WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal anomalies observed

  1. Thermal Infrared Anomalies of Several Strong Earthquakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congxin Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1 There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of “time-frequency relative power spectrum.” (2 There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3 Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4 Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  2. Thermal infrared anomalies of several strong earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Congxin; Zhang, Yuansheng; Guo, Xiao; Hui, Shaoxing; Qin, Manzhong; Zhang, Ying

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method to extract the useful anomaly information. Based on the analyses of 8 earthquakes, we got the results as follows. (1) There are significant thermal radiation anomalies before and after earthquakes for all cases. The overall performance of anomalies includes two main stages: expanding first and narrowing later. We easily extracted and identified such seismic anomalies by method of "time-frequency relative power spectrum." (2) There exist evident and different characteristic periods and magnitudes of thermal abnormal radiation for each case. (3) Thermal radiation anomalies are closely related to the geological structure. (4) Thermal radiation has obvious characteristics in abnormal duration, range, and morphology. In summary, we should be sure that earthquake thermal infrared anomalies as useful earthquake precursor can be used in earthquake prediction and forecasting.

  3. Thermal Infrared Anomalies of Several Strong Earthquakes

    OpenAIRE

    Congxin Wei; Yuansheng Zhang; Xiao Guo; Shaoxing Hui; Manzhong Qin; Ying Zhang

    2013-01-01

    In the history of earthquake thermal infrared research, it is undeniable that before and after strong earthquakes there are significant thermal infrared anomalies which have been interpreted as preseismic precursor in earthquake prediction and forecasting. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of thermal radiation observed before and after the 8 great earthquakes with magnitude up to Ms7.0 by using the satellite infrared remote sensing information. We used new types of data and method...

  4. CTS TEP thermal anomalies: Heat pipe system performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, B. D.

    1977-01-01

    A part of the investigation is summarized of the thermal anomalies of the transmitter experiment package (TEP) on the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) which were observed on four occasions in 1977. Specifically, the possible failure modes of the variable conductance heat pipe system (VCHPS) used for principal thermal control of the high-power traveling wave tube in the TEP are considered. Further, the investigation examines how those malfunctions may have given rise to the TEP thermal anomalies. Using CTS flight data information, ground test results, analysis conclusions, and other relevant information, the investigation concentrated on artery depriming as the most likely VCHPS failure mode. Included in the study as possible depriming mechanisms were freezing of the working fluid, Marangoni flow, and gas evolution within the arteries. The report concludes that while depriming of the heat pipe arteries is consistent with the bulk of the observed data, the factors which cause the arteries to deprime have yet to be identified.

  5. Thermal Radiation Anomalies Associated with Major Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Pulinets, Sergey; Kafatos, Menas C.; Taylor, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Recent developments of remote sensing methods for Earth satellite data analysis contribute to our understanding of earthquake related thermal anomalies. It was realized that the thermal heat fluxes over areas of earthquake preparation is a result of air ionization by radon (and other gases) and consequent water vapor condensation on newly formed ions. Latent heat (LH) is released as a result of this process and leads to the formation of local thermal radiation anomalies (TRA) known as OLR (outgoing Longwave radiation, Ouzounov et al, 2007). We compare the LH energy, obtained by integrating surface latent heat flux (SLHF) over the area and time with released energies associated with these events. Extended studies of the TRA using the data from the most recent major earthquakes allowed establishing the main morphological features. It was also established that the TRA are the part of more complex chain of the short-term pre-earthquake generation, which is explained within the framework of a lithosphere-atmosphere coupling processes.

  6. TERRA Battery Thermal Control Anomaly - Simulation and Corrective Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Eric W.

    2010-01-01

    The TERRA spacecraft was launched in December 1999 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, becoming the flagship of NASA's Earth Observing System program to gather data on how the planet's processes create climate. Originally planned as a 5 year mission, it still provides valuable science data after nearly 10 years on orbit. On October 13th, 2009 at 16:23z following a routine inclination maneuver, TERRA experienced a battery cell failure and a simultaneous failure of several battery heater control circuits used to maintain cell temperatures and gradients within the battery. With several cells nearing the minimum survival temperature, preventing the electrolyte from freezing was the first priority. After several reset attempts and power cycling of the control electronics failed to reestablish control authority on the primary side of the controller, it was switched to the redundant side, but anomalous performance again prevented full heater control of the battery cells. As the investigation into the cause of the anomaly and corrective action continued, a battery thermal model was developed to be used in determining the control ability remaining and to simulate and assess corrective actions. Although no thermal model or detailed reference data of the battery was available, sufficient information was found to allow a simplified model to be constructed, correlated against pre-anomaly telemetry, and used to simulate the thermal behavior at several points after the anomaly. It was then used to simulate subsequent corrective actions to assess their impact on cell temperatures. This paper describes the rapid development of this thermal model, including correlation to flight data before and after the anomaly., along with a comparative assessment of the analysis results used to interpret the telemetry to determine the extent of damage to the thermal control hardware, with near-term corrective actions and long-term operations plan to overcome the anomaly.

  7. Thermal anomaly of Soultz-sous-Forets. [France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, A.; Menjoz, A.; Schwoerer, P.

    1984-09-01

    In the northern part of the Alsace region, to the north-east of Haguenau, the thermal anomaly of Soultz-sous-Forets presents itself as a particularly intense local paroxysm, increasing of 4.5/sup 0/C/100 m the geothermal gradient value, which is already very high in this region (6/sup 0/C/100 m). Recently, the Institut mixte de recherches geothermiques, in collaboration with the Service geologique regional d'Alsace, took up again the geological and thermal data of about 60 drillings having reached at least the Muschelkalk top or having approached it very closely in the whole region. The real origin of this anomaly is unknown until now. Yet various hypotheses were put forward, among which is water circulation. The latter has been selected here. As a low global upward hydraulic yield is sufficient to develop the anomaly observed, a first quantitative description of the system was realized, with the hypothesis of geothermal circulation between faults at the basement top. As a conclusion, it is proposed to drill a determined location, and to realize various research works, thus permitting to derive the real origins of the thermal anomaly.

  8. Occurrence and Detectability of Thermal Anomalies on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Christensen, Philip R.; Spencer, John R.; Abramov, Oleg; Howett, Carly; Mellon, Michael; Nimmo, Francis; Piqueux, Sylvain; Rathbun, Julie A.

    2017-10-01

    Endogenic activity is likely on Europa, given its young surface age of and ongoing tidal heating by Jupiter. Temperature is a fundamental signature of activity, as witnessed on Enceladus, where plumes emanate from vents with strongly elevated temperatures. Recent observations suggest the presence of similar water plumes at Europa. Even if plumes are uncommon, resurfacing may produce elevated surface temperatures, perhaps due to near-surface liquid water. Detecting endogenic activity on Europa is one of the primary mission objectives of NASA’s planned Europa Clipper flyby mission.Here, we use a probabilistic model to assess the likelihood of detectable thermal anomalies on the surface of Europa. The Europa Thermal Emission Imaging System (E-THEMIS) investigation is designed to characterize Europa’s thermal behavior and identify any thermal anomalies due to recent or ongoing activity. We define “detectability” on the basis of expected E-THEMIS measurements, which include multi-spectral infrared emission, both day and night.Thermal anomalies on Europa may take a variety of forms, depending on the resurfacing style, frequency, and duration of events: 1) subsurface melting due to hot spots, 2) shear heating on faults, and 3) eruptions of liquid water or warm ice on the surface. We use numerical and analytical models to estimate temperatures for these features. Once activity ceases, lifetimes of thermal anomalies are estimated to be 100 - 1000 yr. On average, Europa’s 10 - 100 Myr surface age implies a resurfacing rate of ~3 - 30 km2/yr. The typical size of resurfacing features determines their frequency of occurrence. For example, if ~100 km2 chaos features dominate recent resurfacing, we expect one event every few years to decades. Smaller features, such as double-ridges, may be active much more frequently. We model each feature type as a statistically independent event, with probabilities weighted by their observed coverage of Europa’s surface. Our results

  9. Multivariate anomaly detection for Earth observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flach, Milan; Gans, Fabian; Brenning, Alexander; Denzler, Joachim; Reichstein, Markus; Rodner, Erik; Bathiany, Sebastian; Bodesheim, Paul; Guanche, Yanira; Sippel, Sebastian; Mahecha, Miguel D

    2017-01-01

    .... One important methodological question is how to reliably detect anomalies in an automated and generic way within multivariate data streams, which typically vary seasonally and are interconnected across variables...

  10. Temperatures on europa from galileo photopolarimeter-radiometer: nighttime thermal anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer; Tamppari; Martin; Travis

    1999-05-28

    Galileo observations of Europa's thermal emission show low-latitude diurnal brightness temperatures in the range of 86 to 132 kelvin. Nighttime temperatures form an unexpected pattern, with high temperatures on the bright ejecta blanket of the crater Pwyll and an equatorial minimum in temperatures after sunset, uncorrelated with surface albedo or geology. The nighttime anomalies may be due to regional thermal inertia variations of an unknown origin, which are equivalent to a two- to threefold variation in thermal conductivity, or to endogenic heat fluxes locally reaching 1 watt per square meter. Endogenic heat flow at this high level, although consistent with some geological evidence, is theoretically unlikely.

  11. The residual frictional thermal anomaly measurement in WFSD-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Peng, H.; Ma, X.; Jiang, J.

    2012-12-01

    The earthquakes research shows the frictional heat generated during earthquake faulting is thought to be the largest part of the total seismic energy budget, and most of the frictional resistance is dissipated as heat. So temperature anomaly measurement is the most direct way to quantify co-seismic friction. Therefore, temperature measurement was taken in the borehole WFSD-1 rapidly following the WenChuan earthquake. To obtain the slight temperature anomaly of 10-2, the resolution of the thermometer should be better than 0.003°C if the temperature change within 0.1m could be distinguished with the mean temperature gradient 0.02 ~ 0.03°C/m. Finally, we developed a high precision temperature measuring probe, BBT-01 with resolution of 0.001°C. Gathered with the probe lifting control system, data acquisition module, power supply and communication module, the temperature measuring system BBT-01 is composed. In order to understand the lifting speed influence on the measured temperature, we had temperature probe heat balance test at 970m in WFSD-1. It shows the thermal equilibrium time should be at least 1500 s and the BBT-01 temperature thermometer resolution are better than the 0.001°C/m. We found three temperature anomalies in 400-500m, 580-610m and 620-750m in the borehole WFSD-1, respectively. Comparing the temperature anomaly curve with the layered structure profile. we found that the temperature anomaly of 390-550m, 620-750m should be caused by formation changes.Using the Byerlees law for computation, the depth in the fault plane should be below 1000m to produce a temperature anomaly of 0.2°C. In addition, the frictional heat temperature anomaly measured in many Continental Scientific Drilling Projects are in 10-2 magnitude, and anomalies width are tens of meters. It also can be verified that the 390-550m and 620-750m anomaly are not caused by friction. It can be seen in figure4 that the average geothermal gradient in 80-590m is 19.77°C/km, and 21.31°C/km in

  12. Thermal surveillance of active volcanoes. [infrared scanner recordings of thermal anomalies of Mt. Baker volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, J. D. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. By the end of 1973, aerial infrared scanner traverses for thermal anomaly recordings of all Cascade Range volcanoes were essentially completed. Amplitude level slices of the Mount Baker anomalies were completed and compiled at a scale of 1:24,000, thus producing, for the first time, an accurate map of the distribution and intensity of thermal activity on Mount Baker. The major thermal activity is concentrated within the crater south of the main summit and although it is characterized by intensive solfataric activity and warm ground, it is largely subglacial, causing the development of sizable glacier perforation features. The outgoing radiative flux from the east breach anomalies is sufficient to account for the volume of ice melted to form the glacier perforations. DCP station 6251 has been monitoring a thermally anomalous area on the north slope of Mount Baker. The present thermal activity of Mount Baker accounts for continuing hydrothermal alteration in the crater south of the main summit and recurrent debris avalanches from Sherman Peak on its south rim. The infrared anomalies mapped as part of the experiment SR 251 are considered the basic evidence of the subglacial heating which was the probable triggering mechanism of an avalanche down Boulder Glacier on August 20-21, 1973.

  13. Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1999

    1999-01-01

    This theme issue on anomalies includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, and additional resources for elementary and junior high school students. Pertinent activities are suggested, and sidebars discuss UFOs, animal anomalies, and anomalies from nature; and resources covering unexplained phenonmenas like crop circles, Easter Island,…

  14. Anomaly Detection in Test Equipment via Sliding Mode Observers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Wanda M.; Drakunov, Sergey V.

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear observers were originally developed based on the ideas of variable structure control, and for the purpose of detecting disturbances in complex systems. In this anomaly detection application, these observers were designed for estimating the distributed state of fluid flow in a pipe described by a class of advection equations. The observer algorithm uses collected data in a piping system to estimate the distributed system state (pressure and velocity along a pipe containing liquid gas propellant flow) using only boundary measurements. These estimates are then used to further estimate and localize possible anomalies such as leaks or foreign objects, and instrumentation metering problems such as incorrect flow meter orifice plate size. The observer algorithm has the following parts: a mathematical model of the fluid flow, observer control algorithm, and an anomaly identification algorithm. The main functional operation of the algorithm is in creating the sliding mode in the observer system implemented as software. Once the sliding mode starts in the system, the equivalent value of the discontinuous function in sliding mode can be obtained by filtering out the high-frequency chattering component. In control theory, "observers" are dynamic algorithms for the online estimation of the current state of a dynamic system by measurements of an output of the system. Classical linear observers can provide optimal estimates of a system state in case of uncertainty modeled by white noise. For nonlinear cases, the theory of nonlinear observers has been developed and its success is mainly due to the sliding mode approach. Using the mathematical theory of variable structure systems with sliding modes, the observer algorithm is designed in such a way that it steers the output of the model to the output of the system obtained via a variety of sensors, in spite of possible mismatches between the assumed model and actual system. The unique properties of sliding mode control

  15. Localized thermal anomalies in haloclines of coastal Yucatan sinkholes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessell, Ronald K; Coke, James G; Easley, Dale H

    2002-01-01

    A temperature spike is reported in the haloclines of three Yucatan sinkholes along a 1 km NW-SE transect from 5 to 4 km inland from the Caribbean coast. The temperature spike decreases in magnitude from 3.5 degrees C to 0.2 degrees C, approaching the coast. The anomaly does not vary diurnally and does not extend down into the underlying sea water. These conditions are inconsistent with explanations such as radiation absorption within the halocline, in situ microbially mediated sulfate reduction within the halocline and the underlying sea water, and sulfide oxidation by photosynthetic purple and green bacteria within the halocline. One explanation consistent with the shape and halocline location of the temperature spike involves a localized sea water convection cell operating near the coast. Cold sea water from the Caribbean Sea enters the coastal limestone at depths of a few hundred meters and heats up because of the geothermal gradient, buoyantly rising in vertical fractures within the unconfined aquifer. Blocked by the less dense fresh water, the movement stops in the halocline where the warm sea water mixes with brackish water. The convection cycle would be completed by the coastward movement of cooling brackish water. The observed temperature anomalies could possibly be snapshots of this warm layer moving coastward.

  16. VIIRS/NPP Thermal Anomalies/Fire 6-Min L2 Swath 750m V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Thermal Anomalies (VNP14) Version 1 product is produced in 6-minute temporal satellite increments (swaths) at...

  17. MODIS/Terra Thermal Anomalies/Fire 5-Min L2 Swath 1km V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS Thermal Anomalies/Fire products are primarily derived from MODIS 4- and 11-micrometer radiances. The fire detection strategy is based on absolute detection of...

  18. Hot flow anomaly observed at Jupiter's bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valek, P. W.; Thomsen, M. F.; Allegrini, F.; Bagenal, F.; Bolton, S.; Connerney, J.; Ebert, R. W.; Gladstone, R.; Kurth, W. S.; Levin, S.; Louarn, P.; Mauk, B.; McComas, D. J.; Pollock, C.; Reno, M.; Szalay, J. R.; Weidner, S.; Wilson, R. J.

    2017-08-01

    A Hot Flow Anomaly (HFA) is created when an interplanetary current sheet interacts with a planetary bow shock. Previous studies have reported observing HFAs at Earth, Mercury, Venus, Mars, and Saturn. During Juno's approach to Jupiter, a number of its instruments operated in the solar wind. Prior to crossing into Jupiter's magnetosphere, Juno observed an HFA at Jupiter for the first time. This Jovian HFA shares most of the characteristics of HFAs seen at other planets. The notable exception is that the Jovian HFA is significantly larger than any HFA seen before. With an apparent size greater than 2 × 106 km the Jovian HFA is orders of magnitude larger than those seen at the other planets. By comparing the size of the HFAs at the other planets with the Jovian HFA, we conclude that HFAs size scales with the size of planetary bow shocks that the interplanetary current sheet interacts with.

  19. Addressing "The Karakoram Anomaly" Through In-Situ Observations and Reanalysis Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, F.

    2016-12-01

    It is established in the scientific literature that high altitude alpine glaciers of the Karakoram are responding to climate change differently from the glaciers throughout the globe. The global retreat of the glaciers formed during the little ice age is considered as a clear indicator of the global climate change. In direct contrast, prominent expansion and/or stability are observed in some of the glaciers residing in the Karakoram. This phenomenon is reported as "The Karakoram Anomaly". Factors that are facilitating the Karakoram anomaly are: change in regional climate and glacier nourishment, extreme vertical gradients of topography, heavy debris cover on the ablation zone of the glaciers, and steepness and thermal characteristics of the ice mass. Quantitative assessment of all these factors is a challenge as vast and rigorous terrain of the Karakoram is inaccessible and therefore hydrometeorological observations are sparse. Among all stated factors, climate change is the most dynamic and high-frequency phenomena as compared to change in geomorphological characteristics of the area. In connection to regional climate change, it is further reported that humidity, cloudiness and summer precipitation are increasing in the area, however, their quantitative assessment is yet to be done. To bridge this knowledge gap, meteorological variables, such as temperature and its lapse rate, humidity, cloudiness, near-surface wind speed, surface atmospheric pressure, the number of rainy days and precipitation are analyzed using available in-situ data. Moreover, to address the Karakoram anomaly, reanalysis products are bias corrected using in-situ observations so that spatially complete information of change in regional meteorological variables can be ascertained. This information will be useful for the scientific community to further argue the rationality of the Karakoram Anomaly.

  20. Airglow observations over the equatorial ionization anomaly zone in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. Chow

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Airglow imaging at mid-latitude stations often show intensity modulations associated with medium scale travelling ionospheric disturbances (MSTID, while those carried out near the equatorial regions reveal depletions caused by equatorial plasma bubbles (EPB. Two all sky cameras are used to observe plasma depletions in the 630.0 nm emission over the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA region, Taiwan (23° N, 121° E; 13.5° N Magnetic during 1998–2002 and 2006–2007. The results show EPB and MSTID depletions in different solar activity conditions. Several new features of the EPB depletions such as bifurcation, secondary structure on the walls, westward tilt, etc., are discussed in this paper. Evidence of tilted depletions with secondary structures developing on the eastern wall that later evolve to appear as bifurcations, are presented for the first time. Moreover, detail investigations are carried out using International Reference Ionosphere (IRI model as well as the electron density from Ionosonde and Global Positioning System (GPS Occultation Experiment (GOX onboard FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellite, to understand the conditions that favor the propagation of MSTID to the latitude of Taiwan.

  1. Nucleosynthetic molybdenum isotope anomalies in iron meteorites - new evidence for thermal processing of solar nebula material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Graeme M.; Rehkämper, Mark; Coles, Barry J.; Goldberg, Tatiana; Smith, Caroline L.

    2017-09-01

    We have investigated nucleosynthetic Mo isotope anomalies in 38 different bulk iron meteorites from 11 groups, to produce by far the largest and most precise dataset available to date for such samples. All magmatic iron groups were found to display deficits in s-process Mo isotopes, with essentially constant anomalies within but significant variations between groups. Only meteorites of the non-magmatic IAB/IIICD complex revealed terrestrial Mo isotopic compositions. The improved analytical precision achieved in this study enables two isotopically distinct suites of iron meteorites to be identified. Of these, the r=p suite encompasses the IC, IIAB, IIE, IIIAB, IIIE and IVA groups and exhibits relatively modest but 'pure' s-process deficits, relative to Earth. The second r>p suite includes groups IIC, IIIF and IVB. These iron meteorites show larger s-process deficits than the r=p suite, coupled with an excess of r-process relative to p-process components. Comparison of the results with data for other elements (e.g., Cr, Ni, Ru, Ti, Zr) suggests that the Mo isotope variability is most likely produced by thermal processing and selective destruction of unstable presolar phases. An updated model is proposed, which relates the iron meteorite suites to different extents of thermal processing in the solar nebula, as governed by heliocentric distance. In detail, the r=p suite of iron meteorite parent bodies is inferred to have formed closer to the Sun, where the extent of thermal processing was similar to that experienced by terrestrial material, so that the meteorites exhibit only small s-process deficits relative to Earth. In contrast, the r>p suite formed at greater heliocentric distance, where more subtle thermal processing removed a smaller proportion of r- and p-process host phases, thereby generating larger s-process deficits relative to the terrestrial composition. In addition, the thermal conditions enabled selective destruction of p- versus r-isotope carrier phases

  2. Engima of a thermal anomaly - A TM/AVHRR study of the volcanic Arabian highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodget, H. W.; Andre, C. G.; Masuoka, P. M.

    1987-01-01

    Discovery of a large thermal anomaly in the western Arabian highlands on Landsat TM imagery is reported. The anomaly, 15 C warmer than surroundings, forms a 2-km-wide arc around the southern flank of Jebel Chada, a volcano active in 1256 AD. It is recorded by AVHRR imagery as well, despite the 1.1-km spatial resolution of this sensor. Air photos and geologic maps show no bedrock unit that corresponds to the anomaly. Digital techniques were applied to the TM and AVHRR data, including contrast enhancement, density slicing, principal components analysis, and construction of multiband composite images. It is concluded that the anomaly results from a thin cover of volcanic ash or cinder that is optically indistinguishable from underlying basalt, rather than from internal (volcanic or hydrologic) heat sources.

  3. Observation and origin of an interannual salinity anomaly in the Mozambique Channel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, P.M.; Schouten, M.W.; van Leeuwen, P.J.; Ridderinkhof, H.; de Ruijter, W.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    A positive salinity anomaly of 0.2 PSU was observed between 50 and 200 m over the years 2000–2001 across the Mozambique Channel at a section at 17°S which was repeated in 2003, 2005, 2006, and 2008. Meanwhile, a moored array is continued from 2003 to 2008. This anomaly was most distinct showing an

  4. Detection of Cardiovascular Anomalies: An Observer-Based Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ledezma, Fernando

    2012-07-01

    In this thesis, a methodology for the detection of anomalies in the cardiovascular system is presented. The cardiovascular system is one of the most fascinating and complex physiological systems. Nowadays, cardiovascular diseases constitute one of the most important causes of mortality in the world. For instance, an estimate of 17.3 million people died in 2008 from cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, many studies have been devoted to modeling the cardiovascular system in order to better understand its behavior and find new reliable diagnosis techniques. The lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system proposed in [1] is restructured using a hybrid systems approach in order to include a discrete input vector that represents the influence of the mitral and aortic valves in the different phases of the cardiac cycle. Parting from this model, a Taylor expansion around the nominal values of a vector of parameters is conducted. This expansion serves as the foundation for a component fault detection process to detect changes in the physiological parameters of the cardiovascular system which could be associated with cardiovascular anomalies such as atherosclerosis, aneurysm, high blood pressure, etc. An Extended Kalman Filter is used in order to achieve a joint estimation of the state vector and the changes in the considered parameters. Finally, a bank of filters is, as in [2], used in order to detect the appearance of heart valve diseases, particularly stenosis and regurgitation. The first numerical results obtained are presented.

  5. Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum triggered by Volcanism revealed by Mercury anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozyem, Hassan; Adatte, Thierry; Mbabi Bitchong, André; Chevalier, Yoann; Keller, Gerta

    2017-04-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.8±0.2 Ma) is marked by a global drop of 2-6‰ in 13C values and rapid warming of 4-5°C in tropical surface waters and 4-8°C in high latitudes. Climate warming persisted for several tens of thousands of years and resulted in rapid diversification in terrestrial mammals and marine planktic foraminifera. Deep-water bathyal benthic foraminifera suffered a mass extinction ( 40% species) but no significant extinctions occurred shallow shelf environments. Benthic extinctions are commonly explained as the effects of the initial stage of climate warming due to North Atlantic Volcanic Province volcanism (NAVP), which triggered methane release from ocean sediments causing global warming and ocean acidification. But the relationship between NAPV and the PETM events are not clearly demonstrated. Several studies [1-4] demonstrated the relationship between Hg anomalies in sediments and LIP activity associated with mass extinctions. We investigated the mercury (Hg) content of several sections located in deep bathyal (Zumaya, Trabakua, N-Spain) and outer shelf environments (Dababiya GSSP, Duwi, Egypt). At Zumaya the PETM is marked by a red clayey and marly interval poor in organic matter and coincident with a pronounced ∂13C negative shift. A comparable clay interval with low TOC content is also present in the Dababyia section in the lower part of the negative ∂13C shift, whereas the upper part of is enriched in TOC, reflecting increased productivity. A significant but unique Hg enrichment is observed at the onset of the PETM just below the carbone isotope shift in Spain as well as in Egypt. This increase, which is not correlated with clay or total organic carbon contents, suggests the Hg anomaly resulted from higher atmospheric Hg input into the marine realm, rather than organic matter scavenging and/or increased run-off. This Hg anomaly at the onset of the PETM provides the first direct evidence that volcanism played a

  6. Driving Roles of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Thermal Anomalies in Intensification and Persistence of the Arctic Superstorm in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Fu, Yunfei; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2017-10-01

    Intense synoptic-scale storms have been more frequently observed over the Arctic during recent years. Specifically, a superstorm hit the Arctic Ocean in August 2012 and preceded a new record low Arctic sea ice extent. In this study, the major physical processes responsible for the storm's intensification and persistence are explored through a series of numerical modeling experiments with the Weather Research and Forecasting model. It is found that thermal anomalies in troposphere as well as lower stratosphere jointly lead to the development of this superstorm. Thermal contrast between the unusually warm Siberia and the relatively cold Arctic Ocean results in strong troposphere baroclinicity and upper level jet, which contribute to the storm intensification initially. On the other hand, Tropopause Polar Vortex (TPV) associated with the thermal anomaly in lower stratosphere further intensifies the upper level jet and accordingly contributes to a drastic intensification of the storm. Stacking with the enhanced surface low, TPV intensifies further, which sustains the storm to linger over the Arctic Ocean for an extended period.

  7. MODIS/Aqua Terra Thermal Anomalies/Fire locations 1km FIRMS V006 NRT (Vector data)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Near Real-Time (NRT) MODIS Thermal Anomalies / Fire locations processed by FIRMS (Fire Information for Resource Management System) - Land Atmosphere Near real time...

  8. MODIS/Aqua Near Real Time (NRT) Coarse Thermal Anomalies/Fire 5-Min L2 Swath 5km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS Near Real Time (NRT) Thermal Anomalies/Fire products are primarily derived from MODIS 4- and 11-micrometer radiances. The fire detection strategy is based on...

  9. MODIS/Terra Thermal Anomalies/Fire Daily L3 Global 1km SIN Grid V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS Thermal Anomalies/Fire products are primarily derived from MODIS 4- and 11-micrometer radiances. The fire detection strategy is based on absolute detection of...

  10. MODIS/Aqua Near Real Time (NRT) Thermal Anomalies/Fire 5-Min L2 Swath 1km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS Near Real Time (NRT) Thermal Anomalies/Fire products are primarily derived from MODIS 4- and 11-micrometer radiances. The fire detection strategy is based on...

  11. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  12. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzà, F; Vedral, V

    2017-03-07

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  13. Near Real Time website for IASI observations of atmospheric anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayer, Catherine; Grainger, Don; Marsh, Kevin; Carboni, Elisa; Ventress, Lucy; Smith, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Rapid analysis of satellite observations of the state of the atmosphere and the contaminant levels within it can be used for pollution monitoring, forest fire detection and volcanic activity monitoring. There are numerous operational satellite instruments for which this is possible. The IASI instruments, currently flying on board the MetOp-A and MetOp-B satellite platforms, are used to produce Near Real Time (NRT) data using analysis algorithms developed by Oxford University. The data is then displayed on a website within 3 hours of measurement. This allows for the semi-continuous monitoring of the state of the atmosphere over most of the globe, both in daylight and at night. Global coverage is achieved 4 times per day, which is a significant advantage over most of the alternatives, either geostationary, giving limited spatial coverage, or UV instruments which are only able to observe during the daylight side of the orbit. The website includes flags for atmospheric contaminants detectable by IASI, including dust, biomass burning-derived species and volcanic ash and SO2. In the near future, the website will be developed to also include a quantitative estimate of the mass loading of SO2 contained within any volcanic cloud. Emissions of volcanic products, such as ash and SO2, are useful indicators of a change in the activity level of a volcano. Since many volcanoes are only monitored by remote sensing methods, such as satellite instruments, this can be the only such indicator available. These emissions are also dangerous to passing aircraft, causing damage to external surfaces of the plane and to the engines, sometimes leading to failure. Evacuation of regions surrounding volcanoes, and cessation or diversion of air traffic around actively erupting volcanoes is costly and highly disruptive but is sometimes required. Up to date information is of critical importance as to when to make these sensitive decisions. An archive of data will be available to allow for easy

  14. Multivariate anomaly detection for Earth observations: a comparison of algorithms and feature extraction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Flach

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Today, many processes at the Earth's surface are constantly monitored by multiple data streams. These observations have become central to advancing our understanding of vegetation dynamics in response to climate or land use change. Another set of important applications is monitoring effects of extreme climatic events, other disturbances such as fires, or abrupt land transitions. One important methodological question is how to reliably detect anomalies in an automated and generic way within multivariate data streams, which typically vary seasonally and are interconnected across variables. Although many algorithms have been proposed for detecting anomalies in multivariate data, only a few have been investigated in the context of Earth system science applications. In this study, we systematically combine and compare feature extraction and anomaly detection algorithms for detecting anomalous events. Our aim is to identify suitable workflows for automatically detecting anomalous patterns in multivariate Earth system data streams. We rely on artificial data that mimic typical properties and anomalies in multivariate spatiotemporal Earth observations like sudden changes in basic characteristics of time series such as the sample mean, the variance, changes in the cycle amplitude, and trends. This artificial experiment is needed as there is no gold standard for the identification of anomalies in real Earth observations. Our results show that a well-chosen feature extraction step (e.g., subtracting seasonal cycles, or dimensionality reduction is more important than the choice of a particular anomaly detection algorithm. Nevertheless, we identify three detection algorithms (k-nearest neighbors mean distance, kernel density estimation, a recurrence approach and their combinations (ensembles that outperform other multivariate approaches as well as univariate extreme-event detection methods. Our results therefore provide an effective workflow to

  15. Subduction and slab tearing dynamics constrained by thermal anomalies in the Anatolia-Aegean region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Vincent; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Loiselet, Christelle; Bouchot, Vincent

    2015-04-01

    Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones with backward migration (rollback), slab tearing or slab breakoff by numerical or laboratory experiments and by integrating seismicity, tomography data and geochemical studies. Here we investigate these processes in the Aegean-Anatolian domain and particularly the western side of Turkey (western Anatolia) by incorporating thermal regime of the crust, and in particular the geothermal fields as anomalies that could reflect the thermal state of Aegean subduction zone at depth. This domain is characterized by 1) extensional crustal deformation which progressively localized during the Aegean slab retreat from late Eocene to Present, enabling the development of a hot backarc domain; this extension accelerated between 15 and 8 Ma coeval with a fast rotation of the Hellenides and 2) since the latest Miocene, extension is coupled with the development of the North Anatolian Fault that accommodates the westward escape of the Anatolian block. Both the acceleration of extension in the Middle Miocene and the recent escape of Anatolia have been proposed to result from several slab tearing events, the first one being located below western Turkey and the Eastern Aegean Sea, a second one below eastern Turkey and a last one below the Corinth Rift (Faccenna et al., 2006; Jolivet et al., 2013). The distribution of magmatism and mineral resources has been suggested to be largely controlled by these retreat and tearing events (Menant et al., submitted). The development of a widespread active geothermal province in western Anatolia is unlikely to simply result from the Quaternary magmatism whose volcanism part has a too limited extent. Conversely, the long wavelength east-west variation of surface heat flow density could reflect deep thermal processes in the lower crust and/or deeper, and we thus look for possible connections with larger-scale mantle dynamics. We use the distribution of thermal anomalies at different scales and the 3

  16. Surface vector mapping of magnetic anomalies over the Moon using Kaguya and Lunar Prospector observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunakawa, Hideo; Takahashi, Futoshi; Shimizu, Hisayoshi; Shibuya, Hidetoshi; Matsushima, Masaki

    2015-06-01

    We have provided preliminary global maps of three components of the lunar magnetic anomaly on the surface applying the surface vector mapping (SVM) method. The data used in the present study consist of about 5 million observations of the lunar magnetic field at 10-45 km altitudes by Kaguya and Lunar Prospector. The lunar magnetic anomalies were mapped at 0.2° equi-distance points on the surface by the SVM method, showing the highest intensity of 718 nT in the Crisium antipodal region. Overall features on the SVM maps indicate that elongating magnetic anomalies are likely to be dominant on the Moon except for the young large basins with the impact demagnetization. Remarkable demagnetization features suggested by previous studies are also recognized at Hertzsprung and Kolorev craters on the farside. These features indicate that demagnetized areas extend to about 1-2 radii of the basins/craters. There are well-isolated central magnetic anomalies at four craters: Leibnitz, Aitken, Jules Verne, and Grimaldi craters. Their magnetic poles through the dipole source approximation suggest occurrence of the polar wander prior to 3.3-3.5 Ga. When compared with high-albedo markings at several magnetic anomalies such as the Reiner Gamma anomalies, three-dimensional structures of the magnetic field on/near the surface are well correlated with high-albedo areas. These results indicate that the global SVM maps are useful for the study of the lunar magnetic anomalies in comparison with various geological and geophysical data.

  17. Integrated GRASS GIS based techniques to identify thermal anomalies on water surface. Taranto case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarelli, Carmine; Matarrese, Raffaella; Felice Uricchio, Vito

    2014-05-01

    In the last years, thermal images collected by airborne systems have made the detection of thermal anomalies possible. These images are an important tool to monitor natural inflows and legal or illegal dumping in coastal waters. By the way, the potential of these kinds of data is not well exploited by the Authorities who supervises the territory. The main reason is the processing of remote sensing data that requires very specialized operators and softwares which are usually expensive and complex. In this study, we adopt a simple methodology that uses GRASS, a free open-source GIS software, which has allowed us to map surface water thermal anomalies and, consequently, to identify and locate coastal inflows, as well as manmade or natural watershed drains or submarine springs (in italian citri) in the Taranto Sea (South of Italy). Taranto sea represents a coastal marine ecosystem that has been gradually modified by mankind. One of its inlet, the Mar Piccolo, is a part of the National Priority List site identified by the National Program of Environmental Remediation and Restoration because of the size and high presence of industrial activities, past and present, that have had and continue to seriously compromise the health status of the population and the environment. In order to detect thermal anomalies, two flights have been performed respectively on March 3rd and on April 7th, 2013. A total of 13 TABI images have been acquired to map the whole Mar Piccolo with 1m of spatial resolution. TABI-320 is an airborne thermal camera by ITRES, with a continuous spectral range between 8 and 12 microns. On July 15th, 2013, an in-situ survey was carried out along the banks to retrieve clear visible points of natural or artificial inflows, detecting up to 72 of discharges. GRASS GIS (Geographic Resources Analysis Support System), is a free and open source Geographic Information System (GIS) software suite used for geospatial data management and analysis, image processing

  18. Thermal anomalies detection before strong earthquakes (M > 6.0 using interquartile, wavelet and Kalman filter methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akhoondzadeh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Thermal anomaly is known as a significant precursor of strong earthquakes, therefore Land Surface Temperature (LST time series have been analyzed in this study to locate relevant anomalous variations prior to the Bam (26 December 2003, Zarand (22 February 2005 and Borujerd (31 March 2006 earthquakes. The duration of the three datasets which are comprised of MODIS LST images is 44, 28 and 46 days for the Bam, Zarand and Borujerd earthquakes, respectively. In order to exclude variations of LST from temperature seasonal effects, Air Temperature (AT data derived from the meteorological stations close to the earthquakes epicenters have been taken into account. The detection of thermal anomalies has been assessed using interquartile, wavelet transform and Kalman filter methods, each presenting its own independent property in anomaly detection. The interquartile method has been used to construct the higher and lower bounds in LST data to detect disturbed states outside the bounds which might be associated with impending earthquakes. The wavelet transform method has been used to locate local maxima within each time series of LST data for identifying earthquake anomalies by a predefined threshold. Also, the prediction property of the Kalman filter has been used in the detection process of prominent LST anomalies. The results concerning the methodology indicate that the interquartile method is capable of detecting the highest intensity anomaly values, the wavelet transform is sensitive to sudden changes, and the Kalman filter method significantly detects the highest unpredictable variations of LST. The three methods detected anomalous occurrences during 1 to 20 days prior to the earthquakes showing close agreement in results found between the different applied methods on LST data in the detection of pre-seismic anomalies. The proposed method for anomaly detection was also applied on regions irrelevant to earthquakes for which no anomaly was detected

  19. A database for the monitoring of thermal anomalies over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Muñoz, Juan C; Mattar, Cristian; Sobrino, José A; Malhi, Yadvinder

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information technologies and accessibility to climate and satellite data in recent years have favored the development of web-based tools with user-friendly interfaces in order to facilitate the dissemination of geo/biophysical products. These products are useful for the analysis of the impact of global warming over different biomes. In particular, the study of the Amazon forest responses to drought have recently received attention by the scientific community due to the occurrence of two extreme droughts and sustained warming over the last decade. Thermal Amazoni@ is a web-based platform for the visualization and download of surface thermal anomalies products over the Amazon forest and adjacent intertropical oceans using Google Earth as a baseline graphical interface (http://ipl.uv.es/thamazon/web). This platform is currently operational at the servers of the University of Valencia (Spain), and it includes both satellite (MODIS) and climatic (ERA-Interim) datasets. Thermal Amazoni@ is composed of the viewer system and the web and ftp sites with ancillary information and access to product download.

  20. Spatial and temporal distribution of ore deposits, in relation with thermal anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcouet, V.; Bonneville, A.; Guillou-Frottier, L.

    2003-04-01

    Ore deposits have formed over billion years of Earth's history with a discontinuous distribution in time and space.In time, their formation is episodical, and the data concerning the main deposit types show an alternation of periods with mineralisation followed by time gaps, with no large amount of ore generation. The "Snowball Earth" theory suggests that Banded Iron formations (BIF) are in relation with periods of intense global glaciations of Paleoproterozoic (2500-1600 Ma) and Neoproterozoic (1000-540 Ma) ages. During global glaciations, surface temperatures were of the order of -50°C and an ice layer of about 1km covered almost the entire Earth. We have performed analytical and numerical modelling of such events that shows the development of high thermal anomalies in the crust. These anomalies can reach several tens of degrees for a time lapse that depends on the duration of the glaciation. If the thermal impact is clear, the mechanical impact of the glaciations on the crustal rocks still needs to be evaluated to precisely assess the role of glaciations as a possible cause to some of the gaps in the temporal distribution of ore deposits.Ore deposits have also a heterogeneous spatial distribution: they are located in specific places of the Earth's crust, where thermo-mechanical and hydrothermal conditions have triggered their formation. The temperature pattern corresponding to these cases can prove to be particularly favourable to ore deposits. A good example of such deposits, is the Ashanti belt in Ghana of which we present a detailed study. It is the key district of gold mineralisation in the Paleoproterozoic terrane of West Africa. This is the second giant concentration of gold deposits after South Africa with a potential of about 2500 tons of gold. The Eburnean orogeny operated between 2.13 and 1.98 Ga. Two tectonic phases affected the area, a period of thrusting and a second one corresponding to transcurrent tectonism. A numerical modelling was performed

  1. A Hydrometeorological Perspective on the Karakoram Anomaly Using Unique Valley-Based Synoptic Weather Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Furrukh; Zeng, Xubin; Gupta, Hoshin; Hazenberg, Pieter

    2017-10-01

    Glaciers in the eastern Hindukush, western Karakoram, and northwestern Himalayan mountain ranges of Northern Pakistan are not responding to global warming in the same manner as their counterparts elsewhere. Their retreat rates are less than the global average, and some are either stable or growing. Various investigations have questioned the role of climatic factors in regard to this anomalous behavior, widely referred to as "The Karakoram Anomaly." Here, for the first time, we present a hydrometeorological perspective based on five decades of synoptic weather observations collected by the meteorological network of Pakistan. Analysis of this unique data set indicates that increased regional scale humidity, cloud cover, and precipitation, along with decreased net radiation, near-surface wind speed, potential evapotranspiration, and river flow, especially during the summer season, represent a substantial change in the energy, mass, and momentum fluxes that are facilitating the establishment of the Karakoram anomaly.

  2. Ionospheric Anomalies of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake with Multiple Observations during Magnetic Storm Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang

    2017-04-01

    Ionospheric anomalies linked with devastating earthquakes have been widely investigated by scientists. It was confirmed that GNSS TECs suffered from drastically increase or decrease in some diurnal periods prior to the earthquakes. Liu et al (2008) applied a TECs anomaly calculation method to analyze M>=5.9 earthquakes in Indonesia and found TECs decadence within 2-7 days prior to the earthquakes. Nevertheless, strong TECs enhancement was observed before M8.0 Wenchuan earthquake (Zhao et al 2008). Moreover, the ionospheric plasma critical frequency (foF2) has been found diminished before big earthquakes (Pulinets et al 1998; Liu et al 2006). But little has been done regarding ionospheric irregularities and its association with earthquake. Still it is difficult to understand real mechanism between ionospheric anomalies activities and its precursor for the huge earthquakes. The M9.0 Tohoku earthquake, happened on 11 March 2011, at 05:46 UT time, was recognized as one of the most dominant events in related research field (Liu et al 2011). A median geomagnetic disturbance also occurred accompanied with the earthquake, which makes the ionospheric anomalies activities more sophisticated to study. Seismic-ionospheric disturbance was observed due to the drastic activities of earth. To further address the phenomenon, this paper investigates different categories of ionospheric anomalies induced by seismology activity, with multiple data sources. Several GNSS ground data were chosen along epicenter from IGS stations, to discuss the spatial-temporal correlations of ionospheric TECs in regard to the distance of epicenter. We also apply GIM TEC maps due to its global coverage to find diurnal differences of ionospheric anomalies compared with geomagnetic quiet day in the same month. The results in accordance with Liu's conclusions that TECs depletion occurred at days quite near the earthquake day, however the variation of TECs has special regulation contrast to the normal quiet

  3. Thermal anomalies and paleoclimatic diffusive and advective phenomena: example of the Anglo-Paris Basin, northern France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentzer, Jacques; Violette, Sophie; Lopez, Simon; Bruel, Dominique

    2017-11-01

    This study is the first quantification of the combined impact of diffusive and advective paleoclimatic phenomena to explain the weak vertical thermal flux anomaly in the upper part of the Anglo-Paris intracratonic sedimentary basin in northern France. The aim of the research is to understand the mechanisms at the origin of the thermal flux anomaly at the level of the Meso-Cenozoic sediment pile. Based on a temperature profile representative of the basin, transient thermo-hydraulic simulations were performed along a representative vertical cross-section of about 400 km within the Lower Cretaceous multi-layer aquifer. Four paleoclimatic scenarios are the combination of two paleotemperature climatic forcings and two hydrodynamic regimes, one of them taking into account the interruption of the recharge linked to permafrost development. The simulation results clearly show the transient nature of the basin's thermal regime. Then, for the reference well, the majority of the thermal flux anomaly can be explained by advective and paleoclimatic mechanisms with a decrease in geothermal flux simulated up to a little over 30 mW/m2, depending on the scenarios. Decrease in heat flux because of basin-scale subsurface flows in the Lower Cretaceous is around 15 mW/m2. There are several ways forward from this first simple model, including simulation of development of permafrost and also the integration of vertical flows in the basin by use of a three-dimensional model to better explain the data.

  4. Selecting Observation Platforms for Optimized Anomaly Detectability under Unreliable Partial Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto E. Garcia; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2011-06-01

    Diagnosers for keeping track on the occurrences of special events in the framework of unreliable partially observed discrete-event dynamical systems were developed in previous work. This paper considers observation platforms consisting of sensors that provide partial and unreliable observations and of diagnosers that analyze them. Diagnosers in observation platforms typically perform better as sensors providing the observations become more costly or increase in number. This paper proposes a methodology for finding an observation platform that achieves an optimal balance between cost and performance, while satisfying given observability requirements and constraints. Since this problem is generally computational hard in the framework considered, an observation platform optimization algorithm is utilized that uses two greedy heuristics, one myopic and another based on projected performances. These heuristics are sequentially executed in order to find best observation platforms. The developed algorithm is then applied to an observation platform optimization problem for a multi-unit-operation system. Results show that improved observation platforms can be found that may significantly reduce the observation platform cost but still yield acceptable performance for correctly inferring the occurrences of special events.

  5. Some isotopic and geochemical anomalies observed in Mexico prior to large scale earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz R, S. de la; Armienta, M.A.; Segovia A, N

    1992-05-15

    A brief account of some experiences obtained in Mexico, related with the identification of geochemical precursors of volcanic eruptions and isotopic precursors of earthquakes and volcanic activity is given. The cases of three recent events of volcanic activity and one large earthquake are discussed in the context of an active geological environment. The positive results in the identification of some geochemical precursors that helped to evaluate the eruptive potential during two volcanic crises (Tacana 1986 and Colima 1991), and the significant radon-in-soil anomalies observed during a volcanic catastrophic eruption (El Chichon, 1982) and prior to a major earthquake (Michoacan, 1985) are critically analysed. (Author)

  6. A comparison of classical and intelligent methods to detect potential thermal anomalies before the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akhoondzadeh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a number of classical and intelligent methods, including interquartile, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA, artificial neural network (ANN and support vector machine (SVM, have been proposed to quantify potential thermal anomalies around the time of the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4. The duration of the data set, which is comprised of Aqua-MODIS land surface temperature (LST night-time snapshot images, is 62 days. In order to quantify variations of LST data obtained from satellite images, the air temperature (AT data derived from the meteorological station close to the earthquake epicenter has been taken into account. For the models examined here, results indicate the following: (i ARIMA models, which are the most widely used in the time series community for short-term forecasting, are quickly and easily implemented, and can efficiently act through linear solutions. (ii A multilayer perceptron (MLP feed-forward neural network can be a suitable non-parametric method to detect the anomalous changes of a non-linear time series such as variations of LST. (iii Since SVMs are often used due to their many advantages for classification and regression tasks, it can be shown that, if the difference between the predicted value using the SVM method and the observed value exceeds the pre-defined threshold value, then the observed value could be regarded as an anomaly. (iv ANN and SVM methods could be powerful tools in modeling complex phenomena such as earthquake precursor time series where we may not know what the underlying data generating process is. There is good agreement in the results obtained from the different methods for quantifying potential anomalies in a given LST time series. This paper indicates that the detection of the potential thermal anomalies derive credibility from the overall efficiencies and potentialities of the four integrated methods.

  7. A comparison of classical and intelligent methods to detect potential thermal anomalies before the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoondzadeh, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a number of classical and intelligent methods, including interquartile, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA), artificial neural network (ANN) and support vector machine (SVM), have been proposed to quantify potential thermal anomalies around the time of the 11 August 2012 Varzeghan, Iran, earthquake (Mw = 6.4). The duration of the data set, which is comprised of Aqua-MODIS land surface temperature (LST) night-time snapshot images, is 62 days. In order to quantify variations of LST data obtained from satellite images, the air temperature (AT) data derived from the meteorological station close to the earthquake epicenter has been taken into account. For the models examined here, results indicate the following: (i) ARIMA models, which are the most widely used in the time series community for short-term forecasting, are quickly and easily implemented, and can efficiently act through linear solutions. (ii) A multilayer perceptron (MLP) feed-forward neural network can be a suitable non-parametric method to detect the anomalous changes of a non-linear time series such as variations of LST. (iii) Since SVMs are often used due to their many advantages for classification and regression tasks, it can be shown that, if the difference between the predicted value using the SVM method and the observed value exceeds the pre-defined threshold value, then the observed value could be regarded as an anomaly. (iv) ANN and SVM methods could be powerful tools in modeling complex phenomena such as earthquake precursor time series where we may not know what the underlying data generating process is. There is good agreement in the results obtained from the different methods for quantifying potential anomalies in a given LST time series. This paper indicates that the detection of the potential thermal anomalies derive credibility from the overall efficiencies and potentialities of the four integrated methods.

  8. Search a way out of fluid-magmatic activity on the periphery of the thermal structure Siberian magnetic anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvinova, Tamara; Petrova, Alevtina

    2017-04-01

    The work have for an object to study of a deep structure of the region of Eastern Siberia, allocation of zones of the most ancient magnetoactive horizons and search of exits of fluid and magmatic aktivization, on the periphery of thermal structures within which the most part of ore gold deposits, copper and other polymetals concentrates. Researches of not uniformity of the base in the field of the Siberian magnetic anomaly are executed on the basis of interpretation of anomalies of the module of vertical and horizontal components of the magnetic field of Earth, and also anomalies of gravity. The zone of all-round permafrost settles down from the Arctic coast of Siberia to 60 - 62N. World anomaly of a magnetic field of Earth of Eastern Siberia gets on a permafrost zone. It extends from North Siberian Lowland on Taimyr to Lake Baikal. On the isoline of 60 000 nT it occupies the space from 75N to 50N and from 80 to 130 E. For the purpose of studying of a deep structure and clarification of the nature of magnetization of anomalies of the base cards of anomalies vertical and horizontal the magnetic field of Earth component were used. Density cuts are received on anomalies of gravity. On deep sections the dense and magnetic horizon located in the range of depths the 10-15th is visible. Detection of anomalies vertical components means that the specific magnetoactive layer possesses thermoresidual magnetization which direction doesn't coincide with the modern direction and testifies to early time of its education. The most brightly thermoresidual anomalies are expressed on Plateau of Putoran and the Anabar shield. In the territory of Eastern Siberia near Lake Baikal sources of thermal waters are known. The great interest represents search of thermal auras - talik - to the north of Lake Baikal in a zone of universal permafrost. One of the most important factors of formation of thermal auras is carrying out of the fluid streams delivered from deep-focal fluid systems

  9. Tracking of Thermal Infrared Anomaly before One Strong Earthquake-In the Case of Ms6.2 Earthquake in Zadoi, Qinghai on October 17th, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Yuansheng; Tian, Xiufeng; Zhang, Qiaoli; Tian, Jie

    2017-10-01

    The detection and tracking process of thermal infrared anomaly before Ms6.2 earthquake in Zadio, Qinghai on October 17th, 2016, are reviewed and analyzed; then the different characteristics of thermal infrared brightness temperature data before this earthquake is described in details. According to these characteristics, the tracking process of thermal anomaly is divided into four stages, respectively identification stage, pre-judgment stage, tracking and approaching stage and verification stage. The anomaly forms and turning signals focused in each stage can provide clear indication information for earthquake pre-judgment; finally, the prediction efficiency and technical issues of this method are illustrated and discussed.

  10. Environmental Drivers of Variation in Bleaching Severity of Acropora Species during an Extreme Thermal Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia O. Hoogenboom

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available High sea surface temperatures caused global coral bleaching during 2015–2016. During this thermal stress event, we quantified within- and among-species variability in bleaching severity for critical habitat-forming Acropora corals. The objective of this study was to understand the drivers of spatial and species-specific variation in the bleaching susceptibility of these corals, and to evaluate whether bleaching susceptibility under extreme thermal stress was consistent with that observed during less severe bleaching events. We surveyed and mapped Acropora corals at 10 sites (N = 596 around the Lizard Island group on the northern Great Barrier Reef. For each colony, bleaching severity was quantified using a new image analysis technique, and we assessed whether small-scale environmental variables (depth, microhabitat, competition intensity and species traits (colony morphology, colony size, known symbiont clade association explained variation in bleaching. Results showed that during severe thermal stress, bleaching of branching corals was linked to microhabitat features, and was more severe at reef edge compared with lagoonal sites. Bleaching severity worsened over a very short time-frame (~1 week, but did not differ systematically with water depth, competition intensity, or colony size. At our study location, within- and among-species variation in bleaching severity was relatively low compared to the level of variation reported in the literature. More broadly, our results indicate that variability in bleaching susceptibility during extreme thermal stress is not consistent with that observed during previous bleaching events that have ranged in severity among globally dispersed sites, with fewer species escaping bleaching during severe thermal stress. In addition, shaded microhabitats can provide a refuge from bleaching which provides further evidence of the importance of topographic complexity for maintaining the biodiversity and ecosystem

  11. Satellite thermal IR and atmospheric radon anomalies associated with the Haripur earthquake (Oct 2010; Mw 5.2), Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Muhammad; Barkat, Adnan; Ali, Aamir; Rehman, Khaista; Ali Zafar, Waqar; Iqbal, Talat

    2017-12-01

    The recent scientific progress in the context of earthquake forecasting reveals some key physical processes related to seismic activity. The lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling model provides a comprehensive mechanism to understand the underlying key physical processes. In this study, a precursory analysis was conducted for the shallow, moderate-magnitude Haripur earthquake (Oct 2010; Mw 5.2) bounded by two major water reservoirs, highlighting its significance. This precursory analysis was performed using the land surface temperature (LST) extracted from satellite (MODIS) thermal infrared data and atmospheric radon concentration recorded at Islamabad and Murree stations using radon monitors. A significant change in LST (4-8 °C) was observed in the epicentral region 6 days prior to this event. In addition, a comparison was made between daily and five-year-averaged LST that further supports our results. The radon concentration also showed anomalous behavior 3-4 days prior to this particular event with crucial meteorological indicators in the safe limit. This abnormal behavior of both precursors prior to this event proposes a possible correlation with the local seismic activity. Moreover, the higher amplitude of radon anomaly at the nearest station (Islamabad) is also validating its local cause. The results presented in this study are very encouraging and stimulate the idea of earthquake forecasting using multi-precursory approach.

  12. Long-term observations of theWeddell Sea Anomaly based on the Swarm, CHAMP and DEMETER missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominska, E.

    2016-12-01

    Normalized density difference index (INDD) was introduced for the purpose of detection of such phenomena as the Weddell Sea Anomaly (WSA). With this basic approach, we are capable of identifying spatial and temporal occurrence of anomalies exhibiting reversed diurnal cycle, characterized by greater ionospheric plasma densities observed in the post-sunset hours, when compared to day-time ones. Development of the WSA together with similar phenomenon observed in the Northern Hemisphere, named as the Mid-latitude Summer Nighttime Anomaly is documented with three satellite missions Swarm, DEMETER, and CHAMP. Since the generation of discussed anomalies is still an open issue, multi-mission and multi-instrumental observations at various altitudes should improve our understanding of the phenomena, and verify the role of several potential mechanisms used for explanation. Among mentioned mechanisms, combined result of thermospheric wind, solar photo-ionization, and the local magnetic field configuration is taken as a most comprehensive explanation. Analysis based on long-term trends of observations from three missions and six satellites are aimed at the proper parametrization of the phenomenon. Using spatial gradients in the magnetic field components derived from Swarm A/B/C magnetometers, we discuss longitudinal distributions and variations of anomalies. The study quantifies hemispheric differences between two anomalies, as well as temporal trends concerning the solar cycle.

  13. The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) - Global, 4 km, Sea Surface Temperature and Related Thermal Stress Metrics for 1985-2005 (NODC Accession 0044419)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) is a collection of sea surface temperature (SST) and related thermal stress metrics, developed specifically for...

  14. Ionospheric anomalies associated with the Haiti earthquake of 12 January 2010 observed by DEMETER satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarkar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the ionospheric anomalies around the time of a strong earthquake (M = 7.0 which occurred in Haiti region (18.457° N, 72.533° W on 12 January 2010. DEMETER satellite data have been used to study the plasma parameters variation during the Haiti earthquake. One day (11 January 2010 before the earthquake there is a significant enhancement of electron density and electron temperature near the epicenter. Decrease of electron temperature is observed few days after the earthquake. Anomalous plasma parameter variations are detected both in day and nighttimes before the quake. Statistical processing of the DEMETER data demonstrates that satellite data can play an important role for the study of precursory phenomena associated with earthquakes.

  15. Mapping temperature and radiant geothermal heat flux anomalies in the Yellowstone geothermal system using ASTER thermal infrared data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Heasler, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to use satellite-based thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing data to measure, map, and monitor geothermal activity within the Yellowstone geothermal area to help meet the missions of both the U.S. Geological Survey Yellowstone Volcano Observatory and the Yellowstone National Park Geology Program. Specifically, the goals were to: 1) address the challenges of remotely characterizing the spatially and temporally dynamic thermal features in Yellowstone by using nighttime TIR data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and 2) estimate the temperature, geothermal radiant emittance, and radiant geothermal heat flux (GHF) for Yellowstone’s thermal areas (both Park wide and for individual thermal areas). ASTER TIR data (90-m pixels) acquired at night during January and February, 2010, were used to estimate surface temperature, radiant emittance, and radiant GHF from all of Yellowstone’s thermal features, produce thermal anomaly maps, and update field-based maps of thermal areas. A background subtraction technique was used to isolate the geothermal component of TIR radiance from thermal radiance due to insolation. A lower limit for the Yellowstone’s total radiant GHF was established at ~2.0 GW, which is ~30-45% of the heat flux estimated through geochemical (Cl-flux) methods. Additionally, about 5 km2 was added to the geodatabase of mapped thermal areas. This work provides a framework for future satellite-based thermal monitoring at Yellowstone as well as exploration of other volcanic / geothermal systems on a global scale.

  16. An observed connection between wintertime temperature anomalies over Northwest China and weather regime transitions in North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Zhang, Qingyun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the association between wintertime temperature anomalies over Northwest China and the weather regime transitions in North Atlantic on synoptic scale is analyzed by using observational surface air temperature (SAT) data and atmospheric reanalysis data. Daily SAT anomaly and duration time are used in order to define SAT anomaly cases. Differences with regard to the circulation anomalies over the Ural Mountains and the upstream North Atlantic area are evident. It is found that the colder than normal SAT is caused by the enhanced Ural high and associated southward flow over Northwest China. Time-lagged composites reveal possible connections between the SAT anomalies and the different development phases of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The Ural highs tend to be strengthened during the negative phase of NAO (NAO-) to Atlantic ridge transition, which are closely related to the downstream-propagating Rossby wave activity. The opposite circulation patterns are observed in the warm SAT cases. A cyclonic circulation anomaly is distinctly enhanced over the Urals during the positive phase of NAO (NAO+) to Scandinavian blocking transition, which would cause warmer SAT over Northwest China. Further analyses suggest that the intensified zonal wind over North Atlantic would favor the NAO- to Atlantic ridge transition, while the weakened zonal wind may be responsible for the transition between NAO+ and Scandinavian blocking.

  17. The impact of land surface temperature on soil moisture anomaly detection from passive microwave observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Parinussa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available For several years passive microwave observations have been used to retrieve soil moisture from the Earth's surface. Low frequency observations have the most sensitivity to soil moisture, therefore the current Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and future Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP satellite missions observe the Earth's surface in the L-band frequency. In the past, several satellite sensors such as the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E and WindSat have been used to retrieve surface soil moisture using multi-channel observations obtained at higher microwave frequencies. While AMSR-E and WindSat lack an L-band channel, they are able to leverage multi-channel microwave observations to estimate additional land surface parameters. In particular, the availability of Ka-band observations allows AMSR-E and WindSat to obtain coincident surface temperature estimates required for the retrieval of surface soil moisture. In contrast, SMOS and SMAP carry only a single frequency radiometer and therefore lack an instrument suited to estimate the physical temperature of the Earth. Instead, soil moisture algorithms from these new generation satellites rely on ancillary sources of surface temperature (e.g. re-analysis or near real time data from weather prediction centres. A consequence of relying on such ancillary data is the need for temporal and spatial interpolation, which may introduce uncertainties. Here, two newly-developed, large-scale soil moisture evaluation techniques, the triple collocation (TC approach and the Rvalue data assimilation approach, are applied to quantify the global-scale impact of replacing Ka-band based surface temperature retrievals with Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA surface temperature output on the accuracy of WindSat and AMSR-E based surface soil moisture retrievals. Results demonstrate that under sparsely vegetated conditions, the use of

  18. OBSERVED ASTEROID SURFACE AREA IN THE THERMAL INFRARED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, C. R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Kramer, E.; Sonnett, S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wright, E. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2017-02-01

    The rapid accumulation of thermal infrared observations and shape models of asteroids has led to increased interest in thermophysical modeling. Most of these infrared observations are unresolved. We consider what fraction of an asteroid’s surface area contributes the bulk of the emitted thermal flux for two model asteroids of different shapes over a range of thermal parameters. The resulting observed surface in the infrared is generally more fragmented than the area observed in visible wavelengths, indicating high sensitivity to shape. For objects with low values of the thermal parameter, small fractions of the surface contribute the majority of thermally emitted flux. Calculating observed areas could enable the production of spatially resolved thermal inertia maps from non-resolved observations of asteroids.

  19. Recent space shuttle observations of the South Atlantic anomaly and the radiation belt models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konradi, A.; Badhwar, G. D.; Braby, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Active ingredients consisting of Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) and a Proton and Heavy Ion Detector (PHIDE) have been carried on a number of Space Shuttle flights. These instruments have allowed us to map out parts of the South Atlantic Particle Anomaly (SAA) and to compare some of it's features with predictions of the AP-8 energetic proton flux models. We have observed that consistent with the generally observed westward drift of the surface features of the terrestial magnetic field of the SAA has moved west by about 6.9 degrees longitude between the epoch year 1970 of the AP-8 solar maximum model and the Space Shuttle observations made twenty years later. However, calculations indicate that except for relatively brief periods following very large magnetic storms the SAA seems to occupy the same position in L-space as in 1970. After the great storm of 24 March 1991 reconfiguration of the inner radiation belt and/or proton injection into the inner belt, a second energetic proton belt was observed to form at approximately equal to 2. As confirmed by a subsequent flight observations, this belt was shown to persist at least for six months. Our measurements also indicate an upward shift in the L location of the primary belt from L = 1.4 to L = 1.5. In addition we confirm through direct real time observations the existence and the approximate magnitude of the East-West effect. If the need exists for improved and updated radiation belt models in the Space Station era, these observations point out the specific features that should be considered and incorporated when this task is undertaken.

  20. Anomaly observed in Moessbauer spectra near the neel temperature of FeBr sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Naili Di

    2003-01-01

    In several decades, iron(II) bromide (FeBr sub 2) has been investigated as a typical Ising-type antiferromagnet by several kinds of experimental techniques. By the Moessbauer measurements, it was normally observed that only the magnetic spectrum appeared just below Neel temperature in FeBr sub 2. However, we found the anomalous spectra, in which paramagnetic component coexisted with magnetic one near Neel temperature. For two kinds of single crystal FeBr sub 2 samples, IM and IIM, we determined the Moessbauer parameters of the observed spectra by the computer analyses: the relative absorption intensity I sub p of the paramagnetic component to the total absorption area of the best fitting spectrum and the value of the hyperfine field H sub h sub f of the magnetic component and values of the quadrupole splitting 1/2 centre dot e sup 2 qQ of the magnetic and the paramagnetic components. The temperature variation of H sub h sub f is unique and the same as that observed for the sample in which the anomaly was not ...

  1. Experimental Observation of Thermal Self-Modulation in OPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiangrui; Wang, Hai; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    1996-01-01

    The thermal self-modulation has been observed experimentally via SHG in OPO. The threshold pump power for the thermal self- modulation is much smaller than that of the nonlinear self-pulsing. The thermal effect prevent from realizing the theoretical prediction for the self-pulsing.

  2. Urban air temperature anomalies and their relation to soil moisture observed in the city of Hamburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Wiesner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of the urban air temperature for the city of Hamburg is analyzed based upon a one-year dataset of meteorological and pedological measurements. As local air temperature anomalies are subject to land-use and surface cover, they are monitored by a network of measurement stations within three different urban structures. Mean annual temperature deviations are found to be +1.0K$+1.0\\,\\text{K}$ for inner city sites and +0.25K$+0.25\\,\\text{K}$ to -0.2K$-0.2\\,\\text{K}$ for suburban sites compared to a rural reference. The nocturnal urban heat island (UHI is identified and averages +1.7K$+1.7\\,\\text{K}$ at the inner city stations, +0.7K$+0.7\\,\\text{K}$ at a suburban district housing area and +0.3K$+0.3\\,\\text{K}$ at a nearby green space. The observed UHI effect is most prominent when the wind speed is low (≤2ms-1$\\leq2\\,\\text{ms}^{-1}$ and the sky is only partly cloudy (≤6∕8th$\\leq6/8^{\\text{th}}$. In spring 2011 an average inner city UHI of up to +5.2K$+5.2\\,\\text{K}$ is observed during situations matching these conditions, while the extraordinary dry fall of 2011 lead to remarkably high air temperature differences at all observed stations. As expected, no evidence for a significant impact of topsoil moisture on nighttime UHI effect is found. The analysis of air temperature anomalies during daytime results in an annual mean deviation of -0.5K$-0.5\\,\\text{K}$ above unsealed, vegetated surfaces from a sealed site during days with a turbulent mixing induced by wind speed >2ms-1$>2\\,\\text{ms}^{-1}$. Here, there is an indication for a relation between the water content of upper soil layers and the warming of air: 11 to 17 % of the variance of the diurnal air temperature span is found to be explained by the soil water content for selected relevant days.

  3. Comparison of satellite altimetry sea level anomalies and hydrographic observations in the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Mir Calafat

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Steric sea level (SSL computed from hydrographic observations in the Mediterranean Sea is compared against altimetric sea level anomalies (SLA at seasonal and inter-annual time scales for the period 1993-2008. SSL (referenced to 300 m is computed using two data sets: in situ profiles and gridded products obtained from interpolated observations. The impact of expendable/mechanical bathythermograph (XBT/MBT biases affecting some of the in situ profiles is investigated by comparing both corrected and uncorrected data. For the period 2003-2008 the mass component is estimated from GRACE observations and subtracted from SLA. The analysis of the spatio-temporal distribution of profiles shows that the number of profiles with data below 300 m is a small percentage of the total and that their spatial coverage of the Mediterranean basin is very limited. This is an important handicap for regions where the contribution of the deep layers to SSL is significant. Overall, SSL and SLA are shown to be consistent in the Mediterranean at seasonal time scales, although the annual amplitude of the SSL from in situ profiles and interpolated data is considerably smaller than that of the SLA. The agreement at inter-annual time scales is less good. At some particular locations SSL computed from individual profiles is more correlated with SLA than the gridded products. At basin and sub-basin scales, however, interpolated and in situ observations provide similar results in terms of their correlation with observed SLA. The XBT/MBT bias corrections have little effect on the SSL at the time scales considered in this study.

  4. Observations in equatorial anomaly region of total electron content enhancements and depletions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dashora

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A GSV 4004A GPS receiver has been operational near the crest of the equatorial anomaly at Udaipur, India for some time now. The receiver provides the line-of-sight total electron content (TEC, the phase and amplitude scintillation index, σφ and S4, respectively. This paper presents the first results on the nighttime TEC depletions associated with the equatorial spread F in the Indian zone. The TEC depletions are found to be very well correlated with the increased S4 index. A new feature of low-latitude TEC is also reported, concerning the observation of isolated and localized TEC enhancements in the nighttime low-latitude ionosphere. The TEC enhancements are not correlated with the S4 index. The TEC enhancements have also been observed along with the TEC depletions. The TEC enhancements have been interpreted as the manifestation of the plasma density enhancements reported by Le et al. (2003.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere; Ionospheric irregularities

  5. Lower atmospheric anomalies following the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake observed by GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Han, L.; Cho, J.

    2011-05-01

    The Mw=8.0 Wenchuan Earthquake occurred on May 12, 2008 at the Longmen Shan fault, the western Sichuan Basin, China, killing more than ten thousand people in several cities and causing large economic losses. Global Positioning System (GPS) observations have provided unique insights on this event, including co-seismic ionospheric disturbances, co-/post-seismic crustal deformations and fault slip distributions. However, the processes and the driving mechanisms are still not clear, particularly possible seismo-lower atmospheric-ionospheric coupling behaviors. In this paper, the lower atmospheric (tropospheric) variations are investigated using the total zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) from GPS measurements around this event. It has the first found co-seismic tropospheric anomalies during the mainshock with an increase and then a decrease, mainly in the zenith hydrostatic delay component (ZHD), while it is also supported by the same pattern of surface-observed atmospheric pressure changes at co-located GPS site that are driven by the ground-coupled air waves from ground vertical motion of seismic waves propagation. Therefore, the co-seismic tropospheric disturbances (CTD) indicate again the acoustic coupling effect of the atmosphere and the solid-Earth with air wave propagation from the ground to the top atmosphere.

  6. Observed ocean thermal response to Hurricanes Gustav and Ike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Patrick C.; Shay, Lynn K.; Brewster, Jodi K.; Jaimes, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The 2008 Atlantic hurricane season featured two hurricanes, Gustav and Ike, crossing the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) within a 2 week period. Over 400 airborne expendable bathythermographs (AXBTs) were deployed in a GOM field campaign before, during, and after the passage of Gustav and Ike to measure the evolving upper ocean thermal structure. AXBT and drifter deployments specifically targeted the Loop Current (LC) complex, which was undergoing an eddy-shedding event during the field campaign. Hurricane Gustav forced a 50 m deepening of the ocean mixed layer (OML), dramatically altering the prestorm ocean conditions for Hurricane Ike. Wind-forced entrainment of colder thermocline water into the OML caused sea surface temperatures to cool by over 5°C in GOM common water, but only 1-2°C in the LC complex. Ekman pumping and a near-inertial wake were identified by fluctuations in the 20°C isotherm field observed by AXBTs and drifters following Hurricane Ike. Satellite estimates of the 20° and 26°C isotherm depths and ocean heat content were derived using a two-layer model driven by sea surface height anomalies. Generally, the satellite estimates correctly characterized prestorm conditions, but the two-layer model inherently could not resolve wind-forced mixing of the OML. This study highlights the importance of a coordinated satellite and in situ measurement strategy to accurately characterize the ocean state before, during, and after hurricane passage, particularly in the case of two consecutive storms traveling through the same domain.

  7. South China Sea crustal thickness and lithosphere thinning from satellite gravity inversion incorporating a lithospheric thermal gravity anomaly correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusznir, Nick; Gozzard, Simon; Alvey, Andy

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of ocean crust and lithosphere within the South China Sea (SCS) are controversial. Sea-floor spreading re-orientation and ridge jumps during the Oligocene-Miocene formation of the South China Sea led to the present complex distribution of oceanic crust, thinned continental crust, micro-continents and volcanic ridges. We determine Moho depth, crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning (1- 1/beta) for the South China Sea using a gravity inversion method which incorporates a lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly correction (Chappell & Kusznir, 2008). The gravity inversion method provides a prediction of ocean-continent transition structure and continent-ocean boundary location which is independent of ocean isochron information. A correction is required for the lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly in order to determine Moho depth accurately from gravity inversion; the elevated lithosphere geotherm of the young oceanic and rifted continental margin lithosphere of the South China Sea produces a large lithosphere thermal gravity anomaly which in places exceeds -150 mGal. The gravity anomaly inversion is carried out in the 3D spectral domain (using Parker 1972) to determine 3D Moho geometry and invokes Smith's uniqueness theorem. The gravity anomaly contribution from sediments assumes a compaction controlled sediment density increase with depth. The gravity inversion includes a parameterization of the decompression melting model of White & McKenzie (1999) to predict volcanic addition generated during continental breakup lithosphere thinning and seafloor spreading. Public domain free air gravity anomaly, bathymetry and sediment thickness data are used in this gravity inversion. Using crustal thickness and continental lithosphere thinning factor maps with superimposed shaded-relief free-air gravity anomaly, we improve the determination of pre-breakup rifted margin conjugacy, rift orientation and sea-floor spreading trajectory. SCS conjugate margins

  8. The intermediate layers and associated tidal motions observed by a digisonde in the equatorial anomaly region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Lee

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This investigation presents an initial attempt to analyze a full year of daily ionosonde observations relevant to the determination of plasma densities, tidal structures, and ion transports in the equatorial anomaly region of the lower ionosphere. Particular focus is on the intermediate layers, their seasonal and diurnal variations, and cause-effect relationships. The ionogram database was recorded using a digisonde portable sounder (DPS at National Central University (NCU, 24 °58' N, 121°11' E during 1996. Statistical results indicate that the intermediate layers appear primarily during the daytime of the spring/winter months. The monthly median height characteristics reveal that the layers descend from high to low altitudes and different tidal motions control the layers in different months. Generally, the semi-diurnal and quarter-diurnal tides, which cause ionization convergence, are mainly in the spring/winter and summer/autumn months, respectively. Variations in the electron densities of the layers also indicate that the density increases could result from a great number of molecular and metallic ions. Furthermore, a novel approach to ionogram presentation is introduced to investigate the intermediate layers. This approach allows the DPS to characterize the detailed daily information of the intermediate layers.Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  9. Outcome of assisted reproduction in women with congenital uterine anomalies: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, M; Richardson, A; Asif, S; Polanski, L; Parris-Larkin, M; Chandler, J; Fogg, L; Jassal, P; Thornton, J G; Raine-Fenning, N J

    2018-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of congenital uterine anomalies, including arcuate uterus, and their effect on reproductive outcome in subfertile women undergoing assisted reproduction. Consecutive women referred for subfertility between May 2009 and November 2015 who underwent assisted reproduction were included in the study. As part of the initial assessment, each woman underwent three-dimensional transvaginal sonography. Uterine morphology was classified using the modified American Fertility Society (AFS) classification of congenital uterine anomalies proposed by Salim et al. If the external contour of the uterus was uniformly convex or had an indentation of Reproductive outcomes, including live birth, clinical pregnancy and preterm birth, were compared between women with a normal uterus and those with a congenital uterine anomaly. Subgroup analysis by type of uterine morphology and logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, levels of anti-Müllerian hormone, antral follicle count and number and day of embryo transfer were performed. A total of 2375 women were included in the study, of whom 1943 (81.8%) had a normal uterus and 432 (18.2%) had a congenital uterine anomaly. The most common anomalies were arcuate (n = 387 (16.3%)) and subseptate (n = 16 (0.7%)) uterus. The rate of live birth was similar between women with a uterine anomaly and those with a normal uterus (35% vs 37%; P = 0.47). The rates of clinical pregnancy, mode of delivery and sex of the newborn were also similar between the two groups. Preterm birth before 37 weeks' gestation was more common in women with uterine anomalies than in controls (22% vs 14%, respectively; P = 0.03). Subgroup analysis by type of anomaly showed no difference in the incidence of live birth and clinical pregnancy for women with an arcuate uterus, but indicated worse pregnancy outcome in women with other major anomalies (P = 0.042 and 0.048, respectively). Congenital uterine anomalies as a whole, when

  10. Prevalence of dental anomalies among 7- to 35-year-old people in Hamadan, Iran in 2012-2013 as observed using panoramic radiographys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokri, A bbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Khajeh, Samira; Faramarzi, Farhad; Kahnamoui, Hanieh Mogaver [Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the prevalence of all types and subtypes of dental anomalies among 7- to 35-year-old patients by using panoramic radiographs. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 1649 people in Hamadan City, in 2012-2013. The prevalence of four types and 12 subtypes of dental anomalies was evaluated by two observers separately by using panoramic radiography. Dental anomalies were divided into four types: (a) shape (including fusion, taurodontism, and dens invagination); (b) number (including hypodontia, oligodontia, and hyperdontia); (c) structure (including amelogenesis imperfecta, dentinogenesis imperfecta, and dentin dysplasia); and (d) position (including displacement, impaction, and dilacerations). The reliability between the two observers was 79.56% according to the Kappa statistics. The prevalence of dental anomalies diagnosed by panoramic radiographs was 29%. Anomalies of position and number were the most common types of abnormalities, and anomalies of shape and structure were the least in both genders. Anomalies of impaction (44.76%), dilacerations (21.11%), hypodontia (15.88%), taurodontism (9.29%), and hyperdontia (6.76%) were the most common subtypes of dental anomalies. The anomalies of shape and number were more common in the age groups of 7-12 years and 13-15 years, respectively, while the anomalies of structure and position were more common among the other age groups. Anomalies of tooth position were the most common type of dental anomalies, and structure anomalies were the least in this Iranian population. The frequency and type of dental anomalies vary within and between populations, confirming the role of racial factors in the prevalence of dental anomalies.

  11. The influence of regional surface soil moisture anomalies on forest fires in Siberia observed from satellites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, A [Institute of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Balzter, H [Department of Geography, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); George, C, E-mail: ab@ipf.tuwien.ac.a [Earth Observation, Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Crowmarsh Gifford, Wallingford OX10 8BB (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-15

    Forest fires are frequent in the Siberian taiga and are predicted to increase in frequency as a result of increased fire risk under drought conditions, and prolonged fire seasons caused by climate change. There is, however, some uncertainty as to the extent to which drought influences forest fire frequency at a regional scale. Here, we present an analysis of satellite derived soil moisture anomaly data from ERS-1/2 (ERS: Earth Resources Satellite) scatterometer data and burned area maps from MODIS/AVHRR/ATSR (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) over Central Siberia for the years 1992-2000. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship of remotely sensed soil moisture deviations from the long-term mean and fire within the boreal biome on a sub-continental scale. Results show that wet surface soil moisture conditions limit the extent of burned area. They can prevent the outbreak of fires but the magnitude of a negative (dry) deviation does not determine the maximum size of fire affected areas. It is known from the literature, however, that an ignition is more likely to occur under low surface wetness conditions, such as those that we observed during July and August in both permafrost and non-permafrost regions. Although the burned area under drier conditions in July is lowest over non-permafrost, the actual number of fires is as high as over continuous permafrost. Approximately 80% of all events occurred under such conditions during that month. The fire size was below 50 km{sup 2} under moist conditions. Larger burned areas have in general not been detected when the surface wetness deviation exceeded +5%.

  12. Observing a scale anomaly and a universal quantum phase transition in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovdat, O; Mao, Jinhai; Jiang, Yuhang; Andrei, E Y; Akkermans, E

    2017-09-11

    One of the most interesting predictions resulting from quantum physics, is the violation of classical symmetries, collectively referred to as anomalies. A remarkable class of anomalies occurs when the continuous scale symmetry of a scale-free quantum system is broken into a discrete scale symmetry for a critical value of a control parameter. This is an example of a (zero temperature) quantum phase transition. Such an anomaly takes place for the quantum inverse square potential known to describe 'Efimov physics'. Broken continuous scale symmetry into discrete scale symmetry also appears for a charged and massless Dirac fermion in an attractive 1/r Coulomb potential. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the universality of this quantum phase transition and to present convincing experimental evidence of its existence for a charged and massless fermion in an attractive Coulomb potential as realized in graphene.When the continuous scale symmetry of a quantum system is broken, anomalies occur which may lead to quantum phase transitions. Here, the authors provide evidence for such a quantum phase transition in the attractive Coulomb potential of vacancies in graphene, and further envision its universality for diverse physical systems.

  13. Novel Hypomorphic Mutation in FANCD2 Gene Observed in a Fetus with Multiple Congenital Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslava Vazharova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies affect 1% to 2% of the newborns. The urinary tract and the kidneys are involved in 4-5% of the cases while upper-extremities abnormalities are present in 10%. Certain anomalies occur in isolation, whereas others are associated with systemic conditions. The prenatal detection of fetal anomalies compatible with life is a challenge for both the parents and the physician. The prognosis for the fetus/newborn and the reproductive decisions of the family largely depend on the causes underlying the disease. The reported case is of a G2P1 pregnant woman referred for routine ultrasound scan at 24 weeks of gestation (w.g.. The fetus had growth retardation, right kidney agenesis, bilateral absence of radial bones and thumbs, radial deviation of the wrists, and short humeri. Nuchal fold thickness was 5 mm and there was a single umbilical artery. After termination of pregnancy, SNP array genotyping and next-generation sequencing of targeted candidate-genes were performed trying to clarify the etiology of the fetal polymalformative syndrome. A new hypomorphic mutation in FANCD2 gene was found to underlie this fetal anomaly. The case illustrates that patients/families affected by rare monogenic disorders may benefit from application of modern technologies like microarrays and NGS.

  14. Near-Curie magnetic anomaly at the Ni/C interface observed by Electron Holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, Loris; Matteucci, Giorgio; Schofield, Marvin A

    2010-01-01

    We analyze with electron holography carried out in a transmission electron microscope the near-Curie behavior of magnetism at the edge of a Nickel thin film coated with Carbon. In-situ experiments with finely controlled variations of the sample temperature reveal an anomaly in the ferromagnetic t...

  15. Interpreting anomalies observed in oxide semiconductor TFTs under negative and positive bias stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, J.W.; Nathan, A.; Barquinha, P.; Pereira, L.; Fortunato, E.; Martins, R.; Cobb, B.

    2016-01-01

    Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors can show anomalous behavior under bias stress. Two types of anomalies are discussed in this paper. The first is the shift in threshold voltage (VTH) in a direction opposite to the applied bias stress, and highly dependent on gate dielectric material. We

  16. [Anomaly of infrared thermal radiation intensity on unilateral mild to moderate Bell's palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu-long; Hong, Wen-xue; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Zhen-ying; Zhang, Dong

    2011-05-01

    Bell's palsy is a kind of facial nerve diseases with a high incidence, and the patients who get the disease the first time predominate in the patients who suffer mildly or moderately. The aim of the present study is to explore a novel assessment for Bell's palsy objectively and noninvasively based on infrared thermal image. As the acupoints on the face are approximately bilateral symmetric, the acupoints on the affected side were chosen as the experimental group, while the same ones on the other side as the control group. Their infrared thermal radiations were researched separately and the results were as follows: on acute stage, the differences of infrared thermal radiation intensity of the same points were significant between the healthy and affected sides, indicating significant temperature difference (over 0.3 degrees C). The acupoints on the affected side with its surrounding tissue formed an irregular abnormal region on the infrared thermal image. Its pseudocolor was obviously different from that of the healthy side. At the same time, the more serious the Bell's palsy, the more evident the temperature differences of the same acupoints on bilateral sides. It was positive correlation (r=0.676, r=0.498, r=0.506, r=0.545, r=0.518, all Pinfrared thermal image could be used to objectively assess the severity of Bell' palsy.

  17. Can nuclear physics explain the anomaly observed in the internal pair production in the Beryllium-8 nucleus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xilin; Miller, Gerald A.

    2017-10-01

    Recently the experimentalists in Krasznahorkay (2016) [1] announced observing an unexpected enhancement of the e+-e- pair production signal in one of the 8Be nuclear transitions. The subsequent studies have been focused on possible explanations based on introducing new types of particle. In this work, we improve the nuclear physics modeling of the reaction by studying the pair emission anisotropy and the interferences between different multipoles in an effective field theory inspired framework, and examine their possible relevance to the anomaly. The connection between the previously measured on-shell photon production and the pair production in the same nuclear transitions is established. These improvements, absent in the original experimental analysis, should be included in extracting new particle's properties from the experiment of this type. However, the improvements can not explain the anomaly. We then explore the nuclear transition form factor as a possible origin of the anomaly, and find the required form factor to be unrealistic for the 8Be nucleus. The reduction of the anomaly's significance by simply rescaling our predicted event count is also investigated.

  18. Can nuclear physics explain the anomaly observed in the internal pair production in the Beryllium-8 nucleus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xilin Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently the experimentalists in Krasznahorkay (2016 [1] announced observing an unexpected enhancement of the e+–e− pair production signal in one of the 8Be nuclear transitions. The subsequent studies have been focused on possible explanations based on introducing new types of particle. In this work, we improve the nuclear physics modeling of the reaction by studying the pair emission anisotropy and the interferences between different multipoles in an effective field theory inspired framework, and examine their possible relevance to the anomaly. The connection between the previously measured on-shell photon production and the pair production in the same nuclear transitions is established. These improvements, absent in the original experimental analysis, should be included in extracting new particle's properties from the experiment of this type. However, the improvements can not explain the anomaly. We then explore the nuclear transition form factor as a possible origin of the anomaly, and find the required form factor to be unrealistic for the 8Be nucleus. The reduction of the anomaly's significance by simply rescaling our predicted event count is also investigated.

  19. Interpreting anomalies observed in oxide semiconductor TFTs under negative and positive bias stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jong Woo; Nathan, Arokia; Barquinha, Pedro; Pereira, Luís; Fortunato, Elvira; Martins, Rodrigo; Cobb, Brian

    2016-08-01

    Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors can show anomalous behavior under bias stress. Two types of anomalies are discussed in this paper. The first is the shift in threshold voltage (VTH) in a direction opposite to the applied bias stress, and highly dependent on gate dielectric material. We attribute this to charge trapping/detrapping and charge migration within the gate dielectric. We emphasize the fundamental difference between trapping/detrapping events occurring at the semiconductor/dielectric interface and those occurring at gate/dielectric interface, and show that charge migration is essential to explain the first anomaly. We model charge migration in terms of the non-instantaneous polarization density. The second type of anomaly is negative VTH shift under high positive bias stress, with logarithmic evolution in time. This can be argued as electron-donating reactions involving H2O molecules or derived species, with a reaction rate exponentially accelerated by positive gate bias and exponentially decreased by the number of reactions already occurred.

  20. Interpreting anomalies observed in oxide semiconductor TFTs under negative and positive bias stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woo Jin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxide semiconductor thin-film transistors can show anomalous behavior under bias stress. Two types of anomalies are discussed in this paper. The first is the shift in threshold voltage (VTH in a direction opposite to the applied bias stress, and highly dependent on gate dielectric material. We attribute this to charge trapping/detrapping and charge migration within the gate dielectric. We emphasize the fundamental difference between trapping/detrapping events occurring at the semiconductor/dielectric interface and those occurring at gate/dielectric interface, and show that charge migration is essential to explain the first anomaly. We model charge migration in terms of the non-instantaneous polarization density. The second type of anomaly is negative VTH shift under high positive bias stress, with logarithmic evolution in time. This can be argued as electron-donating reactions involving H2O molecules or derived species, with a reaction rate exponentially accelerated by positive gate bias and exponentially decreased by the number of reactions already occurred.

  1. Gravity anomalies and lithospheric flexure around the Longmen Shan deduced from combinations of in situ observations and EGM2008 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Yawen; Fu, Guangyu; Wang, Zhuohua; Liu, Tai; Xu, Changyi; Jin, Honglin

    2016-10-01

    The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. These new FGAs show pairs of positive and negative anomalies along the eastern edges of the Tibetan Plateau. The FGAs are used to calculate effective elastic thickness ( T e) and load ratios ( F) of the lithosphere. Admittance analysis indicates the T e of Longmen Shan (LMS) to be 6 km, and profile analysis indicates that the T e of the Sichuan Basin excesses 30 km. The load ratio ( F 1 = 1) confirms that the lithospheric flexure of the LMS area can be attributed solely to the surface load of the crust. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: The current work describes the combined data of three field campaigns, spanning 2009-2013. Their joint gravity and GPS observations thoroughly cover the sites of lithospheric flexure between the Sichuan Basin and the Eastern Tibetan Plateau. The study area's free-air gravity anomalies (FGAs) are updated by using a remove-and-restore algorithm which merges EGM2008 data with in situ observations. With the new FGAs data, the lithospheric strength of the study area is studied by the authors, and they also give a combined model to illustrate the uplift mechanism of this area.

  2. Provisional maps of thermal areas in Yellowstone National Park, based on satellite thermal infrared imaging and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. Greg; Heasler, Henry; Jaworowski, Cheryl; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2014-01-01

    Maps that define the current distribution of geothermally heated ground are useful toward setting a baseline for thermal activity to better detect and understand future anomalous hydrothermal and (or) volcanic activity. Monitoring changes in the dynamic thermal areas also supports decisions regarding the development of Yellowstone National Park infrastructure, preservation and protection of park resources, and ensuring visitor safety. Because of the challenges associated with field-based monitoring of a large, complex geothermal system that is spread out over a large and remote area, satellite-based thermal infrared images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) were used to map the location and spatial extent of active thermal areas, to generate thermal anomaly maps, and to quantify the radiative component of the total geothermal heat flux. ASTER thermal infrared data acquired during winter nights were used to minimize the contribution of solar heating of the surface. The ASTER thermal infrared mapping results were compared to maps of thermal areas based on field investigations and high-resolution aerial photos. Field validation of the ASTER thermal mapping is an ongoing task. The purpose of this report is to make available ASTER-based maps of Yellowstone’s thermal areas. We include an appendix containing the names and characteristics of Yellowstone’s thermal areas, georeferenced TIFF files containing ASTER thermal imagery, and several spatial data sets in Esri shapefile format.

  3. A mode-coupling theory analysis of the observed diffusion anomaly in aqueous polyatomic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Puja; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-09-28

    In contrast to simple monatomic alkali and halide ions, complex polyatomic ions such as nitrate, acetate, nitrite, and chlorate have not been studied in any great detail. Experiments have shown that diffusion of polyatomic ions exhibits many remarkable anomalies; notable among them is the fact that polyatomic ions with similar size show large difference in their diffusivity values. This fact has drawn relatively little interest in scientific discussions. We show here that a mode-coupling theory can provide a physically meaningful interpretation of the anomalous diffusivity of polyatomic ions in water, by including the contribution of rotational jumps on translational friction. The two systems discussed here, namely, aqueous nitrate ion and aqueous acetate ion, although have similar ionic radii, exhibit largely different diffusivity values due to the differences in the rate of their rotational jump motions. We have further verified the mode-coupling theory formalism by comparing it with experimental and simulation results that agree well with the theoretical prediction.

  4. A mode-coupling theory analysis of the observed diffusion anomaly in aqueous polyatomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Puja; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to simple monatomic alkali and halide ions, complex polyatomic ions such as nitrate, acetate, nitrite, and chlorate have not been studied in any great detail. Experiments have shown that diffusion of polyatomic ions exhibits many remarkable anomalies; notable among them is the fact that polyatomic ions with similar size show large difference in their diffusivity values. This fact has drawn relatively little interest in scientific discussions. We show here that a mode-coupling theory can provide a physically meaningful interpretation of the anomalous diffusivity of polyatomic ions in water, by including the contribution of rotational jumps on translational friction. The two systems discussed here, namely, aqueous nitrate ion and aqueous acetate ion, although have similar ionic radii, exhibit largely different diffusivity values due to the differences in the rate of their rotational jump motions. We have further verified the mode-coupling theory formalism by comparing it with experimental and simulation results that agree well with the theoretical prediction.

  5. Sunspot number recalibration: The 1840-1920 anomaly in the observer normalization factors of the group sunspot number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, Edward W.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the normalization factors (k'-factors) used to scale secondary observers to the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO) reference series of the Hoyt & Schatten (1998a, 1998b) group sunspot number (GSN). A time series of these k'-factors exhibits an anomaly from 1841 to 1920, viz., the average k'-factor for all observers who began reporting groups from 1841 to 1883 is 1.075 vs. 1.431 for those who began from 1884 to 1920, with a progressive rise, on average, during the latter period. The 1883-1884 break between the two subintervals occurs precisely at the point where Hoyt and Schatten began to use a complex daisy-chaining method to scale observers to RGO. The 1841-1920 anomaly implies, implausibly, that the average sunspot observer who began from 1841 to 1883 was nearly as proficient at counting groups as mid-20th century RGO (for which k' = 1.0 by definition) while observers beginning during the 1884-1920 period regressed in group counting capability relative to those from the earlier interval. Instead, as shown elsewhere and substantiated here, RGO group counts increased relative to those of other long-term observers from 1874 to 1915. This apparent inhomogeneity in the RGO group count series is primarily responsible for the increase in k'-factors from 1884 to 1920 and the suppression, by 44% on average, of the Hoyt and Schatten GSN relative to the original Wolf sunspot number (WSN) before 1885. Correcting for the early "learning curve" in the RGO reference series and minimizing the use of daisy-chaining rectifies the anomalous behavior of the k'-factor series. The resultant GSN time series (designated GSN*) is in reasonable agreement with the revised WSN (SN*; Clette & Lefèvre 2016) and the backbone-based group sunspot number (RGS; Svalgaard & Schatten 2016) but significantly higher than other recent reconstructions (Friedli, personal communication, 2016; Lockwood et al. 2014a, 2014b, Usoskin et al. 2016a). This result is substantiated by a "correction

  6. Sunspot number recalibration: The ~1840–1920 anomaly in the observer normalization factors of the group sunspot number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliver Edward W.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the normalization factors (k′-factors used to scale secondary observers to the Royal Greenwich Observatory (RGO reference series of the Hoyt & Schatten (1998a, 1998b group sunspot number (GSN. A time series of these k′-factors exhibits an anomaly from 1841 to 1920, viz., the average k′-factor for all observers who began reporting groups from 1841 to 1883 is 1.075 vs. 1.431 for those who began from 1884 to 1920, with a progressive rise, on average, during the latter period. The 1883–1884 break between the two subintervals occurs precisely at the point where Hoyt and Schatten began to use a complex daisy-chaining method to scale observers to RGO. The 1841–1920 anomaly implies, implausibly, that the average sunspot observer who began from 1841 to 1883 was nearly as proficient at counting groups as mid-20th century RGO (for which k′ = 1.0 by definition while observers beginning during the 1884–1920 period regressed in group counting capability relative to those from the earlier interval. Instead, as shown elsewhere and substantiated here, RGO group counts increased relative to those of other long-term observers from 1874 to ~1915. This apparent inhomogeneity in the RGO group count series is primarily responsible for the increase in k′-factors from 1884 to 1920 and the suppression, by 44% on average, of the Hoyt and Schatten GSN relative to the original Wolf sunspot number (WSN before ~1885. Correcting for the early “learning curve” in the RGO reference series and minimizing the use of daisy-chaining rectifies the anomalous behavior of the k′-factor series. The resultant GSN time series (designated GSN* is in reasonable agreement with the revised WSN (SN*; Clette & Lefèvre 2016 and the backbone-based group sunspot number (RGS; Svalgaard & Schatten 2016 but significantly higher than other recent reconstructions (Friedli, personal communication, 2016; Lockwood et al. 2014a, 2014b; Usoskin et al. 2016a. This result

  7. Test for consistence of a flyby anomaly simulation with the observed Doppler residuals for the Messenger flybys of Mercury

    CERN Document Server

    Busack, Hans-Juergen

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the observed Earth flyby anomalies have been successfully simulated using an empirical formula (H. J. Busack, 2007). This simulation has led to the prediction of anomaly values, to be expected for the Rosetta flybys of Mars in 2007, and following twice of Earth in 2007 and 2009. While the data for the Mars flyby are yet under evaluation, the predictions of the formula for the last two Earth flybys of Rosetta are fully confirmed now. This is remarkable, since an alternatively proposed formula (Anderson et al., 2007) failed to predict the correct values for the recent flybys. For the Mercury flybys of the Messenger spacecraft, this alternative formula predicts a null result. In the meantime, Doppler residuals of these flybys on 14.01.2008 and 06.10.2008 are availabel. On both flybys, significant residuals were observed, using gravity data derived by Mariner 10 on Mercury (D. E. Smith et al., 2009). According to the authors, these residuals cannot be eliminated totally by adjustment of the second degree...

  8. Antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests: an exploratory video-observational study about client-midwife communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Linda; Hutton, Eileen K; Gitsels-van der Wal, Janneke T; Spelten, Evelien R; Kuiper, Fleur; Pereboom, Monique T R; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests is conceptualised as having both Health Education (HE) and Decision-Making Support (DMS) functions. Building and maintaining a client-midwife relation (CMR) is seen as a necessary condition for enabling these two counselling functions. However, little is known about how these functions are fulfilled in daily practice. This study aims to describe the relative expression of the antenatal counselling functions; to describe the ratio of client versus midwife conversational contribution and to get insight into clients' characteristics, which are associated with midwives' expressions of the functions of antenatal counselling. exploratory video-observational study. 269 videotaped antenatal counselling sessions for congenital anomaly tests provided by 20 midwives within six Dutch practices. we used an adapted version of the Roter Interaction Analysis System to code the client-midwife communication. Multilevel linear regression analyses were used to analyse associations between clients' characteristics and midwives' expressions of antenatal counselling in practice. most utterances made during counselling were coded as HE (41%); a quarter as DMS (23%) and 36% as CMR. Midwives contributed the most to the HE compared to clients or their partners (91% versus 9%) and less to the DMS function of counselling (61% versus 39%). Multilevel analyses showed an independent association between parity and shorter duration of antenatal counselling; (β=-3.01; pcounselling of multipara was less compared to nulliparous. antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests by midwives is focused on giving HE compared to DMS. The relatively low contribution of clients during DMS might indicate poor DMS given by midwives. Counselling of multipara was significantly shorter than counselling of nulliparous; multiparae received less HE as well as DMS compared to nulliparous women. our findings should encourage midwives to reflect on the process of

  9. An equatorial bubble: Its evolution observed in relation to bottomside spread F and to the Appleton anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, J. A.

    2000-03-01

    This is a case study that undertakes the first comprehensive description of the concurrent evolutions of an isolated equatorial bubble, bottomside spread F (BSSF), and the enhanced Appleton anomaly. A principal focus is the dynamics of the intersection of the bubble with the anomaly crest which is the source of maximum scintillation on transionospheric RF propagation. Conditions are equinox at solar maximum. Measurements were by an array of eight ionospheric sounders in the Western Hemisphere with a collective field of view extending along the dip equator for about 1600 km and to 40° north dip latitude that resolved rapid changes in the phenomena yet encompassed their extent and duration. Viewed locally, the bubble was triggered by an upwelling of the bottomside F layer during E×B upward drift that accelerated upward for 15-20 min before the onset of irregularities seen as range spread F (RSF). Viewed macroscopically, this onset was part of continuous front of RSF onset that coincided with E×B reversal and moved westward at the velocity of the terminator so as to remain at 1920 LT, to the cast of the bubble as BSSF; within the bubble during the upwelling of the bottomside crest; at the west wall of the bubble at the onset of its eastward drift; and west of the bubble as BSSF. The bubble drifted eastward at 185 m/s and rose upward at continuous contact with the anomaly profile which was simultaneously increasing but as a function of LT. Thus the intersection was a function of the upward and eastward velocities of the bubble and the westward motion of the anomaly at the velocity of the terminator. The time and place of the intersection is thus dependent on the entire sequence of events and on the differing dependences on UT and LT, and since each can vary, the time and place of maximum scintillation is highly variable. In light of this variability, observations at least as comprehensive as those reported here appear to be necessary to describe the region

  10. Plasma barodiffusion in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions: application to observed yield anomalies in thermonuclear fuel mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendt, Peter; Landen, O L; Robey, H F; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2010-09-10

    The observation of large, self-generated electric fields (≥10(9)  V/m) in imploding capsules using proton radiography has been reported [C. K. Li, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225001 (2008)]. A model of pressure gradient-driven diffusion in a plasma with self-generated electric fields is developed and applied to reported neutron yield deficits for equimolar D3He [J. R. Rygg, Phys. Plasmas 13, 052702 (2006)] and (DT)3He [H. W. Herrmann, Phys. Plasmas 16, 056312 (2009)] fuel mixtures and Ar-doped deuterium fuels [J. D. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The observed anomalies are explained as a mild loss of deuterium nuclei near capsule center arising from shock-driven diffusion in the high-field limit.

  11. Estimating thermal performance curves from repeated field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childress, Evan; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2017-01-01

    Estimating thermal performance of organisms is critical for understanding population distributions and dynamics and predicting responses to climate change. Typically, performance curves are estimated using laboratory studies to isolate temperature effects, but other abiotic and biotic factors influence temperature-performance relationships in nature reducing these models' predictive ability. We present a model for estimating thermal performance curves from repeated field observations that includes environmental and individual variation. We fit the model in a Bayesian framework using MCMC sampling, which allowed for estimation of unobserved latent growth while propagating uncertainty. Fitting the model to simulated data varying in sampling design and parameter values demonstrated that the parameter estimates were accurate, precise, and unbiased. Fitting the model to individual growth data from wild trout revealed high out-of-sample predictive ability relative to laboratory-derived models, which produced more biased predictions for field performance. The field-based estimates of thermal maxima were lower than those based on laboratory studies. Under warming temperature scenarios, field-derived performance models predicted stronger declines in body size than laboratory-derived models, suggesting that laboratory-based models may underestimate climate change effects. The presented model estimates true, realized field performance, avoiding assumptions required for applying laboratory-based models to field performance, which should improve estimates of performance under climate change and advance thermal ecology.

  12. Detecting potential anomalies in projections of rainfall trends and patterns using human observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohfeld, K. E.; Savo, V.; Sillmann, J.; Morton, C.; Lepofsky, D.

    2016-12-01

    Shifting precipitation patterns are a well-documented consequence of climate change, but their spatial variability is particularly difficult to assess. While the accuracy of global models has increased, specific regional changes in precipitation regimes are not well captured by these models. Typically, researchers who wish to detect trends and patterns in climatic variables, such as precipitation, use instrumental observations. In our study, we combined observations of rainfall by subsistence-oriented communities with several metrics of rainfall estimated from global instrumental records for comparable time periods (1955 - 2005). This comparison was aimed at identifying: 1) which rainfall metrics best match human observations of changes in precipitation; 2) areas where local communities observe changes not detected by global models. The collated observations ( 3800) made by subsistence-oriented communities covered 129 countries ( 1830 localities). For comparable time periods, we saw a substantial correspondence between instrumental records and human observations (66-77%) at the same locations, regardless of whether we considered trends in general rainfall, drought, or extreme rainfall. We observed a clustering of mismatches in two specific regions, possibly indicating some climatic phenomena not completely captured by the currently available global models. Many human observations also indicated an increased unpredictability in the start, end, duration, and continuity of the rainy seasons, all of which may hamper the performance of subsistence activities. We suggest that future instrumental metrics should capture this unpredictability of rainfall. This information would be important for thousands of subsistence-oriented communities in planning, coping, and adapting to climate change.

  13. Towards improved knowledge of geology and global thermal regime from Swarm satellites magnetic gradient observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravat, Dhananjay; Olsen, Nils; Sabaka, Terence

    Anomaly Map compilation (ca. 2002), the original compilation corrected with satellite-altitude data sets, and Swarm constellation gradient corrected fields over the U.S. Using this U.S. study as a test, we examine the possibility of improving the spectral coverage in many regions of the world where...... and fidelity of the magnetic field downward continued to the Earth’s surface translate into improvements in the interpretation of anomalies for recognition of geologic variability and tectonic processes (e.g., recognizing details of geologic provinces, anomalous seafloor spreading patterns, etc., that can help...... on the interpretation, particularly the derived Curie depths and the thermal variation of the lithosphere. We examine the inaccuracies in anomalies and also their resulting interpretation using the U.S. aeromagnetic data where a full spectrum magnetic anomaly coverage is available (Ravat et al., 2009, USGS open files...

  14. The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) Version 1 - Global, 4 km, Sea Surface Temperature and Related Thermal Stress Metrics for 1985-2005 (NODC Accession 0044419)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) is a collection of sea surface temperature (SST) and related thermal stress metrics, developed specifically for...

  15. The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) Version 2 - Global, 4 km Sea Surface Temperature and Related Thermal Stress Metrics for 1982-2008 (NODC Accession Number 0054501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) is a collection of sea surface temperature (SST) and related thermal stress metrics, developed specifically for...

  16. The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) Version 5 - Global, 4 km Sea Surface Temperature and Related Thermal Stress Metrics for 1982-2012 (NCEI Accession 0126774)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Version 5 of the Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) is a global, 4 km, sea surface temperature (SST) and related thermal stress metrics dataset for...

  17. The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) Version 2 - Global, 4 km Sea Surface Temperature and Related Thermal Stress Metrics for 1982-2008 (NODC Accession 0054501)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) is a collection of sea surface temperature (SST) and related thermal stress metrics, developed specifically for...

  18. The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) Version 4 - Global, 4 km Sea Surface Temperature and Related Thermal Stress Metrics for 1981-10-31 to 2010-12-31 (NODC Accession 0087989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) is a collection of sea surface temperature (SST) and related thermal stress metrics, developed specifically for...

  19. The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) Version 3 - Global, 4 km Sea Surface Temperature and Related Thermal Stress Metrics for 1982-2009 (NODC Accession 0068999)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Coral Reef Temperature Anomaly Database (CoRTAD) is a collection of sea surface temperature (SST) and related thermal stress metrics, developed specifically for...

  20. Middle-atmospheric Ozone and HCl anomalies during the polar stratospheric warming 2010 observed by JEM/SMILES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili Mahani, M.; Kreyling, D.; Sagawa, H.; Murata, I.; Kasaba, Y.; Kasai, Y.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we focused on investigating ozone and HCl variations and anomalies in the middle atmosphere due to the Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SSW) event of Arctic winter 2009-2010 using JEM/SMILES data. HCl anomalies in evolution of a SSW have been studied for the first time. SSWs are dramatic events in the winter stratosphere of the Northern Hemisphere where the deceleration or reversal of the eastward winds is accompanied by an increase of temperature by several tens of degrees. The main cause of this phenomenon is known to be the interaction of zonal mean flow with upward propagating transient planetary waves from the troposphere in mid-winter leading to a vortex displacement or break down. SSWs are dynamical disturbances found to affect both dynamics and chemical compositions of the middle atmosphere still having several different atmospheric features and behaviors to be studied. The Superconducting sub-Millimeter Limb Emission Sounder (SMILES) is a highly sensitive radiometer to observe various atmospheric compositions from upper troposphere to the mesosphere. SMILES was developed by the Japanese Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Communications and Technology (NICT) located at the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) on board the International Space Station (ISS). From October 2009 to April 2010, SMILES has accurately measured the vertical distributions and the diurnal variations of for example ozone and HCl with the accuracy of less than 8% and 5% in the middle atmosphere respectively. By using SMILES data the SSW event of 2010 was confirmed on 25-January categorized as a major, vortex displacement warming. After the SSW, ozone values enhanced up to 15-20% in mid-stratosphere due to the meridional transport from lower latitudes and weakening of the polar vortex. The mesospheric ozone response will also be demonstrated and discussed. For HCl, the total increase of 10% in Upper Stratosphere Lower Mesosphere (USLM) before the

  1. Analysis of proton and electron spectra observed by EPT/PROBA-V in the South Atlantic Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Rosson, G.; Pierrard, V.

    2017-08-01

    Proton and electron spectra observed by the Energetic Particle Telescope (EPT) on board the ESA satellite PROBA-V have been investigated at different locations in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The EPT spectrometer provides high-resolution measurements of the charged particle radiation environment in space performing with direct electron, proton and heavy ion discrimination. Dividing the SAA into 5 different bins of 5° × 5° each one for protons, we obtain that the average proton spectra have often similar slopes, but greatly differ from one location to another. The highest fluxes are generally located in the North of the SAA. For some energy ranges and time periods, the South of the SAA shows different shapes, indicating different sources for the North and South populations of the SAA. Electron spectra show very low fluxes of energetic electrons, often lower than what is provided by the model AE8.

  2. Observables and anomalies in $B\\rightarrow K^{(*)}\\ell^{+}\\ell^{-}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084122

    2014-01-01

    Recent analyses of $B\\rightarrow K^{(*)}\\ell^{+}\\ell^{-}$ processes at LHCb are in tension with Standard Model predictions. Some phenomenological interpretations suggest a contribution from a new vector particle. These results are difficult to account for within supersymmetric models. However, other phenomenological analyses suggest the data may be described by strong interaction effects that were assumed to be small when producing the Standard Model predictions. A pedagogical introduction to the observables in question is presented, alongside experimental considerations. This is followed by a brief overview of the phenomenological results.

  3. Seeded Growth of Ferrite Nanoparticles from Mn oxides : Observation of Anomalies in Magnetic Transitions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon-Min

    2015-06-17

    A series of magnetically active ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared by using Mn oxide NPs as seeds. Verwey transition is identified in Fe3O4 NPs with an average diameter of 14.5 nm at 96 K, where a sharp drop of magnetic susceptibility occurs. In MnFe2O4 NPs, spin glass-like state is observed with the decrease of magnetization below the blocking temperature due to the disordered spins during the freezing process. From these MnFe2O4 NPs, MnFe2O4@MnxFe1-xO core-shell NPs are prepared by seeded growth. The structure of core is cubic spinels (Fd-3m), and shell is composed of iron-manganese oxide (MnxFe1-xO) with a rock salt structure (Fm-3m). Moiré fringes appear perpendicular to <110> directions on the cubic shape NPs through the plane-matched epitaxial growth. These fringes are due to the difference in their lattice spacings between MnFe2O4 and MnxFe1-xO. Exchange bias is observed in these MnFe2O4@MnxFe1-xO core-shell NPs with an enhanced coercivity as well as the shift of hysteresis along the field direction.

  4. Comparison of satellite-derived LAI and precipitation anomalies over Brazil with a thermal infrared-based Evaporative Stress Index for 2003-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Martha C.; Zolin, Cornelio A.; Hain, Christopher R.; Semmens, Kathryn; Tugrul Yilmaz, M.; Gao, Feng

    2015-07-01

    Shortwave vegetation index (VI) and leaf area index (LAI) remote sensing products yield inconsistent depictions of biophysical response to drought and pluvial events that have occurred in Brazil over the past decade. Conflicting reports of severity of drought impacts on vegetation health and functioning have been attributed to cloud and aerosol contamination of shortwave reflectance composites, particularly over the rainforested regions of the Amazon basin which are subject to prolonged periods of cloud cover and episodes of intense biomass burning. This study compares timeseries of satellite-derived maps of LAI from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and precipitation from the Tropical Rainfall Mapping Mission (TRMM) with a diagnostic Evaporative Stress Index (ESI) retrieved using thermal infrared remote sensing over South America for the period 2003-2013. This period includes several severe droughts and floods that occurred both over the Amazon and over unforested savanna and agricultural areas in Brazil. Cross-correlations between absolute values and standardized anomalies in monthly LAI and precipitation composites as well as the actual-to-reference evapotranspiration (ET) ratio used in the ESI were computed for representative forested and agricultural regions. The correlation analyses reveal strong apparent anticorrelation between MODIS LAI and TRMM precipitation anomalies over the Amazon, but better coupling over regions vegetated with shorter grass and crop canopies. The ESI was more consistently correlated with precipitation patterns over both landcover types. Temporal comparisons between ESI and TRMM anomalies suggest longer moisture buffering timescales in the deeper rooted rainforest systems. Diagnostic thermal-based retrievals of ET and ET anomalies, such as used in the ESI, provide independent information on the impacts of extreme hydrologic events on vegetation health in comparison with VI and precipitation-based drought

  5. Seismo-ionospheric anomalies and implications from recent GNSS observations in India and South-East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D. Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lithosphere and the atmosphere/ionosphere, continuously exchange energy through various coupling mechanisms. Earthquake creates waves of energy, e.g. direct shock acoustic waves (SAWs and Rayleigh wave induced acoustic waves (RAWs. In the event of an earthquake occurring beneath the sea, atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs are also generated. If the earthquake is large enough (Mw > 6, SAWs, RAWs and AGWs induce detectable ionospheric plasma perturbations. Inferring the seismological information from these seismo-ionospheric manifestations is the subject that pertains to ionospheric seismology. Both ground and satellite based advanced radio techniques are being used in monitoring ionospheric plasma perturbations. In this study, seismo-ionospheric anomalies and implications from recent GNSS observations in India and South-East Asia are discussed, mainly pertaining to the following. (1 From the ionospheric plasma response to 2015 Nepal earthquake, the estimated group velocity for Andaman and Indian shield regions are 2100 ms−1 and 3900 ms−1 respectively and validated from ground measurements. (2 Atmospheric acoustic resonance at 4.0 mHz and a train of wave packet of TEC variation resulting from the beat phenomenon observed at the site ‘umlh’ and (3 GNSS-based tsunami warning which is going to be promising tool in augmenting the existing tsunami warning systems.

  6. On the electric field transient anomaly observed at the time of the Kythira M=6.9 earthquake on January 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Varley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of the Earth's electromagnetic fields prior to the occurrence of strong seismic events has repeatedly revealed cases were transient anomalies, often deemed as possible earthquake precursors, were observed on electromagnetic field recordings of surface, atmosphere and near space carried out measurements. In an attempt to understand the nature of such signals several models have been proposed based upon the exhibited characteristics of the observed anomalies and different possible generation mechanisms, with electric earthquake precursors (EEP appearing to be the main candidates for short-term earthquake precursors. This paper discusses the detection of a ULF electric field transient anomaly and its identification as a possible electric earthquake precursor accompanying the Kythira M=6.9 earthquake occurred on the 8 January 2006.

  7. Thermal Modeling of Comet-like Objects from AKARI Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Yoonsoo P.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Usui, Fumihiko

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the physical properties of the comet-like objects 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington (4015WH) and P/2006 HR30 (Siding Spring; HR30) by applying a simple thermophysical model to the near-infrared spectroscopy and broadband observation data obtained by the AKARIsatellite of JAXA when they showed no detectable comet-like activity. We selected these two targets because the tendency of thermal inertia to decrease with the size of an asteroid, which has been demonstrated in recent studies, has not been confirmed for comet-like objects. It was found that 4015WH, which was originally discovered as a comet but has not shown comet-like activity after its discovery, has effective size D = 3.74-4.39 km and geometric albedo {p}V≈ 0.040{--}0.055 with thermal inertia {{Γ }}=100{--}250 J m-2 K-1 {{{s}}}-1/2. The corresponding grain size is estimated as 1-3 mm. We also found that HR30, which was observed as a bare cometary nucleus at the time of our observation, has D=23.9{--}27.1 km and {p}V=0.035{--}0.045 with {{Γ }}=250{--}1000 J m-2 K-1 {{{s}}}-1/2. We conjecture the pole latitude -20^\\circ ≲ {β }s≲ +60^\\circ . The results for both targets are consistent with previous studies. Based on the results, we propose that comet-like objects are not clearly distinguishable from their asteroidal counterparts on the D-Γ plane.

  8. Detecting geothermal anomalies and evaluating LST geothermal component by combining thermal remote sensing time series and land surface model data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romaguera, M.; Vaughan, R. G.; Ettema, J.; Izquierdo-Verdiguier, E.; Hecker, C. A.; van der Meer, F. D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores for the first time the possibilities to use two land surface temperature (LST) time series of different origins (geostationary Meteosat Second Generation satellite data and Noah land surface modelling, LSM), to detect geothermal anomalies and extract the geothermal component of

  9. The association between cerebral developmental venous anomaly and concomitant cavernous malformation: an observational study using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guolu; Bai, Chuanfeng; Yu, Tengfei; Wu, Zhen; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Junting; zhao, Jizong

    2014-03-15

    Some studies reported that cerebral developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is often concurrent with cavernous malformation (CM). But there is lack of statistical evidence and study of bulk cases. The factors associated with concurrency are still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of concomitant DVA and CM using observational data on Chinese patients and analyze the factors associated with the concurrency. The records of all cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed between January 2001 and December 2012 in Beijing Tiantan Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. The DVA and CM cases were selected according to imaging reports that met diagnostic criteria. Statistical analysis was performed using the Pearson chi-square statistic for binary variables and multivariable logistic regression analysis for predictors associated with the concurrent CM. We reviewed a total of 165,230 cranial MR images performed during the previous 12 year period, and identified 1,839 cases that met DVA radiographic criteria. There were 205 patients who presented concomitant CM among the 1,839 DVAs. The CM prevalence in DVA cases (11.1%) was significantly higher than that in the non-DVA cases (2.3%) (PDVA. There is a higher chance of concurrent CM with DVA when the DVA has three or more medullary veins in the same MRI scanning section, when the DVA is infratentorial, and when there are multiple DVAs. When diagnosing DVA cases, physicians should be alerted to the possibility of concurrent CM.

  10. Observation of thermal fluctuations in a superfluid optomechanical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashkanova, A. D.; Shkarin, A. B.; Brown, C. D.; Flowers-Jacobs, N. E.; Childress, L.; Hoch, S. W.; Hohmann, L.; Ott, K.; Garcia, S.; Reichel, J.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2017-02-01

    In cavity optomechanics the state of a mechanical element can be manipulated by interfacing it with light via radiation pressure, electrostriction, or related phenomena. The majority of mechanical elements employed in optomechanical systems to date are solid objects (membranes, nanowires, mirrors, etc); however fluids can also be used as a mechanical element. Compared to solids, fluids have an advantage: they readily achieve precise alignment with the optical cavity, as the fluid can conformally fill or coat the optical cavity. However, almost all optomechanical systems need to be cooled to sub-Kelvin temperatures in order for quantum effects to be observed. Liquid helium is the only fluid that doesn't solidify under its own pressure at these temperatures. Additionally, helium has almost no optical absorption, high thermal conductivity and very low acoustic loss at cryogenic temperatures. We have developed an optomechanical system in which the mechanical mode is a standing density wave in superfluid helium inside a 70 μm long Fabry-Perot cavity. The optical mode is also a mode of the same cavity. Thus, the system is completely self-aligned. In this system, we used electrostriction to drive the mechanical mode with light by modulating the optical intensity. We also observed the mode's undriven Brownian motion and from that extracted it mean phonon number. We measured phonon number as low as nac=11. The optomechanical effects of optical spring and optical damping were observed, and agreed well with the predictions of conventional optomechanical theory.

  11. Midwives' perceptions of communication during videotaped counseling for prenatal anomaly tests: how do they relate to clients' perceptions and independent observations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, L.; Gistels-van der Wal, J.T.; Pereboom, M.T.; Spelten, E.R.; Hutton, E.K.; Dulmen, A.M. van

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to provide insight into Dutch midwives' self-evaluation of prenatal counseling for anomaly screening in real life practice and, the degree of congruence of midwives' self-assessments with clients' perceptions and with observed performance. METHODS: Counseling sessions

  12. Midwives’ perceptions of communication during videotaped counseling for prenatal anomaly tests: How do they relate to clients’ perceptions and independent observations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, L.; Gitsels-van der Wal, J.T.; Pereboom, M.T.R.; Spelten, E.R.; Hutton, E.K.; Dulmen, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to provide insight into Dutch midwives’ self-evaluation of prenatal counseling for anomaly screening in real life practice and, the degree of congruence of midwives’ self-assessments with clients’ perceptions and with observed performance. Methods: Counseling sessions

  13. Midwives' perceptions of communication during videotaped counseling for prenatal anomaly tests: How do they relate to clients' perceptions and independent observations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, L.; Gitsels–van der Wal, J.T.; Pereboom, M.T.R.; Spelten, E.R.; Hutton, E.K.; van Dulmen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to provide insight into Dutch midwives' self-evaluation of prenatal counseling for anomaly screening in real life practice and, the degree of congruence of midwives' self-assessments with clients' perceptions and with observed performance. Methods: Counseling sessions

  14. Thermal infrared brightness temperature anomalies associated with the Yushu (China Ms = 7.1 earthquake on 14 April 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Xie

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a wavelet transform method to identify possible seismic brightness temperature anomalies that might be associated with the Yushu (Ms = 7.1 earthquake that occurred in Qinghai province of China on 14 April 2010. Daily infrared data from the Chinese geostationary meteorological satellite FY-2E were used for the period from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2011 and the spatial region 28.1–38.1° N by 91.7–101.7° E. We find that the wavelet transform is an effective method to analyse time series which contain nonstationary power, and identify here anomalous power both in the time and frequency domain. The results show that, over the two years, the relative wavelet power spectrum (RWPS showed anomalous RWPS variations in nine cases: two of these were followed by earthquakes; seven were not. One of the two RWPS anomalies that were followed by an earthquake was in the southern area of the epicentre of the Yushu earthquake, with the RWPS anomaly starting to appear around 29 March 2010, decreasing in the period before the earthquake, and completely gone by 14 April 2010. The Yushu earthquake was the only strong earthquake within the region and two-year time period chosen, so the abnormal change of RWPS during this time period was possibly associated with the Yushu earthquake.

  15. Thermally-Driven Mantle Plumes Reconcile Hot-spot Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D.; Davies, J.

    2008-12-01

    Hot-spots are anomalous regions of magmatism that cannot be directly associated with plate tectonic processes (e.g. Morgan, 1972). They are widely regarded as the surface expression of upwelling mantle plumes. Hot-spots exhibit variable life-spans, magmatic productivity and fixity (e.g. Ito and van Keken, 2007). This suggests that a wide-range of upwelling structures coexist within Earth's mantle, a view supported by geochemical and seismic evidence, but, thus far, not reproduced by numerical models. Here, results from a new, global, 3-D spherical, mantle convection model are presented, which better reconcile hot-spot observations, the key modification from previous models being increased convective vigor. Model upwellings show broad-ranging dynamics; some drift slowly, while others are more mobile, displaying variable life-spans, intensities and migration velocities. Such behavior is consistent with hot-spot observations, indicating that the mantle must be simulated at the correct vigor and in the appropriate geometry to reproduce Earth-like dynamics. Thermally-driven mantle plumes can explain the principal features of hot-spot volcanism on Earth.

  16. Global gravitational anomalies and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Subham Dutta; David, Justin R.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the constraints imposed by global gravitational anomalies on parity odd induced transport coefficients in even dimensions for theories with chiral fermions, gravitinos and self dual tensors. The η-invariant for the large diffeomorphism corresponding to the T transformation on a torus constraints the coefficients in the thermal effective action up to mod 2. We show that the result obtained for the parity odd transport for gravitinos using global anomaly matching is consistent with the direct perturbative calculation. In d = 6 we see that the second Pontryagin class in the anomaly polynomial does not contribute to the η-invariant which provides a topological explanation of this observation in the `replacement rule'. We then perform a direct perturbative calculation for the contribution of the self dual tensor in d = 6 to the parity odd transport coefficient using the Feynman rules proposed by Gaumé and Witten. The result for the transport coefficient agrees with that obtained using matching of global anomalies.

  17. Thermal, atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies around the time of the Colima M7.8 earthquake of 21 January 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Pulinets

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the possible relationship of anomalous variations of different atmospheric and ionospheric parameters observed around the time of a strong earthquake (Mw 7.8 which occurred in Mexico (state of Colima on 21 January 2003. These variations are interpreted within the framework of the developed model of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere coupling. The main attention is focused on the processes in the near ground layer of the atmosphere involving the ionization of air by radon, the water molecules' attachment to the formed ions, and the corresponding changes in the latent heat. Model considerations are supported by experimental measurements showing the local diminution of air humidity one week prior to the earthquake, accompanied by the anomalous thermal infrared (TIR signals and surface latent heat flux (SLHF and anomalous variations of the total electron content (TEC registered over the epicenter of the impending earthquake three days prior to the main earthquake event. Statistical processing of the data of the GPS receivers network, together with various other atmospheric parameters demonstrate the possibility of an early warning of an impending strong earthquake.

  18. Thermal, atmospheric and ionospheric anomalies around the time of the Colima M7.8 earthquake of 21 January 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Pulinets

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the possible relationship of anomalous variations of different atmospheric and ionospheric parameters observed around the time of a strong earthquake (Mw 7.8 which occurred in Mexico (state of Colima on 21 January 2003. These variations are interpreted within the framework of the developed model of the Lithosphere-Atmosphere-Ionosphere coupling. The main attention is focused on the processes in the near ground layer of the atmosphere involving the ionization of air by radon, the water molecules' attachment to the formed ions, and the corresponding changes in the latent heat. Model considerations are supported by experimental measurements showing the local diminution of air humidity one week prior to the earthquake, accompanied by the anomalous thermal infrared (TIR signals and surface latent heat flux (SLHF and anomalous variations of the total electron content (TEC registered over the epicenter of the impending earthquake three days prior to the main earthquake event. Statistical processing of the data of the GPS receivers network, together with various other atmospheric parameters demonstrate the possibility of an early warning of an impending strong earthquake.

  19. Examples of Models Fit to Magnetic Anomalies Observed Over Subaerial, Submarine, and Subglacial Volcanoes in the West Antarctic Rift System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Finn, C. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2006-12-01

    Aeromagnetic and marine magnetic surveys over the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system, constrained by seismic reflection profiles over the Ross Sea continual shelf, and radar ice sounding surveys over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) allowed calculation of models fit to very high-amplitude anomalies. We present several examples: exposed 2700-m high, subaerial erupted volcano Mt Melbourne; the 750-m high source of anomaly D (Hamilton submarine volcano) in the Ross sea; and the 600-m high edifice of Mt. CASERTZ beneath the WAIS. The character of these anomalies and their sources varies greatly, and is inferred to be the result of subaerial, submarine and subglacial emplacement respectively. Mt. Melbourne erupted through the WAIS at a time when it was grounded over the Ross Sea continental shelf. Highly magnetic volcanic flows inferred to have high remanent (normal) magnetization in the present field direction produce the 600-nT positive anomaly. The flows protected the edifice above the ice from erosion. Negligible amounts of probably subglacially erupted, apparently non-magnetic hyaloclastite exist in association with Mt. Melbourne. Mt. CASERTZ is nonmagnetic and the edifice is interpreted as consisting of a transient mound of unconsolidated hyaloclastite injected into the WAIS. However Mt. CASERTZ, about 8-km diameter, overlies a 200-m high, 40-km wide highly magnetic residual edifice modeled as the top of the source (an active subglacial volcano) of a 400-nT high positive anomaly. Any former edifices comprising hyaloclastite, pillow breccia or other volcanic debris injected into the moving WAIS apparently have been removed. About 400 other high- amplitude anomalies associated with low relief (80 percent less than 200 m) edifices at the base of the ice (the tops of the sources of these steep gradient anomalies) beneath the WAIS defined by radar ice sounding have been interpreted as having former hyaloclastite edifices, which were removed by the moving

  20. New observations on formation of thermally induced martensite in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kinetical, morphological, crystallographical and thermal characteristics of thermally induced martensite in an Fe–30%Ni–1%Pd alloy has been studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction method. Kinetics of ...

  1. Antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests: an exploratory video-observational study about client-midwife communication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, L.; Hutton, E.K.; Gitsels-van der Wal, J.T.; Spelten, E.R.; Kuiper, F.; Pereboom, M.T.R.; Dulmen, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective: antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests is conceptualised as having both Health Education (HE) and Decision-Making Support (DMS) functions. Building and maintaining a client–midwife relation (CMR) is seen as a necessary condition for enabling these two counselling functions.

  2. Antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests: An exploratory video-observational study about client-midwife communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, L.; Hutton, E.K.; Gitsels–van der Wal, J.T.; Spelten, E.R.; Kuiper, F.; Pereboom, M.T.R.; van Dulmen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests is conceptualised as having both Health Education (HE) and Decision-Making Support (DMS) functions. Building and maintaining a client-midwife relation (CMR) is seen as a necessary condition for enabling these two counselling functions.

  3. Antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests: an exploratory video-observational study about client-midwife communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, L.; Hutton, E.K.; Gitsels-van der Wal, J.T.; Spelten, E.R.; Kuiper, F.; Pereboom, M.T.; Dulmen, S. van

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: antenatal counselling for congenital anomaly tests is conceptualised as having both Health Education (HE) and Decision-Making Support (DMS) functions. Building and maintaining a client-midwife relation (CMR) is seen as a necessary condition for enabling these two counselling functions.

  4. Vascular anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Jyotsna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of vascular anomalies is an emerging multidisciplinary, super-specialisation field involving several surgical, medical and radiological specialties. Over the years, development in this field has been limited because of complex nomenclature and lack of consensus on the best practice for treatment of some of the more complex vascular anomalies. It was only in 1996 that the International Society of the Study of Vascular Anomalies defined nomenclature for the anomalies and gave clear guidelines on management, allowing for improved clinical practices. As in all fields of clinical medicine, the correct diagnosis of the vascular anomalies is essential to choose the appropriate treatment. This paper gives clear guidelines for diagnosis, understanding of the anomalies and discusses their management.

  5. An Analysis of Simulated and Observed Global Mean Near-Surface Air Temperature Anomalies from 1979 to 1999: Trends and Attribution of Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, R. M.; Ko, M. K. W.

    2001-01-01

    The 1979 - 1999 response of the climate system to variations in solar spectral irradiance is estimated by comparing the global averaged surface temperature anomalies simulated by a 2D (two dimensional) energy balance climate model to observed temperature anomalies. We perform a multiple regression of southern oscillation index and the individual model responses to solar irradiance variations, stratospheric and tropospheric aerosol loading, stratospheric ozone trends, and greenhouse gases onto each of five near-surface temperature anomaly data sets. We estimate the observed difference in global mean near surface air temperature attributable to the solar irradiance difference between solar maximum and solar minimum to be between 0.06 and 0.11 K, and that 1.1 - 3.8% of the total variance in monthly mean near-surface air temperature data is attributable to nations in solar spectral irradiance. For the five temperature data sets used in our analysis, the trends in raw monthly mean temperature anomaly data have a large range, spanning a factor of 3 from 0.06 to 0.17 K/decade. However. our analysis suggests that trends in monthly temperature anomalies attributable to the combination of greenhouse gas, stratospheric ozone, and tropospheric sulfate aerosol variations are much more consistent among data sets, ranging from 0.16 to 0.24 K/decade. Our model results suggest that roughly half of the warming from greenhouse gases is cancelled by the cooling from changes in stratospheric ozone. Tropospheric sulfate aerosol loading in the present day atmospheric contributes significantly to the net radiative forcing of the present day climate system. However, because the change in magnitude and latitudinal distribution of tropospheric sulfate aerosol has been small over the past 20 years, the change in the direct radiative forcing attributable to changes in aerosol loading over this time is also small.

  6. Ebstein anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the complications of the disease. For example, taking antibiotics before dental surgery may help prevent endocarditis. Alternative Names Ebstein's anomaly; Ebstein's malformation; Congenital heart defect - ...

  7. Strong Thermal Anomalies in the Lowermost Mantle Explain a Large Fraction of Deep Earth Seismic Structure (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuberth, B. S.; Bunge, H.

    2010-12-01

    One major challenge in the study of Earth's deep interior is to improve existing conceptual models of mantle flow. Understanding the dynamic behavior of the mantle is important as it drives plate tectonics and controls the way the Earth looses its heat. Thus, it is a crucial factor in tectonic modeling or in simulations of the geodynamo and of the thermal history of the Earth. In the last decade, the classical viewpoint has been put into question that only a small part of the heat leaving the mantle at the top is coming from the underlying core (2-3 TW or ~5% of the total surface heat flux). A number of studies from various fields have recently promoted the idea of a much larger core contribution to the mantle energy budget of as much as 10 TW (~30% of the surface heat flow). For example, finite frequency tomography has produced images of large plumes in the lower mantle, which potentially carry a significant amount of heat to the surface (Nolet et al. [2006]). This strengthens the notion that the dynamic role of these plumes is larger than inferred classically from observation of dynamic topography. Here, we demonstrate that plume structures predicted for such a high core heat flux by high-performance computations of 3-D mantle flow are compatible with seismic tomography and small rates of polar wander. An important aspect in such comparisons is that the resolving power of seismic tomography is limited due to uneven data coverage. One possibility to account for this effect is to apply the resolution operator of the tomographic inversions to our synthetic structures. However, this operator can only be constructed for tomographic models with a small number of free parameters, thus limiting its use. Therefore, we will explore new ways to test dynamic flow calculations for Earth's mantle against seismic data and tomographic models. One possible approach is to perform large-scale simulations of 3-D seismic wave propagation through both tomographic models as well as our

  8. The extended algebra of observables for Dirac fields and the trace anomaly of their stress-energy tensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiagi, Claudio; Hack, Thomas-Paul; Pinamonti, Nicola [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2009-03-15

    We discuss from scratch the classical structure of Dirac spinors on an arbitrary globally hyperbolic, Lorentzian spacetime, their formulation as a locally covariant quantum field theory, and the associated notion of a Hadamard state. Eventually, we develop the notion of Wick polynomials for spinor fields, and we employ the latter to construct a covariantly conserved stress-energy tensor suited for back-reaction computations. We explicitly calculate its trace anomaly in particular. (orig.)

  9. Comparison of Anomalies and Trends of OLR as Observed by CERES and Computed from Geophysical Parameters Derived from Analysis of AIRS/AMSU Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susskind, Joel; Molnar, Gyula I.

    2009-01-01

    Anomalies and trends of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) serve as important indicators of climate change. Several satellite based instruments currently provide information related to OLR. CERES, on board the EOS Aqua and Terra satellites, contains broad band radiometers that measure total flux and short-wave flux, from which OLR is determined. AIRS is a high spectral resolution IR sounder on EOS Aqua that measures IR radiances covering most of the spectral interval 650 cm-1 to 2670 cm-1. These observations enable the determination of detailed information about atmospheric temperature, moisture, and ozone profiles, as well as surface skin temperatures and cloud parameters. The AIRS OLR product is the total flux over the spectral interval 2 cm-1 to2750 cm-1 computed for the surface and atmospheric state determined from AIRS observations. We compared spatial anomalies and trends of OLR, over the seven year period September 2002 through August 2009, as observed by CERES and computed using Version 5 AIRS products. These two sets of OLR anomalies and trends, obtained in very different ways, agree with each other almost perfectly in essentially every detail. This important finding shows that a very stable high spectral infra-red sounder such as AIRS corroborates the anomalies and trends of OLR obtained from CERES. More significantly, anomalies and trends of the individual geophysical parameters derived from AIRS explain the detailed causes of the anomalies and trends of CERES OLR. Both sets of results show that global mean OLR has been decreasing at a rate of 0.12 W/m2/yr over the seven year time period under study. Both also confirm that the primary cause of this is due to changes in the tropics, in which OLR has been decreasing at a rate of 0.27 W/m2/yr. AIRS products show that the decrease of tropical OLR is a result of increasing tropical atmospheric water vapor and cloud cover over the time period studied, which in turn is responding to a very strong E1 Nino/ La

  10. New observations on formation of thermally induced martensite in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    New thin foil samples (∼50 μm) were prepared for transmission electron microscopy from the thermally treated samples. These TEM specimens were then electropolished at room temperature using a twin-jet polish- ing technique with a solution of 150 ml 2-butoxy ethenol,. 50 ml of perchloric acid and 300 ml methanol.

  11. Non-thermal plasma mills bacteria: Scanning electron microscopy observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunov, O., E-mail: lunov@fzu.cz; Churpita, O.; Zablotskii, V.; Jäger, A.; Dejneka, A. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Deyneka, I. G.; Meshkovskii, I. K. [St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics, St. Petersburg 197101 (Russian Federation); Syková, E. [Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic); Kubinová, Š. [Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic); Institute of Experimental Medicine AS CR, Prague 14220 (Czech Republic)

    2015-02-02

    Non-thermal plasmas hold great promise for a variety of biomedical applications. To ensure safe clinical application of plasma, a rigorous analysis of plasma-induced effects on cell functions is required. Yet mechanisms of bacteria deactivation by non-thermal plasma remain largely unknown. We therefore analyzed the influence of low-temperature atmospheric plasma on Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Using scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrate that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria strains in a minute were completely destroyed by helium plasma. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were not affected by the same treatment. Furthermore, histopathological analysis of hematoxylin and eosin–stained rat skin sections from plasma–treated animals did not reveal any abnormalities in comparison to control ones. We discuss possible physical mechanisms leading to the shred of bacteria under non-thermal plasma irradiation. Our findings disclose how helium plasma destroys bacteria and demonstrates the safe use of plasma treatment for MSCs and skin cells, highlighting the favorability of plasma applications for chronic wound therapy.

  12. Thermal observations of spacecraft target 1999 JU3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campins, Humberto; Barucci, Antonella; Dotto, Elizabetta; Emery, Joshua; Fernandez, Yanga; Kelley, Michael; Licandro, Javier

    2008-03-01

    We propose a 1.4 hr program to observe, with IRS, the near-Earth asteroid 161273 (1999 JU3), the primary target of two proposed spacecraft missions: the European Space Agency (ESA) MARCO POLO sample return mission and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Hyabusa-2 mission. These observations will provide characterization of the composition and thermophysical properties of this distinctive asteroid.

  13. Shell anomalies observed in a population of Archaias angulatus (Foraminifera) from the Florida Keys (USA) sampled in 1982-83 and 2006-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souder, H.C.; McCloskey, B.; Hallock, P.; Byrne, R.

    2010-01-01

    Archived specimens of Archaias angulatus collected live at a depth of < 2. m in John Pennekamp Coral Reef State Park, Key Largo, Florida, in June, September and December 1982, and March 1983, were compared to specimens collected live from the same site and months in 2006-07. Shells were examined using light microscopy for anomalous features, which were then documented using scanning electron microscopy. Seven different types of morphological abnormalities and five different surface texture anomalies were observed. Physical abnormalities included profoundly deformed, curled, asymmetrical, and uncoiled shells, irregular suture lines, surface protrusions, and breakage/repair. Textural anomalies observed were surface pits, dissolution features, microborings, microbial biofilms, and the presence of epibionts including bryzoans, cyanobacteria and foraminifers. The same kinds of features were found in this A. angulatus population in both 1982-83 collections and 2006-07 collections. Within-date variability was higher in specimens collected in 1982-83, while between-date variability was higher in 2006-07; overall the range of variability was similar. Given that the site was originally chosen for study because these foraminifers were so abundant, the lack of significant change indicates that the variability of the geochemical habitat is still within the range that A. angulatus can thrive. ?? 2010.

  14. THERMAL AND CHEMICAL EVOLUTIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS OBSERVED WITH SUZAKU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Sato

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the properties of the intracluster medium (ICM of galaxy clusters to outer regions observed with Suzaku. The observed temperature dropped by about ~30% from the central region to the virial radius of the clusters. The derived entropy profile agreed with the expectation from simulations within r500, while the entropy profile in r > r500 indicated a flatter slope than the simulations. This would suggest that the cluster outskirts were out of hydrostatic equilibrium. As for the metallicity, we studied the metal abundances from O to Fe up to ~0.5 times the virial radius of galaxy groups and clusters. Comparing the results with supernova nucleosynthesis models, the number ratio of type II to Ia supernovae is estimated to be ~3.5. We also calculated not only Fe, but also O and Mg mass-to-light ratios (MLRs with K-band luminosity. The MLRs in the clusters had a similar feature.

  15. Observed Thermal Impacts of Wind Farms Over Northern Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawsky, Lauren M; Zhou, Liming; Baidya Roy, Somnath; Xia, Geng; Vuille, Mathias; Harris, Ronald A

    2015-06-25

    This paper assesses impacts of three wind farms in northern Illinois using land surface temperature (LST) data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites for the period 2003-2013. Changes in LST between two periods (before and after construction of the wind turbines) and between wind farm pixels and nearby non-wind-farm pixels are quantified. An areal mean increase in LST by 0.18-0.39 °C is observed at nighttime over the wind farms, with the geographic distribution of this warming effect generally spatially coupled with the layout of the wind turbines (referred to as the spatial coupling), while there is no apparent impact on daytime LST. The nighttime LST warming effect varies with seasons, with the strongest warming in winter months of December-February, and the tightest spatial coupling in summer months of June-August. Analysis of seasonal variations in wind speed and direction from weather balloon sounding data and Automated Surface Observing System hourly observations from nearby stations suggest stronger winds correspond to seasons with greater warming and larger downwind impacts. The early morning soundings in Illinois are representative of the nighttime boundary layer and exhibit strong temperature inversions across all seasons. The strong and relatively shallow inversion in summer leaves warm air readily available to be mixed down and spatially well coupled with the turbine. Although the warming effect is strongest in winter, the spatial coupling is more erratic and spread out than in summer. These results suggest that the observed warming signal at nighttime is likely due to the net downward transport of heat from warmer air aloft to the surface, caused by the turbulent mixing in the wakes of the spinning turbine rotor blades.

  16. Observed Thermal Impacts of Wind Farms Over Northern Illinois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M. Slawsky

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses impacts of three wind farms in northern Illinois using land surface temperature (LST data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS instruments onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites for the period 2003–2013. Changes in LST between two periods (before and after construction of the wind turbines and between wind farm pixels and nearby non-wind-farm pixels are quantified. An areal mean increase in LST by 0.18–0.39 °C is observed at nighttime over the wind farms, with the geographic distribution of this warming effect generally spatially coupled with the layout of the wind turbines (referred to as the spatial coupling, while there is no apparent impact on daytime LST. The nighttime LST warming effect varies with seasons, with the strongest warming in winter months of December-February, and the tightest spatial coupling in summer months of June-August. Analysis of seasonal variations in wind speed and direction from weather balloon sounding data and Automated Surface Observing System hourly observations from nearby stations suggest stronger winds correspond to seasons with greater warming and larger downwind impacts. The early morning soundings in Illinois are representative of the nighttime boundary layer and exhibit strong temperature inversions across all seasons. The strong and relatively shallow inversion in summer leaves warm air readily available to be mixed down and spatially well coupled with the turbine. Although the warming effect is strongest in winter, the spatial coupling is more erratic and spread out than in summer. These results suggest that the observed warming signal at nighttime is likely due to the net downward transport of heat from warmer air aloft to the surface, caused by the turbulent mixing in the wakes of the spinning turbine rotor blades.

  17. What is a Timing Anomaly?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassez, Franck; Hansen, Rene Rydhof; Olesen, Mads Chr.

    2012-01-01

    Timing anomalies make worst-case execution time analysis much harder, because the analysis will have to consider all local choices. It has been widely recognised that certain hardware features are timing anomalous, while others are not. However, defining formally what a timing anomaly is, has been...... difficult. We examine previous definitions of timing anomalies, and identify examples where they do not align with common observations. We then provide a definition for consistently slower hardware traces that can be used to define timing anomalies and aligns with common observations....

  18. Chemical contrast observed in thermal images of blood-stained fabrics exposed to steam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Wayne L; Boltin, Nicholas D; Lu, Zhenyu; Cassidy, Brianna M; Belliveau, Raymond G; Straub, Emory J; DeJong, Stephanie A; Morgan, Stephen L; Myrick, M L

    2015-09-21

    Thermal imaging is not ordinarily a good way to visualize chemical contrast. In recent work, however, we observed strong and reproducible images with chemical contrasts on blood-stained fabrics, especially on more hydrophobic fabrics like acrylic and polyester.

  19. Comparison of Observed Surface Temperatures of 4 Vesta to the KRC Thermal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, T. N.; Becker, K. J.; Anderson, J. A.; Capria, M. T.; Tosi, F.; DeSanctis, M. C.; Palomba, E.; Grassi, D.; Capaccioni, F.; Ammannito, E.; hide

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we will compare ob-served temperatures of the surface of Vesta using data acquired by the Dawn [1] Visible and Infrared Map-ping Spectrometer (VIR-MS) [2] during the approach phase to model results from the KRC thermal model. High thermal inertia materials, such as bedrock, resist changes in temperature while temperatures of low thermal inertia material, such as dust, respond quickly to changes in solar insolation. The surface of Vesta is expected to have low to medium thermal inertia values, with the most commonly used value being extremely low at 15 TIU [4]. There are several parameters which affect observed temperatures in addition to thermal inertia: bond albedo, slope, and surface roughness. In addition to these parameters, real surfaces are rarely uniform monoliths that can be described by a single thermal inertia value. Real surfaces are often vertically layered or are mixtures of dust and rock. For Vesta's surface, with temperature extremes ranging from 50 K to 275 K and no atmosphere, even a uniform monolithic surface may have non-uniform thermal inertia due to temperature dependent thermal conductivity.

  20. Observation of quantum thermalization and progress towards the many-body localized regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Adam; Tai, Eric; Lukin, Alex; Rispoli, Matthew; Schittko, Robert; Menke, Tim; Preiss, Philipp; Greiner, Markus

    2017-04-01

    In classical thermodynamics entropy plays a crucial role. A classical many-body system equilibrates to a maximally entropic state, and will quickly re-thermalize when perturbed. In contrast, the total entropy of an isolated quantum many-body system does not change following a global or local quantum quench. Nevertheless, sufficiently local observables quickly thermalize to steady state values which are well described by entropic thermal ensembles. Surprisingly, this thermalization is absent in the presence of sufficiently high disorder. In this regime, the system can retain memory of its initial state even at infinite times. We explore these phenomena in a 1D Bose-Hubbard system of ultracold rubidium atoms under a quantum gas microscope. Our microscope gives us unique access to local observables as well as the ability to measure entanglement entropy both locally and globally. We observe a fast growth in subsystems' entanglement entropy after the quench and describe how it provides thermalization for local observables. We have now added disorder to our system to study the breakdown of thermalization in the many-body localized regime; we will present our progress towards these measurements.

  1. AIRS-Observed Interrelationships of Anomaly Time-Series of Moist Process-Related Parameters and Inferred Feedback Values on Various Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Gyula I.; Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena

    2011-01-01

    In the beginning, a good measure of a GMCs performance was their ability to simulate the observed mean seasonal cycle. That is, a reasonable simulation of the means (i.e., small biases) and standard deviations of TODAY?S climate would suffice. Here, we argue that coupled GCM (CG CM for short) simulations of FUTURE climates should be evaluated in much more detail, both spatially and temporally. Arguably, it is not the bias, but rather the reliability of the model-generated anomaly time-series, even down to the [C]GCM grid-scale, which really matter. This statement is underlined by the social need to address potential REGIONAL climate variability, and climate drifts/changes in a manner suitable for policy decisions.

  2. Observed seasonal and interannual variability of the near-surface thermal structure of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R. R.; Ramakrishna, S. S. V. S.

    2017-06-01

    The observed seasonal and interannual variability of near-surface thermal structure of the Arabian Sea Warm Pool (ASWP) is examined utilizing a reanalysis data set for the period 1990-2008. During a year, the ASWP progressively builds from February, reaches its peak by May only in the topmost 60 m water column. The ASWP Index showed a strong seasonal cycle with distinct interannual signatures. The years with higher (lower) sea surface temperature (SST) and larger (smaller) spatial extent are termed as strong (weak) ASWP years. The differences in the magnitude and spatial extent of thermal structure between the strong and weak ASWP regimes are seen more prominently in the topmost 40 m water column. The heat content values with respect to 28 °C isotherm (HC28) are relatively higher (lower) during strong (weak) ASWP years. Even the secondary peak in HC28 seen during the preceding November-December showed higher (lower) magnitude during the strong ASWP (weak) years. The influence of the observed variability in the surface wind field, surface net air-sea heat flux, near-surface mixed layer thickness, sea surface height (SSH) anomaly, depth of 20 °C isotherm and barrier layer thickness is examined to explain the observed differences in the near-surface thermal structure of the ASWP between strong and weak regimes. The surface wind speed is much weaker in particular during the preceding October and February-March corresponding to the strong ASWP years when compared to those of the weak ASWP years implying its important role. Both stronger winter cooling during weak ASWP years and stronger pre-monsoon heating during strong ASWP years through the surface air-sea heat fluxes contribute to the observed sharp contrast in the magnitudes of both the regimes of the ASWP. The upwelling Rossby wave during the preceding summer monsoon, post-monsoon and winter seasons is stronger corresponding to the weak ASWP regime when compared to the strong ASWP regime resulting in greater

  3. Astrometric solar system anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieto, Michael Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, John D [PROPULSION LABORATORY

    2009-01-01

    There are at least four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it often experiences a change in total orbital energy per unit mass. next, a secular change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm yr{sup -1}. The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions. Some astronomers and physicists are convinced this effect is of concern, but many others are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported unexplained increase that is significant at the three-sigma level. It is produent to suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations, or that one or more anomalies are a result of systematic error. Yet they might eventually be explained by new physics. For example, a slightly modified theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation for the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  4. Distribution and solar wind control of compressional solar wind-magnetic anomaly interactions observed at the Moon by ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halekas, J. S.; Poppe, A. R.; Lue, C.; Farrell, W. M.; McFadden, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    A statistical investigation of 5 years of observations from the two-probe Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of Moon's Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) mission reveals that strong compressional interactions occur infrequently at high altitudes near the ecliptic but can form in a wide range of solar wind conditions and can occur up to two lunar radii downstream from the lunar limb. The compressional events, some of which may represent small-scale collisionless shocks ("limb shocks"), occur in both steady and variable interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions, with those forming in steady IMF well organized by the location of lunar remanent crustal magnetization. The events observed by ARTEMIS have similarities to ion foreshock phenomena, and those observed in variable IMF conditions may result from either local lunar interactions or distant terrestrial foreshock interactions. Observed velocity deflections associated with compressional events are always outward from the lunar wake, regardless of location and solar wind conditions. However, events for which the observed velocity deflection is parallel to the upstream motional electric field form in distinctly different solar wind conditions and locations than events with antiparallel deflections. Consideration of the momentum transfer between incoming and reflected solar wind populations helps explain the observed characteristics of the different groups of events.Plain Language SummaryWe survey the environment around the Moon to determine when and where strong amplifications in the charged particle density and magnetic field strength occur. These structures may be some of the smallest shock waves in the solar system, and learning about their formation informs us about the interaction of charged particles with small-scale magnetic fields throughout the solar system and beyond. We find that these compressions occur in an extended region downstream from the lunar dawn and dusk regions and

  5. Challenges to quantitative applications of Landsat observations for the urban thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feng; Yang, Song; Yin, Kai; Chan, Paul

    2017-09-01

    Since the launch of its first satellite in 1972, the Landsat program has operated continuously for more than forty years. A large data archive collected by the Landsat program significantly benefits both the academic community and society. Thermal imagery from Landsat sensors, provided with relatively high spatial resolution, is suitable for monitoring urban thermal environment. Growing use of Landsat data in monitoring urban thermal environment is demonstrated by increasing publications on this subject, especially over the last decade. Urban thermal environment is usually delineated by land surface temperature (LST). However, the quantitative and accurate estimation of LST from Landsat data is still a challenge, especially for urban areas. This paper will discuss the main challenges for urban LST retrieval, including urban surface emissivity, atmospheric correction, radiometric calibration, and validation. In addition, we will discuss general challenges confronting the continuity of quantitative applications of Landsat observations. These challenges arise mainly from the scan line corrector failure of the Landsat 7 ETM+ and channel differences among sensors. Based on these investigations, the concerns are to: (1) show general users the limitation and possible uncertainty of the retrieved urban LST from the single thermal channel of Landsat sensors; (2) emphasize efforts which should be done for the quantitative applications of Landsat data; and (3) understand the potential challenges for the continuity of Landsat observation (i.e., thermal infrared) for global change monitoring, while several climate data record programs being in progress. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Reliability of CHAMP Anomaly Continuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Kim, Hyung Rae; Taylor, Patrick T.; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad F.

    2003-01-01

    CHAMP is recording state-of-the-art magnetic and gravity field observations at altitudes ranging over roughly 300 - 550 km. However, anomaly continuation is severely limited by the non-uniqueness of the process and satellite anomaly errors. Indeed, our numerical anomaly simulations from satellite to airborne altitudes show that effective downward continuations of the CHAMP data are restricted to within approximately 50 km of the observation altitudes while upward continuations can be effective over a somewhat larger altitude range. The great unreliability of downward continuation requires that the satellite geopotential observations must be analyzed at satellite altitudes if the anomaly details are to be exploited most fully. Given current anomaly error levels, joint inversion of satellite and near- surface anomalies is the best approach for implementing satellite geopotential observations for subsurface studies. We demonstrate the power of this approach using a crustal model constrained by joint inversions of near-surface and satellite magnetic and gravity observations for Maude Rise, Antarctica, in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Our modeling suggests that the dominant satellite altitude magnetic anomalies are produced by crustal thickness variations and remanent magnetization of the normal polarity Cretaceous Quiet Zone.

  7. Thermal and Nonthermal Emissions of a Composite Flare Derived from NoRH and SDO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongwoo; White, Stephen M.; Jing, Ju; Liu, Chang; Masuda, Satoshi; Chae, Jongchul

    2017-12-01

    Differential emission measure (DEM) derived from the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory is used in the analysis of a solar flare observed by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). The target was a composite event consisting of an impulsive flare, SOL2015-06-21T01:42 (GOES class M2.0), and a gradual flare, SOL2015-06-21T02:36 (M2.6), for which separation of thermal plasma heating from nonthermal particle acceleration was of major interest. We have calculated the thermal free-free intensity maps with the AIA-derived DEM and compared them against the observed NoRH maps to attribute the difference to the nonthermal component. In this way, we were able to locate three distinct sources: the major source with thermal and nonthermal components mixed, a nonthermal source devoid of thermal particles, and a thermal source lacking microwave emission. Both the first and the second nonthermal sources produced impulsively rising 17 GHz intensities and moved away from the local magnetic polarization inversion lines in correlation with the flare radiation. In contrast, the thermal sources stay in fixed locations and show temporal variations of the temperature and emission measure uncorrelated with the flare radiation. We interpret these distinct properties as indicating that nonthermal sources are powered by magnetic reconnection and thermal sources passively receive energy from the nonthermal donor. The finding of these distinct properties between thermal and nonthermal sources demonstrates the microwave and EUV emission measure combined diagnostics.

  8. Observational limitations of Bose-Einstein photon statistics and radiation noise in thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.-J.; Talghader, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    For many decades, theory has predicted that Bose-Einstein statistics are a fundamental feature of thermal emission into one or a few optical modes; however, the resulting Bose-Einstein-like photon noise has never been experimentally observed. There are at least two reasons for this: (1) Relationships to describe the thermal radiation noise for an arbitrary mode structure have yet to be set forth, and (2) the mode and detector constraints necessary for the detection of such light is extremely hard to fulfill. Herein, photon statistics and radiation noise relationships are developed for systems with any number of modes and couplings to an observing space. The results are shown to reproduce existing special cases of thermal emission and are then applied to resonator systems to discuss physically realizable conditions under which Bose-Einstein-like thermal statistics might be observed. Examples include a single isolated cavity and an emitter cavity coupled to a small detector space. Low-mode-number noise theory shows major deviations from solely Bose-Einstein or Poisson treatments and has particular significance because of recent advances in perfect absorption and subwavelength structures both in the long-wave infrared and terahertz regimes. These microresonator devices tend to utilize a small volume with few modes, a regime where the current theory of thermal emission fluctuations and background noise, which was developed decades ago for free-space or single-mode cavities, has no derived solutions.

  9. Influence of urbanization on the thermal environment of meteorological station: Satellite-observed evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Shi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, five national meteorological stations in Anhui province are taken as typical examples to explore the effects of local urbanization on their thermal environment by using Landsat data from 1990 to 2010. Satellite-based land use/land cover (LULC, land surface temperature (LST, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI are used to investigate the effects. The study shows that LULC around meteorological stations changed significantly due to urban expansion. Fast urbanization is the main factor that affects the spatial-temporal distribution of thermal environment around meteorological stations. Moreover, the normalized LST and NDVI exhibit strong inverse correlations around meteorological stations, so the variability of LST can be monitored through evaluating the variability of NDVI. In addition, station-relocation plays an important role in improving representativeness of thermal environment. Notably, the environment representativeness was improved, but when using the data from the station to study climate change, the relocation-induced inhomogeneous data should be considered and adjusted. Consequently, controlling the scale and layout of the urban buildings and constructions around meteorological stations is an effective method to ameliorate observational thermal environment and to improve regional representativeness of station observation. The present work provides observational evidences that high resolution Landsat images can be used to evaluate the thermal environment of meteorological stations.

  10. Analysis of thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets using magnetic domain observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Takezawa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We used magnetic domain observation to statistically observe the thermal demagnetization behavior of Nd–Fe–B sintered magnets at elevated temperatures up to 150 °C. Simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred adjacent grains occurred at 90 °C because of the magnetic interaction among the grains beyond grain boundaries in the Dysprosium (Dy-free low-coercivity magnet. Conversely, simultaneous magnetization reversal in a hundred grains did not occur in the Dy-added high-coercivity magnets, and the demagnetizing ratio steadily increased with temperature. Furthermore, the addition of Dy induced high thermal stability by eliminating the simultaneous thermal demagnetization, which was caused by the magnetic interaction among the grains.

  11. Characterization of Near-Earth Asteroid 2009 KC3 from Radar and Thermal Infrared Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, Patrick A.; Howell, E. S.; Nolan, M. C.; Benner, L. A. M.; Brozovic, M.; Giorgini, J. D.; Vervack, R. J.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Magri, C.; Mueller, M.

    2010-01-01

    We will report on the size, shape, spin state, and reflective and thermal properties of C-type, Apollo-class, potentially hazardous, near-Earth asteroid 2009 KC3 (a = 3.2 AU, e = 0.7, i = 10 deg). This object was discovered by the Siding Spring Survey in May 2009 and subsequently observed in the

  12. Amplitude of the diurnal temperature cycle as observed by thermal infrared and microwave radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land surface temperature (LST) is a key input to physically-based retrieval algorithms of hydrological states and fluxes, and global measurements of LST are provided by many satellite platforms. Passive microwave (MW) observations offer an alternative to conventional thermal infrared (TIR) LST retri...

  13. Using Lunar Observations to Assess Terra MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chen, Hongda

    2010-01-01

    MODIS collects data in both the reflected solar and thermal emissive regions using 36 spectral bands. The center wavelengths of these bands cover the3.7 to 14.24 micron region. In addition to using its on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a full aperture solar diffuser (SD) and a blackbody (BB), lunar observations have been scheduled on a regular basis to support both Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization. This paper provides an overview of MODIS lunar observations and their applications for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and thermal emissive bands (TEB) with an emphasis on potential calibration improvements of MODIS band 21 at 3.96 microns. This spectral band has detectors set with low gains to enable fire detection. Methodologies are proposed and examined on the use of lunar observations for the band 21 calibration. Also presented in this paper are preliminary results derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations and remaining challenging issues.

  14. [Ebstein anomaly and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesgo, Carmen Armida Iñigo; Gómez, Luis Guillermo Torres; Higareda, Salvador Hernández; Vargas, Juan Rafael Gómez

    2008-08-01

    The Ebstein's anomaly is a congenital malformation of the tricuspid valve and of the right ventricle that usually is associated with interauricular communication, foramen oval, and arrhythmias of Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome type. To analyze the association between Ebstein's anomaly and pregnancy. A prospective study was made in five pregnant women's with Ebstein's anomaly without surgery. We analyzed the clinical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, x-ray of thorax, Doppler color heart ultrasound, and fetal valoration by means of pelvic ecosonogram and cardiotocographic registry, and routinely prenatal paraclinic tests. We observed severe expansion of the ventricle and 3rd degree index of atrialization in two patients. In two pregnancies there were interatrial communication (patients with cyanosis) and in three was detected severe tricuspid insufficiency. The average of gestacional age was of 36.4 +/- 1.8 weeks. Two of the five pregnancies has preterm birth. Only one childbirth was short weight to gestational age. The rest stayed within percentile 10. There were no obits or neonatal deaths, either congenital abnormality by Doppler heart ultrasound. The pregnancy is well tolerated in patients with Ebstein's anomaly; nevertheless, participation of multidisciplinary team is recommended to establish the treatment.

  15. Viscous dissipation as a regional thermal anomaly-generator process: implications on the evolution of Baja California post-subduction volcanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete-Aranda, R.; Contreras, J.

    2010-12-01

    An intriguing feature of the Baja California peninsula is that volcanic activity thrived and continued along the axis of the peninsula even after the cessation of subduction 10 Ma ago. Post-subduction volcanism in Baja California occurred mainly in monogenetic volcanic fields comprising a variety of compositions, most of them associated with high-temperature regimes and marked by a “slab” signature (i.e., adakites, Niobium-enriched basalts and high-magnesium andesites). Several attempts have been made to explain the origin and compositional diversity of such post-subduction volcanism. Many of them rely on the assumption that anomalous magmas are formed in direct response to tectonic events such as slab window formation or slab-tearing processes. However, none of them can offer a satisfactory explanation as to why volcanism as young as 1 Ma can be found along the Baja California peninsula. Observations elsewhere and in numerical simulations have shown that the slab tearing process is a fast one lasting only a few million years. By contrast the post-subduction volcanism in Baja California has lasted more than 10-million years. Here, we present a physical model that shed light into the origin of this controversial phenomenon. The model calls upon viscous dissipation or shear heating as the process responsible for the generation of a regional heat flow anomaly with a maximum amplitude of 40 mW/m2 clearly observed in deep boreholes drilled in the area. We hypothesize that at moderate depths it may have caused partial melting after the cessation of subduction along the Baja California. Our results show that indeed is possible for rocks to increase their temperatures substantially in this way. Preliminary numerical experimentation shows that the melt fraction could reach up to 10% and the maximum amount of shear heating could lead to a temperature increase close to 200 °C at 35 km depth. Moreover, the rise of magmas and/or hot fluids in the shear zone will enhance

  16. Observed variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Johnson, Z.; Salgaonkar, G.; Nisha, K.; Rajan, C.K.; Rao, R.R.

    variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons V. V. Gopalakrishna, 1 Z. Johnson, 2 G. Salgaonkar, 1 K. Nisha, 1 C. K. Rajan, 2 and R. R. Rao 3 Received 19 April 2005; revised 3 August 2005; accepted.... Rajan, and R. R. Rao (2005), Observed variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L18605, doi:10.1029/2005GL023280. 1. Introduction [2] In the Lakshadweep Sea (LS: 8...

  17. Underground physics and the barometric pumping effect observed for thermal neutron flux underground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenkin, Yu. V.; Alekseenko, V. V.; Gromushkin, D. M.; Sulakov, V. P.; Shchegolev, O. B.

    2017-05-01

    It is known that neutron background is a major problem for low-background experiments carrying out underground, such as dark matter search, double-beta decay searches and other experiments known as Underground Physics. We present here some results obtained with the en-detector of 0.75 m2, which is running for more than 4 years underground at a depth of 25 m water equivalent in Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University. Some spontaneous increases in thermal neutron flux up to a factor of 3 were observed in delayed anti-correlation with barometric pressure. The phenomenon can be explained by the radon barometric pumping effect resulting in similar effect in neutron flux being produced in (α, n)-reactions by alpha-decays of radon and its daughters in surrounding rock. This is the first demonstration of the barometric pumping effect observed in thermal neutron flux underground.

  18. The Response of Equatorial Ionization Anomaly in 120°E to the Geomagnetic Storm of 18 August 2003 at Different Altitudes From Multiple Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weihua; Zhu, Zhengping; Xiong, Chao; Chang, Shanshan

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the variations of equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in 120°E region during the 17-20 August 2003 storm are investigated from measurements of satellites at different altitudes from Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP), Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), scientific satellite of the Republic of China (ROCSAT-1), and Defense Meteorological Satellite Program missions. The results showed that (1) at CHAMP and GRACE altitudes, the EIA was inhibited before the storm sudden commencement (SSC) and also during the storm recovery phase, but it was enhanced significantly during the storm main phase of the storm. (2) The variations of EIA strength and interhemispheric density asymmetry of the two crests were similar at CHAMP and GRACE altitudes, while the location asymmetry of the two crests was different at CHAMP and GRACE altitudes. (3) The irregularities and long-duration scintillation were recorded before the SSC of the storm, when the EIA was inhibited. The irregularities at different altitudes and short-duration scintillation were observed during the main phase of the storm, when the EIA was enhanced significantly. (4) The EIA enhancement can be attributed to the enhanced electric field due to prompt penetration interplanetary electric fields and the storm time neutral wind, while the suppression of EIA on 17 August can be attributed to the absence of the equatorward neutral wind, which varied with the altitudes. The EIA inhibition during the recovery phase may be caused mainly by the neutral wind. Our results suggest that the neutral wind is the crucial factor causing the variations in EIA and the occurrence of scintillation.

  19. Doppler signals observed during high temperature thermal ablation are the result of boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAHIRNYAK, VOLODYMYR M.; MOROS, EDUARDO G.; NOVÁK, PETR; KLIMBERG, V. SUZANNE; SHAFIRSTEIN, GAL

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate the causation mechanism of Spectral Doppler ultrasound signals (DUS) observed during high temperature thermal ablation and evaluate their potential for image-guidance. Methods Sixteen ex vivo ablations were performed in fresh turkey breast muscle, eight with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) devices, and eight with a conductive interstitial thermal therapy (CITT) device. Temperature changes in the ablation zone were measured with thermocouples located at 1 to 10mm away from the ablation probes. Concomitantly, DUS were recorded using a standard diagnostic ultrasound scanner. Retrospectively, sustained observations of DUS were correlated with measured temperatures. Sustained DUS was arbitrarily defined as the Doppler signals lasting more than 10 s as observed in the diagnostic ultrasound videos captured from the scanner. Results For RFA experiments, minimum average temperature (T1±SD) at which sustained DUS were observed was 97.2±7.3°C, while the maximum average temperature (T2±SD) at which DUS were not seen was 74.3±9.1°C. For CITT ablation, T1 and T2 were 95.7±5.9°C and 91.6±7.2°C, respectively. It was also observed, especially during CITT ablation, that temperatures remained relatively constant during Doppler activity. Conclusions The value of T1 was near the standard boiling point of water (99.61°C) while T2 was below it. Together, T1 and T2 support the conclusion that DUS during high temperature thermal ablation are the result of boiling (phase change). This conclusion is also supported by the nearly constant temperature histories maintained at locations from which DUS emanated. PMID:20569109

  20. Chiral anomalies and differential geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumino, B.

    1983-10-01

    Some properties of chiral anomalies are described from a geometric point of view. Topics include chiral anomalies and differential forms, transformation properties of the anomalies, identification and use of the anomalies, and normalization of the anomalies. 22 references. (WHK)

  1. Observation of thermally driven field-like spin torque in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Arnab, E-mail: arnabbose@ee.iitb.ac.in; Jain, Sourabh; Asam, Nagarjuna; Bhuktare, Swapnil; Singh, Hanuman; Tulapurkar, Ashwin A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Shukla, Amit Kumar; Konishi, Katsunori; Lam, Duc Duong; Fujii, Yuya; Miwa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2016-07-18

    We report the thermally driven giant field-like spin-torque in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) on application of heat current from top to bottom. The field-like term is detected by the shift of the magneto-resistance hysteresis loop applying temperature gradient. We observed that the field-like term depends on the magnetic symmetry of the MTJ. In asymmetric structures, with different ferromagnetic materials for free and fixed layers, the field-like term is greatly enhanced. Our results show that a pure spin current density of the order of 10{sup 9 }A/m{sup 2} can be produced by creating a 120 mK temperature difference across 0.9 nm thick MgO tunnelling barrier. Our results will be useful for writing MTJ and domain wall-based memories using thermally driven spin torque.

  2. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  3. Iapetus' near surface thermal emission modeled and constrained using Cassini RADAR Radiometer microwave observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, A.; Leyrat, C.; Janssen, M. A.; Keihm, S.; Wye, L. C.; West, R.; Lorenz, R. D.; Tosi, F.

    2014-10-01

    Since its arrival at Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft has had only a few opportunities to observe Iapetus, Saturn's most distant regular satellite. These observations were all made from long ranges (>100,000 km) except on September 10, 2007, during Cassini orbit 49, when the spacecraft encountered the two-toned moon during its closest flyby so far. In this pass it collected spatially resolved data on the object's leading side, mainly over the equatorial dark terrains of Cassini Regio (CR). In this paper, we examine the radiometry data acquired by the Cassini RADAR during both this close-targeted flyby (referred to as IA49-3) and the distant Iapetus observations. In the RADAR's passive mode, the receiver functions as a radiometer to record the thermal emission from planetary surfaces at a wavelength of 2.2-cm. On the cold icy surfaces of Saturn's moons, the measured brightness temperatures depend both on the microwave emissivity and the physical temperature profile below the surface down to a depth that is likely to be tens of centimeters or even a few meters. Combined with the concurrent active data, passive measurements can shed light on the composition, structure and thermal properties of planetary regoliths and thus on the processes from which they have formed and evolved. The model we propose for Iapetus' microwave thermal emission is fitted to the IA49-3 observations and reveals that the thermal inertias sensed by the Cassini Radiometer over both CR and the bright mid-to-high latitude terrains, namely Ronceveaux Terra (RT) in the North and Saragossa Terra (ST) in the South, significantly exceed those measured by Cassini's CIRS (Composite Infrared Spectrometer), which is sensitive to much smaller depths, generally the first few millimeters of the surface. This implies that the subsurface of Iapetus sensed at 2.2-cm wavelength is more consolidated than the uppermost layers of the surface. In the case of CR, a thermal inertia of at least 50 J m-2 K-1 s-1/2, and

  4. Thermal Analysis of MIRIS Space Observation Camera for Verification of Passive Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duk-Hang Lee

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We conducted thermal analyses and cooling tests of the space observation camera (SOC of the multi-purpose infrared imaging system (MIRIS to verify passive cooling. The thermal analyses were conducted with NX 7.0 TMG for two cases of attitude of the MIRIS: for the worst hot case and normal case. Through the thermal analyses of the flight model, it was found that even in the worst case the telescope could be cooled to less than 206°K. This is similar to the results of the passive cooling test (~200.2°K. For the normal attitude case of the analysis, on the other hand, the SOC telescope was cooled to about 160°K in 10 days. Based on the results of these analyses and the test, it was determined that the telescope of the MIRIS SOC could be successfully cooled to below 200°K with passive cooling. The SOC is, therefore, expected to have optimal performance under cooled conditions in orbit.

  5. Some observations regarding the thermal flux from Earth's erupting volcanoes for the period 2000 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, R.; Blackett, M.; Hill-Butler, C.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation will describe 15 years of MODIS observations of the thermal flux from Earth's sub-aerially erupting volcanoes. The MODVOLC algorithm has been providing data regarding volcanic eruptions on Earth to the volcanological community since the launch of Terra MODIS, via the internet, in near-real-time (http:modis.higp.hawaii.edu). During this time, eruptions at 102 volcanoes have been observed, including activity associated with mafic lava flows, lava lakes, vent-based explosive activity and felsic lava domes. This presentation will present an overview of how MODIS has documented every eruption to occur on Earth since 2000, and will describe some of the more interesting result that have been obtained from the analysis of this archive. The total amount of energy radiated into the atmosphere can be divided into two parts: a baseline level of emission which has increased gradually over this 15 period, superimposed on which are large "spikes" attributable to large, lava-flow-forming eruptions. The most intense eruption during this period of time was the 2004 eruption of Nyamuragira, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, whilst the largest magnitude event was the 2012-2013 eruption of Tolbachik, Russia. Spatio-temporal patterns in thermal output will be addressed. Time-series analysis of heat flux from these 102 volcanoes has revealed while some volcanoes exhibit statistically significant periodicity in the magnitude of their heat output, many do not.

  6. Lymphatic Anomalies Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    Lymphatic Malformation; Generalized Lymphatic Anomaly (GLA); Central Conducting Lymphatic Anomaly; CLOVES Syndrome; Gorham-Stout Disease ("Disappearing Bone Disease"); Blue Rubber Bleb Nevus Syndrome; Kaposiform Lymphangiomatosis; Kaposiform Hemangioendothelioma/Tufted Angioma; Klippel-Trenaunay Syndrome; Lymphangiomatosis

  7. Tracheobronchial Branching Anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Min Ji; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shick [Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Park, A Young [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    There are various congenital anomalies with respect to the number, length, diameter, and location of tracheobronchial branching patterns. The tracheobronchial anomalies are classified into two groups. The first one, anomalies of division, includes tracheal bronchus, cardiac bronchus, tracheal diverticulum, pulmonary isomerism, and minor variations. The second one, dysmorphic lung, includes lung agenesis-hypoplasia complex and lobar agenesis-aplasia complex

  8. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  9. MRI of central nervous system anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izawa, M.; Oikawa, A.; Matoba, A.

    1987-05-01

    MRI was very useful in the evaluation of congenital anomalies of central nervous system as well as other nervous system disease with three-dimensional spatial resolution. We had experienced MRI of central nervous system anomalies, demonstrated characterisitic findings in each anomaly. MRI is useful to observe the coronal, horizontal and sagittal images of the brain and spinal cord in order to discuss the etiological mechanisms of spinal dysraphysm and its associated anomalies. In case of spina bifida cystica MRI was available to decide operative indication for radical operation and tetherd cord developed from postoperative scar or accompanied intraspinal lesions.

  10. Detecting Biosphere anomalies hotspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanche-Garcia, Yanira; Mahecha, Miguel; Flach, Milan; Denzler, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    distribution. The proposed methodology has been applied to different areas around the globe. The results show that the method is able to detect historic events and also provides a useful tool to define sensitive regions. This method and results have been developed within the framework of the project BACI (http://baci-h2020.eu/), which aims to integrate Earth Observation data to monitor the earth system and assessing the impacts of terrestrial changes. [1] V. Chandola, A., Banerjee and v., Kumar. Anomaly detection: a survey. ACM computing surveys (CSUR), vol. 41, n. 3, 2009. [2] P. Mahalanobis. On the generalised distance in statistics. Proceedings National Institute of Science, vol. 2, pp 49-55, 1936.

  11. Ozone, water vapor, and temperature anomalies associated with atmospheric blocking events over Eastern Europe in spring - summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnov, S. A.; Mokhov, I. I.; Lupo, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Using data from the AIRS satellite instrument (V6, L3), ozone, water vapor (WV), and temperature anomalies associated with the relatively short spring atmospheric blocking event and anomalously prolonged summer block over European Russia (ER) in 2010 are analyzed. Within the domain of the blocking anticyclones, negative total column ozone (TCO) anomalies and positive total column water vapor (TCWV) anomalies reaching the values of -25 and -32 Dobson Units (DU) and 10 and 11 kg m-2 during the spring and summer blocks are observed, respectively. Conversely, within the regions adjacent to the anticyclones to the west and east, positive TCO anomalies (77 and 45 DU) and negative TCWV anomalies (-3 and -4 kg m-2) are found. These TCO and TCWV anomalies are conditioned by the regional atmospheric circulation associated with the strong omega-type blocking. The TCO deficit and TCWV surplus within the atmospheric blocking domain are explained primarily by the poleward advection of subtropical air with low TCO and high TCWV content and tropopause uplift. The TCO and TCWV anomalies are also associated with quasi-stationary Rossby wave trains that accompanied these blocking events. An analysis of the anomaly vertical structure shows that the marked TCO decrease is primarily due to the lower stratospheric ozone decrease, while the strong TCWV increase is mainly the result of an increase of lower tropospheric WV content. The possible role of photochemical ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere due to WV advection within the blocked regions is also discussed. Vertical profiles of the thermal anomalies during both atmospheric blocking events reveal dipole-like structures characterized by positive temperature anomalies in the troposphere and negative anomalies in the lower stratosphere.

  12. An Investigation of the Ranges of Validity of Asteroid Thermal Models for Near-Earth Asteroid Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mommert, M.; Jedicke, R.; Trilling, D. E.

    2018-02-01

    The majority of known asteroid diameters are derived from thermal-infrared observations. Diameters are derived using asteroid thermal models that approximate their surface temperature distributions and compare the measured thermal-infrared flux with model-dependent predictions. The most commonly used thermal model is the Near-Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM), which is usually perceived as superior to other models like the Fast-Rotating Model (FRM). We investigate the applicability of the NEATM and the FRM to thermal-infrared observations of Near-Earth Objects using synthetic asteroids with properties based on the real Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) population. We find the NEATM to provide more accurate diameters and albedos than the FRM in most cases, with a few exceptions. The modeling results are barely affected by the physical properties of the objects, but we find a large impact of the solar phase angle on the modeling results. We conclude that the NEATM provides statistically more robust diameter estimates for NEAs observed at solar phase angles less than ∼65°, while the FRM provides more robust diameter estimates for solar phase angles greater than ∼65°. We estimate that <5% of all NEA diameters and albedos derived up to date are affected by systematic effects that are of the same order of magnitude as the typical thermal model uncertainties. We provide statistical correction functions for diameters and albedos derived using the NEATM and FRM as a function of solar phase angle.

  13. Organic petrology of the Aptian-age section in the downdip Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Mississippi, USA: Observations and preliminary implications for thermal maturation history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Brett J.; Hackley, Paul C.; Enomoto, Catherine B.; Bove, Alana M.; Dulong, Frank T.; Lohr, Celeste D.; Scott, Krystina R.

    2014-01-01

    This study identifies a thermal maturity anomaly within the downdip Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB) of southern Mississippi, USA, through examination of bitumen reflectance data from Aptian-age strata (Sligo Formation, Pine Island Shale, James Limestone, and Rodessa Formation). U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reconnaissance investigations conducted in 2011–2012 examined Aptian-age thermal maturity trends across the onshore northern Gulf of Mexico region and indicated that the section in the downdip MISB is approaching the wet gas/condensate window (Ro~1.2%). A focused study in 2012–2013 used 6 whole core, one sidewall core, and 49 high-graded cutting samples (depth range of 13,000–16,500 ft [3962.4–5029.2 m] below surface) collected from 15 downdip MISB wells for mineralogy, fluid inclusion, organic geochemistry, and organic petrographic analysis. Based on native solid bitumen reflectance (Ro generally > 0.8%; interpreted to be post-oil indigenous bitumens matured in situ), Ro values increase regionally across the MISB from the southeast to the northwest. Thermal maturity in the eastern half of the basin (Ro range 1.0 to 1.25%) appears to be related to present-day burial depth and shows a gradual increase with respect to depth. To the west, thermal maturity continues to increase even as the Aptian section shallows structurally on the Adams County High (Ro range 1.4 to > 1.8%). After evaluating the possible thermal agents responsible for increasing maturity at shallower depths (i.e., igneous activity, proximity to salt, variations in regional heat flux, and uplift), we tentatively propose that either greater paleoheat flow or deeper burial coupled with uplift in the western part of the MISB could be responsible for the thermal maturity anomaly. Further research and additional data are needed to determine the cause(s) of the thermal anomaly.

  14. Prediction of gravity anomalies for geophysical exploration | Idowu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Where the density of the available gravity anomalies is not enough, for a particular purpose of geophysical exploration, more gravity stations can be established within the surveyed area and the gravity anomalies observed for these stations. In some cases, where observations of gravity anomalies are not possible due, ...

  15. First observation of the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with kinetic inductance detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, R.; Comis, B.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Adane, A.; Ade, P.; André, P.; Beelen, A.; Belier, B.; Benoît, A.; Bideaud, A.; Billot, N.; Boudou, N.; Bourrion, O.; Calvo, M.; Catalano, A.; Coiffard, G.; D'Addabbo, A.; Désert, F.-X.; Doyle, S.; Goupy, J.; Kramer, C.; Leclercq, S.; Martino, J.; Mauskopf, P.; Mayet, F.; Monfardini, A.; Pajot, F.; Pascale, E.; Perotto, L.; Pointecouteau, E.; Ponthieu, N.; Revéret, V.; Rodriguez, L.; Savini, G.; Schuster, K.; Sievers, A.; Tucker, C.; Zylka, R.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Clusters of galaxies provide valuable information on the evolution of the Universe and large scale structures. Recent cluster observations via the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect have proven to be a powerful tool to detect and study them. In this context, high resolution tSZ observations (~tens of arcsec) are of particular interest to probe intermediate and high redshift clusters. Aims: Observations of the tSZ effect will be carried out with the millimeter dual-band NIKA2 camera, based on kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) to be installed at the IRAM 30-m telescope in 2015. To demonstrate the potential of such an instrument, we present tSZ observations with the NIKA camera prototype, consisting of two arrays of 132 and 224 detectors that observe at 140 and 240 GHz with a 18.5 and 12.5 arcsec angular resolution, respectively. Methods: The cluster RX J1347.5-1145 was observed simultaneously at 140 and 240 GHz. We used a spectral decorrelation technique to remove the atmospheric noise and obtain a map of the cluster at 140 GHz. The efficiency of this procedure has been characterized through realistic simulations of the observations. Results: The observed 140 GHz map presents a decrement at the cluster position consistent with the tSZ nature of the signal. We used this map to study the pressure distribution of the cluster by fitting a gNFW model to the data. Subtracting this model from the map, we confirm that RX J1347.5-1145 is an ongoing merger, which confirms and complements previous tSZ and X-ray observations. Conclusions: For the first time, we demonstrate the tSZ capability of KID based instruments. The NIKA2 camera with ~5000 detectors and a 6.5 arcmin field of view will be well-suited for in-depth studies of the intra cluster medium in intermediate to high redshifts, which enables the characterization of recently detected clusters by the Planck satellite.

  16. Influence of Coral Community Structure and Thermal Stress Exposure on Observed Patterns of Bleaching across the Northern Mariana Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, L.; Heron, S. F.; Johnson, S.; Okano, R.; Benavente, D.; Iguel, J.; Perez, D. I.; Liu, G.; Geiger, E.; Eakin, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    In 2013 and 2014, the Mariana Archipelago experienced consecutive thermal stress events that resulted in widespread coral bleaching and mortality. Using in situ survey data collected across seven of the Northern Mariana Islands during the 2014 event, we undertook the first quantitative comparison between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Watch 5 km satellite monitoring products and coral bleaching observations. Analysis of coral community characteristics, historical temperature conditions and thermal stress revealed a strong influence of coral biodiversity in the patterns of observed bleaching. This illustrates the importance of using local benthic characteristics to interpret the level of impact from thermal stress exposure. In an era of continuing climate change, accurate monitoring of thermal stress and prediction of coral bleaching are essential for resource managers and stakeholders to direct resources to the most effective management actions to conserve coral reefs.

  17. Thermal treatment effects imposed on solid DNA cationic lipid complex with hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride, observed by variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizioł, Jacek, E-mail: niziol@agh.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2014-12-21

    DNA cationic lipid complexes are materials of properties required for applications in organic electronics and optoelectronics. Often, their thermal stability demonstrated by thermogravimetry is cited in the literature as important issue. However, little is known about processes occurring in heated solid DNA cationic lipid complexes. In frame of this work, thin films of Deoxyribonucleic acid-hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DNA-CTMA) were deposited on silicon wafers. Samples were thermally annealed, and simultaneously, their optical functions were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. At lower temperatures, thermal expansion coefficient of solid DNA-CTMA was negative, but at higher temperatures positive. Thermally induced modification of absorption spectrum in UV-vis was observed. It occurred at a range of temperatures higher than this of DNA denaturation in solution. The observed phenomenon was irreversible, at least in time scale of the experiment (one day)

  18. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    which associated anomalies are most common in cases with DS with associated anomalies. In this study we observed a higher percentage of associated anomalies than in the other reported series as well as an increase in the incidence of duodenal atresia, urinary system anomalies, musculoskeletal system anomalies, and respiratory system anomalies, and a decrease in the incidence of anal atresia, annular pancreas, and limb reduction defects. In conclusion, we observed a high prevalence of total congenital anomalies and specific patterns of malformations associated with Down syndrome which emphasizes the need to evaluate carefully all cases with Down syndrome for possible associated major congenital anomalies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The structure of thermals in cumulus from airborne dual-Doppler radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Rick R.

    Airborne dual-Doppler syntheses are used in combination with flight-level in situ data to explore the velocity fields in vertical and horizontal cross-sections of cumulus turrets. The multidimensional representations of the rising thermals led to an improved conceptual model of cumulus cloud growth. The Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR) on-board the University of Wyoming KingAir research aircraft is a 95 GHz Doppler radar capable of quasi-simultaneous multi-fixed-beam scanning. A technique was developed to analyze and merge data collected by pairs of WCR beams yielding two-dimensional wind field syntheses in horizontal or vertical planes. The gridding methodology can be customized to follow the scanned surface, with grid cell sizes between 30 and 45 m. The algorithm to solve the velocity inverse decomposition problem takes advantage of available a-priori and external information about the target and its environment. An estimate of the ambient winds is employed to evaluate the velocity component normal to the solution plane. The accuracy of the two-dimensional (2-D) velocity is on the order of 1-2 m s-1, and it is dependent on: the radar system design, the data collection process, and the weather target properties. A methodology to calculate each error component and to infer the maximum uncertainty in the retrieved 2-D velocity is discussed. The clouds sampled in this study were cumulus congestus forming in cold, dry and nearly neutrally stable environments over land. Observations focused on newly-developed turrets and followed their evolution over periods of up to 15 min. The turrets ranged from 1 to 2 km in horizontal size. Measurable radar reflectivities covered vertical depths of up to 2 km. Cloud bases were at temperatures of 0 to -5°C, and cloud top temperatures were -20 to -30°C. The cumuli formed and evolved through sequences of updraft pulses, or thermals, consisting of well-defined vortex-ring structures at the top, and trailing turbulent wake flows behind them

  20. HYPERSPECTRAL ANOMALY DETECTION IN URBAN SCENARIOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Rejas Ayuga

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the spectral features of reflectance and emissivity in the pattern recognition of urban materials in several single hyperspectral scenes through a comparative analysis of anomaly detection methods and their relationship with city surfaces with the aim to improve information extraction processes. Spectral ranges of the visible-near infrared (VNIR, shortwave infrared (SWIR and thermal infrared (TIR from hyperspectral data cubes of AHS sensor and HyMAP and MASTER of two cities, Alcalá de Henares (Spain and San José (Costa Rica respectively, have been used. In this research it is assumed no prior knowledge of the targets, thus, the pixels are automatically separated according to their spectral information, significantly differentiated with respect to a background, either globally for the full scene, or locally by image segmentation. Several experiments on urban scenarios and semi-urban have been designed, analyzing the behaviour of the standard RX anomaly detector and different methods based on subspace, image projection and segmentation-based anomaly detection methods. A new technique for anomaly detection in hyperspectral data called DATB (Detector of Anomalies from Thermal Background based on dimensionality reduction by projecting targets with unknown spectral signatures to a background calculated from thermal spectrum wavelengths is presented. First results and their consequences in non-supervised classification and extraction information processes are discussed.

  1. Satellite and Ground Based Thermal Observation of the 2014 Effusive Eruption at Stromboli Volcano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Zakšek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As specifically designed platforms are still unavailable at this point in time, lava flows are usually monitored remotely with the use of meteorological satellites. Generally, meteorological satellites have a low spatial resolution, which leads to uncertain results. This paper presents the first long term satellite monitoring of active lava flows on Stromboli volcano (August–November 2014 at high spatial resolution (160 m and relatively high temporal resolution (~3 days. These data were retrieved by the small satellite Technology Experiment Carrier-1 (TET-1, which was developed and built by the German Aerospace Center (DLR. The satellite instrument is dedicated to high temperature event monitoring. The satellite observations were accompanied by field observations conducted by thermal cameras. These provided short time lava flow dynamics and validation for satellite data. TET-1 retrieved 27 datasets over Stromboli during its effusive activity. Using the radiant density approach, TET-1 data were used to calibrate the MODVOLC data and estimate the time averaged lava discharge rate. With a mean output rate of 0.87 m3/s during the three-month-long eruption, we estimate the total erupted volume to be 7.4 × 106 m3.

  2. Thermal tides and studies to tune the mechanistic tidal model using UARS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Yudin

    Full Text Available Monthly simulations of the thermal diurnal and semidiurnal tides are compared to High-Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI and Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII wind and temperature measurements on the Upper-Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS. There is encouraging agreement between the observations and the linear global mechanistic tidal model results both for the diurnal and semidiurnal components in the equatorial and mid-latitude regions. This gives us the confidence to outline the first steps of an assimilative analysis/interpretation for tides, dissipation, and mean flow using a combination of model results and the global measurements from HRDI and WINDII. The sensitivity of the proposed technique to the initial guess employed to obtain a best fit to the data by tuning model parameters is discussed for the January and March 1993 cases, when the WINDII day and night measurements of the meridional winds between 90 and 110 km are used along with the daytime HRDI measurements. Several examples for the derivation of the tidal variables and decomposition of the measured winds into tidal and mean flow components using this approach are compared with previous tidal estimates and modeling results for the migrating tides. The seasonal cycle of the derived diurnal tidal amplitudes are discussed and compared with radar observation between 80 and 100 km and 40°S and 40°N.

  3. Thermal tides and studies to tune the mechanistic tidal model using UARS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Yudin

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Monthly simulations of the thermal diurnal and semidiurnal tides are compared to High-Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI and Wind Imaging Interferometer (WINDII wind and temperature measurements on the Upper-Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS. There is encouraging agreement between the observations and the linear global mechanistic tidal model results both for the diurnal and semidiurnal components in the equatorial and mid-latitude regions. This gives us the confidence to outline the first steps of an assimilative analysis/interpretation for tides, dissipation, and mean flow using a combination of model results and the global measurements from HRDI and WINDII. The sensitivity of the proposed technique to the initial guess employed to obtain a best fit to the data by tuning model parameters is discussed for the January and March 1993 cases, when the WINDII day and night measurements of the meridional winds between 90 and 110 km are used along with the daytime HRDI measurements. Several examples for the derivation of the tidal variables and decomposition of the measured winds into tidal and mean flow components using this approach are compared with previous tidal estimates and modeling results for the migrating tides. The seasonal cycle of the derived diurnal tidal amplitudes are discussed and compared with radar observation between 80 and 100 km and 40°S and 40°N.

  4. Estimation of soil and vegetation temperatures with multiangular thermal infrared observations: IMGRASS, HEIFE, and SGP 1997 experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menenti, M.; Jia, L.; Li, Z.L.; Djepa, V.; Wang, J.; Stoll, M.P.; Su, Z.; Rast, M.

    2001-01-01

    The potential of directional observations in the thermal infrared region for land surface studies is a largely uncharted area of research. The availability of the dual-view Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) observations led to explore new opportunities in this direction. In the context of

  5. Congenital optic nerve anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Begué, N; Saint-Gerons, M

    2016-12-01

    To update the current knowledge about congenital optic disc anomalies. A comprehensive literature search was performed in the major biomedical databases. Patients with these anomalies usually have poor vision in infancy. Refractive errors are common, and serous retinal detachment may develop in some of these anomalies. It is critically important to clinically differentiate between these congenital optic disc anomalies, as central nervous system malformations are common in some, whereas others may be associated with systemic anomalies. Congenital optic disc anomalies are a heterogeneous group of pathologies with characteristic fundus appearance and systemic associations. We should always try to make a correct diagnosis, in order to ask for specific tests, as well as to provide an adequate follow-up. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermal characteristics of a B8.3 flare observed on July 04, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Arun Kumar; Sylwester, Barbara; Sylwester, Janusz; Jain, Rajmal

    We explore the temporal evolution of flare plasma parameters including temperature (T) - differential emission measure (DEM) relationship by analyzing high spectral and temporal cadence of X-ray emission in 1.6-8.0 keV energy band, recorded by SphinX (Polish) and Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS; Indian) instruments, during a B8.3 flare which occurred on July 04, 2009. SphinX records X-ray emission in 1.2-15.0 keV energy band with the temporal and spectral cadence as good as 6 μs and 0.4 keV, respectively. On the other hand, SOXS provides X-ray observations in 4-25 keV energy band with the temporal and spectral resolution of 3 s and 0.7 keV, respectively. We derive the thermal plasma parameters during impulsive phase of the flare employing well-established Withbroe-Sylwester DEM inversion algorithm.

  7. Observing the subsurface thermal signature of the Black Sea cold intermediate layer with Argo profiling floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Anil; Fach, Bettina A.; Oguz, Temel

    2017-06-01

    Cold intermediate layers (CILs) constitute a key indicator of the subsurface thermal signature in many marginal and subarctic seas. Towards better understanding the impacts of natural and anthropogenic climate variability in the Black Sea, the present study elucidates processes leading to the observed changes of CIL characteristics at mesoscale and monthly-to-interannual scales by analyzing weekly temperature-salinity profiles provided by Argo floats for 2002-2015. The continuous time series data allowed to elucidate different types of CIL formation episodes. For the first time, it was possible to trace their subsequent evolution depending on the number and intensity of successive, but often intermittent, autumn-winter cooling events in addition to the ambient flow and stratification characteristics within the cyclonic interior and anticyclonic coastal eddies/gyres. The spatial distribution of CIL formation in the cold years 2003, 2006 and 2012 covered much of the Black Sea, even coastal anticyclonic eddies as a new feature which has not been documented before. The data also recorded modification of CIL during the rest of the year in terms of its thickness, position, temperature and salinity ranges in response to advective transport by the circulation system, interior turbulent mixing, and quasi-lateral intrusions associated with mesoscale features.

  8. Direct observation of surface-state thermal oscillations in SmB6 oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Brian; Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2018-01-01

    SmB6 is a mixed valence Kondo insulator that exhibits a sharp increase in resistance following an activated behavior that levels off and saturates below 4 K. This behavior can be explained by the proposal of SmB6 representing a new state of matter, a topological Kondo insulator, in which a Kondo gap is developed, and topologically protected surface conduction dominates low-temperature transport. Exploiting its nonlinear dynamics, a tunable SmB6 oscillator device was recently demonstrated, where a small dc current generates large oscillating voltages at frequencies from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz. This behavior was explained by a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. However, a crucial aspect of this model, the predicted temperature oscillation in the surface state, has not been experimentally observed to date. This is largely due to the technical difficulty of detecting an oscillating temperature of the very thin surface state. Here we report direct measurements of the time-dependent surface-state temperature in SmB6 with a RuO2 microthermometer. Our results agree quantitatively with the theoretically simulated temperature waveform, and hence support the validity of the oscillator model, which will provide accurate theoretical guidance for developing future SmB6 oscillators at higher frequencies.

  9. Physical properties of transneptunian objects, Centaurs, and Trojans from thermal observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, M.

    2014-01-01

    The most productive way to measure the size and albedo of small bodies throughout the Solar System is through studies of their thermal emission. This is complicated for the cold bodies in the outer Solar System, whose thermal emission peaks at wavelengths for which the Earth's atmosphere is opaque.

  10. Minor Physical Anomalies, Footprints, and Behavior: Was the Buddha Right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Thomas W.; Munoz, Milagros M.

    1982-01-01

    A relationship between an anomaly of the footprint suggested by ancient Abhidhamma meditations and Minor Physical Anomalies Scale was observed in children. The footprint anomalies correlated with the activity levels of children in the same way as the scores on the scale and consistently with prior research using the scale. (Author/RD)

  11. Anomaly detection and reconstruction from random projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, James E; Du, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Compressed-sensing methodology typically employs random projections simultaneously with signal acquisition to accomplish dimensionality reduction within a sensor device. The effect of such random projections on the preservation of anomalous data is investigated. The popular RX anomaly detector is derived for the case in which global anomalies are to be identified directly in the random-projection domain, and it is determined via both random simulation, as well as empirical observation that strongly anomalous vectors are likely to be identifiable by the projection-domain RX detector even in low-dimensional projections. Finally, a reconstruction procedure for hyperspectral imagery is developed wherein projection-domain anomaly detection is employed to partition the data set, permitting anomaly and normal pixel classes to be separately reconstructed in order to improve the representation of the anomaly pixels.

  12. Astrometric Solar-System Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    2009-05-01

    There are four unexplained anomalies connected with astrometric data. Perhaps the most disturbing is the fact that when a spacecraft on a flyby trajectory approaches the Earth within 2000 km or less, it experiences a gain in total orbital energy per unit mass (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 091102). This amounts to a net velocity increase of 13.5 mm/s for the NEAR spacecraft at a closest approach of 539 km, 3.9 mm/s for the Galileo spacecraft at 960 km, and 1.8 mm/s for the Rosetta spacecraft at 1956 km. Next, I suggest the change in the astronomical unit AU is definitely a concern. It is increasing by about 15 cm/yr (Krasinsky and Brumberg, Celes. Mech. & Dynam. Astron. 90, 267). The other two anomalies are perhaps less disturbing because of known sources of nongravitational acceleration. The first is an apparent slowing of the two Pioneer spacecraft as they exit the solar system in opposite directions (Anderson et al., Phys. Rev. D 65, 082004). Some, including me, are convinced this effect is of concern, but many are convinced it is produced by a nearly identical thermal emission from both spacecraft, in a direction away from the Sun, thereby producing acceleration toward the Sun. The fourth anomaly is a measured increase in the eccentricity of the Moon's orbit. Here again, an increase is expected from tidal friction in both the Earth and Moon. However, there is a reported increase that is about three times larger than expected (J. G. Williams, DDA/AAS Brouwer Award Lecture, Halifax, Nova Scotia 2006). We suspect that all four anomalies have mundane explanations. However, the possibility that they will be explained by a new theory of gravitation is not ruled out, perhaps analogous to Einstein's 1916 explanation of the excess precession of Mercury's perihelion.

  13. Satellite, Observational, Meteorological and Thermal Records From Two Sites in the Antarctic Megadunes - Stability of Atmospheric Forcing, Thermal Cracking, and the Seasonal Evolution of the Thermal Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, M. A.; Shuman, C. A.; Albert, M.; Scambos, T.

    2004-12-01

    An NSF-OPP funded research site in the megadunes occupied during the 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 field seasons provided an opportunity to monitor wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, air temperature, and the evolution of the thermal profile in the firn. In the first season this was done on the lee face of a megadune; in the second season it was done there and at an additional site on the windward face. Wind speed and temperature fluctuations were well correlated at the two sites with little lag. The thermal profiles provide a picture of the cold wave penetration at both sites. Firn in these areas was significantly recrystallized (see abstract by Courville et al., this session), had a surface character that included both large sastrugi (windward slopes) and very smooth surfaces (lee slopes), and showed numerous thermal contraction cracks that were likely sites of vertical air movement. In the first season the smooth lee slope was covered by a thin glaze; the spatial extent of this glaze and the surface roughness variations are detectable in satellite imagery from this period. Large area MODIS-based image maps show the dominance of katabatic-wind-generated features in the dune field. Satellite-based microwave emission time series show the source of emission to be extremely shallow and/or characteristic of rapid cooling to near isothermal conditions; these patterns have been used to map the extent of recrystallized firn. This will be revisited in light of the new time series of firn thermal profiles.

  14. Atmospheric circulation patterns and phenological anomalies of grapevine in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cola, Gabriele; Alilla, Roberta; Dal Monte, Giovanni; Epifani, Chiara; Mariani, Luigi; Parisi, Simone Gabriele

    2014-05-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is a fundamental crop for Italian agriculture as testified by the first place of Italy in the world producers ranking. This justify the importance of quantitative analyses referred to this crucial crop and aimed to quantify meteorological resources and limitations to development and production. Phenological rhythms of grapevine are strongly affected by surface fields of air temperature which in their turn are affected by synoptic circulation. This evidence highlights the importance of an approach based on dynamic climatology in order to detect and explain phenological anomalies that can have relevant effects on quantity and quality of grapevine production. In this context, this research is aimed to study the existing relation among the 850 hPa circulation patterns over the Euro-Mediterranean area from NOAA Ncep dataset and grapevine phenological fields for Italy over the period 2006-2013, highlighting the main phenological anomalies and analyzing synoptic determinants. This work is based on phenological fields with a standard pixel of 2 km routinely produced from 2006 by the Iphen project (Italian Phenological network) on the base of phenological observations spatialized by means of a specific algorithm based on cumulated thermal resources expressed as Normal Heat Hours (NHH). Anomalies have been evaluated with reference to phenological normal fields defined for the Italian area on the base of phenological observations and Iphen model. Results show that relevant phenological anomalies observed over the reference period are primarily associated with long lasting blocking systems driving cold air masses (Arctic or Polar-Continental) or hot ones (Sub-Tropical) towards the Italian area. Specific cases are presented for some years like 2007 and 2011.

  15. Assessment of IRI-2012, NeQuick-2 and IRI-Plas 2015 models with observed equatorial ionization anomaly in Africa during 2009 sudden stratospheric warming event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaji, O. S.; Oyeyemi, E. O.; Adewale, A. O.; Wu, Q.; Okoh, D.; Doherty, P. H.; Kaka, R. O.; Abbas, M.; Owolabi, C.; Jidele, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    In Africa, we assessed the performance of all the three options of International Reference Ionosphere 2012, IRI-2012 (i.e. IRI-2001, IRI-2001COR and IRI-NeQuick), NeQuick-2 and IRI-Plas 2015 models prior to and during 2009 sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event to predict equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) crest locations and their magnitudes using total electron content (TEC) from experimental records of Global Positioning System (GPS). We confirmed that the IRI-Plas 2015 that appeared as the best compared to all of the models as regard prediction of the EIA crest locations in the northern hemisphere of Africa is due to discontinuities in the GPS data between ∼8° N and 22° N. As regard the predictions of EIA crest magnitudes and the location of EIA crests in the southern hemisphere of Africa, they are not present in all the models. The NeQuick-2 model does not have the capability to predict either the EIA crest location in the northern or southern hemisphere. The SSW effect on the low latitude was able to modify a single EIA crest to pre-noon and post noon EIA crests in the northern hemisphere during the SSW peak phase and significantly reduced the GPS TEC magnitudes over the hemispheres as well. These SSW effects and delays of plasma transportation to higher latitudes in GPS TEC were absent in all the models. For future improvements of IRI-2012, NeQuick-2 and IRI-Plas 2015 models, SSW conditions should be included in order to characterize the effect of lower atmosphere on the ionosphere. The EIA trough modeling is only present in IRI-2001COR and IRI-2001NeQuick options. In the middle latitude, all the model could not predict the location of highest TEC magnitudes found at RBAY (Richardsbay, South Africa).

  16. Geothermal Anomaly Mapping Using Landsat ETM+ Data in Ilan Plain, Northeastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hai-Po; Chang, Chung-Pai; Dao, Phuong D.

    2018-01-01

    Geothermal energy is an increasingly important component of green energy in the globe. A prerequisite for geothermal energy development is to acquire the local and regional geothermal prospects. Existing geophysical methods of estimating the geothermal potential are usually limited to the scope of prospecting because of the operation cost and site reachability in the field. Thus, explorations in a large-scale area such as the surface temperature and the thermal anomaly primarily rely on satellite thermal infrared imagery. This study aims to apply and integrate thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technology with existing geophysical methods for the geothermal exploration in Taiwan. Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery is used to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST) in Ilan plain. Accuracy assessment of satellite-derived LST is conducted by comparing with the air temperature data from 11 permanent meteorological stations. The correlation coefficient of linear regression between air temperature and LST retrieval is 0.76. The MODIS LST product is used for the cross validation of Landsat derived LSTs. Furthermore, Landsat ETM+ multi-temporal brightness temperature imagery for the verification of the LST anomaly results were performed. LST Results indicate that thermal anomaly areas appear correlating with the development of faulted structure. Selected geothermal anomaly areas are validated in detail by field investigation of hot springs and geothermal drillings. It implies that occurrences of hot springs and geothermal drillings are in good spatial agreement with anomaly areas. In addition, the significant low-resistivity zones observed in the resistivity sections are echoed with the LST profiles when compared with in the Chingshui geothermal field. Despite limited to detecting the surficial and the shallow buried geothermal resources, this work suggests that TIR remote sensing is a valuable tool by providing an effective way of mapping

  17. Geothermal Anomaly Mapping Using Landsat ETM+ Data in Ilan Plain, Northeastern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hai-Po; Chang, Chung-Pai; Dao, Phuong D.

    2017-11-01

    Geothermal energy is an increasingly important component of green energy in the globe. A prerequisite for geothermal energy development is to acquire the local and regional geothermal prospects. Existing geophysical methods of estimating the geothermal potential are usually limited to the scope of prospecting because of the operation cost and site reachability in the field. Thus, explorations in a large-scale area such as the surface temperature and the thermal anomaly primarily rely on satellite thermal infrared imagery. This study aims to apply and integrate thermal infrared (TIR) remote sensing technology with existing geophysical methods for the geothermal exploration in Taiwan. Landsat 7 (L7) Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) imagery is used to retrieve the land surface temperature (LST) in Ilan plain. Accuracy assessment of satellite-derived LST is conducted by comparing with the air temperature data from 11 permanent meteorological stations. The correlation coefficient of linear regression between air temperature and LST retrieval is 0.76. The MODIS LST product is used for the cross validation of Landsat derived LSTs. Furthermore, Landsat ETM+ multi-temporal brightness temperature imagery for the verification of the LST anomaly results were performed. LST Results indicate that thermal anomaly areas appear correlating with the development of faulted structure. Selected geothermal anomaly areas are validated in detail by field investigation of hot springs and geothermal drillings. It implies that occurrences of hot springs and geothermal drillings are in good spatial agreement with anomaly areas. In addition, the significant low-resistivity zones observed in the resistivity sections are echoed with the LST profiles when compared with in the Chingshui geothermal field. Despite limited to detecting the surficial and the shallow buried geothermal resources, this work suggests that TIR remote sensing is a valuable tool by providing an effective way of mapping

  18. The effects of sea surface temperature anomalies on oceanic coral reef systems in the southwestern tropical Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, B. P.; Costa, M. B. S. F.; Coxey, M. S.; Gaspar, A. L. B.; Veleda, D.; Araujo, M.

    2013-06-01

    In 2010, high sea surface temperatures that were recorded in several parts of the world and caused coral bleaching and coral mortality were also recorded in the southwest Atlantic Ocean, between latitudes 0°S and 8°S. This paper reports on coral bleaching and diseases in Rocas Atoll and Fernando de Noronha archipelago and examines their relationship with sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies recorded by PIRATA buoys located at 8°S30°W, 0°S35°W, and 0°S23°W. Adjusted satellite data were used to derive SST climatological means at buoy sites and to derive anomalies at reef sites. The whole region was affected by the elevated temperature anomaly that persisted through 2010, reaching 1.67 °C above average at reef sites and 1.83 °C above average at buoys sites. A significant positive relationship was found between the percentage of coral bleaching that was observed on reef formations and the corresponding HotSpot SST anomaly recorded by both satellite and buoys. These results indicate that the warming observed in the ocean waters was followed by a warming at the reefs. The percentage of bleached corals persisting after the subsidence of the thermal stress, and disease prevalence increased through 2010, after two periods of thermal stress. The in situ temperature anomaly observed during the 2009-2010 El Niño event was equivalent to the anomaly observed during the 1997-1998 El Niño event, explaining similar bleaching intensity. Continued monitoring efforts are necessary to further assess the relationship between bleaching severity and PIRATA SST anomalies and improve the use of this new dataset in future regional bleaching predictions.

  19. Hot Flow Anomalies at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, G. A.; Sibeck, David Gary; Boardsen, Scott A.; Moore, Tom; Barabash, S.; Masters, A.; Shane, N.; Slavin, J.A.; Coates, A.J.; Zhang, T. L.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present a multi-instrument study of a hot flow anomaly (HFA) observed by the Venus Express spacecraft in the Venusian foreshock, on 22 March 2008, incorporating both Venus Express Magnetometer and Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA) plasma observations. Centered on an interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity with inward convective motional electric fields on both sides, with a decreased core field strength, ion observations consistent with a flow deflection, and bounded by compressive heated edges, the properties of this event are consistent with those of HFAs observed at other planets within the solar system.

  20. Correcting atmospheric effects in thermal ground observations for hyperspectral emissivity estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Joris; Buitrago, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of Land surface temperature is of crucial importance in energy balance studies and environmental modeling. Accurate retrieval of land surface temperature (LST) demands detailed knowledge of the land surface emissivity. Measured radiation by remote sensing sensors to land surface temperature can only be performed using a-priori knowledge of the emissivity. Uncertainties in the retrieval of this emissivity can cause huge errors in LST estimations. The retrieval of emissivity (and LST) is per definition an underdetermined inversion, as only one observation is made while two variables are to be estimated. Several researches have therefore been performed on measuring emissivity, such as the normalized emissivity method, the temperature-emissivity separation (TES) using the minimum and maximum difference of emissivity and the use of vegetation indices. In each of these approaches atmospherically corrected radiance measurements by remote sensing sensors are correlated to ground measurements. Usually these ground measurements are performed with the ground equivalent of the remote sensing sensors; the CIMEL 312-2 has the same spectral bands as ASTER. This way parameterizations acquired this way are only usable for specific sensors and need to be redone for newer sensors. Recently hyperspectral thermal radiometers, such as the MIDAC, have been developed that can solve this problem. By using hyperspectral observations of emissivity, together with sensor simulators, ground measurements of different satellite sensor can be simulated. This facilitates the production of validation data for the different TES algorithms. However before such measurements can be performed extra steps of processing need to be performed. Atmospheric correction becomes more important in hyperspectral observations than for broadband observations, as energy levels measured per band is lower. As such the atmosphere has a relative larger contribution if bandwidths become smaller. The goal of this

  1. Correlation between calculated molecular descriptors of excipient amino acids and experimentally observed thermal stability of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng-Lund, Helena; Friis, Natascha; van de Weert, Marco

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) between protein stability and the physicochemical properties of excipients was investigated to enable a more rational choice of stabilizing excipients than prior knowledge. The thermal transition temperature and aggregation time were determined...

  2. Observations of the thermal environment on Red Sea platform reefs: a heat budget analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Davis, K. A.

    2011-03-11

    Hydrographic measurements were collected on nine offshore reef platforms in the eastern Red Sea shelf region, north of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The data were analyzed for spatial and temporal patterns of temperature variation, and a simple heat budget analysis was performed with the goal of advancing our understanding of the physical processes that control temperature variability on the reef. In 2009 and 2010, temperature variability on Red Sea reef platforms was dominated by diurnal variability. The daily temperature range on the reefs, at times, exceeded 5°C-as large as the annual range of water temperature on the shelf. Additionally, our observations reveal the proximity of distinct thermal microclimates within the bounds of one reef platform. Circulation on the reef flat is largely wave driven. The greatest diurnal variation in water temperature occurs in the center of larger reef flats and on reefs protected from direct wave forcing, while smaller knolls or sites on the edges of the reef flat tend to experience less diurnal temperature variability. We found that both the temporal and spatial variability in water temperature on the reef platforms is well predicted by a heat budget model that includes the transfer of heat at the air-water interface and the advection of heat by currents flowing over the reef. Using this simple model, we predicted the temperature across three different reefs to within 0.4°C on the outer shelf using only information about bathymetry, surface heat flux, and offshore wave conditions. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Parameterization and Observability Analysis of Scalable Battery Clusters for Onboard Thermal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    which includes the current from regenerative braking . Repeated UAC cycles are used as the model input to generate the surface temperature Ts to test...battery thermal dynamics is the key to an effective thermal management system and to main- tain safety, performance, and life longevity of these Li-Ion...the current and surface temperature of the battery, which are the commonly mea- sured signals in a vehicle battery management system . It is shown that

  4. Orbital debris hazard insights from spacecraft anomalies studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Darren S.

    2016-09-01

    Since the dawning of the space age space operators have been tallying spacecraft anomalies and failures then using these insights to improve the space systems and operations. As space systems improved and their lifetimes increased, the anomaly and failure modes have multiplied. Primary triggers for space anomalies and failures include design issues, space environmental effects, and satellite operations. Attempts to correlate anomalies to the orbital debris environment have started as early as the mid-1990's. Early attempts showed tens of anomalies correlated well to altitudes where the cataloged debris population was the highest. However, due to the complexity of tracing debris impacts to mission anomalies, these analyses were found to be insufficient to prove causation. After the fragmentation of the Chinese Feng-Yun satellite in 2007, it was hypothesized that the nontrackable fragments causing anomalies in LEO would have increased significantly from this event. As a result, debris-induced anomalies should have gone up measurably in the vicinity of this breakup. Again, the analysis provided some subtle evidence of debris-induced anomalies but it was not convincing. The continued difficulty in linking debris flux to satellite anomalies and failures prompted the creation of a series of spacecraft anomalies and failure workshops to investigate the identified shortfalls. These gatherings have produced insights into why this process is not straightforward. Summaries of these studies and workshops are presented and observations made about how to create solutions for anomaly attribution, especially as it relates to debris-induced spacecraft anomalies and failures.

  5. Comparison of Thermal Structure Results from Venus Express and Ground Based Observations since Vira

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    An international team was formed in 2013 through the International Space Studies Institute (Bern, Switzerland) to compare recent results of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure from spacecraft and ground based observations made since the Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) was developed (Kliore et al., 1985, Keating et al., 1985). Five experiments on European Space Agency's Venus Express orbiter mission have yielded results on the atmospheric structure during is operational life (April 2006 - November 2014). Three of these were from occultation methods: at near infrared wavelengths from solar occultations, (SOIR, 70 - 170 km), at ultraviolet wavelengths from stellar occultations (SPICAV, 90-140 km), and occultation of the VEx-Earth radio signal (VeRa, 40-90 km). In-situ drag measurements from three different techniques (accelerometry, torque, and radio tracking, 130 - 200 km) were also obtained using the spacecraft itself while passive infrared remote sensing was used by the VIRTIS experiment (70 - 120 km). The only new data in the -40-70 km altitude range are from radio occultation, as no new profiles of the deep atmosphere have been obtained since the VeGa 2 lander measurements in 1985 (not included in VIRA). Some selected ground based results available to the team were also considered by team in the inter comparisons. The temperature structure in the lower thermosphere from disk resolved ground based observations (except for one ground based investigation), is generally consistent with the Venus Express results. These experiments sampled at different periods, at different locations and at different local times and have different vertical and horizontal resolution and coverage. The data were therefore binned in latitude and local time bins and compared, ignoring temporal variations over the life time of the Venus Express mission and assumed north-south symmetry. Alternating warm and cooler layers are present in the 120-160 altitude range in results

  6. Simultaneous inversion of multiple land surface parameters from MODIS optical-thermal observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Han; Liang, Shunlin; Xiao, Zhiqiang; Shi, Hanyu

    2017-06-01

    Land surface parameters from remote sensing observations are critical in monitoring and modeling of global climate change and biogeochemical cycles. Current methods for estimating land surface variables usually focus on individual parameters separately even from the same satellite observations, resulting in inconsistent products. Moreover, no efforts have been made to generate global products from integrated observations from the optical to Thermal InfraRed (TIR) spectrum. Particularly, Middle InfraRed (MIR) observations have received little attention due to the complexity of the radiometric signal, which contains both reflected and emitted radiation. In this paper, we propose a unified algorithm for simultaneously retrieving six land surface parameters - Leaf Area Index (LAI), Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR), land surface albedo, Land Surface Emissivity (LSE), Land Surface Temperature (LST), and Upwelling Longwave radiation (LWUP) by exploiting MODIS visible-to-TIR observations. We incorporate a unified physical radiative transfer model into a data assimilation framework. The MODIS visible-to-TIR time series datasets include the daily surface reflectance product and MIR-to-TIR surface radiance, which are atmospherically corrected from the MODIS data using the Moderate Resolution Transmittance program (MODTRAN, ver. 5.0). LAI was first estimated using a data assimilation method that combines MODIS daily reflectance data and a LAI phenology model, and then the LAI was input to the unified radiative transfer model to simulate spectral surface reflectance and surface emissivity for calculating surface broadband albedo and emissivity, and FAPAR. LST was estimated from the MIR-TIR surface radiance data and the simulated emissivity, using an iterative optimization procedure. Lastly, LWUP was estimated using the LST and surface emissivity. The retrieved six parameters were extensively validated across six representative sites with

  7. Anomalies on orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cohen, Andrew G.; Georgi, Howard

    2001-03-16

    We discuss the form of the chiral anomaly on an S1/Z2 orbifold with chiral boundary conditions. We find that the 4-divergence of the higher-dimensional current evaluated at a given point in the extra dimension is proportional to the probability of finding the chiral zero mode there. Nevertheless the anomaly, appropriately defined as the five dimensional divergence of the current, lives entirely on the orbifold fixed planes and is independent of the shape of the zero mode. Therefore long distance four dimensional anomaly cancellation ensures the consistency of the higher dimensional orbifold theory.

  8. Theoretically Optimal Distributed Anomaly Detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel general framework for distributed anomaly detection with theoretical performance guarantees is proposed. Our algorithmic approach combines existing anomaly...

  9. Anomaly Detection in Sequences

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We present a set of novel algorithms which we call sequenceMiner, that detect and characterize anomalies in large sets of high-dimensional symbol sequences that...

  10. Scattering anomaly in optics

    CERN Document Server

    Silveirinha, Mario G

    2016-01-01

    In time-reversal invariant electronic systems the scattering matrix is anti-symmetric. This property enables an effect, designated here as "scattering anomaly", such that the electron transport does not suffer from back reflections, independent of the specific geometry of the propagation path or the presence of time-reversal invariant defects. In contrast, for a generic time-reversal invariant photonic system the scattering matrix is symmetric and there is no similar anomaly. Here, it is theoretically proven that despite these fundamental differences there is a wide class of photonic platforms - in some cases formed only by time-reversal invariant media - in which the scattering anomaly can occur. It is shown that an optical system invariant under the action of the composition of the time-reversal, parity and duality operators is characterized by an anti-symmetric scattering matrix. Specific examples of photonic platforms wherein the scattering anomaly occurs are given, and it is demonstrated with full wave n...

  11. Infrared observations of eclipses of Io, its thermophysical parameters, and the thermal radiation of the Loki volcano and environs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinton, William M.; Kaminski, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Observations of Io during eclipses by Jupiter in 1981-1984 are reported. Data obtained at 3.45-30 microns using bolometer system No. 1 on the 3-m IRTF telescope at Mauna Kea are presented in extensive tables and graphs and analyzed by means of least-squares fitting of thermophysical models to the eclipse cooling and heating curves, thermal-radiation calculations for the Io volcanoes, and comparison with Voyager data. Best fits are obtained for a model comprising (1) a bright region with a vertically inhomogeneous surface and (2) a dark vertically homogeneous region with thermal inertia only about 0.1 times that of (1). Little evidence of volcanic-flux variability during the period is found, and the majority (but not all) of the excess thermal IR radiation in the sub-Jovian hemisphere is attributed to the Loki volcano and its lava lake.

  12. Thermal stresses, differential subsidence, and flexure at oceanic fracture zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Pal; Haxby, William F.

    1990-01-01

    Geosat geoid undulations over four Pacific fracture zones have been analyzed. After correcting for the isostatic thermal edge effect, the amplitudes of the residuals are shown to be proportional to the age offset. The shape of the residuals seems to broaden with increasing age. Both geoid anomalies and available ship bathymetry data suggest that slip must sometimes occur on the main fracture zone or secondary faults. Existing models for flexure at fracture zones cannot explain the observed anomalies. A combination model accounting for slip and including flexure from thermal stresses and differential subsidence is presented. This model accounts for lateral variations in flexural rigidity from brittle and ductile yielding due to both thermal and flexural stresses and explains both the amplitudes and the shape of the anomalies along each fracture zone. The best fitting models have mechanical plate thicknesses that are described by the depth to the 600-700 C isotherms.

  13. Congenital cardiac anomalies in myelomeningocele patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Moeini Naghani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Myelomeningocele may be isolated but more frequently is associated with other anomalies. Congenital heart disease occurs with different incidence rate in myelomeningocele which is observed more frequently with skeletal malformations. Methods. This study was undertaken in the Children’s Hospital Medical Center between 2010 to 2012 to evaluate 75 myelomeningocele patients for cardiac anomalies, with electrocardiography and echocardiography in addition to clinical examination of the cardiopulmonary system. Demographic information, myelomeningocele location and characteristics, orthopedic deformities, neurological deficits and radiographic findings were studied besides cardiologic assessments. Results. The ages of the patients ranged from 1 day to 4 years. The myelomeningocele locations were lumbosacral, lumbar and sacral area in most cases. Physical examination of the heart was abnormal in 6 children, but echocardiography revealed cardiac anomalies in only two children. Both children were female patients with severe scoliosis, multiple rib deficiencies and associated vertebral anomalies. Conclusion. Congenital heart defects are not very common in MMC patients. Female patients with suspicious clinical examinations for cardiac anomalies and associated rib and vertebral anomalies are advised to be investigated by echocardiography to rule out associated cardiac anomalies.

  14. Observational report with regard to thermal comfort in nursing homes; Signaleringsrapport inzake thermische behaaglijkheid in verpleeghuizen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-08

    A large number of studies on the subject of thermal (dis)comfort for patients in nursing homes in the summer is summarized. [Dutch] In dit signaleringsrapport is een groot aantal onderzoeken samengevat welke door of in opdracht van het Bouwcollege zijn uitgevoerd op het gebied van thermische (on)behaaglijkheid voor patienten (somatisch en psychogeriatrisch) in verpleeghuizen onder zomeromstandigheden.

  15. Thermal stability of catalytically grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes observed in transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Cheng-Yu; Liu, Chuan-Pu; Boothroyd, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The thermal stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was assessed in situ by transmission electron microscopy. Upon heating, Ni catalysts in MWC-NTs containing bamboo structures shrank from the tail due to evaporation, leading to additional bamboo formation and tube elongation at 800...

  16. Constraining physical properties of compositionally-distinct Martian bedrock surfaces using overlapping THEMIS observations and the KRC thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Alexandra; Deanne Rogers, A.

    2017-10-01

    The physical properties of Martian surface materials (e.g. grain size, cohesion, porosity, amount of induration, rock abundance, etc.) provide clues to the origins of, and processes involved (e.g. sedimentary, effusive volcanic, pyroclastic) in, forming rock outcrops on Mars. Many outcrop surfaces likely possess vertical heterogeneity in the near-surface (Mars Odyssey THEMIS surface temperature observations spanning multiple seasons and local times. We constrain top layer particle sizes from TES and CRISM spectral observations. Currently, we are focusing on chloride-bearing units in Terra Sirenum and Meridiani Planum and spectrally-distinct mafic and feldspathic bedrock units with uncertain origins and histories in Noachis Terra and Nili Fossae. The variations in apparent thermal inertia over local times and seasons suggests that most of these surfaces are consistent with low thermal inertia materials (~200 tiu) overlying moderately-high thermal inertia (600 tiu) surfaces. Work will be ongoing to further constrain top and lower layer thermal inertias for these areas and other spectrally and physically-distinctive outcrops over the surface of Mars.

  17. Anomaly effects of arrays for 3d geoelectrical resistivity imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anomaly effects observed in dipole-dipole (DDP), pole-dipole (PDP) and Wenner-Schlumberger (WSC) arrays were generally larger than that observed in other arrays considered. The least anomaly effect on the synthetic models was observed in pole-pole (PP) array. This indicates that DDP, PDP and WSC arrays are ...

  18. The thermal emission of Centaurs and trans-Neptunian objects at millimeter wavelengths from ALMA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R.; Müller, T.; Fornasier, S.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Moullet, A.; Gurwell, M.; Stansberry, J.; Leiva, R.; Sicardy, B.; Butler, B.; Boissier, J.

    2017-12-01

    The sensitivity of ALMA makes it possible to detect thermal mm/submm emission from small and/or distant solar system bodies at the sub-mJy level. While the measured fluxes are primarily sensitive to the objects' diameters, deriving precise sizes is somewhat hampered by the uncertain effective emissivity at these wavelengths. Following recent work presenting ALMA data for four trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) with satellites, we report on ALMA 233 GHz (1.29 mm) flux measurements of four Centaurs (2002 GZ32, Bienor, Chiron, Chariklo) and two other TNOs (Huya and Makemake), sampling a range of sizes, albedos, and compositions. These thermal fluxes are combined with previously published fluxes in the mid/far infrared in order to derive their relative emissivity at radio (mm/submm) wavelengths, using the Near Earth Asteroid Standard Model (NEATM) and thermophysical models. We reassess earlier thermal measurements of these and other objects - including Pluto/Charon and Varuna - exploring, in particular, effects due to non-spherical shape and varying apparent pole orientation whenever information is available, and show that these effects can be key for reconciling previous diameter determinations and correctly estimating the spectral emissivities. We also evaluate the possible contribution to thermal fluxes of established (Chariklo) or claimed (Chiron) ring systems. For Chariklo, the rings do not impact the diameter determinations by more than 5%; for Chiron, invoking a ring system does not help in improving the consistency between the numerous past size measurements. As a general conclusion, all the objects, except Makemake, have radio emissivities significantly lower than unity. Although the emissivity values show diversity, we do not find any significant trend with physical parameters such as diameter, composition, beaming factor, albedo, or color, but we suggest that the emissivity could be correlated with grain size. The mean relative radio emissivity is found to be 0

  19. Trace anomaly and counterterms in designer gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anabalón, Andrés [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberalesand Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez,Av. Padre Hurtado 750, Viña del Mar (Chile); Astefanesei, Dumitru [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso,Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile); Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut,14476 Golm (Germany); Choque, David [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut,14476 Golm (Germany); Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María,Av. España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Martínez, Cristián [Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECs),Av. Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile)

    2016-03-17

    We construct concrete counterterms of the Balasubramanian-Kraus type for Einstein-scalar theories with designer gravity boundary conditions in AdS{sub 4}, so that the total action is finite on-shell and satisfy a well defined variational principle. We focus on scalar fields with the conformal mass m{sup 2}=−2l{sup −2} and show that the holographic mass matches the Hamiltonian mass for any boundary conditions. We compute the trace anomaly of the dual field theory in the generic case, as well as when there exist logarithmic branches of non-linear origin. As expected, the anomaly vanishes for the boundary conditions that are AdS invariant. When the anomaly does not vanish, the dual stress tensor describes a thermal gas with an equation of state related to the boundary conditions of the scalar field. In the case of a vanishing anomaly, we recover the dual theory of a massless thermal gas. As an application of the formalism, we consider a general family of exact hairy black hole solutions that, for some particular values of the parameters in the moduli potential, contains solutions of four-dimensional gauged N=8 supergravity and its ω-deformation. Using the AdS/CFT duality dictionary, they correspond to triple trace deformations of the dual field theory.

  20. THERMAL CHANGES OBSERVED AT DRILLING SITE DURING BONE DRILLING Model study in bovine rib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedy Kusuma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of bone drill in the process of odontectomy and preparation of dental implant may increase temperature around drilling hole. As thermal changes are the critical precursor to physiological bone healing, increased of temperature over threshold must be minimized. The aim of this model study was to compare the temperature changes that were generated during bone drilling with various speeds. Eighteen fresh bovine ribs were chosen due to the similarity of physical properties and dimension of human mandible. A constant drill load of 4.06N was applied throughout the drilling procedures via a drilling rig. Bovine ribs were drilled by using the same bur  geometry (twist drill, 120 point angle at low speed (8.750 rpm, 21.875 rpm, 35.000 rpm. The  bone temperature changes generated by the drilling process were measured measured by K-type thermocouple. The speed of 8750 rpm produced a maximum temperature changes in both distance of 1 mm and 2 mm from drilling hole. Minimal temperature changes were recorded for the speed of 35.000 rpm. ANOVA test, showed the mean of thermal changes for each of speed at distance 1 and 2 mm from drilling hole. The clinical benefits of using speed below 35000 rpm need to be considered due to the potential risk of thermal damage.

  1. Thermal preferences and limits of Triatoma brasiliensis in its natural environment - Field observations while host searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá, Silvia; Bezerra, Claudia Mendonça; Diotaiuti, Lileia

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work was to explore the thermal relationship between foraging Triatoma brasiliensis and its natural habitat during the hottest season in the state of Ceará, Brazil. The thermal profiles were determined using infrared analysis. Although the daily temperature of rock surfaces varied in a wide range, T. brasiliensis selected to walk through areas with temperatures between 31.7-40.5ºC. The temperature of T. brasiliensis body surface ranged from 32.8-34.4ºC, being higher in legs than the abdomen. A strong relationship was found between the temperature of the insect and the temperature of rock crevices where they were hidden (r: 0.96, p < 0.05). The species was active at full sunlight being a clear example of how the light-dark rhythm may be altered, even under predation risk. Our results strongly suggest a thermal borderline for T. brasiliensis foraging activity near 40ºC. The simultaneous determination of insect body and rock temperatures here presented are the only obtained in natural habitats for this or other triatomines. PMID:26517659

  2. Suppression of ionospheric scintillation during St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic super storm as observed over the anomaly crest region station Pingtung, Taiwan: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Chinmaya; Tsai, L.-C.; Su, S.-Y.; Galkin, I. A.; Caton, R. G.; Groves, K. M.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the reasons behind the absence of ionospheric VHF scintillation over Pingtung, Taiwan during the March 17, 2015 St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm. What makes it more interesting is the fact that the absence of scintillation on the storm day was preceded by observations of scintillation for 6 consecutive days before the storm. A combination of data from VHF receivers, ionosonde and in situ plasma density observations from European Space Agency (ESA)'s SWARM constellation were used for this purpose. Also, global hmF2 maps obtained from International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) Real-Time Assimilative Mapping (IRTAM) were utilised for a better picture of the ionospheric conditions. The main driver behind the absence of the scintillation in the Taiwanese sector was a reduced pre-reversal enhancement (PRE) electric field caused due to westward prompt-penetration electric field (PPEF). This caused the post-sunset ionosphere to drift downwards in altitude causing unfavourable conditions for Rayleigh-Taylor instability. On the contrary, the PPEFs were found to strongly enhance the PRE electric fields in the Indian sector leading to ionospheric irregularities/scintillations in the post-sunset sector.

  3. Observations and Modeling of Thermal Structure in the Lower Atmosphere and the Upward Propagation of Tides into the Thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. J.; Kahre, M.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal tides are the atmospheric response to diurnally varying thermal forcing resulting from radiative and convective heat transfer from the surface and from aerosol and gaseous heating within the atmosphere. Tides include sun-synchronous (migrating) waves driven in response to solar heating and additional non-migrating waves resulting from longitudinal variations in the distributions of topography, dust aerosol and water ice clouds. The systematic spatial mapping of temperature over 5 Mars years by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) has yielded a well-defined climatology of seasonally-varying temperature structures in the lower atmosphere, from 5 to 80 km. Tide theory and Mars global circulation model (MGCM) simulations are a fruitful framework for relating temperature observations to thermal forcing by aerosol fields [1]. The analysis of density and temperature fields derived from MAVEN IUVS and NGIMS observations have revealed the presence of predominantly zonal wave 2 and 3 features at altitudes of 100-170 km that are almost certainly non-migrating tides propagating upward from the lower atmosphere [2,3]. In this presentation we will use the MCS climatology and MGCM simulations to relate the density variations seen by MAVEN with the seasonally varying tide activity in the lower atmosphere. Large amplitude perturbations in density are most sensitive to the tide components with the longest vertical wavelengths in temperature, which are well resolved in MCS observations.

  4. High salinity anomalies south of Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, K.; Carter, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    Patches of higher salinity water were observed, using Seaglider data, in the upper 50m of the water-column between Oahu and Penguin Bank. These anomalies occur approximately once a month, and are visible in the glider data for an average of 3 days. Anomalies have abrupt transitions occurring over mere hours. Salinity within the patches can reach values in excess of 35.2 psu, 0.3 higher than the average profile for the region. The salinity signature associated with the anomalies corresponds to Subtropical surface water, found north of the Hawaiian island chain. The high salinity water is trapped by the thermocline in the mixed layer. Seasonal variations of the anomaly depth are directly related to the seasonal variations of mixed layer depth. These patches of high salinity coincide with the presence of eddies. Using sea surface height as an indicator, we found that eddy-eddy interaction and eddy-island interaction dictate the advection of upwelled waters into the region. Infrequently, we observe corresponding temperature anomalies. The larger the distance between the center of the eddy and the glider, the less visible the temperature anomaly. Positive (negative) values indicate salinity above (below) the mean profile.

  5. Self-healing slip pulses driven by thermal decomposition: Towards identifying dynamic weakening mechanisms in seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J. D.; Viesca, R. C.; Garagash, D.

    2012-12-01

    Seismological observations indicate that earthquake ruptures commonly propagate as self-healing slip pulses, with slip duration at any location on the fault being much shorter than the total event duration [Heaton 1990]. Theoretical work has linked these slip pulses to low values of the background driving stress on the fault [Zheng and Rice 1998]. Recent experiments [Han et al. 2007;Brantut et al. 2008] have shown that fault materials may thermally decompose during shear. These endothermic reactions release pore fluid, leading to an increase in pore pressure and a decrease in temperature [Sulem and Famin 2009]. An Arrhenius kinetic controls the reaction rate, and dynamic weakening only occurs when the temperature reaches a critical temperature triggering the reaction. This abrupt change is in sharp contrast with thermal pressurization where the pore pressure increases smoothly with slip. Previous theoretical studies of thermal decomposition have focused on simple mechanical systems with imposed slip rates [Sulem and Famin 2009], or coupling to a spring-slider model [Brantut et al. 2011]. We present the first solutions to couple thermal decomposition with dynamic rupture, extending the model in Garagash [2012] to solve for self-healing slip pulses. For a range of driving stresses there are two possible slip pulses, compared with a single solution for thermal pressurization alone. One solution corresponds to small slip and a low temperature rise that precludes the reaction; the other is a larger slip solution with weakening due to thermal pressurization at the rupture tip, and weakening due to thermal decomposition in the middle of the pulse. A dramatic drop in fault strength accompanies the onset of the reaction, leading to peak slip rates coinciding with the onset of the reaction. For thermal pressurization alone the maximum strain rate always occurs at the rupture tip, and depends sensitively on the driving stress. Thermal decomposition is identified by slower

  6. Multi-Wavelength Spectroscopic Observations of a White Light Flare Produced Directly by Non-thermal Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Imada, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Kyoko; Bamba, Yumi; Brooks, David

    2017-08-01

    An X1.6 flare on 2014 October 22 was observed by multiple spectrometers in UV, EUV and X-ray (Hinode/EIS, IRIS, and RHESSI), and multi-wavelength imaging observations (SDO/AIA and HMI). We analyze a bright kernel that produces a white light (WL) flare with continuum enhancement and a hard X-ray (HXR) peak. Taking advantage of the spectroscopic observations of IRIS and Hinode/EIS, we measure the temporal variation of the plasma properties in the bright kernel in the chromosphere and corona. We find that explosive evaporation was observed when the WL emission occurred. The temporal correlation of the WL emission, HXR peak, and evaporation flows indicates that the WL emission was produced by accelerated electrons. We calculated the energy flux deposited by non-thermal electrons (observed by RHESSI) and compared it to the dissipated energy estimated from a chromospheric line (Mg II triplet) observed by IRIS. The deposited energy flux from the non-thermal electrons is about (3-7.7)x1010 erg cm-2 s-1 for a given low-energy cutoff of 30-40 keV, assuming the thick-target model. The energy flux estimated from the changes in temperature in the chromosphere measured using the Mg II subordinate line is about (4.6-6.7)×109 erg cm-2 s-1: ˜6%-22% of the deposited energy. This comparison of estimated energy fluxes implies that the continuum enhancement was directly produced by the non-thermal electrons.

  7. Observation of interference effects via four photon excitation of highly excited Rydberg states in thermal cesium vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, Jorge M; Guttridge, Alex; Wade, Christopher G; De Melo, Natalia R; Adams, Charles S; Weatherill, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    We report on the observation of Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and Absorption (EIA) of highly-excited Rydberg states in thermal Cs vapor using a 4-step excitation scheme. The advantage of this 4-step scheme is that the final transition to the Rydberg state has a large dipole moment and one can achieve similar Rabi frequencies to 2 or 3 step excitation schemes using two orders of magnitude less laser power. Consequently each step is driven by a relatively low power infra-red diode laser opening up the prospect for new applications. The observed lineshapes are in good agreement with simulations based on multilevel optical Bloch equations.

  8. Shallow-source aeromagnetic anomalies observed over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet compared with coincident bed topography from radar ice sounding - New evidence for glacial "removal" of subglacially erupted late Cenozoic rift-related volcanic edifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, John C.; Blankenship, D.D.; Morse, D.L.; Bell, R.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding results from the 1991-1997 Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey over part of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) and subglacial area of the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system have enabled detailed examination of specific anomaly sources. These anomalies, previously interpreted as caused by late Cenozoic subglacial volcanic centers, are compared to newly available glacial bed-elevation data from the radar ice sounding compilation of the entire area of the aeromagnetic survey to test this hypothesis in detail. We examined about 1000 shallow-source magnetic anomalies for bedrock topographic expression. Using very conservative criteria, we found over 400 specific anomalies which correlate with bed topography directly beneath each anomaly. We interpret these anomalies as indicative of the relative abundance of volcanic anomalies having shallow magnetic sources. Of course, deeper source magnetic anomalies are present, but these have longer wavelengths, lower gradients and mostly lower amplitudes from those caused by the highly magnetic late Cenozoic volcanic centers. The great bulk of these >400 (40-1200-nT) anomaly sources at the base of the ice have low bed relief (60-600 m, with about 80%10 million years ago. Eighteen of the anomalies examined, about half concentrated in the area of the WAIS divide, have high-topographic expression (as great as 400 m above sea level) and high bed relief (up to 1500 m). All of these high-topography anomaly sources at the base of the ice would isostatically rebound to elevations above sea level were the ice removed. We interpret these 18 anomaly sources as evidence of subaerial eruption of volcanoes whose topography was protected from erosion by competent volcanic flows similar to prominent volcanic peaks that are exposed above the surface of the WAIS. Further, we infer these volcanoes as possibly erupted at a time when the WAIS was absent. In contrast, at the other extreme

  9. Geoid anomalies in the vicinity of subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcadoo, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    In the considered investigation, attention is given to the line source model, a surface source model, an application of the model, and a model of the thermal lithosphere associated with marginal basins. It is found that undulations in the altimetrically observed geoid of the southwest Pacific are strongly controlled by positive density anomalies in the subducting slabs of the region and the effects of elevation of the geotherm in behind arc lithosphere (corresponding to young marginal basins). Finer details of slab geometry do not obviously manifest themselves in the observed geoid. Such gravitational effects are quite attenuated at sea level and are apparently mixed with crustal effects, oceanographic noise, etc. It appears that slabs in global composite may contribute substantially to intermediate and long wavelength portions (down to spherical harmonic degree 3 or 4) of the earth's gravity field.

  10. Direct observation of the thermal demagnetization of magnetic vortex structures in nonideal magnetite recorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Muxworthy, Adrian R.; Kovács, András

    2016-01-01

    heating is achieved through the construction and examination of magnetic-induction maps. Stepwise demagnetization of the remanence-induced Fe3O4 particle upon heating to above the Curie temperature, performed in a similar fashion to bulk thermal demagnetization measurements, revealed that its vortex state...... remains stable under heating close to its unblocking temperature and is recovered upon cooling with the same or reversed vorticity. Hence, the PSD Fe3O4 particle exhibits thermomagnetic behavior comparable to a single-domain carrier, and thus, vortex states are considered reliable magnetic recorders...

  11. Congenital laryngeal anomalies,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Rutter

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is essential for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to be cognizant of the fact that infants with congenital laryngeal anomalies are at particular risk for an unstable airway. Objectives: To familiarize clinicians with issues relevant to the airway management of infants and to present a succinct description of the diagnosis and management of an array of congenital laryngeal anomalies. Methods: Revision article, in which the main aspects concerning airway management of infants will be analyzed. Conclusions: It is critical for clinicians to understand issues relevant to the airway management of infants.

  12. Summer season variability of the north residual cap of Mars as observed by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, W. M.; Titus, T. N.

    2008-02-01

    Previous observations have noted the change in albedo in a number of North Pole bright outliers and in the distribution of bright ice deposits between Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data sets. Changes over the summer season as well as between regions at the same season ( Ls) in different years have been observed. We used the bolometric albedo and brightness temperature channels of the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the MGS spacecraft to monitor north polar residual ice cap variations between Mars years and within the summer season for three northern Martian summers between July 1999 and April 2003. Large-scale brightness variations are observed in four general areas: (1) the patchy outlying frost deposits from 90 to 270°E, 75 to 80°N; (2) the large "tail" below the Chasma Boreale and its associated plateau from 315 to 45°E, 80 to 85°N, that we call the "Boreale Tongue" and in Hyperboreae Undae; (3) the troughed terrain in the region from 0 to 120°E longitude (the lower right on a polar stereographic projection) we have called "Shackleton's Grooves" and (4) the unit mapped as residual ice in Olympia Planitia. We also note two areas which seem to persist as cool and bright throughout the summer and between Mars years. One is at the "source" of Chasma Boreale (˜15°E, 85°N) dubbed "McMurdo", and the "Cool and Bright Anomaly (CABA)" noted by Kieffer and Titus 2001. TES Mapping of Mars' north seasonal cap. Icarus 154, 162-180] at ˜330°E, 87°N called here "Vostok". Overall defrosting occurs early in the summer as the temperatures rise and then after the peak temperatures are reached ( Ls˜110) higher elevations and outlier bright deposits cold trap and re-accumulate new frost. Persistent bright areas are associated with either higher elevations or higher background albedos suggesting complex feedback mechanisms including cold-trapping of frost due to albedo and elevation effects, as well as influence of mesoscale atmospheric dynamics.

  13. Bolivian Bouguer Anomaly Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Bouguer anomaly grid for the country of Bolivia.Number of columns is 550 and number of rows is 900. The order of the data is from the lower left to the...

  14. Assessing Asset Pricing Anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. de Groot (Wilma)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractOne of the most important challenges in the field of asset pricing is to understand anomalies: empirical patterns in asset returns that cannot be explained by standard asset pricing models. Currently, there is no consensus in the academic literature on the underlying causes of

  15. Low Risk Anomalies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Paul; Wagner, Christian; Zechner, Josef

    . Empirically, we find that option-implied ex-ante skewness is strongly related to ex-post residual coskewness and alphas. Beta- and volatility-based low risk anomalies are largely driven by a single principal component, which is in turn largely explained by skewness. Controlling for skewness renders the alphas...

  16. Present Status of b -> s l+ l- Anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmoudi, Farvah; Neshatpour, Siavash

    2017-05-04

    We discuss the observed deviations in b -> s l+ l- processes from the Standard Model predictions and present global fits for the New Physics description of these anomalies. We further investigate the stability of the global fits under different theoretical assumptions and suggest strategies and a number of observables to clear up the source of the anomalies.

  17. Cassini Thermal Observations of Saturn's Main Rings: Implications for Particle Rotation and Vertical Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilkera, Linda J.; Pilorz, Stuart H.; Wallis, Brad D.; Pearl, John C.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Brooks, Shawn M.; Altobelli, Nicolas; Edgington, Scott G.; Showalter, Mark; Flasar, F. Michael; hide

    2006-01-01

    In late 2004 and 2005 the Cassini composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) obtained spatially resolved thermal infrared radial scans of Saturn's main rings (A, B and C, and Cassini Division) that show ring temperatures decreasing with increasing solar phase angle, (alpha), on both the lit and unlit faces of the ring plane. These temperature differences suggest that Saturn's main rings include a population of ring particles that spin slowly, with a spin period greater than 3.6 h, given their low thermal inertia. The A ring shows the smallest temperature variation with (alpha), and this variation decreases with distance from the planet. This suggests an increasing number of smaller, and/or more rapidly rotating ring particles with more uniform temperatures, resulting perhaps from stirring by the density waves in the outer A ring and/or self-gravity wakes. The temperatures of the A and B rings are correlated with their optical depth, (tau), when viewed from the lit face, and anti-correlated when viewed from the unlit face. On the unlit face of the B ring, not only do the lowest temperatures correlate with the largest (tau), these temperatures are also the same at both low and high a, suggesting that little sunlight is penetrating these regions. The temperature differential from the lit to the unlit side of the rings is a strong, nearly linear, function of optical depth. This is consistent with the expectation that little sunlight penetrates to the dark side of the densest rings, but also suggests that little vertical mixing of ring particles is taking place in the A and B rings.

  18. The Pioneer Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor T. Toth

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Radio-metric Doppler tracking data received from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft from heliocentric distances of 20-70 AU has consistently indicated the presence of a small, anomalous, blue-shifted frequency drift uniformly changing with a rate of ~6 × 10–9 Hz/s. Ultimately, the drift was interpreted as a constant sunward deceleration of each particular spacecraft at the level of aP = (8.74 ± 1.33 × 10–10 m/s2. This apparent violation of the Newton's gravitational inverse square law has become known as the Pioneer anomaly; the nature of this anomaly remains unexplained. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the physical properties of the anomaly and the conditions that led to its detection and characterization. We review various mechanisms proposed to explain the anomaly and discuss the current state of efforts to determine its nature. A comprehensive new investigation of the anomalous behavior of the two Pioneers has begun recently. The new efforts rely on the much-extended set of radio-metric Doppler data for both spacecraft in conjunction with the newly available complete record of their telemetry files and a large archive of original project documentation. As the new study is yet to report its findings, this review provides the necessary background for the new results to appear in the near future. In particular, we provide a significant amount of information on the design, operations and behavior of the two Pioneers during their entire missions, including descriptions of various data formats and techniques used for their navigation and radio-science data analysis. As most of this information was recovered relatively recently, it was not used in the previous studies of the Pioneer anomaly, but it is critical for the new investigation.

  19. Z_{2} and Chiral Anomalies in Topological Dirac Semimetals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkov, Anton A; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-09-23

    We demonstrate that topological Dirac semimetals, which possess two Dirac nodes, separated in momentum space along a rotation axis and protected by rotational symmetry, exhibit an additional quantum anomaly, distinct from the chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which we call the Z_{2} anomaly, is a consequence of the fact that the Dirac nodes in topological Dirac semimetals carry a Z_{2} topological charge. The Z_{2} anomaly refers to nonconservation of this charge in the presence of external fields due to quantum effects and has observable consequences due to its interplay with the chiral anomaly. We discuss possible implications of this for the interpretation of magnetotransport experiments on topological Dirac semimetals. We also provide a possible explanation for the magnetic field dependent angular narrowing of the negative longitudinal magnetoresistance, observed in a recent experiment on Na_{3}Bi.

  20. Liquid Polymorphism and Density Anomaly in a Lattice Gas Model

    OpenAIRE

    Henriques, Vera Bohomoletz; Barbosa, Marcia Cristina Bernardes

    2004-01-01

    We present a simple model for an associating liquid in which polymorphism and density anomaly are connected. Our model combines a two dimensional lattice gas with particles interacting through a soft core potential and orientational degrees of freedom represented through thermal \\char`\\"{}ice variables\\char`\\"{} . The competition between the directional attractive forces and the soft core potential leads to a phase diagram in which two liquid phases and a density anomaly are present. The coex...

  1. Electrical Anomalies Observed During DC3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Timothy J.; Rutledge, Steven A.; Dolan, Brenda; Krehbiel, Paul; Rison, William; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Lyons, Walt

    2013-01-01

    The primary scientific goals of DC3 involved improving our understanding of the chemical impacts of thunderstorms and their anvils. However, the Colorado domain provided opportunities to study other interesting phenomena, including the potential impacts of smoke ingestion on convection and thunderstorms, electrification processes in smoke plumes and pyrocumulonimbus clouds, and the production of sprites by unconventional thunderstorm.

  2. Precise observation of C. elegans dynamic behaviours under controlled thermal stimulus using a mobile phone-based microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, T; Shin, D-M; Kim, S; Lee, S; Lee, T G; Kim, K

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the temperature-dependent locomotion of Caenorhabditis elegans by using the mobile phone-based microscope. We developed the customized imaging system with mini incubator and smartphone to effectively control the thermal stimulation for precisely observing the temperature-dependent locomotory behaviours of C. elegans. Using the mobile phone-based microscope, we successfully followed the long-term progress of specimens of C. elegans in real time as they hatched and explored their temperature-dependent locomotory behaviour. We are convinced that the mobile phone-based microscope is a useful device for real time and long-term observations of biological samples during incubation, and can make it possible to carry out live observations via wireless communications regardless of location. In addition, this microscope has the potential for widespread use owing to its low cost and compact design. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  3. Observation on the thermal stability of multi-layer graphene with metal nanoparticles with 0D structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Woo; Kim, Sun Woo; Shin, Jin Ha; Park, Jong Hwan; Kim, Seok Hun; Song, Young Il; Suh, Su Jeong

    2017-10-01

    We studied the effect of rapid thermal treatment on multi-layer graphene with metal particles in an oxygen gas atmosphere. The multi-layer graphene-coated copper nanoparticles (MGCNs) were produced via electrical explosion in an isopropyl alcohol liquid medium. The MGCNs usually consist of multi-layer graphene shells that tightly surround the core copper nanoparticles without obvious voids. A fracture is induced by tearing the multi-layer graphene structure and the oxidized copper metal particles of the MGCNs after thermal treatment in oxygen gas at a low temperatures, including 25, 100, 200, and 300 °C. The MGCNs were characterized via Raman spectroscopy to obtain the graphene peak and its variation according to the oxygen gas temperature. Transmission electron microscopy was conducted to confirm the effect of the oxygen on the multi-layer graphene and copper nanoparticles phase using oxygen gas. The structure of the copper nanoparticles was observed via x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to measure the chemical bonding on the multi-layer graphene surfaces treated with oxygen gas. We can show systematically optical images of changes in multi-layer graphene morphology like the 0D structure and existence of functional groups through various analyses after rapid thermal treatment in oxygen.

  4. Parity (and time-reversal) anomaly in a semiconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Tchernyshyov, Oleg

    2000-01-01

    The physics of a parity anomaly, potentially observable in a narrow-gap semiconductor, is revisited. Fradkin, Dagotto, and Boyanovsky have suggested that a Hall current of anomalous parity can be induced by a Peierls distortion on a domain wall. I argue that a perturbation inducing the parity anomaly must break the time reversal symmetry, which rules out the Peierls distortion as a potential cause. I list all possible perturbations that can generate the anomaly.

  5. Europium anomaly in plagioclase feldspar - Experimental results and semiquantitative model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, D. F.; Drake, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    The partition of europium between plagioclase feldspar and magmatic liquid is considered in terms of the distribution coefficients for divalent and trivalent europium. A model equation is derived giving the europium anomaly in plagioclase as a function of temperature and oxygen fugacity. The model explains europium anomalies in plagioclase synthesized under controlled laboratory conditions as well as the variations of the anomaly observed in natural terrestrial and extraterrestrial igneous rocks.

  6. A New Methodology for Early Anomaly Detection of BWR Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, K. N.

    2005-11-27

    The objective of the performed research is to develop an early anomaly detection methodology so as to enhance safety, availability, and operational flexibility of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants. The technical approach relies on suppression of potential power oscillations in BWRs by detecting small anomalies at an early stage and taking appropriate prognostic actions based on an anticipated operation schedule. The research utilizes a model of coupled (two-phase) thermal-hydraulic and neutron flux dynamics, which is used as a generator of time series data for anomaly detection at an early stage. The model captures critical nonlinear features of coupled thermal-hydraulic and nuclear reactor dynamics and (slow time-scale) evolution of the anomalies as non-stationary parameters. The time series data derived from this nonlinear non-stationary model serves as the source of information for generating the symbolic dynamics for characterization of model parameter changes that quantitatively represent small anomalies. The major focus of the presented research activity was on developing and qualifying algorithms of pattern recognition for power instability based on anomaly detection from time series data, which later can be used to formulate real-time decision and control algorithms for suppression of power oscillations for a variety of anticipated operating conditions. The research being performed in the framework of this project is essential to make significant improvement in the capability of thermal instability analyses for enhancing safety, availability, and operational flexibility of currently operating and next generation BWRs.

  7. Congenital anomalies in Primorsky region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, P; Voronin, S; Golokhvast, K

    2015-01-01

    has increased dramatically since 2000. This was due to the beginning of activities of medicogenetic service since 1998: the legal framework and information database were created, the flow of pregnant women was formed actively, and invasive prenatal diagnosis was introduced.Incidence of congenital anomalies has a reliable statistical association (chi-square) with bioclimatic zones and ecological situation. The high level of pathology is observed in both teenagers and children in the critical environmental situation areas, where there are enterprises of coal, mining and chemical industry, ship repair, construction, engineering sites, and areas with intensive chemical use and improvement of agriculture. For the most part these are cities and districts of the region where more than a half of the major manufacturing plants of the 1st and 2nd hazard classes are located. Exceeding the maximum allowable concentrations (MAC) of harmful substances in the air, soil, and water in these areas often reaches tenfold. It should be noted that in the territories with the critical environmental situation a relatively high level of malformations is observed in adolescents in the continental bioclimatic zone, and in children - on the coast, suggesting the influence of different climatic factors. Also a high level of the same congenital anomalies was revealed in children in bioclimatic zones of the coast and transition zones with the intense environmental situation.According to the results of the regression analysis, the varying degrees of influence of ecological and hygienic factors on the incidence of congenital anomalies were determined. In children, up to 77.3% of the spread of pathology depends on the complex of parameters of the environment; the proportion of the influence of sanitary and hygienic indicators is 63.1%, and natural and climatic indicators - 14.2%. Such factors as the characteristics of the soil condition, the level of air pollution, chemical pollution and adverse

  8. Microscopic Observation of the Light-Cone-Like Thermal Correlations in Cracking Excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Ghaffari, H O

    2016-01-01

    Many seemingly intractable systems can be reduced to a system of interacting spins. Here, we introduce a system of artificial acoustic spins which are manipulated with ultrasound excitations associated with micro-cracking sources in thin sheets of crystals. Our spin-like system shows a peculiar relaxation mechanism after inducing an impulsive stress-ramp akin to splitting, or rupturing, of the system. Using real-time construction of correlations between spins states, we observe a clear emergence of the light cone effect. It has been proposed that equilibration horizon occurs on a local scale in systems where correlations between distant sites are established at a finite speed. The observed equilibration horizon in our observations defines a region where elements of the material are in elastic communication through excited elementary excitations. These results yield important insights into dynamic communication between failing elements in brittle materials during processes such as brittle fragmentation and dyn...

  9. Anomaly-safe discrete groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-Chun Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that there is a class of finite groups, the so-called perfect groups, which cannot exhibit anomalies. This implies that all non-Abelian finite simple groups are anomaly-free. On the other hand, non-perfect groups generically suffer from anomalies. We present two different ways that allow one to understand these statements.

  10. Physico-chemical observations on polyethylene base resin under the effect of thermal ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudou, L.; Guastavino, J. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique, Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    2002-01-07

    Within the framework of a project for the better understanding of the behaviour of polyethylene under specific operating conditions, the temperature influence on a polyethylene base resin was studied. A differential scanning calorimetry analysis has shown the effect of annealing on morphological changes. The first was noticed at 318 K while a sharp transition to an amorphous material was observed at around 373 K followed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of the double peak (730-720 cm{sup -1}), characteristic of crystalline and amorphous states. These observations are used to support the interpretation of conductivity measurements. (author)

  11. Increase in NOx emissions from thermal power plants in India: bottom-up inventories and satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    Driven by rapid economic development and growing electricity demand, NOx emissions (E) from the power sector in India have increased dramatically since the mid-1990s. In this study, we present the NOx emissions from Indian public thermal power plants for the period 1996-2010 using a unit-based methodology and compare the emission estimates with the satellite observations of NO2 tropospheric vertical column densities (TVCDs) from four spaceborne instruments: GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2. Results show that NOx emissions from Indian power plants increased by at least 70% during 1996-2010. Coal-fired power plants, NOx emissions from which are not regulated in India, contribute ~96% to the total power sector emissions. A number of isolated NO2 hot spots are observed over the power plant areas, and good agreement between NO2 TVCDs and NOx emissions is found for areas dominated by power plant emissions. Average NO2 TVCDs over power plant areas were continuously increasing during the study period. We find that the ratio of ΔE/E to ΔTVCD/TVCD changed from greater than one to less than one around 2005-2008, implying that a transition of the overall NOx chemistry occurred over the power plant areas, which may cause significant impact on the atmospheric environment.ariations of NOx emissions from thermal power plants and NO2 TVCD over power plant areas for 4 NO2 instruments during 1996-2010 patial distribution of NOx emissions from thermal power plants and OMI NO2 TVCDs over India during 2005-2010

  12. Radar Shape Modeling Of 1996 HW1 Combined With Thermal Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howell, Ellen S.; Magri, C.; Nolan, M. C.; Taylor, P. A.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Mueller, M.; Benner, L. A. M.; Giorgini, J. D.; Scheeres, D. J.; Hicks, M. D.; Rhoades, H.; Somers, J. M.; Gaftonyuk, N. M.; Krugly, Y. N.; Kouprianov, V. V.; Molotov, I. E.; Benishek, V.; Protitch-Benishek, V.; Galad, A.; Higgins, D.; Kusnirak, P.; Pray, D.

    2010-01-01

    We observed near-Earth asteroid (8567) 1996 HW1 at the Arecibo Observatory on six dates in September 2008, obtaining radar images and spectra. By combining these data with an extensive set of new lightcurves taken during 2008-2009 and with previously published lightcurves from 2005, we were able to

  13. Direct observation of free-exciton thermalization in quantum-well structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Umlauff, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Kalt, H.

    1998-01-01

    . The subsequent relaxation dynamics within the 1s-exciton dispersion is directly monitored by time-resolved studies of the phonon-assisted photoluminescence. It is demonstrated that the free-exciton distribution remains nonthermal for some 100 ps. The observed dynamics is in reasonable agreement with numerical...

  14. Multiple asteroid systems : Dimensions and thermal properties from Spitzer Space Telescope and ground-based observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchis, F.; Enriquez, J. E.; Emery, J. P.; Mueller, M.; Baek, M.; Pollock, J.; Assafin, M.; Vieira Martins, R.; Berthier, J.; Vachier, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Lim, L. F.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    We collected mid-IR spectra from 5.2 to 38 μm using the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph of 28 asteroids representative of all established types of binary groups. Photometric lightcurves were also obtained for 14 of them during the Spitzer observations to provide the context of the

  15. Comparison between Satellite Water Vapour Observations and Atmospheric Models’ Predictions of the Upper Tropospheric Thermal Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Dim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric profiles (temperature, pressure, and humidity are commonly used parameters for aerosols and cloud properties retrievals. In preparation of the launch of the Global Change Observation Mission-Climate/Second-Generation GLobal Imager (GCOM-C/SGLI satellite, an evaluation study on the sensitivity of atmospheric models to variations of atmospheric conditions is conducted. In this evaluation, clear sky and above low clouds water vapour radiances of the upper troposphere obtained from satellite observations and those simulated by atmospheric models are compared. The models studied are the Nonhydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM and the National Center for Environmental Protection/Department Of Energy (NCEP/DOE. The satellite observations are from the Terra/Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (Terra/MODIS satellite. The simulations performed are obtained through a forward radiative transfer calculation procedure. The resulting radiances are transformed into the upper tropospheric brightness temperature (UTBT and relative humidity (UTRH. The discrepancies between the simulated data and the observations are analyzed. These analyses show that both the NICAM and the NCEP/DOE simulated UTBT and UTRH have comparable distribution patterns. However the simulations’ differences with the observations are generally lower with the NCEP/DOE than with the NICAM. The NCEP/DOE model outputs very often overestimate the UTBT and therefore present a drier upper troposphere. The impact of the lower troposphere instability (dry convection on the upper tropospheric moisture and the consequences on the models’ results are evaluated through a thunderstorm and moisture predictor (the K-stability index. The results obtained show a positive relation between the instability and the root mean square error (RMSE: observation versus models. The study of the impact of convective clouds shows that the area covered by these clouds increases with the

  16. Eigenstate thermalization in the two-dimensional transverse field Ising model. II. Off-diagonal matrix elements of observables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondaini, Rubem; Rigol, Marcos

    2017-07-01

    We study the matrix elements of few-body observables, focusing on the off-diagonal ones, in the eigenstates of the two-dimensional transverse field Ising model. By resolving all symmetries, we relate the onset of quantum chaos to the structure of the matrix elements. In particular, we show that a general result of the theory of random matrices, namely, the value 2 of the ratio of variances (diagonal to off-diagonal) of the matrix elements of Hermitian operators, occurs in the quantum chaotic regime. Furthermore, we explore the behavior of the off-diagonal matrix elements of observables as a function of the eigenstate energy differences and show that it is in accordance with the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis ansatz.

  17. Prevalence and Distribution of Developmental Dental Anomalies in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Erkmen Almaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in paediatric patients attending the Department of Paediatric Dentistry, Kırıkkale University Faculty of Dentistry. Materials and Methods: The study consisted a sample of 9173 patients, aged between 0-15 years, referred to our clinic between 1 August 2011-1 August 2012. The patients were examined clinically and radiographically in terms of the number, size, shape, structure and color anomalies. Results: One hundred sixty six children (1.8% were found to have developmental dental anomalies. The most frequently observed anomalies were congenitally missing teeth (0.52% and supernumerary teeth (0.27%. Anomalies such as dens invaginatus (0.03%, dentinogenesis imperfecta (0.02% and dilaceration (0.02% were encountered more rarely. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and determination of the prevalence of dental anomalies in children is important in the treatment planning.

  18. Morphological anomalies in Ixodes ricinus and Ixodes inopinatus collected from tick-borne encephalitis natural foci in Central Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chitimia-Dobler, Lidia; Bestehorn, Malena; Bröker, Michael

    2017-01-01

    in Germany, Slovakia and Denmark. A total of 278 (1.9%) out of 14,602 nymph and adult ticks showed morphological anomalies. The anomalies were divided into general anomalies (body asymmetry) and local anomalies (anomalies of appendages, malformation of capitulum, exoskeleton anomalies and anal groove......, palps and exoskeleton. Anal groove deformation was observed in three females and three nymphs. In 2016, the frequency of anomalies in I. inopinatus was found five times higher (9.3%) than in I. ricinus (1.9%). This is the first report of anomaly (ectromely, leg atrophy, idiosoma deformation) in flagged...

  19. A study of dental anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Sook; Kim, Jae Duck [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to find out the prevalence of dental anomalies in 600 normal persons (male:363, female:237) at age 14 to 39 years, through history taking, oral examination, and radiographic observations of subjects. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The prevalence of individual dental anomalies were as follows; Congenitally missing teeth 7%; supernumerary teeth 1.33%; ectopic eruption 8.50%; transposition 0.33%; rotation 23.67%; microdontia 11.16% (peg lateral is 5.33%; third molar 5.83%); prolonged retention of deciduous teeth 1.33%; crowding 49.83%; and spacing 15.17%. 2. Alterations in numbers of teeth : The most frequently missing teeth were mandibular lateral incisors, followed by mandibular second premolars and maxillary second premolars. In numbers of congenitally missing teeth per person, 52.38% had one missing tooth and 30.95% had two missing teeth. In supernumerary teeth, there was higher rate in male than in female. Most supernumerary teeth were mesiodens of median area in maxilla and the eruption pattern of that teeth generally was unerupted state. 3. In transposition, exchange of position of teeth involved the canine and first premolar. 4. Congenital missing rate of permanent successors in prolonged retention of deciduous teeth was 69.23%. 5. Crowding and spacing had respectively higher rate in mandible and in maxilla.

  20. Mapping the thermal structure and minor species of Venus mesosphere with ALMA submillimeter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccialli, A.; Moreno, R.; Encrenaz, T.; Fouchet, T.; Lellouch, E.; Widemann, T.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Water vapor and sulfur compounds are key species in the photochemistry of Venus mesosphere. These species, together with mesospheric temperatures, exhibit drastic temporal variations, both on short timescales (diurnal and day-to-day) as well on long timescales, far from being understood. Aims: We targeted CO, SO, HDO and SO2 transitions in the submillimeter range using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to study their spatial and temporal variations. Methods: Four sets of observations were acquired on different dates in November 2011 during the first ALMA Early Science observation Cycle 0. Venus angular diameter was about 11'' with an illumination factor of 92%, so that mostly the day side of the planet was mapped. Assuming a nominal CO abundance profile, we retrieved vertical temperature profiles over the entire disk as a function of latitude and local time. Temperature profiles were later used to retrieve SO, SO2, and H2O. We used HDO as a tracer for water assuming a D/H enrichment of 200 times the terrestrial value. Results: We derived 3D maps of mesospheric temperatures in the altitude range 70-105 km. SO, SO2, and H2O are characterized by a negligible abundance below 85 km followed by an increase with altitude in the upper mesosphere. Disk-averaged SO abundances present a maximum mixing ratio of 15.0 ± 3.1 ppb on November 26 followed the next day by a minimum value of 9.9 ± 1.2 ppb. Due to a very low S/N, SO2 could only be derived from the disk-averaged spectrum on the first day of observation revealing an abundance of 16.5 ± 4.6 ppb. We found a SO2/SO ratio of 1.5 ± 0.4. Global maps of SO reveal strong variations both with latitude and local time and from day to day with abundance ranging from < 1 to 15 ppb. H2O disk-averages retrievals reveal a steady decrease from November 14 to 27, with the abundance varying from 3.6 ± 0.6 ppm on the first day to 2.9 ± 0.7 ppm on the last day. H2O maps reveal a slightly higher abundance on the evening

  1. Multiple renal anomalies associated with encapsulated swellings of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current observation reports the occurrence of the left renal anomalies and encapsulated swellings involving the left sciatic nerve in a 47 years old male cadaver. Renal anomalies consisted of left double kidney, left bifid ureter and double arterial supply to the left kidney. The double kidney consisted of the two upper and ...

  2. SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome and dental anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon-Camacho, Oscar Francisco; Fuerte-Flores, Bertha Irene; Ricardez-Marcial, Edgar F; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-11-01

    SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant syndrome caused by mutations in the SOX2 gene and clinically characterized by severe eye malformations (anophthalmia/microphthalmia) and extraocular anomalies mainly involving brain, esophagus, and genitalia. In this work, a patient with the SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome and exhibiting a novel dental anomaly is described. SOX2 genotyping in this patient revealed an apparently de novo c.70del20 deletion, a commonly reported SOX2 mutation. A review of the phenotypic variation observed in patients carrying the recurrent SOX2 c.70del20 mutation is presented. Although dental anomalies are uncommonly reported in the SOX2 anophthalmia syndrome, we suggest that a dental examination should be performed in patients with SOX2 mutations. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. VERY LARGE ARRAY OBSERVATIONS OF DG TAU'S RADIO JET: A HIGHLY COLLIMATED THERMAL OUTFLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, C.; Mutel, R. L.; Gayley, K. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52240 (United States); Guedel, M. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Ray, T. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Section, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Skinner, S. L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. C. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    The active young protostar DG Tau has an extended jet that has been well studied at radio, optical, and X-ray wavelengths. We report sensitive new Very Large Array (VLA) full-polarization observations of the core and jet between 5 GHz and 8 GHz. Our high angular resolution observation at 8 GHz clearly shows an unpolarized inner jet with a size of 42 AU (0.''35) extending along a position angle similar to the optical-X ray outer jet. Using our nearly coeval 2012 VLA observations, we find a spectral index {alpha} = +0.46 {+-} 0.05, which combined with the lack of polarization is consistent with bremsstrahlung (free-free) emission, with no evidence for a non-thermal coronal component. By identifying the end of the radio jet as the optical depth unity surface, and calculating the resulting emission measure, we find that our radio results are in agreement with previous optical line studies of electron density and consequent mass-loss rate. We also detect a weak radio knot at 5 GHz located 7'' from the base of the jet, coincident with the inner radio knot detected by Rodriguez et al. in 2009 but at lower surface brightness. We interpret this as due to expansion of post-shock ionized gas in the three years between observations.

  4. Dayside observations of thermal-ion upwellings at 800-km altitude - An ionospheric signature of the cleft ion fountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, R. T.; Livingston, R. C.; Vickrey, J. F.; Heelis, R. A.; Hanson, W. B.

    1989-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence that energetic heavy ions observed at one or more earth radii over the polar cap originate from the dayside ionosphere in the vicinity of the dayside cleft. The ions, consisting mostly of O(+), are often characterized by conic pitch-angle distributions, suggesting that they have undergone acceleration transverse to geomagnetic field lines. This process of ion injection from a latitudinally localized source region in the dayside auroral oval followed by dispersal throughout the entire polar cap has been called the 'cleft ion fountain'. Here, results are presented of upward thermal-ion flows measured at 800-km altitude in the dayside polar ionosphere by the Hilat satellite. The characteristics of these thermal-ion upwellings (TIU) are described and shown to be closely associated with the cleft ion fountain. It is shown that TIU events are latitudinally confined and spatially collocated with cleft electron precipitation, upward field-aligned currents, and velocity gradients in magnetospheric convection.

  5. Combining Observations in the Reflective Solar and Thermal Domains for Improved Mapping of Carbon, Water and Energy FLuxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houborg, Rasmus; Anderson, Martha; Kustas, Bill; Rodell, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the utility of integrating remotely sensed estimates of leaf chlorophyll (C(sub ab)) into a thermal-based Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model that estimates land-surface CO2 and energy fluxes using an analytical, light-use-efficiency (LUE) based model of canopy resistance. Day to day variations in nominal LUE (LUE(sub n)) were assessed for a corn crop field in Maryland U.S.A. through model calibration with CO2 flux tower observations. The optimized daily LUE(sub n) values were then compared to estimates of C(sub ab) integrated from gridded maps of chlorophyll content weighted over the tower flux source area. Changes in Cab exhibited a curvilinear relationship with corresponding changes in daily calibrated LUE(sub n) values derived from the tower flux data, and hourly water, energy and carbon flux estimation accuracies from TSEB were significantly improved when using C(sub ab) for delineating spatio-temporal variations in LUE(sub n). The results demonstrate the synergy between thermal infrared and shortwave reflective wavebands in producing valuable remote sensing data for monitoring of carbon and water fluxes.

  6. Thermal refugia against coral bleaching throughout the northern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Eslam O.

    2017-10-17

    Tropical reefs have been impacted by thermal anomalies caused by global warming that induced coral bleaching and mortality events globally. However, there have only been very few recordings of bleaching within the Red Sea despite covering a latitudinal range of 15° and consequently it has been considered a region that is less sensitive to thermal anomalies. We therefore examined historical patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) and associated anomalies (1982–2012) and compared warming trends with a unique compilation of corresponding coral bleaching records from throughout the region. These data indicated that the northern Red Sea has not experienced mass bleaching despite intensive Degree Heating Weeks (DHW) of >15°C-weeks. Severe bleaching was restricted to the central and southern Red Sea where DHWs have been more frequent, but far less intense (DHWs <4°C-weeks). A similar pattern was observed during the 2015–2016 El Niño event during which time corals in the northern Red Sea did not bleach despite high thermal stress (i.e. DHWs >8°C-weeks), and bleaching was restricted to the central and southern Red Sea despite the lower thermal stress (DHWs < 8°C-weeks). Heat stress assays carried out in the northern (Hurghada) and central (Thuwal) Red Sea on four key reef-building species confirmed different regional thermal susceptibility, and that central Red Sea corals are more sensitive to thermal anomalies as compared to those from the north. Together, our data demonstrate that corals in the northern Red Sea have a much higher heat tolerance than their prevailing temperature regime would suggest. In contrast, corals from the central Red Sea are close to their thermal limits, which closely match the maximum annual water temperatures. The northern Red Sea harbours reef-building corals that live well below their bleaching thresholds and thus we propose that the region represents a thermal refuge of global importance.

  7. Do retractile testes have anatomical anomalies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber M. Anderson

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To assess the incidence of anatomical anomalies in patients with retractile testis. Materials and Methods: We studied prospectively 20 patients (28 testes with truly retractile testis and compared them with 25 human fetuses (50 testes with testis in scrotal position. We analyzed the relations among the testis, epididymis and patency of the processus vaginalis (PV. To analyze the relations between the testis and epididymis, we used a previous classification according to epididymis attachment to the testis and the presence of epididymis atresia. To analyze the structure of the PV, we considered two situations: obliteration of the PV and patency of the PV. We used the Chi-square test for contingency analysis of the populations under study (p <0.05. Results: The fetuses ranged in age from 26 to 35 weeks post-conception (WPC and the 20 patients with retractile testis ranged in ages from 1 to 12 years (average of 5.8. Of the 50 fetal testes, we observed complete patency of the PV in 2 cases (4% and epididymal anomalies (EAs in 1 testis (2%. Of the 28 retractile testes, we observed patency of the PV in 6 cases (21.4% and EA in 4 (14.28%. When we compared the incidence of EAs and PV patency we observed a significantly higher prevalence of these anomalies in retractile testes (p=0.0116. Conclusions: Retractile testis is not a normal variant with a significant risk of patent processus vaginalis and epididymal anomalies.

  8. Do retractile testes have anatomical anomalies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kleber M; Costa, Suelen F; Sampaio, Francisco J B; Favorito, Luciano A

    2016-01-01

    To assess the incidence of anatomical anomalies in patients with retractile testis. We studied prospectively 20 patients (28 testes) with truly retractile testis and compared them with 25 human fetuses (50 testes) with testis in scrotal position. We analyzed the relations among the testis, epididymis and patency of the processus vaginalis (PV). To analyze the relations between the testis and epididymis, we used a previous classification according to epididymis attachment to the testis and the presence of epididymis atresia. To analyze the structure of the PV, we considered two situations: obliteration of the PV and patency of the PV. We used the Chi-square test for contingency analysis of the populations under study (ptestes, we observed complete patency of the PV in 2 cases (4%) and epididymal anomalies (EAs) in 1 testis (2%). Of the 28 retractile testes, we observed patency of the PV in 6 cases (21.4%) and EA in 4 (14.28%). When we compared the incidence of EAs and PV patency we observed a significantly higher prevalence of these anomalies in retractile testes (p=0.0116). Retractile testis is not a normal variant with a significant risk of patent processos vaginalis and epididymal anomalies. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  9. Real-time observation of initial stages of thermal oxidation on Si(001) surface by using synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshigoe, A; Moritani, K

    2003-01-01

    Real-time observation of initial stages of thermal oxidation processes on the Si(001) surface using O sub 2 gas (1x10 sup - sup 4 Pa) was performed by means of the O-1s and Si-2p photoemission spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation. From the analysis of the time evolution of oxygen uptake curves on the basis of the reaction kinetics model, the oxide-layer growth depending on the surface temperature was categorized by the Langmuir adsorption and the auto-catalytic reaction models, respectively. It was found that the oxidation rates increased with increasing the surface temperature. The time evolution of Si oxidation states depending on the surface temperature was well monitored. We found that the surface temperature enhanced the diffusion and/or migration of adsorbed oxygen and the bulk Si atom. (author)

  10. Thermal observations of the degassing of the December 2006 and May 2007 pyroclastic flow deposits at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, S. M.; Carter, A. J.

    2007-12-01

    Bezymianny Volcano (Kamchatka, Russia) has been periodically active since its reawakening in 1956, most recently erupting on December 24, 2006 and May 11, 2007. Currently, one or two eruptive cycles occur each year, consisting of spine emplacement followed by an explosive eruption accompanied by pyroclastic flows, concluding with extrusion of a lava flow. During August 2007, systematic depth profiles of temperatures of the December 2006 and May 2007 pyroclastic flow deposits (PFDs) were obtained in seven satellite-derived target locations using an Omega HH509 thermocouple. In addition, 38 fumarole temperatures were obtained and Forward Looking Infrared Radiometer (FLIR) data were collected throughout the target areas. Degassing of the PFDs was observed through large clusters and linear arrays of fumaroles located in depressions with distinct rocky centres. Hot depressions were also observed without active fumaroles, suggesting that hydrothermal activity due to interaction with the underlying snow layer after PFD emplacement was possibly not forceful enough to breach the surface in these locations or that the activity had diminished since the eruption. The hottest fumarole observed reached a temperature of 377C, 5 km from the lava dome. Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data will be used to characterise the two deposits and assess cooling rates and emplacement temperatures. Preliminary data show that the two areas with hottest fumarole temperatures do not correspond to the hottest areas of the deposits. This is the first time extensive direct temperature measurements of warm PFDs have been obtained at Bezymianny.

  11. Suzaku Observations of Thermal and Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission from the Middle-Aged Supernova Remnant G156.2+5.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Hwang, Una; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Mori, Koji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    We present results from X-ray analysis of a Galactic middle-aged supernova remnant (SNR) G156.2+5.7 which is bright and largely extended in X-ray wavelengths, showing a clear circular shape (radius approx.50'). Using the Suzaku satellite, we observed this SNR in three pointings; partially covering the northwestern (NW) rim, the eastern (E) rim, and the central portion of this SNR. In the NW rim and the central portion, we confirm that the X-ray spectra consist of soft and hard-tail emission, while in the E rim we find no significant hard-tail emission. The soft emission is well fitted by either a one-component or two-component non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) model. In the NW and E rims, a one-component (the swept-up interstellar medium) NEI model well represents the soft emission. On the other hand, in the central portion, a two-component (the interstellar medium and the metal-rich ejecta) NEI model fits the soft emission better than the one-component NEI model from a statistical point of view. The relative abundances in the ejecta component suggest that G156.2+5.7 is a remnant from a core-collapse SN explosion whose progenitor mass is less than 15 Solar Mass. The origin of the hard-tail emission detected in the NW rim and the central portion of the SNR is highly likely non-thermal synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons. In the NW rim, the relativistic electrons seems to be accelerated by a forward shock with a slow velocity of APPROX.500 km/sec.

  12. System and method for anomaly detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Chad

    2010-06-15

    A system and method for detecting one or more anomalies in a plurality of observations is provided. In one illustrative embodiment, the observations are real-time network observations collected from a stream of network traffic. The method includes performing a discrete decomposition of the observations, and introducing derived variables to increase storage and query efficiencies. A mathematical model, such as a conditional independence model, is then generated from the formatted data. The formatted data is also used to construct frequency tables which maintain an accurate count of specific variable occurrence as indicated by the model generation process. The formatted data is then applied to the mathematical model to generate scored data. The scored data is then analyzed to detect anomalies.

  13. More about discrete gauge anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Ibáñez, L E

    1993-01-01

    I discuss and extend several results concerning the cancellation of discrete gauge anomalies. I show how heavy fermions do not decouple in the presence of discrete gauge anomalies. As a consequence, in general, cancellation of discrete gauge anomalies cannot be described merely in terms of low energy operators involving only the light fermions. I also discuss cancellation of discrete gauge anomalies through a discrete version of the Green-Schwarz (GS) mechanism as well as the possibility of discrete gauge R-symmetries and their anomalies. Finally, some phenomenological applications are discussed. This includes symmetries guaranteeing absence of FCNC in two-Higgs models and generalized matter parities stabilizing the proton in the supersymmetric standard model. In the presence of a discrete GS mechanism or/and gauge R-symmetries, new possibilities for anomaly free such symmetries are found.

  14. Anomaly detection: eye movement patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W; Fodor, J D; Crain, S; Shankweiler, D

    1998-09-01

    The symptom of a garden path in sentence processing is an important anomaly in the input string. This anomaly signals to the parser that an error has occurred, and provides cues for how to repair it. Anomaly detection is thus an important aspect of sentence processing. In the present study, we investigated how the parser responds to unambiguous sentences that contain syntactic anomalies and pragmatic anomalies, examining records of eye movement during reading. While sensitivity to the two kinds of anomaly was very rapid and essentially simultaneous, qualitative differences existed in the patterns of first-pass reading times and eye regressions. The results are compatible with the proposal that syntactic information and pragmatic information are used differently in garden-path recovery.

  15. Atomki anomaly and the Secluded Dark Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    The Atomiki anomaly can be interpreted as a new light vector boson. If such a new particle exists, it could be a mediator between the Standard Model sector and the dark sector including the dark matter. We discussed some simple effective models with these particles. In the models, the secluded dark matter models are good candidates to satisfy the thermal relic abundance. In particular, we found that the dark matter self-interaction can be large enough to solve the small scale structure puzzle...

  16. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  17. Increase in NOx emissions from Indian thermal power plants during 1996-2010: unit-based inventories and multisatellite observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zifeng; Streets, David G

    2012-07-17

    Driven by rapid economic development and growing electricity demand, NO(x) emissions (E) from the power sector in India have increased dramatically since the mid-1990s. In this study, we present the NO(x) emissions from Indian public thermal power plants for the period 1996-2010 using a unit-based methodology and compare the emission estimates with the satellite observations of NO(2) tropospheric vertical column densities (TVCDs) from four spaceborne instruments: GOME, SCIAMACHY, OMI, and GOME-2. Results show that NO(x) emissions from Indian power plants increased by at least 70% during 1996-2010. Coal-fired power plants, NO(x) emissions from which are not regulated in India, contribute ∼96% to the total power sector emissions, followed by gas-fired (∼4%) and oil-fired (<1%) ones. A number of isolated NO(2) hot spots are observed over the power plant areas, and good agreement between NO(2) TVCDs and NO(x) emissions is found for areas dominated by power plant emissions. Average NO(2) TVCDs over power plant areas were continuously increasing during the study period. We find that the ratio of ΔE/E to ΔTVCD/TVCD changed from greater than one to less than one around 2005-2008, implying that a transition of the overall NO(x) chemistry occurred over the power plant areas, which may cause significant impact on the atmospheric environment.

  18. [Developmental venous anomaly (DVA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A; Hagen, T; Ahlhelm, F; Viera, J; Reith, W; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G

    2007-10-01

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term "venous angioma" is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques.

  19. Anomalies and entanglement renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgeman, Jacob C.; Williamson, Dominic J.

    2017-09-01

    We study 't Hooft anomalies of discrete groups in the framework of (1+1)-dimensional multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz states on the lattice. Using matrix product operators, general topological restrictions on conformal data are derived. An ansatz class allowing for optimization of MERA with an anomalous symmetry is introduced. We utilize this class to numerically study a family of Hamiltonians with a symmetric critical line. Conformal data is obtained for all irreducible projective representations of each anomalous symmetry twist, corresponding to definite topological sectors. It is numerically demonstrated that this line is a protected gapless phase. Finally, we implement a duality transformation between a pair of critical lines using our subclass of MERA.

  20. Low Risk Anomalies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Paul; Wagner, Christian; Zechner, Josef

    This paper shows theoretically and empirically that beta- and volatility-based low risk anomalies are driven by return skewness. The empirical patterns concisely match the predictions of our model that endogenizes the role of skewness for stock returns through default risk. With increasing downside...... risk, the standard capital asset pricing model (CAPM) increasingly overestimates expected equity returns relative to firms' true (skew-adjusted) market risk. Empirically, the profitability of betting against beta/volatility increases with firms' downside risk, and the risk-adjusted return differential...... of betting against beta/volatility among low skew firms compared to high skew firms is economically large. Our results suggest that the returns to betting against beta or volatility do not necessarily pose asset pricing puzzles but rather that such strategies collect premia that compensate for skew risk...

  1. Satellite observation of lowermost tropospheric ozone by multispectral synergism of IASI thermal infrared and GOME-2 ultraviolet measurements over Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, J.; Eremenko, M.; Liu, X.; Dufour, G.; Cai, Z.; Hoepfner, M.; von Clarmann, T.; Sellitto, P.; Foret, G.; Gaubert, B.; Beekmann, M.; Orphal, J. J.; Chance, K.; Spurr, R. J.; Flaud, J.

    2013-12-01

    Lowermost tropospheric ozone is a major factor determining air quality, which directly affects human health in megacities and causes damages to ecosystems. Monitoring tropospheric ozone is a key societal issue which can be addressed at the regional scale by spaceborne observation. However, current satellite retrievals of tropospheric ozone using uncoupled either ultraviolet (UV) or thermal infrared (TIR) observations show limited sensitivity to ozone at the lowermost troposphere (LMT, up to 3 km asl of altitude above sea level), which is the major concern for air quality. In this framework, we have developed a new multispectral approach for observing lowermost tropospheric ozone from space by synergism of atmospheric TIR radiances observed by IASI and earth UV reflectances measured by GOME-2. Both instruments are onboard the series of MetOp satellites (in orbit since 2006 and expected until 2022) and their scanning capabilities offer global coverage every day, with a relatively fine ground pixel resolution (12-km-diameter pixels spaced by 25 km for IASI at nadir). Our technique uses altitude-dependent Tikhonov-Phillips-type constraints, which optimize sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone. It integrates the VLIDORT and KOPRA radiative transfer codes for simulating UV reflectance and TIR radiance, respectively. We have used our method to analyze real observations over Europe during an ozone pollution episode in the summer of 2009. The results show that the multispectral synergism of IASI (TIR) and GOME-2 (UV) enables the observation of the spatial distribution of ozone plumes in the LMT, in good agreement with the CHIMERE regional chemistry-transport model. In this case study, when high ozone concentrations extend vertically above 3 km asl, they are similarly observed over land by both the multispectral and IASI retrievals. On the other hand, ozone plumes located below 3 km asl are only clearly depicted by the multispectral retrieval (both over land and over ocean

  2. "The face of ostracism" : The impact of the social categorization on the thermal facial responses of the target and the observer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paolini, Daniele; Alparone, Francesca R.; Cardone, Daniela; van Beest, I.; Merla, Arcangelo

    2016-01-01

    Ostracism has been shown to elicit pain in both the target and the observers. Two experiments investigated the autonomic thermal signature associated with an ostracism experience and assessed whether and how social categorization impacts the autonomic arousal of both the target and the observer.

  3. Thermal and Non-thermal Nature of the Soft Excess Emission from Sersic 159-03 observed with XMM-Newton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Lieu, Richard; Mittaz, Jonathan P. D.; Kaastra, Jelle S.; Nevalainen, Jukka

    2005-01-01

    Several nearby clusters exhibit an excess of soft X-ray radiation which cannot be attributed to the hot virialized intra-cluster medium. There is no consensus to date on the origin of the excess emission: it could be either of thermal origin, or due to an inverse Compton scattering of the cosmic microwave background. Using high resolution XMM-Newton data of Sersic 159-03 we first show that strong soft excess emission is detected out to a radial distance of 0.9 Mpc. The data are interpreted using the two viable models available, i.e., by invoking a warm reservoir of thermal gas, or relativistic electrons which are part of a cosmic ray population. The thermal model leads to a better goodness-of-fit, and the emitting warm gas must be high in mass and low in metallicity.

  4. Coral reef bleaching and sea surface temperature anomalies: 1991-1996 global patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goreau, T.J.; Hayes, R.L.; Strong, A.

    1997-12-31

    Global spatio-temporal patterns of mass coral reef bleaching during the first half of the 1990s continued to show the strong temperature correlations which first became established in the 1980s. Satellite sea surface temperature data and field observations were used to track thermal bleaching events in real time. Most bleaching events followed warm season sea surface temperature anomalies of around +1 degree celsius above historical means. Global bleaching patterns appear to have been strongly affected by worldwide cooling which followed eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991. High water temperatures and mass coral reef bleaching took place in the Caribbean, Indian Ocean, and South Pacific in 1991, but there were few thermal anomalies or bleaching events in 1992 and 1993, years which were markedly cooler worldwide. Following the settling of Mount Pinatubo aerosols and resumption of global warming trends, extensive ocean thermal hot spots and bleaching events resumed in the South Pacific, South Atlantic, and Indian Oceans in 1994. Bleaching again took place in hot spots in the Indian Ocean and Caribbean in 1995, and in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, South Pacific, North Pacific, and Persian Gulf in 1996. Coral reefs worldwide are now very close to their upper temperature tolerance limits. This sensitivity, and the fact that the warmest ecosystems have no source of immigrant species pre-adapted to warmer conditions, may make coral reef ecosystems the first to be severely impacted if global temperatures and sea levels remain at current values or increase further.

  5. In-Flight Diagnosis and Anomaly Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In flight diagnosis and anomaly detection is a difficult challenge that requires sufficient observation and real-time processing of health information. Our approach...

  6. Anomaly detection in clinical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengxing; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2012-01-01

    Meaningful anomalies in clinical processes may be related to caring performance or even the patient survival. It is imperative that the anomalies be timely detected such that useful and actionable knowledge of interest could be extracted to clinicians. Many previous approaches assume prior knowledge about the structure of clinical processes, using which anomalies are detected in a supervised manner. For a majority of clinical settings, however, clinical processes are complex, ad hoc, and even unknown a prior. In this paper, we investigate how to facilitate detection of anomalies in an unsupervised manner. An anomaly detection model is presented by applying a density-based clustering method on patient careflow logs. Using the learned model, it is possible to detect whether a particular patient careflow trace is anomalous with respect to normal traces in the logs. The approach has been validated over real data sets collected from a Chinese hospital.

  7. New XMM-Newton observation of the thermally emitting isolated neutron star 2XMM J104608.7-594306

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, A. M.; Motch, C.; Turolla, R.; Popov, S. B.; Schwope, A. D.; Treves, A.

    2015-11-01

    Context. The isolated neutron star (INS) 2XMM J104608.7-594306 is one of the only two to be discovered through their thermal emission since the ROSAT era. Possibly a remnant of a former generation of massive stars in the Carina nebula, the exact nature of the source is unclear, and it might be unique amongst the several classes of Galactic INSs. Aims: In a first dedicated XMM-Newton observation of the source, we found intriguing evidence of a very fast spin period of P ~ 18.6 ms at the 4σ confidence level. Moreover, spectral features in absorption have also been identified. We re-observed 2XMM J104608.7-594306 with XMM-Newton to better characterise the spectral energy distribution of the source, confirm the candidate spin period, and possibly constrain the pulsar spin-down. Methods: We used the two XMM-Newton observations of 2XMM J104608.7-594306 to perform detailed timing and spectral X-ray analysis. Both the spin-down rate and the energy of the spectral features provide estimates on the neutron star magnetic field, which are crucial for investigating the evolutionary state of the neutron star. Results: Statistically acceptable spectral fits and meaningful physical parameters for the source are only obtained when the residuals at energies 0.55 keV and 1.35 keV are taken into account by the spectral modelling. While the former can result from the inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the surface of the neutron star or can be related to a local overabundance of oxygen in the Carina nebula, the one at 1.35 keV is only satisfactorily accounted for by invoking a line in absorption. In this case, the best-fit neutron star atmosphere models constrain the hydrogen column density, the effective temperature, and the luminosity of the source within NH = (2.5-3.3) × 1021 cm-2, Teff = (6-10) × 105 K, and LX = (1.1-7.4) × 1032 erg s-1. The implied distance is consistent with a location in (or in front of) the Carina nebula, and radiation radii are compatible with

  8. The KARMEN anomaly, light neutralinos and supernova SN1987A

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, M

    2000-01-01

    The KARMEN experiment observes a time anomaly in events induced by pion decay at rest. This anomaly can be ascribed to the production of a new weakly interacting particle X with mass m_X\\sim 34 MeV. We show that a recently proposed identification of the X particle with the lightest neutralino \\chi in the frame work of the MSSM with broken R parity is in contradiction to optical observations of SN 1987A.

  9. Turtle carapace anomalies: the roles of genetic diversity and environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Velo-Antón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phenotypic anomalies are common in wild populations and multiple genetic, biotic and abiotic factors might contribute to their formation. Turtles are excellent models for the study of developmental instability because anomalies are easily detected in the form of malformations, additions, or reductions in the number of scutes or scales. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we integrated field observations, manipulative experiments, and climatic and genetic approaches to investigate the origin of carapace scute anomalies across Iberian populations of the European pond turtle, Emys orbicularis. The proportion of anomalous individuals varied from 3% to 69% in local populations, with increasing frequency of anomalies in northern regions. We found no significant effect of climatic and soil moisture, or climatic temperature on the occurrence of anomalies. However, lower genetic diversity and inbreeding were good predictors of the prevalence of scute anomalies among populations. Both decreasing genetic diversity and increasing proportion of anomalous individuals in northern parts of the Iberian distribution may be linked to recolonization events from the Southern Pleistocene refugium. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our results suggest that developmental instability in turtle carapace formation might be caused, at least in part, by genetic factors, although the influence of environmental factors affecting the developmental stability of turtle carapace cannot be ruled out. Further studies of the effects of environmental factors, pollutants and heritability of anomalies would be useful to better understand the complex origin of anomalies in natural populations.

  10. Satellite observation of lowermost tropospheric ozone by multispectral synergism of IASI thermal infrared and GOME-2 ultraviolet measurements over Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cuesta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new multispectral approach for observing lowermost tropospheric ozone from space by synergism of atmospheric radiances in the thermal infrared (TIR observed by IASI (Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer and earth reflectances in the ultraviolet (UV measured by GOME-2 (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2. Both instruments are onboard the series of MetOp satellites (in orbit since 2006 and expected until 2022 and their scanning capabilities offer global coverage every day, with a relatively fine ground pixel resolution (12 km-diameter pixels spaced by 25 km for IASI at nadir. Our technique uses altitude-dependent Tikhonov–Phillips-type constraints, which optimize sensitivity to lower tropospheric ozone. It integrates the VLIDORT (Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer and KOPRA (Karlsruhe Optimized and Precise Radiative transfer Algorithm radiative transfer codes for simulating UV reflectance and TIR radiance, respectively. We have used our method to analyse real observations over Europe during an ozone pollution episode in the summer of 2009. The results show that the multispectral synergism of IASI (TIR and GOME-2 (UV enables the observation of the spatial distribution of ozone plumes in the lowermost troposphere (LMT, from the surface up to 3 km a.s.l., above sea level, in good agreement with the CHIMERE regional chemistry-transport model. In this case study, when high ozone concentrations extend vertically above 3 km a.s.l., they are similarly observed over land by both the multispectral and IASI retrievals. On the other hand, ozone plumes located below 3 km a.s.l. are only clearly depicted by the multispectral retrieval (both over land and over ocean. This is achieved by a clear enhancement of sensitivity to ozone in the lowest atmospheric layers. The multispectral sensitivity in the LMT peaks at 2 to 2.5 km a.s.l. over land, while sensitivity for IASI or GOME-2 only peaks at 3 to 4 km a.s.l. at lowest

  11. Nesting of thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic anomalies in liquid silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasisht, Vishwas V; Mathew, John; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Sastry, Srikanth

    2014-09-28

    Anomalous behaviour in density, diffusivity, and structural order is investigated for silicon modeled by the Stillinger-Weber potential by performing molecular dynamics simulations. As previously reported in the case of water [J. R. Errington and P. G. Debenedetti, Nature (London) 409, 318 (2001)] and silica [M. S. Shell, P. G. Debenedetti, and A. Z. Panagiotopoulos, Phys. Rev. E 66, 011202 (2002)], a cascading of thermodynamic, dynamic, and structural anomalous regions is also observed in liquid silicon. The region of structural anomaly includes the region of diffusivity anomaly, which in turn encompasses the region of density anomaly (which is unlike water but similar to silica). In the region of structural anomaly, a tight correlation between the translational and tetrahedrality order parameter is found, but the correlation is weaker when a local orientational order parameter (q3) is used as a measure of tetrahedrality. The total excess entropy and the pair correlation entropy are computed across the phase diagram and the correlation between the excess entropy and the regions of anomalies in the phase diagram of liquid silicon is examined. Scaling relations associating the excess entropy with the diffusion coefficient show considerable deviation from the quasi-universal behaviour observed in hard-sphere and Lennard-Jones liquids and some liquid metals. Excess entropy based criteria for diffusivity and structural anomalies fail to capture the observed regions of anomaly.

  12. The hydrogen anomaly problem in neutron Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik B.

    2018-03-01

    Neutron Compton scattering (also called ‘deep inelastic scattering of neutrons’, DINS) is a method used to study momentum distributions of light atoms in solids and liquids. It has been employed extensively since the start-up of intense pulsed neutron sources about 25 years ago. The information lies primarily in the width and shape of the Compton profile and not in the absolute intensity of the Compton peaks. It was therefore not immediately recognized that the relative intensities of Compton peaks arising from scattering on different isotopes did not always agree with values expected from standard neutron cross-section tables. The discrepancies were particularly large for scattering on protons, a phenomenon that became known as ‘the hydrogen anomaly problem’. The present paper is a review of the discovery, experimental tests to prove or disprove the existence of the hydrogen anomaly and discussions concerning its origin. It covers a twenty-year-long history of experimentation, theoretical treatments and discussions. The problem is of fundamental interest, since it involves quantum phenomena on the subfemtosecond time scale, which are not visible in conventional thermal neutron scattering but are important in Compton scattering where neutrons have two orders of magnitude times higher energy. Different H-containing systems show different cross-section deficiencies and when the scattering processes are followed on the femtosecond time scale the cross-section losses disappear on different characteristic time scales for each H-environment. The last section of this review reproduces results from published papers based on quantum interference in scattering on identical particles (proton or deuteron pairs or clusters), which have given a quantitative theoretical explanation both regarding the H-cross-section reduction and its time dependence. Some new explanations are added and the concluding chapter summarizes the conditions for observing the specific quantum

  13. Slow Organic-to-Inorganic Sub-Lattice Thermalization in Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskites Observed by Ultrafast Photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Angela Y. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd Evanston IL 60208 USA; Cho, Yi-Ju [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin Chu 30013 Taiwan; Chen, Kuan-Chen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin Chu 30013 Taiwan; Chen, Chang-Wen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin Chu 30013 Taiwan; Kinaci, Alper [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Ave Argonne IL 60439 USA; Diroll, Benjamin T. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Ave Argonne IL 60439 USA; Wagner, Michael J. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd Evanston IL 60208 USA; Chan, Maria K. Y. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Ave Argonne IL 60439 USA; Lin, Hao-Wu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing-Hua University, Hsin Chu 30013 Taiwan; Schaller, Richard D. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd Evanston IL 60208 USA; Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 Cass Ave Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2016-05-31

    Carrier dynamics in methylammonium lead halide (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) perovskite thin films, of differing crystal morphology, are examined as functions of temperature and excitation wavelength. At room temperature, long-lived (> nanosecond) transient absorption signals indicate negligible carrier trapping. However, in measurements of ultrafast photoluminescence excited at 400 nm, a heretofore unexplained, large amplitude (50%-60%), 45 ps decay process is observed. This feature persists for temperatures down to the orthorhombic phase transition. Varying pump photon energy reveals that the fast, band-edge photoluminescence (PL) decay only appears for excitation >= 2.38 eV (520 nm), with larger amplitudes for higher pump energies. Lower photon-energy excitation yields slow dynamics consistent with negligible carrier trapping. Further, sub-bandgap two-photon pumping yields identical PL dynamics as direct absorption, signifying sensitivity to the total deposited energy and insensitivity to interfacial effects. Together with first principles electronic structure and ab initio molecular dynamics calculations, the results suggest the fast PL decay stems from excitation of high energy phonon modes associated with the organic sub-lattice that temporarily enhance wavefunction overlap within the inorganic component owing to atomic displacement, thereby transiently changing the PL radiative rate during thermalization. Hence, the fast PL decay relates a characteristic organic-to-inorganic sub-lattice equilibration timescale at optoelectronic-relevant excitation energies.

  14. Remotely sensed soil temperatures beneath snow-free skin-surface using thermal observations from tandem polar-orbiting satellites: An analytical three-time-scale model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Wenfeng; Zhou, Ji; Ju, Weimin

    2014-01-01

    -surface. This study shows that thermal remote sensing can be used to estimate soil temperatures. Our results provide insights into thermal observations collected with tandem polar-orbiting satellites when used toward obtaining soil temperatures under clear-sky conditions without the use of any ground......, including the daily-averaged temperature, thermal inertia, upward surface flux factor, and day-to-day change rate. Thus, under clear-sky conditions, the four thermal measurements in a diurnal cycle recorded with tandem polar-orbiting satellites are sufficient for reconstructing the DTC of both land surface...... and soil temperatures. Polar-orbiting satellite data from MODIS are used to show the model's capability. The results demonstrate that soil temperatures with a spatial resolution of 1km under snow-free conditions can be generated at any time of a clear-sky day. Validation is performed by using a comparison...

  15. Reconstruction of gap-free time series satellite observations of land surface temperature to model spectral soil thermal admittance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghafarian Malamiri, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    The soil thermal properties (soil thermal conductivity, soil heat capacity and soil diffusivity) are the main parameters in the applications that need quantitative information on soil heat transfer. Conventionally, these properties are either measured in situ or estimated by semi-empirical models

  16. The gravity anomaly of Mount Amiata; different approaches for understanding anomaly source distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girolami, C.; Barchi, M. R.; Heyde, I.; Pauselli, C.; Vetere, F.; Cannata, A.

    2017-11-01

    In this work, the gravity anomaly signal beneath Mount Amiata and its surroundings have been analysed to reconstruct the subsurface setting. In particular, the work focuses on the investigation of the geological bodies responsible for the Bouguer gravity minimum observed in this area.

  17. Thermal remote sensing of water under flooded vegetation: New observations of inundation patterns for the ‘Small’ Lake Chad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, M.; Lemoalle, J.; Bader, J.-C.; Tweed, S.; Mofor, L.

    2011-06-01

    SummaryLake Chad at the border of the Sahara desert in central Africa, is well known for its high sensitivity to hydroclimatic events. Gaps in in situ data have so far prevented a full assessment of the response of Lake Chad to the ongoing prolonged drought that started in the second half of the 20th century. Like many other wetlands and shallow lakes, the 'Small' Lake Chad includes large areas of water under aquatic vegetation which needs to be accounted for to obtain the total inundated area. In this paper, a methodology is proposed that uses Meteosat thermal maximum composite data (Tmax) to account for water covered by aquatic vegetation and provide a consistent monthly time series of total inundated area estimates for Lake Chad. Total inundation patterns in Lake Chad were reconstructed for a 15-yr period (1986-2001) which includes the peak of the drought (86-91) and therefore provides new observations on the hydrological functioning of the 'Small' Lake Chad. During the study period, Lake Chad remained below 16,400 km 2 (third quartile ˜8800 km 2). The variability of the inundated area observed in the northern pool (standard deviation σnorthern pool = 1980 km 2) is about 60% greater than that of the southern pool ( σsouthern pool = 1250 km 2). The same methodology could be applied to other large wetlands and shallow lakes in semi-arid or arid regions elsewehere using Meteosat (e.g. Niger Inland Delta, Sudd in Sudan, Okavango Delta) and other weather satellites (e.g., floodplains of the Lake Eyre Basin in Australia and Andean Altiplano Lakes in South America).

  18. Quantum topology and global anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Baadhio, R A

    1996-01-01

    Anomalies are ubiquitous features in quantum field theories. They can ruin the consistency of such theories and put significant restrictions on their viability, especially in dimensions higher than four. Global gauge and gravitational anomalies are to date, one of the scant powerful and probing tools available to physicists in the pursuit of uniqueness.This monograph is one of the very few that specializes in the study of global anomalies in quantum field theories. A discussion of various issues associated to three dimensional physics - the Chern-Simons-Witten theories - widen the scope of thi

  19. Novel quantum criticality in CeRu2Si2 near absolute zero observed by thermal expansion and magnetostriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, J; Abe, S; Takahashi, D; Segawa, Y; Komai, Y; Tsujii, H; Matsumoto, K; Suzuki, H; Onuki, Y

    2008-12-19

    We report linear thermal expansion and magnetostriction measurements for CeRu2Si2 in magnetic fields up to 52.6 mT and at temperatures down to 1 mK. At high temperatures, this compound showed Landau-Fermi-liquid behavior: The linear thermal expansion coefficient and the magnetostriction coefficient were proportional to the temperature and magnetic field, respectively. In contrast, a pronounced non-Fermi-liquid effect was found below 50 mK. The negative contribution of thermal expansion and magnetostriction suggests the existence of an additional quantum critical point.

  20. Heat flux and thermal conduction in O+ and H+ ion flows deduced from EISCAT-VHF radar observations in the high-latitude topside ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Taieb, Charley

    1994-06-01

    With two periods of EISCAT-VHF radar observations, magnetically quiet and moderately disturbed, we have calculated the H+ and O+ heat fluxes in using formulae of Wu and Taieb (1993), accounting not only for temperature gradients but also for pressure gradients, velocity gradients, and diffusion-thermal effects. They correspond to different physical processes that are calculated and compared between them. Then, the general features of the H+ and O+ ion thermal conductions are studied during the two periods of observation in the high-latitude topside ionosphere. The analysis of the two periods of measurements revealed the following trends, to be confirmed by further observations: (1) During the two periods the H+ heat flux Q2 is always upward in the altitude range from 600 km up to about 1000 km. It is larger during the quiet period than during the disturbed period. (2) The most important dominant mechanism for H+ heat flux is the diffusion-thermal effect due to the H+-O+ collision, with a correcting term due to the H+ temperature gradient. (3) The O+ heat flux is always downward in the same altitude range during the two periods of observations. The absolute value during the disturbed period is slightly larger than that during the quiet period. (4) The dominant mechanism for O+ heat flux is its temperature gradient, corrected by the coupling with the H+ ion. (5) The O+ thermal conduction is less important during the quiet period than during the disturbed period, while for the H+ thermal conduction it is the contrary. (6) The H+ thermal conduction increases with altitude below about 1000 km.

  1. High-resolution X-ray computed tomography observations of the thermal drying of lump-sized subbituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, Jonathan P. [Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States); EMS Energy Institute, University Park, PA (United States); Pone, J. Denis N. [ConocoPhilips Technology Center, Bartlesville, Oklahoma (United States); Mitchell, Gareth D.; Halleck, Phillip [EMS Energy Institute, University Park, PA (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Drying of low-rank coals affects: coal cleaning, combustion, comminution, gasification, liquefaction, and in-seam fluid-flow (water, coalbed methane, and carbon dioxide for sequestration/enhanced coalbed methane). To evaluate the extent of drying-induced transitions, 3 lump-sized (approximately 6 x 2 x 2 cm) Powder River Basin subbituminous coal samples were thermally dried in an air-drying coal oven at 50 C over two weeks. A high-resolution industrial X-ray computed tomography scanner was utilized to generate (non-destructively) three-dimensional regional volumetric renderings, as-received and over 3-stages of drying. The lumps had cleats, both open and mineral filled, with a degree of fracture diversity along the longitudinal plane. Comparison of the virtual slice surfaces, at identifiable locations, allowed the induced cracking and shrinkage accompanying the transitions during 19% moisture loss to almost dry to be observed. Under these drying conditions, the heat transfer, and thus extent of drying, proceeded radially inward. With increased drying time the fractures extend and become larger in aperture as the coal shrinks. The major fractures mostly followed the existing cleat system. With additional drying, these cleats widened and the aperture increase propagated deeper into the coal extended into the butt cleats. New fractures were located mostly perpendicular to the cleat fracture surface. The external volume of the coal lumps had limited shrinkage. The axial extent of the shrinkage length (lump edge to lump edge) was on the order of 4-6%, the bulk of the shrinkage being accommodated by the internal shrinkage between cleats. (author)

  2. Reconstruction of gap-free time series satellite observations of land surface temperature to model spectral soil thermal admittance

    OpenAIRE

    Ghafarian Malamiri, H.R.

    2015-01-01

    The soil thermal properties (soil thermal conductivity, soil heat capacity and soil diffusivity) are the main parameters in the applications that need quantitative information on soil heat transfer. Conventionally, these properties are either measured in situ or estimated by semi-empirical models using the fractions of soil constituents. The use of such methods over large and heterogeneous areas, however, is often costly, timeconsuming and sometimes impractical. This thesis proposes and evalu...

  3. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. Only those grid cells within 10 kilometers of a gravity data point have gravity values....

  4. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. All grid cells within the rectangular data area (from 61 to 66 degrees North latitude and...

  5. CHAMP Magnetic Anomalies of the Antarctic Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Rae; Gaya-Pique, Luis R.; vonFrese, Ralph R. B.; Taylor, Patrick T.; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2003-01-01

    Regional magnetic signals of the crust are strongly masked by the core field and its secular variations components and hence difficult to isolate in the satellite measurements. In particular, the un-modeled effects of the strong auroral external fields and the complicated- behavior of the core field near the geomagnetic poles conspire to greatly reduce the crustal magnetic signal-to-noise ratio in the polar regions relative to the rest of the Earth. We can, however, use spectral correlation theory to filter the static lithospheric and core field components from the dynamic external field effects. To help isolate regional lithospheric from core field components, the correlations between CHAMP magnetic anomalies and the pseudo magnetic effects inferred from gravity-derived crustal thickness variations can also be exploited.. Employing these procedures, we processed the CHAMP magnetic observations for an improved magnetic anomaly map of the Antarctic crust. Relative to the much higher altitude Orsted and noisier Magsat observations, the CHAMP magnetic anomalies at 400 km altitude reveal new details on the effects of intracrustal magnetic features and crustal thickness variations of the Antarctic.

  6. [Cutaneous vascular anomalies in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, L; Kacenelenbogen, N

    2015-09-01

    Vascular anomalies, which are erroneously categorized under the term angiomas, are a highly heterogeneous group of lesions that are poorly understood and affect a mean of 5 to 10 % of children. The fortuitous discovery of propranolol's efficacy in one of these entities has made them a topical issue. The paper's main objective is to inform family doctors of the various types of vascular anomalies, clarify their classification, and provide a common terminology. Its secondary objective is to provide a decision tree that enables primary care doctors to avoid diagnostic pitfalls, successfully detect cases, and optimize management. Systematic review. According to a recent study, 71,3 % of publications use the term hemangioma erroneously, regardless of the authors' field. The key for family doctors is to use one international classification only, that of the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA), in order to facilitate management and comprehension between the different healthcare levels. The diagnosis of vascular anomalies is clinical in 90 % of cases, so all family doctors can, whilst using a decision tree, diagnose a vascular anomaly and refer only those that are complex for specialist care. The most common vascular anomaly is infantile hemangioma in infants, which spontaneously regresses around the age of 5-7 years in 90 % of cases. Watchful waiting and regular follow-up suffice, therefore, in such settings.

  7. Control of rift asymmetry and segmentation on the thermal architecture of hyperextended rift systems: insights from Pyrenean field observations and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescoutre, Rodolphe; Tugend, Julie; Brune, Sascha; Manatschal, Gianreto

    2017-04-01

    Mid-Cretaceous rift basins are exposed in the Pyrenees providing key information on rifted domain formation that is not available at present-day rift system. Substantial paleotemperature and thermochronological data have been collected and published in numerous recent papers. These data show a strong heterogeneity in the distribution of peak temperatures within the Cretaceous rift basins. Locations that experienced relatively high or low temperatures appear to cluster in specific areas along strike. These areas have been interpreted as either reflecting hot and cold conditions during rifting, or alternatively, a change in the polarity of a strongly asymmetric rift systems. In this study, we test if the observed variability of peak temperatures can be explained by segmentation and a change in polarity of an asymmetrical upper/lower plate rift model. To this aim we restore the observed syn- to early post-rift peak temperatures to their paleo-location within sections across the evolving rift system. In the meantime, we conduct numerical models of rift migration leading to asymmetrical extension that are benchmarked with geological and geophysical observations from the Pyrenees. From the models, we extract thermal information at different stages of rifting that are finally compared to the thermal data from the Pyrenean Cretaceous rift basins. This work employs a novel approach by comparing thermal output from numerical modelling with the distribution of peak temperatures and thermal gradient from field data. As such, these results may have substantial implications to further understand the pre-orogenic thermal evolution of the Pyrenean rift system and the role of segmentation. More generally, the results of this work may unravel the role of rift asymmetry and segmentation on the thermal architecture of hyperextended rift basins and margins.

  8. Barium and neodymium isotopic anomalies in the Allende meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcculloch, M. T.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1978-01-01

    The discovery of Ba and Nd isotopic anomalies in two inclusions from the Allende meteorite is reported. The inclusions are Ca-Al-rich objects typical of the type considered as high-temperature condensation products in the solar nebula and contain distinctive Mg and O isotopic anomalies of the FUN (mass Fractionation, Unknown Nuclear processes) type. Mass-spectrometry results are discussed which show that inclusion C1 has anomalies in Ba at masses 134 and 136, while inclusion EK1-4-1 exhibits large marked negative anomalies at 130, 132, 134, and 136, as well as a positive anomaly at 137. It is also found that inclusion EK1-4-1 shows marked negative anomalies in Nd at masses 142, 146, 148, and 150, in addition to a positive anomaly at 145. These isotopic shifts are attributed to addition of r-process nuclei rather than mass fractionation. It is suggested that an onion-shell supernova explosion followed by injection into the solar nebula is the most likely generic model that may explain the observations.

  9. Multispectral Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing of Volcanic SO2 Plumes with NASA’s Earth Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realmuto, V. J.

    2009-12-01

    The instruments aboard NASA’s series of Earth Observing System satellites provide a rich suite of measurements for the mapping of volcanic plumes and clouds. This presentation will focus on applications of thermal multispectral infrared (TIR) data acquired with the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS), and Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) to the recent eruptions of Augustine and Sarychev volcanoes in Alaska and the Russian Kuril Islands, respectively. ASTER, MODIS, and AIRS provide complimentary information on the quantity and distribution of sulfur dioxide (SO2), silicate ash, and sulfate (SO4) aerosols within plumes. In addition, data from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) are used to derive estimates of aerosol loading, cloud-top altitude, wind direction, and wind speed. MODIS is our workhorse for plume mapping projects. There are MODIS instruments on the Terra and Aqua platforms, ensuring at least two MODIS passes per day over most volcanoes and four passes per day over many volcanoes. The spatial resolution of MODIS TIR radiance measurements is 1 km (at nadir) over a ground swath of 2330 km. MODIS can detect both the 7.3 and 8.5 μm bands of SO2, although the 7.3 μm band is often obscured by water vapor absorption when plumes are altitudes below ~ 4 km. ASTER has five channels in the TIR, and can detect the 8.5 μm SO2 band. The high spatial resolution (90 m) of ASTER TIR radiance measurements results in high sensitivity to SO2 within a narrow ground swath (60 km). AIRS has over 2700 spectral channels between 3.7 and 15.4 μm, allowing us to make unambiguous identifications of SO2, SO4 aerosols, and ash over a ground swath of ~2330 km. AIRS can detect the 7.3 μm SO2 band, and the strength of this band partially offsets the coarse spatial resolution of this instrument (~17 km at nadir). The key to multi-sensor mapping is the availability of a standard set

  10. The Observation of Martensite and Magnetic Domain Structures in Ni53Mn24Ga23 Shape Memory Alloys by Scanning Electron Acoustic Microscopy and Scanning Thermal Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun-Yu; Zeng, Hua-Rong; Song, Hong-Zhang; Hui, Sen-Xing; Li, Guo-Rong; Yin, Qing-Rui

    2012-05-01

    We present observations of martensite variants and ferromagnetic domain structures of Ni53Mn24Ga23 ferromagnetic shape memory alloys with a pure tetragonal martensitic phase by using scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) and scanning thermal microscopy (SThM). Electron acoustic images show a polycrystalline morphology with martensite variants. Direct coincidence between crystallographic martensitic twin variants and magnetic domains is found. A domain-like structure, obtained by SThM, is firstly reported, and then confirmed by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The experimental results will be helpful for investigating the local thermal properties of ferromagnets and understanding the relationship between martensite variants and magnetic domains.

  11. Spontaneous hot flow anomalies at Mars and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collinson, Glyn; Sibeck, David; Omidi, Nick; Grebowsky, Joseph; Halekas, Jasper; Mitchell, David; Espley, Jared; Zhang, Tielong; Persson, Moa; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    We report the first observations of Spontaneous Hot Flow Anomalies (SHFAs) at Venus and Mars, demonstrating their existence in the foreshocks of other planets beyond Earth. Using data from the ESA Venus Express and the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft, we present magnetic and plasma observations from events at both planets, exhibiting properties similar to "classical" Hot Flow Anomalies, with bounding shock-like compressive regions and a hot and diffuse core. However, these explosive foreshock transients were observed without any attendant interplanetary magnetic field discontinuity, consistent with SHFAs observed at Earth and our hybrid simulations.

  12. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jung Kyu; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Young Ho; Kim, Ei Jeong; Chun, Yi Kyeong [Samsung Cheil Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies are various and may be an isolated finding or may be found in conjunction with numerous associations, including genetic syndromes, Karyotype abnormals, central nervous system anomalies and other general musculoskeletal disorders. Early prenatal diagnosis of these focal musculoskeletal anomalies nor only affects prenatal care and postnatal outcome but also helps in approaching other numerous associated anomalies.

  13. Coronary Artery Anomalies in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian A. Scansen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery anomalies represent a disease spectrum from incidental to life-threatening. Anomalies of coronary artery origin and course are well-recognized in human medicine, but have received limited attention in veterinary medicine. Coronary artery anomalies are best described in the dog, hamster, and cow though reports also exist in the horse and pig. The most well-known anomaly in veterinary medicine is anomalous coronary artery origin with a prepulmonary course in dogs, which limits treatment of pulmonary valve stenosis. A categorization scheme for coronary artery anomalies in animals is suggested, dividing these anomalies into those of major or minor clinical significance. A review of coronary artery development, anatomy, and reported anomalies in domesticated species is provided and four novel canine examples of anomalous coronary artery origin are described: an English bulldog with single left coronary ostium and a retroaortic right coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and transseptal left coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and absent left coronary artery with a prepulmonary paraconal interventricular branch and an interarterial circumflex branch; and a mixed-breed dog with tetralogy of Fallot and anomalous origin of all coronary branches from the brachiocephalic trunk. Coronary arterial fistulae are also described including a coronary cameral fistula in a llama cria and an English bulldog with coronary artery aneurysm and anomalous shunting vessels from the right coronary artery to the pulmonary trunk. These examples are provided with the intent to raise awareness and improve understanding of such defects.

  14. Effective Tolman temperature induced by trace anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eune, Myungseok [Sangmyung University, Department of Civil Engineering, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Gim, Yongwan [Sogang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sogang University, Research Institute for Basic Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wontae [Sogang University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Despite the finiteness of stress tensor for a scalar field on the four-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole in the Israel-Hartle-Hawking vacuum, the Tolman temperature in thermal equilibrium is certainly divergent on the horizon due to the infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature. The origin of this conflict is due to the fact that the conventional Tolman temperature was based on the assumption of a traceless stress tensor, which is, however, incompatible with the presence of the trace anomaly responsible for the Hawking radiation. Here, we present an effective Tolman temperature which is compatible with the presence of the trace anomaly by using the modified Stefan-Boltzmann law. Eventually, the effective Tolman temperature turns out to be finite everywhere outside the horizon, and so an infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature at the event horizon does not appear any more. In particular, it is vanishing on the horizon, so that the equivalence principle is exactly recovered at the horizon. (orig.)

  15. Effective Tolman temperature induced by trace anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eune, Myungseok; Gim, Yongwan; Kim, Wontae

    2017-04-01

    Despite the finiteness of stress tensor for a scalar field on the four-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole in the Israel-Hartle-Hawking vacuum, the Tolman temperature in thermal equilibrium is certainly divergent on the horizon due to the infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature. The origin of this conflict is due to the fact that the conventional Tolman temperature was based on the assumption of a traceless stress tensor, which is, however, incompatible with the presence of the trace anomaly responsible for the Hawking radiation. Here, we present an effective Tolman temperature which is compatible with the presence of the trace anomaly by using the modified Stefan-Boltzmann law. Eventually, the effective Tolman temperature turns out to be finite everywhere outside the horizon, and so an infinite blue-shift of the Hawking temperature at the event horizon does not appear any more. In particular, it is vanishing on the horizon, so that the equivalence principle is exactly recovered at the horizon.

  16. Enriched axial anomaly in Weyl materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Zachary M.; Galitski, Victor M.

    2017-10-01

    While quantum anomalies are often associated with the breaking of a classical symmetry in the quantum theory, their anomalous contributions to observables remain distinct and well defined even when the symmetry is broken from the outset. This paper explores such anomalous contributions to the current, originating from the axial anomaly in a Weyl semimetal, and in the presence of a generic Weyl node-mixing term. We find that apart from the familiar anomalous divergence of the axial current proportional to a product of electric and magnetic fields, there is another anomalous term proportional to a product of the electric field and the orientation of a spin-dependent node-mixing vector. We obtain this result both by a quantum field-theoretic analysis of an effective Weyl action and solving an explicit lattice model. The extended spin-mixing mass terms, and the enriched axial anomaly they entail, could arise as mean-field or proximity-induced order parameters in spin-density-wave phases in Weyl semimetals or be generated dynamically within a Floquet theory.

  17. [Alternating hemiplegia of childhoood and oculomotor anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursztyn, J; Mikaeloff, Y; Kaminska, A; Plouin, P; Soufflet, C; Dulac, O; Chaix, Y

    2000-02-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a syndrome which begins in the first year of life. It is characterized by repeated attacks of uni-or bilateral hemiplegia or hemiparesia. In most cases paroxysmal manifestations are observed: movements or dystonia++ attacks, episodic nystagmus, abnormal eye movements and disturbance of the neurovegetative system, predominantly in the first year of life. In half of the cases, neurological anomalies begin during the neonatal period with a non characteristic aspect. Typical attacks take place after one year of life, sometimes associated with partial epilepsy. In a quarter of cases, the oculomotor anomalies have been known since early life. The diagnosis is made prior to one year on the basis of associated oculomotor anomalies and other symptoms without EEG arguments for epilepsy. Paroxysmal nystagmus is always found. One eye is affect in most cases, generally with horizontal and seldom with vertical movements of large variable pendular amplitude. One eye with nystagmus and the other with mydriasis is sometimes reported. Most attacks last from 30 sec to 3 min. Paroxysmal strabismus described in half of the cases seems to be generally unilateral internuclear transitory ophthalmoplegia. Finally, ocular deviations on the hemiparetic side are described. They are generally unique or sometimes associated with head deviation. Spontaneous blinking is reduced. Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a non-epileptic sporadic, paroxysmal manifestation of unknown pathogenesis. Prognosis is poor. The presence of oculomotor signs suggests the diagnosis.

  18. Thermal precursors in satellite images of the 1999 eruption of Shishaldin Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, Jonathan; Dean, Kenneson; Engle, Kevin; Izbekov, Pavel

    2002-07-01

    Shishaldin Volcano, Unimak Island Alaska, began showing signs of thermal unrest in satellite images on 9 February 1999. A thermal anomaly and small steam plume were detected at the summit of the volcano in short-wave thermal infrared AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer) satellite data. This was followed by over 2 months of changes in the observed thermal character of the volcano. Initially, the thermal anomaly was only visible when the satellite passed nearly directly over the volcano, suggesting a hot source deep in the central crater obscured from more oblique satellite passes. The "zenith angle" needed to see the anomaly increased with time, presumably as the thermal source rose within the conduit. Based on this change, an ascent rate of ca. 14 m per day for the thermal source was estimated, until it reached the summit on around 21 March. It is thought that Strombolian activity began around this time. The precursory activity culminated in a sub-Plinian eruption on 19 April, ejecting ash to over 45,000 ft. (13,700 m). The thermal energy output through the precursory period was calculated based on geometric constraints unique to Shishaldin. These calculations show fluctuations that can be tied to changes in the eruptive character inferred from seismic records and later geologic studies. The remote location of this volcano made satellite images a necessary observation tool for this eruption. To date, this is the longest thermal precursory activity preceding a sub-Plinian eruption recorded by satellite images in the region. This type of thermal monitoring of remote volcanoes is central in the efforts of the Alaska Volcano Observatory to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruption, and mitigate their associated hazards to air-traffic and local residents.

  19. Magnetic anomalies on Io and their relationship to the spatial distribution of volcanic centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knicely, Joshua; Everett, Mark E.; Sparks, David W.

    2017-08-01

    Forward modeling of planetary-scale magnetic anomalies due to induced crustal magnetization of Io is developed. The approach involves finite difference modeling of a temporally- and spatially-averaged steady state geotherm superimposed by the thermal evolution of an instantaneously emplaced volcanic pipe with and without an underlying magma chamber. A slight adjustment to previous studies results in a preferred steady state geotherm. The crustal magnetization is based on the calculated distribution of temperature, the strength of an idealized Jovian magnetic field, and a temperature-dependent susceptibility. Magnetite is assumed to be the dominant magnetic mineral. Synthetic satellite flyby data are generated along selected meridional swaths of Io's surface, based on observed locations of volcanic centers, hotspots, and accumulations of ejected volcanic material. This work produces a 1-D geotherm which remains at approximately the surface temperature to within a few kilometers of the thermal lithosphere/mantle boundary. This solution shows little dependence on porosity due to the depth at which rapid temperature change occurs. These conclusions hold for largely varying mantle temperatures. Silicate volcanic centers cool to the temperature of sulfur eruptions rapidly and become indistinguishable from sulfur volcanism within 10,000 years. The magnetic anomaly due to temperature variation is smaller than detectable for nominal conditions. The modeling herein requires a flyby altitude of ∼25 km and a pipe radius of ∼640 m for detection, or, for a more reasonable flyby altitude of 100 km, a pipe radius of ∼6000 m. If a crustal anomaly is detected by future satellite missions, it would suggest different conditions at Io than modeled here.

  20. Ice flux divergence anomalies on 79north Glacier, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seroussi, H.; Morlighem, M.; Rignot, E.

    2011-01-01

    , with a dense grid of ice thickness data collected with an airborne radar sounder in 1998, to examine its ice flux divergence. We detect large variations, up to 100 m/yr, in flux divergence on grounded ice that are incompatible with what we know of the glacier surface mass balance, basal mass balance...... and thinning rate. We examine the hypothesis that these anomalies are due to the three-dimensional flow of ice around and atop bumps and hollows in basal topography by comparing the flux divergence of three-dimensional numerical models with its surface equivalent. We find that three-dimensional effects have...... only a small contribution to the observed anomalies. On the other hand, if we degrade the spatial resolution of the data to 10 km the anomalies disappear. Further analysis shows that the source of the anomalies is not the ice velocity data but the interpolation of multiple tracks of ice thickness data...

  1. An Entropy-Based Network Anomaly Detection Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Bereziński

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is an interdisciplinary subfield of computer science involving methods at the intersection of artificial intelligence, machine learning and statistics. One of the data mining tasks is anomaly detection which is the analysis of large quantities of data to identify items, events or observations which do not conform to an expected pattern. Anomaly detection is applicable in a variety of domains, e.g., fraud detection, fault detection, system health monitoring but this article focuses on application of anomaly detection in the field of network intrusion detection.The main goal of the article is to prove that an entropy-based approach is suitable to detect modern botnet-like malware based on anomalous patterns in network. This aim is achieved by realization of the following points: (i preparation of a concept of original entropy-based network anomaly detection method, (ii implementation of the method, (iii preparation of original dataset, (iv evaluation of the method.

  2. Video behavior profiling for anomaly detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2008-05-01

    This paper aims to address the problem of modelling video behaviour captured in surveillancevideos for the applications of online normal behaviour recognition and anomaly detection. A novelframework is developed for automatic behaviour profiling and online anomaly sampling/detectionwithout any manual labelling of the training dataset. The framework consists of the followingkey components: (1) A compact and effective behaviour representation method is developed basedon discrete scene event detection. The similarity between behaviour patterns are measured basedon modelling each pattern using a Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN). (2) Natural grouping ofbehaviour patterns is discovered through a novel spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervisedmodel selection and feature selection on the eigenvectors of a normalised affinity matrix. (3) Acomposite generative behaviour model is constructed which is capable of generalising from asmall training set to accommodate variations in unseen normal behaviour patterns. (4) A run-timeaccumulative anomaly measure is introduced to detect abnormal behaviour while normal behaviourpatterns are recognised when sufficient visual evidence has become available based on an onlineLikelihood Ratio Test (LRT) method. This ensures robust and reliable anomaly detection and normalbehaviour recognition at the shortest possible time. The effectiveness and robustness of our approachis demonstrated through experiments using noisy and sparse datasets collected from both indoorand outdoor surveillance scenarios. In particular, it is shown that a behaviour model trained usingan unlabelled dataset is superior to those trained using the same but labelled dataset in detectinganomaly from an unseen video. The experiments also suggest that our online LRT based behaviourrecognition approach is advantageous over the commonly used Maximum Likelihood (ML) methodin differentiating ambiguities among different behaviour classes observed online.

  3. Non-relativistic scale anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arav, Igal [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University,55 Haim Levanon street, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel); Chapman, Shira [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics,31 Caroline Street North, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Oz, Yaron [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University,55 Haim Levanon street, Tel-Aviv, 69978 (Israel)

    2016-06-27

    We extend the cohomological analysis in arXiv:1410.5831 of anisotropic Lifshitz scale anomalies. We consider non-relativistic theories with a dynamical critical exponent z=2 with or without non-relativistic boosts and a particle number symmetry. We distinguish between cases depending on whether the time direction does or does not induce a foliation structure. We analyse both 1+1 and 2+1 spacetime dimensions. In 1+1 dimensions we find no scale anomalies with Galilean boost symmetries. The anomalies in 2+1 dimensions with Galilean boosts and a foliation structure are all B-type and are identical to the Lifshitz case in the purely spatial sector. With Galilean boosts and without a foliation structure we find also an A-type scale anomaly. There is an infinite ladder of B-type anomalies in the absence of a foliation structure with or without Galilean boosts. We discuss the relation between the existence of a foliation structure and the causality of the field theory.

  4. Intestinal vascular anomalies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frémond, B; Yazbeck, S; Dubois, J; Brochu, P; Garel, L; Ouimet, A

    1997-06-01

    Vascular anomalies are an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding in childhood. Confusing nomenclature has made objective comparisons of published cases difficult and has interfered with an established consensus regarding diagnosis and therapeutic modalities. The purpose of this study was to clarify the situation by reviewing the records of all children who had intestinal vascular anomalies who were referred to our institution from 1975 to 1995. Thirteen lesions were identified in nine children (five boys and four girls). The median age at clinical onset was 8 years. Only two patients presented with a complex syndrome (Klippel-Trenaunay, 1; Osler-Rendu-Weber, 1). Diagnosis, location, and extension of these anomalies was only possible by angiography, which indicated that seven patients had isolated venous malformations and two had arteriovenous malformations. Because the lesions did not involve the serosa, intraoperative localization was a major problem. The main findings were a few slightly dilated mesenteric veins. Treatment was conservative in four children and surgical in five. Pathological findings on resected bowel demonstrated dilated and abnormal veins in the mucosa and submucosa. Selective angiography should not be delayed in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding if results of all other investigations are negative. Because these lesions are rarely recognizable on operative inspection, precise preoperative angiographic localization of intestinal vascular anomalies is essential to allow for a safe and limited resection of the involved bowel segment. Based on a better understanding of the natural history of these lesions, a classification of vascular anomalies of intestines in children is proposed.

  5. Origin of conductivity anomalies in the asthenosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, T.; Zhang, B.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical conductivity anomalies with anisotropy parallel to the plate motion have been observed beneath the oceanic lithosphere by electromagnetic studies (e.g., Evans et al., 2005; Baba et al., 2010; Naif et al., 2013). Electrical conductivity of the oceanic asthenosphere at ~100 km depth is very high, about 10-2 to 10-1 S/m. This zone is also known in seismology as the low velocity zone. Since Karato (1990) first suggested that electrical conductivity is sensitive to water content in NAMs, softening of asthenosphere has been regarded as a good indicator for constraining the distribution of water. There are two difficulties to explain the observed conductivity features in the asthenosphere. Recent publications on electrical conductivity of hydrous olivine suggested that olivine with the maximum soluble H2O content at the top of the asthenosphere has much lower conductivity less than 0.1 S/m (e.g., Yoshino et al., 2006; 2009a; Poe et al., 2010; Du Frane and Tyburczy, 2012; Yang, 2012), which is a typical value of conductivity anomaly observed in the oceanic mantle. Partial melting has been considered as an attractive agent for substantially raising the conductivity in this region (Shankland and Waff, 1977), because basaltic melt has greater electrical conductivity (> 100.5 S/m) and high wetting properties. However, dry mantle peridotite cannot reach the solidus temperature at depth 100 km. Volatile components can dramatically reduce melting temperature, even if its amount is very small. Recent studies on conductivity measurement of volatile-bearing melt suggest that conductivity of melt dramatically increases with increasing volatile components (H2O: Ni et al., 2010a, b; CO2: Gaillard et al., 2008; Yoshino et al., 2010; 2012a). Because incipient melt includes higher amount of volatile components, conductivity enhancement by the partial melt is very effective at temperatures just above that of the volatile-bearing peridotite solidus. In this study, the electrical

  6. WFC3 IR subarray anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushouse, Howard

    2009-07-01

    Certain combinations of WFC3 IR subarray size and sample sequence yield images that show a sharp change in background level that exactly bi-sects each detector amplifier quadrant. The change in level has an amplitude of a few DN per pixel. The cause of this anomaly and its apparent correlation with subarray size and sample sequence is not understood. Given the 4 available subarray sizes and 11 available readout sample sequences, there are a total of 44 possible subarray mode readout combinations. To date, 14 of those combinations have been used on-orbit in either calibration and GO programs. Of those, 3 combinations show the anomaly. This program will obtain IR dark exposures in the remaining 30 readout combinations that have not yet been explored. This will add to our knowledge of which combinations show the anomaly and will therefore help us to understand its origin.

  7. Multiple Visceral and Peritoneal Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Prabhu S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Visceral and peritoneal anomalies are frequently encountered during cadaveric dissections and surgical procedures of abdomen. A thorough knowledge of the same is required for the success of diagnostic, surgical and radiological procedures of abdomen. We report multiple peritoneal and visceral anomalies noted during dissection classes for medical undergraduates. The anomalies were found in an adult male cadaver aged approximately 70 years. The right iliac fossa was empty due to the sub-hepatic position of caecum and appendix. The sigmoid colon formed an inverted “U” shaped loop above the sacral promontory in the median position. It entered the pelvis from the right side and descended along the lateral wall of the pelvis. The sigmoid mesocolon was attached obliquely to the posterior abdominal wall, just above the sacral promontory. Further there was a cysto-colic fold of peritoneum extending from the right colic flexure. We discuss the clinical significance of the variations.

  8. Graph anomalies in cyber communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vander Wiel, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandine, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisk, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-11

    Enterprises monitor cyber traffic for viruses, intruders and stolen information. Detection methods look for known signatures of malicious traffic or search for anomalies with respect to a nominal reference model. Traditional anomaly detection focuses on aggregate traffic at central nodes or on user-level monitoring. More recently, however, traffic is being viewed more holistically as a dynamic communication graph. Attention to the graph nature of the traffic has expanded the types of anomalies that are being sought. We give an overview of several cyber data streams collected at Los Alamos National Laboratory and discuss current work in modeling the graph dynamics of traffic over the network. We consider global properties and local properties within the communication graph. A method for monitoring relative entropy on multiple correlated properties is discussed in detail.

  9. Anomalies in Flavour physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chrzaszcz, Marcin Jakub

    2015-01-01

    LHCb is measuring more and more deviations in electroweak penguin measurements, both in the angular observables (like P5') and the branching fractions. Furthermore, there are strong hints of lepton universality breaking in semileptonic decays. This talk aims to present the results of these measurements and the implications for new physics. A result of a global fit will be presented.

  10. Effects of Short-Term Thermal Alteration on Organic Matter in Experimentally-Heated Tagish Lake Observed by Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Nakato, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Nakamura, T.; Kebukawa, Y.; Maisano, J.; Colbert, M.; Martinez, J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites exhibit a wide range of aqueous and thermal alteration characteristics, while some are known to demonstrate mineralogical and petrologic evidence of having been thermally metamorphosed after aqueous alteration. This group of meteorites are commonly referred as thermally met-amorphosed carbonaceous chondrites (TMCCs), and their reflectance spectra show resemblances to that of C-type asteroids which typically have low albedos. This suggests that the surfaces of the C-type asteroids are also composed of both hydrous and dehydrated minerals, and thus TMCCs are among the best samples that can be studied in laboratory to reveal the true nature of the C-type asteroids. Although TMCCs are usually meteorites that were previously categorized as CI and CM chondrites, they are not strictly CI/CM because they exhibit isotopic and petrographic characteristics that significantly deviate from typical CI/CM. More appropriately, they are called CI-like and/or CM-like chondrites. Typical examples of TMCCs include the C2-ung/CM2TIV Belgica (B)-7904 and Yamato (Y) 86720. Thermal alteration is virtually complete in these meteorites and thus they are considered typical end-members of TMCCs exhibiting complete dehydration of matrix phyllosilicates. The estimated heating conditions are 10 to 103 days at 700 C to 1 to 100 hours at 890 C, i.e. short-term heating induced by impact and/or solar radiation. While the petrology and chemistry of TMCCs have only recently been extensively characterized, we have just begun to study in detail their organic contents. In order to understand how short-term heating affects the maturity of insoluble organic matter (IOM) in hydrous chondrites, we investigated experimentally-heated Tagish Lake meteorite using Raman spectroscopy, as the chemical and bulk oxygen isotopic compositions of the matrix of the carbonate (CO3)-poor lithology of the Tagish Lake (hereafter Tag) meteorite bears similarities to the TMCCs.

  11. Residual generator for cardiovascular anomalies detection

    KAUST Repository

    Belkhatir, Zehor

    2014-06-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of using observer-based approaches for cardiovascular anomalies detection and isolation. We consider a lumped parameter model of the cardiovascular system that can be written in a form of nonlinear state-space representation. We show that residuals that are sensitive to variations in some cardiovascular parameters and to abnormal opening and closure of the valves, can be generated. Since the whole state is not easily available for measurement, we propose to associate the residual generator to a robust extended kalman filter. Numerical results performed on synthetic data are provided.

  12. Structure and Transport Anomalies in Soft Colloids

    KAUST Repository

    Srivastava, Samanvaya

    2013-04-01

    Anomalous trends in nanoparticle correlation and motion are reported in soft nanoparticle suspensions using static and dynamic x-ray scattering measurements. Contrary to normal expectations, we find that particle-particle correlations decrease and particle dynamics become faster as volume fraction rises above a critical particle loading associated with overlap. Our observations bear many similarities to the cascade of structural and transport anomalies reported for complex, network forming molecular fluids such as water, and are argued to share similar physical origins. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  13. On cosmological implications of gravitational trace anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilic, Neven [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: bilic@thphys.irb.hr; Guberina, Branko [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: guberina@thphys.irb.hr; Horvat, Raul [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: horvat@lei3.irb.hr; Nikolic, Hrvoje [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: hrvoje@thphys.irb.hr; Stefancic, Hrvoje [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: shrvoje@thphys.irb.hr

    2007-12-06

    We study the infrared effective theory of gravity that stems from the quantum trace anomaly. Quantum fluctuations of the metric induce running of the cosmological constant and the Newton constant at cosmological scales. By imposing the generalized Bianchi identity we obtain a prediction for the scale dependence of the dark matter and dark energy densities in terms of the parameters of the underlying conformal theory. For certain values of the model parameters the dark energy equation of state and the observed spectral index of the primordial density fluctuations can be simultaneously reproduced.

  14. Interpretation of magnetic anomalies using a genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaftan, İlknur

    2017-08-01

    A genetic algorithm (GA) is an artificial intelligence method used for optimization. We applied a GA to the inversion of magnetic anomalies over a thick dike. Inversion of nonlinear geophysical problems using a GA has advantages because it does not require model gradients or well-defined initial model parameters. The evolution process consists of selection, crossover, and mutation genetic operators that look for the best fit to the observed data and a solution consisting of plausible compact sources. The efficiency of a GA on both synthetic and real magnetic anomalies of dikes by estimating model parameters, such as depth to the top of the dike ( H), the half-width of the dike ( B), the distance from the origin to the reference point ( D), the dip of the thick dike ( δ), and the susceptibility contrast ( k), has been shown. For the synthetic anomaly case, it has been considered for both noise-free and noisy magnetic data. In the real case, the vertical magnetic anomaly from the Pima copper mine in Arizona, USA, and the vertical magnetic anomaly in the Bayburt-Sarıhan skarn zone in northeastern Turkey have been inverted and interpreted. We compared the estimated parameters with the results of conventional inversion methods used in previous studies. We can conclude that the GA method used in this study is a useful tool for evaluating magnetic anomalies for dike models.

  15. Frequency of Developmental Dental Anomalies in the Indian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttal, Kruthika S; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Bhargava, Puneet; Bathi, Renuka J

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the frequency of developmental dental anomalies in the Indian population. Methods: This prospective study was conducted over a period of 1 year and comprised both clinical and radiographic examinations in oral medicine and radiology outpatient department. Adult patients were screened for the presence of dental anomalies with appropriate radiographs. A comprehensive clinical examination was performed to detect hyperdontia, talon cusp, fused teeth, gemination, concrescence, hypodontia, dens invaginatus, dens evaginatus, macro- and microdontia and taurodontism. Patients with syndromes were not included in the study. Results: Of the 20,182 patients screened, 350 had dental anomalies. Of these, 57.43% of anomalies occurred in male patients and 42.57% occurred in females. Hyperdontia, root dilaceration, peg-shaped laterals (microdontia), and hypodontia were more frequent compared to other dental anomalies of size and shape. Conclusions: Dental anomalies are clinically evident abnormalities. They may be the cause of various dental problems. Careful observation and appropriate investigations are required to diagnose the condition and institute treatment. PMID:20613914

  16. Anomaly detection in diurnal data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mata, F.; Zuraniewski, P.W.; Mandjes, M.; Mellia, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present methodological advances in anomaly detection tailored to discover abnormal traffic patterns under the presence of seasonal trends in data. In our setup we impose specific assumptions on the traffic type and nature; our study features VoIP call counts, for which several

  17. Extension of magnetic anomaly rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, P. A.

    1982-12-01

    The Moskowitz-Lombardi rule which has established a relationship for magnetic hyperfine-structure anomalies for ten mercury, Z = 80, isotopes and isomers is extended, in the light of new experimental work, to iridium, gold, and thallium, Z = 77, 79, and 81 respectively

  18. PAX6 aniridia and interhemispheric brain anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzeid, Hana; Youssef, Mohamed A; ElShakankiri, Nihal; Hauser, Philippe; Munier, Francis L; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2009-10-17

    To report the clinical and genetic study of patients with autosomal dominant aniridia. We studied ten patients with aniridia from three families of Egyptian origin. All patients underwent full ophthalmologic, general and neurological examination, and blood drawing. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the index case of each family. Genomic DNA was prepared from venous leukocytes, and direct sequencing of all the exons and intron-exon junctions of the Paired Box gene 6 (PAX6) was performed after PCR amplification. Phenotype description, including ophthalmic and cerebral anomalies, mutation detection in PAX6 and phenotype-genotype correlation was acquired. Common features observed in the three families included absence of iris tissue, corneal pannus with different degrees of severity, and foveal hypoplasia with severely reduced visual acuity. In Families 2 and 3, additional findings, such as lens dislocation, lens opacities or polar cataract, and glaucoma, were observed. We identified two novel (c.170-174delTGGGC [p.L57fs17] and c.475delC [p.R159fs47]) and one known (c.718C>T [p.R240X]) PAX6 mutations in the affected members of the three families. Systemic and neurological examination was normal in all ten affected patients. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed absence of the pineal gland in all three index patients. Severe hypoplasia of the brain anterior commissure was associated with the p.L57fs17 mutation, absence of the posterior commissure with p.R159fs47, and optic chiasma atrophy and almost complete agenesis of the corpus callosum with p.R240X. We identified two novel PAX6 mutations in families with severe aniridia. In addition to common phenotype of aniridia and despite normal neurological examination, absence of the pineal gland and interhemispheric brain anomalies were observed in all three index patients. The heterogeneity of PAX6 mutations and brain anomalies are highlighted. This report emphasizes the association between aniridia

  19. Dental anomalies in Didelphis albiventris (Mammalia, Marsupialia, Didelphidae from Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amelia Chemisquy

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Dental anomalies have been investigated and reported for most orders of mammals, including marsupials. Previous works in Didelphis albiventris Lund, 1840 only described one kind of malformation or just a few observations from some collections, thus the type and presence of anomalies for this species was underestimated. The aim of this contribution is to describe and analyze several dental anomalies found in specimens of Didelphis albiventris from Argentina, Uruguay and Brazil. Dental anomalies were classified in three categories: supernumerary or missing teeth, morphological anomalies in size and shape, and teeth in unusual positions. We found 32 individuals of D. albiventris with anomalies out of 393 analyzed specimens (8.14%, some specimens with more than one anomaly. A similar proportion of specimens from Argentina and Uruguay presented anomalies, while in specimens from Brazil anomalies were less common. Anomalies were more commonly found in the upper toothrow and in molars, being supernumerary teeth and molars with unusual crown-shape the most common ones. The percentage of specimens with anomalies found for D. albiventris is higher than previously reported for the species, and other Didelphimorphia. Inbreeding and limited gene flow do not appear as possible explanations for the elevated percentage of anomalies, especially due to the ecological characteristics of Didelphis albiventris. Developmental instability and fluctuating asymmetry could be some of the causes for the anomalies found in this species, mostly since the habitat used by D. albiventris tends to be unstable and disturbed. Dental anomalies were mostly found in areas of the toothrow where occlusion is relaxed or does not prevent teeth from interlocking during mastication, and consequently have no functional value.

  20. CMB anomalies after Planck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Copi, Craig J.; Huterer, Dragan; Starkman, Glenn D.

    2016-09-01

    Several unexpected features have been observed in the microwave sky at large angular scales, both by WMAP and by Planck. Among those features is a lack of both variance and correlation on the largest angular scales, alignment of the lowest multipole moments with one another and with the motion and geometry of the solar system, a hemispherical power asymmetry or dipolar power modulation, a preference for odd parity modes and an unexpectedly large cold spot in the Southern hemisphere. The individual p-values of the significance of these features are in the per mille to per cent level, when compared to the expectations of the best-fit inflationary ΛCDM model. Some pairs of those features are demonstrably uncorrelated, increasing their combined statistical significance and indicating a significant detection of CMB features at angular scales larger than a few degrees on top of the standard model. Despite numerous detailed investigations, we still lack a clear understanding of these large-scale features, which seem to imply a violation of statistical isotropy and scale invariance of inflationary perturbations. In this contribution we present a critical analysis of our current understanding and discuss several ideas of how to make further progress.

  1. Long-Term Volcanic Activity at Shiveluch Volcano: Nine Years of ASTER Spaceborne Thermal Infrared Observations  

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Carter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Shiveluch (Kamchatka, Russia is the most active andesitic volcano of the Kuril-Kamchatka arc, typically exhibiting near-continual high-temperature fumarolic activity and periods of exogenous lava dome emplacement punctuated by discrete large explosive eruptions. These eruptions can produce large pyroclastic flow (PF deposits, which are common on the southern flank of the volcano. Since 2000, six explosive eruptions have occurred that generated ash fall and PF deposits. Over this same time period, the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER instrument has been acquiring image-based visible/near infrared (VNIR, short wave infrared (SWIR and thermal infrared (TIR data globally, with a particular emphasis on active volcanoes. Shiveluch was selected as an ASTER target of interest early in the mission because of its frequent activity and potential impact to northern Pacific air transportation. The north Pacific ASTER archive was queried for Shiveluch data and we present results from 2000 to 2009 that documents three large PF deposits emplaced on 19 May 2001, 9 May 2004, and 28 February 2005. The long-term archive of infrared data provides an excellent record on the changing activity and eruption state of the volcano.

  2. One-dimensional modeling of thermal energy produced in a seismic fault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konga, Guy Pascal; Koumetio, Fidèle; Yemele, David; Olivier Djiogang, Francis

    2017-12-01

    Generally, one observes an anomaly of temperature before a big earthquake. In this paper, we established the expression of thermal energy produced by friction forces between the walls of a seismic fault while considering the dynamic of a one-dimensional spring–block model. It is noted that, before the rupture of a seismic fault, displacements are caused by microseisms. The curves of variation of this thermal energy with time show that, for oscillatory and aperiodic displacement, the thermal energy is accumulated in the same way. The study reveals that thermal energy as well as temperature increases abruptly after a certain amount of time. We suggest that the corresponding time is the start of the anomaly of temperature observed which can be considered as precursory effect of a big seism. We suggest that the thermal energy can heat gases and dilate rocks until they crack. The warm gases can then pass through the cracks towards the surface. The cracks created by thermal energy can also contribute to the rupture of the seismic fault. We also suggest that the theoretical model of thermal energy, produced in seismic fault, associated with a large quantity of experimental data may help in the prediction of earthquakes.

  3. Extending TOPS: Ontology-driven Anomaly Detection and Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votava, P.; Nemani, R. R.; Michaelis, A.

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) is a flexible modeling software system that integrates ecosystem models with frequent satellite and surface weather observations to produce ecosystem nowcasts (assessments of current conditions) and forecasts useful in natural resources management, public health and disaster management. We have been extending the Terrestrial Observation and Prediction System (TOPS) to include a capability for automated anomaly detection and analysis of both on-line (streaming) and off-line data. In order to best capture the knowledge about data hierarchies, Earth science models and implied dependencies between anomalies and occurrences of observable events such as urbanization, deforestation, or fires, we have developed an ontology to serve as a knowledge base. We can query the knowledge base and answer questions about dataset compatibilities, similarities and dependencies so that we can, for example, automatically analyze similar datasets in order to verify a given anomaly occurrence in multiple data sources. We are further extending the system to go beyond anomaly detection towards reasoning about possible causes of anomalies that are also encoded in the knowledge base as either learned or implied knowledge. This enables us to scale up the analysis by eliminating a large number of anomalies early on during the processing by either failure to verify them from other sources, or matching them directly with other observable events without having to perform an extensive and time-consuming exploration and analysis. The knowledge is captured using OWL ontology language, where connections are defined in a schema that is later extended by including specific instances of datasets and models. The information is stored using Sesame server and is accessible through both Java API and web services using SeRQL and SPARQL query languages. Inference is provided using OWLIM component integrated with Sesame.

  4. Electron instability thresholds of solar wind magnetic fluctuations in non-thermal anisotropic kappa distribution plasmas: Survey of Wind-SWE-VEIS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, A. F.; Adrian, M. L.; Moya, P. S.; Wendel, D. E.

    2015-12-01

    The solar wind electron velocity distribution function (eVDF) displays a great variety of non-thermal features (e.g., core, halo and strahl electron populations; with superposition of different temperatures, thermal anisotropies, suprathermal tails, beam-like features, etc.) that deviate from thermal equilibrium. These electron nonthermal deviations provide a local source for whistler-cyclotron and firehose instabilities electromagnetic fluctuations that are commonly observed. We present clear observational evidence that the temperature anisotropy whistler instability threshold, of a nonthermal kappa distribution plasma, marginally bounds solar wind magnetic fluctuations — when the full electron distribution is considered, without regard of separation of the various electron components during slow solar wind periods. Analysis seems to suggest that during slow solar wind periods, collisional effects are dominant. During fast solar wind periods, magnetic fluctuations and solar wind anisotropies are enhanced above the parallel whistler anisotropic threshold boundary and collisional effects are drastically reduced. Preliminary calculations further show that the oblique electron whistler mirror anisotropic instability bounds both the slow and fast solar wind. Regardless of solar wind speed, the solar wind electron thermal anisotropy appears globally bounded by the parallel electron firehose instability for anisotropies Te⊥ / Te|| < 1 indicative of a firehose-stable electron plasma. Preliminary analysis suggests that skew-kappa nonthermal distributions also shows marginally stable threshold boundaries when considering electron heat flux instability thresholds. The results of our analysis suggests that the slow solar wind electron plasma, when considered globally as a single eVDF, is only marginally stable with respect to nonthermal skew kappa distributions and parallel propagating instabilities.

  5. Mesozoic anomalies in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Nair, R.R.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Ramprasad, T.; Krishna, K.S.; Subrahmanyam, V.; D'Cruz, M.; Subrahmanyam, C.; Paul, J.; Subrahmanyam, A.S.; Sekhar, D.V.C.

    The analysis of 8200 line km of total magnetic intensity data in the Bay of Bengal, northeastern Indian Ocean, revealed the presence of approximately N30~'E-trending seafloor spreading type magnetic anomalies. These anomalies resemble the Mesozoic...

  6. Diffuse Oceanic Plate Boundaries, Plate Non-Rigidity, True Polar Wander, and Motion Between Hotspots: Results From Investigations of Marine Magnetic Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R. G.

    2009-05-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading record reversals of Earth's magnetic field and the orientation of the paleomagnetic field. They can be used to make precise estimates of relative plate motion and of the apparent polar wander of oceanic plates. In this talk I will present the results of several studies that include analyses of marine magnetic anomalies. A new set of geologically current relative plate angular velocities, termed MORVEL, has been determined in part from 1696 rates of seafloor spreading estimated from marine magnetic anomalies (DeMets, Gordon, & Argus 2009). The MORVEL set of angular velocities supersede those of NUVEL-1A (DeMets et al. 1994). A new feature of MORVEL is the assumed existence of many diffuse oceanic plate boundaries, such as that between the Indian and Capricorn plates. An important result from MORVEL is that several plate circuits fail closure, that is, the relative plate angular velocities summed around the circuit differ significantly from zero as would be expected if all the plates are rigid. Thus, it appears that at least some plates are not rigid. The most dramatic example of plate circuit non-closure is for the Pacific-Nazca-Cocos plate circuit, which encloses the Galapagos triple junction and fails to close by a stunning 14 ± 5 mm/yr (95% confidence limits). Part of the observed non-rigidity is likely due to predictable horizontal thermal contraction as oceanic lithosphere cools and subsides (Kumar & Gordon 2009). I will present simple illustrations of the velocity field within a plate expected from horizontal thermal contraction and speculate on how it may relate to observed plate circuit non-closures. The shapes of magnetic anomalies due to seafloor spreading contain valuable information about the location of the paleomagnetic pole, especially for the Pacific plate for which oriented rock samples are scarce. Particularly useful are Pacific-Farallon magnetic anomaly crossings near the paleo-equator. I use

  7. The thermal structure of the Venus atmosphere: Intercomparison of Venus Express and ground based observations of vertical temperature and density profiles✰

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.; Lebonnois, Sebastien; Mahieux, Arnaud; Pätzold, Martin; Bougher, Steven; Bruinsma, Sean; Chamberlain, Sarah; Clancy, R. Todd; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Gilli, Gabriella; Grassi, Davide; Haus, Rainer; Herrmann, Maren; Imamura, Takeshi; Kohler, Erika; Krause, Pia; Migliorini, Alessandra; Montmessin, Franck; Pere, Christophe; Persson, Moa; Piccialli, Arianna; Rengel, Miriam; Rodin, Alexander; Sandor, Brad; Sornig, Manuela; Svedhem, Håkan; Tellmann, Silvia; Tanga, Paolo; Vandaele, Ann C.; Widemann, Thomas; Wilson, Colin F.; Müller-Wodarg, Ingo; Zasova, Ludmila

    2017-09-01

    The Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) model contains tabulated values of temperature and number densities obtained by the experiments on the Venera entry probes, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and multi-probe missions in the 1980s. The instruments on the recent Venus Express orbiter mission generated a significant amount of new observational data on the vertical and horizontal structure of the Venus atmosphere from 40 km to about 180 km altitude from April 2006 to November 2014. Many ground based experiments have provided data on the upper atmosphere (90-130 km) temperature structure since the publication of VIRA in 1985. The "Thermal Structure of the Venus Atmosphere" Team was supported by the International Space Studies Institute (ISSI), Bern, Switzerland, from 2013 to 2015 in order to combine and compare the ground-based observations and the VEx observations of the thermal structure as a first step towards generating an updated VIRA model. Results of this comparison are presented in five latitude bins and three local time bins by assuming hemispheric symmetry. The intercomparison of the ground-based and VEx results provides for the first time a consistent picture of the temperature and density structure in the 40 km-180 km altitude range. The Venus Express observations have considerably increased our knowledge of the Venus atmospheric thermal structure above ∼40 km and provided new information above 100 km. There are, however, still observational gaps in latitude and local time above certain regions. Considerable variability in the temperatures and densities is seen above 100 km but certain features appear to be systematically present, such as a succession of warm and cool layers. Preliminary modeling studies support the existence of such layers in agreement with a global scale circulation. The intercomparison focuses on average profiles but some VEx experiments provide sufficient global coverage to identify solar thermal tidal components. The differences

  8. Fetal renal anomalies : diagnosis, management, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen-Elias, Henrica Antonia Maria

    2004-01-01

    In two to three percent of fetuses structural anomalies can be found with prenatal ultrasound investigation. Anomalies of the urinary tract account for 15 to 20% of these anomalies with a detection rate of approximately of 90%. In Chapter 2, 3 and 4 we present reference curves for size and growth

  9. Anomaly Monitoring Method for Key Components of Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Peng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented a fault diagnosis method for key components of satellite, called Anomaly Monitoring Method (AMM, which is made up of state estimation based on Multivariate State Estimation Techniques (MSET and anomaly detection based on Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT. On the basis of analysis failure of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs, we divided the failure of LIBs into internal failure, external failure, and thermal runaway and selected electrolyte resistance (Re and the charge transfer resistance (Rct as the key parameters of state estimation. Then, through the actual in-orbit telemetry data of the key parameters of LIBs, we obtained the actual residual value (RX and healthy residual value (RL of LIBs based on the state estimation of MSET, and then, through the residual values (RX and RL of LIBs, we detected the anomaly states based on the anomaly detection of SPRT. Lastly, we conducted an example of AMM for LIBs, and, according to the results of AMM, we validated the feasibility and effectiveness of AMM by comparing it with the results of threshold detective method (TDM.

  10. Automated anomaly detection for Orbiter High Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Eric G.; Jones, Sharon M.; Goode, Plesent W.; Vazquez, Sixto L.

    1992-01-01

    The description, analysis, and experimental results of a method for identifying possible defects on High Temperature Reusable Surface Insulation (HRSI) of the Orbiter Thermal Protection System (TPS) is presented. Currently, a visual postflight inspection of Orbiter TPS is conducted to detect and classify defects as part of the Orbiter maintenance flow. The objective of the method is to automate the detection of defects by identifying anomalies between preflight and postflight images of TPS components. The initial version is intended to detect and label gross (greater than 0.1 inches in the smallest dimension) anomalies on HRSI components for subsequent classification by a human inspector. The approach is a modified Golden Template technique where the preflight image of a tile serves as the template against which the postflight image of the tile is compared. Candidate anomalies are selected as a result of the comparison and processed to identify true anomalies. The processing methods are developed and discussed, and the results of testing on actual and simulated tile images are presented. Solutions to the problems of brightness and spatial normalization, timely execution, and minimization of false positives are also discussed.

  11. Cerium anomaly at microscale in fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Bertrand, Loïc

    2015-09-01

    Patterns in rare earth element (REE) concentrations are essential instruments to assess geochemical processes in Earth and environmental sciences. Excursions in the "cerium anomaly" are widely used to inform on past redox conditions in sediments. This proxy resources to the specificity of cerium to adopt both the +III and +IV oxidation states, while most rare earths are purely trivalent and share very similar reactivity and transport properties. In practical terms, the level of cerium anomaly is established through elemental point quantification and profiling. All these models rely on a supposed homogeneity of the cerium oxidation state within the samples. However, this has never been demonstrated, whereas the cerium concentration can significantly vary within a sample, as shown for fossils, which would vastly complicate interpretation of REE patterns. Here, we report direct micrometric mapping of Ce speciation through synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and production of local rare earth patterns in paleontological fossil tissues through X-ray fluorescence mapping. The sensitivity of the approach is demonstrated on well-preserved fishes and crustaceans from the Late Cretaceous (ca. 95 million years (Myr) old). The presence of Ce under the +IV form within the fossil tissues is attributed to slightly oxidative local conditions of burial and agrees well with the limited negative cerium anomaly observed in REE patterns. The [Ce(IV)]/[Ce(tot)] ratio appears remarkably stable at the microscale within each fossil and is similar between fossils from the locality. Speciation maps were obtained from an original combination of synchrotron microbeam X-ray fluorescence, absorption spectroscopy, and diffraction, together with light and electron microscopy. This work also highlights the need for more systematic studies of cerium geochemistry at the microscale in paleontological contexts, in particular across fossil histologies.

  12. Expanding the spectrum of human ganglionic eminence region anomalies on fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Righini, Andrea; Parazzini, Cecilia; Izzo, Giana [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Cesaretti, Claudia [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Medical Genetics Unit, Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy); Conte, Giorgio [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); Frassoni, Carolina; Inverardi, Francesca [Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Istituto Neurologico ' ' C. Besta' ' , Clinical Epileptology and Experimental Neurophysiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Bulfamante, Gaetano; Avagliano, Laura [San Paolo Hospital, Division of Human Pathology, Milan (Italy); Rustico, Mariangela [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Prenatal Diagnosis, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Ganglionic eminence (GE) is a transient fetal brain structure that harvests a significant amount of precursors of cortical GABA-ergic interneurons. Prenatal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of GE anomalies (i.e., cavitations) have already been reported associated with severe micro-lissencephaly. The purpose of this report was to illustrate the MR imaging features of GE anomalies in conditions other than severe micro-lissencephalies. Among all the fetuses submitted to prenatal MR imaging at our center from 2005 to 2014, we collected eight cases with GE anomalies and only limited associated brain anomalies. The median gestational age at the time of MR imaging was 21 weeks ranging from 19 to 29 weeks. Two senior pediatric neuroradiologists categorized the anomalies of the GE region in two groups: group one showing cavitation in the GE region and group two showing enlarged GE region. For each fetal case, associated cranial anomalies were also reported. Five out of the eight cases were included in group one and three in group two. Besides the GE region abnormality, all eight cases had additional intracranial anomalies, such as mild partial callosal agenesis, vermian hypoplasia and rotation, cerebellar hypoplasia, ventriculomegaly, enlarged subarachnoid spaces, molar tooth malformation. Ultrasound generally detected most of the associated intracranial anomalies, prompting the MR investigation; on the contrary in none of the cases, GE anomalies had been detected by ultrasound. Our observation expands the spectrum of human GE anomalies, demonstrating that these may take place also without associated severe micro-lissencephalies. (orig.)

  13. Holomorphic anomaly and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codesido, Santiago; Mariño, Marcos

    2018-02-01

    We show that the all-orders WKB periods of one-dimensional quantum mechanical oscillators are governed by the refined holomorphic anomaly equations of topological string theory. We analyze in detail the double-well potential and the cubic and quartic oscillators, and we calculate the WKB expansion of their quantum free energies by using the direct integration of the anomaly equations. We reproduce in this way all known results about the quantum periods of these models, which we express in terms of modular forms on the WKB curve. As an application of our results, we study the large order behavior of the WKB expansion in the case of the double well, which displays the double factorial growth typical of string theory.

  14. Survey of Anomaly Detection Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, B

    2006-10-12

    This survey defines the problem of anomaly detection and provides an overview of existing methods. The methods are categorized into two general classes: generative and discriminative. A generative approach involves building a model that represents the joint distribution of the input features and the output labels of system behavior (e.g., normal or anomalous) then applies the model to formulate a decision rule for detecting anomalies. On the other hand, a discriminative approach aims directly to find the decision rule, with the smallest error rate, that distinguishes between normal and anomalous behavior. For each approach, we will give an overview of popular techniques and provide references to state-of-the-art applications.

  15. Interpretation of the Isabella High Wave-Speed Anomaly as the Partially Delaminated High-Density Root of the Southern Sierra Nevada Batholith, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleeby, J.; Le Pourhiet, L.

    2012-12-01

    High resolution tomography of the Sierra Nevada Earthscope Project (Reeg, 2008 & Jones et al., 2012) shows that the core area of the Isabella anomaly (Vp+4-6%) resembles a prolate antiformal slab that plunges steeply SE into the upper mantle to ~200 km depth, extending down from a zone of lower crustal attachment that runs along the southwestern Sierra Nevada and adjacent eastern San Joaquin basin. Receiver function, refraction and tomography also show that areas to the east and south of lower crustal attachment consist of ascended asthenosphere lying directly beneath tectonized Moho. The lower-velocity envelope of the anomaly (Vp+1-4%) extends to 250-300 km depths and covers cross-sectional areas locally in excess of 2x of the higher Vp core. We have leveraged lithospheric structure and geologic history against thermal-mechanical modeling in pursuit of an integrated story for the physical and geologic processes that are governing the development of the anomaly. Initial structure is constrained by mantle xenoliths, differentially exhumed lower crustal exposures, and deep cores in the basin. The initial state further recognizes that: 1. the sub-Sierra Nevada batholith mantle lithosphere, including a substantial thickness (35-40 km) of eclogitic (arclogite) cumulates that were produced during high magma flux arc activity, was cooled to a conductive geotherm by flat slab subduction at the end of the Cretaceous; and 2. the gravitationally metastable mantle lithosphere was thermally mobilized from beneath in the Neogene by the opening of a slab window, which also imposed a state of modest regional extension. We have resolved a class of models that successfully predicts the structure of the anomaly, the timing and kinematics of related lithospheric separation and focused extensional tectonism, the timing and source characteristics of related volcanism, and the spatial/temporal patterns of observed subsidence and uplift transients. A general aspect of most of our model

  16. Parity anomaly in four dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkov, M.; Vassilevich, D.

    2017-07-01

    In an analogy to the odd-dimensional case we define the parity anomaly as the part of the one-loop effective action for fermions associated with spectral asymmetry of the Dirac operator. This quantity is computed directly on four-dimensional manifolds with a boundary and related to the Chern-Simons current on the boundary. Despite a quite unusual Chern-Simons level obtained, the action is gauge invariant and passes all consistency checks.

  17. Bifid rib: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythili Krishnan Rathinasabapathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of the bifid rib was found during routine bone study. The distal part of the osseous rib bifurcated into two divisions with an angle of 60°. Both divisions had their own costal cartilage. Bifid rib is a congenital abnormality of the rib cage and usually asymptomatic, often discovered incidentally on chest X-ray. Effects of this neuroskeletal anomaly can include respiratory difficulties and neurological limitations.

  18. Entanglement entropy and anomaly inflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Taylor L.; Leigh, Robert G.; Parrikar, Onkar; Ramamurthy, Srinidhi T.

    2016-03-01

    We study entanglement entropy for parity-violating (time-reversal breaking) quantum field theories on R1 ,2 in the presence of a domain wall between two distinct parity-odd phases. The domain wall hosts a 1 +1 -dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) with nontrivial chiral central charge. Such a CFT possesses gravitational anomalies. It has been shown recently that, as a consequence, its intrinsic entanglement entropy is sensitive to Lorentz boosts around the entangling surface. Here, we show using various methods that the entanglement entropy of the three-dimensional bulk theory is also sensitive to such boosts owing to parity-violating effects, and that the bulk response to a Lorentz boost precisely cancels the contribution coming from the domain wall CFT. We argue that this can naturally be interpreted as entanglement inflow (i.e., inflow of entanglement entropy analogous to the familiar Callan-Harvey effect) between the bulk and the domain-wall, mediated by the low-lying states in the entanglement spectrum. These results can be generally applied to 2 +1 -d topological phases of matter that have edge theories with gravitational anomalies, and provide a precise connection between the gravitational anomaly of the physical edge theory and the low-lying spectrum of the entanglement Hamiltonian.

  19. Anomaly mediation in superstring theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlon, Joseph P. [Rudolf Peierls Center for Theoretical Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Balliol College, Oxford (United Kingdom); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Palti, Eran [Centre de Physique Theoretique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2010-08-15

    We study anomaly mediated supersymmetry breaking in type IIB string theory and use our results to test the supergravity formula for anomaly mediated gaugino masses. We compute 1-loop gaugino masses for models of D3-branes on orbifold singularities with 3-form fluxes by calculating the annulus correlator of 3-form flux and two gauginos in the zero momentum limit. Consistent with supergravity expectations we find both anomalous and running contributions to 1-loop gaugino masses. For background Neveu-Schwarz H-flux we find an exact match with the supergravity formula. For Ramond-Ramond flux there is an off-shell ambiguity that precludes a full matching. The anomaly mediated gaugino masses, while determined by the infrared spectrum, arise from an explicit sum over UV open string winding modes. We also calculate brane-to-brane tree-level gravity mediated gaugino masses and show that there are two contributions coming from the dilaton and from the twisted modes, which are suppressed by the full T{sup 6} volume and the untwisted T{sup 2} volume respectively. (orig.)

  20. Magnetic satellite anomalies and tectonostratigraphic terranes over Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Quintero, E.; Campos-Enríquez, O.

    2003-04-01

    Satellite magnetic data from Magsat are described and correlated with surface or near surface magnetic studies between 10° and 35° north latitude and 85° and 120° west longitude. Mexico is featured by six satellite regional magnetic anomalies. Based in such results we made a detailed description of these magnetic anomalies (geographic extension, intensity, polarity). In order to approach our goal, filtering and enhancement of magnetic features were made (i.e., reduction to the pole, first and second vertical derivatives) resulting some maps where such features appear more clear. A first attempt to correlate these data with other studies such as gravimetry, geology, seismicity, heat flow, available in Mexico were developed in order to have a more basis to infer their origin. We found in some areas a high correlation between tectonostratigraphic Mexican terranes and magnetic satellite anomalies. According to our study there is evidence of magnetic material in the crust along the Gulf of Mexico coast plains with a degree of correlation with north Mayan terrane. Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB) is divided in a more magnetic area to the east with a thick crust and low heat flow, meanwhile the west part is less magnetic with a thinner crust and high heat flow. Cochimi (ultramafic), Pericu and Yuma terranes are correlated with a magnetic anomaly to the south of Baja California peninsula. Magnetic anomaly observed in the Gulf of Mexico is well correlated with oceanic crust. Maya terrane is composed by magnetic crust. Likewise Mohave-Sonora Megashear seems to be southern limit of an anomaly located in the west part of Texas. The South of the studied area points that Mixteco, Zapoteco and Cuicateco terranes are underlied with magnetic material. Anomalies in Baja California peninsula and Middle America Trench, could be associated with pieces of the extinct oceanic Farallon plate. Our results seem to correlate with the existence of Oaxaquia terrane. Finally we present

  1. Ebstein's anomaly may be caused by mutations in the sarcomere protein gene MYH7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engelen, K; Postma, A V; van de Meerakker, J B A; Roos-Hesselink, J W; Helderman-van den Enden, A T J M; Vliegen, H W; Rahman, T; Baars, M J H; Sels, J-W; Bauer, U; Pickardt, T; Sperling, S R; Moorman, A F M; Keavney, B; Goodship, J; Klaassen, S; Mulder, B J M

    2013-03-01

    Ebstein's anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation characterised by adherence of the septal and posterior leaflets of the tricuspid valve to the underlying myocardium. Associated abnormalities of left ventricular morphology and function including left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) have been observed. An association between Ebstein's anomaly with LVNC and mutations in the sarcomeric protein gene MYH7, encoding β-myosin heavy chain, has been shown by recent studies. This might represent a specific subtype of Ebstein's anomaly with a Mendelian inheritance pattern. In this review we discuss the association of MYH7 mutations with Ebstein's anomaly and LVNC and its implications for the clinical care for patients and their family members.

  2. Airborne detection of magnetic anomalies associated with soils on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, W.E.; Beard, L.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Helm, J.M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1995-04-01

    Reconnaissance airborne geophysical data acquired over the 35,000-acre Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), TN, show several magnetic anomalies over undisturbed areas mapped as Copper Ridge Dolomite (CRD). The anomalies of interest are most apparent in magnetic gradient maps where they exceed 0.06 nT/m and in some cases exceed 0.5 nT/m. Anomalies as large as 25nT are seen on maps. Some of the anomalies correlate with known or suspected karst, or with apparent conductivity anomalies calculated from electromagnetic data acquired contemporaneously with the magnetic data. Some of the anomalies have a strong correlation with topographic lows or closed depressions. Surface magnetic data have been acquired over some of these sites and have confirmed the existence of the anomalies. Ground inspections in the vicinity of several of the anomalies has not led to any discoveries of manmade surface materials of sufficient size to generate the observed anomalies. One would expect an anomaly of approximately 1 nT for a pickup truck from 200 ft altitude. Typical residual magnetic anomalies have magnitudes of 5--10 nT, and some are as large as 25nT. The absence of roads or other indications of culture (past or present) near the anomalies and the modeling of anomalies in data acquired with surface instruments indicate that man-made metallic objects are unlikely to be responsible for the anomaly. The authors show that observed anomalies in the CRD can reasonably be associated with thickening of the soil layer. The occurrence of the anomalies in areas where evidences of karstification are seen would follow because sediment deposition would occur in topographic lows. Linear groups of anomalies on the maps may be associated with fracture zones which were eroded more than adjacent rocks and were subsequently covered with a thicker blanket of sediment. This study indicates that airborne magnetic data may be of use in other sites where fracture zones or buried collapse structures are of interest.

  3. Interrogating the Isabella Anomaly with the Central California Seismic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Dougherty, S. L.; Clayton, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Isabella positive velocity anomaly is located in the uppermost mantle beneath the Great Valley of Central California ( 36°N) and was first recognized by seismic tomography efforts in 1980. The geologic interpretation of this feature remains contentious however. The conventional interpretation is that the anomaly is related to the delamination of a dense mafic root associated with the formation of the Sierra Nevada batholith which lies to the east. Alternatively, the anomaly has been interpreted as a fossil slab fragment associated with the stalled subduction of the Monterey microplate which lies offshore. One of the challenges in interpreting the Isabella anomaly is the relatively poor resolution due to a lack of seismic data in and around the Great Valley. To help further constrain the subsurface structure in this region, we deployed a dense line of 40 broadband seismometers in Central California stretching from the Sierra foothills to the coast that recorded data during 2013-2015. Here we report on our on-going research efforts which include body and surface wave tomography as well as scattered wave imaging derived from P and S wave receiver functions. The most prominent feature observed in the receiver function imaging is a high amplitude crustal discontinuity which is observed over 80 km distance. This westward dipping feature begins near the surface beneath the Sierra foothills and reaches 25 km depth beneath the Great Valley. We speculate that this feature represents the top of a high velocity ophiolite body that underlies most of the Great Valley. Receiver functions also suggest the presence of eastward dipping velocity discontinuities in the uppermost mantle (40-80 km) below the western Great Valley. Body wave travel-time measurements indicate that the Isabella anomaly extends west to beneath the coastal range. These observations support the hypothesis that the Isabella anomaly is a slab fragment rather than a piece of delaminating lithosphere.

  4. Algorithms for Anomaly Detection - Lecture 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The concept of statistical anomalies, or outliers, has fascinated experimentalists since the earliest attempts to interpret data. We want to know why some data points don’t seem to belong with the others: perhaps we want to eliminate spurious or unrepresentative data from our model. Or, the anomalies themselves may be what we are interested in: an outlier could represent the symptom of a disease, an attack on a computer network, a scientific discovery, or even an unfaithful partner. We start with some general considerations, such as the relationship between clustering and anomaly detection, the choice between supervised and unsupervised methods, and the difference between global and local anomalies. Then we will survey the most representative anomaly detection algorithms, highlighting what kind of data each approach is best suited to, and discussing their limitations. We will finish with a discussion of the difficulties of anomaly detection in high-dimensional data and some new directions for anomaly detec...

  5. Algorithms for Anomaly Detection - Lecture 1

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The concept of statistical anomalies, or outliers, has fascinated experimentalists since the earliest attempts to interpret data. We want to know why some data points don’t seem to belong with the others: perhaps we want to eliminate spurious or unrepresentative data from our model. Or, the anomalies themselves may be what we are interested in: an outlier could represent the symptom of a disease, an attack on a computer network, a scientific discovery, or even an unfaithful partner. We start with some general considerations, such as the relationship between clustering and anomaly detection, the choice between supervised and unsupervised methods, and the difference between global and local anomalies. Then we will survey the most representative anomaly detection algorithms, highlighting what kind of data each approach is best suited to, and discussing their limitations. We will finish with a discussion of the difficulties of anomaly detection in high-dimensional data and some new directions for anomaly detec...

  6. Stillbirth and congenital anomalies in migrants in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Gundlund, Anna; Villadsen, Sarah Fredsted

    2016-01-01

    The risk of giving birth to a stillborn child or a child with severe congenital anomaly is higher for women who have immigrated to Europe as compared to the majority population in the receiving country. The literature, however, reveals great differences between migrant groups, even within migrants...... disparity is a result of the socioeconomic disadvantage most migrants face. Consanguinity has been considered as another cause for the increased stillbirth risk and the high risk of congenital anomaly observed in many migrant groups. Utilization and quality of care during pregnancy and childbirth...

  7. Bilateral anomalies of renal pelves presenting with supernumerary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current observation presents a case of right duplicated renal pelvis and anomalies of right and left renal vessels. The duplicated pelves formed anterior and posterior segments which entered the renal substance separately and each had its own set of renal major calyces. The anterior segment appeared dilated, ...

  8. Seafloor spreading magnetic anomalies in the southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; Rao, D.G.

    the pre-existing oceanic crust. DSDP Site 221 is observed to be located on the reversely magnetized oceanic crust between anomalies 22 and 21 which provide a reliable age constraint (48 Myr) for the oceanic crust at this site. The presence of additional...

  9. Massive pions, anomalies and baryons in holographic QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, O. [Departament de Fisica and IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Panico, G., E-mail: panico@phys.ethz.c [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Wulzer, A. [Institut de Theorie des Phenomenes Physiques, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-03-01

    We consider a holographic model of QCD, obtained by a very simple modification of the original construction, which describes at the same time the pion mass, the QCD anomalies and the baryons as topological solitons. We study in detail its phenomenological implications in both the mesonic and baryonic sectors and compare with the observations.

  10. The flyby anomaly : An investigation into potential causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jouannic, B.; Noomen, R.; Van den IJssel, J.A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Since December 1990, a number of spacecraft have performed a flyby around Earth in which an unexpected change in velocity has been observed, which has not been explained so far: the so-called flyby anomaly. The effect on the excess velocity has been expressed in an empirical relation by Anderson,

  11. Observations of NEAs at Arecibo Observatory and NASA's IRTF: Combining Radar and Thermal Measurements to Better Understand NEA Physical Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolan, Michael C.; Vervack, R. J.; Howell, E. S.; Magri, C.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Taylor, P. A.; Mueller, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Benner, L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    As we sample ever-smaller sizes of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), we see an increasing variation in the range of physical properties. Radar experiments show a diverse range of shapes, surface features, and rotation states among NEAs. Infrared observations of these objects are equally varied,

  12. Influence of Component Temperature Derivation from Dual Angle Thermal Infrared Observations on TSEB Flux Estimates Over an Irrigated Vineyard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Ana; Timmermans, Wim J.; Skokovic, Drazen; Gonzalez-Dugo, Maria P.

    2015-12-01

    A two-source model for deriving surface energy fluxes and their soil and canopy components was evaluated using multi-angle airborne observations. In the original formulation (TSEB1), a single temperature observation, Priestley—Taylor parameterization and the vegetation fraction are used to derive the component fluxes. When temperature observations are made from different angles, soil and canopy temperatures can be extracted directly. Two dual angle model versions are compared versus TSEB1: one incorporating the Priestley—Taylor parameterization (TSEB2I) and one using the component temperatures directly (TSEB2D), for which data from airborne campaigns over an agricultural area in Spain are used. Validation of TSEB1 versus ground measurements showed RMSD values of 28 and 10 Wm-2 for sensible and latent heat fluxes, respectively. Reasonable agreement between TSEB1 and TSEB2I was found, but a rather low correlation between TSEB1 and TSEB2D was observed. The TSEB2D estimates appear to be more realistic under the given conditions.

  13. The 55 K specific heat anomaly in palladium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, N.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A specific heat anomaly in PdH and PdD has been observed by Aston et al. (1957) close to 55 K. Its position was found to be independent of hydrogen concentration and its magnitude to be linear in hydrogen concentration. Ferguson's (1965) and Brodowsky's (1972) explanations of the anomaly are shown to be unsatisfactory. This is true also for the detailed mechanical statistical model proposed by Staford and McLellan (1974) for interstitial solid solutions of hydrogen in transition metals. It is shown that Gopal's (1966) simple Schottky model of specific heat anomaly, which considers a system of several levels with Boltzmann statistics, provides much better agreement with experiment than the more elaborate models, both in magnitude and in predicting a linear dependence on hydrogen concentration.

  14. Developmental anomalies: Mutational consequence of mouse zygote exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Generoso, W.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Rutledge, J.C. (Children' s Hospital and Medical Center, Seattle, WA (USA). Dept. of Labs.); Aronson, J. (Wistar Inst. of Anatomy and Biology, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1989-01-01

    One of the objectives of mutagenesis research in mice is to enrich our knowledge of basic mammalian biology. The practical goal is to apply this knowledge to the problems of human health. The research described here exemplifies this philosophy. The observation that certain mutagens induced high incidences of fetal anomalies and death following exposure during the zygote stage is a new phenomenon in mutagenesis and experimental embryopathy. The mechanism for the induction of zygote-derived anomalies appears to be genetic, but it is not of the conventional type. These zygote-derived anomalies resemble the large class of stillbirths and sporadic defects in humans that are of unknown etiology. The zygote research in mice presents an opportunity for studying the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of this class of defects. 12 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. XMM-Newton observations of the non-thermal supernova remnant HESS J1731-347 (G353.6-0.7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshenko, V.; Pühlhofer, G.; Bamba, A.; Acero, F.; Tian, W. W.; Klochkov, D.; Santangelo, A.

    2017-12-01

    We report on the analysis of XMM-Newton observations of the non-thermal shell-type supernova remnant HESS J1731-347 (G353.6-0.7). For the first time the complete remnant shell has been covered in X-rays, which allowed direct comparison with radio and TeV observations. We carried out a spatially resolved spectral analysis of XMM-Newton data and confirmed the previously reported non-thermal power-law X-ray spectrum of the source with negligible variations of spectral index across the shell. On the other hand, the X-ray absorption column is strongly variable and correlates with the CO emission thus confirming that the absorbing material must be in the foreground and reinforcing the previously suggested lower limit on distance. Finally, we find that the X-ray emission of the remnant is suppressed towards the Galactic plane, which points to lower shock velocities in this region, likely due to the interaction of the shock with the nearby molecular cloud.

  16. On observation of the downconversion mechanism in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped tellurite glass using thermal and optical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, M.S.; Santos, F.A. [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, Faculdade de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologias, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Yukimitu, K.; Moraes, J.C.S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista, UNESP, Departamento de Física e Química, Av. Brasil, 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Nunes, L.A.O. [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 369, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Andrade, L.H.C. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Óptica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, Cidade Universitária de Dourados, CP 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil); Lima, S.M., E-mail: smlima@uems.br [Grupo de Espectroscopia Óptica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, Cidade Universitária de Dourados, CP 351, Dourados, MS (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    In this work we report the observed downconversion (DC) mechanism in Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+}-codoped tellurite glasses (in mol%, 80TeO{sub 2}–10Li{sub 2}O–10TiO{sub 2}). The samples were synthesized by the conventional melt-quenching method and then studied using optical spectroscopy and thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). These characterizations enabled investigation of the radiative and nonradiative processes involved in energy transfer from erbium to ytterbium. The visible Er{sup 3+} fluorescence intensities decreased as a function of the Yb{sup 3+} concentration, and there was a corresponding increase in the ytterbium emission at around 980 nm. Simultaneously, there was a reduction in the heat-generated due nonradiative decays (∼21%) when ytterbium was added. This temperature change was measured by TLS measurements and the results corroborate with the indicated by spectroscopic interpretation. - Highlights: • Energy transfer from erbium to ytterbium in tellurite glass. • ∼56% of cross-relaxation efficiency from Er{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+}. • Downconversion effect in tellurite glasses. • Downconversion effect observation by thermal lens spectroscopy.

  17. Shear wave velocity, seismic attenuation, and thermal structure of the continental upper mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemieva, I.M.; Billien, M.; Leveque, J.-J.; Mooney, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic velocity and attenuation anomalies in the mantle are commonly interpreted in terms of temperature variations on the basis of laboratory studies of elastic and anelastic properties of rocks. In order to evaluate the relative contributions of thermal and non-thermal effects on anomalies of attenuation of seismic shear waves, QS-1, and seismic velocity, VS, we compare global maps of the thermal structure of the continental upper mantle with global QS-1 and Vs maps as determined from Rayleigh waves at periods between 40 and 150 S. We limit the comparison to three continental mantle depths (50, 100 and 150 km), where model resolution is relatively high. The available data set does not indicate that, at a global scale, seismic anomalies in the upper mantle are controlled solely by temperature variations. Continental maps have correlation coefficients of seismic and thermal anomalies of the opposite sign. The strongest inverse correlation is found at a depth of 100 km, where the attenuation model is best resolved. Significantly, at this depth, the contours of near-zero QS anomalies approximately correspond to the 1000 ??C isotherm, in agreement with laboratory measurements that show a pronounced increase in seismic attenuation in upper mantle rocks at 1000-1100 ??C. East-west profiles of VS, QS and T where continental data coverage is best (50??N latitude for North America and 60??N latitude for Eurasia) further demonstrate that temperature plays a dominant, but non-unique, role in determining the value of lithospheric VS and QS. At 100 km depth, where the resolution of seismic models is the highest, we compare observed seismic VS and QS with theoretical VST and QST values, respectively, that are calculated solely from temperature anomalies and constrained by experimental data on temperature dependencies of velocity and attenuation. This comparison shows that temperature variations alone are sufficient to explain seismic VS and QS in ca 50 per cent of continental

  18. High-resolution spectroscopy of 32P . (II). Level density and primary transition strengths observed after thermal neutron capture in 31P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, S.; Winter, Ch.; Lieb, K. P.; Krusche, B.; Robinson, S.; Von Egidy, T.

    1989-09-01

    The -γ-ray spectrum emitted after thermal neutron capture in 31P was studied at the ILL high flux reactor with a pair spectrometer and an intrinsic Ge detector. A total of 212 transitions were assigned to the decay of 32P and 155 of these, representing 96.7% of the observed flux, were placed in a level scheme of 38 states. The neutron binding energy was determined as 7935.74 (16) keV. The densities of states observed in this reaction and in a recent (d, p) study are analyzed in the constant temperature Fermi-gas model. The primary E1 and M1 transition strengths in 32P are discussed and are compared to other sd-shell nuclei.

  19. Analysis of pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies before the global M = 7.0+ earthquakes in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. F. Peng

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies that occurred before the global M = 7.0+ earthquakes in 2010 are investigated using the total electron content (TEC from the global ionosphere map (GIM. We analyze the possible causes of the ionospheric anomalies based on the space environment and magnetic field status. Results show that some anomalies are related to the earthquakes. By analyzing the time of occurrence, duration, and spatial distribution of these ionospheric anomalies, a number of new conclusions are drawn, as follows: earthquake-related ionospheric anomalies are not bound to appear; both positive and negative anomalies are likely to occur; and the earthquake-related ionospheric anomalies discussed in the current study occurred 0–2 days before the associated earthquakes and in the afternoon to sunset (i.e. between 12:00 and 20:00 local time. Pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies occur mainly in areas near the epicenter. However, the maximum affected area in the ionosphere does not coincide with the vertical projection of the epicenter of the subsequent earthquake. The directions deviating from the epicenters do not follow a fixed rule. The corresponding ionospheric effects can also be observed in the magnetically conjugated region. However, the probability of the anomalies appearance and extent of the anomalies in the magnetically conjugated region are smaller than the anomalies near the epicenter. Deep-focus earthquakes may also exhibit very significant pre-earthquake ionospheric anomalies.

  20. Multi-method, multi-scale geophysical observations in the Obsidian Pool Thermal Area, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Pasquet, S.; Sims, K. W. W.; Dickey, K.

    2016-12-01

    Despite the prominence of Yellowstone as the world's most active hydrothermal province, relatively little is known about the plumbing systems that link deeper hydrothermal fluids to the charismatic hot springs, geysers and mud pots at the surface. We present the results of a multi-method, multi-scale geophysical investigation of the Obsidian Pool Thermal Area (OPTA) in Yellowstone National Park. OPTA hosts acid-sulfate hot springs and mud pots with relatively low pH. We present the results of seismic refraction, electrical resistivity, time-domain EM (TEM), soil conductivity meter (EMI), and GPR data acquired in July 2016. There is a strong contrast in physical properties in the upper 50 m of the subsurface between the low-lying hydrothermal area and surrounding hills: the hydrothermal area has much lower seismic velocities ( 1 km/s vs 3 km/s) and electrical resistivity ( 20 ohm-m vs 300 ohm-m). A prominent zone of very low resistivity (<10 ohm-m) exists at about 20 m depth beneath all hydrothermal features. Poisson's ratio, calculated from P-wave refraction tomography and surface wave inversions, shows low values beneath the "frying pan," where gas is emerging in small fumaroles, suggesting that Poisson's ratio is an effective "gas detector" in hydrothermal areas. Near-surface resistivity mapped from EMI shows a strong correlation with hydrothermal areas previously mapped by heat flow, with areas of high heat flow generally having low resistivity near the surface. Two exceptions are (1) the "frying pan," which shows a central area of high resistivity (corresponding to escaping gas) surrounding by a halo of low resistivity, and (2) a broad area of low resistivity connecting the hydrothermal centers to the lake, which may be clay deposits. TEM data penetrate up to 200 m in depth and suggest that a reservoir of hydrothermal fluids may underlie the entire area, including beneath the forested hills, at depths greater than 100 m, but that they rise toward the surface in

  1. Seasonal and Non-Seasonal Variations of Jupiter's Atmosphere from Observations of Thermal Emission, 1994-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, G.; Fletcher, L.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Greathouse, T.; Fisher, B.; Greco, J.; Wakefield, L.; Snead, E.; Boydstun, K.; Simon-Miller, A.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed mid-infrared images of Jupiter's thermal emission, covering approx.1.5 Jovian years, acquired in discrete filters between 7.8 and 24.5 microns. The behavior of stratospheric (approx.10-mbar) and tropospheric (approx.100-400 mbar) temperatures is generally consistent with predictions of seasonal variability, with differences between 100-mbar temperatures +/-50-60deg from the equator on the order of +/-2. Removing this effect, there appear to be long-term quasi-periodic variability of tropospheric temperatures, whose amplitude, phase and period depend on latitude. The behavior of temperatures in the Equatorial Zone (EZ) suggests a approx.4-6-year period with amplitude of about +/-1-1.5 K in temperature. At mid-latitudes, the periodicity is more distinct with amplitudes around +/-1.5-2.5 K and 4-8 year periods. The 4.2-year variation of stratospheric temperatures known as the quasiquadrennial oscillation or "QQO" (Leovy et al. 1991, Nature 354, 380) continued during this period. There were no variations of zonal mean temperatures associated with any of the "global upheaval" events that have produced dramatic changes of jupiter's visible appearance and cloud cover, although there are colder discrete regions associated with updrafts, e.g. the early stages of the re-darkening ("revival") of the South Equatorial Belt (SEB) in late 2010. On the other hand increases in the visible albedos ("fades") of belts are accompanied by increases in the thickness of a 700-mbar cloud layer (most likely NH3 ice) and clouds at higher pressures, together with the mixing ratio of NH3 gas near 400 mbar (above its condensation level). These quantities decrease during re-darkening ("revival") episodes, during which we note discrete features that are exceptions to the general correlation between dark albedos and minimal cloudiness. In contrast to all these changes, the meridional distribution of the 240-mbar para-H2 fraction appears to be invariant in time.

  2. Developmental venous anomaly (DVA); Developmental Venous Anomaly (DVA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, A.; Ahlhelm, F.; Viera, J.; Reith, W.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Hagen, T. [Radiologische Praxis, Augsburg (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    As congenital anatomic variants of venous drainage, developmental venous anomalies (DVA) represent up to 60% of all cerebral vascular malformations. The prior term ''venous angioma'' is a misnomer implicating an abnormal vascular structure with an increased bleeding risk. They are often found incidentally and are hardly ever symptomatic. Their morphologic characteristics are dilated vessels in the white matter, which converge on a greater collector vein, forming the typical caput medusae. They drain into the superficial or deep venous system. The frequent association with other, potentially bleeding-prone vascular malformations is clinically relevant, in particular cavernous angioma, which might require therapeutic action. Therefore, coincident vascular lesions need to be actively sought by appropriate additional imaging techniques. (orig.) [German] Als eine embryologische Variante der venoesen Drainage macht die so genannte ''developmental venous anomaly'' (DVA) etwa 60% aller zerebralen vaskulaeren Malformationen aus. Der vormalige Terminus ''venoeses Angiom'' sollte nicht mehr benutzt werden, da er abnormale Gefaessstrukturen mit einem erhoehten Blutungsrisiko impliziert. Die DVA werden oft inzidentell entdeckt und sind nur selten symptomatisch. Das typische Erscheinungsbild ist durch dilatierte, medusenhauptartig angeordnete venoese Marklagergefaesse gekennzeichnet, die in eine groessere Sammelvene drainieren. Der Abfluss erfolgt ueber das oberflaechliche oder tiefe Venensystem. Klinisch wichtig ist die haeufige Assoziation mit anderen zerebralen Gefaessmalformationen, insbesondere kavernoesen Angiomen, nach denen im Rahmen der Diagnostik explizit gesucht werden muss, da diese eine potenzielle Blutungsquelle darstellen und ein therapeutisches Vorgehen erfordern koennen. (orig.)

  3. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jung-Kyu; Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Choi, Jong-Sun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies vary, and can manifest as part of a syndrome or be accompanied by numerous other conditions such as genetic disorders, karyotype abnormalities, central nervous system anomalies and other skeletal anomalies, lsolated focal musculoskeletal anomaly does, however, also occur; its early prenatal diagnosis is important in deciding prenatal care, and also helps in counseling parents about the postnatal effects of numerous possible associated anomalies. We have encountered 50 cases involving focal musculoskeletal anomalies, including total limb dysplasia [radial ray abnormality (n=3), mesomelic dysplasia (n=1)]; anomalies of the hand [polydactyly (n=8), syndactyly (n=3), ectrodactyly (n=1), clinodactyly (n=6), clenched hand (n=5)]; anomalies of the foot [clubfoot (n=10), rockerbottom foot (n=5), sandal gap deformity (n=1), curly toe (n=2)]; amniotic band syndrome (n=3); and anomalies of the focal spine [block vertebra (n=1), hemivertebra (n=1)]. Among these 50 cases, five [polydactyly (n=1), syndactyly (n=2) and curly toe (n=2) were confirmed by postnatal physical evaluation, two (focal spine anomalies) were diagnosed after postnatal radiologic examination, and the remaining 43 were proven at autopsy. For each condition, we describe the prenatal sonographic findings, and include a brief review.

  4. Statistical analysis and modelling study of local ozone anomalies in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barodka, Siarhei; Krasouski, Aliaksandr; Svetashev, Alexander; Turishev, Leonid; Zhuchkevich, Veronika; Bruchkouski, Ilya; Lapo, Palina; Shlender, Tsimafei

    2017-04-01

    Local ozone anomalies constitute an important short-term component of the stratospheric ozone variability and are usually defined as synoptic-scale deviations in the total ozone column field, having a characteristic lifetime of about a week or a few days. The present study is devoted to investigation of the statistics, dynamical structure and formation mechanisms of local ozone anomalies. First, we process observational and reanalysis data to obtain statistics of all cases of negative ("mini-holes") and positive ("mini-highs") anomalies over the territory of Europe during the last two decades, paying attention to such issues as definition of anomalies, their possible classification, and algorithms for their objective identification. Furthermore, we investigate several prominent cases of both negative and positive anomalies, focusing on the underlying dynamical processes. For that purpose, we combine observations and reanalysis with global-scale numerical simulations by ECMWF OpenIFS model and regional mesoscale simulations by WRF model. Special attention is paid to the cases of deepest negative ozone anomalies (e.g., the 1997-1998 ozone mini-hole, which is responsible for the minimal total ozone column value ever observed over Belarus, 163 DU), and of springtime and summertime ozone mini-holes, when sufficiently low total ozone column values coincide in time with intense solar irradiation. Finally, we discuss the connection of local ozone anomalies with surface weather phenomena, their predictability in numerical weather modelling, and the role of local ozone anomalies in the broad context of stratosphere-troposphere interactions research.

  5. Increased prevalence of major congenital anomalies in births with placental abruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihimäki, Outi; Metsäranta, Marjo; Ritvanen, Annukka; Gissler, Mika; Luukkaala, Tiina; Paavonen, Jorma; Nuutila, Mika; Andersson, Sture; Tikkanen, Minna

    2013-08-01

    To examine the association between major congenital anomalies and placental abruption. A register-based retrospective case-control study was carried out from 1987 to 2005. Data on baseline characteristics and birth outcomes were collected from three Finnish national health registers: the Medical Birth Register, National Hospital Discharge Register, and Register of Congenital Malformations. The study population consisted of 4,190 women with singleton birth and placental abruption. Three control women without placental abruption were selected for each case, matched by maternal age, parity, year of birth, and hospital district. The main outcome measure of the study was a major congenital anomaly associated with placental abruption. In total, 261 (prevalence 623/10,000) births with placental abruption and 415 (prevalence 330/10,000) control births had major congenital anomalies (odds ratio [OR] 1.92, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6-2.52). The association was strongest among births with growth restriction and prematurity. Adjusted analysis revealed a significant association with central nervous system anomalies (OR 2.33, 95% CI 1.29-4.23), anomalies of the eyes and ears (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.08-3.09), cardiovascular anomalies (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.34-2.37), respiratory anomalies (OR 3.51, 95% CI 1.56-7.90), gastrointestinal anomalies (OR 3.81, 95% CI 2.27-6.41), genitourinary anomalies (OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.73- 3.74), musculoskeletal anomalies (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.24-2.24), and anomalies of integument (OR 3.29, 95% CI 1.20-8.98) in births complicated by placental abruption. Major congenital anomalies are twice as common among neonates born from pregnancies complicated by placental abruption compared with control pregnancies without abruption. This observation applies to several organ systems. II.

  6. Congenital anomalies among live births in a polluted area. A ten-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianicolo Emilio Antonio Luca

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital anomalies and their primary prevention are a crucial public health issue. This work aimed to estimate the prevalence of congenital anomalies in Brindisi, a city in southeastern Italy at high risk of environmental crisis. Methods This research concerned newborns up to 28 days of age, born between 2001 and 2010 to mothers resident in Brindisi and discharged with a diagnosis of congenital anomaly. We classified cases according to the coding system adopted by the European Network for the Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT. Prevalence rates of congenital anomalies in Brindisi were compared with those reported by EUROCAT. Logistic regression models were adapted to evaluate the association between congenital anomalies and municipality of residence of the mother during pregnancy. Results Out of 8,503 newborns we recorded 194 subjects with congenital anomalies (228.2/10,000 total births, 1.2 times higher than the one reported by the EUROCAT pool of registries. We observed 83 subjects with congenital heart diseases with an excess of 49.1%. Odds Ratios for congenital heart diseases significantly increased for newborns to mothers resident in Brindisi (OR 1.75 CI 95% 1.30-2.35. Conclusions Our findings indicated an increased prevalence of Congenital Anomalies (especially congenital heart diseases in the city of Brindisi. More research is needed in order to analyze the role of factors potentially involved in the causation of congenital anomalies.

  7. Vertebral column anomalies in Indo-Pacific and Atlantic humpback dolphins Sousa spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Caroline R; Wang, John Y

    2016-08-09

    Conspicuous vertebral column abnormalities in humpback dolphins (genus Sousa) were documented for the first time during 3 photo-identification field studies of small populations in Taiwan, Senegal and Angola. Seven Taiwanese humpback dolphins S. chinensis taiwanensis with vertebral column anomalies (lordosis, kyphosis or scoliosis) were identified, along with 2 possible cases of vertebral osteomyelitis. There was evidence from several individuals photographed over consecutive years that the anomalies became more pronounced with age. Three Atlantic humpback dolphins S. teuszii were observed with axial deviations of the vertebral column (lordosis and kyphosis). Another possible case was identified in a calf, and 2 further animals were photographed with dorsal indents potentially indicative of anomalies. Vertebral column anomalies of humpback dolphins were predominantly evident in the lumbo-caudal region, but one Atlantic humpback dolphin had an anomaly in the cervico-thoracic region. Lordosis and kyphosis occurred simultaneously in several individuals. Apart from the described anomalies, all dolphins appeared in good health and were not obviously underweight or noticeably compromised in swim speed. This study presents the first descriptions of vertebral column anomalies in the genus Sousa. The causative factors for the anomalies were unknown in every case and are potentially diverse. Whether these anomalies result in reduced fitness of individuals or populations merits attention, as both the Taiwanese and Atlantic humpback dolphin are species of high conservation concern.

  8. Demeter high resolution observations of the ionospheric thermal plasma response to magnetospheric energy input during the magnetic storm of November 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Séran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution Demeter plasma and wave observations were available during one of the geomagnetic storms of November 2004 when the ionospheric footprint of the plasmasphere was pushed below 64 degrees in the midnight sector. We report here onboard observations of thermal/suprathermal plasma and HF electric field variations with a temporal resolution of 0.4 s, which corresponds to a spatial resolution of 3 km. Local perturbations of the plasma parameters at the altitude of 730 km are analysed with respect to the variation of the field-aligned currents, electron and proton precipitation and large-scale electric fields, measured in-situ by Demeter and by remote optical methods from the IMAGE/Polar satellites.

    Flow monitoring in the 21:00 and 24:00 MLT sectors during storm conditions reveals two distinct regions of O+ outflow, i.e. the region of the field-aligned currents, which often comprises few layers of opposite currents, and the region of velocity reversal toward dusk at sub-auroral latitudes. Average upward O+ velocities are identical in both local time sectors and vary between 200 and 450 m s−1, with an exception of a few cases of higher speed (~1000 m s−1 outflow, observed in the midnight sector. Each individual outflow event does not indicate any heating process of the thermal O+ population. On the contrary, the temperature of the O+, outflowing from auroral latitudes, is found to be even colder than that of the ambient ion plasma. The only ion population which is observed to be involved in the heating is the O+ with energies a few times higher than the thermal energy. Such a population was detected at sub-auroral latitudes in the region of duskward flow reversal. Its temperature raises up to a few eV inside the layer of sheared velocity.

    A deep decrease in the H+ density at heights and latitudes, where, according to the IRI model

  9. Demeter high resolution observations of the ionospheric thermal plasma response to magnetospheric energy input during the magnetic storm of November 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Séran

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution Demeter plasma and wave observations were available during one of the geomagnetic storms of November 2004 when the ionospheric footprint of the plasmasphere was pushed below 64 degrees in the midnight sector. We report here onboard observations of thermal/suprathermal plasma and HF electric field variations with a temporal resolution of 0.4 s, which corresponds to a spatial resolution of 3 km. Local perturbations of the plasma parameters at the altitude of 730 km are analysed with respect to the variation of the field-aligned currents, electron and proton precipitation and large-scale electric fields, measured in-situ by Demeter and by remote optical methods from the IMAGE/Polar satellites. Flow monitoring in the 21:00 and 24:00 MLT sectors during storm conditions reveals two distinct regions of O+ outflow, i.e. the region of the field-aligned currents, which often comprises few layers of opposite currents, and the region of velocity reversal toward dusk at sub-auroral latitudes. Average upward O+ velocities are identical in both local time sectors and vary between 200 and 450 m s−1, with an exception of a few cases of higher speed (~1000 m s−1 outflow, observed in the midnight sector. Each individual outflow event does not indicate any heating process of the thermal O+ population. On the contrary, the temperature of the O+, outflowing from auroral latitudes, is found to be even colder than that of the ambient ion plasma. The only ion population which is observed to be involved in the heating is the O+ with energies a few times higher than the thermal energy. Such a population was detected at sub-auroral latitudes in the region of duskward flow reversal. Its temperature raises up to a few eV inside the layer of sheared velocity. A deep decrease in the H+ density at heights and latitudes, where, according to the IRI model, these ions are expected to comprise ~50% of the positive charge, indicates that the thermospheric balance

  10. The accessory fallopian tube: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusum R Gandhi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a rare anatomical variation in the form of accessory fallopian tube on right side. The duplication of fallopian tube was observed in a 34-year-old female during routine undergraduate dissection in our department. Fallopian tube is the part of uterus that carries the ovum from the ovary to the uterus. Accessory fallopian tube is the congenital anomaly attached to the ampullary part of main tube. This accessory tube is common site of pyosalpinx, hydrosalpinx, cystic swelling and torsion. The ovum released by the ovary may also be captured by the blind accessory tube leading to infertility or ectopic pregnancy. Hence, all patients of infertility or pelvic inflammatory disease should be screened to rule out the presence of accessory fallopian tube and if encountered should be removed.

  11. The stranding anomaly as population indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peltier, Helene; Baagøe, Hans J.; Camphuysen, Kees C. J.

    2013-01-01

    credibility are disputed. Our present goal is to improve the value of stranding data as population indicator as part of monitoring strategies by constructing the spatial and temporal null hypothesis for strandings. The null hypothesis is defined as: small cetacean distribution and mortality are uniform...... conditions did not explain observed seasonal variations of porpoise strandings. Long-term stranding anomalies increased first in the southern North Sea, the Channel and Bay of Biscay coasts, and finally the eastern North Sea. The hypothesis of changes in porpoise distribution was consistent with local visual...... surveys, mostly SCANS surveys (1994 and 2005). This new indicator could be applied to cetacean populations across the world and more widely to marine megafauna....

  12. Axial anomalies of Lifshitz fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Bakas, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    We compute the axial anomaly of a Lifshitz fermion theory with anisotropic scaling z=3 which is minimally coupled to geometry in 3+1 space-time dimensions. We find that the result is identical to the relativistic case using path integral methods. An independent verification is provided by showing with spectral methods that the eta-invariant of the Dirac and Lifshitz fermion operators in three dimensions are equal. Thus, by the integrated form of the anomaly, the index of the Dirac operator still accounts for the possible breakdown of chiral symmetry in non-relativistic theories of gravity. We apply this framework to the recently constructed gravitational instanton backgrounds of Horava-Lifshitz theory and find that the index is non-zero provided that the space-time foliation admits leaves with harmonic spinors. Using Hitchin's construction of harmonic spinors on Berger spheres, we obtain explicit results for the index of the fermion operator on all such gravitational instanton backgrounds with SU(2)xU(1) isom...

  13. In-situ SCC observation on thermally-sensitized type 304 stainless steel irradiated to 1 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, J.; Nemoto, Y.; Tsukada, T.; Usami, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hide, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka-shi, Kanagawa-ken (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is concerned as being one of the specific problems for water-cooled first wall/blanket components in the design activity of international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER). To examine the crack initiation and growth behaviors of IASCC, in-situ observation on gage length of specimens was conducted during slow strain rate tests (SSRT) in high temperature water. Results from in-situ observation on Type 304 stainless steel (SS) irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} have been reported already. Type 304 SS was subjected to a solution annealing (SA), a thermally sensitization (TS) or a cold working (CW, 20%) and irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). After neutron irradiation, SSRT for the specimens was conducted in oxygenated high purity water at 561 K. The gage length of the specimen was observed through a window equipped on an autoclave during the SSRT. Subsequently, fracture surface examination was performed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In fracture surface examination of the specimens irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}, almost entire intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was exhibited for the TS material while mixtures of transgranular stress corrosion cracking (TGSCC) and ductile dimple fracture were observed for the SA and the CW materials. Although crack initiation was observed immediately after maximum stress for the CW irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2}, crack initiation was observed immediately before maximum stress (99% of maximum stress) for the CW irradiated to 1.0 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} in in-situ observation. (authors)

  14. Using Lava Tube Skylight Thermal Emission Spectra to Determine Lava Composition on Io: Quantitative Constraints for Observations by Future Missions to the Jovian System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, A. G.

    2008-12-01

    Deriving the composition of Io's dominant lavas (mafic or ultramafic?) is a major objective of the next missions to the jovian system. The best opportunities for making this determination are from observations of thermal emission from skylights, holes in the roof of a lava tube through which incandescent lava radiates, and Io thermal outbursts, where lava fountaining is taking place [1]. Allowing for lava cooling across the skylight, the expected thermal emission spectra from skylights of different sizes have been calculated for laminar and turbulent tube flow and for mafic and ultramafic composition lavas. The difference between the resulting mafic and ultramafic lava spectra has been quantified, as has the instrument sensitivity needed to acquire the necessary data to determine lava eruption temperature, both from Europa orbit and during an Io flyby. A skylight is an excellent target to observe lava that has cooled very little since eruption (temperatures close to lava eruption temperature. Skylights are therefore easily discernible against a cool background, and are detectable from great distances at night or with Io in eclipse with imagers covering the range 0.4 to 5.0 μm. To distinguish between ultramafic and mafic lavas, multispectral (or hyperspectral) observations with precise exposure timing and knowledge of filter response are needed in the range 0.4 to 0.8 μm, with (minimally) an additional model-constraining measurement at ~4-5 μm. As with many lava tube systems on Earth, skylights should be common on Io (for example, at Prometheus, Culann and Amirani). The possible superheating of lava prior to eruption complicates the analysis [4], but is likely to be significant only for deep- seated, often explosive, eruptions. Effusive activity at the aforementioned three locations is likely fed from shallow reservoirs [5], minimising superheating effects. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory-California Institute of Technology, under

  15. Direct observation of a transverse vibrational mechanism for negative thermal expansion in Zn(CN)2: an atomic pair distribution function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Karena W; Chupas, Peter J; Kepert, Cameron J

    2005-11-09

    The instantaneous structure of the cyanide-bridged negative thermal expansion (NTE) material Zn(CN)(2) has been probed using atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of high energy X-ray scattering data (100-400 K). The temperature dependence of the atomic separations extracted from the PDFs indicates an increase of the average transverse displacement of the cyanide bridge from the line connecting the Zn(II) centers with increasing temperature. This allows the contraction of non-nearest-neighbor Zn...Zn' and Zn...C/N distances despite the observed expansion of the individual direct Zn-C/N and C-N bonds. Thus, this analysis provides definitive structural confirmation that an increase in the average displacement of bridging atoms is the origin of the NTE behavior. The lattice parameters reveal a slight reduction in the NTE behavior at high temperature from a minimum coefficient of thermal expansion (alpha = dl/ldT) of -19.8 x 10(-6) K(-1) below 180 K, which is attributed to interaction between the doubly interpenetrated frameworks that comprise the structure.

  16. On Newton-Cartan trace anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auzzi, Roberto; Baiguera, Stefano; Nardelli, Giuseppe

    2016-02-01

    We classify the trace anomaly for parity-invariant non-relativistic Schrödinger theories in 2 + 1 dimensions coupled to background Newton-Cartan gravity. The general anomaly structure looks very different from the one in the z = 2 Lifshitz theories. The type A content of the anomaly is remarkably identical to that of the relativistic 3 + 1 dimensional case, suggesting the conjecture that an a-theorem should exist also in the Newton-Cartan context.

  17. Magnetic Anomaly Detection by Remote Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-21

    REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From- To) 21-09-2016 Final 1/1/2013- 12/31/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Magnetic Anomaly Detection ...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Research on the possibility of detecting magnetic anomalies remotely using laser excitation of a...A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Magnetic Anomaly Detection by Remote Means Richard B. Miles and Arthur Dogariu

  18. Network anomaly detection a machine learning perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharyya, Dhruba Kumar

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid rise in the ubiquity and sophistication of Internet technology and the accompanying growth in the number of network attacks, network intrusion detection has become increasingly important. Anomaly-based network intrusion detection refers to finding exceptional or nonconforming patterns in network traffic data compared to normal behavior. Finding these anomalies has extensive applications in areas such as cyber security, credit card and insurance fraud detection, and military surveillance for enemy activities. Network Anomaly Detection: A Machine Learning Perspective presents mach

  19. On Newton-Cartan trace anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auzzi, Roberto [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore,Via Musei 41, 25121 Brescia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Perugia,Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Baiguera, Stefano [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore,Via Musei 41, 25121 Brescia (Italy); Nardelli, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore,Via Musei 41, 25121 Brescia (Italy); TIFPA - INFN, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento,38123 Povo (Italy)

    2016-02-01

    We classify the trace anomaly for parity-invariant non-relativistic Schrödinger theories in 2+1 dimensions coupled to background Newton-Cartan gravity. The general anomaly structure looks very different from the one in the z=2 Lifshitz theories. The type A content of the anomaly is remarkably identical to that of the relativistic 3+1 dimensional case, suggesting the conjecture that an a-theorem should exist also in the Newton-Cartan context.

  20. Dielectric anomaly and relaxation natures in a Zn-Cr pillar−layered metal−organic framework with cages and channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Chen; Yao, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Shao-Xian; Luo, Hong-Bin [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering and College of Chemistry & Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zou, Yang, E-mail: zouyang@njtech.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering and College of Chemistry & Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Li, Li [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering and College of Chemistry & Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Ren, Xiao-Ming, E-mail: xmren@njtech.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering and College of Chemistry & Molecular Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing 210009 (China); State Key Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2017-06-15

    A bimetallic metal–organic framework (MOF) with the formula [Zn{sub 3}btc{sub 2}(Cr{sub 3}O(isonic){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(OH))]·(DMF){sub 15.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8} (H{sub 3}btc=1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid; isonic=isonicotinicate) shows a pillar-layered structure. The monolayer consists of hexagon-like rings formed by the [Zn(isonic){sub 2}(btc){sub 2}] tetrahedral and the consecutive monolayers are pillared by trigonal–prismatic clusters of [Cr{sub 3}O(isonic){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(OH)]through the remaining binding sites of the Zn{sup 2+} ions. DMF and water molecules are confined in the cages and channels. TGA indicates that the lattice DMF and water molecules begin to be released at temperatures above 363 K. Dielectric measurements were carried out in the range of 173–363 K and 1–10{sup 7} Hz for three successive thermal cycles. The dielectric spectroscopy obtained in the first thermal cycle was different from that observed in the next two thermal cycles, while the dielectric spectra in the last two thermal cycles were almost identical. The dielectric nature of this MOF is discussed in detail for each thermal cycle. Since MOFs are unique host–guest systems in which the structure of the host framework is designable and the guests are exchangeable, it is no doubt those MOFs are materials with a variety of dielectric natures. This study gives a fresh impetus to achieve MOFs–based dielectric materials. - Graphical abstract: The bimetallic MOF [Zn{sub 3}btc{sub 2}(Cr{sub 3}O(isonic){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(OH))]·(DMF){sub 15.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}1, shows a pillar-layered open-framework structure. The dielectric spectra of 1 are almost identical in the last two thermal cycles, whereas significantly different from that observed in the first thermal cycle. The novel dielectric anomaly associated with a stacked structure transformation of the disordered guests. - Highlights: • A bimetallic metal-organic framework shows a pillar-layered structure.

  1. Recent summer Arctic atmospheric circulation anomalies in a historical perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belleflamme, A.; Fettweis, X.; Erpicum, M.

    2015-01-01

    A significant increase in the summertime occurrence of a high pressure area over the Beaufort Sea, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and Greenland has been observed since the beginning of the 2000s, and particularly between 2007 and 2012. These circulation anomalies are likely partly responsible for the enhanced Greenland ice sheet melt as well as the Arctic sea ice loss observed since 2007. Therefore, it is interesting to analyse whether similar conditions might have happened since the late 19th century over the Arctic region. We have used an atmospheric circulation type classification based on daily mean sea level pressure and 500 hPa geopotential height data from five reanalysis data sets (ERA-Interim, ERA-40, NCEP/NCAR, ERA-20C, and 20CRv2) to put the recent circulation anomalies in perspective with the atmospheric circulation variability since 1871. We found that circulation conditions similar to 2007-2012 have occurred in the past, despite a higher uncertainty of the reconstructed circulation before 1940. For example, only ERA-20C shows circulation anomalies that could explain the 1920-1930 summertime Greenland warming, in contrast to 20CRv2. While the recent anomalies exceed by a factor of 2 the interannual variability of the atmospheric circulation of the Arctic region, their origin (natural variability or global warming) remains debatable.

  2. Conscious and unconscious detection of semantic anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    When asked What superhero is associated with bats, Robin, the Penguin, Metropolis, Catwoman, the Riddler, the Joker, and Mr. Freeze? people frequently fail to notice the anomalous word Metropolis. The goals of this study were to determine whether detection of semantic anomalies, like Metropolis, is conscious or unconscious and whether this detection is immediate or delayed. To achieve these goals, participants answered anomalous and nonanomalous questions as their reading times for words were recorded. Comparisons between detected versus undetected anomalies revealed slower reading times for detected anomalies-a finding that suggests that people immediately and consciously detected anomalies. Further, comparisons between first and second words following undetected anomalies versus nonanomalous controls revealed some slower reading times for first and second words-a finding that suggests that people may have unconsciously detected anomalies but this detection was delayed. Taken together, these findings support the idea that when we are immediately aware of a semantic anomaly (i.e., immediate conscious detection) our language processes make immediate adjustments in order to reconcile contradictory information of anomalies with surrounding text; however, even when we are not consciously aware of semantic anomalies, our language processes still make these adjustments, although these adjustments are delayed (i.e., delayed unconscious detection).

  3. Tectonically Induced Anomalies Without Large Earthquake Occurrences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zheming; Wang, Guangcai; Liu, Chenglong; Che, Yongtai

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we documented a case involving large-scale macroscopic anomalies in the Xichang area, southwestern Sichuan Province, China, from May to June of 2002, after which no major earthquake occurred. During our field survey in 2002, we found that the timing of the high-frequency occurrence of groundwater anomalies was in good agreement with those of animal anomalies. Spatially, the groundwater and animal anomalies were distributed along the Anninghe-Zemuhe fault zone. Furthermore, the groundwater level was elevated in the northwest part of the Zemuhe fault and depressed in the southeast part of the Zemuhe fault zone, with a border somewhere between Puge and Ningnan Counties. Combined with microscopic groundwater, geodetic and seismic activity data, we infer that the anomalies in the Xichang area were the result of increasing tectonic activity in the Sichuan-Yunnan block. In addition, groundwater data may be used as a good indicator of tectonic activity. This case tells us that there is no direct relationship between an earthquake and these anomalies. In most cases, the vast majority of the anomalies, including microscopic and macroscopic anomalies, are caused by tectonic activity. That is, these anomalies could occur under the effects of tectonic activity, but they do not necessarily relate to the occurrence of earthquakes.

  4. Anomaly Detection from Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiandong Guo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral remote sensing imagery contains much more information in the spectral domain than does multispectral imagery. The consecutive and abundant spectral signals provide a great potential for classification and anomaly detection. In this study, two real hyperspectral data sets were used for anomaly detection. One data set was an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS data covering the post-attack World Trade Center (WTC and anomalies are fire spots. The other data set called SpecTIR contained fabric panels as anomalies compared to their background. Existing anomaly detection algorithms including the Reed–Xiaoli detector (RXD, the blocked adaptive computation efficient outlier nominator (BACON, the random selection based anomaly detector (RSAD, the weighted-RXD (W-RXD, and the probabilistic anomaly detector (PAD are reviewed here. The RXD generally sets strict assumptions to the background, which cannot be met in many scenarios, while BACON, RSAD, and W-RXD employ strategies to optimize the estimation of background information. The PAD firstly estimates both background information and anomaly information and then uses the information to conduct anomaly detection. Here, the BACON, RSAD, W-RXD, and PAD outperformed the RXD in terms of detection accuracy, and W-RXD and PAD required less time than BACON and RSAD.

  5. Fetal Kidney Anomalies: Next Generation Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Maria; Sunde, Lone; Nielsen, Marlene Louise

    with prenatally detected kidney anomalies in order to uncover genetic explanations and assess recurrence risk. Also, we aim to study the relation between genetic findings and post mortem kidney histology. Methods The study comprises fetuses diagnosed prenatally with bilateral kidney anomalies that have undergone...... in the nephronophthisis associated gene, TMEM67 and six fetuses had mutations in kidney developmental genes. For these fetuses kidney histology is presented. Conclusion and Perspectives In eight (14%) fetuses we identified a likely genetic cause of the kidney anomalies. Ten fetuses from eight families, in which...... no mutations were identified, have been selected for exome sequencing in order to uncover novel genes associated to fetal kidney anomalies....

  6. Hashimoto thyroiditis and thyroid gland anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babademez, Mehmet Ali; Tuncay, Kenan Selçuk; Zaim, Murat; Acar, Baran; Karaşen, Rıza Murat

    2010-11-01

    There are several thyroid gland developmental anomalies such as presence of a pyramidal lobe, absence of the lateral lobes, absence of the isthmus or incomplete isthmus, and significantly asymmetric lateral lobes. The absence or agenesis of the isthmus is a rare condition (1%). In this report, we present a case with Hashimoto thyroiditis and thyroid gland anomalies that consist of thyroglossal duct remnant and absence of the isthmus. Furthermore, an anomaly in the parathyroid gland location and morphologic anomaly as a cystic parathyroid gland were seen in our case.

  7. Contributions of cretaceus quiet zone natural remanent magnetization to Magsat anomalies in the Southwest Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Lawrence G.; Frey, Herbert V.; Roark, James H.; Thomas, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The Magsat magnetic anomalies over the Southwest Indian Ocean are modeled using a combination of induced plus viscous remanent magnetization (IM/VRM) and natural remanent magnetization (NRM). Two broad, roughly parallel, SW to NE trending triple-peaked positive anomalies dominate the region, one lying south of Africa and the other north of Antarctica. Although these anomaly peaks generally correspond with the Agulhas Plateau/Maud Rise, Mozambique Plateau/Astrid Ridge, and Madagascar Ridge/Conrad Rise conjugate pairs, the IM/VRM contribution from structural characteristics (i.e., crustal thickness) accounts for only about 20% of the anomaly amplitudes. A spatially variable but observationally constrained NRM contribution in Cretaceous Quiet Zone (KQZ) crust is required to account for the location, shape, and amplitude contrast of these anomalies. Many crustal features in the Southwest Indian Ocean near Antarctica have little geophysical data to constrain their structure but do hagve tectonic conjugates near Africa for which much more geophysical data are generally available. Using geophysical and geological constraints from one member to model the magnetization structure of its conjugate reproduces the observed Magsat reduced-to-pole anomalies over both structures very well. This suggests that no significant alteration in their magnetization structure has occurred since the features split. Models of these conjugate structures show that IM/VRM reproduces the Magsat anomalies associated with non-KQZ crust but that both IM/VRM and a dominant NRM component are required to explain the anomalies associated with KQZ crust.

  8. A study on the Abruzzo 6 April 2009 earthquake by applying the RST approach to 15 years of AVHRR TIR observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lisi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A self adaptive approach (RST, Robust Satellite Technique has been proposed as a suitable tool for satellite TIR surveys in seismically active regions devoted to detect and monitor thermal anomalies possibly related to earthquake occurrence. In this work, RST approach has been applied to 15 years of AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer thermal infrared observations in order to study the 6 April 2009 Abruzzo earthquake. Preliminary results show clear differences in TIR anomalies occurrence during the periods used for validation (15 March–15 April 2009 and the one (15 March–15 April 2008 without earthquakes with ML≥4.5, used for confutation purposes. Quite clear TIR anomalies appears also to mark main tectonic lineaments during the preparatory phases of others, low magnitude(3.9<ML<4.6 earthquakes, occurred in the area in the same period.

  9. Anomalous thermal expansion of InSe layered semiconductors in the low-temperature region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krynetskii, I. B.; Kulbachinskii, V. A. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Shabanova, N. P., E-mail: shaban@sci.lebedev.ru; Tsikunov, A. V.; Kovalenko, R. I.; Rodin, V. V.; Gavrilkin, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The temperature dependence of the linear thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) of an InSe single crystal in the (001) plane is measured in the temperature range 7-50 K. A peak in the thermal expansion is detected near T = 10 K, after which the sample shrinks upon heating. The effect of an external magnetic field of up to 6 T, which is parallel to the (001) plane, on the TEC is investigated. The observed partial suppression of the peak and crystal compression by the field indicates the relation of these anomalies to possible electron ordering in InSe layers.

  10. GRAVITY ANOMALIES OF THE MOON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Pugacheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The source of gravity anomalies of the Moon are large mascons with a high mass concentration at a depth of volcanic plains and lunar Maria. New data on the gravitational field of the Moon were obtained from two Grail spacecrafts. The article presents the data of physical and mechanical properties of the surface soil layer of the lunar Maria and gives an assessment of the chemical composition of the soil. There have been calculated heterogeneity parameters of the surface macro-relief of the lunar Maria: albedo, soil density, average grain diameter of the particles forming the surface layer and the volume fraction occupied by particles. It can be assumed that mascons include rich KREEP rocks with a high content of thorium and iron oxide. Formation of mascons is connected with intensive development of basaltic volcanism on the Moon in the early periods of its existence.

  11. Global Horizontal Irradiance Anomalies in Long Term Series Over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cony, Marco; Liria, Juan; Weisenberg, Ralf; Serrano, Enrique

    2014-05-01

    India has a high potential for solar energy applications due to its geographic position within the Sun Belt and the large number of cloudless days in many regions of the country. However, certain regions of India, particularly those largely populated, can exhibit large aerosol loading in the atmosphere as a consequence of anthropogenic emissions that could have a negative feedback in the solar resource potential. This effect, named as solar dimming, has already been observed in India, and in some other regions in the world, by some authors using ground data from the last two decades. The recent interest in the promotion of solar energy applications in India highlights the need of extending and improving the knowledge of the solar radiation resources in this country, since most of the long term measurements available correspond to global horizontal radiation (GHI) and most of them are also located big cities or highly populated areas. In addition, accurate knowledge on the aerosol column quantification and on its dynamical behavior with high spatial resolution is particularly important in the case of India, due to their impact on direct normal irradiation. Long term studies of solar irradiation over India can be performed using monthly means of GHI measurements from the Indian Meteorological Department. Ground data are available from 1964 till today through the World Radiation Data Centre that publish these values in the web. This work shows a long term analysis of GHI using anomalies techniques over ten different sites over India. Besides, techniques of linear trends have been applied for to show the evolution over this period. The analysis of anomalies has also found two periods of different behavior. From 1964 till 1988 the anomalies observed were positive and the last 20 years seems to be a period of negative anomalies. The results exhibit a decreasing trend and negative anomalies confirming thus the darkening effect already reported by solar dimming studies

  12. ENSO related SST anomalies and relation with surface heat fluxes over south Pacific and Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S.; Nuncio, M.; Satheesan, K.

    2017-07-01

    The role of surface heat fluxes in Southern Pacific and Atlantic Ocean SST anomalies associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is studied using observation and ocean reanalysis products. A prominent dipole structure in SST anomaly is found with a positive (negative) anomaly center over south Pacific (65S-45S, 120W-70W) and negative (positive) one over south Atlantic (50S-30S, 30W-0E) during austral summer (DJF) of El Nino (LaNina). During late austral spring-early summer (OND) of El Nino (LaNina), anomalous northerly (southerly) meridional moisture transport and a positive (negative) sea level pressure anomaly induces a suppressed (enhanced) latent heat flux from the ocean surface over south Pacific. This in turn results in a shallower than normal mixed layer depth which further helps in development of the SST anomaly. Mixed layer thins further due to anomalous shortwave radiation during summer and a well developed SST anomaly evolves. The south Atlantic pole exhibits exactly opposite characteristics at the same time. The contribution from the surface heat fluxes to mixed layer temperature change is found to be dominant over the advective processes over both the basins. Net surface heat fluxes anomaly is also found to be maximum during late austral spring-early summer period, with latent heat flux having a major contribution to it. The anomalous latent heat fluxes between atmosphere and ocean surface play important role in the growth of observed summertime SST anomaly. Sea-surface height also shows similar out-of-phase signatures over the two basins and are well correlated with the ENSO related SST anomalies. It is also observed that the magnitude of ENSO related anomalies over the southern ocean are weaker in LaNina years than in El Nino years, suggesting an intensified tropics-high latitude tele-connection during warm phases of ENSO.

  13. Relationship between monthly temperature anomalies and drought frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, E.; Naumann, G.

    2012-04-01

    to avoid bias, only bins with more than 20 observations were considered. The results showed that 64% of the stations had a significant inverse relation between average SPI and rising temperature anomalies (at a significance level of 0.05%). All the stations with a significant relation presented a negative slope in the regression, meaning that SPI values declined in average at a rate of 0.185degC^-1. A large increase on the frequency of months with SPI lower than -1 was also observed in these stations. While the average frequency of dry months for temperatures anomalies close to zero (-0.5 degC 0.5 degC) was about 14% (stdev=2.7), months with temperature anomalies higher than 2degC showed an average incidence of dry months of about 40% (stdev= 12). Therefore, this study shows clear evidences of a direct relation between temperature anomalies (mostly related to heat waves) and the occurrence of meteorological drought events. Nevertheless, the results also indicate that, in some regions, the occurrence of dry events is not necessarily coupled with the variability of air temperature. Further studies are necessary in order to understand the discrepant results among these regions. Additional effects, such as sea surface temperature fluctuations and specific humidity need to be analyzed in order to isolate the effects of surface temperature.

  14. High Order Non-Stationary Markov Models and Anomaly Propagation Analysis in Intrusion Detection System (IDS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Skormin, Victor A

    2007-01-01

    .... Unless anomaly propagation is observed, alarms are to be treated as false positives. The rationale behind the concept lies in the fact that the most common feature of worms and viruses is self-replication...

  15. Morphology of the winter anomaly in NmF2 and Total Electron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasyukevich, Yury; Ratovsky, Konstantin; Yasyukevich, Anna; Klimenko, Maksim; Klimenko, Vladimir; Chirik, Nikolay

    2017-04-01

    We analyzed the winter anomaly manifestation in the F2 peak electron density (NmF2) and Total Electron Content (TEC) based on the observation data and model calculation results. For the analysis we used 1998-2015 TEC Global Ionospheric Maps (GIM) and NmF2 ground-based ionosonde observation data from and COSMIC, CHAMP and GRACE radio occultation data. We used Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) and International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-2012). Based on the observation data and model calculation results we constructed the maps of the winter anomaly intensity in TEC and NmF2 for the different solar and geomagnetic activity levels. The winter anomaly intensity was found to be higher in NmF2 than in TEC according to both observation and modeling. In this report we show the similarity and difference in winter anomaly as revealed in experimental data and model results.

  16. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Tevfik; Turan, Yahya; Gülşen, İsmail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury. PMID:25210343

  17. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury.

  18. Anomaly Detection in Gas Turbine Fuel Systems Using a Sequential Symbolic Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Anomaly detection plays a significant role in helping gas turbines run reliably and economically. Considering the collective anomalous data and both sensitivity and robustness of the anomaly detection model, a sequential symbolic anomaly detection method is proposed and applied to the gas turbine fuel system. A structural Finite State Machine is used to evaluate posterior probabilities of observing symbolic sequences and the most probable state sequences they may locate. Hence an estimation-based model and a decoding-based model are used to identify anomalies in two different ways. Experimental results indicate that both models have both ideal performance overall, but the estimation-based model has a strong robustness ability, whereas the decoding-based model has a strong accuracy ability, particularly in a certain range of sequence lengths. Therefore, the proposed method can facilitate well existing symbolic dynamic analysis- based anomaly detection methods, especially in the gas turbine domain.

  19. Remarks on global anomalies in RCFT orientifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Schellekens, A.N. [NIKHEF Theory Group, Kruislaan 409, 1098 SJ Amsterdam (Netherlands) and Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain) and IMAPP, Radboud Universiteit, Nijmegen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: t58@nikhef.nl

    2006-01-26

    We check the list of supersymmetric standard model orientifold spectra of Dijkstra, Huiszoon and Schellekens for the presence of global anomalies, using probe branes. Absence of global anomalies is found to impose strong constraints, but in nearly all cases they are automatically satisfied by the solutions to the tadpole cancellation conditions.

  20. Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

    2010-02-19

    This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

  1. Dental anomalies in patients with down syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mari Eli Leonelli de Moraes; Luiz Cesar de Moraes; Gustavo Nogara Dotto; Patrícia Pasquali Dotto; Luis Roque de Araújo dos Santos

    2007-01-01

    ...%), suspected anodontia (10.7%), conic teeth (8.3%) and impacted teeth (5.9%). In conclusion, patients with Down syndrome presented a high incidence of dental anomalies and, in most cases, the same individual presented more than one dental anomaly...

  2. Kesan Anomali Bermusim Terhadap Bursa Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Nurfadhlina Binti Abdul Halim; How Teng Ying; Wan Muhamad Amir Bin Wan Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Kajian ini mengkaji sama ada Bursa Malaysia adalah efisien dalam bentuk lemah. Penemuan kewujudan anomali bermusim iaitu kesan Januari atau bulanan dan kesan harian akan menolak hipotesis pasaran efisien bentuk lemah. Analisis regresi siri masa digunakan untuk menentukan kewujudan anomali bermusim dalam Indeks Komposit Bursa Malaysia dari tahun 1999 sehingga tahun 2006.

  3. Socio-occupational status and congenital anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varela, María M Morales-Suárez; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Llopis-González, Agustin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association between socio-occupational status and the frequency of major congenital anomalies in offspring.......The aim of this study is to investigate the association between socio-occupational status and the frequency of major congenital anomalies in offspring....

  4. A Probability Model for Belady's Anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Kirby; Sambasivam, Samuel E.; Anderson, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    In demand paging virtual memory systems, the page fault rate of a process varies with the number of memory frames allocated to the process. When an increase in the number of allocated frames leads to an increase in the number of page faults, Belady's anomaly is said to occur. In this paper, we present a probability model for Belady's anomaly. We…

  5. Early Airway Intervention for Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Lauren A; Sidman, James D; Roby, Brianne

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews the presentation of children with craniofacial anomalies by the most common sites of airway obstruction. Major craniofacial anomalies may be categorized into those with midface hypoplasia, mandible hypoplasia, combined midface and mandible hypoplasia, and midline deformities. Algorithms of airway interventions are provided to guide the initial management of these complex patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Praenatalt diagnosticeret hydronefrose og andre urologiske anomalier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Jørgensen, Troels Munch; Rittig, Søren

    2006-01-01

    By renal ultrasound examination, urological anomalies may be demonstrated in 1-2% of fetuses and in about 0.5% of newborns. Boys have about twice the frequency of girls. Surgical treatment is indicated in about one fourth of these urological anomalies. If all pregnant women in Denmark were to hav...

  7. Improved prenatal detection of chromosomal anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøslev-Friis, Christina; Hjort-Pedersen, Karina; Henriques, Carsten U

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal screening for karyotype anomalies takes place in most European countries. In Denmark, the screening method was changed in 2005. The aim of this study was to study the trends in prevalence and prenatal detection rates of chromosome anomalies and Down syndrome (DS) over a 22-year period....

  8. Distance Metric Learning for Conditional Anomaly Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valko, Michal; Hauskrecht, Milos

    2008-01-01

    Anomaly detection methods can be very useful in identifying unusual or interesting patterns in data. A recently proposed conditional anomaly detection framework extends anomaly detection to the problem of identifying anomalous patterns on a subset of attributes in the data. The anomaly always depends (is conditioned) on the value of remaining attributes. The work presented in this paper focuses on instance-based methods for detecting conditional anomalies. The methods depend heavily on the distance metric that lets us identify examples in the dataset that are most critical for detecting the anomaly. To optimize the performance of the anomaly detection methods we explore and study metric learning methods. We evaluate the quality of our methods on the Pneumonia PORT dataset by detecting unusual admission decisions for patients with the community-acquired pneumonia. The results of our metric learning methods show an improved detection performance over standard distance metrics, which is very promising for building automated anomaly detection systems for variety of intelligent monitoring applications.

  9. Photodiode and photomultiplier areal sensitivity anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngbluth, O., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Several silicon photodiodes and photomultipliers were tested to determine signal variations as a light spot was scanned over the photosensitive surface of these detectors. Qualitative and quantitative data is presented to demonstrate the areal sensitivity anomalies. These anomalies are related back to the fabrication techniques of the manufacturers.

  10. Praenatalt diagnosticeret hydronefrose og andre urologiske anomalier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortes, Dina; Jørgensen, Troels Munch; Rittig, Søren

    2006-01-01

    By renal ultrasound examination, urological anomalies may be demonstrated in 1-2% of fetuses and in about 0.5% of newborns. Boys have about twice the frequency of girls. Surgical treatment is indicated in about one fourth of these urological anomalies. If all pregnant women in Denmark were to have...

  11. Hydrothermal anomalies before the 2009 Mw 6.3 L'Aquila earthquake in Italy referring to the geospheres coupling effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lixin; Zheng, Shuo; Qin, Kai; De Santis, Angelo; Liu, Shanjun

    2016-04-01

    A large number of precursory anomalies of the 2009 L'Aquila EQ were reported after the shocking, including thermal properties, electric and magnetic fields, gas emissions and seismicity. Previous studies on the seismic b-value are also insufficient, which is possibly a proxy of crust stress conditions and could therewith act as a crude stress-meter wherever seismicity is observed in lithosphere. Nevertheless, the reported anomalies have not been so far synergically analyzed to interpret or prove the potential coupling process among different geospheres. In this paper, the spatio-temporal evolution of several hydrothermal parameters related to the coversphere and atmosphere, including soil moisture, soil temperature, near-surface air temperature, and precipitable water, was comprehensively investigated. Air temperature and atmospheric aerosol were also statistically analyzed in time series with ground observations. An abnormal enhancement of aerosol occurred on March 30, 2009 and thus proved quasi-synchronous anomalies among the hydrothermal parameters from March 29 to 31 in particular places geo-related to tectonic thrusts and local topography. In additional, the three-dimensional (3D) visualization analysis of b-value revealed that regional stress accumulated to a high level, particularly in the L'Aquila basin and around regional large thrusts. This links logically and spatially the multiple observations on coversphere and atmosphere with that on lithosphere. Finally, the coupling effects of geospheres were discussed, and a conceptual LCA coupling mode was proposed to interpret the possible mechanisms of the multiple quasi-synchronous anomalies preceding the L'Aquila EQ. Results indicate that CO2-rich fluids in deep crust might have played a significant role in the local LCA coupling process.

  12. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L.; Drivas, Theodore D.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or "coarse-grained" solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy) by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive "4 /5 th-law"-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents) required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the "Big Power Law in the Sky" observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  13. A Rare Anomaly of Duodenum: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Lalwani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available  Anatomical variations of duodenum such as atresia, stenosis, and variations in shape have been described by various authors, but the existence of a gross anomaly in shape and position of midgut segment of the duodenum is rare. Few reported cases of duodenal anomalies date back to early twentieth century. In the wake of advancement of imaging techniques and minimal access surgeries, authors report a case of a rare duodenal anomaly. The reported case assumes significance because of thepossibility of misinterpretation of radiological images which has been discussed while citing such references. The present case reports an anomaly of the position of the midgut segment of the duodenum in an adult female cadaver. It was observed that the lower half of second part of duodenum was coiled like a serpent on the upper pole of right kidney. This part coursed initially upwards running parallel and to the right of the upper half of the second part of the duodenum. The third part coursed downwards and to the left, posterior to head and neck of pancreas, in its course sandwiching the commencement of portal vein.

  14. A radiological study on the tooth shape anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Karp Shik [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and distribution according to the types of tooth shape anomalies in permanent teeth of 6,082 persons by means of analysis of the full mouth periapical radiographs. And the following results were obtained ; 1. Among tooth shape anomalies, the highest incidence was observed on dilaceration (20.14%), followed by dens invaginatus (3.02%), peg lateralis (1.48%), taurodontism (0.34%), dens evaginatus (0.33%), talon cusp (0.20%), fusion (0.07%) and gemination (0%) in descending order of frequency. 2. Peg lateralis, dens invaginatus and dilaceration occurred more prevalent in females, and other types of tooth shape anomalies occurred more prevalent in males. 3. Dens evaginatus and taurodontism occurred with bilateral tendency, but other anomalies occurred with unilateral tendency. 4. As to the involved teeth, maxillary lateral incisors were the most frequently involved teeth on peg lateralis, dens invaginatus and talon cusp. And the mandibular premolars were the most frequently involved teeth on dens evaginatus, the maxillary first molars were on taurodontism, the maxillary second premolars were on dilaceration, and the mandibular incisors and canines were on fusion.

  15. Seasonal sea surface temperature anomaly prediction for coastal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Charles A.; Pegion, Kathy; Vecchi, Gabriel A.; Alexander, Michael A.; Tommasi, Desiree; Bond, Nicholas A.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Gudgel, Richard G.; Kristiansen, Trond; O'Brien, Todd D.; Xue, Yan; Yang, Xiasong

    2015-09-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies are often both leading indicators and important drivers of marine resource fluctuations. Assessment of the skill of SST anomaly forecasts within coastal ecosystems accounting for the majority of global fish yields, however, has been minimal. This reflects coarse global forecast system resolution and past emphasis on the predictability of ocean basin-scale SST variations. This paper assesses monthly to inter-annual SST anomaly predictions in coastal "Large Marine Ecosystems" (LMEs). We begin with an analysis of 7 well-observed LMEs adjacent to the United States and then examine how mechanisms responsible for prediction skill in these systems are reflected in predictions for LMEs globally. Historical SST anomaly estimates from the 1/4° daily Optimal Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature reanalysis (OISST.v2) were first found to be highly consistent with in-situ measurements for 6 of the 7 U.S. LMEs. Thirty years of retrospective forecasts from climate forecast systems developed at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (CM2.5-FLOR) and the National Center for Environmental Prediction (CFSv2) were then assessed against OISST.v2. Forecast skill varied widely by LME, initialization month, and lead but there were many cases of high skill that also exceeded that of a persistence forecast, some at leads greater than 6 months. Mechanisms underlying skill above persistence included accurate simulation of (a) seasonal transitions between less predictable locally generated and more predictable basin-scale SST variability; (b) seasonal transitions between different basin-scale influences; (c) propagation of SST anomalies across seasons through sea ice; and (d) re-emergence of previous anomalies upon the breakdown of summer stratification. Globally, significant skill above persistence across many tropical systems arises via mechanisms (a) and (b). Combinations of all four mechanisms contribute to less prevalent but nonetheless

  16. The association of gastroschisis with other congenital anomalies: how important is it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Rodrigo; Picone, Olivier; Bernardes, Lisandra; Martinovic, Jelena; Dumez, Yves; Benachi, Alexandra

    2011-04-01

    To report the prevalence of the association between gastroschisis and other anomalies, their prenatal characteristics and the postnatal follow-up. Prenatal and postnatal data from all patients with gastroschis prenatally diagnosed between January 1998 and December 2006 were reviewed concerning the presence of associated anomalies. Gastroschisis was prenatally diagnosed in 108 fetuses. Associated anomalies were identified in 14 cases (prevalence of 13.0%), with prenatal diagnosis being made in 5 (35.7%) patients. Postnatal examination revealed the association of other anomalies in nine other newborns not observed during prenatal examinations. Maternal age, parity, gestational age at diagnosis and birth, delivery mode and birth weight were similar in cases with 'isolated gastroschisis' and associated anomalies (p > 0.05). Survival rates in the 'isolated gastroschisis group' and 'associated anomaly group' were 91.5 and 78.6% (p > 0.05), respectively. The median time before oral feeding tended to be longer (but not statistical significantly) in the 'associated anomaly group' (32, range: 5-720 days) compared to the 'isolated gastroschisis group' (22, range: 5-180 days; p = 0.06), but with a significantly longer permanence in neonatal intensive care unit (p = 0.04). This study highlights the importance of identifying other anomalies when evaluating fetuses with gastroschisis to permit counselling concerning the postnatal outcomes. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. [Congenital anomalies in Amsterdam: results of the 'Amsterdam-Born Children and their Development' study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikkens, Jonne J; van Eijsden, Manon; Bezemer, P Dick; Bakker, Marian K; Bonsel, Gouke J; van der Wal, Marcel F; Cornel, Martina C

    2009-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of congenital anomalies in children born in Amsterdam and to analyse potential differences between groups based on risk factors such as ethnicity and maternal age. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study. Between 2003 and 2004, mothers filled in questionnaires on their newborn children on behalf of the Amsterdam-Born Children and their Development study (ABCD study). Data from 5,276 liveborn children in this cohort were used to calculate the prevalence rates of congenital anomalies in Amsterdam. These were compared with expected prevalence rates based on Eurocat data for the Northern region of the Netherlands during the years 2000-2005. Prevalence rates were compared between subgroups which had been divided according to risk factors: maternal ethnic origin, maternal age, parity, gender of child, inter-pregnancy interval, years of maternal education, smoking, alcohol use, and periconceptional folate use. The total prevalence of major congenital anomalies among liveborn children in the ABCD cohort was as expected based on the figures from the Eurocat registration. Digestive anomalies were reported significantly less frequently (n = 1) than expected (n = 10). Mothers of Surinam descent more frequently reported a child with a musculoskeletal anomaly. Older mothers were more likely to report congenital anomalies. No significant trends regarding other risk factors were observed. No significant trends regarding ethnicity and congenital anomalies were detected. The interpretation of the other results was hampered by methodological differences between the ABCD study and Eurocat. Nationwide registration with active case detection of congenital anomalies is therefore recommended.

  18. Gaussian Process Regression-Based Video Anomaly Detection and Localization With Hierarchical Feature Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai-Wen; Chen, Yie-Tarng; Fang, Wen-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a hierarchical framework for detecting local and global anomalies via hierarchical feature representation and Gaussian process regression (GPR) which is fully non-parametric and robust to the noisy training data, and supports sparse features. While most research on anomaly detection has focused more on detecting local anomalies, we are more interested in global anomalies that involve multiple normal events interacting in an unusual manner, such as car accidents. To simultaneously detect local and global anomalies, we cast the extraction of normal interactions from the training videos as a problem of finding the frequent geometric relations of the nearby sparse spatio-temporal interest points (STIPs). A codebook of interaction templates is then constructed and modeled using the GPR, based on which a novel inference method for computing the likelihood of an observed interaction is also developed. Thereafter, these local likelihood scores are integrated into globally consistent anomaly masks, from which anomalies can be succinctly identified. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time GPR is employed to model the relationship of the nearby STIPs for anomaly detection. Simulations based on four widespread datasets show that the new method outperforms the main state-of-the-art methods with lower computational burden.

  19. Genotoxic Effects of Tobacco on Buccal Epithelium: Cell Nuclear Anomalies as Biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohini Das Biswas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco use has toxic effects on different organs. This study was carried out to assess the effect of indigenous tobacco both in smoking (bidi and smokeless (gutkha, zarda and khaini forms on buccal cells at chromosomal level, through assessment of different nuclear anomalies as biomarker. Methods:This study was done on people living in Durgapur and its adjacent areas, West Bengal, India during January to July 2011. The samples were collected from 50 smokers (case group, 50 smokeless tobacco consumers or chewers (case group and 50 non-tobacco consumers (control group. Micronucleus assay was used to assess buccal cell nuclear changes. Buccal smears collected from study subjects were prepared on a grease free slide. Prepared slides were observed under light microscope and 2 to 5 fields were observed randomly for counting the different anomalies. In each field, the frequency of each anomaly was assessed in 100 cells and reported with percentage. Results:Chewers had significantly the highest frequency of all nuclear anomalies compared to smokers and healthy controls (HCs. Smokers also had significantly more anomalies compared to HCs. Condensed chromatin (CC, karyolysis (KL and bi-nucleation (BN in chewers and CC, pyknosis and BN in smokers were the most frequent anomalies. KL was significantly more frequent in chewers compared to smokers (59.8 ± 6.4 vs. 24.2 ± 12.4%, P < 0.001, however, the frequency of other nuclear anomalies were not significantly different in these two study groups. Presence of each nuclear anomaly was significantly greater in older ages in all study groups. Conclusion:Tobacco can cause and increase the rate of nuclear anomalies in both smoking and smokeless forms compared to HCs. The genotoxic effects of tobacco on buccal cells are partly age-related. Cell nuclear anomalies in buccal tissue can be used as biomarker indicating the detrimental effects of tobacco.

  20. Direct observation and validation of fluorescein tear film break-up patterns by using a dual thermal-fluorescent imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tai-Yuan; Chang, Shu-Wen; Yang, Chiao-Ju; Chiang, Huihua Kenny

    2014-08-01

    The fluorescein tear film break-up test is a common tear film stability test for dry eye diagnosis. This test requires applying fluorescein sodium drops to a tear film to observe the tear film break-up. However, this test is limited by using the fluorescein sodium drops, which can induce reflex tearing and reduce the reliability of the diagnosis results. This paper proposes that tear film evaporation accelerates on the fluorescein tear film break-up area (FTBA), resulting in a lower temperature area (LTA) on the tear film. A dual modality system was established to capture the thermal and fluorescent image of fluorescein-stain tear films for 48 participants. Observations showed that the LTA and FTBA were highly correlated in their location (r = 0.82) and size (r = 0.91). This is first study to show that the FTBA and LTA are essentially the same region. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using the noncontact thermograph method to evaluate tear film stability without using a fluorescein sodium drop.

  1. Plastic anomaly of the B2 ordered Fe-40Al alloy; Anomalie plastique de l'alliage Fe-40Al ordonne B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, O

    2002-05-01

    The plastic behaviour of Fe-40Al (B2-ordered) alloys was studied. This material has the particularly of exhibiting a yield stress that increases in a given temperature range ('yield stress anomaly'). This anomaly is usually associated with a zero strain rate sensitivity in the very same temperature range. These two peculiarities can be explained as a whole by a thermally activated exhaustion of the mobile dislocations. In this work, the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of the FeAl alloys was first characterised. Then, slip geometry was studied in a large temperature range using oriented single crystals. Finally, the elementary deformation processes were studied through an analysis of dislocation structures in deformed materials using TEM post-mortem and in-situ techniques. Our results show that the yield stress anomaly stems from superdislocations exhaustion through the formation of antiphase boundary tubes, due to vacancy absorption. The number of antiphase boundary tubes produced during dislocation motion depends on vacancy concentration, that in turn increases with temperature. This is believed to be the main reason for thermally activated exhaustion. In addition, the anomaly peak and the related stress fall-off at higher temperatures can be ascribed to superdislocation decomposition, which provides the material with ordinary dislocations that cannot generate antiphase boundary tubes. Superdislocations exhaustion seems to be the catalyzing factor for decomposition. We have proposed a basis for an exhaustion/multiplication model. Considering a classical Frank-Read type multiplication mechanism, we express the yield stress as a function of temperature and we show that this results in an anomaly. Moreover, supposing that boron modifies vacancy migration energy, we suggest that the influence of boron on the stress anomaly stems from an increase of vacancy capture radius by mobile superdislocations. (authors)

  2. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turcotte, Melissa [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the

  3. Persistence and photochemical decay of springtime total ozone anomalies in the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tegtmeier

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistence and decay of springtime total ozone anomalies over the entire extratropics (midlatitudes plus polar regions is analysed using results from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM, a comprehensive chemistry-climate model. As in the observations, interannual anomalies established through winter and spring persist with very high correlation coefficients (above 0.8 through summer until early autumn, while decaying in amplitude as a result of photochemical relaxation in the quiescent summertime stratosphere. The persistence and decay of the ozone anomalies in CMAM agrees extremely well with observations, even in the southern hemisphere when the model is run without heterogeneous chemistry (in which case there is no ozone hole and the seasonal cycle of ozone is quite different from observations. However in a version of CMAM with strong vertical diffusion, the northern hemisphere anomalies decay far too rapidly compared to observations. This shows that ozone anomaly persistence and decay does not depend on how the springtime anomalies are created or on their magnitude, but reflects the transport and photochemical decay in the model. The seasonality of the long-term trends over the entire extratropics is found to be explained by the persistence of the interannual anomalies, as in the observations, demonstrating that summertime ozone trends reflect winter/spring trends rather than any change in summertime ozone chemistry. However this mechanism fails in the northern hemisphere midlatitudes because of the relatively large impact, compared to observations, of the CMAM polar anomalies. As in the southern hemisphere, the influence of polar ozone loss in CMAM increases the midlatitude summertime loss, leading to a relatively weak seasonal dependence of ozone loss in the Northern Hemisphere compared to the observations.

  4. Discriminating satellite IR anomalies associated with the MS 7.1 Yushu earthquake in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kai; Wu, Lixin; Zheng, Shuo; Ma, Weiyu

    2018-03-01

    In the process of exploring pre-earthquake thermal anomalies using satellite infrared data, Blackett et al. (2011) found that the previously reported anomalies before the 2001 Mw 7.7 Gujarat earthquake, in India, were related to positive biases caused by data gaps due to cloud cover and mosaicing of neighboring orbits of MODIS satellite data. They supposed that such effects could also be responsible for other cases. We noted a strip-shaped TIR anomaly on March 17th, 2010, 28 days before the Ms. 7.1 Yushu earthquake (Qin et al., 2011). Here we again investigate multi-year infrared satellite data in different bands to discriminate whether the anomaly is associated with the earthquake, or is only bias caused by the data gaps. From the water vapor images, we find lots of clouds that have TIR anomalies. However, on the cloudiness background, there is an obvious strip-shaped gap matching the tectonic faults almost perfectly. In particular, the animation loops of hourly water vapor images show that the cloud kept moving from west to east, while they never covered the strip-shaped gap. We consider that the cloud with this special spatial pattern should have implied the abnormal signals associated with the seismogenic process. Based on current physical models, the satellite IR anomalies both on TIR and water vapor bands can qualitatively be explained using synthetic mechanisms.

  5. Data Mining for Anomaly Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Gautam; Mack, Daniel; Mylaraswamy, Dinkar; Bharadwaj, Raj

    2013-01-01

    The Vehicle Integrated Prognostics Reasoner (VIPR) program describes methods for enhanced diagnostics as well as a prognostic extension to current state of art Aircraft Diagnostic and Maintenance System (ADMS). VIPR introduced a new anomaly detection function for discovering previously undetected and undocumented situations, where there are clear deviations from nominal behavior. Once a baseline (nominal model of operations) is established, the detection and analysis is split between on-aircraft outlier generation and off-aircraft expert analysis to characterize and classify events that may not have been anticipated by individual system providers. Offline expert analysis is supported by data curation and data mining algorithms that can be applied in the contexts of supervised learning methods and unsupervised learning. In this report, we discuss efficient methods to implement the Kolmogorov complexity measure using compression algorithms, and run a systematic empirical analysis to determine the best compression measure. Our experiments established that the combination of the DZIP compression algorithm and CiDM distance measure provides the best results for capturing relevant properties of time series data encountered in aircraft operations. This combination was used as the basis for developing an unsupervised learning algorithm to define "nominal" flight segments using historical flight segments.

  6. Study of Shell-Mold Thermal Resistance: Laboratory Measurements, Estimation from Compact Strip Production Plant Data, and Observation of Simulated Flux-Mold Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    González de la C., J. Manuel; Flores F., Tania M.; Castillejos E., A. Humberto

    2016-08-01

    The slag film that forms between the shell and mold in steel continuous casting is key in regulating the heat transfer between them. Generally, the mechanisms proposed are related to the phenomena associated with the formation of crystals in the solid layer of the film, such as the appearance of internal pores and surface roughness, which decrease phononic conduction through the layer and interfacial gap with the mold, respectively, and the emergence of crystals themselves, which reduce the transmissivity of infrared radiation across the layer. Due to the importance of the solid layer, this study investigates experimentally the effective thermal resistance, R T, between a hot Inconel surface and a cold Cu surface separated by an initially glassy slag disk, made from powders for casting low and medium-carbon steels, denoted as A and B, respectively. In the tests, an initially mirror-polished disk is sandwiched for 10,800 seconds while the Inconel temperature, away from the disk face, is maintained steady at a value, T c, between 973 K and 1423 K (700 °C and 1150 °C)-below the liquidus temperature of the slags. The disks have a thickness, d t, between ~0.7 and 3.2 mm. Over the range of conditions studied, mold slag B shows R T 33 pct larger than slag A, and microscopic observation of disks hints that the greater resistance arises from the larger porosity developed in B. This finding is supported by high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscope observations of the evolution of the surface of slag parallelepipeds encased between Pt sheets, which reveal that during devitrification the film surface moves outward not inward, contrary with what is widely claimed. This behavior would favor contact of the slag with the mold for both kinds of powders. However, in the case of slag A, the crystalline grains growing at or near the surface pack closely together, leaving only few and small empty spaces. In slag B, crystalline grains pack loosely and many and large empty

  7. Case-control analysis of paternal age and trisomic anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, E; Morris, J K

    2010-11-01

    To determine whether older paternal age increases the risk of fathering a pregnancy with Patau (trisomy 13), Edwards (trisomy 18), Klinefelter (XXY) or XYY syndrome. Case-control: cases with each of these syndromes were matched to four controls with Down syndrome from within the same congenital anomaly register and with maternal age within 6 months. Data from 22 EUROCAT congenital anomaly registers in 12 European countries. Diagnoses with observed or (for terminations) predicted year of birth from 1980 to 2005, comprising live births, fetal deaths with gestational age ≥ 20 weeks and terminations after prenatal diagnosis of the anomaly. Data include 374 cases of Patau syndrome, 929 of Edwards syndrome, 295 of Klinefelter syndrome, 28 of XYY syndrome and 5627 controls with Down syndrome. Odds ratio (OR) associated with a 10-year increase in paternal age for each anomaly was estimated using conditional logistic regression. Results were adjusted to take account of the estimated association of paternal age with Down syndrome (1.11; 95% CI 1.01 to 1.23). The OR for Patau syndrome was 1.10 (95% CI 0.83 to 1.45); for Edwards syndrome, 1.15 (0.96 to 1.38); for Klinefelter syndrome, 1.35 (1.02 to 1.79); and for XYY syndrome, 1.99 (0.75 to 5.26). There was a statistically significant increase in the odds of Klinefelter syndrome with increasing paternal age. The larger positive associations of Klinefelter and XYY syndromes with paternal age compared with Patau and Edwards syndromes are consistent with the greater percentage of these sex chromosome anomalies being of paternal origin.

  8. Wind forcing of salinity anomalies in the Denmark Strait overflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hall

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The overflow of dense water from the Nordic Seas to the North Atlantic through Denmark Strait is an important part of the global thermohaline circulation. The salinity of the overflow plume has been measured by an array of current meters across the continental slope off the coast of Angmagssalik, southeast Greenland since September 1998. During 2004 the salinity of the overflow plume changed dramatically; the entire width of the array (70 km freshened between January 2004 and July 2004, with a significant negative salinity anomaly of about 0.06 in May. The event in May represents a fresh anomaly of over 3 standard deviations from the mean since recording began in 1998. The OCCAM 1/12° Ocean General Circulation Model not only reproduces the 2004 freshening event (r=0.96, p<0.01, but also correlates well with salinity observations over a previous 6 year period (r=0.54, p<0.01, despite the inevitable limitations of a z-coordinate model in representing the mixing processes at and downstream of the Denmark Strait sill. Consequently the physical processes causing the 2004 anomaly and prior variability in salinity are investigated using the model output. Our results reject the hypotheses that the anomaly is caused by processes occurring between the overflow sill and the moorings, or by an increase in upstream net freshwater input. Instead, we show that the 2004 salinity anomaly is caused by an increase in volume flux of low salinity water, with a potential density greater than 27.60 kg m−3, flowing towards the Denmark Strait sill in the East Greenland Current. This is caused by an increase in southward wind stress upstream of the sill at around 75° N 20° W four and a half months earlier, and an associated strengthening of the East Greenland Current.

  9. Obstetric outcome of women with uterine anomalies in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Yang-yu; Qiao, Jie

    2010-02-20

    Congenital uterine anomalies are associated with the highest incidence of reproductive failure and obstetric complications. This study aimed to summarize the clinical characteristics and prenatal outcome of pregnancy in women with congenital uterine malformations. This retrospective study evaluated the fertility and obstetric outcome of 116 inpatients with uterine malformations with pregnancy in Peking University Third Hospital from June 1998 to June 2009. A total of 270 randomly selected pregnant women with a previously confirmed normally shaped uterus as a control group. Student's t test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to compare means for normally distributed variables. The analysis was carried out using the SPSS. Among 21 961 deliveries in Peking University Third Hospital, 116 (0.45%) were in women with uterine anomalies. A septate uterus was present in 43 (37.1%) and the uterus didelphys in 28 (24.2%) of the 116 women identified. Bicornuate uterus, arcuate and unicomate uterus were observed in 12 (10.3%), 18 (15.5%) and 15 (12.9%) patients, respectively. Patients with uterine anomalies had significantly higher rates of malpresentation (38.8%), preterm delivery (19.8%), and cesarean section (78.5%) compared with the group of women with a normal uterus. Patients with uterine anomalies had significantly lower mean birth-weight neonates and a significantly higher incidence of small for gestationalage (SGA) neonates; women with uterus didelphys more frequently required infertility treatment than patients with other uterine anomalies (P unicorns (P < 0.05). Women with congenital uterinemal formation usually have higher incidence of complications during pregnancy and delivery. A septate uterus appears to be associated with poorer obstetric outcomes.

  10. TECHNICAL AND FUNDAMENTAL ANOMALIES. PARADOXES OF MODERN STOCK EXCHANGE MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAKO Elena Dana

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper continues the series of researches about the paradoxes of modern stock exchange markets and their impact on the real economy, addressing this time the most important technical anomalies but also fundamental anomalies, which can be observed on the financial markets. As we mentioned in several previous articles, the paradoxes of stock exchanges are related to potential contradictions that arise in relation to a generally accepted truth. A lot of researches in the field of stock market investment focused on finding the answer to the question whether historical prices can be used to predict future prices for listed securities. Complex forecasting methods were created to clarify this aspect. Thus, technical analysis is a method of forecasting the price movements and trends of the market in the future, by studying the market graphs (including here both, the price of the listed instruments and the volume of transactions. The fundamental anomalies refer to the anomalies in trading financial instruments, and to the elements of fundamental analysis. The basic principle of fundamental analysis refers to the fact that the market price of any financial instrument is the result of supply and demand for that instrument. Both the supply and demand that finally determine the price of a financial instrument, are under the influence of various factors. Market’s analysts monitor various economic indicators and examine the market reports, to detect changes that may occur in the economy. The fundamental analysis attempts to predict prices and the overall market development by analyzing some economic indicators, political or social factors which are likely to influence the stock exchange prices. Both technical and fundamental anomalies have a major impact on price formation for financial instruments which are traded on stock exchanges, and are able to offer to warned investors higher earnings.

  11. Sea surface temperature anomalies in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    . Further analysis has shown that the sea surface anomalies are well correlated to the anomalies of air temperature and latent heat flux values; whereas they are least correlated to the anomalies of wind stress and net radiation values, except over...

  12. Associated anomalies in cleft lip and palate: analysis of 811 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    facial congenital anomalies. It has not been established if specific types of anomalies are frequently related with clefts, or which organ is most commonly affected. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of associated anomalies in consecutive ...

  13. Optical and thermal design of 1.5-m aperture solar UV visible and IR observing telescope for Solar-C mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Y.; Katsukawa, Y.; Shimizu, T.; Ichimoto, K.; Horiuchi, T.; Matsumoto, Y.; Takeyama, N.

    2017-11-01

    order of magnitude more photons than SOT, relatively shorter telescope length of 2.8 m to accommodate a launcher's nosecone size for possible dual-satellite-launch configuration, and much wider observing wavelength from UV (down to 250 nm) through near IR (up to 1100 nm). The large aperture is essentially important to attain scientific goals of the plan-B, especially for accurate diagnostics of the dynamic solar chromosphere as revealed by Hinode, although this make it difficult to design the telescope because of ten times more solar heat load introduced into the telescope. The SUVIT consists of two optically separable components; the telescope assembly (TA) and an accompanying focal plane package equipped with filtergraphs and spectrographs. Opto-mechanical and -thermal performance of the TA is crucial to attain high-quality solar observations and here we present a status of feasible study in its optical and thermal designing for diffraction-limited performance at visible wavelength in a reasonably wide field of view.

  14. Effect of geomagnetic storm conditions on the equatorial ionization anomaly and equatorial temperature anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Gaurav; Bag, T.; Sunil Krishna, M. V.

    2018-03-01

    The effect of the geomagnetic storm on the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) and equatorial temperature anomaly (ETA) has been studied using the atomic oxygen dayglow emissions at 577.7 nm (OI 557.7 nm) and 732.0 nm (OII 732.0 nm). For the purpose of this study, four intense geomagnetic storms during the ascending phase of solar cycle 24 have been considered. This study is primarily based on the results obtained using photochemical models with necessary inputs from theoretical studies and experimental observations. The latest reaction rate coefficients, quantum yields and the corresponding cross-sections have also been incorporated in these models. The volume emission rate of airglow emissions has been calculated using the neutral densities from NRLMSISE-00 and charged densities from IRI-2012 model. The modeled volume emission rate (VER) for OI 557.7 nm shows a positive correlation with the Dst index at 150 km and negative correlation with Dst at 250 and 280 km altitudes. Latitudinal profile of the greenline emission rate at different altitudes show a distinct behaviour similar to what has been observed in EIA with crests on either sides of the equator. The EIA crests are found to show poleward movement in the higher altitude regions. The volume emission rate of 732.0 nm emission shows a strong enhancement during the main phase of the storm. The changes observed in the airglow emission rates are explained with the help of variations induced in neutral densities and parameters related to EIA and ETA. The latitudinal variation of 732.0 nm emission rate is correlated to the variability in EIA during the storm period.

  15. Structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiabei; Yang, Xiu-qun

    2017-04-01

    The structure and dynamics of decadal anomalies in the wintertime midlatitude North Pacific ocean-atmosphere system are examined in this study, using the NCEP/NCAR atmospheric reanalysis, HadISST SST and Simple Ocean Data Assimilation data for 1960-2010. The midlatitude decadal anomalies associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation are identified, being characterized by an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low (high) pressure over a cold (warm) oceanic surface. Such a unique configuration of decadal anomalies can be maintained by an unstable ocean-atmosphere interaction mechanism in the midlatitudes, which is hypothesized as follows. Associated with a warm PDO phase, an initial midlatitude surface westerly anomaly accompanied with intensified Aleutian low tends to force a negative SST anomaly by increasing upward surface heat fluxes and driving southward Ekman current anomaly. The SST cooling tends to increase the meridional SST gradient, thus enhancing the subtropical oceanic front. As an adjustment of the atmospheric boundary layer to the enhanced oceanic front, the low-level atmospheric meridional temperature gradient and thus the low-level atmospheric baroclinicity tend to be strengthened, inducing more active transient eddy activities that increase transient eddy vorticity forcing. The vorticity forcing that dominates the total atmospheric forcing tends to produce an equivalent barotropic atmospheric low pressure north of the initial westerly anomaly, intensifying the initial anomalies of the midlatitude surface westerly and Aleutian low. Therefore, it is suggested that the midlatitude ocean-atmosphere interaction can provide a positive feedback mechanism for the development of initial anomaly, in which the oceanic front and the atmospheric transient eddy are the indispensable ingredients. Such a positive ocean-atmosphere feedback mechanism is fundamentally responsible for the observed decadal anomalies in the midlatitude North Pacific ocean

  16. Anomalies in field theories with extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Scrucca, C A

    2004-01-01

    We give an overview of the issue of anomalies in field theories with extra dimensions. We start by reviewing in a pedagogical way the computation of the standard perturbative gauge and gravitational anomalies on non-compact spaces, using Fujikawa's approach and functional integral methods, and discuss the available mechanisms for their cancellation. We then generalize these analyses to the case of orbifold field theories with compact internal dimensions, emphasizing the new aspects related to the presence of orbifold singularities and discrete Wilson lines, and the new cancellation mechanisms that are becoming available. We conclude with a very brief discussion on global and parity anomalies.

  17. [Diagnosis and management of vascular anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philandrianos, C; Degardin, N; Casanova, D; Petit, P; Bartoli, J-M; Bardot, J; Magalon, G

    2011-06-01

    Vascular anomalies are a complex pathological group. They are especially difficult to study because of confusion in the terminology used. The classification developed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) in 1996 allows using a common scientific language. There are two groups of lesions: vascular tumor and vascular malformation. The management of these anomalies is difficult and must involve an interdisciplinary approach including specialists in plastic surgery, radiology, pediatry and dermatology. We propose a simplified approach for the management of these pathologies. This approach is coming from the experience of Marseille (France) multidisciplinary team. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Using EVT for Geological Anomaly Design and Its Application in Identifying Anomalies in Mining Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feilong Qin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A geological anomaly is the basis of mineral deposit prediction. Through the study of the knowledge and characteristics of geological anomalies, the category of extreme value theory (EVT to which a geological anomaly belongs can be determined. Associating the principle of the EVT and ensuring the methods of the shape parameter and scale parameter for the generalized Pareto distribution (GPD, the methods to select the threshold of the GPD can be studied. This paper designs a new algorithm called the EVT model of geological anomaly. These study data on Cu and Au originate from 26 exploration lines of the Jiguanzui Cu-Au mining area in Hubei, China. The proposed EVT model of the geological anomaly is applied to identify anomalies in the Jiguanzui Cu-Au mining area. The results show that the model can effectively identify the geological anomaly region of Cu and Au. The anomaly region of Cu and Au is consistent with the range of ore bodies of actual engineering exploration. Therefore, the EVT model of the geological anomaly can effectively identify anomalies, and it has a high indicating function with respect to ore prospecting.

  19. Thermal Mapping Airborne Simulator for Small Satellite Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance, inexpensive, airborne simulator that will serve as the prototype for a small satellite based imaging system capable of mapping thermal anomalies...

  20. In situ observation of thermally activated domain memory and polarization memory in an aged K{sup +}-doped (Ba, Sr)TiO{sub 3} single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue Dezhen; Gao Jinghui; Bao Huixin; Zhou Yumei; Zhang Lixue; Ren Xiaobing, E-mail: Xuedezhen@gmail.com [Multi-disciplinary Materials Research Center, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2011-07-13

    Different ferroelectric domains are degenerate states of the same ferroelectric phase; thus they are energetically equivalent and, in principle there exists no preference for a particular domain pattern. However, the existence of point defects is considered to stabilize certain preferential domain states. In order to study the temperature violation on such stabilized domains, we performed in situ observation on an aged K{sup +}-doped (Ba, Sr)TiO{sub 3} single crystal and found that both the domain configuration and polarization state can be memorized after experiencing a thermally activated ferro-para-ferro transition cycle, as manifested by a reappearance of the same domain pattern and double P-E hysteresis loop. In contrast, after the sample was aged in the paraelectric state (>10 min), these memory effects disappeared. The above memory effects are considered to originate from the interaction between point defects and the crystal symmetry driven by a symmetry-conforming tendency of point defects. Such a mechanism suggests that the memory effects are relevant to the existence of acceptor dopant and associated mobile oxygen vacancies, and they are not restricted to a particular dopant. Thus similar memory effects are expected to exist in a wide range of ferroelectric materials with acceptor doping.

  1. "TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region. IX. Thermal properties of Kuiper belt objects and Centaurs from combined Herschel and Spitzer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lellouch, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lacerda, P.; Mommert, M.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Müller, T. G.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Moreno, R.; Groussin, O.; Delsanti, A.; Harris, A. W.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The goal of this work is to characterize the ensemble thermal properties of the Centaurs / trans-Neptunian population. Methods: Thermal flux measurements obtained with Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS provide size, albedo, and beaming factors for 85 objects (13 of which are presented here for

  2. "TNOs are Cool" : A survey of the trans-Neptunian region IX. Thermal properties of Kuiper belt objects and Centaurs from combined Herschel and Spitzer observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lellouch, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lacerda, P.; Mommert, M.; Duffard, R.; Ortiz, J. L.; Mueller, T. G.; Fornasier, S.; Stansberry, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Vilenius, E.; Mueller, M.; Peixinho, N.; Moreno, R.; Groussin, O.; Delsanti, A.; Harris, A. W.

    Aims. The goal of this work is to characterize the ensemble thermal properties of the Centaurs/trans-Neptunian population. Methods. Thermal flux measurements obtained with Herschel/PACS and Spitzer/MIPS provide size, albedo, and beaming factors for 85 objects (13 of which are presented here for the

  3. Decadal climate prediction with a refined anomaly initialisation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Danila; Guemas, Virginie; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco J.; Hawkins, Ed; Nichols, Nancy K.

    2017-03-01

    In decadal prediction, the objective is to exploit both the sources of predictability from the external radiative forcings and from the internal variability to provide the best possible climate information for the next decade. Predicting the climate system internal variability relies on initialising the climate model from observational estimates. We present a refined method of anomaly initialisation (AI) applied to the ocean and sea ice components of the global climate forecast model EC-Earth, with the following key innovations: (1) the use of a weight applied to the observed anomalies, in order to avoid the risk of introducing anomalies recorded in the observed climate, whose amplitude does not fit in the range of the internal variability generated by the model; (2) the AI of the ocean density, instead of calculating it from the anomaly initialised state of temperature and salinity. An experiment initialised with this refined AI method has been compared with a full field and standard AI experiment. Results show that the use of such refinements enhances the surface temperature skill over part of the North and South Atlantic, part of the South Pacific and the Mediterranean Sea for the first forecast year. However, part of such improvement is lost in the following forecast years. For the tropical Pacific surface temperature, the full field initialised experiment performs the best. The prediction of the Arctic sea-ice volume is improved by the refined AI method for the first three forecast years and the skill of the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation is significantly increased compared to a non-initialised forecast, along the whole forecast time.

  4. Factors affecting thermal infrared images at selected field sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisson, J.B.; Ferguson, J.S.

    1993-07-01

    A thermal infrared (TIR) survey was conducted to locate surface ordnance in and around the Naval Ordnance Disposal Area, and a thermal anomaly was found. This report documents studies conducted to identify the position of cause of the thermal anomaly. Also included are results of a long path Fourier transform infrared survey, soil sampling activities, soil gas surveys, and buried heater studies. The results of these studies indicated that the thermal anomaly was caused by a gravel pad, which had thermal properties different than those of the surrounding soil. Results from this investigation suggest that TIR is useful for locating surface objects having a high thermal inertia compared to the surrounding terrain, but TIR is of very limited use for characterizing buried waste or other similar buried objects at the INEL.

  5. Prediction of optical communication link availability: real-time observation of cloud patterns using a ground-based thermal infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Clément; Cros, Sylvain; Saint-Antonin, Laurent; Schmutz, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    The growing demand for high-speed broadband communications with low orbital or geostationary satellites is a major challenge. Using an optical link at 1.55 μm is an advantageous solution which potentially can increase the satellite throughput by a factor 10. Nevertheless, cloud cover is an obstacle for this optical frequency. Such communication requires an innovative management system to optimize the optical link availability between a satellite and several Optical Ground Stations (OGS). The Saint-Exupery Technological Research Institute (France) leads the project ALBS (French acronym for BroadBand Satellite Access). This initiative involving small and medium enterprises, industrial groups and research institutions specialized in aeronautics and space industries, is currently developing various solutions to increase the telecommunication satellite bandwidth. This paper presents the development of a preliminary prediction system preventing the cloud blockage of an optical link between a satellite and a given OGS. An infrared thermal camera continuously observes (night and day) the sky vault. Cloud patterns are observed and classified several times a minute. The impact of the detected clouds on the optical beam (obstruction or not) is determined by the retrieval of the cloud optical depth at the wavelength of communication. This retrieval is based on realistic cloud-modelling on libRadtran. Then, using subsequent images, cloud speed and trajectory are estimated. Cloud blockage over an OGS can then be forecast up to 30 minutes ahead. With this information, the preparation of the new link between the satellite and another OGS under a clear sky can be prepared before the link breaks due to cloud blockage.

  6. Mexico Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (97)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' gravity anomaly grid for Mexico, North-Central America and the Western Caribbean Sea is NOT the input data set used in the development of the MEXICO97 model....

  7. Magnetic anomalies in Central Bengal fan

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, T.C.S.; Lakshminarayana, S.; Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.

    Total magnetic field anomalies recorded over the Central Bengal Fan are analysed and the depths to the magnetic basement are computed using the analytical signal and the Werner deconvolution methods. To the west and east of 85 degrees E...

  8. Kesan Anomali Bermusim Terhadap Bursa Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nurfadhlina Binti Abdul Halim; How Teng Ying; Wan Muhamad Amir Bin Wan Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Kajian ini mengkaji sama ada Bursa Malaysia adalah efisien dalam bentuk lemah. Penemuan kewujudan anomali bermusim iaitu kesan Januari atau bulanan dan kesan harian akan menolak hipotesis pasaran efisien bentuk lemah...

  9. SEG US Bouguer Gravity Anomaly Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The SEG gravity data are the product of the ad hoc Gravity Anomaly Map (GAM) Committee, sponsored by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the U.S....

  10. Major congenital anomalies in a Danish region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Hansen, Anne Vinkel; Birkelund, Anne Sofie

    2014-01-01

    : diabetes, epilepsy, mental disorder, thyroid disease, asthma, or inflammatory bowel disease. Medication for these conditions accounted for 46% of maternal drug use. CONCLUSION: Maternal morbidity and use of potentially teratogenic medication have increased among congenital anomaly cases. Foetal and infant......INTRODUCTION: This study describes the prevalence of congenital anomalies and changes over time in birth outcome, mortality and chronic maternal diseases. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was based on population data from the EUROCAT registry covering the Funen County, Denmark, 1995......-2008. The registry covers live births, foetal deaths with a gestational age (GA) of 20 weeks or more, and terminations of pregnancy due to congenital anomalies (TOPFA). RESULTS: The overall prevalence of congenital anomalies was 2.70% (95% confidence interval: 2.58-2.80). The majority of cases had an isolated...

  11. Seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luteijn, Johannes Michiel; Dolk, Helen; Addor, Marie-Claude

    2014-01-01

    with influenza. RESULTS: We detected statistically significant seasonality in prevalence of anomalies previously associated with influenza, but the conception peak was in June (2.4% excess). We also detected seasonality in congenital cataract (April conceptions, 27%), hip dislocation and/or dysplasia (April, 12......BACKGROUND: This study describes seasonality of congenital anomalies in Europe to provide a baseline against which to assess the impact of specific time varying exposures such as the H1N1 pandemic influenza, and to provide a comprehensive and recent picture of seasonality and its possible relation...... to etiologic factors. METHODS: Data on births conceived in 2000 to 2008 were extracted from 20 European Surveillance for Congenital Anomalies population-based congenital anomaly registries in 14 European countries. We performed Poisson regression analysis encompassing sine and cosine terms to investigate...

  12. Coral Reef Watch, Temperature Anomaly, 50 km

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Coral Reef Watch distributes SST anomaly data using a combination of the POES AVHRR Global Area Coverage data, and data from a climatological database. AVHRR...

  13. Comparison of Unsupervised Anomaly Detection Methods

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Several different unsupervised anomaly detection algorithms have been applied to Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) data to serve the purpose of developing a...

  14. Causes of Upper-Ocean Temperature Anomalies in the Tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugg, A.; Foltz, G. R.; Perez, R. C.

    2016-02-01

    Hurricane activity and regional rainfall are strongly impacted by upper ocean conditions in the tropical North Atlantic, defined as the region between the equator and 20°N. A previous study analyzed a strong cold sea surface temperature (SST) anomaly that developed in this region during early 2009 and was recorded by the Pilot Research Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA) moored buoy at 4°N, 23°W (Foltz et al. 2012). The same mooring shows a similar cold anomaly in the spring of 2015 as well as a strong warm anomaly in 2010, offering the opportunity for a more comprehensive analysis of the causes of these events. In this study we examine the main causes of the observed temperature anomalies between 1998 and 2015. Basin-scale conditions during these events are analyzed using satellite SST, wind, and rain data, as well as temperature and salinity profiles from the NCEP Global Ocean Data Assimilation System. A more detailed analysis is conducted using ten years of direct measurements from the PIRATA mooring at 4°N, 23°W. Results show that the cooling and warming anomalies were caused primarily by wind-driven changes in surface evaporative cooling, mixed layer depth, and upper-ocean vertical velocity. Anomalies in surface solar radiation acted to damp the wind-driven SST anomalies in the latitude bands of the ITCZ (3°-8°N). Basin-scale analyses also suggest a strong connection between the observed SST anomalies and the Atlantic Meridional Mode, a well-known pattern of SST and surface wind anomalies spanning the tropical Atlantic.

  15. Maxillary dental anomalies in patients with cleft lip and palate: a cone beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikoglu, M; Buyuk, S K; Sekerci, A E; Cantekin, K; Candirli, C

    2015-01-01

    To compare the frequency of maxillary dental anomalies in patients affected by unilateral (UCLP) and bilateral (BCLP) cleft lip with palate and to determine whether statistical differences were present or not between cleft and normal sides in UCLP group by using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In addition, the frequency of those dental anomalies was compared with previous studies presenting the same population without cleft Study Design: Fifty non-syndromic patients affected by UCLP (28 patients) and BCLP (22 patients) were selected for analysis of dental anomalies by means of CBCT. The frequency of maxillary dental anomalies including tooth agenesis, microdontia of lateral incisor, ectopic eruption and impaction of canine and supernumerary tooth were examined. Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for statistical comparisons. All patients affected by UCLP and BCLP were found to have at least one maxillary dental anomaly. The most frequently observed dental anomaly was tooth agenesis (92.5% and 86.4%, respectively) in UCLP and BCLP groups. Tooth agenesis and canine impaction were observed more commonly in the cleft side (75.0% and 35.7%, respectively) than in the normal side (57.1% and 14.3%, respectively) in UCLP group (p≯0.05). All dental anomalies were found to be higher in both cleft groups than in general populations not affected by cleft. Since patients affected by UCLP and BCLP had at least one dental anomaly and higher dental anomaly frequency as compared to patients without cleft, those patients should be examined carefully prior to orthodontic treatment.

  16. Combining modelled and remote sensing soil moisture anomalies for an operational global drought monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammalleri, Carmelo; Vogt, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture anomalies (i.e., deviations from the climatology) are often seen as a reliable tool to monitor and quantify the occurrence of drought events and their potential impacts, especially in agricultural and naturally vegetated lands. Soil moisture datasets (or their proxy) can be derived from a variety of sources, including land-surface models and thermal and microwave satellite remote sensing images. However, each data source has different advantages and drawbacks that prevent to unequivocally prefer one dataset over the others, especially in global applications that encompass a wide range of soil moisture regimes. The analysis of the spatial reliability of the different datasets at global scale is further complicated by the lack of reliable long-term soil moisture records for a ground validation over most regions. To overcome this limitation, in recent years the Triple Collocation (TC) technique has been deployed in order to quantify the likely errors associated to three mutually-independent datasets without assuming that one of them represents the "truth". In this study, three global datasets of soil moisture anomalies are investigated: the first one derived from the runs of the Lisflood hydrological model, the second one obtained from the combined active/passive microwave dataset produced in the framework of the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI), and the last one derived from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) observations. A preliminary analysis of the three datasets aimed at detecting the areas where the TC technique can be successfully applied, hence the spatial distribution of the random error variance for each model is evaluated. This study allows providing useful advises for a robust combination of the three datasets into a single product for a more reliable global drought monitoring.

  17. Gravitational Anomalies in the Solar System?

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Mindful of the anomalous perihelion precession of Mercury discovered by U. Le Verrier in the second half of the nineteenth century and its successful explanation by A. Einstein with his General Theory of Relativity in the early years of the twentieth century, discrepancies among observed effects in our Solar system and their theoretical predictions on the basis of the currently accepted laws of gravitation applied to known bodies have the potential of paving the way for remarkable advances in fundamental physics. This is particularly important now more than ever, given that most of the Universe seems to be made of unknown substances dubbed Dark Matter and Dark Energy. Should this not be directly the case, Solar system's anomalies could anyhow lead to advancements in cumulative science, as shown to us by the discovery of Neptune in the first half of the nineteenth century. Moreover, investigations in one of such directions can serendipitously enrich the other one as well. The current status of some alleged gra...

  18. Gauge anomalies in Lorentz-violating QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tiago R. S.; Sobreiro, Rodrigo F.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we study the issue of gauge anomalies in Lorentz-violating QED. To do so, we opt to use the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism within the algebraic renormalization approach, reducing our study to a cohomology problem. Since this approach is independent of the renormalization scheme, the results obtained here are expected to be general. We find that the Lorentz-violating QED is free of gauge anomalies to all orders in perturbation theory.

  19. Road Anomalies Detection Using Basic Morphological Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Danilescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract—In this paper some approaches for pothole detection of roads, using morphological algorithms, are recalled and tested. For road anomalies detection, one of the key elements is the pavement pothole information. Any algorithm for pothole detection has certain advantages and limitations as well, due to the real world environment, which is highly unstructured and dynamic. For road segmentation, the road anomalies detection algorithm based on skeletonization is used.

  20. Road Anomalies Detection Using Basic Morphological Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Dalia Danilescu; Alexandru Lodin; Lăcrimioara Grama; Corneliu Rusu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract—In this paper some approaches for pothole detection of roads, using morphological algorithms, are recalled and tested. For road anomalies detection, one of the key elements is the pavement pothole information. Any algorithm for pothole detection has certain advantages and limitations as well, due to the real world environment, which is highly unstructured and dynamic. For road segmentation, the road anomalies detection algorithm based on skeletonization is used.

  1. On the stagnation point anomaly of RANS

    OpenAIRE

    野村, 駿; 島, 信行; Takashi, NOMURA; Nobuyuki, SHIMA; 静大院; 静大工; Shizuoka Univ.

    2010-01-01

    In impinging flows, most Reynolds-averaged turbulence models severely overpredict the wall-normal turbulence intensity on the stagnation streamline (The stagnation point anomaly). In the present study, plane impinging flows are predicted using a second-moment closure which employs a stress redistribution model proposed by Shima and Kobayashi (2007) with an additional redistribution term. The closure dissolves the stagnation point anomaly in spite of a simple "standard" ε transport equation ad...

  2. Anomaly Detection Approaches for Communication Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thottan, Marina; Liu, Guanglei; Ji, Chuanyi

    In recent years, network anomaly detection has become an important area for both commercial interests as well as academic research. Applications of anomaly detection typically stem from the perspectives of network monitoring and network security. In network monitoring, a service provider is often interested in capturing such network characteristics as heavy flows, flow size distributions, and the number of distinct flows. In network security, the interest lies in characterizing known or unknown anomalous patterns of an attack or a virus.

  3. On the use of SSTAs (Significant Sequences of TIR Anomalies) to activate Natural Time Analysis: a long term study on earthquakes (M>4) occurred in Greece during 2004-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisi, Mariano; Tramutoli, Valerio; Eleftheriou, Alexander; Filizzola, Carolina; Genzano, Nicola; Lacava, Teodosio; Paciello, Rossana; Pergola, Nicola; Vallianatos, Filippos

    2017-04-01

    Real-time integration of independent observations is expected to significantly improve our present capability of dynamically assess Seismic Hazard. Specific observations (e.g. anomaly in one parameter) can be used as a trigger (and/or to establish space/time constraints) for activating (implementing) the analysis on other independent parameters (e.g. b-value computation, Natural Time Analysis, on seismic data) whose systematic computation could result otherwise very computationally expensive or operationally impossible. In the present paper one of these parameters (the Earth's emitted radiation in the Thermal Infra-Red spectral region) has been used to activate the application of Natural Time Analysis of seismic data in order to verify possible improvements in the forecast of earthquakes (with M≥4) occurred in Greece during 2004-2013. The RST (Robust Satellite Technique) data analysis approach and RETIRA (Robust Estimator of TIR Anomalies) index were used to preliminarily define, and then to identify, Significant Sequences of TIR Anomalies (SSTAs) in 10 years (2004-2013) of daily TIR images acquired by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite. A previous paper showed that in the same period of time more than 93% of all identified SSTAs occurred in a pre-fixed space-time window around earthquakes time (30 days before up to 15 after) and epicenter (within 150 km or Dorbrovolsky distance) with a false positive rate smaller than 7%. In this paper a circular area around the barycenter of the observed Thermal Anomalies (and not just the convolution of them) has been used to define the area from which to collect seismic data required for Natural Time Analysis. Fifteen days prior the date of the first observed Significant Thermal Anomaly (STA) was the starting time used for collecting earthquakes from the catalog. The changes in the quality of earthquake forecast that were achieved by using each

  4. Anomalous diffusion and diffusion anomaly in confined Janus dumbbells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krott, Leandro B.; Gavazzoni, Cristina; Bordin, José Rafael

    2016-12-01

    Self-assembly and dynamical properties of Janus nanoparticles have been studied by molecular dynamic simulations. The nanoparticles are modeled as dimers and they are confined between two flat parallel plates to simulate a thin film. One monomer from the dumbbells interacts by a standard Lennard-Jones potential and the other by a two-length scales shoulder potential, typically used for anomalous fluids. Here, we study the effects of removing the Brownian effects, typical from colloidal systems immersed in aqueous solution, and consider a molecular system, without the drag force and the random collisions from the Brownian motion. Self-assembly and diffusion anomaly are preserved in relation to the Brownian system. Additionally, a superdiffusive regime associated to a collective reorientation in a highly structured phase is observed. Diffusion anomaly and anomalous diffusion are explained in the two length scale framework.

  5. The threshold anomaly for heavy-ion scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satchler, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    The real parts of optical potentials deduced from heavy-ion scattering measurements become rapidly more attractive as the bombarding energy is reduced close to the top of the Coulomb barrier. This behavior is explained as a coupled-channels effect, and is related to the corresponding reduction in the absorptive potential through a dispersion relation which expresses the consequences of causality. Another manifestation of this ''anomaly'' is the striking enhancement observed for the near- and sub-barrier fusion of two heavy ions. The barrier penetration model of fusion is examined critically in this context. It is also stressed that similar anomalies could appear in the energy dependence of nonelastic scattering. 21 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Pelger-Huët anomaly in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshuillers, Pierre; Raskin, Rose; Messick, Joanne

    2014-09-01

    A 14-year-old, spayed female Domestic Shorthair cat was referred to the Purdue University Veterinary Teaching Hospital (PUVTH) for iodine 131 treatment of hyperthyroidism. Upon arrival, a biochemistry profile and a CBC were performed. Approximately 50% of the neutrophils and all the eosinophils observed were hyposegmented with a mature, condensed chromatin pattern. Nuclei had a band to "dumbbell" shape, and rarely a round shape, suggesting a Pelger-Huët anomaly or a pseudo Pelger-Huët. Based on both a negative FeLV and FIV tests, the absence of any clinical signs to support an inflammatory process, and the persistence of this granulocytic morphology 6 months after its previous admission to the PUVTH, a diagnosis of Pelger-Huët anomaly was established in this cat. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  7. Medical imaging for congenital anomalies of the lung. Focused on tracheobronchial and parenchymal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohda, Ehiichi; Shiraga, Nobuyuki; Higuchi, Mutsumi; Ishibashi, Ryouchi [Tachikawa Hospital, Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-02-01

    This is a review of medical imaging studies for congenital anomalies of the lung focused on tracheobronchial and parenchymal anomalies. It is important to know the findings of these developmental anomalies, because they are frequently manifested as infectious diseases or mass. Documented details are pulmonary agenesis, aplasia, pulmonary hypoplasia, tracheal agenesis, bridging bronchus, tracheal bronchus, congenital tracheal stenosis, bronchial atresia, bronchobiliary fistula, bronchogenic cyst, bronchopulmonary sequestration, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, and pulmonary lymphangiectasia. (author)

  8. Recent physical-chemical anomalies and associated ecological responses in southern California kelp forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. J.; Reed, D.; Washburn, L.; Bell, T. W.; Blanchette, C. A.

    2016-02-01

    Time series data collected by the Santa Barbara Coastal Long-Term Ecological Research program on giant kelp forests and the environmental factors that influence them provide a unique opportunity to examine the extent and ecological consequences of recent anomalies in physical and chemical properties of a shallow water benthic marine ecosystem. Positive temperature anomalies have been recorded in all but two months since early 2013 with deviations ranging as high as 3.8 oC above the 14-year monthly mean, which is unprecedented in the time series. Positive anomalies in salinity (DS) were also observed every month since late 2012 and DS exceeded 0.3 for several months in 2013 and 2014. Positive DS values occurred in previous years, but were weaker and shorter in duration. Apart from 1-2 months, anomalies in nitrate, phosphate, and silicate turned consistently negative in late 2012. However, comparable anomalies in these nutrients occurred earlier in the record, especially before 2008 for nitrate and phosphate. Anomalies in key ecological characteristics of giant kelp forests associated with the large positive temperature anomalies have been much less striking. Water column chlorophyll a, the standing biomass of giant kelp and densities of many kelp forest consumers have been lower than normal in recent years, but not markedly so compared to other years in the time series. Shorter time series data on pigment concentrations in giant kelp revealed a declining trend in recent years, consistent with the below normal levels observed in kelp tissue nitrogen. The most dramatic change in kelp forests that coincided with the onset of the temperature anomalies was observed in sea stars, which first showed signs of a wasting disease in fall of 2013. The disease spread rapidly from north to south and by spring 2014 infections were prevalent throughout southern California. Large corresponding increases in the abundance of starfish prey have yet to be observed.

  9. Clustering and Recurring Anomaly Identification: Recurring Anomaly Detection System (ReADS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Recurring Anomaly Detection System (ReADS). The Recurring Anomaly Detection System is a tool to analyze text reports, such as aviation reports and maintenance records: (1) Text clustering algorithms group large quantities of reports and documents; Reduces human error and fatigue (2) Identifies interconnected reports; Automates the discovery of possible recurring anomalies; (3) Provides a visualization of the clusters and recurring anomalies We have illustrated our techniques on data from Shuttle and ISS discrepancy reports, as well as ASRS data. ReADS has been integrated with a secure online search

  10. Cataract Surgery for Tilted Lens in Peters' Anomaly Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayuki Nishide

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cases of cataract surgery without penetrating keratoplasty in patients with Peters' anomaly are very rare. We report a case of Peters' anomaly type 2 with tilted lens due to synechia between the lens and iris that was treated with cataract surgery without penetrating keratoplasty. Case Presentation: A 16-year-old girl had Peters' anomaly in both eyes. Corneal opacity was severe in the left eye due to high-grade dysgenesis of the anterior segment. In the right eye, corneal opacity had spread from the center of the cornea to the inferotemporal side, and there was synechia between the iris and corneal endothelium from the inferonasal side to the inferotemporal side. Opacity was observed in the anterior pole of the lens, and there was synechia between the anterior iris and the lens. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM revealed that the lens was tilted because of synechia. The tilted lens induced astigmatism, which reduced visual acuity to 20/250, in conjunction with a cataract. Cataract surgery was performed; the synechia between the lens capsule and the iris was severed, an intraocular lens was inserted, and the tilt was repaired. UBM was used postoperatively to confirm that the lens capsule synechia had been corrected and that the intraocular lens was not tilted. As a result, visual acuity improved to 20/100; glaucoma and expansion of corneal opacity were not observed. Conclusions: Severing of the synechia between the cataract and iris, during cataract surgery, in a patient with Peters' anomaly type 2 resulted in favorable postoperative visual acuity.

  11. Familial ebstein anomaly, left ventricular hypertrabeculation, and ventricular septal defect associated with a MYH7 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinelli, Audra L; Mulder, Theodorus J; Funke, Birgit H; Lafferty, Katherine A; Longo, Sherri A; Niyazov, Dmitriy M

    2013-12-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart defect that most often occurs sporadically within a kindred. Familial cases, although reported, are uncommon. At this time, the genetic etiology of Ebstein anomaly is not fully elucidated. Here, we describe clinical and molecular investigations of a rare case of familial Ebstein anomaly in association with a likely pathogenic mutation of the MYH7 gene. The severity of presentation varies, and Ebstein anomaly can be observed in association with such other heart defects as ventricular septal defect and left ventricular (LV) hypertrabeculation, as seen in our family of study. In our family of study, the 31-year-old father and four of his children have been diagnosed with Ebstein anomaly. Genetic testing revealed that the father was heterozygous for the Glu1220del variant detected in exon 27 of the MYH7 gene. The MYH7 gene encodes the β-myosin heavy chain and is expressed in cardiac muscle. DNA sequencing of three of his affected children confirmed that they carried the same variant while the fourth affected child was not available for testing. This is the first report of familial Ebstein anomaly associated with the Glu1220del mutation of the MYH7 gene. The mutation segregates with disease in a family with autosomal dominant transmission of congenital heart defects including Ebstein anomaly and other associated cardiovascular defects including LV hypertrabeculation and ventricular septal defect. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Framing anomaly in the effective theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Andrey; Cho, Gil Young; You, Yizhi; Abanov, Alexander G; Fradkin, Eduardo

    2015-01-09

    We consider the geometric part of the effective action for the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE). It is shown that accounting for the framing anomaly of the quantum Chern-Simons theory is essential to obtain the correct gravitational linear response functions. In the lowest order in gradients, the linear response generating functional includes Chern-Simons, Wen-Zee, and gravitational Chern-Simons terms. The latter term has a contribution from the framing anomaly which fixes the value of thermal Hall conductivity and contributes to the Hall viscosity of the FQH states on a sphere. We also discuss the effects of the framing anomaly on linear responses for non-Abelian FQH states.

  13. Thermal-based modeling of coupled carbon, water, and energy fluxes using nominal light use efficiencies constrained by leaf chlorophyll observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schull, M. A.; Anderson, M. C.; Houborg, R.; Gitelson, A.; Kustas, W. P.

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that estimates of leaf chlorophyll content (Chl), defined as the combined mass of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b per unit leaf area, can be useful for constraining estimates of canopy light use efficiency (LUE). Canopy LUE describes the amount of carbon assimilated by a vegetative canopy for a given amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) and is a key parameter for modeling land-surface carbon fluxes. A carbon-enabled version of the remote-sensing-based two-source energy balance (TSEB) model simulates coupled canopy transpiration and carbon assimilation using an analytical sub-model of canopy resistance constrained by inputs of nominal LUE (βn), which is modulated within the model in response to varying conditions in light, humidity, ambient CO2 concentration, and temperature. Soil moisture constraints on water and carbon exchange are conveyed to the TSEB-LUE indirectly through thermal infrared measurements of land-surface temperature. We investigate the capability of using Chl estimates for capturing seasonal trends in the canopy βn from in situ measurements of Chl acquired in irrigated and rain-fed fields of soybean and maize near Mead, Nebraska. The results show that field-measured Chl is nonlinearly related to βn, with variability primarily related to phenological changes during early growth and senescence. Utilizing seasonally varying βn inputs based on an empirical relationship with in situ measured Chl resulted in improvements in carbon flux estimates from the TSEB model, while adjusting the partitioning of total water loss between plant transpiration and soil evaporation. The observed Chl-βn relationship provides a functional mechanism for integrating remotely sensed Chl into the TSEB model, with the potential for improved mapping of coupled carbon, water, and energy fluxes across vegetated landscapes.

  14. An ensemble Kalman filter dual assimilation of thermal infrared and microwave satellite observations of soil moisture into the Noah land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Christopher R.; Crow, Wade T.; Anderson, Martha C.; Mecikalski, John R.

    2012-11-01

    Studies that have assimilated remotely sensed soil moisture (SM) into land surface models (LSMs) have generally focused on retrievals from microwave (MW) sensors. However, retrievals from thermal infrared (TIR) sensors have also been shown to add unique information, especially where MW sensors are not able to provide accurate retrievals (due to, e.g., dense vegetation). In this study, we examine the assimilation of a TIR product based on surface evaporative flux estimates from the Atmosphere Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model and the MW-based VU Amsterdam NASA surface SM product generated with the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM). A set of data assimilation experiments using an ensemble Kalman filter are performed over the contiguous United States to assess the impact of assimilating ALEXI and LPRM SM retrievals in isolation and together in a dual-assimilation case. The relative skill of each assimilation case is assessed through a data denial approach where a LSM is forced with an inferior precipitation data set. The ability of each assimilation case to correct for precipitation errors is quantified by comparing with a simulation forced with a higher-quality precipitation data set. All three assimilation cases (ALEXI, LPRM, and Dual assimilation) show relative improvements versus the open loop (i.e., reduced RMSD) for surface and root zone SM. In the surface zone, the dual assimilation case provides the largest improvements, followed by the LPRM case. However, the ALEXI case performs best in the root zone. Results from the data denial experiment are supported by comparisons between assimilation results and ground-based SM observations from the Soil Climate Analysis Network.

  15. Thermal-based modeling of coupled carbon, water, and energy fluxes using nominal light use efficiencies constrained by leaf chlorophyll observations

    KAUST Repository

    Schull, M. A.

    2015-03-11

    Recent studies have shown that estimates of leaf chlorophyll content (Chl), defined as the combined mass of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b per unit leaf area, can be useful for constraining estimates of canopy light use efficiency (LUE). Canopy LUE describes the amount of carbon assimilated by a vegetative canopy for a given amount of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (APAR) and is a key parameter for modeling land-surface carbon fluxes. A carbon-enabled version of the remote-sensing-based two-source energy balance (TSEB) model simulates coupled canopy transpiration and carbon assimilation using an analytical sub-model of canopy resistance constrained by inputs of nominal LUE (βn), which is modulated within the model in response to varying conditions in light, humidity, ambient CO2 concentration, and temperature. Soil moisture constraints on water and carbon exchange are conveyed to the TSEB-LUE indirectly through thermal infrared measurements of land-surface temperature. We investigate the capability of using Chl estimates for capturing seasonal trends in the canopy βn from in situ measurements of Chl acquired in irrigated and rain-fed fields of soybean and maize near Mead, Nebraska. The results show that field-measured Chl is nonlinearly related to βn, with variability primarily related to phenological changes during early growth and senescence. Utilizing seasonally varying βn inputs based on an empirical relationship with in situ measured Chl resulted in improvements in carbon flux estimates from the TSEB model, while adjusting the partitioning of total water loss between plant transpiration and soil evaporation. The observed Chl-βn relationship provides a functional mechanism for integrating remotely sensed Chl into the TSEB model, with the potential for improved mapping of coupled carbon, water, and energy fluxes across vegetated landscapes.

  16. Vibrational anomalies and marginal stability of glasses

    KAUST Repository

    Marruzzo, Alessia

    2013-01-01

    The experimentally measured vibrational spectrum of glasses strongly deviates from that expected in Debye\\'s elasticity theory: The density of states deviates from Debye\\'s ω2 law ("boson peak"), the sound velocity shows a negative dispersion in the boson-peak frequency regime, and there is a strong increase in the sound attenuation near the boson-peak frequency. A generalized elasticity theory is presented, based on the model assumption that the shear modulus of the disordered medium fluctuates randomly in space. The fluctuations are assumed to be uncorrelated and have a certain distribution (Gaussian or otherwise). Using field-theoretical techniques one is able to derive mean-field theories for the vibrational spectrum of a disordered system. The theory based on a Gaussian distribution uses a self-consistent Born approximation (SCBA),while the theory for non-Gaussian distributions is based on a coherent-potential approximation (CPA). Both approximate theories appear to be saddle-point approximations of effective replica field theories. The theory gives a satisfactory explanation of the vibrational anomalies in glasses. Excellent agreement of the SCBA theory with simulation data on a soft-sphere glass is reached. Since the SCBA is based on a Gaussian distribution of local shear moduli, including negative values, this theory describes a shear instability as a function of the variance of shear fluctuations. In the vicinity of this instability, a fractal frequency dependence of the density of states and the sound attenuation ∝ ω1+a is predicted with a ≲ 1/2. Such a frequency dependence is indeed observed both in simulations and in experimental data. We argue that the observed frequency dependence stems from marginally stable regions in a glass and discuss these findings in terms of rigidity percolation. © 2013 EDP Sciences and Springer.

  17. An embryological point of view on associated congenital anomalies of children with Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavikova, T; Zabojnikova, L; Babala, J; Varga, I

    2015-01-01

    The most common congenital gut motility disorder is the Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). This anomaly is characterized by absence of neural crest-derived enteric neuronal ganglia. The aim of our study was to analyze the relationship between HSCR and other congenital anomalies or malfunctions. We examined 130 patients with Hirschsprung disease from Slovakia for last 10 years. During patients examination we focused not only on morphological abnormalities, but also functional anomalies. The incidence of associated congenital anomalies in our patients with HSCR was 26.1 %. But if we add functional defects (hypothyroidism, malfunction in cellular immunity, neurological deficit) to the morphological congenital abnormalities, the rate of the patients with HSCR with additional defects achieves 50.1 %. Nine of our patients (6.9 %) had syndromic HSCR. The most frequent disorder (13.6 % of patients) was primary deficiency in cellular immunity. More than 12.3 % of patients with HSCR had genitourinary abnormalities, in 10.0 % of patients variable degree of psychomotor retardation was observed, and skeletal, muscle and limb anomalies involved 7.7 % of patients. In 7.6 % cases of patients we found congenital hypothyroidism (including 2 cases of agenesis of thyroid gland). More than 6.1 % of patients presented with an associated anomaly in gastrointestinal tract (mostly anorectal malformations). Up to 5.5 % patients had congenital anomaly of heart, 3.8 % had ophthalmic and 3.1 % had craniofacial anomalies. Down syndrome was the main diagnosis in 3.8 % patients. We discussed  the relationship between HSCR and other anomalies, which are probably caused by abnormal migration, proliferation, or differentiation, of neural crest cells during embryogenesis (Tab. 1, Fig. 2, Ref. 75).

  18. The Collapse of Super-isostacy: Volcanic Intrusions as an Alternative Model for Lunar Mascon Gravity Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, W. S.; McGovern, P. J.; Potter, R. W.; Collins, G. S.; Kring, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Lunar mascons are large positive free-air gravity anomalies associated with topographically low impact basins. This is an unexpected location for a gravity high, implying the presence of denser than normal material somewhere in the crust or lithosphere. The conventional model for lunar mascons interprets these gravity anomalies as the signature of super-isostatic uplift of the crust-mantle interface, presumably created during the impact process. However, for the likely lithospheric thermal gradients during the impact basin forming epoch on the Moon, hydrocode modeling shows that impact heating raises the mantle temperature in the center of the basin above its solidus out to a distance of several hundred km from the basin center. Thus, the post-impact thermal gradient is quite large and essentially no elastic lithosphere is initially present in the basin center. Thermal evolution calculations indicate that it takes of order 100 Ma for significant lithosphere thickening to occur in the basin center. On the other hand, because the partially molten material has a low effective viscosity, visco-elastic relaxation calculations show that the timescale for the collapse of super-isostatic uplift at the basin center is of order thousands of years. Thus, even if the initial impact created super-isostatic uplift of the crust-mantle interface, it would have collapsed to an isostatic state long before the lithosphere was able to thicken significantly. Any successful model for lunar mascons that requires flexural or super-isostatic support of a load must create that load at least 50-100 Ma after the basin impact in order to allow lithospheric thickening in the basin center. One possible load forming process is volcanic filling. In the case of the Orientale basin, mare basalts began erupting at the surface 60-100 Ma after the impact and the maximum eruption rate occurred about 200 Ma after the basin formed. The surface lava flows are too thin (space could be an important

  19. Thermopile probe to measure temperature anomalies in geothermal boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis, B.R.; Stephani, E.L.; Todd, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    The standard thermal well logging tools presently employed by oil well logging service companies use a thermistor probe as the temperature measuring device. The thermistor is normally incorporated as one arm of a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The bridge circuit must be staged for limited temperature ranges and is adequate for most well logging operations where only detection of thermal anomalies is of primary concern and the logging speed is not important. The design of a thermopile sensor using conventional thermocouples and a downhole thermally isolated reference junction has greatly improved the temperature logging capability in a deep geothermal wellbore. The much faster response of the thermopile sensor will allow a logging rate of up to 200 ft/min in contrast to the average rate of 50 ft/min using the thermistor probe. The thermopile sensor is a low impedance device whose characteristics are very well known. The development of a high pressure dewar chamber for use in high temperature downhole instrumentation sondes has provided a suitable environment to employ a downhole reference junction permitting the use of thermocouple measurements in the deep geothermal borehole.

  20. Exploring the web of heterotic string theories using anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruehle, Fabian

    2013-07-15

    We investigate how anomalies can be used to infer relations among different descriptions of heterotic string theory. Starting from the observation that the construction mechanism of heterotic orbifold compactifications considered up to now prevents them from being resolved into fully smooth Calabi-Yau compactification manifolds, we use a new mechanism to obtain an orbifold which does not suffer from the aforementioned limitations. We explain in general how to resolve orbifolds into smooth Calabi-Yau using toric geometry and gauged linear sigma models. The latter allow for studying the theory in various other regions of the string moduli space as well, which unveils interesting intermediate geometries. By following anomalies through the different regimes, we can match the orbifold theories to their smooth Calabi-Yau counterparts. In the process, we investigate discrete R and non-R orbifold symmetries and propose a mechanism for studying their fate in other regions of the moduli space. Finally, we introduce a novel anomaly cancelation mechanism in gauged linear sigma models, which manifests itself in target space as a description of compactification geometries with torsion and Neveu-Schwarz five branes.