generated moderate to strong shaking in the epicentral region, was widely felt throughout northern Utah and surrounding states (>2500 responses in a ~200-250 km radius on the USGS Community Internet Intensity Map), and was well recorded by the Utah Regional Seismic Network. Only moderate, non-structural damage was reported. The Randolph earthquake is unusual in that it generated liquefaction (rare for M earthquake is thus one of the smallest earthquakes recorded with modern instrumentation to generate liquefaction. We observed sand boils in alluvial sediments earthquake helps refine the lower magnitude and ground-shaking limit for liquefaction, which is important for geotechnical engineering applications in areas underlain by highly susceptible soils and for interpretation of paleoliquefaction features in regions lacking fault evidence of paleoearthquakes. Sand boils formed in the 15 April 2010 Mw 4.5 Randolph, Utah, earthquake. Scale is 6 x 16 cm.

  1. The imprint of thermally induced devolatilization phenomena on radon signal: implications for the geochemical survey in volcanic areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollo, Silvio; Tuccimei, Paola; Galli, Gianfranco; Iezzi, Gianluca; Scarlato, Piergiorgio

    2017-10-01

    Thermal gradients due to magma dynamics in active volcanic areas may affect the emanating power of the substrate and the background level of radon signal. This is particularly effective in subvolcanic substrates where intense hydrothermal alteration and/or weathering processes generally form hydrous minerals, such as zeolites able to store and release great amounts of H2O (up to ˜25 wt.%) at relative low temperatures. To better understand the role played by thermally induced devolatilization reactions on the radon signal, a new experimental setup has been developed for measuring in real time the radon emission from a zeolitized volcanic tuff. Progressive dehydration phenomena with increasing temperature produce radon emissions two orders of magnitude higher than those measured during rock deformation, microfracturing and failure. In this framework, mineral devolatilization reactions can contribute significantly to produce radon emissions spatially heterogeneous and non-stationary in time, resulting in a transient state dictated by temperature gradients and the carrier effects of subsurface gases. Results from these experiments can be extrapolated to the temporal and spatial scales of magmatic processes, where the ascent of small magma batches from depth causes volatile release due to dehydration phenomena that increase the radon signal from the degassing host rock material.

  2. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaschel, Nils; Ariza, Dario; Díez, Sergio; Gerboles, Marta; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Quirion, David; Tackmann, Kerstin; Ullan, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. In this paper, we are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype optimized to achieve a homogeneous flow distribution. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  3. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Utah. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2012 Utah State Code base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Utah.

  5. 76 FR 16808 - Notice of Invitation to Participate In Coal Exploration License, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Sevier County, Utah. DATES: The notice... following-described lands in Sevier County, Utah: Salt Lake Meridian, Utah T. 22 S., R. 4 E., Sec. 14, all...

  6. Thermal tracing of retained meltwater in the lower accumulation area of the Southwestern Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charalampidis, Charalampos; Van As, Dirk; Colgan, William T.

    2016-01-01

    We present in situ firn temperatures from the extreme 2012 melt season in the southwestern lower accumulation area of the Greenland ice sheet. The upper 2.5 m of snow and firn was temperate during the melt season, when vertical meltwater percolation was inefficient due to a similar to 5.5 m thick...... ice layer underlying the temperate firn. Meltwater percolation and refreezing beneath 2.5 m depth only occurred after the melt season. Deviations from temperatures predicted by pure conductivity suggest that meltwater refroze in discrete bands at depths of 2.0-2.5, 5.0-6.0 and 8.0-9.0 m. While we find...... winter was on average 4.7 degrees C warmer due to meltwater refreezing. Our observations also suggest that the 2012 firn conditions were preconditioned by two warm summers and ice layer formation in 2010 and 2011. Overall, firn temperatures during the years 2009-13 increased by 0.6 ºC....

  7. Effect of landscape density in a residential area on thermal performance in a tropical climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamarulzaman Noorazlina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a well-documented that the urban air temperature is gradually growing in all cities due to the rapid development of buildings, roads and other infrastructure, human activities and also decreasing in vegetated areas. In a tropical climate, outdoor environment is clearly warmer than indoor environment due to higher air temperatures, particularly in dry seasons. Since the indoor environment is influenced by its surroundings, this situation indirectly contributes to the discomfort indoor environment in the building. Thus, it generates to the dependence on mechanical ventilation and increase the energy consumption in buildings. Many research studies have proof that plants not only beauty a city, but also improve the urban environmental condition by reducing the transferring of heat flux on buildings and increasing the reflection of radiation and shading. Therefore strategically placed vegetation around a building could decrease the energy consumption in buildings by reducing the adverse impact of some climate elements. Overall, this paper focuses on the results of a preliminary pilot study of two Semi-Detached houses with different landscape density in Seri Iskandar, Perak. Three climatic parameters, building configuration, and landscape design measured and analyze in this paper.

  8. The Use of the Airborne Thermal/Visible Land Application Sensor (ATLAS) to Determine the Thermal Response Numbers for Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Rickman, Doug; Quattroch, Dale; Estes. Maury

    2007-01-01

    Although satellite data are very useful for analysis of the urban heat island effect at a coarse scale, they do not lend themselves to developing a better understanding of which surfaces across the city contribute or drive the development of the urban heat island effect. Analysis of thermal energy responses for specific or discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape (e.g., asphalt, building rooftops, vegetation) requires measurements at a very fine spatial scale (i.e., thermal energy regimes. Additionally, very fine scale spatial resolution thermal infrared data, such as that obtained from aircraft, are very useful for demonstrating to planning officials, policy makers, and the general populace the benefits of the urban forest. These benefits include mitigating the urban heat island effect, making cities more aesthetically pleasing and more habitable environments, and aid in overall cooling of the community. High spatial resolution thermal data are required to quantify how artificial surfaces within the city contribute to an increase in urban heating and the benefit of cool surfaces (e.g., surface coatings that reflect much of the incoming solar radiation as opposed to absorbing it thereby lowering urban temperatures). The TRN (thermal response number)(Luvall and Holbo 1989) is a technique using aircraft remotely sensed surface temperatures to quantify the thermal response of urban surfaces. The TRN was used to quantify the thermal response of various urban surface types ranging from completely vegetated surfaces to asphalt and concrete parking lots for several cities in the United States.

  9. Hydrologic and chemical data for selected thermal-water wells and springs in the Indian Bathtub area, Owyhee County, southwestern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.W.; Parliman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data collected during January through September 1989 from 86 thermal-water wells and 5 springs in the Indian Bathtub area, southwestern Idaho. The data include well and spring locations, well-construction and water level information, hydrographs of water levels in 9 wells, hydrographs of discharges in 4 springs, and chemical and isotopic analysis of water from 33 thermal-water wells and 5 springs. These data were collected as part of a continuing study to determine the cause or causes of decreased discharge at Indian Bathtub Spring and other thermal springs along Hot Creek.

  10. Utah's Mobile Earth Science Outreach Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoessow, F. S.; Christian, L.

    2016-12-01

    Students at Utah State University's College of Natural Resources have engineered the first mobile Earth Science outreach platform capable of delivering high-tech and interactive solar-powered educational resources to the traditionally-underserved, remote communities of rural Utah. By retrofitting and modifying an industrial box-truck, this project effectively created a highly mobile and energy independent "school in a box" which seeks to help change the way that Earth science is communicated, eliminate traditional barriers, and increase science accessibility - both physically and conceptually. The project's education platform is focused on developing a more effective, sustainable, and engaging platform for presenting Earth science outreach curricula to community members of all ages in an engaging fashion. Furthermore, this project affords university students the opportunity to demonstrate innovative science communication techniques, translating vital university research into educational outreach operations aimed at doing real, measurable good for local communities.

  11. Characterizing the Fate and Mobility of Phosphorus in Utah Lake Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, M.; Carling, G. T.; Nelson, S.; Bickmore, B.; Miller, T.

    2016-12-01

    An increasing number of lakes worldwide are impacted by eutrophication and harmful algal blooms due to nutrient inputs. Utah Lake, located in northern Utah, is a eutrophic freshwater lake that is unique because it is naturally shallow, turbid, and alkaline with high dissolved oxygen levels. Recently, the Utah Division of Water Quality has proposed a new rule to limit phosphorus (P) loading to Utah Lake from wastewater treatment plants in an effort to mitigate eutrophication. However, reducing external P loads may not lead to immediate improvements in water quality due to the legacy pool of nutrients in lake sediments. The purpose of this study is to characterize the fate and mobility of P in Utah Lake to better understand P cycling in this unique system. We analyzed P speciation, mineralogy, and binding capacity in lake sediment samples collected from 9 locations across Utah Lake. P concentrations in sediment ranged from 1120 to 1610 ppm, with highest concentrations in Provo Bay near the major metropolitan area. Likewise, P concentrations in sediment pore water were highest in Provo Bay with concentrations up to 4 mg/L. Sequential leach tests indicate that 30-45% of P is bound to apatite and another 40-55% is adsorbed onto the surface of redox sensitive Fe/Mn hydroxides. This was confirmed by SEM images, which showed the highest P concentrations correlating with both Ca (apatite) and Fe (Fe hydroxides). The apatite-bound P fraction is likely immobile, but the P fraction sorbed to Fe/Mn hydroxides is potentially bioavailable under changing redox conditions. Batch sorption results indicate that lake sediments have a high capacity to absorb and remove P from the water column, with an average uptake of 70-96% of P from spiked surface water with concentrations ranging from 1-10 mg/L. Mineral precipitation and sorption to bottom sediments is an efficient removal mechanism of P in Utah Lake, but a significant portion of P may be available for resuspension and cycling in

  12. Early Detection and Quantification of Verticillium Wilt in Olive Using Hyperspectral and Thermal Imagery over Large Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Calderón

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Automatic methods for an early detection of plant diseases (i.e., visible symptoms at early stages of disease development using remote sensing are critical for precision crop protection. Verticillium wilt (VW of olive caused by Verticillium dahliae can be controlled only if detected at early stages of development. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA and support vector machine (SVM classification methods were applied to classify V. dahliae severity using remote sensing at large scale. High-resolution thermal and hyperspectral imagery were acquired with a manned platform which flew a 3000-ha commercial olive area. LDA reached an overall accuracy of 59.0% and a κ of 0.487 while SVM obtained a higher overall accuracy, 79.2% with a similar κ, 0.495. However, LDA better classified trees at initial and low severity levels, reaching accuracies of 71.4 and 75.0%, respectively, in comparison with the 14.3% and 40.6% obtained by SVM. Normalized canopy temperature, chlorophyll fluorescence, structural, xanthophyll, chlorophyll, carotenoid and disease indices were found to be the best indicators for early and advanced stage infection by VW. These results demonstrate that the methods developed in other studies at orchard scale are valid for flights in large areas comprising several olive orchards differing in soil and crop management characteristics.

  13. Deep resistivity structure in southwestern Utah and its geothermal significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannamaker, P.E.; Ward, S.H.; Hohmann, G.W.; Sill, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Magnetotelluric (MT) measurements in southwestern Utah have yielded a model of resistivity structure in this area to a depth of about 100 km. The MT observations are strongly affected by Great Basin graben sedimentary fill, which constitutes conductive upper-crustal lateral inhomogeneity and requires simulation using two- and three-dimensional modeling algorithms before deeper portions of the resistivity section can be resolved. Included in the model is a layer of low resistivity (20 ..cap omega..-m) residing from 35 to 65 km depth. Sensitivity tests of the data to the structure weigh strongly against the top of this layer being as shallow as 25 km and against the conductivity and thickness of the layer being highly correlated. No intra-crustal low-resistivity layer is indicated by the MT data.

  14. Level IV Ecoregions of Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  15. Level III Ecoregions of Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions by state were extracted from the seamless national shapefile. Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and...

  16. FLOODPLAIN, IRON COUNTY, UTAH, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. The University of Utah Urban Undertaking (U4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Bares, R.; Mendoza, D. L.; Fasoli, B.; Bowling, D. R.; Garcia, M. A.; Buchert, M.; Pataki, D. E.; Crosman, E.; Horel, J.; Catharine, D.; Strong, C.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The University of Utah is leading efforts to understand the spatiotemporal patterns in both emissions and concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHG) and criteria pollutants within urban systems. The urbanized corridor in northern Utah along the Wasatch Front, anchored by Salt Lake City, is undergoing rapid population growth that is projected to double in the next few decades. The Wasatch Front offers multiple advantages as an unique "urban laboratory": urban regions in multiple valleys spanning numerous orders of magnitude in population, each with unique airsheds, well-defined boundary conditions along deserts and tall mountains, strong signals during cold air pool events, seasonal contrasts in pollution, and a legacy of productive partnerships with local stakeholders and governments. We will show results from GHG measurements from the Wasatch Front, including one of the longest running continuous CO2 records in urban areas. Complementing this record are comprehensive meteorological observations and GHG/pollutant concentrations on mobile platforms: light rail, helicopter, and research vans. Variations in the GHG and pollutant observations illustrate human behavior and the resulting "urban metabolism" taking place on hourly, weekly, and seasonal cycles, resulting in a coupling between GHG and criteria pollutants. Moreover, these observations illustrate systematic spatial gradients in GHG and pollutant distributions between and within urban areas, traced to underlying gradients in population, energy use, terrain, and land use. Over decadal time scales the observations reveal growth of the "urban dome" due to expanding urban development. Using numerical models of the atmosphere, we further link concentrations of GHG and air quality-relevant pollutants to underlying emissions at the neighborhood scale as well as urban planning considerations.

  18. A millennium-length reconstruction of Bear River stream flow, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. J. DeRose; M. F. Bekker; S.-Y. Wang; B. M. Buckley; R. K. Kjelgren; T. Bardsley; T. M. Rittenour; E. B. Allen

    2015-01-01

    The Bear River contributes more water to the eastern Great Basin than any other river system. It is also the most significant source of water for the burgeoning Wasatch Front metropolitan area in northern Utah. Despite its importance for water resources for the region’s agricultural, urban, and wildlife needs, our understanding of the variability of Bear River’s stream...

  19. Nesting and Habitat Parameters for Selected Raptors in the Desert of Northwestern Utah

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Peterson

    1988-01-01

    This study examined the effects of habitat parameters, disturbances and predation on the reproductive success of golden eagles (Aguila chrysaetos), ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis), red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and prairie falcons (Falco mexicanus) in the desert area southwest of the Great Salt Lake in northwestern Utah. The prairie falcon was the only species examined that had a normal reproductive output during the study years of 1984-1986. The prairie falcon was better able to uti...

  20. Quality of surface water in the Bear River basin, Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, K.M.; Price, Don

    1972-01-01

    The United States Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, began a reconnaissance in 1967 to obtain essential water-quality information for the Bear River basin. The reconnaissance was directed toward defining the chemical quality of the basin’s surface waters, including suitability for specific uses, geology, and general basin hydrology. Emphasis was given to those areas where water-development projects are proposed or being considered.

  1. Water quality and quantity of selected springs and seeps along the Colorado River corridor, Utah and Arizona: Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Grand Canyon National Park, 1997-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Howard E.; Spence, John R.; Antweiler, Ronald C.; Berghoff, Kevin; Plowman, Terry I.; Peart, Dale B.; Roth, David A.

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service conducted an intensive assessment of selected springs along the Colorado River Corridor in Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and Grand Canyon National Park in 1997 and 1998, for the purpose of measuring and evaluating the water quality and quantity of the resource. This study was conducted to establish baseline data for the future evaluation of possible effects from recreational use and climate change. Selected springs and seeps were visited over a study period from 1997 to 1998, during which, discharge and on-site chemical measurements were made at selected springs and seeps, and samples were collected for subsequent chemical laboratory analysis. This interdisciplinary study also includes simultaneous studies of flora and fauna, measured and sampled coincidently at the same sites. Samples collected during this study were transported to U.S. Geological Survey laboratories in Boulder, Colorado, where analyses were performed using state-of-the-art laboratory technology. The location of the selected springs and seeps, elevation, geology, aspect, and onsite measurements including temperature, discharge, dissolved oxygen, pH, and specific conductance, were recorded. Laboratory analyses include determinations for alkalinity, aluminum, ammonium (nitrogen), antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, bismuth, boron, bromide, cadmium, calcium, cerium, cesium, chloride, chromium, cobalt, copper, dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, dysprosium, erbium, europium, fluoride, gadolinium, holmium, iodine, iron, lanthanum, lead, lithium, lutetium, magnesium, manganese, mercury, molybdenum, neodymium, nickel, nitrate (nitrogen), nitrite (nitrogen), phosphate, phosphorus, potassium, praseodymium, rhenium, rubidium, samarium, selenium, silica, silver, sodium, strontium, sulfate, tellurium, terbium, thallium, thorium, thulium, tin, titanium, tungsten

  2. Underwater Robots Surface in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurd, Randy C.; Hacking, Kip S.; Damarjian, Jennifer L.; Wright, Geoffrey A.; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-01-01

    Underwater robots (or ROVs: Remotely Operated Vehicles as they are typically called in industry) have recently become a very popular instructional STEM activity. Nationally, ROVs have been used in science and technology classrooms for several years in cities such as Seattle, San Diego, Virginia Beach, and other coastal areas. In the past two…

  3. Monitoring heat losses using Landsat ETM+ thermal infrared data — a case study at Kuju fumarolic area in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mia, Md.; Fujimitsu, Yasuhiro

    2013-10-01

    To monitor heat losses using Landsat 7 thermal infrared data from 2002 to 2010 within the active fumarolic region of Kuju volcano in Japan, we used the Stefan-Boltzmann equation for radiative heat flux (RHF) estimation. Heat discharge rate (HDR) was calculated by using the relationship coefficient of RHF and HDR, obtained from two previous studies. The highest total RHF was found to be about 57.7 MW in 2002 and the lowest was about 21.1 MW in 2010. We found the highest HDR, of about 384.5 MW, in 2002 and the lowest, of about 140.8 MW, in 2010. The RHF anomalous areas were showing a declining trend during our study period. The relationship between the land surface temperature (LST) above ambient and RHF was, as expected, in a strong correlation for each result during our study period. Overall, our study was able to delineate the declining trend of heat losses that supports a previous study of similar declining trend of HDR using steam maximum diameter method from the active fumarolic region of Kuju volcano.

  4. Environmental Assessment Proposed Demolition Plan Hill Air Force Base, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Hill AFB Historic Buildings and Structures Reassessment ( Salo E., et al, 2003). The Utah SHPO concurred with the Hill AFB determinations in April...communications made by URS to Utah DEQ Air Quality. September. Salo , Edward, Marsha Prior, and John Ferguson, 2003. Hill AFB Historic Buildings and

  5. Strong motion instrumentation plan for Utah Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    The State of Utah, and its people have invested a considerable amount of money to construct and maintain the infrastructure and bridges in the state. This entire transportation network is at risk in the event of an earthquake. To protect Utah's bridg...

  6. Telepractice Services at Sound Beginnings at Utah State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiser, Kristina M.; Edwards, Marge; Behl, Diane; Munoz, Karen F.

    2012-01-01

    The Utah State University Sound Beginnings program originated in 2007 as a laboratory school to serve children with hearing loss from birth to age 6 years old living in Northern Utah. Sound Beginnings offers an interdisciplinary listening and spoken language educational option for families through the following services: toddler and preschool…

  7. Utah Flooding Hazard: Raising Public Awareness through the Creation of Multidisciplinary Web-Based Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleton, J.; Erickson, B.; Bowman, S. D.; Unger, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Utah Geological Survey's (UGS) Geologic Hazards Program has partnered with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to create geologically derived web-based flood hazard maps. Flooding in Utah communities has historically been one of the most damaging geologic hazards. The most serious floods in Utah have generally occurred in the Great Salt Lake basin, particularly in the Weber River drainage on the western slopes of the Wasatch Range, in areas of high population density. With a growing population of 2.9 million, the state of Utah is motivated to raise awareness about the potential for flooding. The process of increasing community resiliency to flooding begins with identification and characterization of flood hazards. Many small communities in areas experiencing rapid growth have not been mapped completely by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). Existing FIRM maps typically only consider drainage areas that are greater than one square mile in determining flood zones and do not incorporate geologic data, such as the presence of young, geologically active alluvial fans that indicate a high potential for debris flows and sheet flooding. Our new flood hazard mapping combines and expands on FEMA data by incorporating mapping derived from 1:24,000-scale UGS geologic maps, LiDAR data, digital elevation models, and historical aerial photography. Our flood hazard maps are intended to supplement the FIRM maps to provide local governments and the public with additional flood hazard information so they may make informed decisions, ultimately reducing the risk to life and property from flooding hazards. Flooding information must be widely available and easily accessed. One of the most effective ways to inform the public is through web-based maps. Web-based flood hazard maps will not only supply the public with the flood information they need, but also provides a platform to add additional geologic hazards to an easily accessible format.

  8. Utah Guidance and Toolkit for Student Learning Objectives: Instructions and Materials. Utah SLOs. Updated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This document is intended to help teachers understand and create Student Learning Objectives (SLOs). This resource is a practical guide intended to provide clarity to a complex but worthwhile task. This resource may also be used by administrators for professional learning. As Utah moves toward providing a "Model for Measuring Educator…

  9. 78 FR 49400 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Revisions to Utah...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ...''). The Program requires the inspection of diesel-powered vehicles by means of an emissions opacity test... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Revisions to...). Mail: Carl Daly, Director, Air Program, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8, Mailcode 8P-AR...

  10. Heat flow in vapor dominated areas of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field: implications for the thermal budget of the Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Harris, Robert; Werner, Cynthia Anne; Murphy, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the vigor of magmatic activity in Yellowstone requires knowledge of the mechanisms and rates of heat transport between magma and the ground surface. We present results from a heat flow study in two vapor dominated, acid-sulfate thermal areas in the Yellowstone Caldera, the 0.11 km2 Obsidian Pool Thermal Area (OPTA) and the 0.25 km2 Solfatara Plateau Thermal Area (SPTA). Conductive heat flux through a low permeability layer capping large vapor reservoirs is calculated from soil temperature measurements at >600 locations and from laboratory measurements of soil properties. The conductive heat output is 3.6 ± 0.4 MW and 7.5 ± 0.4 MW from the OPTA and the SPTA, respectively. The advective heat output from soils is 1.3 ± 0.3 MW and 1.2 ± 0.3 MW from the OPTA and the SPTA, respectively and the heat output from thermal pools in the OPTA is 6.8 ± 1.4 MW. These estimates result in a total heat output of 11.8 ± 1.4 MW and 8.8 ± 0.4 MW from OPTA and SPTA, respectively. Focused zones of high heat flux in both thermal areas are roughly aligned with regional faults suggesting that faults in both areas serve as conduits for the rising acid vapor. Extrapolation of the average heat flux from the OPTA (103 ± 2 W·m−2) and SPTA (35 ± 3 W·m−2) to the ~35 km2 of vapor dominated areas in Yellowstone yields 3.6 and 1.2 GW, respectively, which is less than the total heat output transported by steam from the Yellowstone Caldera as estimated by the chloride inventory method (4.0 to 8.0 GW).

  11. Photogeologic and thermal infrared reconnaissance surveys of the Los Negritos-Ixtlan de los Hervores geothermal area, Michoacan, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Valle R.; Friedman, J.D.; Gawarecki, S.J.; Banwell, C.J.

    1970-01-01

    New techniques, involving interpretation of panchromatic, ektachrome and ektachrome infrared aerographic photogaphs and thermographic infrared imagery recording emission from the earth's surface in middle and far infrared wavelengths (3-5??m and 8-14??m), are being introduced in geothermal investigations in Mexico to identify outstanding structural and geologic features in a rapid and economical manner. The object of this work is to evaluate the new airborne infrared techniques and equipment as a complement to the data obtained from panchromatic aerial photography. This project is part of the Mexican remote sensing program of natural resources carried out under the auspices of the Comision Nacional del Espacio Exterior and in which the Research Institute (Instituto de Investigaciones de la Industria Electrica) is actively participating. The present study was made cooperatively with the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the U.S. Geological Survey. The Los Negritos-Ixtlan de los Hervores geothermal fields are located east of Lake Chapala at the intersection of the Sierra Madre occidental and the west-central segment of the neovolcanic axis of Mexico. The two principal zones of hydrothermal activity occur in a tectonic trench filled with lake sediments of the Quaternary intercalated with Quaternary and Holocene volcanic rocks and characterized by an intricate system of block-fault tectonics, part of the Chapala-Acambay tectonic system, along which there has been volcanic activity in modern time. Surface manifestations of geothermal activity consist of relatively high heat flow and hot springs, small geysers and small steam vents aligned along an E-W axis at Ixtlan, possibly at the intersection of major fault trends and mud volcanoes and hot pools aligned NE-SW at Los Negritos. More than 20 exit points of thermal waters are shown on infrared imagery to be aligned along an extension of the Ixtlan fault between Ixtlan and El Salitre. A narrow zone of

  12. 76 FR 28068 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah State University/College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... Prehistoric Museum, Price, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. ] Notice is here given... control of the Utah State University/College of Eastern Utah Prehistoric Museum, Price, UT. The human... NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum...

  13. Developing a state water plan: Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordy, Gail E.; Smith, G.J.; Roark, D. Michael; Lambert, Patrick M.; Yarbrough, John A.; Burden, Carole B.; Garrett, R.B.; Emett, D.C.; Thiros, Susan A.; Sandberg, G.W.; Puchta, R.W

    1988-01-01

    This is the twenty-fifth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Division of Water Resources, provide data to enable interested parties to keep abreast of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, and related changes in precipitation and streamflow. Supplementary data such as graphs showing chemical quality of water and maps showing water-level contours are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas for which applicable data are available and are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions.This report includes individual discussions of selected major areas of ground-water development in the State for the calendar year 1987. Water-level fluctuations, however, are described from the spring of 1987 to the spring of 1988. Much of the data used in this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Division of Water Rights, Utah Department of Natural Resources.

  14. Developing a state water plan: Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, James L.; Smith, G.J.; Roark, D. Michael; Lambert, Patrick M.; Jensen, V.L.; Wilberg, Dale E.; Burden, Carole B.; Garrett, R.B.; Emett, D.C.; Duncanson, Susan; Sandberg, G.W.; Puchta, R.W; Herbert, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    This is the twenty-third in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Division of Water Resources, provide data to enable interested parties to keep abreast of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawals from wells, water-level changes, and related changes in precipitation and streamflow. Supplementary data such as graphs showing chemical quality of water and maps showing water-level contours are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas for which applicable data are available and are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions.This report includes individual discussions of selected major areas of ground-water development in the State for the calendar year 1985. Water-level fluctuations, however, are described from the spring of 1985 to the spring of 1986. Much of the data used in this report were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Division of Water Rights, Utah Department of Natural Resources.

  15. Developing a state water plan: Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilberg, Dale E.; Smith, G.J.; Roark, D. Michael; Lambert, Patrick M.; Jensen, V.L.; Cordy, Gail E.; Burden, Carole B.; Enright, Michael; Emett, D.C.; Thiros, Susan A.; Sandberg, G.W.; Puchta, R.W; Herbert, L.R.

    1987-01-01

    This is the twenty-fourth in a Series of annual reports that describe ground-water Conditions in Utah. Reports in the series, prepared cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Division of Water Resources, provide data to enable interested parties to keep abreast of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well Construction, ground-water withdrawals from wells, Water-level changes, and related changes in precipitation and streamflow. Supplementary data such as graphs showing chemical quality of Water and maps showing water-level contours are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas for which applicable data are available and are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions.The report includes individual discussions of Selected major areas of ground-water development in the State for the calendar year 1986. Water-level fluctuations, however, are described for spring 1986 to spring 1987. Much of the data used in the report were collected by the Geological Survey in cooperation with the Division of Water Rights, Utah Department of Natural Resources.

  16. Conservation planning for the Colorado River in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christine Rasmussen,; Shafroth, Patrick B.

    2016-01-01

    Strategic planning is increasingly recognized as necessary for providing the greatest possible conservation benefits for restoration efforts. Rigorous, science-based resource assessment, combined with acknowledgement of broader basin trends, provides a solid foundation for determining effective projects. It is equally important that methods used to prioritize conservation investments are simple and practical enough that they can be implemented in a timely manner and by a variety of resource managers. With the help of local and regional natural resource professionals, we have developed a broad-scale, spatially-explicit assessment of 146 miles (~20,000 acres) of the Colorado River mainstem in Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah that will function as the basis for a systematic, practical approach to conservation planning and riparian restoration prioritization. For the assessment we have: 1) acquired, modified or created spatial datasets of Colorado River bottomland conditions; 2) synthesized those datasets into habitat suitability models and estimates of natural recovery potential, fire risk and relative cost; 3) investigated and described dominant ecosystem trends and human uses, and; 4) suggested site selection and prioritization approaches. Partner organizations (The Nature Conservancy, National Park Service, Bureau of Land Management and Utah Forestry Fire and State Lands) are using the assessment and datasets to identify and prioritize a suite of restoration actions to increase ecosystem resilience and improve habitat for bottomland species. Primary datasets include maps of bottomland cover types, bottomland extent, maps of areas inundated during high and low flow events, as well as locations of campgrounds, roads, fires, invasive vegetation treatment areas and other features. Assessment of conditions and trends in the project area entailed: 1) assemblage of existing data on geology, changes in stream flow, and predictions of future conditions; 2) identification

  17. Aeromagnetic map of northwest Utah and adjacent parts of Nevada and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Two aeromagnetic surveys were flown to promote further understanding of the geology and structure in northwest Utah and adjacent parts of Nevada and Idaho by serving as a basis for geophysical interpretations and by supporting geological mapping, water and mineral resource investigations, and other topical studies. Although this area is in general sparsely populated, (except for cities and towns along the Wasatch Front such as Ogden and Brigham City), it encompasses metamorphic core complexes in the Grouse Creek and Raft River Mountains (figure 1) of interest to earth scientists studying Cenozoic extension. The region was shaken in 1909 and 1934 by M6+ earthquakes east of the Hansel Mountains (Doser, 1989; Arabasz and others, 1994); damage from the 1934 earthquake occurred as far east as Logan, Utah (http:// www.seis.utah.edu/lqthreat/nehrp_htm/1934hans/n1934ha1. shtml#urbse). The presence of Quaternary shield volcanoes and bimodal Pleistocene volcanism in Curlew Valley (Miller and others, 1995; Felger and others, 2016) as well as relatively high temperature gradients encountered in the Indian Cove drillhole in the north arm of Great Salt Lake (Blackett and others, 2014) may indicate some potential for geothermal energy development in the area (Miller and others, 1995). The area also hosts four significant mining districts, in the northern Pilot Range, the Goose Creek Mountains in the northwest corner of the map, the southern end of the Promontory Mountains, and the southwest part of the Raft River Mountains, although production notably waned after World War II (Doelling, 1980). Other prospects of interest include those in the southern Grouse Creek Mountains, Silver Island, and the northern Newfoundland Mountains.Large areas of northwest Utah are covered by young, surficial deposits or by Great Salt Lake or are down-dropped into deep Cenozoic basins, making extrapolation of bedrock geology from widely spaced exposures difficult or tenuous (figure 1). Local spatial

  18. Three-dimensional numerical model of ground-water flow in northern Utah Valley, Utah County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Philip M.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional, finite-difference, numerical model was developed to simulate ground-water flow in northern Utah Valley, Utah. The model includes expanded areal boundaries as compared to a previous ground-water flow model of the valley and incorporates more than 20 years of additional hydrologic data. The model boundary was generally expanded to include the bedrock in the surrounding mountain block as far as the surface-water divide. New wells have been drilled in basin-fill deposits near the consolidated-rock boundary. Simulating the hydrologic conditions within the bedrock allows for improved simulation of the effect of withdrawal from these wells. The inclusion of bedrock also allowed for the use of a recharge model that provided an alternative method for spatially distributing areal recharge over the mountains.The model was calibrated to steady- and transient-state conditions. The steady-state simulation was developed and calibrated by using hydrologic data that represented average conditions for 1947. The transient-state simulation was developed and calibrated by using hydrologic data collected from 1947 to 2004. Areally, the model grid is 79 rows by 70 columns, with variable cell size. Cells throughout most of the model domain represent 0.3 mile on each side. The largest cells are rectangular with dimensions of about 0.3 by 0.6 mile. The largest cells represent the mountain block on the eastern edge of the model domain where the least hydrologic data are available. Vertically, the aquifer system is divided into 4 layers which incorporate 11 hydrogeologic units. The model simulates recharge to the ground-water flow system as (1) infiltration of precipitation over the mountain block, (2) infiltration of precipitation over the valley floor, (3) infiltration of unconsumed irrigation water from fields, lawns, and gardens, (4) seepage from streams and canals, and (5) subsurface inflow from Cedar Valley. Discharge of ground water is simulated by the model to (1

  19. Thermal Activity Monitoring of an Active Volcano Using Landsat 8/OLI-TIRS Sensor Images: A Case Study at the Aso Volcanic Area in Southwest Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Bodruddoza Mia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal remote sensing is currently an emerging technique for monitoring active volcanoes around the world. The study area, the Aso volcano, is currently the most active and has erupted almost every year since 2012. For the first time, Landsat 8 TIRS thermal data were used in this study area to evaluate and monitor the recent thermal status of this volcano, situated in Southwest Japan, from 2013 to 2016 using four sets of images. The total heat discharged rate (HDR, radiative heat flux (RHF, land surface temperature (LST, and land cover (LC were evaluated, and the relationship between them was determined, to understand the thermal status of the study area. We used the NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index for land cover, the NDVI-threshold method for emissivity, the split-window algorithm for LST, and the Stefan–Boltzmann equation for radiative heat flux estimation in this study. The total heat discharge rate was computed using a relationship coefficient of RHF and HDR here. The highest HDR was obtained in 2013, at about 4715 MW, and was the lowest in 2016, at about 3819 MW. The total heat loss showed a declining trend, overall, from 2013 to 2016. The highest pixel RHF was in 2013 and the lowest was in 2014; after that, it increased gradually until 2016, coinciding with the LST of this study area. LC showed that, with decreasing heat loss, the vegetated coverage increased and bare land or mixed land decreased, and vice versa. From the spatial distribution of RHF, we saw that, within the Nakadake craters of the Aso volcano, Crater 1 was the most active part of this volcano throughout the study period, and Crater 3 was the most active after 2014. We inferred that the applied methods using the continuous Landsat 8 TIRS data showed an effective and efficient method of monitoring the thermal status of this active volcano.

  20. Geology and resources of the Tar Sand Triangle, southeastern Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dana, G.F.; Oliver, R.L.; Elliott, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    The Tar Sand Triangle is located in southeastern Utah between the Dirty Devil and Colorado Rivers and covers an area of about 200 square miles. The geology of the area consists of gently northwest dipping strata exposed in the box canyons and slopes of the canyonlands morphology. Strata in the area range in age from Jurassic to Permian. The majority of tar sand saturation is found in the Permian White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation. The White Rim Sandstone Member consists of a clean, well-sorted sandstone which was deposited in a shallow marine environment. Resources were calculated from analytical data from the three coreholes drilled by the Laramie Energy Technology Center and other available data. The total in-place resources, determined from this study, are 6.3 billion barels. Previous estimates ranged from 2.9 to 16 million barrels. More coring and analyses will be necessary before a more accurate determination of resources can be attempted. 8 references, 11 figures, 7 tables.

  1. Qualitative and Quantitative Structure of Zooplankton Associations in the Danube Thermal Discharge Area of Nuclear Power Plant Cernavoda

    OpenAIRE

    ŞUNDRI, Mirela Iuliana; GOMOIU, Marian-Traian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: The authors presents the structure of zooplankton community recorded in the Danube River sector influenced by the thermal discharge from the Nuclear Power Plant at Cernavoda (Romania). On the basis of samples collected in the summer season of the 1999-2001 and 2007, in three key stations (Danube River waters upstream NPP – St.1, thermal effluent – St. 4 and downstream effluent – St.6) 31 species were recorded; zooplankton associations, having relative high densitie...

  2. An active power dispatch technique using pseudo spot price of electricity for a power system area including limited energy supply thermal units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadil, Salih [Osmangazi Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Eskisehir (Turkey); Yasar, Celal [Dumlupnar Univ., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Kutahya (Turkey)

    2002-02-01

    We propose a new active power dispatch technique using pseudo spot price of electricity for a power system area including limited energy supply thermal units. The dispatch technique considers upper and lower generation limits of the generation units, maximum capability of transmission lines and the fuel constraint of the limited energy supply thermal units in a lossy power system. Calculation of active line flows that are used in the determination of optimal active generations are obtained by means of Newton-Raphson AC load flow calculation. We assume that limited energy supply thermal units are fueled under take-or-pay agreement. The proposed dispatch technique was tested on an example power system. The dispatch problem was also solved by means of another dispatch technique that uses gradient method. Results obtained from both techniques are compared. (Author)

  3. Factors Associated with Physician Assistant Practice in Rural and Primary Care in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Jennifer M.; Morgan, Perri; Pedersen, Donald M.; Koduri, Sri; Alder, Stephen C.

    2011-01-01

    Physician Assistants (PAs) have become an integral part of the United States (U.S.) health care system since the profession began in the late 1960s. PAs have been suggested as solutions to predicted physician shortages especially in primary care. This study examined the predictors of primary care and rural practice patterns of PAs in Utah. A cross sectional survey design was utilized. The outcome variables were practice specialty and practice location. The predictor variables were age, gender, number of years in practice, location of upbringing, and professional school of graduation. There was a response rate of 67.7%. The Utah Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing (DOPL) provided the list of licensed PAs in the state. Physician assistants who reported being raised in rural communities were 2.29 times more likely to be practicing in rural communities (95% CI 0.89–5.85). Female PAs had lower odds of practicing in a rural area (OR: 0.26; 95% CI: 0.10–0.66). Female PAs had lower odds of practicing in primary care versus their male counterparts (OR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.33–0.96). Graduation from the Utah PA Program was more likely to result in primary care practice (OR: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.34–3.49). PMID:22295196

  4. Factors Associated with Physician Assistant Practice in Rural and Primary Care in Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Coombs

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physician Assistants (PAs have become an integral part of the United States (U.S. health care system since the profession began in the late 1960s. PAs have been suggested as solutions to predicted physician shortages especially in primary care. This study examined the predictors of primary care and rural practice patterns of PAs in Utah. A cross sectional survey design was utilized. The outcome variables were practice specialty and practice location. The predictor variables were age, gender, number of years in practice, location of upbringing, and professional school of graduation. There was a response rate of 67.7%. The Utah Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing (DOPL provided the list of licensed PAs in the state. Physician assistants who reported being raised in rural communities were 2.29 times more likely to be practicing in rural communities (95% CI 0.89–5.85. Female PAs had lower odds of practicing in a rural area (OR: 0.26; 95% CI: 0.10–0.66. Female PAs had lower odds of practicing in primary care versus their male counterparts (OR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.33–0.96. Graduation from the Utah PA Program was more likely to result in primary care practice (OR: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.34–3.49.

  5. Reducing the thermal stress in a heterogeneous material stack for large-area hybrid optical silicon-lithium niobate waveguide micro-chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, P. O.; Mookherjea, S.

    2017-04-01

    The bonding of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) to lithium niobate-on-insulator (LNOI) is becoming important for a new category of linear and nonlinear micro-photonic optical devices. In studying the bonding of SOI to LNOI through benzocyclobutene (BCB), a popular interlayer bonding dielectric used in hybrid silicon photonic devices, we use thermal stress calculations to suggest that BCB thickness does not affect thermal stress in this type of structure, and instead, thermal stress can be mitigated satisfactorily by matching the handles of the SOI and LNOI. We bond LNOI with a silicon handle to a silicon chip, remove the handle on the LNOI side, and thermally cycle the bonded stack repeatedly from room temperature up to 300°C and back down without incurring thermal stress cracks, which do appear when using LNOI with a lithium niobate handle, regardless of the BCB thickness. We show that this process can be used to create many hybrid silicon-lithium niobate waveguiding structures on a single patterned SOI chip bonded to a large-area (16 mm × 4.2 mm) lithium niobate film.

  6. Morphology of pedestrian roads and thermal responses during summer, in the urban area of Bucheon city, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gook-Sup; Jeong, Mi-Ae

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of urban morphology representing sky view factor (SVF) on urban microclimate and on human thermal responses. The physical environments and the changes in body temperatures as well as psychological responses were investigated in summer in Bucheon, Korea. The dry bulb temperature ranged from 31.5 °C at SVF 0.082 site to 35.7 °C at SVF 0.922 site. Most of the environmental elements were statistically correlated to the SVF: the dry bulb temperature R 2 = 0.602, UVB R 2 = 0.556 and the illumination level R 2 = 0.609. The mean skin temperature increased up to 36.0 °C at the SVF 0.940 site and decreased to 33.9 °C at the SVF 0.082 site. The mean skin temperature was statistically correlated to the SVF ( p = 0.005). However, the core body temperature was not correlated to SVF because of time delay effect to the previously exposed thermal environment. In the investigation of thermal acceptability, only 5 % of subjects were dissatisfied with the road that was covered with plentiful trees; in contrast, approximately 50 % of subjects were dissatisfied with the road with poor solar obstacles in the summer. The thermal stress was affected by the urban morphology, and the plentiful urban greening improved thermal comfort.

  7. Air pollution and gastrointestinal diseases in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestas, Melissa May

    The valleys of northern Utah, where most of Utah's population resides, experience episodic air pollution events well in excess of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Most of the events are due to an accumulation of particulate matter during persistent cold air pools in winter from both direct emissions and secondary chemical reactions in the atmosphere. High wintertime ozone concentrations are occasionally observed in the Uintah Basin, in addition to particulate matter. At other times of the year, blowing dust, wildland fires, fireworks, and summertime ozone formation contribute to local air pollution. The objective of this dissertation is to investigate one facet of the health effects of Utah's air pollution on its residents: the acute impacts of air pollution on gastrointestinal (GI) disease. To study the health effects of these episodic pollution events, some measure of air pollution exposure must be matched to the health data. Time and place are used to link the health data for a person with the pollution data. This dissertation describes the method of kriging data from the sparse pollution monitoring network to estimate personal air pollution history based on the zip code of residence. This dissertation then describes the application of these exposure estimates to a health study on GI disease. The purpose of the GI study is to retrospectively look at two groups of patients during 2000-2014: those with autoimmune disease of the GI tract (inflammatory bowel disease, IBD) and those with allergic disease of the GI tract (eosinophilic esophagitis, EoE) to determine whether disease exacerbations occur more commonly during and following periods of poor air quality compared to periods of good air quality. The primary analysis method is case crossover design. In addition to using the kriged air pollution estimates, the analysis was repeated using simpler empirical estimation methods to assess whether the odds ratios are sensitive to the air pollution estimation

  8. Geology of the central Mineral Mountains, Beaver County, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibbett, B.S.; Nielson, D.L.

    1980-03-01

    The Mineral Mountains are located in Beaver and Millard Counties, southwestern Utah. The range is a horst located in the transition zone between the Basin and Range and Colorado Plateau geologic provinces. A multiple-phase Tertiary pluton forms most of the range, with Paleozoic rocks exposed on the north and south and Precambrian metamorphic rocks on the west in the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area). Precambrian banded gneiss and Cambrian carbonate rocks have been intruded by foliated granodioritic to monzonitic rocks of uncertain age. The Tertiary pluton consists of six major phases of quartz monzonitic to leucocratic granitic rocks, two diorite stocks, and several more mafic units that form dikes. During uplift of the mountain block, overlying rocks and the upper part of the pluton were partially removed by denudation faulting to the west. The interplay of these low-angle faults and younger northerly trending Basin and Range faults is responsible for the structural control of the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal system. The structural complexity of the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is unique within the range, although the same tectonic style continues throughout the range. During the Quaternary, rhyolite volcanism was active in the central part of the range and basaltic volcanism occurred in the northern portion of the map area. The heat source for the geothermal system is probably related to the Quaternary rhyolite volcanic activity.

  9. Hydrogeothermal modelling vs. inorganic chemical composition of thermal waters from the area of Carballiño (NW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Delgado-Outeiriño

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermic features in Galicia (northwest Spain have been used since ancient times for therapeutic purposes. A characterization of these thermal waters was carried out in order to understand their behaviour based on inorganic pattern and water-rock interaction mechanisms. In this way 15 thermal water samples were collected in the same hydrographical system. The selected thermal water samples were classified using principal component analysis (PCA and partial least squares (PLS regression analysis in two groups according to their chemical composition: group I with the young water samples and group II with the samples with longest water-rock contact time. This classification agreed with the results obtained by the use of geothermometers and hydrogeochemical modelling, where the samples were classified into two categories according their residence time in the reservoir and their water-rock interaction.

  10. Spore Colour Index And Organic Thermal Maturation Studies On The Pliocene Sediments Of The El Qara-2 Borehole, Nile Delta Area, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, M. I. A. [محمد اسماعيل ابراهيم

    1996-01-01

    Eight conventional core samples from the El Qara-2 well, situated in north central Nile Delta area, Egypt, have been palynologicaly investigated for determining the thermal maturity of the Pliocene Abu Madi and Kafr El Sheihk formations, based on the change in colour of pteridophytic spores. A monotonous assemblage of miospores including Baculatisporites scabridus, Ricciaesporites sp., Foveoisporites sp., Laevigatosporites major, Polypodiaceoisporites retirugatus, Leiotriletes cf. paramaxi...

  11. Footprints of Buildings at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (footprints)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This is an Arc/INFO coverage consisting of 10 polygons representing the buildings' footprints at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. The footprints were collected...

  12. Assessing approaches to manage Phragmites in Utah wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Given the extent of the Phragmites problem in Utah and elsewhere, managers are eager to understand what techniques are most effective for killing Phragmites while...

  13. Utilities at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah (utilpnt)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This feature class represents various types of utilities, including water- and power-related utilities, at Cedar Breaks National Monument, Utah. The utilities were...

  14. Culvert roughness elements for native Utah fish passage : phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory flume testing of native Utah non-salmonid fish was performed to observe how : they use altered flow around obstacles to swim upstream. Three experimental setups included : a bare Plexiglas flume, vertical cylinders, and natural substrate p...

  15. Thermal-history reconstruction of the Baiyun Sag in the deep-water area of the Pearl River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoyin; Yang, Shuchun; Hu, Shengbiao

    2017-11-01

    The Baiyun Sag, located in the deep-water area of the northern South China Sea, is the largest and deepest subbasin in the Pearl River Mouth Basin and one of the most important hydrocarbon-accumulation depression areas in China. Thermal history is widely thought to be of great importance in oil and gas potential assessment of a basin as it controls the timing of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion from the source rock. In order to unravel the paleo-heat flow of the Baiyun Sag, we first analyzed tectonic subsidence of 55 pseudo-wells constructed based on newly interpreted seismic profiles, along with three drilled wells. We then carried out thermal modeling using the multi-stage finite stretching method and calibrated the results using collected present-day vitrinite reflectance data and temperature data. Results indicate that the first and second heating of the Baiyun Sag after 49 Ma ceased at 33.9 Ma and 23 Ma. Reconstructed average basal paleoheat flow values at the end of the rifting periods are 57.7-86.2 mW/m2 and 66.7-97.3 mW/m2, respectively. Following the last heating period at 23 Ma, the study area has undergone a persistent thermal attenuation phase, and basal heat flow has cooled down to 64.0-79.2 mW/m2 at present.

  16. Hydrologic reconnaissance of Rush Valley, Tooele County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, James W.; Price, Don; Waddell, K.M.

    1969-01-01

    This report is the third in a series by the U. S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, which describes the water resources of the western basins of Utah. Its purpose is to present available hydrologic data for Rush Valley, to provide an evaluation of the potential water-resources development of the valley, and to identify needed studies that would help provide an understanding of the valley's water supply.

  17. Hydrologic reconnaissance of Skull Valley, Tooele County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, James W.; Waddell, K.M.

    1968-01-01

    This report is the second in a series by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Rights, which describes the water resources of the western basins of Utah. Its purpose is to present available hydrologic data on Skull Valley, to provide an evaluation of the potential water-resource development of the valley, and to identify needed studies that would help provide an understandingof the valley's water supply.

  18. Thermal neutron equivalent dose assessment around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using NTDs. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Jarad, F; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Haddad, M N; Al-jarallah, M I

    2002-01-01

    Area passive neutron dosemeters based on nuclear track detectors (NTDs) have been used for 13 days to assess accumulated low doses of thermal neutrons around neutron source storage area of the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Moreover, the aim of this study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the storage area. NTDs were mounted with the boron converter on their surface as one compressed unit. The converter is a lithium tetraborate (Li2B4O7) layer for thermal neutron detection via 10B(n,alpha)7Li and 6Li(n,alpha)3H nuclear reactions. The area passive dosemeters were installed on 26 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. The calibration factor for NTD-based area passive neutron dosemeters was found to be 8.3 alpha tracks x cm(-2) x microSv(-1) using active snoopy neutron dosemeters in the KFUPM neutron irradiation facility. The results show the variation of accumulated dose with locations around the storage area. The range of dose rates varied from as low as 40 nSvx h(-1) up to 11 microSv x h(-1). The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosemeter was able to detect accumulated doses as low as 40 nSv x h(-1), which could not be detected with the available active neutron dosemeters. The results of the study also indicate that an additional shielding is required to bring the dose rates down to background level. The present investigation suggests extending this study to find the contribution of doses from fast neutrons around the neutron source storage area using NTDs through proton recoil. The significance of this passive technique is that it is highly sensitive and does not require any electronics or power supplies, as is the case in active systems.

  19. 75 FR 18877 - Notice of Invitation to Participate; Exploration for Coal in Utah License Application UTU-87041

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... located in Emery and Sevier Counties, Utah. DATES: Any party electing to participate in this exploration... in Emery and Sevier Counties, Utah: T. 23 S., R. 5 E., SLM, Utah Sec. 1, all; Sec. 11, all; Sec. 12...

  20. Distribution and Thermal Maturity of Devonian Carbonate Reservoir Solid Bitumen in Desheng Area of Guizhong Depression, South China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Hou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of solid bitumen in the Devonian carbonate reservoir from well Desheng 1, Guizhong Depression, was investigated by optical microscope and hydrocarbon inclusions analysis. Vb and chemical structure indexes measured by bitumen reflectance, laser Raman microprobe (LRM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR were carried out to determine the thermal maturity of solid bitumen. Based on the solid bitumen thermal maturity, the burial and thermal maturity history of Devonian carbonate reservoir were reconstructed by basin modeling. The results indicate that the fractures and fracture-related dissolution pores are the main storage space for the solid bitumen. The equivalent vitrinite reflectance of solid bitumen ranges from 3.42% to 4.43% converted by Vb (% and LRM. The infrared spectroscopy analysis suggests that there are no aliphatic chains detected in the solid bitumen which is rich in aromatics C=C chains (1431–1440 cm−1. The results of Vb (%, LRM, and FTIR analysis demonstrate that the solid bitumen has experienced high temperature and evolved to the residual carbonaceous stage. The thermal evolution of Devonian reservoirs had experienced four stages. The Devonian reservoirs reached the highest reservoir temperature 210–260°C during the second rapid burial-warming stage, which is the main period for the solid bitumen formation.

  1. Assessment and use of drug information references in Utah pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Krystal L; Macdonald, Elyse A; Trovato, Anthony; Tak, Casey R

    2017-01-01

    To determine which drug references Utah pharmacists use most frequently. To determine which types of drug information questions are most commonly asked, and whether Utah pharmacists have access to adequate references to respond to these questions. A 19-question survey was created using Qualtrics, LLC (Provo, Utah) software. An electronic survey link was sent to 1,431 pharmacists with a valid e-mail address listed in the Department of Professional Licensing database. Questions focused on available references in the participant's pharmacy, how current the references are, and the participant's use of the references. Surveys were analyzed for participants practicing in either community or hospital pharmacies in the state of Utah. A total of 147 responses were included in the analysis. Approximately 44% of respondents practiced in the community, and 56% practiced in a hospital setting. The most commonly used references by Utah pharmacists are Micromedex, Lexicomp, UpToDate, Clinical Pharmacology, and Drug Facts & Comparisons. Pharmacists in the community frequently receive questions related to adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, and over-the-counter medications. Pharmacists in the hospital frequently receive questions relating to dosage and administration, drug interactions, and adverse drug reactions. About 89% of community pharmacists and 96% of hospital pharmacists feel available references are adequate to answer the questions they receive. Utah pharmacists generally use large reference suites to answer drug information questions. The majority of pharmacists consider the references available to them to be adequate to answer the questions they receive.

  2. Ground water in Utah - A summary description of the resource and its related physical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Don; Arnow, Ted

    1985-01-01

    Ground water is one of Utah’s most extensive and valuable natural resources. Because of its widespread occurrence in both wet and dry areas, ground water has been, and is a major factor affecting economic growth and development of the State. In some areas, ground water is used to supplement streamflow for irrigation, public supply, and other uses. In other areas, it is the only water available for use. Many communities obtain their entire water supply from ground-water sources (wells and springs) as do numerous rural and suburban households throughout the State.The ground-water reservoirs of Utah contain tremendous quantities of water – many times more than the quantity stored in all the lakes (including Great Salt Lake) and the surface-water reservoirs of the State combined. Water that discharges from those underground reservoirs in seeps and springs is vital in sustaining the flow of streams during dry summer months and in providing the water needed to maintain important wetland habitats. Those same underground reservoirs also provide large quantities of water in carryover storage for use during prolonged droughts.The U.S. Geological survey, under cooperative programs with the Utah department of Natural resources and other Federal, State, and local agencies has been studying Utah’s ground-water resources since 1897. Much information has been gained during those studies about the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground water; the withdrawal and use of the water; and the effects of withdrawal. This report summarizes that information in nontechnical language, which is designed for all readers. Readers interested in more detailed information about ground water in specific areas of Utah are referred to the reports listed by LaPray and Hamblin (1980).

  3. Land protection plan : Bear River Watershed Conservation Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is establishing a conservation area for the Bear River watershed in Idaho, Utah, and Wyoming. The Bear River Watershed...

  4. 36 CFR 7.70 - Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... protection of the ecological and environmental values of the area. (i) The Superintendent of Grand Canyon... the Dirty Devil River upstream of Utah Highway 95 bridge. (2) A person may not operate a PWC at speed...

  5. Geochemistry of spring water, southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Briant A.

    1981-01-01

    The chemical quality of water in the southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado, is important to the future development of the abundant oil-shale resources of the area. This report examines the observed changes in chemistry as water circulates in both shallow and deep ground-water systems. Mass-balance and mass- transfer calculations are used to define reactions that simulate the observed water chemistry in the mixed sandstone, siltstone, and carbonate lithology of the Green River Formation of Tertiary age.The mass-transfer calculations determine a reaction path particular to this system. The early dominance of calcite dissolution produces a calcium carbonate water. After calcite saturation, deeper circulation and further rock-water interaction cause the reprecipitation of calcite, the dissolution of dolomite and plagioclase, and the oxidation of pyrite; all combining to produce a calcium magnesium sodium bicarbonate sulfate water. The calculations suggest that silica concentrations are controlled by a kaolinite-Ca-montmorillonite phase boundary. Close agreement of mineral-saturation indices calculated by both an aqueous-equilibrium model and the mass-transfer model support the selection of reactions from the mass-transfer calculations.

  6. University of Utah, Energy Commercialization Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, James [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-01-17

    During the Energy Commercialization Center’s (ECC) three years in operation, the only thing constant was change. The world of commercialization and cleantech evolved significantly during the time the ECC was formed and operating, including: the availability of cleantech funding lessoned, the growth of incubators and accelerators skyrocketed, the State of Utah created an office dedicated to energy development, the University of Utah was both praised and criticized for its success in commercialization, and the Federal government temporarily shut down. During the three-year grant there were three principle investigators on the grant, as well as three directors for the University’s Commercialization Office. Change can be hard for an organization,but as we instruct the companies we support, “Fail fast and fail often, because it is the fastest path to success.” Although there were some unanticipated challenges along the way, the local ecosystem is stronger because of the ECC’s efforts. Perhaps the greatest lesson learned was the importance of aligned incentives between key stakeholders in the commercialization process and the need for resources at the company and individual entrepreneur levels. The universities have systems and incentives to commercialize technologies, but creating value and companies generally rest with the individuals and entrepreneurs. Unfortunately the ECC was unable to create a viable mechanism to transfer the commercialization process that successfully aligned incentives and achieve a more effective ecosystem within the Rocky Mountain West. However, the ECC was successful in adding value to the individual ecosystems, and connecting national resources to regional and local needs. Regarding the ECC’s effectiveness in developing a cleantech commercialization ecosystem, initial inroads and relationships were established with key stakeholders. However, incentives, perceived or real competition, differences in commercialization processes, and

  7. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, Paul C; Freebury, Colin E; Hamilton, Paul B; Saarela, Jeffery M

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah.

  8. The "Martian" flora: new collections of vascular plants, lichens, fungi, algae, and cyanobacteria from the Mars Desert Research Station, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freebury, Colin E.; Hamilton, Paul B.; Saarela, Jeffery M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Mars Desert Research Station is a Mars analog research site located in the desert outside of Hanksville, Utah, U.S.A. Here we present a preliminary checklist of the vascular plant and lichen flora for the station, based on collections made primarily during a two-week simulated Mars mission in November, 2014. Additionally, we present notes on the endolithic chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and the identification of a fungal genus also based on these collections. Altogether, we recorded 38 vascular plant species from 14 families, 13 lichen species from seven families, six algae taxa including both chlorophytes and cyanobacteria, and one fungal genus from the station and surrounding area. We discuss this floristic diversity in the context of the ecology of the nearby San Rafael Swell and the desert areas of Wayne and Emery counties in southeastern Utah. PMID:27350765

  9. Heat pain detection threshold is associated with the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization: a study of healthy male volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen MS

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Morten Sejer Hansen,1 Jørn Wetterslev,2 Christian Bressen Pipper,3 Mohammad Sohail Asghar,1 Jørgen Berg Dahl4 1Department of Anesthesiology, 4231, Centre of Head and Orthopedics, Rigshospitalet, 2Copenhagen Trial Unit, Centre for Clinical Intervention Research, Department 7812, 3Section of Biostatistics, Faculty of Health, Copenhagen University, Copenhagen, 4Department of Anesthesiology, Department Z, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark Introduction: The area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal sensitization (BTS of the skin and heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT may both have predictive abilities in regards to pain sensitivity and clinical pain states. The association between HPDT and secondary hyperalgesia, however, remains unsettled, and the dissimilarities in physiologic properties suggest that they may represent 2 distinctively different pain entities. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HPDT and BTS-induced secondary hyperalgesia. Methods: A sample of 121 healthy male participants was included and tested on 2 separate study days with BTS (45°C, 3 minutes, HPDT, and pain during thermal stimulation (45°C, 1 minute. Areas of secondary hyperalgesia were quantified after monofilament pinprick stimulation. The pain catastrophizing scale (PCS and hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS were also applied. Results: A significant association between HPDT and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia (p<0.0001 was found. The expected change in area of secondary hyperalgesia due to a 1-degree increase in HPDT was estimated to be −27.38 cm2, 95% confidence interval (CI of −37.77 to −16.98 cm2, with an R2 of 0.19. Likewise, a significant association between HADS-depression subscore and area of secondary hyperalgesia (p=0.046 was found, with an estimated expected change in secondary hyperalgesia to a 1-point increase in HADS-depression subscore of 11 cm2, 95% CI (0.19–21.82, and with

  10. Publications and geothermal sample library facilities of the Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Phillip M.; Ruth, Kathryn A.; Langton, David R.; Bullett, Michael J.

    1990-03-30

    The Earth Science Laboratory of the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in research in geothermal exploration and development for the past eleven years. Our work has resulted in the publication of nearly 500 reports, which are listed in this document. Over the years, we have collected drill chip and core samples from more than 180 drill holes in geothermal areas, and most of these samples are available to others for research, exploration and similar purposes. We hope that scientists and engineers involved in industrial geothermal development will find our technology transfer and service efforts helpful.

  11. Allogenic sedimentary components of Bear Lake, Utah and Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, J.G.; Dean, W.E.; Reynolds, R.L.; Reheis, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Bear Lake is a long-lived lake filling a tectonic depression between the Bear River Range to the west and the Bear River Plateau to the east, and straddling the border between Utah and Idaho. Mineralogy, elemental geochemistry, and magnetic properties provide information about variations in provenance of allogenic lithic material in last-glacial-age, quartz-rich sediment in Bear Lake. Grain-size data from the siliciclastic fraction of late-glacial to Holocene carbonate-rich sediments provide information about variations in lake level. For the quartz-rich lower unit, which was deposited while the Bear River fl owed into and out of the lake, four source areas are recognized on the basis of modern fluvial samples with contrasting properties that reflect differences in bedrock geology and in magnetite content from dust. One of these areas is underlain by hematite-rich Uinta Mountain Group rocks in the headwaters of the Bear River. Although Uinta Mountain Group rocks make up a small fraction of the catchment, hematite-rich material from this area is an important component of the lower unit. This material is interpreted to be glacial fl our. Variations in the input of glacial flour are interpreted as having caused quasi-cyclical variations in mineralogical and elemental concentrations, and in magnetic properties within the lower unit. The carbonate-rich younger unit was deposited under conditions similar to those of the modern lake, with the Bear River largely bypassing the lake. For two cores taken in more than 30 m of water, median grain sizes in this unit range from ???6 ??m to more than 30 ??m, with the coarsest grain sizes associated with beach or shallow-water deposits. Similar grain-size variations are observed as a function of water depth in the modern lake and provide the basis for interpreting the core grain-size data in terms of lake level. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  12. Applications of research from the U.S. Geological Survey program, assessment of regional earthquake hazards and risk along the Wasatch Front, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Paula L.

    1993-01-01

    engineering studies. Translated earthquake hazard maps have also been developed to identify areas that are particularly vulnerable to various causes of damage such as ground shaking, surface rupturing, and liquefaction. The implementation of earthquake hazard reduction plans are now under way in various communities in Utah. The results of a survey presented in this paper indicate that technical public officials (planners and building officials) have an understanding of the earthquake hazards and how to mitigate the risks. Although the survey shows that the general public has a slightly lower concern about the potential for economic losses, they recognize the potential problems and can support a number of earthquake mitigation measures. The study suggests that many community groups along the Wasatch Front, including volunteer groups, business groups, and elected and appointed officials, are ready for action-oriented educational programs. These programs could lead to a significant reduction in the risks associated with earthquake hazards. A DATA BASE DESIGNED FOR URBAN SEISMIC HAZARDS STUDIES: A computerized data base has been designed for use in urban seismic hazards studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The design includes file structures for 16 linked data sets, which contain geological, geophysical, and seismological data used in preparing relative ground response maps of large urban areas. The data base is organized along relational data base principles. A prototype urban hazards data base has been created for evaluation in two urban areas currently under investigation: the Wasatch Front region of Utah and the Puget Sound area of Washington. The initial implementation of the urban hazards data base was accomplished on a microcomputer using dBASE III Plus software and transferred to minicomputers and a work station. A MAPPING OF GROUND-SHAKING INTENSITIES FOR SALT LAKE COUNTY, UTAH: This paper documents the development of maps showing a

  13. Effect of high-temperature treatment in air on the surface area and porous texture of zirconium dioxide prepared by thermal decomposition of the nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arean, C.O.; Colinas, J.M.F.; Garcia, M.A.V. (Oviedo Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry); Arjona, A.M. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Inorganic Chemistry)

    1982-09-01

    Zirconium dioxide, prepared by thermal decomposition of zirconium nitrate, was heated in air at temperatures ranging from 573 to 1023 K. An analysis of nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms on the resulting materials allowed determination of the corresponding specific surface area and porous texture. All oxides calcined within the temperature range 573 to 873 K were found to be basically mesoporous; the most frequent pore radius increasing from 3 to 10.5 nm as the temperature was raised. BET surface areas decreased across the same temperature range, from 94 down to 20 m/sup 2/ g/sup -1/. The sample fired at 1023 K showed a BET surface area smaller than 5 m/sup 2/ g/sup -1/.

  14. Development of a thermal hydraulic modelling of ground water of the Malm in the Munich metropolitan area; Entwicklung einer thermisch-hydraulischen Grundwassermodellierung des Malm im Grossraum Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dussel, M.; Lueschen, E.; Thomas, R. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Angewandte Geophysik, Hannover (DE)] (and others)

    2011-10-24

    The mutual potential influence of geothermal duplicates and the scientific investigation of the relationship between seismic and hydraulic parameters are investigated in the joint research project 'Geothermal characterization of fractured karst limestone aquifers in the Munich metropolitan area'. Thirteen doublets and triplets being in production or sunk illustrate the great geothermal potential and provide important data on the development of a thermal-hydraulic modeling of the reservoir. 3D seismic Unterhaching, 3D structural model, hydrogeological model and a high-resolution 3D temperature model form the basis of the numerical modeling. Different seismic signatures, seismic attributes and variations in the interval velocities characterize the ground geophysically, and were interpreted under consideration of geological and hydrogeological background information as well as borehole measurements in terms of hydraulically conductive homogeneous areas. For the Munich metropolitan area, the numerical modeling is a decision aid for the future optimized and sustainable hydrothermal utilization of the Malm aquifer.

  15. Impact of high efficiency vehicles on future fuel tax revenues in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Utah Department of Transportation Research Division has analyzed the potential impact of : high-efficiency motor vehicles on future State of Utah motor fuel tax revenues used to construct and maintain the : highway network. High-efficiency motor ...

  16. Intrinsic Remediation Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for UST Site 870. Hill Air Force Base, Ogden, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    encompasses the area immediately downgradient from and adjacent to the former location of UST 870.0. This site is referred to as Site EGSS by the Utah...Site 870.0 ( EGSS ), November, 1992. James M. Montgomery Consulting Engineers, Inc., 1992b, Pumping Tests and Product Thickness Test Letter Report, UST...Site 870.0 ( EGSS ), November, 1992. James M. Montgomery Consulting Engineers, Inc., 1993a, Remedial Options Letter Report, January, 1993. James M

  17. Wolves in Utah: An analysis of potential impacts and recommendations for management

    OpenAIRE

    Switalski, T. Adam; Simmons, Trey; Duncan, Shiree L.; Chavez, Andreas S.; Schmidt, Robert H.

    2002-01-01

    The historic range of gray wolves (Canis lupus) in Utah was essentially statewide. Although their presence cannot be disputed, the historic abundance of wolves in Utah is unknown. The release of gray wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho in 1995 established growing populations, and increasing dispersal is bringing these wolves closer to Utah. It seems likely that wolves will commingle with Utah's other native mammals in the near future. The potential presence of wolves in Ut...

  18. Large Area ?-thermal Phonon TES Detector Mediated by the quasi-particle Diffusion Signal for Space Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzigoni, G.; Bagliani, D.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; De Gerone, M.; Gatti, F.; Macculi, C.; Piro, L.

    2014-05-01

    Low temperature detectors operated at about 0.1K have achieved excellent spectral performances in the soft X-rays, becoming appealing for new challenging measurements with space missions in Astrophysics. In order to exploit their full sensitivity, it is necessary to minimize the background signals generated by the cosmic rays, i.e., high energy protons and light nuclei, that leave sizable amounts of energy in the same spectral window of the astrophysics signals. Detectors for GeV protons and nuclei operating few millimeters from the X-ray detector at 0.1K can act as anti-coincidence to disentangle the fake signal of cosmics. Fast and large detectors are designed and fabricated. These operate by mixing the fast a-thermal phonon signal with the slow diffusive thermal ones. A greater uniformity in the response should be obtained using large shaped superconducting aluminium films that acts as phonon collectors: the quasi-particles created by high energy phonons diffuse along the film toward a small Ir TES sensor giving out to a fast rise time. Here we present the measurement of an operating prototype of a superconducting anticoincidence detector for the proposed space mission ATHENA+.

  19. Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrist, Alexia; Styczynski, Ashley; Wynn, DonRaphael; Ansari, Safdar; Hopkin, Justin; Rosado-Santos, Harry; Baker, JoDee; Nakashima, Allyn; Atkinson, Annette; Spencer, Melanie; Dean, Debbie; Teachout, Leslie; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Condori, Rene E; Orciari, Lillian; Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Ellison, James; Niezgoda, Michael; Petersen, Brett; Wallace, Ryan; Musgrave, Karl

    2016-06-03

    In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.

  20. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization.

  1. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considering for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has found that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  2. Parental hesitation in immunizing children in Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthy, Karlen E; Beckstrand, Renea L; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2010-01-01

    To determine why parents in a Utah community hesitated in immunizing their children. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Data were collected from a convenience sample of 86 parents of under-immunized children in the county health department and local pediatric and family practice offices. Participants were asked to complete an immunization hesitancy survey including questions regarding why parents hesitated to immunize their children, parental concerns regarding immunizations, and what advice they would give to a friend or family member who had concerns about childhood vaccines. Parents could also write in any other comment, concern, or suggestion they had regarding childhood immunizations. 2 major themes were identified: concerns regarding immunization safety and lack of perceived need. The most commonly reported concerns regarding immunization safety included autism, immune system overload, and other adverse reactions. Many parents did not recognize the need for childhood immunizations, especially multiple immunizations given simultaneously on a strict timeline. The manner in which immunization information is shared with hesitant parents can be particularly important. There is a need for health care providers to assess and increase parental knowledge regarding immunizations.

  3. Runoff conditions in Utah for water year 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Jeffrey T.; Angeroth, Cory E.

    2012-01-01

    In May 2011, the snowpack conditions in the mountains of central and northern Utah had emergency planners and water managers preparing for levels of runoff similar to the record year of 1983. The SNOwpack TELemetry (SNOTEL) records from the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) reported that the amount of water contained in the snowpack in May 2011 was greater than it was in either May of 1983 or 2005.Despite the above average snowpack,which lasted into the summer of 2011, runoff from snowmelt in 2011 did not create the widespread damage observed in 1983 and 2005. Cooler than normal temperatures resulted in slower snowmelt rates, which produced a prolonged and elevated runoff. Annual streamflow for water year 2011 was well above average, but few records of peak streamflow were set. The increase in water-surface elevation of Great Salt Lake was also above average. Ten streamgages in central and northern Utah, with records spanning greater than 20 years, have been selected to highlight the runoff conditions in Utah during water year 2011. Streamflow on the Duchesne River near Randlett, Utah, and on the Bear River near Utah-Wyoming state line is affected by several upstream diversions. These two streamgages were included in the analysis because their streamflow records have shown responses to spring snowmelt. The annual streamflow in all 10 of these streamgages was greater than 150 percent of average, and 3 streamgages set new records for total annual streamflow in water year 2011. One streamgage set a new peak streamflow record.

  4. 78 FR 2430 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT... February 11, 2013. ADDRESSES: Duncan Metcalfe, Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake... funerary objects should contact Duncan Metcalfe, Natural History Museum of Utah, 301 Wakara Way, Salt Lake...

  5. 30 CFR 944.25 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE UTAH § 944.25 Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following is a... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. 944.25 Section 944.25 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND...

  6. 30 CFR 944.20 - Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Utah abandoned mine plan. 944.20 Section 944.20 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Utah abandoned mine plan. The Utah Abandoned Mine Plan, as submitted on February 9, 1983, and as...

  7. 75 FR 8397 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation RAC Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation RAC Meeting AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation... Management's (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC)/Recreation RAC will meet as indicated below. DATES...

  8. Assessment and use of drug information references in Utah pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorman KL

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine which drug references Utah pharmacists use most frequently. To determine which types of drug information questions are most commonly asked, and whether Utah pharmacists have access to adequate references to respond to these questions. Methods: A 19-question survey was created using Qualtrics, LLC (Provo, Utah software. An electronic survey link was sent to 1,431 pharmacists with a valid e-mail address listed in the Department of Professional Licensing database. Questions focused on available references in the participant’s pharmacy, how current the references are, and the participant’s use of the references. Surveys were analyzed for participants practicing in either community or hospital pharmacies in the state of Utah. Results: A total of 147 responses were included in the analysis. Approximately 44% of respondents practiced in the community, and 56% practiced in a hospital setting. The most commonly used references by Utah pharmacists are Micromedex, Lexicomp, UpToDate, Clinical Pharmacology, and Drug Facts & Comparisons. Pharmacists in the community frequently receive questions related to adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, and over-the-counter medications. Pharmacists in the hospital frequently receive questions relating to dosage and administration, drug interactions, and adverse drug reactions. About 89% of community pharmacists and 96% of hospital pharmacists feel available references are adequate to answer the questions they receive. Conclusions: Utah pharmacists generally use large reference suites to answer drug information questions. The majority of pharmacists consider the references available to them to be adequate to answer the questions they receive.

  9. Assessment of the Geothermal Potential Within the BPA Marketing Area.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.; Allen, Eliot D.

    1980-07-01

    The potential of geothermal energy is estimated that can be used for direct heat applications and electrical power generation within the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) marketing area. The BPA marketing area includes three principal states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho and portions of California, Montana, Wyoming, Nevada, and Utah bordering on these three states. This area covers approximately 384,000 square miles and has an estimated population of 6,760,000. The total electrical geothermal potential within this marketing area is 4077 MW/sub e/ from hydrothermal resources and 16,000 MW/sub e/ from igneous systems, whereas the total thermal (wellhead) potential is 16.15 x 10/sup 15/ Btu/y. Approximately 200 geothermal resource sites were initially identified within the BPA marketing area. This number was then reduced to about 100 sites thought to be the most promising for development by the year 2000. These 100 sites, due to load area overlap, were grouped into 53 composite sites; 21-3/4 within BPA preference customer areas and 31-1/4 within nonpreference customer areas. The geothermal resource potential was then estimated for high-temperature (> 302/sup 0/F = 150/sup 0/C), intermediate-temperature (194 to 302/sup 0/F = 90 to 150/sup 0/C), and low-temperature (< 194/sup 0/F = 90/sup 0/C) resources.

  10. Detecting agricultural to urban land use change from multi-temporal MSS digital data. [Salt Lake County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridd, M. K.; Merola, J. A.; Jaynes, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    Conversion of agricultural land to a variety of urban uses is a major problem along the Wasatch Front, Utah. Although LANDSAT MSS data is a relatively coarse tool for discriminating categories of change in urban-size plots, its availability prompts a thorough test of its power to detect change. The procedures being applied to a test area in Salt Lake County, Utah, where the land conversion problem is acute are presented. The identity of land uses before and after conversion was determined and digital procedures for doing so were compared. Several algorithms were compared, utilizing both raw data and preprocessed data. Verification of results involved high quality color infrared photography and field observation. Two data sets were digitally registered, specific change categories internally identified in the software, results tabulated by computer, and change maps printed at 1:24,000 scale.

  11. Hydrologic evaluation and water-supply considerations for five Paiute Indian land parcels, Millard, Sevier, and Iron counties, southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Don; Stephens, D.W.; Conroy, L.S.

    1989-01-01

    The hydrologic resources in and adjacent to five parcels of land held in trust for the Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah were evaluated. The land, located in southwestern Utah, is generally arid and has had only limited use for grazing. The parcels are located near the towns of Cove Fort, Joseph, Koosharem, and Kanarraville. On the basis of available geohydrologic and hydrologic data, water of suitable quality is locally available in the areas of all parcels for domestic, stock, recreation, and limited irrigation use. Developing this water for use on the parcels would potentially involve obtaining water rights, drilling wells, and constructing diversion structures. Surface water apparently is the most favorable source of supply available for the Joseph parcel, and groundwater apparently is the most favorable source of supply available for the other parcels. (USGS)

  12. 78 FR 6832 - Notice of Mailing Address Change for the Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Mailing Address Change for the Utah State Office, Salt Lake City, UT... of Land Management (BLM), Utah State Office, in Salt Lake City, Utah, will be changing from P.O. Box 45155-0155 to 440 West 200 South, Suite 500, Salt Lake City, Utah 84101-1345. The proposed date will be...

  13. 75 FR 57055 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Draft Revised Recovery Plan for Utah Prairie Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... for Utah Prairie Dog AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document... availability of a draft revised recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens). This species is.... The Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens), found only in southwestern and central Utah, was listed as...

  14. The Thermal State of Permafrost in the Nordic Area during the International Polar Year 2007-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, H. H.; Etzelmuller, B.; Isaksen, K.

    2010-01-01

    of the Nordic area, the permafrost is somewhat colder, but still only a few degrees below the freezing point. The observations presented from the network of boreholes, more than half of which were established during the IPY, provide an important baseline to assess how future predicted climatic changes may...

  15. An update of Utah State University's GAS activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megill, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    The highlights of the Utah State University's participation in the space program are listed. Proposed experiments include: a study of the velocity of a bubble in water under the influence of a temperature gradient; reflight of an experiment on surface tension driven convective flow; surface waves in zero-G; crystallization in zero-G (vapor phase and liquid phase); bio gas generation; and penicillum growth; study of undamped oscillations in a vacuum and zero-G. The effect that spinoffs have had on the Utah State University were discussed.

  16. Environmental assessment: Davis Canyon site, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Davis Canyon site in Utah as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Davis Canyon site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EA. The Davis Canyon site is in the Paradox Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. This setting contains one other potentially acceptable site -- the Lavender Canyon site. Although the Lavender Canyon site is suitable for site characterization, the DOE has concluded that the Davis Canyon site is the preferred site in the Paradox Basin. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Davis Canyon site is not disqualified under the guidelines. Furthermore, the DOE has fond that the site is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Davis Canyon site as one of five sites suitable for characterization. 181 figs., 175 tabs.

  17. Structure, surface area and morphology of aluminas from thermal decomposition of Al(OH(CH3COO2 crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEDRO K. KIYOHARA

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline aluminium hydroxiacetate was prepared by reaction between aluminium powder (ALCOA 123 and aqueous solution of acetic acid at 96ºC ±1ºC. The white powder of Al(OH(CH3COO2 is constituted by agglomerates of crystalline plates, having size about 10mum. The crystals were fired from 200ºC to 1550ºC, in oxidizing atmosphere and the products characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and surface area measurements by BET-nitrogen method. Transition aluminas are formed from heating at the following temperatures: gamma (300ºC; delta (750ºC; alpha (1050ºC. The aluminas maintain the original morphology of the Al(OHAc2 crystal agglomerates, up to 1050ºC, when sintering and coalescence of the alpha-alumina crystals start and proceed up to 1550ºC. High surface area aluminas are formed in the temperature range of 700ºC to 1100ºC; the maximum value of 198m²/g is obtained at 900ºC, with delta-alumina structure. The formation sequence of transition aluminas is similar to the sequence from well ordered boehmite, but with differences in the transition temperatures and in the development of high surface areas. It is suggested that the causes for these diversities between the two sequences from Al(OH Ac2 and boehmite are due to the different particle sizes, shapes and textures of the gamma-Al2O3 which acts as precursor for the sequence gamma- to alpha-Al2O3.

  18. The Basin and Range Province in Utah, Nevada, and California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Thomas B.

    1943-01-01

    In this report an attempt has been made to summarize and in places to interpret the published information that was available through 1938 on the geology of those parts of Nevada, California, and Utah that are included in the geologic province known as the Basin and Range province. This region includes most of the Great Basin, from which no water flows to the sea, as well as part of the drainage basin of the lower Colorado River. It is characterized by numerous parallel, linear mountain ranges that are separated from one another by wide valleys or topographic basins. All the major divisions of geologic time are represented by the rocks exposed in this region. The oldest are of pre-Cambrian age and crop out chiefly along the eastern and southern borders. They have been carefully studied at only a few localities, and the correlation and extent of the subdivision so far recognized is uncertain. There appear to be at least three series of pre-Cambrian rocks which are probably separated from one another by profound unconformities. Large masses of intrusive igneous rocks have been recognized only in the oldest series. During the Paleozoic era the region was a part of the Cordilleran geosyncline, and sediments were deposited during all of the major and most of the minor subdivisions of the era. There are thick and widespread accumulations of Cambrian and Ordovician strata, the maximum aggregate thickness possibly exceeding 23,000 feet. The eastern and western boundaries of the province were approximately those of the area of rapid subsidence within the geosyncline, though the axes of maximum subsidence oscillated back and forth during the two periods. The Silurian and Devonian seas, on the other hand, extended beyond the province and, possibly as a consequence, are represented by much thinner sections - of the order of 6,000 feet. At the end of the Devonian period the geosyncline was split by the emergence of a geanticline in western Nevada, and Mississippian and

  19. Parental Attitudes Regarding School-Based Sexuality Education in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steadman, Mindy; Crookston, Benjamin; Page, Randy; Hall, Cougar

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality education programs can be broadly categorized as either risk-avoidance or risk-reduction approaches. Health educators in Utah public schools must teach a state mandated risk-avoidance curriculum which prohibits the advocacy or encouragement of contraception. Multiple national surveys indicate that parents prefer a risk-reduction approach…

  20. Meteorological Observations Available for the State of Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-09-12

    The National Weather Service’s Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System (MADIS) contains a large number of station networks of surface and upper air meteorological observations for the state of Utah. In addition to MADIS, observations from individual station networks may also be available. It has been confirmed that LLNL has access to the data sources listed below.

  1. A Schoolmarm All My Life: Personal Narratives from Frontier Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkead, Joyce, Ed.

    This book presents edited versions of the personal narratives of 24 Mormon women who taught school in frontier Utah. Drawn primarily from the archives of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, the accounts detail the women's lives as Mormons, as pioneers, and as teachers and have been edited to focus on the education of women,…

  2. Coniferous forest habitat types of central and southern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew P. Youngblood; Ronald L. Mauk

    1985-01-01

    A land-classification system based upon potential natural vegetation is presented for the coniferous forests of central and southern Utah. It is based on reconnaissance sampling of about 720 stands. A hierarchical taxonomic classification of forest sites was developed using the habitat type concept. Seven climax series, 37 habitat types, and six additional phases of...

  3. Utah State Office of Education Fingertip Facts, 2013-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Fingertip Facts is a compendium of some of the most frequently requested data sets from the Utah State Office of Education. Data sets in this year's Fingertip Facts include: Core CRT Language Arts Testing, 2013; Core CRT Mathematics Testing, 2013; 2013 Public Education General Fund; 2012-13 Enrollment Demographics; Public Schools by Grade Level,…

  4. Utah State Office of Education Fingertip Facts, 2014-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Fingertip Facts is a compendium of some of the most frequently requested data sets from the Utah State Office of Education. Data sets in this year's Fingertip Facts include: SAGE Testing, 2014; 2013 Public Education General Fund; 2014-15 Public School Enrollment Demographics; Public Schools by Grade Level, 2013-14; Number of Licensed Educators;…

  5. Lead Toxicity and Iron Deficiency in Utah Migrant Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Stephen D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Determines the frequency of presumptive iron deficiency and lead toxicity in 198 Utah migrant children, aged 9-72 months. There were no confirmed cases of lead toxicity. Thirteen percent of all children tested, and 30 percent of those aged 9-23 months, were iron deficient. Hematocrit determination is an insensitive screen for iron deficiency.…

  6. Enhanced Anti-Ultraviolet and Thermal Stability of a Pesticide via Modification of a Volatile Organic Compound (VOC-Free Vinyl-Silsesquioxane in Desert Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derong Lin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the effect of severe environmental conditions, such as intense heat, blowing sand, and ultraviolet light, conventional pesticide applications have repeatedly failed to adequately control mosquito and sandfly populations in desert areas. In this study, a vinyl silsesquioxane (VS was added to a pesticide (citral to enhance residual, thermal and anti-ultraviolet properties via three double-bond reactions in the presence of an initiator: (1 the connection of VS and citral, (2 a radical self-polymerization of VS and (3 a radical self-polymerization of citral. VS-citral, the expected and main product of the copolymerization of VS and citral, was characterized using standard spectrum techniques. The molecular consequences of the free radical polymerization were analyzed by MALDITOF spectrometry. Anti-ultraviolet and thermal stability properties of the VS-citral system were tested using scanning spectrophotometry (SSP and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The repellency of VS-citral decreased over time, from 97.63% at 0 h to 72.98% at 1 h and 60.0% at 2 h, as did the repellency of citral, from 89.56% at 0 h to 62.73% at 1 h and 50.95% at 2 h.

  7. On Designing Thermal-Aware Localized QoS Routing Protocol for in-vivo Sensor Nodes in Wireless Body Area Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monowar, Muhammad Mostafa; Bajaber, Fuad

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, we address the thermal rise and Quality-of-Service (QoS) provisioning issue for an intra-body Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN) having in-vivo sensor nodes. We propose a thermal-aware QoS routing protocol, called TLQoS, that facilitates the system in achieving desired QoS in terms of delay and reliability for diverse traffic types, as well as avoids the formation of highly heated nodes known as hotspot(s), and keeps the temperature rise along the network to an acceptable level. TLQoS exploits modular architecture wherein different modules perform integrated operations in providing multiple QoS service with lower temperature rise. To address the challenges of highly dynamic wireless environment inside the human body. TLQoS implements potential-based localized routing that requires only local neighborhood information. TLQoS avoids routing loop formation as well as reduces the number of hop traversal exploiting hybrid potential, and tuning a configurable parameter. We perform extensive simulations of TLQoS, and the results show that TLQoS has significant performance improvements over state-of-the-art approaches.

  8. A NOVEL LOW THERMAL BUDGET THIN-FILM POLYSILICON FABRICATION PROCESS FOR LARGE-AREA, HIGH-THROUGHPUT SOLAR CELL PRODUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yue Kuo

    2010-08-15

    A novel thin-film poly-Si fabrication process has been demonstrated. This low thermal budget process transforms the single- and multi-layer amorphous silicon thin films into a poly-Si structure in one simple step over a pulsed rapid thermal annealing process with the enhancement of an ultrathin Ni layer. The complete poly-Si solar cell was fabricated in a short period of time without deteriorating the underneath glass substrate. The unique vertical crystallization process including the mechanism is discussed. Influences of the dopant type and process parameters on crystal structure will be revealed. The poly-Si film structure has been proved using TEM, XRD, Raman, and XPS methods. The poly-Si solar cell structure and the performance have been examined. In principle, the new process is potentially applicable to produce large-area thin-film poly-Si solar cells at a high throughput and low cost. A critical issue in this process is to prevent the excessive dopant diffusion during crystallization. Process parameters and the cell structure have to be optimized to achieve the production goal.

  9. Screening of native plants and algae growing on fly-ash affected areas near National Thermal Power Corporation, Tanda, Uttar Pradesh, India for accumulation of toxic heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, S; Srivastava, S; Mishra, S; Dixit, B; Kumar, A; Tripathi, R D

    2008-10-30

    The present investigation was carried out to screen native plants growing in fly-ash (FA) contaminated areas near National Thermal Power Corporation, Tanda, Uttar Pradesh, India with a view to using them for the eco-restoration of the area. A total number of 17 plants (9 aquatic, 6 terrestrial and 2 algal species) were collected and screened for heavy metal (Fe, Zn, Cu, Mo, B, Si, Al, Cr, Pb, Cd, Hg and As) accumulation. Differential accumulation of various heavy metals by different species of plants was observed. Hydrilla verticillata was found to be the most efficient metal accumulator among 9 aquatic plants, Eclipta alba among 6 terrestrial plants and Phormedium papyraceum between 2 algal species. In general, the maximum levels of most metals were found in terrestrial plants while the lowest in algal species. However, translocation of the metals from root to shoot was found to be higher in aquatic plants than terrestrial ones. These results suggest that various aquatic, terrestrial and algal species of plants may be used in a synergistic way to remediate and restore the FA contaminated areas.

  10. Recent seismicity near Capitol Reef National Park, Utah, and its tectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, James R.; Wong, Ivan G.

    1983-08-01

    On the basis of a limited historical record, the seismicity of the Colorado Plateau appears to be of very low level, with diffusely distributed earthquakes of small to moderate magnitude (ML  5.5). From December 1978 to January 1980, a spatially and temporally isolated swarm of earthquakes was observed near Capitol Reef National Park in south-central Utah. This sequence of at least 38 earthquakes, ML 1.0 to 3.6, represents the highest level of seismicity historically observed within the interior of the Colorado Plateau physiographic province, with the exception of coal-mining-induced seismicity in the Book Cliffs of east-central Utah. The earthquakes occurred in a structurally complex area near the juncture of Waterpocket fold and the Caineville monocline just west of the Henry Mountains. The location of the swarm suggests a possible association with the Laramide basement faults that controlled the development of the fold and monocline. A focal mechanism for one of the events exhibited (1) normal faulting trending northwest and (2) crustal extensional stress in a northeast-southwest direction. These observations are inconsistent with the expected reverse or strike-slip faulting and the compressional tectonic stress field of the Colorado Plateau interior. The observed Capitol Reef seismicity may therefore (1) represent an occurrence of Basin and Range extensional tectonism along a reactivated Laramide structure and (2) refine Zoback and Zoback's boundary of the Basin and Range-Colorado Plateau transition zone.

  11. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, J.T. (ed.)

    1982-09-01

    This document summarizes a conceptual study on the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) at a representative Western site. The site selected for this conceptual study, an area of about 50 square miles, is located 15 miles south of Green River, Utah. The conceptual NEC would consist of nine nuclear electric generating units, arranged on the site in three clusters of three reactors each (triads), separated by about 2 1/2 miles. Of the total electric output of 11,250 MWe that the NEC could produce, about 82% is assumed to be transmitted out of Utah to Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, and California. The technical engineering issues studied included geology and seismology, plant design, low-level radioactive waste disposal, transmission, and construction schedules and costs. Socioeconomic issues included were demographics, land use, community service needs, and fiscal impacts. Environmental considerations included terrestrial and aquatic ecology, visual impact, and secondary population impacts. Radiological issues were concerned with the safety and risks of an NEC and an on-site low-level waste facility. Institutional issues included methods of ownership, taxation, implications of energy export, and water allocation. The basic finding was that an NEC would be technically feasible, but a number of socioeconomic and institutional issues would require resolution before a Western regional NEC could be considered a viable power plant siting option.

  12. Thermal impact of a small alas-valley river in a continuous permafrost area - insights and issues raised from a field monitoring Site in Syrdakh (Central Yakutia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Christophe; Nicolas, Roux; Fedorov, Alexander; Konstantinov, Pavel; Séjourné, Antoine; Costard, François; Marlin, Christelle; Khristoforov, Ivan; Saintenoy, Albane

    2017-04-01

    Lakes are probably the most prominent surface water bodies in continuous permafrost areas. As a consequence, they are also the most studied features in these regions (e.g. Fedorov et al. 2014). They are indeed of great interest, not only for local populations that use the water resource they represent both in winter and summer, but also from a climatic point of view as they can be a specific source of green-house gases due to the relatively warmer environment they create, especially associated with their taliks (thawed zone surrounded by permafrost located beneath large enough lakes). From a hydrogeological perspective, such taliks can form complex groundwater networks, thus possibly connecting sub-permafrost groundwater with surface water in the present context of climate change. On the other hand, rivers, another important feature of permafrost landscapes providing similar challenges, have drawn less attention so that only a few studies focus on river interactions with permafrost (e.g. Costard et al. 2014, Grenier et al. 2013). However, the processes of heat transfer at stake between river and permafrost strongly differ from lake systems for several reasons. The geometries differ, the river water flow and thermal regimes and interactions with the lateral slopes (valley) are specific. Of particular importance is the fact that the water, in the case of rivers, is in motion leading to specific heat exchange phenomena between water and soil. (Roux et al., accepted) addressed this issue recently by means of an experimental study in a cold room and associated numerical simulations. The present study focuses on a real river-permafrost system with its full natural complexity. A small alas-valley in the vicinity of Yakutsk (Central Yakutia, Siberia) was chosen. Monitoring was started in October 2012 to study the thermal and hydrological interactions between a river and its underground in this continuous permafrost environment. Thermal sensors were installed inside the

  13. Mapping thermal maturity in the Chainman shale, near Eureka, Nevada, with Landsat Thematic Mapper images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, L.C.; Pawlewicz, M.J.; Jones, O.D.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a correlation between measurements of organic matter (OM) maturity and laboratory measurements of visible and near-infrared spectral reflectance, and if Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images could be used to map maturity. The maturity of Mississippian Chainman Shale samples collected in east-central Nevada and west-central Utah was determined by using vitrinite reflectance and Rock-Eval pyrolysis. TM 4/TM 5 values correspond well to vitrinite reflectance and hydrogen index variations, and therefore this ratio was used to evaluate a TM image of the Eureka, Nevada, area for mapping thermal maturity differences in the Chainman Shale. -from Authors

  14. More with thermal energy storage. Report 11. Area-oriented groundwater control. Fitting of thermal energy storage in area-oriented groundwater control. Chances and points of attention. Final report; Meer met bodemenergie. Rapport 11. Gebiedsgericht grond-waterbeheer. Inpassing van bodemenergie in gebiedsgrondwaterbeheer. Kansen en aandachtspunten. Eindrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henssen, M. [Bioclear, Groningen (Netherlands); Hartog, N. [Deltares, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-06-25

    The project More With Thermal Energy Storage (MMB, abbreviated in Dutch) focuses on knowledge gaps and potential opportunities regarding open systems. The main questions to be answered are: (1) What effects (hydrological, thermal, microbiological and chemical) occur in the soil system by application of thermal energy storage; (2) Which technical options are available for a sustainable integration of thermal energy storage in the water and energy chain?; (3) Is it possible to achieve multiple objectives by using smart combinations? The project is organized in different work packages. In work package 2, the effects of individual and collective thermal energy storage storage systems on subsoils and the environment are determined. In work package 3 the opportunities for thermal energy storage and soil remediation are examined, while in work package 4 the focus is on new sustainable combinations of heat and cold storage. Work package 1 is the umbrella part where communication and policy of and participation in MMB are the main subjects. In this report the following two questions are posed with regard to the use of thermal energy storage systems in contaminated areas:(1) is it realistic to expect that thermal energy storage systems can contribute to a substantial improvement of groundwater in large-scale contaminated areas?; and (2) is a thermal energy systems an option to control the burden of pollution? And which combinations with other underground or aboveground applications are possible for thermal energy storage? [Dutch] Het project Meer Met Bodemenergie (MMB) richt zich op het invullen van kennisleemtes en mogelijke kansen ten aanzien van open systemen. De belangrijkste vragen waarop het onderzoeksprogramma MMB antwoord geeft zijn: (1) Welke effecten (hydrologisch, thermisch, microbiologisch en chemisch) treden op in het bodemsysteem bij toepassing van bodemenergie?; (2) Welke technische mogelijkheden zijn er voor het duurzaam inpassen van bodem-energie in de water

  15. A Large-Area Nanoplasmonic Sensor Fabricated by Rapid Thermal Annealing Treatment for Label-Free and Multi-Point Immunoglobulin Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hana Tzu-Han; Yang, Chuan-Kai; Lin, Chi-Chen; Wu, Albert Meng-Hsin; Wang, Lon A; Huang, Nien-Tsu

    2017-05-02

    Immunoglobulins are important biomarkers to evaluate the immune status or development of infectious diseases. To provide timely clinical treatments, it is important to continuously monitor the level of multiple immunoglobulins. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-based nanoplasmonic sensors have been demonstrated for multiplex immunoglobulins detection. However, the sensor fabrication process is usually slow and complicated, so it is not accessible for large-area and batch fabrication. Herein, we report a large-area (2 cm × 2 cm) nanofabrication method using physical vapor deposition followed by a rapid thermal annealing treatment. To optimize the sensor performance, we systematically characterized three fabrication conditions, including (1) the deposition thickness; (2) the maximum annealing temperature, and (3) the annealing time. The corresponding absorbance spectrum profile and surface morphology of the nanostructures were observed by a UV-VIS spectrometer and atomic force microscopy. We then tested the sensitivity of the sensor using a glucose solution at different concentrations. The results showed that the sensor with 10 nm gold deposition thickness under 5-min 900 °C rapid thermal annealing can achieve the highest sensitivity (189 nm RIU-1). Finally, we integrated this nanoplasmonic sensor with a microchannel and a motorized stage to perform a 10-spot immunoglobulin detection in 50 min. Based on its real-time, dynamic and multi-point analyte detection capability, the nanoplasmonic sensor has the potential to be applied in high-throughput or multiplex immunoassay analysis, which would be beneficial for disease diagnosis or biomedical research in a simple and cost-effective platform.

  16. Phytoavailability of Geogenic Arsenic and Its Partitioning in Soil: a Case Of Study in a Thermal Area of Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Rita Stazi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic (As is an ubiquitous metalloid that is introduced into the environment from both anthropogenic and geochemical sources. The As can be introduced in food chain through plants grown on polluted soil and/or contaminated irrigation water. The element may impair plant growth, moreover its toxicity and cancerogenicity poses a threat for human health. Most plants tolerate soil As concentrations up to 50 mg kg−1. However, at higher levels some plants might be negatively affected, while some others develop strategies to adapt to these conditions. It is known that As absorption, translocation and accumulation depend on plant species. The As tends to concentrate mainly in plant roots and old leaves, with a minor concentration in stems and young leaves, and the lowest concentrations is in fruits. In this study soil As mobility, tomato phytoavailability, and As plant partitioning were measured in an naturally As reach agricultural area (57.49 mg kg-1.  The results show that As compounds mainly accumulate in the roots (2.85 mg kg-1, whereas only a small portion is translocated to fruits (0.08 mg kg-1 making the risk for human health negligible.

  17. Measures of Child Well-Being in Utah, 2001. A Pledge to Our Children. Utah KIDS COUNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haven, Terry, Ed.

    This KIDS COUNT report details statewide trends in the well-being of Utah's children. The statistical portrait is based on 26 indicators of children's well-being: (1) prenatal care; (2) low birth weight infants; (3) infant mortality; (4) child injury deaths; (5) unintentional injuries; (6) untreated tooth decay; (7) immunization rates; (8) suicide…

  18. Educational Issues in Utah: Governance, Legislation, Technology, and Finance. 1994-95 Conditions of Education in Utah Yearbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Patrick F., Ed.; Johnson, Bob L., Jr., Ed.

    This document is the third edition of "Conditions of Education in Utah," covering the 1994-95 academic year. The first three chapters analyze issues relative to distance education and the Internet. Chapters 1 and 2 examine the pros and cons of distance education, and chapter 3 describes the construction, maintenance, and staffing costs…

  19. Screening for suitable areas for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage within the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium using coupled groundwater flow and heat transport modelling tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anibas, Christian; Kukral, Janik; Touhidul Mustafa, Syed Md; Huysmans, Marijke

    2017-04-01

    Urban areas have a great potential for shallow geothermal systems. Their energy demand is high, but currently they have only a limited potential to cover their own energy demand. The transition towards a low-carbon energy regime offers alternative sources of energy an increasing potential. Urban areas however pose special challenges for the successful exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. High building densities limit the available space for drillings and underground investigations. Urban heat island effects and underground structures influence the thermal field, groundwater pollution and competing water uses limit the available subsurface. To tackle these challenges in the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium two projects 'BruGeo' and the recently finished 'Prospective Research of Brussels project 2015-PRFB-228' address the investigation in urban geothermal systems. They aim to identify the key factors of the underground with respect to Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) installations like thermal properties, aquifer thicknesses, groundwater flow velocities and their heterogeneity. Combined numerical groundwater and heat transport models are applied for the assessment of both open and closed loop shallow geothermal systems. The Brussels Capital Region comprises of the Belgian Capital, the City of Brussels and 18 other municipalities covering 161 km2 with almost 1.2 million inhabitants. Beside the high population density the Brussels Capital Region has a pronounced topography and a relative complex geology. This is both a challenge and an opportunity for the exploitation of shallow geothermal energy. The most important shallow hydrogeological formation in the Brussels-Capital Region are the Brussels Sands with the Brussels Sands Aquifer. Scenarios where developed using criteria for the hydrogeological feasibility of ATES installations such as saturated aquifer thickness, groundwater flow velocity and the groundwater head below surface. The Brussels Sands

  20. The search for a source rock for the giant Tar Sand triangle accumulation, southeastern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntoon, J.E.; Hansley, P.L.; Naeser, N.D.

    1999-01-01

    A large proportion (about 36%) of the world's oil resource is contained in accumulations of heavy oil or tar. In these large deposits of degraded oil, the oil in place represents only a fraction of what was present at the time of accumulation. In many of these deposits, the source of the oil is unknown, and the oil is thought to have migrated over long distances to the reservoirs. The Tar Sand triangle in southeastern Utah contains the largest tar sand accumulation in the United States, with 6.3 billion bbl of heavy oil estimated to be in place. The deposit is thought to have originally contained 13-16 billion bbl prior to the biodegradation, water washing, and erosion that have taken place since the middle - late Tertiary. The source of the oil is unknown. The tar is primarily contained within the Lower Permian White Rim Sandstone, but extends into permeable parts of overlying and underlying beds. Oil is interpreted to have migrated into the White Rim sometime during the Tertiary when the formation was at a depth of approximately 3500 m. This conclusion is based on integration of fluid inclusion analysis, time-temperature reconstruction, and apatite fission-track modeling for the White Rim Sandstone. Homogenization temperatures cluster around 85-90??C for primary fluid inclusions in authigenic, nonferroan dolomite in the White Rim. The fluid inclusions are associated with fluorescent oil-bearing inclusions, indicating that dolomite precipitation was coeval with oil migration. Burial reconstruction suggests that the White Rim Sandstone reached its maximum burial depth from 60 to 24 Ma, and that maximum burial was followed by unroofing from 24 to 0 Ma. Time-temperature modeling indicates that the formation experienced temperatures of 85-90??C from about 35 to 40 Ma during maximum burial. Maximum formation temperatures of about 105-110??C were reached at about 24 Ma, just prior to unroofing. Thermal modeling is used to examine the history of potential source rocks

  1. Socioeconomic impacts: study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, R.; Taylor, J.; Burnett, K.; Greenberg, B.

    1982-02-01

    This document constitutes a segment of a feasibility study investigating the ramifications of constructing a nuclear energy center (NEC) in an arid western region. In this phase of the study, the impacts on socioeconomic conditions in the surrounding communities and possible ways of financing and mitigating these impacts were examined. The general conclusion reached is that the socioeconomic impacts of a nuclear energy center in the Green River area of Southeastern Utah would not impose an absolute bar to NEC development. The economy of the NEC impact area would be substantially transformed by the NEC. In particular, Green River city itself would change from its current status as a relatively stable rural economy with an agricultural, mining, and recreation base to a major city with over 20,000 permanent relatively high income residents. The NEC, by itself, would provide a tax base more than adequate to finance required expansion of public facilities and public human service provisions.

  2. Day we bombed Utah: America's most lethal secret

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    Using a narrative approach and the 1953 death of over 4000 sheep from radiation exposure, the author chronicles weapons testing at the Nevada test site and its effects on the surrounding area. He follows the stories of sheep ranchers and residents in Utah and Nevada communities as they are exposed to repeated fallout from both above and underground testing. The efforts of AEC public relations and technical personnel to avoid the mounting eidence of radiological damage and the eventual disclosure of this evidence following passage of the Freedom of Information Act determined the course of lawsuits that began in the early 1950s. Pressure to maintain nuclear superiority and the patriotism of the largely conservative population of the area contributed to the lengthy coverup of a statistical increase in various forms of cancer. The author stresses the moral implications of government actions.

  3. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  4. Vacuum-thermal-evaporation: the route for roll-to-roll production of large-area organic electronic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D. M.

    2015-05-01

    Surprisingly little consideration is apparently being given to vacuum-evaporation as the route for the roll-to-roll (R2R) production of large-area organic electronic circuits. While considerable progress has been made by combining silicon lithographic approaches with solution processing, it is not obvious that these will be compatible with a low-cost, high-speed R2R process. Most efforts at achieving this ambition are directed at conventional solution printing approaches such as inkjet and gravure. This is surprising considering that vacuum-evaporation of organic semiconductors (OSCs) is already used commercially in the production of organic light emitting diode displays. Beginning from a discussion of the materials and geometrical parameters determining transistor performance and drawing on results from numerous publications, this review makes a case for vacuum-evaporation as an enabler of R2R organic circuit production. The potential of the vacuum route is benchmarked against solution approaches and found to be highly competitive. For example, evaporated small molecules tend to have higher mobility than printed OSCs. High resolution metal patterning on plastic films is already a low-cost commercial process for high-volume packaging applications. Similarly, solvent-free flash-evaporation and polymerization of thin films on plastic substrates is also a high-volume commercial process and has been shown capable of producing robust gate dielectrics. Reports of basic logic circuit elements produced in a vacuum R2R environment are reviewed and shown to be superior to all-solution printing approaches. Finally, the main issues that need to be resolved in order to fully develop the vacuum route to R2R circuit production are highlighted.

  5. Hot dry rock geothermal potential of Roosevelt Hot Springs area: review of data and recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    East, J.

    1981-05-01

    The Roosevelt Hot Springs area in west-central Utah possesses several features indicating potential for hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal development. The area is characterized by extensional tectonics and a high regional heat flow of greater than 105 mW/m/sup 2/. The presence of silicic volcanic rocks as young as 0.5 to 0.8 Myr and totaling 14 km/sup 3/ in volume indicates underlying magma reservoirs may be the heat source for the thermal anomaly. Several hot dry wells have been drilled on the periphery of the geothermal field. Information obtained on three of these deep wells shows that they have thermal gradients of 55 to 60/sup 0/C/km and bottom in impermeable Tertiary granitic and Precambrian gneissic units. The Tertiary granite is the preferred HDR reservoir rock because Precambrian gneissic rocks possess a well-developed banded foliation, making fracture control over the reservoir more difficult. Based on a fairly conservative estimate of 160 km/sup 2/ for the thermal anomaly present at Roosevelt Hot Springs, the area designated favorable for HDR geothermal exploration may be on the order of seven times or more than the hydrogeothermal area currently under development.

  6. Impacts of climate change on coastal benthic ecosystems: assessing the current risk of mortality outbreaks associated with thermal stress in NW Mediterranean coastal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pairaud, Ivane Lilian; Bensoussan, Nathaniel; Garreau, Pierre; Faure, Vincent; Garrabou, Joaquim

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of climate change, the increase in ocean heat wave frequency is expected to impact marine life. Large-scale positive temperature anomalies already occurred in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea in 1999, 2003 and 2006. These anomalies were associated with mass mortality events of macrobenthic species in coastal areas (0-40 m in depth). The anomalies were particularly severe in 1999 and 2003 when thousands of kilometres of coasts and about 30 species were affected. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology to assess the current risk of mass mortality associated with temperature increase along NW Mediterranean continental coasts. A 3D regional ocean model was used to obtain the temperature conditions for the period 2001-2010, for which the model outputs were validated by comparing them with in situ observations in affected areas. The model was globally satisfactory, although extremes were underestimated and required correction. Combined with information on the thermo-tolerance of a key species (the red gorgonian P. clavata) as well as its spatial distribution, the modelled temperature conditions were then used to assess the risk of mass mortality associated with thermal stress for the first time. Most of the known areas of observed mass mortality were found using the model, although the degree of risk in certain areas was underestimated. Using climatic IPCC scenarios, the methodology could be applied to explore the impacts of expected climate change in the NW Mediterranean. This is a key issue for the development of sound management and conservation plans to protect Mediterranean marine biodiversity in the face of climate change.

  7. The mechanism of the area negative thermal expansion in KBe{sub 2}BO{sub 3}F{sub 2} family crystals: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xingxing [Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Lab of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Molokeev, Maxim S. [Laboratory of Crystal Physics, Kirensky Institute of Physics, SB RAS, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, Far Eastern State Transport University, Khabarovsk 680021 (Russian Federation); Li, Wei [School of Physics and Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wu, Shaofan [Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Lin, Zheshuai, E-mail: zslin@mail.ipc.ac.cn; Wu, Yicheng; Chen, Chuangtian [Center for Crystal Research and Development, Key Lab of Functional Crystals and Laser Technology of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-02-07

    A very recent study demonstrated that the KBe{sub 2}BO{sub 3}F{sub 2} (KBBF) family of crystals, including KBBF, RbBe{sub 2}BO{sub 3}F{sub 2}, and CsBe{sub 2}BO{sub 3}F{sub 2}, are the only known borates exhibiting a rarely occurring isotropic area negative thermal expansion (NTE) behavior, over a very large temperature range. In the present work, the NTE mechanism in these crystals is comprehensively investigated using the first-principles calculations. It is revealed that the area NTE behavior mainly originates from the concerted distortion of [BeO{sub 3}F] tetrahedra in the two-dimensional [Be{sub 2}BO{sub 3}F{sub 2}]{sub ∞} framework with respect to temperature, while the [BO{sub 3}] triangles remain almost rigid. Moreover, the different magnitude of NTE effect in the three crystals is attributed to the interaction difference between the alkali metal atoms (K, Rb, or Cs) and the [Be{sub 2}BO{sub 3}F{sub 2}]{sub ∞} layer.

  8. A comparative evaluation and power generation potential analysis of Mediterranean solar thermal power plants. Preliminary study. Materials vol. 3. Availability of areas and sites. Systemvergleich und Potential von solaerthermischen Anlagen im Mittelmeerraum. Vorstudie. Materialband 3. Verfuegbare Flaechen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J.; Klaiss, H.; Schiel, W.; Sigler, M.; Meyer, J.; Staiss, F.

    1991-07-01

    This comprehensive study determines power generation potential of Mediterranean solar thermal power plants. The technical potential depends on insolation, the availability of areas and sites, and on power demands. Volume III compiles the results of the site selection studies. In the northern Mediterranean countries areas which are suited for larger power plant arrays are scarce, whereas extensive areas are found in the southern countries. Weak infrastructures may account for short- to medium-term restrictions. (BWI).

  9. Seismic Characterization of Coal-Mining Seismicity in Utah for CTBT Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arabasz, W J; Pechmann, J C

    2001-03-01

    Underground coal mining (down to {approx}0.75 km depth) in the contiguous Wasatch Plateau (WP) and Book Cliffs (BC) mining districts of east-central Utah induces abundant seismicity that is monitored by the University of Utah regional seismic network. This report presents the results of a systematic characterization of mining seismicity (magnitude {le} 4.2) in the WP-BC region from January 1978 to June 2000-together with an evaluation of three seismic events (magnitude {le} 4.3) associated with underground trona mining in southwestern Wyoming during January-August 2000. (Unless specified otherwise, magnitude implies Richter local magnitude, M{sub L}.) The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) undertook this cooperative project to assist the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in research and development relating to monitoring the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The project, which formally began February 28, 1998, and ended September 1, 2000, had three basic objectives: (1) Strategically install a three-component broadband digital seismic station in the WP-BC region to ensure the continuous recording of high-quality waveform data to meet the long-term needs of LLNL, UUSS, and other interested parties, including the international CTBT community. (2) Determine source mechanisms--to the extent that available source data and resources allowed--for comparative seismic characterization of stress release in mines versus earthquakes in the WP-BC study region. (3) Gather and report to LLNL local information on mine operations and associated seismicity, including ''ground truth'' for significant events. Following guidance from LLNL's Technical Representative, the focus of Objective 2 was changed slightly to place emphasis on three mining-related events that occurred in and near the study area after the original work plan had been made, thus posing new targets of opportunity. These included: a magnitude

  10. Chemical composition and origin of fossil resins from Utah Wasatch Plateau coal. [USA - Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meuzelaar, H.L.C.; Huai, H.; Lo, R.; Dworzanski, J.P. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Center for Micro Analysis and Reaction Chemistry)

    1991-07-01

    In order to arrive at a more detailed chemical description of fossil coal associated resins we need to distinguish between micropetrographic, organic geochemical and process technological definitions, each of which may encompass varying quantities of constituents unrelated to fossil tree resins. New information on composition and origin of Utah Wasatch Plateau coal resins obtained by Curie-point pyrolysis/evaporation in combination with iso-butane chemical ionization mass spectrometry, as presented in this paper, points to the presence of four more or less distinct resins components: (1) a sesquiterpenoid polymer; (2) sesqui- and triterpenoid monomers and dimers; (3) a suite of triterpenoid alcohols, ketones and acids, and (4) a series of increasingly aromatized hydrocarbons with naphthalene and picene type skeletons. Moreover, a strong similarity is found between the composition of recent dammar resin and fossil Wasatch Plateau coal resins indicating a possible Angiosperm (fam. Dipterocarpacae) origin of these Upper Cretaceous coal resins. Some of the technological implications of these findings and the consequent need for a more precise chemical definition and nomenclature are discussed. 27 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Recruiting Quality Majors: New York High School Students Experience the Geology of Southern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colberg, M. R.; Eves, R. L.; Lohrengel, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    Southern Utah University (SUU), Division of Geosciences, is faced with seriously increased competition for students within its traditional recruiting area, the direct result of nearby two-year institutions expanding their missions to four-year roles. Because of this increased competition, it is obvious that students must be recruited from new source areas. Research indicates that New York State has one of the most outstanding high school Earth Science programs in the United States, and it became a target area for recruiting quality students to the SUU geoscience program. Located in the Colorado Plateau to Basin and Range transition zone, SUU is situated in one of the most spectacular and diverse geologic regions in the world. SUU is surrounded by classic southwestern geologic exposures and extensive public lands. In order to use this resource to its maximum advantage, a one-week field program was arranged that would accommodate a maximum of 30 students from New York high schools. The target audience is comprised of juniors and seniors who have participated in an Earth science course, and have expressed an interest in a geoscience career. The field program provides students with a positive learning experience, and stresses basic geologic concepts while utilizing the stunning regional geology of southern Utah as an outdoor classroom. Students receive transferable college credit for participation. To make contact with potential participants, a letter was sent to high school principals requesting the name(s) of the earth sciences teacher(s) in the school. The response was limited (apparently principals do not forward materials to faculty members). However, there was sufficient response to conduct a field experience during late July, 2003. This initial offering was extremely successful and received positive reviews from all participants. The final results of this pilot offering are not yet known, but we are convinced that enrollment of students into SUU's program will

  12. Map showing drainage basins and historic cloudburst floods in the Salina quadrangle, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackman, Robert J.; Williams, Paul L.

    1972-01-01

    In the Salina quadrangle, as in most of the arid West, summer precipitation commonly occurs as thunderstorms. Suring these storms, rain falls as a torrential downpour, or cloudburst, in a local area. An inch of rain or more may fall in half an hour; U.S. Weather Bureau records show that o.4 inch of rain has fallen in a period of 5 minutes (Woolley, 1946). Such a fall of water far exceeds the absorptive capacity of the ground surface, and in areas of steep sparsely vegetated terrain the runoff forms a cloudburst flood in which loose rock, soil, and alluvium combine with water to form a debris-laden mudflow. The mudflow then moves rapidly down gullies and canyons with power great enough to erode and to transport debris, and to destroy the works of man lying in its path. When the mudflow pours from the canyon mount into an open valley, solid debris separates from the water and is added to the alluvial fan built by numerous previous floods. Because many towns in Utah are built on fans at the mouths of canyons, there has been loss of life and considerable damage to buildings, streets, and crops since 1847, when white men first settled in Utah.This map shows historical cloudburst floods for which records exist; data were taken from the sources listed below. Most of the flooded areas shown are in or near populated places, and so the floods were observed and recorded. Actually, no part of the quadrangle is exempt from cloudburst floods; every canyon, dry wash, and swale is visited sooner or later by a cloudburst and becomes, briefly, the site of a destructive mudflow. The traveler is advised to exercise caution in all drainageways, especially during July and August, when 80 percent of the cloudbursts occur.

  13. Milk Intake in Early and Late Adulthood and Risk of Osteoporotic Hip Fractures in Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Slavens, Melanie Jean

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between milk intake and risk of osteoporotic fractures is uncertain. Associations between milk intake and milk avoidance in relation to osteoporotic hip fracture were examined in the Utah Study of Nutrition and Bone Health (USNBH), a statewide case-control study. Cases were ascertained at Utah hospitals treating 98 percent of hip fractures during 1997-2001 and included 1188 men and women aged 50-89 years. Age- and gender-matched controls were randomly selected from Utah drive...

  14. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  15. Climate effects on historical fires (1630-1900) in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter M. Brown; Emily K. Heyerdahl; Stanley G. Kitchen; Marc H. Weber

    2008-01-01

    We inferred climate effects on fire occurrence from 1630 to 1900 for a new set of crossdated fire-scar chronologies from 18 forested sites in Utah and one site in eastern Nevada. Years with regionally synchronous fires (31 years with fire at ≥20% of sites) occurred during drier than average summers and years with no fires at any site (100 years) were wetter...

  16. Geomorphic and Chemical Characteristics of Dust and Soil in the Eastern Great Basin of Utah, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnenberger, M.; Nicoll, K.; Perry, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    This study identifies anthropogenically disturbed areas and barren playa surfaces as the two primary dust source types that repeatedly contribute to dust storm events in the eastern Great Basin of western Utah, U.S.A. Further, dust samples were found to be distinctally different elementally compared to soil samples in this region. This analysis used MODIS and USDA Land cover data to identify 4 major and 5 secondary source areas for dust in this region, which produce dust primarily during the spring and fall months and during moderate or greater drought conditions. The largest number of observed dust plumes (~ 60% of all plumes) originated from playas (ephemeral lakes) and are classified as barren land cover with a silty clay soil sediment surface. Anthropogenic disturbance is necessary to produce dust from the vegetated landscape in the eastern Great Basin, as evidenced by the new dust source active from 2008 to 2010 in the area burned by the 2007 Milford Flat Fire; this fire was the largest in Utah's history due to extensive cover of invasive cheatgrass along with drought conditions. Dust and soil samples contain similar enrichments of major soil elements, however, dust samples were significantly more enriched in Na derived from the surface salts of the Sevier Dry Lake. Trace elements were generally more enriched in dust samples and had larger enrichment values than seen in previous studies. Further, for dust and soil samples, the fine fraction (<2.5 μm) was more enriched in trace elements than the coarse fraction (2.5 to 10 μm). Composition of dust transported has influences on human health, ecosystem functioning, and biogeochemical cycling. Dust storms in the eastern Great Basin negatively impact air quality and transportation in the populated regions of Utah; this study details an improved forecasting protocol for dust storm events that will benefit transportation planning and improve public health.

  17. Inversion structure and winter ozone distribution in the Uintah Basin, Utah, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Seth; Tran, Trang

    2015-12-01

    The Uintah Basin in Utah, U.S.A. experiences high concentrations of ozone during some winters due to strong, multi-day temperature inversions that facilitate the buildup of pollution from local sources, including the oil and gas industry. Together, elevation of monitoring sites and proximity to oil and gas wells explain as much as 90% of spatial variability in surface ozone concentrations during inversion episodes (i.e., R2 = 0.90). Inversion conditions start earlier and last longer at lower elevations, at least in part because lower elevations are more insulated from winds aloft that degrade inversion conditions and dilute produced ozone. Surface air transport under inversions is dominated by light, diurnal upslope-downslope flow that limits net transport distances. Thus, different areas of the Basin are relatively isolated from each other, allowing spatial factors like elevation and proximity to sources to strongly influence ozone concentrations at individual sites.

  18. Celestine-bearing geodes from Wayne and Emery counties, southeastern Utah: Genesis and mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kile, Daniel E.; Dayvault, Richard D.; Hood, William C.; Hatch, H. Steven

    2015-01-01

    Geodes containing celestine with associated quartz, calcite, chlorite, and other minerals occur in the Jurassic Curtis Formation of Emery and Wayne counties off the east and south flanks of the San Rafael Swell in southeastern Utah. The two areas discussed in this article produce geodes to 25 cm wide containing bladed to tabular celestine crystals that are as much as 4.5 cm in length. An evaporative littoral system resulting in the formation of anhydrite nodules is proposed as the initial environment for this deposit. Subsequent silicification of the nodules and, in some cases, the formation of hollow spaces within the silicified nodules, provided a geode structure for the eventual crystallization of celestine and associated minerals.

  19. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment special reconnaissance report for the Deep Creek Mountains, Nevada and Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualheim, B.

    1979-04-01

    This report represents the results of the reconnaissance sampling of the Deep Creek Mountains of western Utah. The Deep Creek range is located in the northwest corner of the Delta NTMS 1:250,000 and the southwestern corner of the Tooele NTMS 1:250,000 sheets and covers an area of 1750 km/sup 2/. Samples collected in this study include dry and wet stream sediments and water from available streams, wells, and springs. The samples were analyzed for uranium, as well as 15 to 20 trace elements, using neutron activation techniques. In addition, field and laboratory measurements were made on the water samples. Analytical data and field measurements are presented in tabular hard copy and fiche format. Water-sample site locations, water-sample uranium concentrations, sediment-sample site locations, and sediment-sample uranium concentrations are shown on separate overlays.

  20. FLOODPLAIN, BOX ELDER COUNTY, UTAH, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  1. Wide area lithologic mapping with ASTER thermal infrared data: Case studies for the regions in/around the Pamir Mountains and the Tarim basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Yoshiki; Fu, Bihong

    2017-07-01

    After the authors have proposed the mineralogical indices, e.g., Quartz Index (QI), Carbonate Index (CI), Mafic Index (MI) for ASTER thermal infrared (TIR) data, many articles have been applied the indices for the geological case studies and proved to be robust in extracting geological information at the local scale. The authors also have developed a system for producing the regional map with the indices, which needs mosaicking of many scenes considering the relatively narrow spatial coverage of each ASTER scene. The system executes the procedures very efficiently to find ASTER data covering a wide target area in the vast and expanding ASTER data archive. Then the searched ASTER data are conditioned, prioritized, and the indices are calculated before finally mosaicking the imagery. Here in this paper, we will present two case studies of the regional lithologic and mineralogic mapping of the indices covering very wide regions in and around the Pamir Mountains and the Tarim basin. The characteristic features of the indices related to geology are analysed, interpreted and discussed.

  2. Vertical profiles of specific surface area, thermal conductivity and density of mid-latitude, Arctic and Antarctic snow: relationships between snow physics and climat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domine, F.; Arnaud, L.; Bock, J.; Carmagnola, C.; Champollion, N.; Gallet, J.; Lesaffre, B.; Morin, S.; Picard, G.

    2011-12-01

    We have measured vertical profiles of specific surface area (SSA), thermal conductivity (TC) and density in snow from 12 different climatic regions featuring seasonal snowpacks of maritime, Alpine, taiga and tundra types, on Arctic sea ice, and from ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. We attempt to relate snow physical properties to climatic variables including precipitation, temperature and its yearly variation, wind speed and its short scale temporal variations. As expected, temperature is a key variable that determines snow properties, mostly by determining the metamorphic regime (temperature gradient or equi-temperature) in conjunction with precipitation. However, wind speed and wind speed distribution also seem to have an at least as important role. For example high wind speeds determine the formation of windpacks of high SSA and high TC instead of depth hoar with lower values of these variables. The distribution of wind speed also strongly affects properties, as for example frequent moderate winds result in frequent snow remobilization, producing snow with higher SSA and lower TC than regions with the same average wind speeds, but with less frequent and more intense wind episodes. These strong effects of climate on snow properties imply that climate change will greatly modify snow properties, which in turn will affect climate, as for example changes in snow SSA modify albedo and changes in TC affect permafrost and the release of greenhouse gases from thawing permafrost. Some of these climate-snow feedbacks will be discussed.

  3. A research project with students of Information and Communication Technology in obligatory secondary education: virtual reconstruction of the thermal area of the roman villa of Balazote (Albacete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mediano Serrano

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The optional subject Information and Communication Technology (ICT in obligatory secondary education is fundamentally about how to use applications. The software related to this subject is based on: photo editing programs, 3D constructions, sound editing and video editing. These can be viewed in isolation and independently or as a part of a comprehensive project in which students have to handle all of them at once. This article will explain a project with students: the virtual reconstruction of the thermal area of the roman villa of Balazote (Albacete. The goal was to improve student motivation and get actively involved in their learning process. Students used computers and classes of the course to conduct such research. First, the necessary information was sought, and then, based on that information and using different software about virtual reconstruction and recording and editing films: Gimp, SketchUP, Movie Maker, etc., our film was made. The result of this work is a film consisting of a virtual tour inside the roman villa.

  4. Stratigraphy and petroleum possibilities of lower Upper Devonian (Frasnian and lower Framennian) strata, Southwestern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biller, Edward J.

    1976-01-01

    The lower Upper Devonian rocks in southwestern Utah--the Guilmette Formation and equivalents--represent a final regressive pulse of the major Late Devonian marine inundation of the Western Interior of the United States and record marine carbonate deposition on a wide continental shelf. They consist primarily of limestone, dolomite, and quartz arenite deposited in a shallow north-trending miogeosyncline, which constituted a single major basin of accumulation on this shelf. The Guilmette Formation and equivalents were deposited in shallow normal to hypersaline marine waters. The environments of deposition include: a moderate- to high-energy intertidal environment, a moderate-energy subtidal environment, a lower energy, deeper subtidal environment below effective wave base, and a high-energy environment in local shallow areas of mud mounds and bioherms. The carbonate deposition of the Guilmette Formation and equivalents was interrupted periodically by the deposition of quartz arenites. These may represent the breaking up of the miogeosynclinal-cratonic pattern of deposition. In most areas, the Guilmette and equivalents are overlain by a thin transgressive marine quartz arenite deposit--the Cove Fort Quartzite and basal Leatham equivalent. Previous paleontologic evidence indicated a general Middle to Late Devonian age for the Guilmette Formation. The present study narrows this range and suggests that the age of the Guilmette Formation and its equivalents is late Middle Devonian (Stringocephalus brachiopod zone) to early Late Devonian (Uppermost Palmatolepis gigas conodont zone). Available subsurface data suggest that the petroleum possibilities of the Guilmette Formation and equivalents in southwestern Utah are poor. Several tests have penetrated .the interval with only minor shows of oil in rocks with low porosity and permeability. Nevertheless, many outcrop samples of the same interval, appear to have excellent porosity and permeability and a strongly fetid odor,

  5. Conference Proceedings: Seed Ecology III - The Third International Society for Seed Science Meeting on Seeds and the Environment - "Seeds and Change"; June 20-June 24, 2010; Salt Lake City, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosemary Pendleton; Susan Meyer; Bitsy Schultz

    2010-01-01

    Seed Ecology III was held in Salt Lake City, Utah in June 2010, sharing the latest research on all aspects of seed ecology. Our meeting was organized around the theme "Seeds and Change." We welcomed contributions in any area of seed ecology. Our agenda also aimed to create bridges between seed ecology and plant conservation, restoration ecology, and global...

  6. Mercury in the Air, Water and Biota at the Great Salt Lake (Utah, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C.; Gustin, M. S.

    2008-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake, Utah (USA), is the fourth largest terminal lake on Earth and a stop-over location for 35 million birds on the Pacific Flyway. Recently, the Utah Department of Health and Utah Division of Wildlife Resources issued tissue mercury (Hg) consumption advisories for several species of birds that consume the lake's brine shrimp. Sources of Hg to the lake are the watershed and the atmosphere, and we hypothesized that the chemistry of the air above the Great Salt Lake would facilitate atmospheric deposition of Hg to the water. Because little information was available on Hg at the Great Salt Lake, and to begin to test this hypothesis, we measured atmospheric elemental (Hg0) and reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) concentrations as well as Hg concentrations in water and brine shrimp five times over a year. Surrogate surfaces and a dry deposition model were applied to estimate the amount of Hg that could be input to the lake surface. We found that atmospheric Hg0 and RGM concentrations were comparable to global ambient background values and those measured in rural areas (respectively). Both Hg0 and RGM exhibited regular diel variability, and no consistent seasonal periods of depleted or elevated values were observed. Based on these findings, local factors are thought to be important in generating elevated RGM concentrations that could be deposited to the lake. Model estimated deposition velocities for RGM to the lake ranged from 0.9 to 3.0 cm sec-1, with an estimated 19 kg of Hg deposited annually. Total Hg and methyl Hg concentrations in surface waters of the lake were consistent throughout the year (3.8 ± 0.8 ng L- 1 and 0.93 ± 0.59 ng L-1, respectively) and not significantly elevated relative to natural waters; however, the percent methyl Hg to total Hg was high (25 to 50%). Brine shrimp Hg concentrations were 384 ppb and had a statistically significant increase from early summer to fall. Based on modeled dry deposition and estimated wet deposition, the

  7. 77 FR 24975 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Revised Recovery Plan for the Utah Prairie Dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-26

    ... Utah Prairie Dog AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of document availability... recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens). This species is federally listed as threatened... preparation of the final revised recovery plan for the Utah prairie dog. The Service and other Federal...

  8. A tree-ring based reconstruction of Logan River streamflow, northern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric B. Allen; Tammy M. Rittenour; R. Justin DeRose; Matthew F. Bekker; Roger Kjelgren; Brendan M. Buckley

    2013-01-01

    We created six new tree-ring chronologies in northern Utah, which were used with preexisting chronologies from Utah and western Wyoming to reconstruct mean annual flow for the Logan River, the largest tributary of the regionally important Bear River. Two reconstruction models were developed, a ''Local'' model that incorporated two Rocky Mountain...

  9. 78 FR 59242 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Maintenance Plan for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Utah; Maintenance... revision is the State of Utah's maintenance plan for the 1997 8-hour ozone standard for Salt Lake County.... Maintenance Plan B. Rules III. Issues Raised by Commenters and EPA's Responses IV. Statutory and Executive...

  10. 76 FR 77223 - PacifiCorp v. Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission PacifiCorp v. Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on December 2, 2011, pursuant to sections 206 and 306 of the Federal Power Act (FPA... Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems (Respondent) has failed to comply with the terms and conditions...

  11. 76 FR 69217 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; State of Utah; Smoke Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... distances, even hundreds of kilometers. Therefore, to effectively address the problem of visibility... development, provisions regarding clean air corridors, mobile sources, and wind-blown dust, among other things... Utah Farm Bureau Federation and Utah State University Extension to develop and implement an inventory...

  12. 76 FR 28074 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake City, UT... inventory of human remains in the possession and control of the Utah Museum of Natural History, Salt Lake... Natural History, 1390 E. Presidents Circle, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, telephone (801) 581-3876, before...

  13. Knowledge Assessment of Food Safety Managers in Utah and Its Implications on the Exam and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummer, Brian A.; Guy, Stanley M.; Bentley, Joanne P. H.

    2010-01-01

    Food Safety Manager's Certification is offered through a state-local Extension partnership in Utah using an online course management system. Exams and course materials were created by an Extension Specialist at Utah State Univ. Extension Agents provide exam and curriculum facilitation in each county. This form of distance education enables access…

  14. Wellness Works: A Collaborative Program for Youth and Adults in Rural Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Lindsey; Roark, Mark F.; Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Utah State University Cooperative Extension programming, provided through the historic land-grant system, is one method used to meet the needs of residents located in rural communities. Residents in a Central Utah county need Cooperative Extension programs to address the health and wellness of their rural community. According to the Utah…

  15. Do You Really Want to Know? Elementary Music Personnel and Potential in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Loretta Niebur

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of two articles reporting the results of a study by the author regarding the status of elementary music education in the state of Utah. This article focuses on the qualifications of Utah's elementary music teachers (music certified, elementary classroom certified, artists-in-residence, volunteers, and paraprofessionals) and the…

  16. 76 FR 9770 - Utah Board of Water Resources Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Utah Board of Water Resources Notice of Successive Preliminary Permit... February 1, 2011, the Utah Board of Water Resources filed an application for a successive preliminary... water intake would convey water from the Bureau of Reclamation's Lake Powell up to a high point within...

  17. Water resources of Parowan Valley, Iron County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Thomas M.

    2017-08-29

    Parowan Valley, in Iron County, Utah, covers about 160 square miles west of the Red Cliffs and includes the towns of Parowan, Paragonah, and Summit. The valley is a structural depression formed by northwest-trending faults and is, essentially, a closed surface-water basin although a small part of the valley at the southwestern end drains into the adjacent Cedar Valley. Groundwater occurs in and has been developed mainly from the unconsolidated basin-fill aquifer. Long-term downward trends in groundwater levels have been documented by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) since the mid-1950s. The water resources of Parowan Valley were assessed during 2012 to 2014 with an emphasis on refining the understanding of the groundwater and surface-water systems and updating the groundwater budget.Surface-water discharge of five perennial mountain streams that enter Parowan Valley was measured from 2013 to 2014. The total annual surface-water discharge of the five streams during 2013 to 2014 was about 18,000 acre-feet (acre-ft) compared to the average annual streamflow of about 22,000 acre-ft from USGS streamgages operated on the three largest of these streams from the 1940s to the 1980s. The largest stream, Parowan Creek, contributes more than 50 percent of the annual surface-water discharge to the valley, with smaller amounts contributed by Red, Summit, Little, and Cottonwood Creeks.Average annual recharge to the Parowan Valley groundwater system was estimated to be about 25,000 acre-ft from 1994 to 2013. Nearly all recharge occurs as direct infiltration of snowmelt and rainfall on the Markagunt Plateau east of the valley. Smaller amounts of recharge occur as infiltration of streamflow and unconsumed irrigation water near the east side of the valley on alluvial fans associated with mountain streams at the foot of the Red Cliffs. Subsurface flow from the mountain block to the east of the valley is a significant source of groundwater recharge to the basin-fill aquifer

  18. Utah Bat Conservation Plan, 2008-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    reptile, mollusk, crustacean , arthropod, or other invertebrate. Unless otherwise indicated, the Fish and Wildlife Service is particularly...turbine owner by planting these areas to a grass mixture consistent with the surrounding grassland or such mixture as is mutually agreed upon by the...Resource Management Plans’ (INRMPs) and the State Wildlife Action Plan’s (WAP) goals and objectives throughout the state to facilitate mutually

  19. THIN SECTION DESCRIPTIONS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; David E. Eby

    2003-12-01

    Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

  20. Intrusive Rock Database for the Digital Geologic Map of Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, C.J.; Ludington, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Digital geologic maps offer the promise of rapid and powerful answers to geologic questions using Geographic Information System software (GIS). Using modern GIS and database methods, a specialized derivative map can be easily prepared. An important limitation can be shortcomings in the information provided in the database associated with the digital map, a database which is often based on the legend of the original map. The purpose of this report is to show how the compilation of additional information can, when prepared as a database that can be used with the digital map, be used to create some types of derivative maps that are not possible with the original digital map and database. This Open-file Report consists of computer files with information about intrusive rocks in Utah that can be linked to the Digital Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze et al., 2000), an explanation of how to link the databases and map, and a list of references for the databases. The digital map, which represents the 1:500,000-scale Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze, 1980), can be obtained from the Utah Geological Survey (Map 179DM). Each polygon in the map has a unique identification number. We selected the polygons identified on the geologic map as intrusive rock, and constructed a database (UT_PLUT.xls) that classifies the polygons into plutonic map units (see tables). These plutonic map units are the key information that is used to relate the compiled information to the polygons on the map. The map includes a few polygons that were coded as intrusive on the state map but are largely volcanic rock; in these cases we note the volcanic rock names (rhyolite and latite) as used in the original sources Some polygons identified on the digital state map as intrusive rock were misidentified; these polygons are noted in a separate table of the database, along with some information about their true character. Fields may be empty because of lack of information from references used or difficulty in finding

  1. Magnetostratigraphy of the Moenkopi Formation at Bears Ears, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienert, Barry R.; Helsley, C. E.

    1980-03-01

    We have performed a paleomagnetic study on over 200 oriented samples collected from the Lower Triassic Moenkopi Formation at Bears Ears in southeastern Utah. Seven intervals of normal and reversed magnetic polarities are present at the Bears Ears site. We have correlated these magnetozones to a similar set established in the same formation 130 km to the northeast. At Bears Ears, magnetozone boundaries occur in different lithologic members of the Moenkopi Formation than corresponding magnetozone boundaries present in the section to the northeast. We conclude that contemporaneous lateral variations of sediment type and environement are a characteristic feature of the Moenkopi Formation.

  2. Thermal properties of adobe employed in Peruvian rural areas: Experimental results and numerical simulation of a traditional bio-composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginés A. Abanto

    2017-06-01

    Different adobes have been studied. Effective thermal conductivity and heat capacity were measured by means of a hot parallel-plate method. Density was estimated using a pycnometer and measuring physical dimensions and mass of each sample, which allowed the calculation of thermal effusivity and diffusivity. Some numerical simulation results displayed good agreement with experimental outcomes. The work presented here has implications for future studies of this traditional building material and might potentially help solving the problem of sustainable housing.

  3. Petrology and Mineralogy of Tertiary Volcanic Rocks in the Vicinity of the Rozel Hills and Black Mountain, Box Elder County, Utah

    OpenAIRE

    Greenman, Elizabeth R.

    1982-01-01

    Two basalt flows and an andesite fissure eruption occur in the Rozel Hills - Black Mountain area in Box Elder County, Utah. Both basalt flows are aphanitic, and contain olivine, plagioclase, augite, and opaque oxides. They may be distinguished both chemically and on the basis of their textures. Unit 2 basalt is finer grained, and appears to be associated with a fault in the Black Mountain area. Chemically, it is similar to high-iron lavas in the Craters of the Moon, Idaho area. It has higher ...

  4. Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, M.D.; Morgan, C.D.

    1999-04-28

    The objective of the project is to increase oil production and reserves by the use of improved reservoir characterization and completion techniques in the Uinta Basin, Utah. To accomplish this objective, a two-year geologic and engineering characterization of the Bluebell field was conducted. The study evaluated surface and subsurface data, currently used completion techniques, and common production problems. It was determined that advanced case- and open-hole logs could be effective in determining productive beds and that stage-interval (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage) and bed-scale isolation completion techniques could result in improved well performance. In the first demonstration well (Michelle Ute well discussed in the previous technical report), dipole shear anisotropy (anisotropy) and dual-burst thermal decay time (TDT) logs were run before and isotope tracer log was run after the treatment. The logs were very helpful in characterizing the remaining hydrocarbon potential in the well. But, mechanical failure resulted in a poor recompletion and did not result in a significant improvement in the oil production from the well.

  5. Gravity and ground magnetic surveys in the Monroe and Joseph KGRA's and surrounding region, South Central Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, M.E.; Cook, K.L.

    1978-06-01

    Regional gravity data were collected in portions of the Pavant Range, Tushar Mountains, northern Sevier Plateau, the Antelope Range, and throughout Sevier Valley approximately between the towns of Richfield and Junction, Utah. Additionally, detailed gravity and ground magnetic data were collected in the vicinity of hot springs in both the Monroe and Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Areas (KGRA's) and subsurface geologic models were constructed. The regional gravity data were terrain corrected out to a distance of 167 km from the station and 948 gravity station values were compiled into a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map of the survey area. This map shows a strong correlation with most structural features mapped in the survey area. Four regional gravity profiles were modeled using two-dimensional formerd and inverse algorithms.

  6. Montane wetland water chemistry, Uinta Mountains, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, K. S.; Matyjasik, M.; Ford, R. L.; Hernandez, M. W.; Welsh, S. B.; Summers, S.; Bartholomew, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    This study attempts to determine the relationship between surface and groundwater chemistry and wetland characteristics within the Reader Lakes watershed, Uinta Mountains. The dominant rock type in the study area is quartz sandstone of the Hades Pass formation, Unita Mountain Group (Middle Proterozoic). Minor amounts of interbedded arkose and illite-bearing shale are also present. Water chemistry data have been collected from more than one hundred locations during the 2008 and 2009 summer seasons. The Reader Creek watershed is approximately 9.8 km long and about 3.5 km wide in the central portion of the basin. Direct precipitation is the primary source of groundwater recharge and the area is typically covered by snow from November until May. Four distinct wetland complexes, designated as the upper, middle, lower and the sloping fen, constitute the major wetland environments in the study area. The chemistry of the melt water from the high-elevation snowfield is affected by weathering of incorporated atmospheric dust and surface rocks. Total dissolved solids in both years were between 7 and 9 mg/L. Major anions include HCO3 (averaging 4.0 mg/L), SO4 (1.3 mg/L), NO3 (0.9 mg/L), Cl (0.8 mg/L), F (0.07 mg/L), PO4 (0.03 mg/L), and Br(0.015 mg/L). Major cations include Na (1.1 mg/L), Ca (1.0 mg/L), K (0.28 mg/L), and Mg (0.15 mg/L). Groundwater concentrations in the lower meadow, as measured in piezomters, are distinctly different, with the following maximum concentrations of anions: HCO3 (36.7 mg/L), SO4 (5.0 mg/L), Cl (3.4 mg/L), NO3 (0.9 mg/L), PO4 (0.28 mg/L), F (0.23 mg/L), Br (0.12 mg/L), and cations: Ca (22 mg/L), Na (4.6 mg/L), Mg (3.4 mg/L), and K (1.8 mg/L)- with a maximum value of 83 mg/L for total dissolved solids. Waters in Reader Creek, the main trunk channel, are typically sodium-potassium and sodium -potassium bicarbonate, with some calcium-bicarbonate, mostly in the middle part of the watershed. Groundwater from springs is sodium-potassium in the upper

  7. Energy siting in Utah: a programming model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, D.L.; Keith, J.E.; Glover, T.F.; Wooldridge, G.L.

    1981-06-01

    Using a conceptual model of a multiple-product firm, the necessary conditions for an optimal input and output allocation were determined for a region constrained by resource availabilities and/or policy constraints. A linear-programing model was developed to determine the optimal allocation of water between agricultural and coal-fired electrical generating entities as well as the trade offs which could occur if electrical generation were increased. Other areas of potential trade offs such as coal source restrictions and air quality regulations were also examined. Coal mining and transportation costs were included as were SO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, and particulate emission rates on a coal and plant basis. Few trade-offs between electrical power generation and irrigated agriculture were noted. However, substantial changes within the energy sector were discovered as coal capacities and air-quality standards were changed. Net revenues declined sharply as air costs after and/or pollution and coal-capacity restrictions were imposed and/or increased. It was determined that substantial changes in regional economic activity occurred as a result of these restrictions on development.

  8. Carbon monoxide poisoning in Utah: 1996-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Lindell K; Deru, Kayla; Churchill, Susan; Legler, Joshua; Snow, Greg; Grey, Todd

    2016-01-01

    The true incidence of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is not clearly known, but a description of possible trends could aid in prevention. Investigators searched Utah state databases for emergency department (ED) visits and admissions for CO poisoning and medical examiner records for CO-related fatalities. From 1996-2013, 7,590 individuals were diagnosed with CO poisoning: 6,469 were treated/ released from EDs; 596 were admitted; 525 died. Of 7,065 non-fatal poisonings, 5,950 (84%) were accidental and 498 (7%) were suicide attempts. Few patients (9.7%) were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. For accidental poisonings, internal combustion engines accounted for 43%, smoke inhalation, 34%, and heating sources, 22%. Internal combustion engines were implicated in 97% of suicide attempts. Non-fatal poisonings declined following a 2008 legislative change requiring CO alarms in residences, but we do not know if legislation caused the decline. One hundred forty-one (27%) fatal poisonings were accidental, 361 (70%) suicides and two (0.4%) homicides. Victims with cardiovascular autopsy findings/past cardiovascular history had lower carboxyhemoglobin levels (mean 51.2%, n=53) compared to those without (70.8%, n=472). Mean postmortem carboxyhemoglobin was highest in ages 20-29 years (72.5%). The incidence of CO poisoning in Utah is declining, but CO poisoning is still common. Alarm legislation may aid prevention efforts. An educational campaign addressing the many causes and circumstances of CO poisoning is required for prevention.

  9. Mechanical Mastication of Utah Juniper Encroaching Sagebrush Steppe Increases Inorganic Soil N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kert R. Young

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Juniper (Juniperus spp. has encroached on millions of hectares of sagebrush (Artemisia spp. steppe. Juniper mechanical mastication increases cover of understory species but could increase resource availability and subsequently invasive plant species. We quantified the effects of juniper mastication on soil resource availability by comparing total C, total N, C : N ratio, Olsen extractable P, sulfate S, and pH using soil samples and inorganic N (NO3-+NH4+ using ion exchange membranes. We compared resource availability in paired masticated and untreated areas in three juniper-dominated sagebrush and bunchgrass ecosystems in the Utah portion of the Great Basin. Inorganic N was 4.7 times higher in masticated than in untreated areas across seasons (P<0.001. Within masticated areas, tree mounds of juniper leaf scales and twigs served as resource islands with 1.9 times higher inorganic N and total C, and 2.8 times higher total N than bare interspaces across seasons (P<0.01. Bare interspaces had 3.0–3.4 times higher inorganic N than interspaces covered with masticated trees during late-summer through winter (P<0.01. Soil fertility changes associated with mastication were not considered sufficient to favor establishment of annual over perennial grasses, and we expect both to increase in cover following juniper mastication.

  10. Summer spatial patterning of chukars in relation to free water in Western Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, R.T.; Bissonette, J.A.; Flinders, J.T.; Hooten, M.B.; Wilson, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Free water is considered important to wildlife in arid regions. In the western United States, thousands of water developments have been built to benefit wildlife in arid landscapes. Agencies and researchers have yet to clearly demonstrate their effectiveness. We combined a spatial analysis of summer chukar (Alectoris chukar) covey locations with dietary composition analysis in western Utah. Our specific objectives were to determine if chukars showed a spatial pattern that suggested association with free water in four study areas and to document summer dietary moisture content in relation to average distance from water. The observed data for the Cedar Mountains study area fell within the middle of the random mean distance to water distribution suggesting no association with free water. The observed mean distance to water for the other three areas was much closer than expected compared to a random spatial process, suggesting the importance of free water to these populations. Dietary moisture content of chukar food items from the Cedar Mountains (59%) was significantly greater (P ecological research. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  11. Is the target of 1 day length of stay per 1% total body surface area burned actually being achieved? A review of paediatric thermal injuries in South East Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Louise, Caton Nadine; David, McGill; John, Stewart Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Length of stay is a standard variable used to evaluate outcomes in burn care. Is the target of 1 day length of stay per 1% total body surface area burned actually being achieved? Methods: A retrospective analysis of 328 paediatric thermal injuries admitted to the South East Scotland Regional Burn Unit between January 2003 and March 2007 to assess whether the target is met and if not, which factors are contributing to a prolonged hospitalisation. Results: 57% achieved the target an...

  12. Temporal variability of extreme temperature indices in Utah during the past few decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Antonio Costa dos Santos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to analyze the trends in five annual extreme indices of temperature for Utah, USA. The analyses were conducted for 28 meteorological stations, during the period from 1970 to 2006, characterized by high quality data set. The analyses of extreme temperature indices have identified an increase in the maximum and minimum air temperatures in Utah. Predominantly, the minimum air temperature is increasing in the studied region. Most of Utah has shown a decrease in the diurnal temperature range, which indicates that the minimum temperature is increasing faster than the maximum temperature.

  13. Discriminant of validity the Wender Utah rating scale in Iranian adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Farideh Farokhzadi; Mohammad Reza Mohammadi; Maryam Salmanian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is the normalization of the Wender Utah rating scale which is used to detect adults with Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Available sampling method was used to choose 400 parents of children (200 parents of children with ADHD as compared to 200 parents of normal children). Wender Utah rating scale, which has been designed to diagnose ADHD in adults, is filled out by each of the parents to most accurately diagnose of ADHD in parents. Wender Utah rating...

  14. Quantification of Impervious Surfaces Along the Wasatch Front, Utah: AN Object-Based Image Analysis Approach to Identifying AN Indicator for Wetland Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydsman-McGinty, E. I.; Ramsey, R. D.; McGinty, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Remote Sensing/GIS Laboratory at Utah State University, in cooperation with the United States Environmental Protection Agency, is quantifying impervious surfaces for three watershed sub-basins in Utah. The primary objective of developing watershed-scale quantifications of impervious surfaces is to provide an indicator of potential impacts to wetlands that occur within the Wasatch Front and along the Great Salt Lake. A geospatial layer of impervious surfaces can assist state agencies involved with Utah's Wetlands Program Plan (WPP) in understanding the impacts of impervious surfaces on wetlands, as well as support them in carrying out goals and actions identified in the WPP. The three watershed sub-basins, Lower Bear-Malad, Lower Weber, and Jordan, span the highly urbanized Wasatch Front and are consistent with focal areas in need of wetland monitoring and assessment as identified in Utah's WPP. Geospatial layers of impervious surface currently exist in the form of national and regional land cover datasets; however, these datasets are too coarse to be utilized in fine-scale analyses. In addition, the pixel-based image processing techniques used to develop these coarse datasets have proven insufficient in smaller scale or detailed studies, particularly when applied to high-resolution satellite imagery or aerial photography. Therefore, object-based image analysis techniques are being implemented to develop the geospatial layer of impervious surfaces. Object-based image analysis techniques employ a combination of both geospatial and image processing methods to extract meaningful information from high-resolution imagery. Spectral, spatial, textural, and contextual information is used to group pixels into image objects and then subsequently used to develop rule sets for image classification. eCognition, an object-based image analysis software program, is being utilized in conjunction with one-meter resolution National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) aerial

  15. Direct utilization of geothermal resources field experiments at Monroe, Utah. Final report, July 14, 1978-July 13, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, C.K.; Owen, L.B. (eds.)

    1982-12-01

    The City of Monroe, Utah undertook a project to demonstrate the economic and technical viability of utilizing a low temperature geothermal resource to provide space and hot water heating to commercial, municipal, and domestic users within the community. During the course of the project, resource development and assessment, including drilling of a production well, was successfully completed. Upon completion of the field development and assessment phase of the program and of a preliminary design of the district heating system, it was determined that the project as proposed was not economically viable. This was due to: (1) a significant increase in estimated capital equipment costs resulting from the general inflation in construction costs, the large area/low population density in Monroe, and a more remote fluid disposal well site than planned, could not balance increased construction costs, (2) a lower temperature resource than predicted, and (3) due to predicted higher pumping and operating costs. After a thorough investigation of alternatives for utilizing the resource, further project activities were cancelled because the project was no longer economical and an alternative application for the resource could not be found within the constraints of the project. The City of Monroe, Utah is still seeking a beneficial use for the 600 gpm, 164/sup 0/F geothermal well. A summary of project activities included.

  16. The first occurrence of the enigmatic archosauriform Crosbysaurus Heckert 2004 from the Chinle Formation of southern Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Gay

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Originally identified as an ornithischian dinosaur, Crosbysaurus harrisae has been found in New Mexico, Arizona, and its type locality in Texas, as well as in North Carolina. The genus has been reassessed by other workers in light of reinterpretations about the postcrania of another putative Triassic ornithischian, Revueltosaurus. The understanding of Triassic dental faunas has become more complicated by the extreme convergence between pseudosuchian archosaurs and ornithischian dinosaur dental morphologies. We report here on a new specimen of Crosbysaurus (MNA V10666 from the Chinle Formation at Comb Ridge in southeastern Utah. This new specimen is assigned to Crosbysaurus sp. on the basis of the unique compound posterior denticles, labiolingual width, and curvature. While MNA V10666 does not help resolve the affinities of Crosbysaurus, it does represent the extension of the geographic range of this taxon for approximately 250 kilometers. This is the first record of the genus Crosbysaurus in Utah and as such it represents the northernmost known record of this taxon. This indicates that Crosbysaurus was not limited to the southern area of the Chinle/Dockum deposition but instead was widespread across the Late Triassic paleoriver systems of western Pangea. The reported specimen was found in close association with a typical Late Triassic Chinle fauna, including phytosaurs, metoposaurs, and dinosauromorphs.

  17. High Surface Area, Thermally Stable, Hydrophobic, Microporous, Rigid Gels Generat-ed at Ambient From MeSi(OEt)3/(EtO)3SiCH2CH2Si(OEt)3 Mixtures by F- Catalyzed Hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Richard M; Furgal, Joseph C; Yamane, Honami; Odykirk, Timothy R; Yi, Eongyu; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2017-10-20

    High surface area materials are of considerable interest for gas storage/capture, molecular sieving, catalyst supports, as well as for slow release drug delivery systems. We report here a very simple and fast route to very high surface area (> 1000 m2/g), mechanically robust, hydrophobic gels prepared by F- catalyzed hydrolysis of mixtures of MeSi(OEt)3 and bistriethoxysilylethane (BTSE) at ambiente. These materials offer surface areas up to 1300 m2/g, peak pore sizes of 0.8 nm and thermal stabilities above 200 °C. Reaction times and surface areas can be controlled by adjusting the solvent volume (CH2Cl2), percent F- (nBu4NF or TBAF) and the BTSE contents. Microporous gels were shown capable of capturing 600 wt. % of slightly polar or nonpolar solvents. Polymers with other corners and linkers were also explored. These nearly incompressible, high surface area, thermally stable, hydrophobic materials offer considerable potential as insulating materials for a wide variety of applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  19. Negligent care and malpractice claiming behavior in Utah and Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert, D M; Thomas, E J; Burstin, H R; Zbar, B I; Orav, E J; Brennan, T A

    2000-03-01

    Previous studies relating the incidence of negligent medical care to malpractice lawsuits in the United States may not be generalizable. These studies are based on data from 2 of the most populous states (California and New York), collected more than a decade ago, during volatile periods in the history of malpractice litigation. The study objectives were (1) to calculate how frequently negligent and nonnegligent management of patients in Utah and Colorado in 1992 led to malpractice claims and (2) to understand the characteristics of victims of negligent care who do not or cannot obtain compensation for their injuries from the medical malpractice system. We linked medical malpractice claims data from Utah and Colorado with clinical data from a review of 14,700 medical records. We then analyzed characteristics of claimants and nonclaimants using evidence from their medical records about whether they had experienced a negligent adverse event. The study measures were negligent adverse events and medical malpractice claims. Eighteen patients from our study sample filed claims: 14 were made in the absence of discernible negligence and 10 were made in the absence of any adverse event. Of the patients who suffered negligent injury in our study sample, 97% did not sue. Compared with patients who did sue for negligence occurring in 1992, these nonclaimants were more likely to be Medicare recipients (odds ratio [OR], 3.5; 95% CI [CI], 1.3 to 9.6), Medicaid recipients (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.4 to 9.0), > or =75 years of age (OR, 7.0; 95% CI, 1.7 to 29.6), and low income earners (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.9 to 4.2) and to have suffered minor disability as a result of their injury (OR, 6.3; 95% CI, 2.7 to 14.9). The poor correlation between medical negligence and malpractice claims that was present in New York in 1984 is also present in Utah and Colorado in 1992. Paradoxically, the incidence of negligent adverse events exceeds the incidence of malpractice claims but when a physician is

  20. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Appendix D, Addenda D1--D7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation foe the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junction Project Office, in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. the objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on-pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra-226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  1. Ground-water resources of the Sevier River basin between Yuba Dam and Leamington Canyon, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Louis Jay; Robinson, Gerald B.

    1968-01-01

    The area investigated is a segment of the Sevier River basin, Utah, comprising about 900 square miles and including a 19-mile reach of the Sevier River between Yuba Dam and Leamington Canyon. The larger valleys in the area are southern Juab, Round, and Scipio Valleys. The smaller valleys are Mills, Little, Dog, and Tinctic Wash Valleys.The geology of parts of Scipio, Little, and Mills Valleys and parts of the surrounding highlands was mapped and studied to explain the occurrence of numerous sinkholes in the thre valleys and to show their relation to the large springs in Mills Valley. The sinkholes, which are formed in the alluvium, are alined along faults, which penetrate both the alluvium and the underlying bedrock, and they have been formed by collapse of solution cavities in the underlying bedrock. The bedrock is mostly sandy limestone beds of the upper part of the North Horn Formation and of the Flagstaff Limestone. The numerous faults traversing Scipio Valley in a north-northeasterly direction trend directly toward Molter and Blue Springs in Mills Valley. One fault, which can be traced directly between the springs, probably is the principal channelway for the ground water moving from Scipio and Little Valleys to the springs.

  2. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the middle Green River basin, Utah, 1986-87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, D.W.; Waddell, Bruce; Miller, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Reconnaissance of wildlife areas in the middle Green River basin of Utah was conducted during 1986 and 1987 to determine whether irrigation drainage has caused, or has the potential to cause significant harmful effects on human health, fish, and wildlife, or may adversely affect the suitability of water for beneficial uses. Studies at Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area and Ouray National Wildlife Refuge indicated that concentrations of boron, selenium, and zinc in water, bottom sediment, and biological tissue were sufficiently large to be harmful to fish and wildlife, and to adversely affect beneficial uses of water. Selenium is the principal element of concern in both areas. Concentrations of dissolved selenium in irrigation drain water entering Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area ranged from 14-140 micrograms/L (ug/L) and consistently exceeded Utah standards for wildlife protection in water in two of the four drains. Concentrations of boron and zinc exceeded Utah standards only occasionally in the drain waters. Concentrations of total selenium in sediments collected where the drains discharge into the lake were 10-85 ug/gm. Liver tissue collected from American coots at Stewart Lake Waterfowl Management Area contained concentrations of selenium from 4.9-26 ug/gm (dry weight), and whole body samples of carp contained as much as 31 ug/gm (dry weight). Concentrations of selenium in Potamogeton and blue-green algae ranged from 2.1-27 ug/gm. Concentrations of boron, selenium, and zinc were also measured in water from Ouray National Wildlife Refuge. Liver tissue of American coots from the North Roadside Pond, which receives irrigation tailwater, contained a geometric-mean concentration of selenium of 32 ug/gm (dry weight). Five water-bird eggs collected from the North and South Roadside Ponds contained selenium concentrations of 63-120 ug/gm (dry weight). (Lantz-PTT)

  3. Hydrology and simulation of ground-water flow in Juab Valley, Juab County, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiros, Susan A.; Stolp, Bernard J.; Hadley, Heidi K.; Steiger, Judy I.

    1996-01-01

    Plans to import water to Juab Valley, Utah, primarily for irrigation, are part of the Central Utah Project. A better understanding of the hydrology of the valley is needed to help manage the water resources and to develop conjunctive-use plans.The saturated unconsolidated basin-fill deposits form the ground-water system in Juab Valley. Recharge is by seepage from streams, unconsumed irrigation water, and distribution systems; infiltration of precipitation; and subsurface inflow from consolidated rocks that surround the valley. Discharge is by wells, springs, seeps, evapotranspiration, and subsurface outflow to consolidated rocks. Ground-water pumpage is used to supplement surface water for irrigation in most of the valley and has altered the direction of groundwater flow from that of pre-ground-water development time in areas near and in Nephi and Levan.Greater-than-average precipitation during 1980-87 corresponds with a rise in water levels measured in most wells in the valley and the highest water level measured in some wells. Less-than average precipitation during 1988-91 corresponds with a decline in water levels measured during 1988-93 in most wells. Geochemical analyses indicate that the sources of dissolved ions in water sampled from the southern part of the valley are the Arapien Shale, evaporite deposits that occur in the unconsolidated basin-fill deposits, and possibly residual sea water that has undergone evaporation in unconsolidated basin-fill deposits in selected areas. Water discharging from a spring at Burriston Ponds is a mixture of about 70 percent ground water from a hypothesized flow path that extends downgradient from where Salt Creek enters Juab Valley and 30 percent from a hypothesized flow path from the base of the southern Wasatch Range.The ground-water system of Juab Valley was simulated by using the U.S. Geological Survey modular, three-dimensional, finite-difference, ground-water flow model. The numerical model was calibrated to simulate

  4. Ground water in the southeastern Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Walter F.; Kimball, Briant A.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for developing oil-shale resources in the southeastern Uinta Basin of Utah and Colorado has created the need for information on the quantity and quality of water available in the area. This report describes the availability and chemical quality of ground water, which might provide a source or supplement of water supply for an oil-shale industry. Ground water in the southeastern Uinta Basin occurs in three major aquifers. Alluvial aquifers of small areal extent are present i n val ley-f i 11 deposits of six major drainages. Consolidated-rock aquifers include the birds's-nest aquifer i n the Parachute Creek Member of the G reen River Formation, which is limited to the central part of the study area; and the Douglas Creek aquifer, which includes parts of the Douglas Creek Member of the Green River Formation and parts of the intertonguing Renegade Tongue of the Wasatch Formation; this aquifer underlies most of the study area.The alluvial aquifers are recharged by infiltration of streamflow and leakage from consolidated-rock aquifers. Recharge is estimated to average about 32,000 acre-feet per year. Discharge from alluvial aquifers, primarily by evapotranspiration, also averages about 32,000 acre-feet per year. The estimated volume of recoverable water in storage in alluvial aquifers is about 200,000 acre-feet. Maximum yields to individual wells are less than 1,000 gallons per minute.Recharge to the bird's-nest aquifer, primarily from stream infiltration and downward leakage from the overlying Uinta Formation, is estimated to average 670 acre-feet per year. Discharge from the bird's-nest aquifer, which is primarily by seepage to Bitter Creek and the White River, is estimated to be at 670 acre-feet per year. The estimated volume of recoverable water in storage in the bird's-nest aquifer is 1.9 million acre-feet. Maximum yields to individual wells in some areas may be as much as 5,000 gallons per minute. A digital-computer model of the flow system was used

  5. Computer-aided dispatch--traffic management center field operational test : state of Utah final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This document provides the final report for the evaluation of the USDOT-sponsored Computer-Aided Dispatch Traffic Management Center Integration Field Operations Test in the State of Utah. The document discusses evaluation findings in the followin...

  6. Utah State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    The Utah State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Utah. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Utah. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Utah.

  7. Irrigation Wells from the Utah Division of Water Rights Point of Diversion Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are derived from a point shapefile created nightly from data in the Utah Division of Water Rights Database. The source data were acquired on October 26,...

  8. Limitations On Canada Goose Production at Fish springs National Wildlife Refuge, Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We studied the western Canada goose (B. c. moffitti) population at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge in western Utah from March to July in 1996 and 1997 to...

  9. Compactional deformation bands in Wingate Sandstone; additional evidence of an impact origin for Upheaval Dome, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Chris H.; Schultz, Richard A.

    2007-04-01

    Field and microstructural observations from Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, show that inelastic strain of the Wingate Sandstone is localized along compactional deformation bands. These bands are tabular discontinuities (Jurassic) age for this impact.

  10. 78 FR 23290 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council Conference Call Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... teleconference, orally present material during the teleconference, or submit written material for the Council to... System Strategy. Results of their findings will be presented to the BLM-Utah and the RAC. A public...

  11. Utah Marbles and Mars Blueberries: Comparitive Terrestrial Analogs for Hematite Concretions on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M. A.; Beitler, B.; Parry, W. T.; Ormö, J.; Komatsu, G.

    2005-03-01

    Compelling comparisons show why Utah iron oxide-cemented "marbles" are a good analog for Mars hematite "blueberries". Terrestrial examples offer valuable models for interpreting the diagenetic history and importance of water on Mars.

  12. Spread and genetic relatedness of native vs. introduced Phragmites australis in Utah wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Utah is experiencing a dramatic invasion of an aggressive European subspecies of the common reed (Phragmites australis subsp. australis). This invasion is...

  13. Hypercorrection in Response to the Apparent Merger of (c) and (a) in Utah English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Marianna

    1992-01-01

    Acoustic analysis of two vowels thought to be merged in Utah English suggest that there are small but consistent differences between them. A matched guise experiment provides evidence that when the vowels are merged hypercorrection is involved. (33 references) (LB)

  14. Supplementary report on Pony Express-Overland Stage sites in western Utah

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The following report is a description by site of Pony Express and Overland Stage stations between Rush Valley and Deep Creek, Utah. Descriptions, including...

  15. A survey of locally endemic mollusca of Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a culmination of field, laboratory, and bibliographic work begun in August, 1974. The project as originally contracted called for a survey of Utah and...

  16. The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program as an NF1 Consortium Site

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Viskochil, David H; Stevenson, David; Carey, John

    2007-01-01

    The University of Utah Clinical Genetics Research Program (CGRP) provided the infrastructure for our site to perform clinical trials within the scope of a consortium to treat multiple medical complications of neurofibromatosis type 1...

  17. TIN Dataset Model of Overburden Above the Mahogany Bed in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An ESRI TIN data model of the overburden material above the Mahogany bed was needed to perform calculations in the Uinta Basin, Utah and Colorado as part of a 2009...

  18. Muskrat population estimates for Fish Springs NWR, Utah : An assessment of techniques

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Completion report for a study of muskrat population dynamics and vegetation utilization, being led by Utah State University for a doctorate dissertation. The study...

  19. Estimating pinyon and juniper cover across Utah using NAIP imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell B. Roundy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansion of Pinus L. (pinyon and Juniperus L. (juniper (P-J trees into sagebrush (Artemisia L. steppe communities can lead to negative effects on hydrology, loss of wildlife habitat, and a decrease in desirable understory vegetation. Tree reduction treatments are often implemented to mitigate these negative effects. In order to prioritize and effectively plan these treatments, rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods are needed to estimate tree canopy cover at the landscape scale. We used object based image analysis (OBIA software (Feature AnalystTM for ArcMap 10.1®, ENVI Feature Extraction®, and Trimble eCognition Developer 8.2® to extract tree canopy cover using NAIP (National Agricultural Imagery Program imagery. We then compared our extractions with ground measured tree canopy cover (crown diameter and line point intercept on 309 plots across 44 sites in Utah. Extraction methods did not consistently over- or under-estimate ground measured P-J canopy cover except where tree cover was >45%. Estimates of tree canopy cover using OBIA techniques were strongly correlated with estimates using the crown diameter method (r = 0.93 for ENVI, 0.91 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.92 for eCognition. Tree cover estimates using OBIA techniques had lower correlations with tree cover measurements using the line-point intercept method (r = 0.85 for ENVI, 0.83 for Feature AnalystTM, and 0.83 for eCognition. All software packages accurately and inexpensively extracted P-J canopy cover from NAIP imagery when the imagery was not blurred, and when P-J cover was not mixed with Amelanchier alnifolia (Utah serviceberry and Quercus gambelii (Gambel’s oak, which had similar spectral values as P-J.

  20. Climate Forcings on Groundwater Variations in Utah and the Great Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Hakala, Kirsti A.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater levels over northern Utah have undergone a declining trend since the 1960’s. This trend has made apparent the need to understand the relationship between climate and groundwater resources. Such necessary information is already in dire need in places such as California. At the close of 2013, California had experienced its driest year in recorded history, with severe drought continuing for the foreseeable future. Utah is the second driest state in the U.S., and therefore has been pa...

  1. The oldest vertebrate trace fossils from Comb Ridge (Bears Ears Region, southeastern Utah)

    OpenAIRE

    Gay, Robert J.; Jenkins, Xavier A.; Lepore, Taormina

    2017-01-01

    Vertebrate trace fossils are common in Upper Triassic deposits across the American southwest. These ichnofauna are dominated by Grallator, Brachychirotherium, and Pseudotetrasauropus, and lack ichnotaxa traditionally considered to be Early Jurassic in age, such as Eubrontes and Anomoepus. While known from Indian Creek and Lisbon Valley, Utah, vertebrate trace fossils have not been previously reported from Comb Ridge, Utah. This is significant considering that lithostratigraphic work has been ...

  2. 78 FR 53477 - Second Call for Nominations to the Utah Resource Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ...The purpose of this notice is to request public nominations to fill vacant positions on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC), which has two positions with terms expiring on January 12, 2014. The RAC provides advice and recommendations to the BLM on land use planning and management of the National System of Public Lands within Utah. The BLM will accept public nominations for 30 days after the publication of this notice.

  3. 78 FR 28240 - Call for Nominations for the Utah Resource Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ...The purpose of this notice is to request public nominations for upcoming vacancies on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Utah Resource Advisory Council (RAC) which has four members with terms expiring on January 12, 2014. The RAC provides advice and recommendations to the BLM on land use planning and management of the National System of Public Lands within Utah. The BLM will accept public nominations for 45 days after the publication of this notice.

  4. Utah's ban on abortion coverage for low-income women challenged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-02-10

    On January 30 (1995) two women's health care providers, a rape crisis center, and a YWCA-run battered women's shelter asked the federal district court in Utah to declare invalid and enjoin enforcement of the state's virtual ban on abortion coverage for Medicaid-eligible women. The plaintiffs argue that Utah's criminal prohibition on state Medicaid coverage for abortion--except when the procedure is necessary to prevent a woman's death--violates federal Medicaid law because it does not cover abortions for survivors of rape or incest. The Hyde Amendment has provided federal Medicaid funds for abortions in cases of rape and incest since 1993, and federal courts have since ruled against eight other states that refused to cover those procedures. In late December, Utah was one of seven states notified by the federal Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) that the state is "out of compliance" with federal Medicaid law. With nearly 46 rapes per 100,000 people, Utah has one of the highest rates of rape in the country. CRLP (Center for Reproductive Law and Policy) has previously filed lawsuits in Utah challenging the state's 1991 abortion ban and a 1993 mandatory delay and biased counseling requirement. Plaintiffs in Utah Women's Clinic v. Graham are represented by CRLP's Eve Gartner, with Salt Lake City attorneys Howard Lundgren and Jeffrey Oritt. full text

  5. Thermal regime of warm-dry permafrost in relation to ground surface temperature in the Source Areas of the Yangtze and Yellow rivers on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, SW China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dongliang; Jin, Huijun; Wu, Qingbai; Bense, Victor F; He, Ruixia; Ma, Qiang; Gao, Shuhui; Jin, Xiaoying; Lü, Lanzhi

    2017-10-31

    Ecology, hydrology, and natural resources in the source areas of the Yangtze and Yellow rivers (SAYYR) are closely linked to interactions between climate and permafrost. However, a comprehensive study of the interactions is currently hampered by sparsely- and unevenly-distributed monitoring sites and limited field investigations. In this study, the thermal regime of warm-dry permafrost in the SAYYR was systematically analyzed based on extensive data collected during 2010-2016 of air temperature (Ta), ground surface temperature (GST) and ground temperature across a range of areas with contrasting land-surface characteristics. Mean annual Ta (MAAT) and mean annual GST (MAGST) were regionally averaged at -3.19±0.71°C and -0.40±1.26°C. There is a close relationship between GST and Ta (R(2)=0.8477) as obtained by a linear regression analysis with all available daily averages. The mean annual temperature at the bottom of the active layer (TTOP) was regionally averaged at -0.72±1.01°C and mostly in the range of -1.0°C and 0°C except at Chalaping (~-2.0°C). Surface offset (MAGST-MAAT) was regionally averaged at 2.54±0.71°C. Thermal offset (TTOP-MAGST) was regionally averaged at -0.17±0.84°C, which was generally within -0.5°C and 0.5°C. Relatively consistent thermal conductivity between the thawed and frozen states of the soils may be responsible for the small thermal offset. Active layer thickness was generally smaller at Chalaping than that on other parts of the QTP, presumably due to smaller climatic continentality index and the thermal dampening of surface temperature variability under the presence of dense vegetation and thick peaty substrates. We conclude that the accurate mapping of permafrost on the rugged elevational QTP could be potentially obtained by correlating the parameters of GST, thermal offset, and temperature gradient in the shallow permafrost. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Study area description: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mary M.; Leu, Matthias; Hanser, Steven E.; Leu, Matthias; Knick, Steven T.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2011-01-01

    The boundary for the Wyoming Basins Ecoregional Assessment (WBEA) was largely determined by the co-occurrence of some of the largest tracts of intact sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) remaining in the western United States with areas of increasing resource extraction. The WBEA area includes two ecoregions in their entirety, Wyoming Basins and Utah-Wyoming Rocky Mountains, and portions of two others (Southern Rocky Mountains and Middle Rockies-Blue Mountains). Over half the study area is in Wyoming; the remainder includes parts of Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Montana. Private landowners manage most (33.1%) of the land base in the WBEA, followed by the U.S. Forest Service (27.3%) and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (25.6%). Sagebrush is the dominant land cover type in the study area, totaling >130,000 km2 ; nearly half the sagebrush in the WBEA is managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Sagebrush in the WBEA faces many potential threats that also influence the broader sagebrush ecosystem. Climate change, drought, land-use practices (e.g., livestock grazing, oil and gas development), and human development have eliminated and fragmented the sagebrush ecosystem, altered fire regimes, and accelerated the invasion of exotic plants such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). Less than 2% of sagebrush in the WBEA is permanently protected from land cover conversion.

  7. Study area description: Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mary M.; Leu, Matthias; Hanser, Steven E.; Leu, Matthias; Knick, Steven T.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2011-01-01

    The boundary for the Wyoming Basins Ecoregional Assessment (WBEA) was largely determined by the co-occurrence of some of the largest tracts of intact sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) remaining in the western United States with areas of increasing resource extraction. The WBEA area includes two ecoregions in their entirety, Wyoming Basins and Utah-Wyoming Rocky Mountains, and portions of two others (Southern Rocky Mountains and Middle Rockies-Blue Mountains). Over half the study area is in Wyoming; the remainder includes parts of Colorado, Utah, Idaho, and Montana. Private landowners manage most (33.1%) of the land base in the WBEA, followed by the U.S. Forest Service (27.3%) and U.S. Bureau of Land Management (25.6%). Sagebrush is the dominant land cover type in the study area, totaling >130,000 km2; nearly half the sagebrush in the WBEA is managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Sagebrush in the WBEA faces many potential threats that also influence the broader sagebrush ecosystem. Climate change, drought, land-use practices (e.g., livestock grazing, oil and gas development), and human development have eliminated and fragmented the sagebrush ecosystem, altered fire regimes, and accelerated the invasion of exotic plants such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). Less than 2% of sagebrush in the WBEA is permanently protected from land cover conversion.

  8. ANALISIS PERMIBILITAS KERUANGAN DAN DINAMIKA FLUIDA ANGIN DAN SUHU KAWASAN PERMUKIMAN TROPIS SUNGAI DI BANJARMASIN, INDONESIA (An Analysis on Spatial Permeability and Fluid Dynamics of Wind and Thermal in Tropical Riverside Residential Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Prayitno

    2013-07-01

    architecture and infrastructure, which are based on land and water. Problems occurring in these areas are density, less interconnectivity, poor accessibility, and very low intelligibility. In addition, the areas’ thermal comfort is very low – poor wind circulation, high humidity, and uncomfortable temperatures. In the study the researcher conducted an experiment based on permeability approach to solve the challenges and problems related to spatial and thermal comfort by using a spatial analysis method, space syntax, and a thermal comfort analysis method, Envimet. This study compared the existing condition with a model architecture of a city block kampung settlement, which was based on local vernacular architecture of Banjarmasin river banks. The research concluded that the intelligibility performance of spatial permeability approach could be improved. This approach resulted in a symbiosis between spatial configuration of land and water and the regional architecture. However, in terms of thermal comfort no significant improvement of performance occurred because the morphology of the area was relatively flat and the proportion of the average height of buildings was low. Consequently, wind path as ventilation was not formed and area thermal comfort was not created.

  9. Analysis of Neogene deformation between Beaver, Utah and Barstow, California: Suggestions for altering the extensional paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. Ernest; Beard, Sue; Mankinen, Edward A.; Hillhouse, John W.

    2013-01-01

    For more than two decades, the paradigm of large-magnitude (~250 km), northwest-directed (~N70°W) Neogene extensional lengthening between the Colorado Plateau and Sierra Nevada at the approximate latitude of Las Vegas has remained largely unchallenged, as has the notion that the strain integrates with coeval strains in adjacent regions and with plate-boundary strain. The paradigm depends on poorly constrained interconnectedness of extreme-case lengthening estimated at scattered localities within the region. Here we evaluate the soundness of the inferred strain interconnectedness over an area reaching 600 km southwest from Beaver, Utah, to Barstow, California, and conclude that lengthening is overestimated in most areas and, even if the estimates are valid, lengthening is not interconnected in a way that allows for published versions of province-wide summations.We summarize Neogene strike slip in 13 areas distributed from central Utah to Lake Mead. In general, left-sense shear and associated structures define a broad zone of translation approximately parallel to the eastern boundary of the Basin and Range against the Colorado Plateau, a zone we refer to as the Hingeline shear zone. Areas of steep-axis rotation (ranging to 2500 km2) record N-S shortening rather than unevenly distributed lengthening. In most cases, the rotational shortening and extension-parallel folds and thrusts are coupled to, or absorb, strike slip, thus providing valuable insight into how the discontinuous strike-slip faults are simply parts of a broad zone of continuous strain. The discontinuous nature of strike slip and the complex mixture of extensional, contractional, and steep-axis rotational structures in the Hingeline shear zone are similar to those in the Walker Lane belt in the west part of the Basin and Range, and, together, the two record southward displacement of the central and northern Basin and Range relative to the adjacent Colorado Plateau. Understanding this province

  10. Reactive nitrogen partitioning and its relationship to winter ozone events in Utah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Wild

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High wintertime ozone levels have been observed in the Uintah Basin, Utah, a sparsely populated rural region with intensive oil and gas operations. The reactive nitrogen budget plays an important role in tropospheric ozone formation. Measurements were taken during three field campaigns in the winters of 2012, 2013 and 2014, which experienced varying climatic conditions. Average concentrations of ozone and total reactive nitrogen were observed to be 2.5 times higher in 2013 than 2012, with 2014 an intermediate year in most respects. However, photochemically active NOx (NO + NO2 remained remarkably similar all three years. Nitric acid comprised roughly half of NOz ( ≡  NOy − NOx in 2013, with nighttime nitric acid formation through heterogeneous uptake of N2O5 contributing approximately 6 times more than daytime formation. In 2012, N2O5 and ClNO2 were larger components of NOz relative to HNO3. The nighttime N2O5 lifetime between the high-ozone year 2013 and the low-ozone year 2012 is lower by a factor of 2.6, and much of this is due to higher aerosol surface area in the high-ozone year of 2013. A box-model simulation supports the importance of nighttime chemistry on the reactive nitrogen budget, showing a large sensitivity of NOx and ozone concentrations to nighttime processes.

  11. Remote Sensing as a Tool to Track Algal Blooms in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, S. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Naftz, D.; Moore, T.; Haney, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake is a large hypersaline, terminal water body in northern Utah, USA. The lake has both a significant economic importance to the local community as a source of brine shrimp and mineral resources, as well as, an ecological importance to large numbers of migratory waterfowl. Due to nutrient input from sewage treatment plants, sections of the Great Salt Lake are subjected to highly eutrophic conditions. One of the main tributaries, Farmington Bay, experiences massive blooms of cyanobacteria which can reach concentrations in excess of 300 mg l-1 in the bay. Effects of these blooms can be observed stretching into the rest of the lake. The detrimental outcomes of the blooms include unsightly scums, foul odor and the danger of cyanobacterial toxins. While the blooms have an obvious effect on Farmington Bay, it is quite possible that the cyanobacteria impact a much wider area of the lake as currents move eutrophic water masses. Of particular interest is the reaction of brine shrimp to the plumes of cyanobacteria-rich water leaving Farmington Bay. We are employing remote sensing as a tool to map the distribution of algae throughout the lake and produce lake-wide maps of water quality on a regular basis. On-lake reflectance measurements have been coupled with MODIS satellite imagery to produce a time series of maps illustrating changes in algal distribution. The successes and shortcomings of our remote sensing technique will be a central topic of this presentation.

  12. Study of a conceptual nuclear energy center at Green River, Utah: licensing considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowdle, M.; Russell, R.; Zillman, D.

    1982-04-01

    This report examines the laws governing the location of a 9-unit nuclear energy center (NEC) near Green River, Utah. The time frame being considered for development of the conceptual NEC is from 1995 to 2013. Accordingly, the report is forced to speculate about some aspects of the plant, its site and its construction. Most of the report examines existing legal requirements for constructing an NEC. Where pertinent, changes in the law are discussed that would affect an NEC that is to be licensed in one or two decades. In general, no insurmountable legal problems exist that would prevent an NEC from being licensed at the Green River location. Several legal requirements pose significant concerns and would have to be faced before an NEC could be built. Among the major legal constraints are radiation protection, regulatory approval of financing, access to water, and local zoning restrictions. Two other constraints that involve legal matters are the wisdom of standardization of the units and the responsibility of the NEC builder to correct socio-economic impacts on the local area.

  13. Salt budget for West Pond, Utah, April 1987 to June 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, S.R.; Waddell, K.M.

    1994-01-01

    During operation of the West Desert pumping project, April 10. 1987, to June 30, 1989, data were collected as part of a monitoring program to evaluate the effects of pumping brine from Great Salt Lake into West Pond in northern Utah. The removal of brine from Great Sail was part of an effort to lower the level of Great Salt Lake when the water level was at a high in 1986. These data were used to prepare a salt budget that indicates about 695 million tons of salt or about 14.2 percent of salt contained in Great Salt Lake was pumped into West Pond. Of the 695 million tons of salt pumped into West Pond, 315 million tons (45 percent) were dissolved in West Pond, 71 million tons (10.2 percent) formed a salt crust at the bottom of the pond, 10 million tons (1.4 percent) infiltrated the subsurface areas inundated by storage in the pond, 88 million tons (12.7 percent) were withdrawn by American Magnesium Corporation, and 123 million tons (17.7 percent) discharged from the pond through the Newfoundland weir. About 88 million tons (13 percent) of the salt pumped from the lake could not be accounted for in the salt budget. About 94 million tons of salt (1.9 percent of the total salt in Great Salt Lake) flowed back to Great Salt Lake.

  14. Physical Volcanology and Hazard Analysis of a Young Volcanic Field: Black Rock Desert, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, A. R.

    2009-05-01

    The Black Rock Desert volcanic field, located in west-central Utah, consists of ~30 small-volume monogenetic volcanoes with compositions ranging from small rhyolite domes to large basaltic lava flow fields. The field has exhibited bimodal volcanism for > 9 Ma with the most recent eruption of Ice Springs volcano ˜ 600 yrs ago. Together this eruptive history along with ongoing geothermal activity attests to the usefulness of a hazard assessment. The likelihood of a future eruption in this area has been calculated to be ˜ 8% over the next 1 Ka (95% confidence). However, many aspects of this field such as the explosivity and nature of many of these eruptions are not well known. The physical volcanology of the Tabernacle Hill volcano, suggests a complicated episodic eruption that may have lasted up to 50 yrs. The initial phreatomagmatic eruptions at Tabernacle Hill are reported to have begun ~14 Ka. This initial eruptive phase produced a tuff cone approximately 150 m high and 1.5 km in diameter with distinct bedding layers. Recent mapping and sampling of Tabernacle Hill's lava field, tuff cone and intra-crater deposits were aimed at better constraining the eruptive history, physical volcanology, and explosive energy associated with this eruption. Blocks ejected during the eruption were mapped and analyzed to yield minimum muzzle velocities of 60 - 70 meters per second. These velocities were used in conjunction with an estimated shallow depth of explosion to calculate an energy yield of ˜ 0.5 kT.

  15. Time-scales of assembly and thermal history of a composite felsic pluton: constraints from the Emerald Lake area, northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Ian M.; Villeneuve, Mike E.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Duncan, Robert A.; Russell, James K.; Mortensen, James K.

    2002-05-01

    Knowledge of the time-scales of emplacement and thermal history during assembly of composite felsic plutons in the shallow crust are critical to deciphering the processes of crustal growth and magma chamber development. Detailed petrological and chemical study of the mid-Cretaceous, composite Emerald Lake pluton, from the northern Canadian Cordillera, Yukon Territory, coupled with U-Pb and 40Ar/ 39Ar geochronology, indicates that this pluton was intruded as a series of magmatic pulses. Intrusion of these pulses produced a strong petrological zonation from augite syenite, hornblende quartz syenite and monzonite, to biotite granite. Our data further indicate that multiple phases were emplaced and cooled to below the mineral closure temperatures over a time-scale on the order of the resolution of the 40Ar/ 39Ar technique (˜1 Myr), and that emplacement occurred at 94.3 Ma. Simple thermal modelling and heat conduction calculations were used to further constrain the temporal relationships within the intrusion. These calculations are consistent with the geochronology and show that emplacement and cooling were complete in less than 100 kyr and probably 70±5 kyr. These results demonstrate that production, transport and emplacement of the different phases of the Emerald Lake pluton occurred essentially simultaneously, and that these processes must also have been closely related in time and space. By analogy, these results provide insights into the assembly and petrogenesis of other complex intrusions and ultimately lead to an understanding of the processes involved in crustal development.

  16. Utah State Prison Space Heating with Geothermal Heat Second Semi-Annual Report for the Period June 1980 - December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-04-01

    Reported herein is a summary of work conducted during the six monty period June, 1980 through December, 1980 of the project under contract to develop the Crystal Hot Springs geothermal resource to provide space and hot water heating for the minimum security building at the Utah State Prison. Efforts during this reporting period have been directed towards the resource assessment phase of the program. Specifically, progress includes: (1) completion of the gravity modeling efforts to define the subsurface structural configuration in the vicinity of the Crystal Hot Springs area, (2) selection of the most promising production targets for a test drilling program, (3) completion of the test drilling program, and (4) testing and monitoring of test well USP/TH-1.

  17. Geothermal investigations in Idaho, Part 2, An evaluation of thermal water in the Bruneau-Grand View area, southwest Idaho - with a section on a reconnaissance audio-magnetotelluric survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.; Hoover, Donald B.; Tippens, C.L.

    1974-01-01

    The Bruneau-Grand View area occupies about 1,100 square miles in southwest Idaho and is on the southern flank of the large depression (possibly a graben) in which lies the western Snake River Plain. The igneous and sedimentary rocks in the area range in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene. They are transected by a prominent system of northwest-trending faults. For discussion purposes, the aquifers in the area have been separated into two broad units: (1) the volcanic-rock aquifers, and (2) the overlying sedimentary-rock aquifers. The Idavada Volcanics or underlying rock units probably constitute the reservoir that contains thermal water. An audio-magnetotelluric survey indicates that a large conductive zone having apparent resistivities approaching 2 ohm-metres underlies a part of the area at a relatively shallow depth. Chemical analysis of 94 water samples collected in 1973 show that the thermal waters in the area are of a sodium bicarbonate type. Although dissolved-solids concentrations of water ranged from 181 to 1,100 milligrams per litre (mg/l) in the volcanic-rock aquifers, they were generally less than 500 mg/l. Measured chloride concentrations of water in the volcanic-rock aquifers were less than 20 mg/l. Temperatures of water from wells and springs ranged from 9.5 to 83.0 degrees C. Temperatures of water from the volcanic-rock aquifers ranged from 40.0 to 83.0 degrees C, whereas temperatures of water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers seldom exceeded 35 degrees C. Aquifer temperatures at depth, as estimated by silica and sodium-potassium-calcium geochemical thermometers, probably do not exceed 150 degrees C. However, a mixed-water geochemical thermometer indicates that temperatures at depth may exceed 180 degrees C. The gas in water from the volcanic-rock aquifers is composed chiefly of atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen. Methane gas (probably derived from organic material) was also found in some water from the sedimentary-rock aquifers. The thermal waters

  18. Assessment of the Impact of Metropolitan-Scale Urban Planning Scenarios on the Moist Thermal Environment under Global Warming: A Study of the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Using Regional Climate Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuka Suzuki-Parker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a high-resolution regional climate model coupled with urban canopy model, the present study provides the first attempt in quantifying the impact of metropolitan-scale urban planning scenarios on moist thermal environment under global warming. Tokyo metropolitan area is selected as a test case. Three urban planning scenarios are considered: status quo, dispersed city, and compact city. Their impact on the moist thermal environment is assessed using wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT. Future projections for the 2070s show a 2–4°C increase in daytime mean WBGT relative to the current climate. The urban scenario impacts are shown to be small, with a −0.4 to +0.4°C range. Relative changes in temperature and humidity as the result of a given urban scenario are shown to be critical in determining the sign of the WBGT changes; however, such changes are not necessarily determined by local changes in urban land surface parameters. These findings indicate that urban land surface changes may improve or worsen the local moist thermal environment and that metropolitan-scale urban planning is inefficient in mitigating heat-related health risks for mature cities like Tokyo.

  19. Geology, selected geophysics, and hydrogeology of the White River and parts of the Great Salt Lake Desert regional groundwater flow systems, Utah and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Peter D.; Dixon, Gary L.; Watrus , James M.; Burns, Andrews G.; Mankinen, Edward A.; McKee, Edwin H.; Pari, Keith T.; Ekren, E. Bartlett; Patrick , William G.; Comer, John B.; Inkenbrandt, Paul C.; Krahulec, K.A.; Pinnell, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The east-central Great Basin near the Utah-Nevada border contains two great groundwater flow systems. The first, the White River regional groundwater flow system, consists of a string of hydraulically connected hydrographic basins in Nevada spanning about 270 miles from north to south. The northernmost basin is Long Valley and the southernmost basin is the Black Mountain area, a valley bordering the Colorado River. The general regional groundwater flow direction is north to south. The second flow system, the Great Salt Lake Desert regional groundwater flow system, consists of hydrographic basins that straddle

  20. Thermal equilibrium concentration of intrinsic point defects in heavily doped silicon crystals - Theoretical study of formation energy and formation entropy in area of influence of dopant atoms-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.; Yamaoka, S.; Sueoka, K.; Vanhellemont, J.

    2017-09-01

    It is well known that p-type, neutral and n-type dopants affect the intrinsic point defect (vacancy V and self-interstitial I) behavior in single crystal Si. By the interaction with V and/or I, (1) growing Si crystals become more V- or I-rich, (2) oxygen precipitation is enhanced or retarded, and (3) dopant diffusion is enhanced or retarded, depending on the type and concentration of dopant atoms. Since these interactions affect a wide range of Si properties ranging from as-grown crystal quality to LSI performance, numerical simulations are used to predict and to control the behavior of both dopant atoms and intrinsic point defects. In most cases, the thermal equilibrium concentrations of dopant-point defect pairs are evaluated using the mass action law by taking only the binding energy of closest pair to each other into account. The impacts of dopant atoms on the formation of V and I more distant than 1st neighbor and on the change of formation entropy are usually neglected. In this study, we have evaluated the thermal equilibrium concentrations of intrinsic point defects in heavily doped Si crystals. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to obtain the formation energy (Ef) of the uncharged V and I at all sites in a 64-atom supercell around a substitutional p-type (B, Ga, In, and Tl), neutral (C, Ge, and Sn) and n-type (P, As, and Sb) dopant atom. The formation (vibration) entropies (Sf) of free I, V and I, V at 1st neighboring site from B, C, Sn, P and As atoms were also calculated with the linear response method. The dependences of the thermal equilibrium concentrations of trapped and total intrinsic point defects (sum of free I or V and I or V trapped with dopant atoms) on the concentrations of B, C, Sn, P and As in Si were obtained. Furthermore, the present evaluations well explain the experimental results of the so-called ;Voronkov criterion; in B and C doped Si, and also the observed dopant dependent void sizes in P and As doped Si

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

  2. Improvement of the management of residual waste in areas without thermal treatment facilities: A life cycle analysis of an Italian management district

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Maria, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.dimaria@unipg.it [LAR Laboratory, Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Via G. Duranti 93, Perugia (Italy); Micale, Caterina; Morettini, Emanuela [LAR Laboratory, Dipartimento di Ingegneria, Via G. Duranti 93, Perugia (Italy); Sisani, Luciano [TSA spa, Via Case Sparse 107, Magione (Italy); Damiano, Roberto [GESENU spa, Via della Molinella 7, Perugia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • LCA analysis of two option for residual waste management. • Exploitation of mechanical physical sorting facility for extracting recyclable from RMSW. • Processing the mechanically sorted organic fraction in bioreactor landfill. • Sensitivity analysis demonstrate high influence for impact assessment of substitution ratio for recycle materials. - Abstract: Starting from an existing waste management district without thermal treatment facilities, two different management scenarios for residual waste were compared by life cycle assessment (LCA). The adoption of a bioreactor landfill for managing the mechanically sorted organic fraction instead of bio-stabilization led to reduction of global warming and fresh water eutrophication by 50% and 10%, respectively. Extraction of recyclables from residual waste led to avoided emissions for particulate matter, acidification and resource depletion impact categories. Marginal energy and the amount of energy recovered from landfill gas marginally affected the LCA results. On the contrary the quality of the recyclables extracted can significantly modify the eco profile of the management schemes.

  3. THERMAL DIGITAL TERRAIN MODEL OF A COAL SPOIL TIP – A WAY OF IMPROVING MONITORING AND EARLY DIAGNOSTICS OF POTENTIAL SPONTANEOUS COMBUSTION AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Lewińska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spoil tips are anthropomorphic terrain structures built out of leftover materials from underground or open pit mining. Usually the term spoil tips refers to those build out of unusable particles from coal exploration. As such they consist mostly of slate and various types of sandstone or mudstone. But also include some amount of coal and, what is more important, coal dust. Fires of spoil tips are dangerous to the environment and humans. They can cause degradation of air, and water qualities. Sometimes degradation to the environment can be irreversible. The presented survey was done in two stages. the first included creating a general terrain model. This was done with the use of long range laser scanner. The second step was a more detailed analysis of spatial and temperature conditions. Two measuring seasons ware performed. The first included a survey made with a short range laser scanner and a hand-held inferred camera. The obtained point cloud was supplemented with temperature value with the use of software and hardware provided by the authors. The visualization of 3D discreet thermal model was done in Bentley MicrioStation. The second included a usage of Z+F IMAGER 5010 laser scanner equipped with T-Cam Rev 1.0 thermal camera insole. A new and unique device that connects laser scanner with infrared camera. This season also provide a point cloud with attached temperature value of measured points. This article provides the description of those two methods including a comparison of their effectiveness and costs. It also describes the heat conditions occurring on spoil tip of Lubelski Węgiel "Bogdanka" S.A coal mine surveyed in December 2015.

  4. Petrology, geochemistry and thermobarometry of the northern area of the Flamenco pluton, Coastal Range batholith, northern Chile. A thermal approach to the emplacement processes in the Jurassic andean batholiths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Natalia; Díaz-Alvarado, Juan; Rodríguez, Carmen; Riveros, Karl; Fuentes, Paulina

    2016-04-01

    The Flamenco pluton is part of a N-S alignment of Late Triassic to Early Jurassic intrusive belt comprising the westernmost part of the Coastal Range batholith in northern Chile. The Jurassic-Cretaceous voluminous magmatism related to subduction in the western active continental margin of Gondwana is emplaced in the predominantly metasedimentary Paleozoic host-rocks of the Las Tórtolas formation, which in the northern area of the Flamenco pluton present an intense deformation, including the Chañaral mélange. Geochemically, the Flamenco pluton shows a wide compositional variability (SiO2 between 48wt % and 67wt %). Gabbros, Qtz-diorites and tonalites, mesocratic and leucocratic granodiorites are classified as calc-alkaline, calcic, magnesian and metaluminous magmatism. Flamenco granitoids define cotectic linear evolution trends, typical of magmatic fractionation processes. Geochemical trends are consistent with magmas evolved from undersaturated and low-pressure melts, even though the absence of transitional contacts between intrusive units precludes in-situ fractionation. Although some granodioritic samples show crossed geochemical trends that point to the compositional field of metasediments, and large euhedral prismatic pinnite-biotite crystals, typical Crd pseudomorph, are observed in contact magmatic facies, geochemical assimilation processes are short range, and the occurrence of host-rocks xenoliths is limited to a few meters from the pluton contact. A thermal approach to the emplacement process has been constrained through the thermobarometric results and a 2D thermo-numerical model of the contact aureole. Some Qtz-diorites and granodiorites located in the north area of the pluton exhibit granulitic textures as Hbl-Pl-Qtz triple junctions, poikiloblastic Kfs and Qtz recrystallization. The Hbl-Pl pairs have been used for the thermobarometric study of this metamorphic process, resulting granoblastic equilibrium temperatures between 770 and 790 °C, whereas

  5. Draft Environmental Impact Statement. MX Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition DEIS. Volume IV. Part II. Environmental Consequences to the Study Regions and Operating Base Vicinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    economic hub of Utah and have led earnings growth in the state. Salt Lake/Utah counties would likely be the only areas which could accommodate M-X without...CO;a C CC PVb’ -t a -PW r V s af- CL (L v 9 0 0,a T LC 10 L T w 0 ILit s P 0 *i a C OC -- -- 55C POrN n drC CO a - - E-4

  6. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available wider range of temperature limits, saving energy while still satisfying the majority of building occupants. It is also noted that thermal comfort varies significantly between individuals and it is generally not possible to provide a thermal environment...

  7. Data flows and water woes: The Utah Data Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mél Hogan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Using a new materialist line of questioning that looks at the agential potentialities of water and its entanglements with Big Data and surveillance, this article explores how the recent Snowden revelations about the National Security Agency (NSA have reignited media scholars to engage with the infrastructures that enable intercepting, hosting, and processing immeasurable amounts of data. Focusing on the expansive architecture, location, and resource dependence of the NSA’s Utah Data Center, I demonstrate how surveillance and privacy can never be disconnected from the material infrastructures that allow and render natural the epistemological state of mass surveillance. Specifically, I explore the NSA’s infrastructure and the million of gallons of water it requires daily to cool its servers, while located in one of the driest states in the US. Complicating surveillance beyond the NSA, as also already imbricated with various social media companies, this article questions the emplacement and impact of corporate data centers more generally, and the changes they are causing to the landscape and local economies. I look at how water is an intriguing and politically relevant part of the surveillance infrastructure and how it has been constructed as the main tool for activism in this case, and how it may eventually help transform the public’s conceptualization of Big Data, as deeply material.

  8. The San Juan Canyon, southeastern Utah: A geographic and hydrographic reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miser, Hugh D.

    1924-01-01

    This report, which describes the San Juan Canyon, San Juan River and the tributary streams and the geography and to some extent the geology of the region, presents information obtained by me during the descent of the river with the Trimble party in 1921. The exploration of the canyon, which was financed jointly by the United States Geological Survey and the Southern California Edison Co., had as its primary object the mapping and study of the San Juan in connection with proposed power and storage projects along this and Colorado rivers.1 The exploration party was headed by K. W. Thimble, topographic engineer of the United States Geological Survey. Other members of the party were Robert N. Allen, Los Angeles, Calif., recorder; H. E. Blake, jr., Monticello, Utah, and Hugh Hyde, Salt Lake City, Utah, rodmen; Bert Loper, Green River, Utah, boatman; Heber Christensen, Moab, Utah, cook; and H. D. Miser, geologist. Wesley Oliver, of Mexican Hat, Utah, served as packer for the party and brought mail and provisions by pack train twice a month to specified accessible places west of Goodridge.

  9. Seepage study of six canals in Salt Lake County, Utah, 1982-1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, L.R.; Cruff, R.W.; Waddell, K.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study of selected reaches of the Utah and Salt Lake, Utah Lake Distributing, Provo Reservoir, Draper Irrigation, East Jordan, and Jordan and Salt Lake City Canals in Salt Lake County, Utah, was made to determine gains or losses of flow in those reaches. Three to five sets of seepage measurements were made on each canal during 1982 or 1983. Adjustments for fluctuations in flow were made from information obtained from water-stage recorders operated at selected locations during the time of each seepage run.The study showed an overall net loss of about 9.5 cubic feet per second in the Utah and Salt Lake Canal, 11.0 cubic feet per second in the Utah Lake Distributing canal, 20.5 cubic feet per second in the Provo Reservoir canal, 1.5 cubic feet per second in the Draper Irrigation Canal, and 4.0 cubic feet per second in the East Jordan canal. It also showed a net gain of about 6.0 cubic feet per second in the Jordan and Salt Lake City Canal. The gains and losses are attributed primarily to the relation of the canals to the depth of the water table near the canals.

  10. High Spatial Resolution Airborne Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Data for Analysis of Urban Landscape Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Estes, Maurice G., Jr.; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have used airborne multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data collected at a high spatial resolution (i.e., 10m) over several cities in the United States to study thermal energy characteristics of the urban landscape. These TIR data provide a unique opportunity to quantify thermal responses from discrete surfaces typical of the urban landscape and to identify both the spatial arrangement and patterns of thermal processes across the city. The information obtained from these data is critical to understanding how urban surfaces drive or force development of the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect, which exists as a dome of elevated air temperatures that presides over cities in contrast to surrounding non-urbanized areas. The UHI is most pronounced in the summertime where urban surfaces, such as rooftops and pavement, store solar radiation throughout the day, and release this stored energy slowly after sunset creating air temperatures over the city that are in excess of 2-4'C warmer in contrast with non-urban or rural air temperatures. The UHI can also exist as a daytime phenomenon with surface temperatures in downtown areas of cities exceeding 38'C. The implications of the UHI are significant, particularly as an additive source of thermal energy input that exacerbates the overall production of ground level ozone over cities. We have used the Airborne Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS), flown onboard a Lear 23 jet aircraft from the NASA Stennis Space Center, to acquire high spatial resolution multispectral TIR data (i.e., 6 bandwidths between 8.2-12.2 (um) over Huntsville, Alabama, Atlanta, Georgia, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Sacramento, California. These TIR data have been used to produce maps and other products, showing the spatial distribution of heating and cooling patterns over these cities to better understand how the morphology of the urban landscape affects development of the UHI. In turn, these data have been used

  11. On the value of surface saturated area dynamics mapped with thermal infrared imagery for modeling the hillslope-riparian-stream continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Barbara; Klaus, Julian; Frei, Sven; Frentress, Jay; Pfister, Laurent; Hopp, Luisa

    2016-10-01

    The highly dynamic processes within a hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) continuum are known to affect streamflow generation, but are yet not fully understood. Within this study, we simulated a headwater HRS continuum in western Luxembourg with an integrated hydrologic surface subsurface model (HydroGeoSphere). The model was setup with thorough consideration of catchment-specific attributes and we performed a multicriteria model evaluation (4 years) with special focus on the temporally varying spatial patterns of surface saturation. We used a portable thermal infrared (TIR) camera to map surface saturation with a high spatial resolution and collected 20 panoramic snapshots of the riparian zone (approx. 10 m × 20 m) under different hydrologic conditions. Qualitative and quantitative comparison of the processed TIR panoramas and the corresponding model output panoramas revealed a good agreement between spatiotemporal dynamic model and field surface saturation patterns. A double logarithmic linear relationship between surface saturation extent and discharge was similar for modeled and observed data. This provided confidence in the capability of an integrated hydrologic surface subsurface model to represent temporal and spatial water flux dynamics at small (HRS continuum) scales. However, model scenarios with different parameterizations of the riparian zone showed that discharge and surface saturation were controlled by different parameters and hardly influenced each other. Surface saturation only affected very fast runoff responses with a small volumetric contribution to stream discharge, indicating that the dynamic surface saturation in the riparian zone does not necessarily imply a major control on runoff generation.

  12. Robust satellite techniques (RST for the thermal monitoring of earthquake prone areas: the case of Umbria-Marche October, 1997 seismic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tramutoli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Several authors claim a space-time correlation between increases in Earth’s emitted Thermal Infra-Red (TIR radiation and earthquake occurrence. The main problems of such studies regard data analysis and interpretation, which are often done without a validation/confutation control. In this context, a robust data analysis technique (RST, i.e. Robust Satellite Techniques is proposed which permits a statistically based definition of TIR «anomaly » and uses a validation/confutation approach. This technique was already applied to satellite TIR surveys in seismic regions for about twenty earthquakes that occurred in the world. In this work RST is applied for the first time to a time sequence of seismic events. Nine years of Meteosat TIR observations have been analyzed to characterize the unperturbed TIR signal behaviour at specific observation times and locations. The main seismic events of the October 1997 Umbria-Marche sequence have been considered for validation, and relatively unperturbed periods (no earthquakes with Mb ? 4 were taken for confutation purposes. Positive time-space persistent TIR anomalies were observed during seismic periods, generally overlapping the principal tectonic lineaments of the region and sometimes focusing on the vicinity of the epicentre. No similar (in terms of relative intensity and space-time persistence TIR anomalies were detected during seismically unperturbed periods.

  13. Base of moderately saline ground water in San Juan County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Lewis

    1990-01-01

    The base of moderately saline ground water (water that contains from 3,000 to 10,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids) was delineated for San Juan County, Utah, based on water-quality data and on formation-water resistivities determined from geophysical well logs using the resistivity-porosity, spontaneous-potential, and resistivity-ratio methods. These data and the contour map developed from them show that a thick layer of very saline to briny ground water (water that contains more than 10,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids) underlies the eastern two-thirds of San Juan County. The upper surface of this layer is affected by the geologic structure of the area, but it may be modified locally by recharge mounds of less saline water and by vertical leakage of water through transmissive faults and fractures. The highest altitude of the base of moderately saline water is west of the Abajo Mountains where it is more than 6,500 feet above sea level. The lowest altitude is in the western part of the county and is below sea level: depressions in the base of moderately saline water in recharge areas in the La Sal and Abajo Mountains also may be that low. The base of moderately saline water commonly is in the Permian Cutler Formation or the Pennsylvanian Honaker Trail Formation of the Hermosa Group, but locally may be as high stratigraphically as the Triassic (?) and Jurassic Navajo Sandstone north of the Abajo Mountains and in the Jurassic Morrison Formation south of the mountains.

  14. Geomorphology and failure history of the earthquake-induced Farmington Siding landslide complex, Davis County, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, M.; Harty, K.M. (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

    1993-04-01

    The Farmington Siding landslide complex covers an area of 19.5 km[sup 2] in central Davis County. First identified and mapped in the 1970s, the feature was classified by previous researchers as a liquefaction-induced lateral spread based on surface geomorphology and exposures on the landslide complex. This was the first landslide in Utah to be attributed to earthquake-induced liquefaction. Geomorphic and geologic evidence indicate that the Farmington Sliding landslide complex likely consists of liquefaction-induced landslides that failed by means of both flow failure and lateral spreading. The landslide complex is located in an area underlain primarily by fine-grained deposits of Pleistocene Lake Bonneville and Holocene Great Salt Lake. Geomorphic features of the landslide complex include main and minor scarps, hummocks, closed depressions, and transverse lineaments. The main scarp consists mostly of a series of arcuate scallops near the left flank of the landslide, but it is a relatively linear, single scarp near the right flank of the landslide. Hummocks and closed depressions are most common near the head region of the landslide complex. Failure of the Farmington Sliding landslide complex has occurred at least twice. The older, distal portion of the landslide complex is cut by the Gilbert shoreline of the Bonneville lake cycle, indicating that landsliding occurred more than 10,000 years ago. In the younger portion of the landslide complex, landsliding has disrupted the Gilbert shoreline. Radiocarbon age estimates from trenches on a hummock near the main scarp of the younger landslide indicate that slope failure occurred sometime between about 2,730 [+-] 370 cal. yr B.P. and 4,530 [+-] 300 cal. yr B.P., possibly during the penultimate or antepenultimate surface-faulting earthquake on the Weber segment of the Wasatch fault zone.

  15. Hydrology and simulation of ground-water flow in Kamas Valley, Summit County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, L.E.; Stolp, B.J.; Spangler, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    Kamas Valley, Utah, is located about 50 miles east of Salt Lake City and is undergoing residential development. The increasing number of wells and septic systems raised concerns of water managers and prompted this hydrologic study. About 350,000 acre-feet per year of surface water flows through Kamas Valley in the Weber River, Beaver Creek, and Provo River, which originate in the Uinta Mountains east of the study area. The ground-water system in this area consists of water in unconsolidated deposits and consolidated rock; water budgets indicate very little interaction between consolidated rock and unconsolidated deposits. Most recharge to consolidated rock occurs at higher altitudes in the mountains and discharges to streams and springs upgradient of Kamas Valley. About 38,000 acre-feet per year of water flows through the unconsolidated deposits in Kamas Valley. Most recharge is from irrigation and seepage from major streams; most discharge is to Beaver Creek in the middle part of the valley. Long-term water-level fluctuations range from about 3 to 17 feet. Seasonal fluctuations exceed 50 feet. Transmissivity varies over four orders of magnitude in both the unconsolidated deposits and consolidated rock and is typically 1,000 to 10,000 feet squared per day in unconsolidated deposits and 100 feet squared per day in consolidated rock as determined from specific capacity. Water samples collected from wells, streams, and springs had nitrate plus nitrite concentrations (as N) substantially less than 10 mg/L. Total and fecal coliform bacteria were detected in some surface-water samples and probably originate from livestock. Septic systems do not appear to be degrading water quality. A numerical ground-water flow model developed to test the conceptual understanding of the ground-water system adequately simulates water levels and flow in the unconsolidated deposits. Analyses of model fit and sensitivity were used to refine the conceptual and numerical models.

  16. Reconnaissance of the shallow-unconfined aquifer in Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, R.L.; Waddell, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    The shallow-unconfined aquifer in Salt Lake (Jordan) Valley, Utah, seldom is used for domestic or industrial purposes because it yields water slowly and is readily contaminated. The water in the aquifer, however, can flood basements and is a potential source of contamination to other water supplies. In about one-half of the valley, water in the shallow-unconfined aquifer is less than 10 feet below land surface. The general direction of flow in the shallow aquifer is toward the Jordan River. Water levels in the north part of the valley and along the Jordan River are highest in March or April and in the south part of the valley are highest in late summer. The smallest concentrations of dissolved solids in water from wells along the east side of the valley, and the greatest concentrations are in the northwest part of the valley near the Great Salt Lake. Large dissolved-solids concentrations are found near some landfills and tailings areas. Nitrate-nitrogen concentrations ranged from less than 0.1 to 86 milligrams per liter and nitrate-nitrogen concentrations from less than 0.02 to 0.85 milligram per liter. Some of the largest nitrate-nitrogen concentrations were found in water wells near animal pens. The greatest concentrations of trace elements generally came from wells near landfills and tailings area. The greatest measured concentration of cadmium was 200 microgram per liter, of mercury 0.1 microgram per liter, of lead 46 micrograms per liter, of iron 37,000 micrograms per liter and of arsenic 360 micrograms per liter. Synthetic organic chemicals were found in water from several wells. The greatest measured concentration of benzene was 400 micrograms per liter, of phenol 660 micrograms per liter, of 1,1 dichloroethane 20 micrograms per liter, of tichloroethylene 8 micrograms per liter , and of chloroethylene, 11 micrograms per liter. The greatest concentrations were in water from wells near landfills. (USGS)

  17. Thermally dried ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene for high mobility and high uniformity on a large area substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-01-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 degrees C without any "coffee stain". The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192 x 150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44 +/- 0.08 cm2.V-1.s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 degrees C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  18. Thermally Dried Ink-Jet Process for 6,13-Bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-Pentacene for High Mobility and High Uniformity on a Large Area Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Lee, Myung Won; Jeong, Seung Hyeon; Song, Chung Kun

    2012-05-01

    In this study we developed a simple ink-jet process for 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)-pentacene (TIPS-pentacene), which is known as a high-mobility soluble organic semiconductor, to achieve relatively high-mobility and high-uniformity performance for large-area applications. We analyzed the behavior of fluorescent particles in droplets and applied the results to determining a method of controlling the behavior of TIPS-pentacene molecules. The grain morphology of TIPS-pentacene varied depending on the temperature applied to the droplets during drying. We were able to obtain large and uniform grains at 46 °C without any “coffee stain”. The process was applied to a large-size organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) backplane for an electrophoretic display panel containing 192×150 pixels on a 6-in.-sized substrate. The average of mobilities of 36 OTFTs, which were taken from different locations of the backplane, was 0.44±0.08 cm2·V-1·s-1, with a small deviation of 20%, over a 6-in.-size area comprising 28,800 OTFTs. This process providing high mobility and high uniformity can be achieved by simply maintaining the whole area of the substrate at a specific temperature (46 °C in this case) during drying of the droplets.

  19. Quantification of BMPs Selection and Spatial Placement Impact on Water Quality Controlling Plans in Lower Bear River Watershed, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salha, A. A.; Stevens, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the watershed-management program in Box Elder County, Utah set by Utah Division of Water Quality (UDEQ) is to evaluate the effectiveness and spatial placement of the implemented best-management practices (BMP) for controlling nonpoint-source contamination at watershed scale. The need to evaluate the performance of BMPs would help future policy and program decisions making as desired end results. The environmental and costs benefits of BMPs in Lower Bear River watershed have seldom been measured beyond field experiments. Yet, implemented practices have rarely been evaluated at the watershed scale where the combined effects of variable soils, climatic conditions, topography and land use/covers and management conditions may significantly change anticipated results and reductions loads. Such evaluation requires distributed watershed models that are necessary for quantifying and reproducing the movement of water, sediments and nutrients. Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model is selected as a watershed level tool to identify contaminant nonpoint sources (critical zones) and areas of high pollution risks. Water quality concerns have been documented and are primarily attributed to high phosphorus and total suspended sediment concentrations caused by agricultural and farming practices (required load is 460 kg/day of total phosphorus based on 0.075 mg/l and an average of total suspended solids of 90 mg/l). Input data such as digital elevation model (DEM), land use/Land cover (LULC), soils, and climate data for 10 years (2000-2010) is utilized along with observed water quality at the watershed outlet (USGS) and some discrete monitoring points within the watershed. Statistical and spatial analysis of scenarios of management practices (BMP's) are not implemented (before implementation), during implementation, and after BMP's have been studied to determine whether water quality of the two main water bodies has improved as required by the LBMR watershed's TMDL

  20. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  1. Late Mississippian gastropods of the Chainman Shale, west-central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Mackenzie; Yochelson, Ellis L.

    1987-01-01

    The Chainman Shale of Mississippian (Osagean to late Chesterian) age, well exposed in the Confusion Range of western Utah, has yielded a profusion of fossils during investigations conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the past 30 years. Conspicuous among these fossils are gastropods, which range in age from latest Meramecian to late Chesterian. In west-central Utah, not far from the State boundary, the Chainman outcrop belt stretches from Granite Mountain south to the northern part of the Needle Range, a distance of69 miles (110 km). The Chainman thickens from north to south; the section at Granite Mountain is 1,315 feet (401 m) thick and that at Jensen Wash in the Burbank Hills, 2,203 feet (671 m). The rocks of the Chainman Shale record a general though irregular shallowing of the area from moderate depths of 330 feet (100 m) or so to quite shallow depths of perhaps locally little more than 3-6 feet (1-2 m). Most of the gastropods occur with ammonoids in a facies of shale or shale containing phosphatic limestone concretions, In this lutaceous facies, Glabrocingulum is predominant and Lunulazona and Retispira are common; these genera are represented by a succession of species. A thick limestone unit is present in some areas in the upper part of the formation, particularly in the vicinity of Skunk Spring, where it is 318 feet (97 m) thick. This limestone unit represents a calcareous shoal facies having an entirely different gastropod fauna, characterized by Catazona and species of Naticopsis. The Chainman Shale could be easily zoned by gastropods, but we are not proposing such azonation. A framework of ammonoid and foraminiferal zones already is available, and we prefer to regard the gastropod assemblages as part of this framework. The assemblages are confined to the major ammonoid and foraminiferal zones, and only three of the gastropod species seem to range across major zonal boundaries. These species are Bellerophon (Bellerophon vespertinus Gordon and

  2. Bibliography of U.S. Geological Survey water-resources reports for Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Ellen E.; Dragos, Stefanie L.

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography contains a complete listing of reports prepared by personnel of the U.S. Geological Survey from 1886 through December 31, 1993, that discuss the water resources of Utah. The reports were prepared primarily by personnel of the Water Resources Division, Utah District, in cooperation with State, other Federal, and local agencies. Several reports were prepared as a part of studies directly funded by the U.S. Geological Survey, and several were prepared by contractors for the U.S. Geological Survey.The bibliography is divided into three major parts: (1) publications of the U.S. Geological Survey; (2) publications prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with and published by agencies of the State of Utah; and (3) reports printed in other publications reports prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey but published by other agencies or by professional organizations. Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey still in print may be purchased from the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Science Information Center, Open-File Reports Section, Box 25286, MS 517, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225. Publications that are out of print at the time of this compilation are marked with an asterisk (*). Except for water-supply papers, most publications that are out of print and unavailable for purchase may be examined at the U.S. Geological Survey Earth Science Information Center, 2222 West 2300 South, 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, Utah 84119.Reports published by the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Divisions of Water Rights and Water Resources, are available on request from these agencies or from the U.S. Geological Survey, Water Resources Division, Room 1016 Administration Building, 1745 West 1700 South, Salt Lake City, Utah 84104. Water-Resources Bulletins of the Utah Geological Survey may be purchased from that agency at 2363 Foothill Drive, Salt Lake City, Utah 84109-1491.Inquiries as to the availability of reports listed as "reports printed in

  3. MX Siting Investigation. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-23

    DIVIDE DISTRICT WITH MONTEZUMA VAL LEY IN THE CENTER BACKGROUND. B - VIEW W - OLD CHERRY CREEK MILL WITH NEW HEAP LEACH PADS UNDER CONSTRUCTION MX...LEFT), AND OLD GOLD PITS (LOWER-CENTER). B - VIEWW CYPRUS VINE’S LEACH PADS AND MILL FACILITIES IN BIG SMOKY VALLEY. ! MX SITING INVESTIGATION ! ErUC...potential is also assigned to most of the Pinto District where Diamond Silverado, Inc. is mining silver and has a heap leach mill operating (Photograph 11B

  4. 75 FR 70024 - Notice of Expansion of the Lisbon Valley Known Potash Leasing Area, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... extract deep potash deposits using dissolution. Based on this new technology, the BLM approved new mineral... available drilling information to determine that the Lisbon Valley KPLA should be expanded to include deep... the following Web site: http://www.blm.gov/ut/st/en/prog/more/Land_Records.html . The lands included...

  5. Final Environmental Impact Statement for Proposed White Elk Military Operations Area, Hill Air Force Base, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    k-e. 6 Mr. Leianke, you have as soft a voice as I do, so 7 if you would please keep in mind the court reporter when...of a soft voice and -- 22 THE CROWD: Okay. I can move up. 23 COL. FRANCIS: Because we have so few...the total event. The period of time during which the sound is heard is also significant. The Sound Exposure Level (abbreviated SEL or LAE for A

  6. Mineral Resources Survey, Seven Additional Valleys, Nevada/Utah Siting Area. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-23

    Ag X T- Docite, andesite (sil alunitized) aied Hills None None X T - Andesite nham a Garside, 1979, Hose 81 Others, 1976, Humphrey , 1960, Kleinhampl...PARAI I fL CuvrV~ ’’r ;l a. so * ’gAl Is, 1Adm Ioo T E rr-g ’ ’ti’ m a, s It*~--~-- Dori Oi ’ Q Ie v~dtLAI i Lt 7 NN ’I’.tl u t P Ol .e .... r& ftu n L

  7. Water-quality data for the Flaming Gorge Reservoir area, Utah and Wyoming, 1969-72

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolke, E.L.; Waddell, K.M.

    1972-01-01

    This report presents the basic data that were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey during a study of the chemical quality of water in Flaming Gorge Reservoir. An interpretive report will follow. The basic data were collected from the reservoir during six sampling runs between October 1970 and September 1972. The reservoir was sampled for chemical analyses at 17 sites. Chemical and physical data were measured in situ at 34 sites. The sites are shown in figure 1 and the data are listed in tables 1 and 3-6.

  8. Raptor Necropsy Data from the Moon Lake Electric Company Service Area (Utah and Colorado), 2001 - 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The data are the results of clinical necropsies of raptors and ravens done in cooperation with pathologists at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Diagnostics...

  9. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP, SEVIER COUNTY, UTAH (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  10. Emissions from Produced Water Treatment Ponds, Uintah Basin, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, M. L.; Lyman, S. N.; Tran, H.; O'Neil, T.; Anderson, R.

    2015-12-01

    An aqueous phase, known as "produced water," usually accompanies the hydrocarbon fluid phases that are extracted from Earth's crust during oil and natural gas extraction. Produced water contains dissolved and suspended organics and other contaminants and hence cannot be discharged directly into the hydrosphere. One common disposal method is to discharge produced water into open-pit evaporation ponds. Spent hydraulic fracturing fluids are also often discharged into the same ponds. It is obvious to anyone with a healthy olfactory system that such ponds emit volatile organics to the atmosphere, but very little work has been done to characterize such emissions. Because oil, gas, and water phases are often in contact in geologic formations, we can expect that more highly soluble compounds (e.g., salts, alcohols, carbonyls, carboxyls, BTEX, etc.) partition preferentially into produced water. However, as the water in the ponds age, many physical, chemical, and biological processes alter the composition of the water, and therefore the composition and strength of volatile organic emissions. For example, some ponds are aerated to hasten evaporation, which also promotes oxidation of organics dissolved in the water. Some ponds are treated with microbes to promote bio-oxidation. In other words, emissions from ponds are expected to be a complex function of the composition of the water as it first enters the pond, and also of the age of the water and of its treatment history. We have conducted many measurements of emissions from produced water ponds in the Uintah Basin of eastern Utah, both by flux chamber and by evacuated canister sampling with inverse modeling. These measurements include fluxes of CO2, CH4, methanol, and many other volatile organic gases. We have also measured chemical compositions and microbial content of water in the ponds. Results of these measurements will be reported.

  11. Concentration, ozone formation potential and source analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a thermal power station centralized area: A study in Shuozhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yulong; Peng, Lin; Li, Rumei; Li, Yinghui; Li, Lijuan; Bai, Huiling

    2017-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from two sampling sites (HB and XB) in a power station centralized area, in Shuozhou city, China, were sampled by stainless steel canisters and measured by gas chromatography-mass selective detection/flame ionization detection (GC-MSD/FID) in the spring and autumn of 2014. The concentration of VOCs was higher in the autumn (HB, 96.87 μg/m3; XB, 58.94 μg/m3) than in the spring (HB, 41.49 μg/m3; XB, 43.46 μg/m3), as lower wind speed in the autumn could lead to pollutant accumulation, especially at HB, which is a new urban area surrounded by residential areas and a transportation hub. Alkanes were the dominant group at both HB and XB in both sampling periods, but the contribution of aromatic pollutants at HB in the autumn was much higher than that of the other alkanes (11.16-19.55%). Compared to other cities, BTEX pollution in Shuozhou was among the lowest levels in the world. Because of the high levels of aromatic pollutants, the ozone formation potential increased significantly at HB in the autumn. Using the ratio analyses to identify the age of the air masses and analyze the sources, the results showed that the atmospheric VOCs at XB were strongly influenced by the remote sources of coal combustion, while at HB in the spring and autumn were affected by the remote sources of coal combustion and local sources of vehicle emission, respectively. Source analysis conducted using the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model at Shuozhou showed that coal combustion and vehicle emissions made the two largest contributions (29.98% and 21.25%, respectively) to atmospheric VOCs. With further economic restructuring, the influence of vehicle emissions on the air quality should become more significant, indicating that controlling vehicle emissions is key to reducing the air pollution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Feasibility study of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade in respect to control rod system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutic, Avdo

    The objectives of this thesis are twofold: to determine the highest achievable power levels of the current University of Utah TRIG Reactor (UUTR) core configuration with the existing three control rods, and to design the core for higher reactor power by optimizing the control rod worth. For the current core configuration, the maximum reactor power, eigenvalue keff, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity have been measured and calculated. These calculated estimates resulted from thermal power calibrations, and the control rod worth measurements at various power levels. The results were then used as a benchmark to verify the MCNP5 core simulations for the current core and then to design a core for higher reactor power. This study showed that the maximum achievable power with the current core configuration and control rod system is 150kW, which is 50kW higher than the licensed power of the UUTR. The maximum achievable UUTR core power with the existing fuel is determined by optimizing the core configuration and control rod worth, showing that a power upgrade of 500 kW is achievable. However, it requires a new control rod system consisting of a total of four control rods. The cost of such an upgrade is $115,000.

  13. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  14. Weather and eared grebe winter migration near the Great Salt Lake, Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Augusta A; Laird, Neil F

    2017-10-18

    This study provides insight from the use of weather radar observations to understand the characteristics of the eared grebe migration near the Great Salt Lake (GSL) and provides unique information on weather conditions connected to these migration events. Doppler weather radar measurements from the Salt Lake City, Utah WSR-88D radar site (KMTX), along with meteorological surface and rawinsonde data, were used to identify and examine 281 eared grebe migration events across 15 winters from 1997/1998 through 2011/2012. An average of about 19 migration events occurred each winter with considerable interannual variability, as well as large variance in the spatial area and number of birds departing the GSL during each event. The migration events typically occurred during clear sky conditions in the presence of surface high pressure and colder than average surface temperatures. Migration events began 55 min after sunset, on average across the winter seasons, and in one case we demonstrate that an extended, nonstop flight was initiated of the departing eared grebes to northern Mexico. Eared grebes leaving the GSL largely flew above the freezing level with a mean northerly tailwind at flight altitude of 3.1 m s -1 and a westerly, cross-flight wind of 5.0 m s -1 while having an average flight speed at cruising altitude of 16.9 m s -1 , or 61 km h -1 . In addition to determining the variability of meteorological conditions during migration events across the 15 winters, atmospheric conditions during the largest migration event observed are presented and discussed.

  15. Weather and eared grebe winter migration near the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Augusta A.; Laird, Neil F.

    2017-10-01

    This study provides insight from the use of weather radar observations to understand the characteristics of the eared grebe migration near the Great Salt Lake (GSL) and provides unique information on weather conditions connected to these migration events. Doppler weather radar measurements from the Salt Lake City, Utah WSR-88D radar site (KMTX), along with meteorological surface and rawinsonde data, were used to identify and examine 281 eared grebe migration events across 15 winters from 1997/1998 through 2011/2012. An average of about 19 migration events occurred each winter with considerable interannual variability, as well as large variance in the spatial area and number of birds departing the GSL during each event. The migration events typically occurred during clear sky conditions in the presence of surface high pressure and colder than average surface temperatures. Migration events began 55 min after sunset, on average across the winter seasons, and in one case we demonstrate that an extended, nonstop flight was initiated of the departing eared grebes to northern Mexico. Eared grebes leaving the GSL largely flew above the freezing level with a mean northerly tailwind at flight altitude of 3.1 m s-1 and a westerly, cross-flight wind of 5.0 m s-1 while having an average flight speed at cruising altitude of 16.9 m s-1, or 61 km h-1. In addition to determining the variability of meteorological conditions during migration events across the 15 winters, atmospheric conditions during the largest migration event observed are presented and discussed.

  16. Multiple Eruptive Phases and Deposits of a Monogenetic Volcano: Tabernacle Hill Volcano, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, A.; Connor, C. B.

    2007-12-01

    Tabernacle Hill volcano, located near the eastern edge of North America's great basin, is one of a group of monogenetic small-volume (0.47 km3) basaltic volcanoes forming a long-lived (~ 1 Ma) north-south trending alignment in Utah's Black Rock Desert. Initial phreatomagmatic eruptions at Tabernacle Hill are reported to have begun 14,320 ± 90 years ago. The initial eruptive phase produced a tuff cone approximately 80 m high (1,511 m a.s.l.) and 1.5 km in diameter with distinct bedding layers. Recent mapping and sampling of Tabernacle Hill's lava and tuff cone deposits has been aimed at better constraining the sequence of events, physical volcanology, rheology, and geochemistry of this eruption. Blocks located on the rim of the tuff cone of mid-crustal and near-surface origin were mapped and analyzed to yield preliminary minimum muzzle velocities of 70-100 m/s. After the initial phreatomagmatic explosions, the eruption style transitioned to a more effusive phase that partially filled the tuff cone with a semi-steady state lava lake 200 m wide and 15 m deep. Eventually, the tuff cone was breached by the impinging lava resulting in large portions of the cone rafting on top of the lava flows away from the vent. Eruption onto the Lake Bonneville lake bed allowed the Tabernacle Hill lava flows to flow radially from the tuff cone and cover an area of 18.1 km2, producing a very uniform high aspect ratio (100:1) flow field. Tabernacle Hill lava flows are pâhoehoe flows with many large phenocrysts of olivine and plagioclase (>1 cm) and have an average thickness of 26.3 m. Subsequent eruptive phases cycled several times between effusive and explosive, producing scoria cones and more lava flows, culminating in an almost complete drainage of the lava lake through large lava tubes and drainback.

  17. Geology of the north end of the Salt Valley Anticline, Grand County, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gard, Leonard Meade

    1976-01-01

    This report describes the geology and hydrology of a portion of the Salt Valley anticline lying north of Moab, Utah, that is being studied as a potential site for underground storage of nuclear waste in salt. Selection of this area was based on recommendations made in an earlier appraisal of the potential of Paradox basin salt deposits for such use. Part of sec. 5, T. 23 S., R. 20 E. has been selected as a site for subsurface investigation as a potential repository for radioactive waste. This site has easy access to transportation, is on public land, is isolated from human habitation, is not visible from Arches National Park, and the salt body lies within about 800 feet (244 m) of the surface. Further exploration should include investigation of possible ground water in the caprock and physical exploration of the salt body to identify a thick bed of salt for use as a storage zone that can be isolated from the shaly interbeds that possibly contain quantities of hydrocarbons. Salt Valley anticline, a northwest-trending diapiric structure, consists of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks arched over a thick core of salt of the Paradox Member of the Middle Pennsylvanian Hermosa Formation. Salt began to migrate to form and/or develop this structure shortly after it was deposited, probably in response to faulting. This migration caused upwelling of the salt creating a linear positive area. This positive area, in turn, caused increased deposition of sediments in adjacent areas which further enhanced salt migration. Not until late Jurassic time had flowage of the salt slowed sufficiently to allow sediments of the Morrison and younger formations to be deposited across the salt welt. A thick cap of insoluble residue was formed on top of the salt diapir as a result of salt dissolution through time. The crest of the anticline is breached; it collapsed in two stages during the Tertiary Period. The first stage was graben collapse during the early Tertiary; the second stage occurred after

  18. Hydrosalinity studies of the Virgin River, Dixie Hot Springs, and Littlefield Springs, Utah, Arizona, and Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.; Gerner, Steven J.; Thiros, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    in the Virgin River Gorge containing known fault zones accounted for about 48 percent of this total seepage loss. An additional seepage loss of 6.7 ft3/s was calculated for the reach of the Virgin River between Bloomington, Utah, and the Utah/Arizona State line. This loss in flow is small compared to total flow in the river and is comparable to the rated error in streamflow measurements in this reach; consequently, it should be used with caution. Littlefield Springs were studied to determine the fraction of its discharge that originates as upstream seepage from the Virgin River and residence time of this water in the subsurface. Geochemical and environmental tracer data from groundwater and surface-water sites in the Virgin River Gorge area suggest that discharge from Littlefield Springs is a mixture of modern (post-1950s) seepage from the Virgin River upstream of the springs and older groundwater from a regional carbonate aquifer. Concentrations of the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) CFC-12 and CFC-113, chloride/fluoride and chloride/bromide ratios, and the stable isotope deuterium indicate that water discharging from Littlefield Springs is about 60 percent seepage from the Virgin River and about 40 percent discharge from the regional carbonate aquifer. The river seepage component was determined to have an average subsurface traveltime of about 26 ±1.6 years before discharging at Littlefield Springs. Radiocarbon data for Littlefield Springs suggest groundwater ages from 1,000 to 9,000 years. Because these are mixed waters, the component of discharge from the carbonate aquifer is likely much older than the groundwater ages suggested by the Littlefield Springs samples. If the dissolved-solids load from Dixie Hot Springs to the Virgin River were reduced, the irrigation water subsequently applied to agricultural fields in the St. George and Washington areas, which originates as water from the Virgin River downstream of Dixie Hot Springs, would have a lower dissolved

  19. Impacts of projected mid-century temperatures on thermal regimes for select specialty and fieldcrops common to the southwestern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, E.; Lopez-Brody, N.; Dialesandro, J.; Steele, C. M.; Rango, A.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of projected temperature increases in agricultural ecosystems are complex, varyingby region, cropping system, crop growth stage and humidity. We analyze the impacts of mid-century temperature increases on crops grown in five southwestern states: Arizona, California,New Mexico, Nevada and Utah. Here we present a spatial impact assessment of commonsouthwestern specialty (grapes, almonds and tomatoes) and field (alfalfa, cotton and corn)crops. This analysis includes three main components: development of empirical temperaturethresholds for each crop, classification of predicted future climate conditions according to thesethresholds, and mapping the probable impacts of these climatic changes on each crop. We use30m spatial resolution 2012 crop distribution and seasonal minimum and maximumtemperature normals (1970 to 2000) to define the current thermal envelopes for each crop.These represent the temperature range for each season where 95% of each crop is presentlygrown. Seasonal period change analysis of mid-century temperatures changes downscaled from20 CMIP5 models (RCP8.5) estimate future temperatures. Change detection maps representareas predicted to become more or less suitable, or remain unchanged. Based upon mid-centurytemperature changes, total regional suitable area declined for all crops except cotton, whichincreased by 20%. For each crop there are locations which change to and from optimal thermalenvelope conditions. More than 80% of the acres currently growing tomatoes and almonds willshift outside the present 95% thermal range. Fewer acres currently growing alfalfa (14%) andcotton (20%) will shift outside the present 95% thermal range by midcentury. Crops outsidepresent thermal envelopes by midcentury may adapt, possibly aided by adaptation technologiessuch as misters or shade structures, to the new temperature regime or growers may elect togrow alternate crops better suited to future thermal envelopes.

  20. 77 FR 21512 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Utah; Maintenance Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-10

    ...; Maintenance Plan for the 1-Hour Ozone Standard for Salt Lake and Davis Counties AGENCY: Environmental.... These revisions updated the State of Utah's maintenance plan for the 1-hour ozone standard for Salt Lake... concerning such maintenance plan. This action is being taken under section 110 of the Clean Air Act (CAA...

  1. 77 FR 35873 - Approval, Disapproval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plan; Utah; Maintenance Plan...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ...; Maintenance Plan for the 1-Hour Ozone Standard for Salt Lake and Davis Counties AGENCY: Environmental... revisions updated the State of Utah's maintenance plan for the 1-hour ozone standard for Salt Lake County... concerning such maintenance plan. This action is being taken under section 110 of the Clean Air Act (CAA...

  2. Differential and correlation analyses of microarray gene expression data in the CEPH Utah families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jinghua; Li, Shuxia

    2008-01-01

    The widespread microarray technology capable of analyzing global gene expression at the level of transcription is expanding its application not only in medicine but also in studies on basic biology. This paper presents our analysis on microarray gene expression data in the CEPH Utah families...

  3. Repeats, returns, and estimated flight ranges of neotropical migratory birds in Utah riparian habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan A. Roberts; Jimmie R. Parrish; Frank P. Howe

    2005-01-01

    We present data on capture and recapture of neotropical migrants at constant-effort mist net sampling locations in Utah between 1994 and 2002. Data were collected in accordance with MAPS (Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship) protocols. Since 1994, a total of 23,789 birds have been captured (i.e., total captures include new captures, recaptures, and unbanded...

  4. 76 FR 66080 - Notice of Proposed Class II Reinstatement of Terminated Oil and Gas Lease, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... above individual during normal business hours. FIRS is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to leave a message or question with the above individual. You will receive a reply during normal business..., or letter to: Bureau of Land Management, Utah State Office, Attn: Kent Hoffman, P.O. Box 45155, Salt...

  5. Plant recruitment and soil microbial characteristics of rehabilitation seedings following wildfire in northern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megan M. Taylor; Ann L. Hild; Nancy L. Shaw; Urszula Norton; Timothy R. Collier

    2014-01-01

    One goal of post-fire native species seeding is to increase plant community resistance to exotic weed invasions, yet few studies address the impacts of seeding on exotic annual establishment and persistence. In 2010 and 2011, we investigated the influence of seedings on exotic annuals and the underlying microbial communities. The wildfire site in northern Utah was...

  6. The Legacy of Utah's Country Schools, 1847-1896. Country School Legacy: Humanities on the Frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkinshaw, Scott B.

    This section of the Country School Legacy: Humanities on the Frontier Project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and sponsored by the Mountain Plains Library Association, traces the development of schools in Utah during the Territorial Period (1847-1896). Following a discussion of the influence of the Church of Jesus Christ of…

  7. Fire ecology and management of the major ecosystems of southern Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon M. Hood; Melanie Miller

    2007-01-01

    This document provides managers with a literature synthesis of the historical conditions, current conditions, fire regime condition classes (FRCC), and recommended treatments for the major ecosystems in southern Utah. Sections are by ecosystems and include: 1) coniferous forests (ponderosa pine, mixed conifer, and Engelmann spruce-subalpine fir), 2) aspen, 3) pinyon-...

  8. Job Satisfaction of Faculty and Staff at the College of Eastern Utah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegmiller, Jesse F.

    Faculty and staff at the College of Eastern Utah were surveyed in order to ascertain the level of job satisfaction of the college's personnel. Over 90% of the faculty completed a 94-item job satisfaction questionnaire which was based on Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene theory of motivation. College staff completed a slightly modified form of the…

  9. 78 FR 2434 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Natural History Museum of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT..., Salt Lake City, UT 84108, telephone (801) 581-3876. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in..., Salt Lake City, UT 84108, telephone (801) 581-3876, before February 11, 2013. Repatriation of the human...

  10. Simulation of quaking aspen potential fire behavior in Northern Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Justin DeRose; A. Joshua Leffler

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of aspen fire ecology in western North America includes the paradoxical characterization that aspen-dominated stands, although often regenerated following fire, are “fire-proof”. We tested this idea by predicting potential fire behavior across a gradient of aspen dominance in northern Utah using the Forest Vegetation Simulator and the Fire and...

  11. Do You Really Want to Know? Elementary Music Programs and Potential in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Loretta Niebur

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two articles reporting the results of a study by the author regarding the status of elementary music education in the state of Utah. This article focuses on how elementary music programs are structured (regular instruction with a music specialist, truncated programs, delegated programs, no formal music instruction, no music…

  12. 75 FR 64741 - Notice of Utah's Resource Advisory Council (RAC) Subcommittee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ..., 2010, from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m., at the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF) office, second... support for the project from many conservation organizations, those leading the effort have not yet... Organizations (NGO's) that have been exposed to the project; identify others that should be involved and methods...

  13. Second Opinions on the Reading First Initiative: The View from Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Janice A.; Hosp, John L.; Nelson, Kristin L.; Hosp, Michelle K.

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the five years of implementation of the first cohort of schools participating in Utah's Reading First Initiative. Fifteen schools across six districts comprised this cohort. Performance is compared to the performance of a cohort of matched comparison schools as well as the average state performance on the Utah…

  14. Chemical quality of ground water in Salt Lake Valley, Utah, 1969-85

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, K.M.; Seiler, R.L.; Solomon, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    During 1979-84, 35 wells completed in the principal aquifer in the Salt Lake Valley, Utah, that had been sampled during 1962-67 were resampled to determine if water-quality changes had occurred. The dissolved-solids concentration of the water from 13 of the wells has increased by more than 10 percent since 1962-67.

  15. Utah lotus: North American legume for rangeland revegetation in southern Great Basin and Colorado Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah lotus (Lotus utahensis Ottley) is a North American leguminous forb that may hold promise for rangeland revegetation in the western USA for diversifying planting mixtures, attracting pollinators, providing high quality forage, and expanding habitats for insects needed by sage grouse chicks. We ...

  16. 77 FR 5617 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Highway in Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... proposed transportation improvement project (Logan 200 East, minor arterial project) in Logan, Cache County... approvals for the following highway project in the State of Utah: The Logan 200 East Minor Arterial Project...; E.O. 12898, Federal Actions to address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low Income...

  17. Assessment and Evaluation of the Utah Master Naturalist Program: Implications for Targeting Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larese-Casanova, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The Utah Master Naturalist Program trains citizens who provide education, outreach, and service to promote citizen stewardship of natural resources within their communities. In 2007-2008, the Watersheds module of the program was evaluated for program success, and participant knowledge was assessed. Assessment and evaluation results indicated that…

  18. Discriminant of validity the Wender Utah rating scale in Iranian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhzadi, Farideh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Salmanian, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is the normalization of the Wender Utah rating scale which is used to detect adults with Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Available sampling method was used to choose 400 parents of children (200 parents of children with ADHD as compared to 200 parents of normal children). Wender Utah rating scale, which has been designed to diagnose ADHD in adults, is filled out by each of the parents to most accurately diagnose of ADHD in parents. Wender Utah rating scale was divided into 6 sub scales which consist of dysthymia, oppositional defiant disorder; school work problems, conduct disorder, anxiety, and ADHD were analyzed with exploratory factor analysis method. The value of (Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin) KMO was 86.5% for dysthymia, 86.9% for oppositional defiant disorder, 77.5% for school related problems, 90.9% for conduct disorder, 79.6% for anxiety and 93.5% for Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, also the chi square value based on Bartlett's Test was 2242.947 for dysthymia, 2239.112 for oppositional defiant disorder, 1221.917 for school work problems, 5031.511 for conduct, 1421.1 for anxiety, and 7644.122 for ADHD. Since mentioned values were larger than the chi square critical values (PWender Utah rating scale can be appropriately used for predicting dysthymia, oppositional defiant disorder, school work problems, conduct disorder, anxiety, in adults with ADHD.

  19. An Examination of the Structure and Construct Validity of the Wender Utah Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Kasey; Watson, David

    2016-01-01

    The Wender Utah Rating Scale (Ward, Wender, & Reimherr, 1993 ) has been widely used in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) research to assess childhood symptoms retrospectively, but little research has examined its factor structure and specificity in predicting ADHD versus other psychopathology. Consequently, this study had 2 goals: (a) to examine the Wender Utah Rating Scale's structure, and (b) to explicate the construct validity of this measure by relating factors from our structural analyses to other ADHD, psychopathology, and personality measures. Structural analyses in an adult community sample (N = 294) yielded a 3-factor structure of aggression (e.g., angry), internalizing distress (e.g., depressed), and academic difficulties (e.g., underachiever). Correlational and regression analyses indicated that these factors failed to display specificity in their associations with ADHD versus other psychopathology. Aggression and internalizing distress associated most strongly with indicators of externalizing (e.g., ill temper, manipulativeness) and internalizing psychopathology (e.g., depression, anxiety), respectively. Academic difficulties associated most strongly with ADHD symptoms, but these relations were relatively weak. Taken together, these findings raise concerns about the Wender Utah Rating Scale's construct validity, although additional longitudinal research is needed to clarify to what extent the Wender Utah Rating Scale validly assesses childhood ADHD symptoms.

  20. The Wender Utah Rating Scale: Adult ADHD Diagnostic Tool or Personality Index?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, B.D.; Pella, Russell D.; Singh, Ashvind N.; Jones, Glenn N.; Gouvier, Wm. Drew

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) is used to retroactively assess ADHD symptoms. This study sought to determine whether the WURS actually functions as an index of dysfunctional personality traits. Method: Five hundred twenty-two adult participants completed the WURS and at least one of the following measures: Wechsler Adult…