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Sample records for therapy triggers hla

  1. Certain HLA alleles are associated with stress-triggered Graves' disease and influence its course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Roberto; Lapa, Daniela; Trimarchi, Francesco; Vita, Giuseppe; Fallahi, Poupak; Antonelli, Alessandro; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    There are no studies on HLA analysis in patients in whom Graves' disease (GD) hyperthyroidism has been preceded by ≥1 stressful event. The aim of the present study was to identify predisposing or protecting HLA alleles and their effects on the course of GD in this subset of patients. We performed serological HLA typing in 58 Caucasian patients with stress-related GD and in 130 matched healthy controls (HC). We also performed genomic HLA typing in 20/58 patients and in all HC. Five HLA alleles and three loci were more frequent in patients compared to HC: B8, Cw7, C*07, C*17, DR3, DR4, DRB1*04, and DQ2. In contrast, B14 was less frequent in patients than in HC. Depending on outcome after ATD withdrawal (remission, exacerbation on-ATD, relapse off-ATD), in patients, some alleles/loci were over-represented, while others were under-represented. Age, FT3, and FT4 fold increase over the upper normal limit at onset were different depending on the allele/locus carried. In GD patients with stress-triggered hyperthyroidism, HLA typing may be helpful in predicting the outcome of the disease after ATD withdrawal.

  2. HLA dependent immune escape mechanisms in B-cell lymphomas : Implications for immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Marcel; Veenstra, Rianne N.; Visser, Lydia; Xu, Chuanhui; Kushekhar, Kushi; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Kluin, Philip M.; van den Berg, Anke; Diepstra, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by tumor cells in the context of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) is generally considered to be a prerequisite for effective immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. We evaluated cell surface HLA class I, HLA class II and cytoplasmic HLA-DM staining by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 389

  3. Flexible peptide recognition by HLA-DR triggers specific autoimmune T-cell responses in autoimmune thyroiditis and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheuk Wun; Osman, Roman; Menconi, Francesca; Concepcion, Erlinda S; Tomer, Yaron

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome 3 variant (APS3v) refers to the co-occurrence of autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) within the same individual. HLA class II confers the strongest susceptibility to APS3v. We previously identified a unique amino acid signature of the HLA-DR pocket (designated APS3v HLA-DR pocket) that predisposes to APS3v. We hypothesized that both thyroid and islet peptides can be presented by the unique APS3v HLA-DR pocket, triggering AITD + T1D together. To test this hypothesis we screened islet and thyroid peptides for their ability to bind to the APS3v HLA-DR pocket. Virtual screen of all possible thyroglobulin (Tg), thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), thyroid peroxidase (TPO), insulin (Ins), and glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) peptides identified 36 peptides that bound to this unique pocket. In vitro binding assays using baculovirus-produced recombinant APS3v HLA-DR identified 11 thyroid/islet peptides (of the 36 predicted binders) that bound with high affinity. By immunizing humanized HLA-DR3 mice carrying the APS3v HLA-DR pocket we identified 4 peptides (Tg.1571, GAD.492, TPO.758, TPO.338) that were presented by antigen presenting cells and elicited T-cell response. We conclude that both thyroid and islet peptides can bind to this flexible APS3v HLA-DR pocket and induce thyroid and islet specific T-cell responses. These findings set the stage to developing specific inhibitors of the APS3v HLA-DR pocket as a precision medicine approach to treating or preventing APS3v in patients that carry this genetic HLA-DR pocket variant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Everolimus but not mycophenolate mofetil therapy is associated with soluble HLA-G expression in heart transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheshgiri, Rohit; Gustafsson, Finn; Sheedy, Jill

    2009-01-01

    /ml) compared with 25% of patients receiving MMF (612 +/- 438 ng/ml, p = 0.03). In all sHLA-G(+) patients, expression remained constant, with no significant changes in HLA-G levels throughout the 12-hour PK study period. CsA did not appear to influence sHLA-G expression, as there was no correlation between HLA...... mechanisms remain unclear, immunosuppressive therapy has been reported to influence this expression. METHODS: We compared sHLA-G expression in heart transplant recipients receiving two different anti-proliferative agents: mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and everolimus (RAD). Twelve-hour pharmacokinetic (PK...

  5. Myofascial trigger point therapy: laser therapy and dry needling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemoto, Luciana; Nascimento de Azevedo, Rosany; Almeida Alfaya, Thays; Nunes Jardim Reis, Renata; Depes de Gouvêa, Cresus Vinicius; Cavalcanti Garcia, Marco Antonio

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the present review is to discuss two forms of treatment for myofascial pain: laser therapy and dry needling. Although studies have reported the deactivation of myofascial trigger points with these two methods, clinical trials demonstrating their efficacy are scarce. The literature reports greater efficacy with the use of laser over dry needling. It has been suggested that improvements in microcirculation through the administration of laser therapy may favor the supply of oxygen to the cells under conditions of hypoxia and help remove the waste products of cell metabolism, thereby breaking the vicious cycle of pain, muscle spasm and further pain. While laser therapy is the method of choice for patients with a fear of needles and healthcare professionals inexperienced with the dry needling technique, further controlled studies are still needed to prove the greater efficacy of this method.

  6. [Diagnosis and therapy of myofascial trigger points].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, D G; Mense, S

    2003-12-01

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are hyperirritable tender spots in palpable tense bands of skeletal muscle. Muscle is an orphan organ, no medical specialty claims muscle as its organ. The article aims at filling some of the gaps in the current knowledge of MTrPs. The presented findings were partly obtained in experiments on anesthetised rabbits, partly they are the result of ample experience with patients suffering from MTrPs. Each muscle has a characteristic elicited referred pain pattern that, for active MTrPs, is familiar to the patient. Without a laboratory test or imaging method, diagnosis of MTrPs depends entirely on history and physical examination. MTrP symptoms follow muscle overload, are activated acutely by sudden overload, or develop gradually with prolonged contractions or repetitive activity. The diagnostic skill required depends on considerable innate palpation ability, authoritative training, and extensive clinical experience. Effective treatment methods include manual stretching by trigger-point pressure release, contract-relax, vapo coolant spray-and-stretch, and dry needling or injection of MTrPs. The integrated hypothesis presents an explanation for the pathophysiology of MTrPs and begins with excessive release of acetylcholine from involved motor endplates. It depends on a new understanding of the abnormality of endplate noise. Biopsies demonstrate segmental shortening of groups of sarcomeres in individual muscle fibres and possibly waves of contracted sarcomeres to account for palpable taut bands.

  7. KIR-HLA genotypes in HIV-infected patients lacking immunological recovery despite effective antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Soria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In HIV-infected individuals, mechanisms underlying unsatisfactory immune recovery during effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART have yet to be fully understood. We investigated whether polymorphism of genes encoding immune-regulating molecules, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and their ligands class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA, could influence immunological response to cART. METHODS: KIR and HLA frequencies were analyzed in 154 HIV-infected and cART-treated patients with undetectable viral load divided into two groups: 'immunological non responders' (INR, N = 50, CD4(+ T-cell count 350/mm(3. Molecular KIR were typed using polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping. Comparisons were adjusted for baseline patient characteristics. RESULTS: The frequency of KIR2DL3 allele was significantly higher in FR than in INR (83.7% vs. 62%, P = 0.005. The functional compound genotype HLA-C1(+/KIR2DL3(+, even at multivariable analysis, when adjusted for nadir CD4(+ T-cell count, was associated with reduced risk of INR status: odds ratio (95% Confidence Intervals 0.34 (0.13-0.88, P = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced presence of the inhibitory KIR2DL3 genotype detected in INR might provoke an imbalance in NK function, possibly leading to increased immune activation, impaired killing of latently infected cells, and higher proviral burden. These factors would hinder full immune recovery during therapy.

  8. Osteodifferentiated Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue Express HLA-G and Display Immunomodulatory Properties in HLA-Mismatched Settings: Implications in Bone Repair Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Montespan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells that can be obtained from several sources such as bone marrow and adipose tissue. Depending on the culture conditions, they can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, or neurons. In this regard, they constitute promising candidates for cell-based therapy aimed at repairing damaged tissues. In addition, MSCs display immunomodulatory properties through the expression of soluble factors including HLA-G. We here analyse both immunogenicity and immunosuppressive capacity of MSCs derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue before and after osteodifferentiation. Results show that HLA-G expression is maintained after osteodifferentiation and can be boosted in inflammatory conditions mimicked by the addition of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Both MSCs and osteodifferentiated MSCs are hypoimmunogenic and exert immunomodulatory properties in HLA-mismatched settings as they suppress T cell alloproliferation in mixed lymphocyte reactions. Finally, addition of biomaterials that stimulate bone tissue formation did not modify MSC immune properties. As MSCs combine both abilities of osteoregeneration and immunomodulation, they may be considered as allogenic sources for the treatment of bone defects.

  9. Innate Immune Activation Can Trigger Experimental Spondyloarthritis in HLA-B27/Huβ2m Transgenic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tok, Melissa N; Satumtira, Nimman; Dorris, Martha; Pots, Desirée; Slobodin, Gleb; van de Sande, Marleen G; Taurog, Joel D; Baeten, Dominique L; van Duivenvoorde, Leonie M

    2017-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) does not display the typical features of auto-immune disease. Despite the strong association with MHC class I, CD8(+) T cells are not required for disease induction in the HLA-B27/Huβ2m transgenic rats. We used Lewis HLA-B27/Huβ2m transgenic rats [21-3 × 283-2]F1, HLA-B7/Huβ2m transgenic rats [120-4 × 283-2]F1, and wild-type rats to test our hypothesis that SpA may be primarily driven by the innate immune response. In vitro, splenocytes were stimulated with heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis and cytokine expression and production was measured. In vivo, male and female rats were immunized with 30, 60, or 90 µg of heat-inactivated M. tuberculosis and clinically monitored for spondylitis and arthritis development. After validation of the model, we tested whether prophylactic and therapeutic TNF targeting affected spondylitis and arthritis. In vitro stimulation with heat-inactivated M. tuberculosis strongly induced gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-1β, in the HLA-B27 transgenic rats compared with controls. In vivo immunization induced an increased spondylitis and arthritis incidence and an accelerated and synchronized onset of spondylitis and arthritis in HLA-B27 transgenic males and females. Moreover, immunization overcame the protective effect of orchiectomy. Prophylactic TNF targeting resulted in delayed spondylitis and arthritis development and reduced arthritis severity, whereas therapeutic TNF blockade did not affect spondylitis and arthritis severity. Collectively, these data indicate that innate immune activation plays a role in the initiation of HLA-B27-associated disease and allowed to establish a useful in vivo model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of disease initiation and progression.

  10. Innate Immune Activation Can Trigger Experimental Spondyloarthritis in HLA-B27/Huβ2m Transgenic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa N. van Tok

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spondyloarthritis (SpA does not display the typical features of auto-immune disease. Despite the strong association with MHC class I, CD8+ T cells are not required for disease induction in the HLA-B27/Huβ2m transgenic rats. We used Lewis HLA-B27/Huβ2m transgenic rats [21-3 × 283-2]F1, HLA-B7/Huβ2m transgenic rats [120-4 × 283-2]F1, and wild-type rats to test our hypothesis that SpA may be primarily driven by the innate immune response. In vitro, splenocytes were stimulated with heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis and cytokine expression and production was measured. In vivo, male and female rats were immunized with 30, 60, or 90 µg of heat-inactivated M. tuberculosis and clinically monitored for spondylitis and arthritis development. After validation of the model, we tested whether prophylactic and therapeutic TNF targeting affected spondylitis and arthritis. In vitro stimulation with heat-inactivated M. tuberculosis strongly induced gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-1β, in the HLA-B27 transgenic rats compared with controls. In vivo immunization induced an increased spondylitis and arthritis incidence and an accelerated and synchronized onset of spondylitis and arthritis in HLA-B27 transgenic males and females. Moreover, immunization overcame the protective effect of orchiectomy. Prophylactic TNF targeting resulted in delayed spondylitis and arthritis development and reduced arthritis severity, whereas therapeutic TNF blockade did not affect spondylitis and arthritis severity. Collectively, these data indicate that innate immune activation plays a role in the initiation of HLA-B27-associated disease and allowed to establish a useful in vivo model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of disease initiation and progression.

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The hardware of the trigger components has been mostly finished. The ECAL Endcap Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC) are in production while Barrel TCC firmware has been upgraded, and the Trigger Primitives can now be stored by the Data Concentrator Card for readout by the DAQ. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) system is complete, and the timing is being finalized. All 502 HCAL trigger links to RCT run without error. The HCAL muon trigger timing has been equalized with DT, RPC, CSC and ECAL. The hardware and firmware for the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) jet triggers are being commissioned and data from these triggers is available for readout. The GCT energy sums from rings of trigger towers around the beam pipe beam have been changed to include two rings from both sides. The firmware for Drift Tube Track Finder, Barrel Sorter and Wedge Sorter has been upgraded, and the synchronization of the DT trigger is satisfactory. The CSC local trigger has operated flawlessly u...

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberta Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Studies Group (TSG) The Trigger Studies Group has just concluded its third 2013 workshop, where all POGs presented the improvements to the physics object reconstruction, and all PAGs have shown their plans for Trigger development aimed at the 2015 High Level Trigger (HLT) menu. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger menu development, path timing, Trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – this last task in collaboration with PdmV (Physics Data and Monte Carlo Validation group). In the last months the group has delivered several HLT rate estimates and comparisons, using the available data and Monte Carlo samples. The studies were presented at the Trigger workshops in September and December, and STEAM has contacted POGs and PAGs to understand the origin of the discrepancies observed between 8 TeV data and Monte Carlo simulations. The most recent results show what the...

  13. Triggers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breitbarth, A.; van Riemsdijk, H.C.

    2004-01-01

    The concept of 'trigger' is a core concept of Chomsky's Minimalist Program. The idea that certain types of movement are triggered by some property of the target position is at least as old as the notion that the movement of noun phrases to the subject position is triggered by their need to receive

  14. BCI-Triggered functional electrical stimulation therapy for upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Marquez-Chin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present here the integration of brain-computer interfacing (BCI technology with functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore voluntary function. The system was tested with a single man with chronic (6 years severe left hemiplegia resulting from a stroke. The BCI, implemented as a simple “brain-switch” activated by power decreases in the 18 Hz – 28 Hz frequency range of the participant’s electroencephalograpic signals, triggered a neuroprosthesis designed to facilitate forward reaching, reaching to the mouth, and lateral reaching movements. After 40 90-minute sessions in which the participant attempted the reaching tasks repeatedly, with the movements assisted by the BCI-triggered neuroprosthesis, the participant’s arm function showed a clinically significant six point increase in the Fugl-Meyer Asessment Upper Extermity Sub-Score. These initial results suggest that the combined use of BCI and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary reaching function in individuals with chronic severe hemiplegia for whom the rehabilitation alternatives are very limited.

  15. BCI-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Upper Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez-Chin, Cesar; Marquis, Aaron; Popovic, Milos R.

    2016-01-01

    We present here the integration of brain-computer interfacing (BCI) technology with functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore voluntary function. The system was tested with a single man with chronic (6 years) severe left hemiplegia resulting from a stroke. The BCI, implemented as a simple “brain-switch” activated by power decreases in the 18 Hz – 28 Hz frequency range of the participant’s electroencephalograpic signals, triggered a neuroprosthesis designed to facilitate forward reaching, reaching to the mouth, and lateral reaching movements. After 40 90-minute sessions in which the participant attempted the reaching tasks repeatedly, with the movements assisted by the BCI-triggered neuroprosthesis, the participant’s arm function showed a clinically significant six point increase in the Fugl-Meyer Asessment Upper Extermity Sub-Score. These initial results suggest that the combined use of BCI and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary reaching function in individuals with chronic severe hemiplegia for whom the rehabilitation alternatives are very limited. PMID:27990247

  16. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger synchronization procedures for running with cosmic muons and operating with the LHC were reviewed during the May electronics week. Firmware maintenance issues were also reviewed. Link tests between the new ECAL endcap trigger concentrator cards (TCC48) and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger have been performed. Firmware for the energy sum triggers and an upgraded tau trigger of the Global Calorimeter Triggers has been developed and is under test. The optical fiber receiver boards for the Track-Finder trigger theta links of the DT chambers are now all installed. The RPC trigger is being made more robust by additional chamber and cable shielding and also by firmware upgrades. For the CSC’s the front-end and trigger motherboard firmware have been updated. New RPC patterns and DT/CSC lookup tables taking into account phi asymmetries in the magnetic field configuration are under study. The motherboard for the new pipeline synchronizer of the Global Trigg...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2012-01-01

      Level-1 Trigger The Level-1 Trigger group is ready to deploy improvements to the L1 Trigger algorithms for 2012. These include new high-PT patterns for the RPC endcap, an improved CSC PT assignment, a new PT-matching algorithm for the Global Muon Trigger, and new calibrations for ECAL, HCAL, and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger. These should improve the efficiency, rate, and stability of the L1 Trigger. The L1 Trigger group also is migrating the online systems to SLC5. To make the data transfer from the Global Calorimeter Trigger to the Global Trigger more reliable and also to allow checking the data integrity online, a new optical link system has been developed by the GCT and GT groups and successfully tested at the CMS electronics integration facility in building 904. This new system is now undergoing further tests at Point 5 before being deployed for data-taking this year. New L1 trigger menus have recently been studied and proposed by Emmanuelle Perez and the L1 Detector Performance Group...

  18. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the March meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, the program of trigger pattern tests and vertical slice tests and planning for the Global Runs starting this summer. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and integration testing is in full swing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. After full checkout, trigger subsystems will be then operated in the CMS Global Runs. Continuous...

  19. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The production of the trigger hardware is now basically finished, and in time for the turn-on of the LHC. The last boards produced are the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcaps (TCC-EE). After the recent installation of the four EE Dees, the TCC-EE prototypes were used for their commissioning. Production boards are arriving and are being tested continuously, with the last ones expected in November. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger hardware is fully integrated after installation of the last EE cables. Pattern tests from the HCAL up to the GCT have been performed successfully. The HCAL triggers are fully operational, including the connection of the HCAL-outer and forward-HCAL (HO/HF) technical triggers to the Global Trigger. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) board firmware has been updated to permit recording of the tower “feature bit” in the data. The Global Calorimeter Trigger hardware is installed, but some firmware developments are still n...

  20. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The overall status of the L1 trigger has been excellent and the running efficiency has been high during physics fills. The timing is good to about 1%. The fine-tuning of the time synchronization of muon triggers is ongoing and will be completed after more than 10 nb-1 of data have been recorded. The CSC trigger primitive and RPC trigger timing have been refined. A new configuration for the CSC Track Finder featured modified beam halo cuts and improved ghost cancellation logic. More direct control was provided for the DT opto-receivers. New RPC Cosmic Trigger (RBC/TTU) trigger algorithms were enabled for collision runs. There is further work planned during the next technical stop to investigate a few of the links from the ECAL to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT). New firmware and a new configuration to handle trigger rate spikes in the ECAL barrel are also being tested. A board newly developed by the tracker group (ReTRI) has been installed and activated to block re...

  1. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The Level-1 Trigger hardware has performed well during both the recent proton-proton and heavy ion running. Efforts were made to improve the visibility and handling of alarms and warnings. The tracker ReTRI boards that prevent fixed frequencies of Level-1 Triggers are now configured through the Trigger Supervisor. The Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) team has introduced a buffer cleanup procedure at stops and a reset of the QPLL during configuring to ensure recalibration in case of a switch from the LHC clock to the local clock. A device to test the cables between the Regional Calorimeter Trigger and the GCT has been manufactured. A wrong charge bit was fixed in the CSC Trigger. The ECAL group is improving crystal masking and spike suppression in the trigger primitives. New firmware for the Drift Tube Track Finder (DTTF) sorters was developed to improve fake track tagging and sorting. Zero suppression was implemented in the DT Sector Collector readout. The track finder b...

  2. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Trigger Hardware The status of the trigger components was presented during the September CMS Week and Annual Review and at the monthly trigger meetings in October and November. Procedures for cold and warm starts (e.g. refreshing of trigger parameters stored in registers) of the trigger subsystems have been studied. Reviews of parts of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) and the Global Trigger (GT) have taken place in October and November. The CERN group summarized the status of the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) system. All TTC crates and boards are installed in the underground counting room, USC55. The central clock system will be upgraded in December (after the Global Run at the end of November GREN) to the new RF2TTC LHC machine interface timing module. Migration of subsystem's TTC PCs to SLC4/ XDAQ 3.12 is being prepared. Work is on going to unify the access to Local Timing Control (LTC) and TTC CMS interface module (TTCci) via SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol, a lightweight XML-based messaging ...

  3. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Since nearly all of the Level-1 (L1) Trigger hardware at Point 5 has been commissioned, activities during the past months focused on the fine-tuning of synchronization, particularly for the ECAL and the CSC systems, on firmware upgrades and on improving trigger operation and monitoring. Periodic resynchronizations or hard resets and a shortened luminosity section interval of 23 seconds were implemented. For the DT sector collectors, an automatic power-off was installed in case of high temperatures, and the monitoring capabilities of the opto-receivers and the mini-crates were enhanced. The DTTF and the CSCTF now have improved memory lookup tables. The HCAL trigger primitive logic implemented a new algorithm providing better stability of the energy measurement in the presence of any phase misalignment. For the Global Calorimeter Trigger, additional Source Cards have been manufactured and tested. Testing of the new tau, missing ET and missing HT algorithms is underw...

  4. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Karen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney (Australia); Stewart, James [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kelly, Valerie [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Xie, Jason [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moseley, Joanne [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan [RaySearch Laboratories AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milosevic, Michael, E-mail: mike.milosevic@rmp.uhn.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  5. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The final parts of the Level-1 trigger hardware are now being put in place. For the ECAL endcaps, more than half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are now available at CERN, such that one complete endcap can be covered. The Global Trigger now correctly handles ECAL calibration sequences, without being influenced by backpressure. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) hardware is complete and working in USC55. Intra-crate tests of all 18 RCT crates and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) are regularly taking place. Pattern tests have successfully captured data from HCAL through RCT to the GCT Source Cards. HB/HE trigger data are being compared with emulator results to track down the very few remaining hardware problems. The treatment of hot and dead cells, including their recording in the database, has been defined. For the GCT, excellent agreement between the emulator and data has been achieved for jets and HF ET sums. There is still som...

  6. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger system has been constantly in use in cosmic and commissioning data taking periods. During CRAFT running it delivered 300 million muon and calorimeter triggers to CMS. It has performed stably and reliably. During the abort gaps it has also provided laser and other calibration triggers. Timing issues, namely synchronization and latency issues, have been solved. About half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are installed, and the firmware is being worked on. The production of the other half has started. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) card firmware has been updated, and new features such as fast parallel zero-suppression have been included. Repairs of drift tube (DT) trigger mini-crates, optical links and receivers of sector collectors are under way and have been completed on YB0. New firmware for the optical receivers of the theta links to the drift tube track finder is being installed. In parallel, tests with new eta track finde...

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Carlin with contributions from D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Data-taking continues at cruising speed, with high availability of all components of the Level-1 trigger. We have operated the trigger up to a luminosity of 7.6E33, where we approached 100 kHz using the 7E33 prescale column.  Recently, the pause without triggers in case of an automatic "RESYNC" signal (the "settle" and "recover" time) was reduced in order to minimise the overall dead-time. This may become very important when the LHC comes back with higher energy and luminosity after LS1. We are also preparing for data-taking in the proton-lead run in early 2013. The CASTOR detector will make its comeback into CMS and triggering capabilities are being prepared for this. Steps to be taken include improved cooperation with the TOTEM trigger system and using the LHC clock during the injection and ramp phases of LHC. Studies are being finalised that will have a bearing on the Trigger Technical Design Report (TDR), which is to be rea...

  8. Potential and Limitation of HLA-Based Banking of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casimir de Rham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Great hopes have been placed on human pluripotent stem (hPS cells for therapy. Tissues or organs derived from hPS cells could be the best solution to cure many different human diseases, especially those who do not respond to standard medication or drugs, such as neurodegenerative diseases, heart failure, or diabetes. The origin of hPS is critical and the idea of creating a bank of well-characterized hPS cells has emerged, like the one that already exists for cord blood. However, the main obstacle in transplantation is the rejection of tissues or organ by the receiver, due to the three main immunological barriers: the human leukocyte antigen (HLA, the ABO blood group, and minor antigens. The problem could be circumvented by using autologous stem cells, like induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells, derived directly from the patient. But iPS cells have limitations, especially regarding the disease of the recipient and possible difficulties to handle or prepare autologous iPS cells. Finally, reaching standards of good clinical or manufacturing practices could be challenging. That is why well-characterized and universal hPS cells could be a better solution. In this review, we will discuss the interest and the feasibility to establish hPS cells bank, as well as some economics and ethical issues.

  9. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the December meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, and results from the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) phase II. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and moving towards integration testing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. This is combined with operations and testing without beam that will continue until startup. The plans for start-up, pilot and early running tri...

  10. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software New Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) for rapidity gap measurements have been installed and integrated into the Trigger recently. For the Global Muon Trigger, tuning of quality criteria has led to improvements in muon trigger efficiencies. Several subsystems have started campaigns to increase spares by recovering boards or producing new ones. The barrel muon sector collector test system has been reactivated, new η track finder boards are in production, and φ track finder boards are under revision. In the CSC track finder, an η asymmetry problem has been corrected. New pT look-up tables have also improved efficiency. RPC patterns were changed from four out of six coincident layers to three out of six in the barrel, which led to a significant increase in efficiency. A new PAC firmware to trigger on heavy stable charged particles allows looking for chamber hit coincidences in two consecutive bunch-crossings. The redesign of the L1 Trigger Emulator...

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Document Server

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos, I. Mikulec, J. Varela and C. Wulz.

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Over the past few months, the Level-1 trigger has successfully recorded data with cosmic rays over long continuous stretches as well as LHC splash events, beam halo, and collision events. The L1 trigger hardware, firmware, synchronization, performance and readiness for beam operation were reviewed in October. All L1 trigger hardware is now installed at Point 5, and most of it is completely commissioned. While the barrel ECAL Trigger Concentrator Cards are fully operational, the recently delivered endcap ECAL TCC system is still being commissioned. For most systems there is a sufficient number of spares available, but for a few systems additional reserve modules are needed. It was decided to increase the overall L1 latency by three bunch crossings to increase the safety margin for trigger timing adjustments. In order for CMS to continue data taking during LHC frequency ramps, the clock distribution tree needs to be reset. The procedures for this have been tested. A repl...

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The road map for the final commissioning of the level-1 trigger system has been set. The software for the trigger subsystems is being upgraded to run under CERN Scientific Linux 4 (SLC4). There is also a new release for the Trigger Supervisor (TS 1.4), which implies upgrade work by the subsystems. As reported by the CERN group, a campaign to tidy the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) racks has begun. The machine interface was upgraded by installing the new RF2TTC module, which receives RF signals from LHC Point 4. Two Beam Synchronous Timing (BST) signals, one for each beam, can now be received in CMS. The machine group will define the exact format of the information content shortly. The margin on the locking range of the CMS QPLL is planned for study for different subsystems in the next Global Runs, using a function generator. The TTC software has been successfully tested on SLC4. Some TTC subsystems have already been upgraded to SLC4. The TTCci Trigger Supervisor ...

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith, from contributions of D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

      The L1 Trigger group deployed several major improvements this year. Compared to 2011, the single-muon trigger rate has been reduced by a factor of 2 and the η coverage has been restored to 2.4, with high efficiency. During the current technical stop, a higher jet seed threshold will be applied in the Global Calorimeter Trigger in order to significantly reduce the strong pile-up dependence of the HT and multi-jet triggers. The currently deployed L1 menu, with the “6E33” prescales, has a total rate of less than 100 kHz and operates with detector readout dead time of less than 3% for luminosities up to 6.5 × 1033 cm–2s–1. Further prescale sets have been created for 7 and 8 × 1033 cm–2s–1 luminosities. The L1 DPG is evaluating the performance of the Trigger for upcoming conferences and publication. Progress on the Trigger upgrade was reviewed during the May Upgrade Week. We are investigating scenarios for stagin...

  14. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

      In 2013 the Trigger Studies Group (TSG) has been restructured in three sub-groups: STEAM, for the development of new HLT menus and monitoring their performance; STORM, for the development of HLT tools, code and actual configurations; and FOG, responsible for the online operations of the High Level Trigger. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger Menu development, path timing, trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Since the end of proton-proton data taking, the group has started preparing for 2015 data taking, with collisions at 13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing. The reliability of the extrapolation to higher energy is being evaluated comparing the trigger rates on 7 and 8 TeV Monte Carlo samples with the data taken in the past two years. The effect of 25 ns bunch spacing is being studied on the d...

  15. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Overall the L1 trigger hardware has been running very smoothly during the last months of proton running. Modifications for the heavy-ion run have been made where necessary. The maximal design rate of 100 kHz can be sustained without problems. All L1 latencies have been rechecked. The recently installed Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) are being used in the heavy ion run. The ZDC scintillators have been dismantled, but the calorimeter itself remains. We now send the L1 accept signal and other control signals to TOTEM. Trigger cables from TOTEM to CMS will be installed during the Christmas shutdown, so that the TOTEM data can be fully integrated within the CMS readout. New beam gas triggers have been developed, since the BSC-based trigger is no longer usable at high luminosities. In particular, a special BPTX signal is used after a quiet period with no collisions. There is an ongoing campaign to provide enough spare modules for the different subsystems. For example...

  16. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Alimena

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Strategy Group The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for the development of future High-Level Trigger menus, as well as of its DQM and validation, in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Taking into account the beam energy and luminosity expected in 2015, a rough estimate of the trigger rates indicates a factor four increase with respect to 2012 conditions. Assuming that a factor two can be tolerated thanks to the increase in offline storage and processing capabilities, a toy menu has been developed using the new OpenHLT workflow to estimate the transverse energy/momentum thresholds that would halve the current trigger rates. The CPU time needed to run the HLT has been compared between data taken with 25 ns and 50 ns bunch spacing, for equivalent pile-up: no significant difference was observed on the global time per event distribution at the only available data point, corresponding to a pile-up of about 10 interactions. Using th...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software After the winter shutdown minor hardware problems in several subsystems appeared and were corrected. A reassessment of the overall latency has been made. In the TTC system shorter cables between TTCci and TTCex have been installed, which saved one bunch crossing, but which may have required an adjustment of the RPC timing. In order to tackle Pixel out-of-syncs without influencing other subsystems, a special hardware/firmware re-sync protocol has been introduced in the Global Trigger. The link between the Global Calorimeter Trigger and the Global Trigger with the new optical Global Trigger Interface and optical receiver daughterboards has been successfully tested in the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. New firmware in the GCT now allows a setting to remove the HF towers from energy sums. The HF sleeves have been replaced, which should lead to reduced rates of anomalous signals, which may allow their inclusion after this is validated. For ECAL, improvements i...

  18. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware The CERN group is working on the TTC system. Seven out of nine sub-detector TTC VME crates with all fibers cabled are installed in USC55. 17 Local Trigger Controller (LTC) boards have been received from production and are in the process of being tested. The RF2TTC module replacing the TTCmi machine interface has been delivered and will replace the TTCci module used to mimic the LHC clock. 11 out of 12 crates housing the barrel ECAL off-detector electronics have been installed in USC55 after commissioning at the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. The cabling to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) is terminated. The Lisbon group has completed the Synchronization and Link mezzanine board (SLB) production. The Palaiseau group has fully tested and installed 33 out of 40 Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC). The seven remaining boards are being remade. The barrel TCC boards have been tested at the H4 test beam, and good agreement with emulator predictions were found. The cons...

  19. The effect of trigger point therapy and medicine ball exercises vs trigger point therapy and stretching on hip rotational biomechanics of the golf swings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Quinn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elite golfers sustain a large number of lumbar spine injuries. Poor rotational biomechanics, which may occur as a result of a shortened iliopsoas muscle, increase the incidence of lumbar spine injuries in golfers. Stretches and medicine ball exercises are often used as part of golf training programmes in an attempt to restore hip flexor length and improve rotational biomechanics. The aim of this study was to ascertain the effect of a combination of trigger point therapy and medicine ball exercises compared to a combination of trigger point therapy and stretching on rotational bio-mechanics of the golf swing. Method: This is a randomised controlled trial consisting of two experimental groups (trigger point therapy and stretching vs. trigger point therapy and medicine ball exercises and one control group (no intervention. Hip flexor length and 3D biomechanical analysis of the golf swing was performed at baseline and one week later. Results: One-hundred elite male golfers participated in this study. Rotational biomechanics, specifically downswing hip turn in the group that received trigger point therapy combined with medicine ball exercises, showed statistically significant improvement at reassessment compared to the control group (p=0.0328. Conclusion: Rotational biomechanics (downswing hip turn improved following a combination of trigger point therapy treatment and a one week programme of medicine ball exercises. This is postulated to have occurred through neural reorganisation and not through improved tensile muscle strength. This improvement in rotational biomechanics has the potential to decrease lumbar spine injury incidence in elite golfers. This study advocates the use of trigger point therapy combined with medicine ball exercises in the treatment of golfers with shortened hip flexors.

  20. Trigger point manual therapy for the treatment of chronic non-cancer pain in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Denneny, D.; Petersen, K.; McLoughlin, R.; Brook, S.; Hassan, S; Williams, ACDEC

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine the effectiveness of trigger point manual therapy for treating chronic non-cancer pain in adults.

  1. KIR, HLA, and IL28B variant predict response to antiviral therapy in genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C patients in Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Nozawa

    Full Text Available Natural killer cell responses play a crucial role in virus clearance by the innate immune system. Although the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR in combination with its cognate human leukocyte antigen (HLA ligand, especially KIR2DL3-HLA-C1, is associated with both treatment-induced and spontaneous clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Caucasians, these innate immunity genes have not been fully clarified in Japanese patients. We therefore investigated 16 KIR genotypes along with HLA-B and -C ligands and a genetic variant of interleukin (IL 28B (rs8099917 in 115 chronic hepatitis C genotype 1 patients who underwent pegylated-interferon-α2b (PEG-IFN and ribavirin therapy. HLA-Bw4 was significantly associated with a sustained virological response (SVR to treatment (P = 0.017; odds ratio [OR] = 2.50, , as was the centromeric A/A haplotype of KIR (P = 0.015; OR 3.37. In contrast, SVR rates were significantly decreased in patients with KIR2DL2 or KIR2DS2 (P = 0.015; OR = 0.30, and P = 0.025; OR = 0.32, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression analysis subsequently identified the IL28B TT genotype (P = 0.00009; OR = 6.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.62 - 18.01, KIR2DL2/HLA-C1 (P = 0.014; OR = 0.24, 95% CI = 0.08 - 0.75, KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4 (P = 0.008, OR = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.37 - 8.05, and white blood cell count at baseline (P = 0.009; OR = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.35 - 8.16 as independent predictive factors of an SVR. We observed a significant association between the combination of IL28B TT genotype and KIR3DL1-HLA-Bw4 in responders (P = 0.0019, whereas IL28B TT along with KIR2DL2-HLA-C1 was related to a non-response (P = 0.0067. In conclusion, combinations of KIR3DL1/HLA-Bw4, KIR2DL2/HLA-C1, and a genetic variant of the IL28B gene are predictive of the response to PEG-IFN and ribavirin therapy in Japanese patients infected with genotype 1b HCV.

  2. [Manual trigger point therapy of shoulder pain : Randomized controlled study of effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohns, S; Schnieder, K; Licht, G; von Piekartz, H

    2016-12-01

    Although chronic shoulder pain is highly prevalent and myofascial trigger points (mTrP) are thought to be found in the majority of patients with shoulder complaints, the influence on the pain mechanism remains unclear. There are only very few controlled clinical studies on the effects of manual trigger point compression therapy. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared the short-term effects of manual trigger point compression therapy (n = 6) with manual sham therapy (n = 6) in patients with unilateral shoulder pain due to myofascial syndrome (MFS). The measurement data were collected before and after two sessions of therapy. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) of mTrP and symmetrically located points on the asymptomatic side were measured together with neutral points in order to detect a potential unilateral or generalized hyperalgesia. Additionally, the pain was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) at rest and during movement and the neck disability index (NDI) and disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaires were also completed and evaluated. Both treatment modalities led to a significant improvement; however, the manual trigger point compression therapy was significantly more effective in comparison to sham therapy, as measured by different parameters. The significant improvement of PPT values in the interventional group even at sites that were not directly treated, indicates central mechanisms in pain threshold modulation induced by manual compression therapy. The weaker but still measurable effects of sham therapy might be explained by the sham modality being a hands on technique or by sufficient stimulation of the trigger point region during the diagnostics and PPT measurements.

  3. Diet as a Trigger or Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James D; Abreu, Maria T

    2017-02-01

    The most common question asked by patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is, "Doctor, what should I eat?" Findings from epidemiology studies have indicated that diets high in animal fat and low in fruits and vegetables are the most common pattern associated with an increased risk of IBD. Low levels of vitamin D also appear to be a risk factor for IBD. In murine models, diets high in fat, especially saturated animal fats, also increase inflammation, whereas supplementation with omega 3 long-chain fatty acids protect against intestinal inflammation. Unfortunately, omega 3 supplements have not been shown to decrease the risk of relapse in patients with Crohn's disease. Dietary intervention studies have shown that enteral therapy, with defined formula diets, helps children with Crohn's disease and reduces inflammation and dysbiosis. Although fiber supplements have not been shown definitively to benefit patients with IBD, soluble fiber is the best way to generate short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate, which has anti-inflammatory effects. Addition of vitamin D and curcumin has been shown to increase the efficacy of IBD therapy. There is compelling evidence from animal models that emulsifiers in processed foods increase risk for IBD. We discuss current knowledge about popular diets, including the specific carbohydrate diet and diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols. We present findings from clinical and basic science studies to help gastroenterologists navigate diet as it relates to the management of IBD. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza...

  5. HLA-DPB1 and HLA Class I Confer Risk of and Protection from Narcolepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollila, Hanna M.; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang; Faraco, Juliette; Lin, Ling; Zheng, Xiuwen; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Dauvilliers, Yves; Pizza, Fabio; Hong, Seung-Chul; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Dong, Xiao Song; Yan, Han; Hong, Heeseung; Coquillard, Cristin; Mahlios, Joshua; Jolanki, Otto; Einen, Mali; Lavault, Sophie; Högl, Birgit; Frauscher, Birgit; Crowe, Catherine; Partinen, Markku; Huang, Yu Shu; Bourgin, Patrice; Vaarala, Outi; Désautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Mack, Steven J.; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1∗01:02-DQB1∗06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza H1N1, suggesting autoimmunity triggered by upper-airway infections. Additional effects of other HLA-DQ alleles have been reported consistently across multiple ethnic groups. Using over 3,000 case and 10,000 control individuals of European and Chinese background, we examined the effects of other HLA loci. After careful matching of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ in case and control individuals, we found strong protective effects of HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:02 (DP0402; odds ratio [OR] = 0.51 [0.38–0.67], p = 1.01 × 10−6) and HLA-DPA1∗01:03-DPB1∗04:01 (DP0401; OR = 0.61 [0.47–0.80], p = 2.07 × 10−4) and predisposing effects of HLA-DPB1∗05:01 in Asians (OR = 1.76 [1.34–2.31], p = 4.71 × 10−05). Similar effects were found by conditional analysis controlling for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ with DP0402 (OR = 0.45 [0.38–0.55] p = 8.99 × 10−17) and DP0501 (OR = 1.38 [1.18–1.61], p = 7.11 × 10−5). HLA-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A∗11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13–1.54], p = 4.92 × 10−4), HLA-B∗35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41–2.70], p = 5.14 × 10−5), and HLA-B∗51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25–1.78], p = 1.09 × 10−5) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza. PMID:25574827

  6. Antigen Presentation by Individually Transferred HLA Class I Genes in HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C Null Human Cell Line Generated Using the Multiplex CRISPR-Cas9 System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Cheol-Hwa; Sohn, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Cho, Hyun-Il; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs) are essential immune molecules that affect transplantation and adoptive immunotherapy. When hematopoietic stem cells or organs are transplanted with HLA-mismatched recipients, graft-versus-host disease or graft rejection can be induced by allogeneic immune responses. The function of each HLA allele has been studied using HLA-deficient cells generated from mutant cell lines or by RNA interference, zinc finger nuclease, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. To improve HLA gene editing, we attempted to generate an HLA class I null cell line using the multiplex CRISPR/Cas9 system by targeting exons 2 and 3 of HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C genes simultaneously. Multiplex HLA editing could induce the complete elimination of HLA class I genes by bi-allelic gene disruption on target sites which was defined by flow cytometry and target-specific polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, artificial antigen-presenting cells were generated by transfer of a single HLA class I allele and co-stimulatory molecules into this novel HLA class I null cell line. Artificial antigen-presenting cells showed HLA-restricted antigen presentation following antigen processing and were successfully used for the efficient generation of tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro. The efficient editing of HLA genes may provide a basis for universal cellular therapies and transplantation.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of HLA-B*58: 01 genetic testing before initiation of allopurinol therapy to prevent allopurinol-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in a Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Huey Yi; Lim, Yi Heng; Prawjaeng, Juthamas; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra; Mohamed, Zahurin; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2018-02-01

    Studies found a strong association between allopurinol-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and the HLA-B*58:01 allele. HLA-B*58:01 screening-guided therapy may mitigate the risk of allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN. This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HLA-B*58:01 screening before allopurinol therapy initiation compared with the current practice of no screening for Malaysian patients with chronic gout in whom a hypouricemic agent is indicated. This cost-effectiveness analysis adopted a societal perspective with a lifetime horizon. A decision tree model coupled with Markov models were developed to estimate the costs and outcomes, represented by quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, of three treatment strategies: (a) current practice (allopurinol initiation without HLA-B*58:01 screening); (b) HLA-B*58:01 screening before allopurinol initiation; and (c) alternative treatment (probenecid) without HLA-B*58:01 screening. The model was populated with data from literature review, meta-analysis, and published government documents. Cost values were adjusted for the year 2016, with costs and health outcomes discounted at 3% per annum. A series of sensitivity analysis including probabilistic sensitivity analysis were carried out to determine the robustness of the findings. Both HLA-B*58:01 screening and probenecid prescribing were dominated by current practice. Compared with current practice, HLA-B*58:01 screening resulted in 0.252 QALYs loss per patient at an additional cost of USD 322, whereas probenecid prescribing resulted in 1.928 QALYs loss per patient at an additional cost of USD 2203. One SJS/TEN case would be avoided for every 556 patients screened. At the cost-effectiveness threshold of USD 8695 per QALY, the probability of current practice being the best choice is 99.9%, in contrast with 0.1 and 0% in HLA-B*58:01 screening and probenecid prescribing, respectively. This is because of the low incidence of

  8. Influence of HLA Matching on the Efficacy of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapies for Osteoarthritis and Degenerative Disc Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier García-Sancho, MD, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. This lack of reactivity is presumably due to the cooperation of 2 factors, (1 downregulation of the host immune responses by the transplanted MSCs and (2 effective insulation of these cells inside the articular cavity or the intervertebral disc, respectively. Interestingly, better HLA matching did not enhance efficacy. These observations have medical relevance as they support the clinical use of allogeneic cells, at least as a single-dose administration. Multiple-dose applications will require further research to exclude possible sensitization.

  9. [Predictive value of single nucleotide polymorphisms of HLA-C and UBE2L3 in evaluating the effect of telbivudine antiviral therapy during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J F; Wang, J; Guo, D D; Qi, C J; Cao, F R; Tian, Z; Yao, N J; Wu, Y C; Yang, Y; He, Y L; Zhao, Y R; Chen, T Y

    2017-08-20

    Objective: To investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of rs3130542 and rs4821116 in the HLA-C and UBE2L3 genes and the effect of telbivudine antiviral therapy during pregnancy in HBeAg-positive mothers through a large-sample control study, and to provide a basis for the development of individualized blocking strategies for pregnant women with a high viral load. Methods: The genotypes of rs3130542 and rs4821116 were determined for 312 pregnant women with a high viral load who received telbivudine antiviral therapy during the second or third trimester of pregnancy, and the dominant model, recessive model, and additive model were used to analyze the association between the genotypes of these two loci and the reduction in HBV DNA load. The Shapiro-Wilk test and the Levene test were used to evaluate data normality and homogeneity of variances, and the t-test or the non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test was selected based on data type and was used for the comparison of means between groups. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was used to determine the genotype of SNPs, and the dominant model, recessive model, and additive model were used for analysis. Results: Mothers with an AA/AG genotype of rs3130542 in the HLA-C gene had a significantly higher probability of HBV DNA load ≥10(3) IU/ml at the time of delivery (P < 0.05) and a significantly higher risk of failure in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission, no matter whether they started to take telbivudine at week 24 or 28 of pregnancy. The association between the genotype of rs4821116 in the UBE2L3 gene and the reduction in viral load in pregnant women needed to be confirmed by studies with a larger sample size. Conclusion: Pregnant women with a high viral load and an AA/AG genotype of rs3130542 in the HLA-C gene tend to have poor response to antiviral therapy during pregnancy, and early antiviral intervention is recommended for such patients.

  10. Myofascial trigger point therapy for triceps surae dysfunction: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieve, Rob; Barnett, Sue; Coghill, Nikki; Cramp, Fiona

    2013-12-01

    The main aim of the case series was to inform further experimental research to determine the effectiveness of myofascial trigger point (MTrP) therapy for the treatment of triceps surae dysfunction. Ten participants with triceps surae dysfunction were recruited (4 females and 6 males); mean age±standard deviation=43±7.1 years. Participants were screened for inclusion/exclusion criteria and the following outcomes measures were assessed at baseline and discharge; lower extremity functional scale (LEFS), verbal numerical rating scale (NRS), MTrP prevalence, ankle dorsiflexion range of movement (ROM) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). Intervention involved trigger point (TrP) pressure release, self MTrP release and a home stretching programme. There was a high prevalence of active/latent MTrPs and possible myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) for all 10 participants at baseline. Active MTrP prevalence decreased to 0%, while latent MTrPs were still present at discharge. There were positive changes in most outcome measures (LEFS, NRS, ROM and PPT) for all 10 participants. Short term to medium term treatment outcomes (6 week post discharge) showed an overall mean LEFS increase of 11 points from 61/80 at baseline to 72/80 at discharge. This case series suggests that a brief course of multimodal MTrP therapy would be helpful for some patients with sub-acute or chronic calf pain. Important preliminary data was gathered, that will inform more rigorous research in this under investigated area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. HLA-G as a Tolerogenic Molecule in Transplantation and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Nardi, Fabiola; Wagner, Bettina; Horn, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule. In allogeneic situations such as pregnancy or allograft transplantation, the expression of HLA-G has been related to a better acceptance of the fetus or the allograft. Thus, it seems that HLA-G is crucially involved in mechanisms shaping an allogeneic immune response into tolerance. In this contribution we focus on (i) how HLA-G is involved in transplantation and human reproduction, (ii) how HLA-G is regulated by genetic and microenvironmental factors, and (iii) how HLA-G can offer novel perspectives with respect to therapy. PMID:25143957

  12. Association of high HLA-E expression during acute cellular rejection and numbers of HLA class I leader peptide mismatches with reduced renal allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberina, Hana; Rebmann, Vera; Wagner, Bettina; da Silva Nardi, Fabiola; Dziallas, Phillip; Dolff, Sebastian; Bienholz, Anja; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heinemann, Falko M; Witzke, Oliver; Zoet, Yvonne M; Claas, Frans H J; Horn, Peter A; Kribben, Andreas; Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2017-03-01

    Non-classical Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E preferentially presents leader peptides derived from classical HLA-class I molecules. HLA-E can trigger opposed immune responses by interacting with inhibitory NKG2A or by activating NKG2C receptors on NK and T-cells. We studied the impact of HLA-E on renal allograft survival during acute cellular rejection. HLA-E expression was up-regulated in acute cellular rejection (ACR) biopsies (n=12) compared to biopsies from 13 renal allografts with no rejection-signs. HLA-E up-regulation was correlated with numbers of HLA-class I leader peptide mismatches (p=0.04). CD8+ and CD56+ infiltrating cells correlated with HLA-E expression (pleader peptides might represent additional targets for immune-activating responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. KIR3DS1/HLA-B Bw4-80Ile Genotype Is Correlated with the IFN-α Therapy Response in hepatitis B e antigen-Positive Chronic Hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To date, several on-treatment-level virological and serological indices that may predict the response to interferon alpha (IFN-α have been reported. However, no effective predictors, such as drug–response genes, that can be detected before administration of anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV therapy with IFN-α, have been found. In the diverse range of chronic viral infection, genes that affect human immunity play important roles in understanding host and viral co-evolution. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which are highly polymorphic at the allele and haplotype levels, participate in the antiviral function of natural killer (NK cells via fine-tuning inhibition and activation of NK-cell responses that occur when the NK cells interact with human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules on target cells. For each individual, the pairing of KIR and HLA ligand is genetically determined. To investigate whether a particular KIR and HLA repertoire influences the risk of HBV infection and response to IFN-α treatment for chronic hepatitis B (CHB, we genotyped the KIRs and HLA ligands of 119 hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg-positive CHB patients. These patients included 43 patients who achieved sustained response (SR induced by IFN-α treatment for 48 weeks, 76 patients who achieved no response (NR, and 96 healthy subjects as controls. SR was defined as HBeAg loss with HBV DNA < 2,000 IU/ml and alanine aminotransferase normalization at 24 weeks posttreatment (week 72. In this study, we showed that activating KIR genes were less prevalent in Han Chinese, especially in Han Chinese with CHB, than in Caucasians. Furthermore, the KIR3DS1 gene, in combination with HLA-B Bw4-80Ile, strongly influenced the therapeutic outcomes for CHB patients who were treated with IFN-α. The frequency of the combination of genes encoding KIR3DS1 and HLA-B Bw4-80Ile was higher in patients who had a sustained treatment response than in patients who had NR [35

  14. Near-Infrared-Triggered Photodynamic Therapy toward Breast Cancer Cells Using Dendrimer-Functionalized Upconversion Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing-Yen; Liao, Ming-Liang; Hong, Guan-Ci

    2017-01-01

    Water-soluble upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) that exhibit significant ultraviolet, blue, and red emissions under 980-nm laser excitation were successfully synthesized for performing near infrared (NIR)-triggered photodynamic therapy (PDT). The lanthanide-doped UCNPs bearing oleate ligands were first exchanged by citrates to generate polyanionic surfaces and then sequentially encapsulated with NH2-terminated poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers (G4) and chlorine6 (Ce6) using a layer-by-layer (LBL) absorption strategy. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis confirm that the hybrid UCNPs possess a polygonal morphology with an average dimension of 16.0 ± 2.1 nm and α-phase crystallinity. A simple calculation derived through thermogravimetric analysis revealed that one polycationic G4 dendrimer could be firmly accommodated by approximately 150 polyanionic citrates through multivalent interactions. Moreover, zeta potential measurements indicated that the LBL fabrication results in the hybrid nanoparticles with positively charged surfaces originated from these dendrimers, which assist the cellular uptake in biological specimens. The cytotoxic singlet oxygen based on the photosensitization of the adsorbed Ce6 through the upconversion emissions can be readily accumulated by increasing the irradiation time of the incident lasers. Compared with that of 660-nm lasers, NIR-laser excitation exhibits optimized in vitro PDT effects toward human breast cancer MCF-7 cells cultured in the tumorspheres, and less than 40% of cells survived under a low Ce6 dosage of 2.5 × 10−7 M. Fluorescence microscopy analysis indicated that the NIR-driven PDT causes more effective destruction of the cells located inside spheres that exhibit significant cancer stem cell or progenitor cell properties. Moreover, an in vivo assessment based on immunohistochemical analysis for a 4T1 tumor-bearing mouse model confirmed the effective inhibition of cancer cell proliferation

  15. A study to determine the effectiveness of chiropractic manipulative therapy and chiropractic manipulative therapy combined with myofascial trigger point therapy in the treatment of chronic mechanical posterior cervical spine pain

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Tech. (Chiropractic) This unblinded, controlled pilot study was conducted in order to compare the effectiveness of chiropractic manipulative therapy with that of a combined therapy involving chiropractic manipulative therapy and myofascial trigger point therapy (dry needling technique and passive stretching), in the treatment of chronic mechanical posterior cervical spine pain. In executing the comparison, it was hypothesised that both treatment protocols would be effective, but that the...

  16. Prevalence of right atrial non-pulmonary vein triggers in atrial fibrillation patients treated with thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Hun; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Mohanty, Prasant; Trivedi, Chintan; Morris, Eli Hamilton; Santangeli, Pasquale; Bai, Rong; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Burkhardt, John David; Gallinghouse, Joseph G; Horton, Rodney; Sanchez, Javier E; Bailey, Shane; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Zagrodzky, Jason; Kim, Soo G; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is known to enhance arrhythmogenicity, and high-normal thyroid function is related with an increased recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation. However, the impact of thyroid hormone replacement (THR) on AF ablation is not well known. This study evaluated 1163 consecutive paroxysmal AF patients [160 (14%) on THR and 1003 (86%) without THR] undergoing their first catheter ablation. A total of 146 patients on THR and 146 controls were generated by propensity matching, based on calculated risk factor scores, using a logistic model (age, sex, body mass index, and left atrium size). The presence of non-pulmonary vein (PV) triggers was disclosed by a high-dose isoproterenol challenge (up to 30 μg/min) after PV isolation. Clinical characteristics were not different between the groups. When compared to the control, non-PV triggers were significantly greater in the THR patients [112 (77%) vs. 47 (32%), P right atrium (95 vs. 56%, P sources of non-PV triggers were the interatrial septum (25 vs. 11%, P = 0.002), coronary sinus (70 vs. 52%, P = 0.01), left atrial appendage (47 vs. 34%, P = 0.03), crista terminalis/superior vena cava (11 vs. 8%, P = 0.43), and mitral valve annulus (7 vs. 5%, P = 0.45) (THR vs. control), respectively. After mean follow-up of 14.7 ± 5.2 months, success rate was lower in patients on THR therapy [94 (64.4%)] compared to patients not receiving THR therapy [110 (75.3%), log-rank test value = 0.04]. Right atrial non-PV triggers were more prevalent in AF patients treated with THR. Elimination of non-PV triggers provided better arrhythmia-free survival in the non-THR group.

  17. NIR-triggered high-efficient photodynamic and chemo-cascade therapy using caspase-3 responsive functionalized upconversion nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Wu, Baoyan; Hu, Xianglong; Xing, Da

    2017-10-01

    Stimuli-responsive nanoparticles with multiple therapeutic/diagnostic functions are highly desirable for effective tumor treatment. Herein novel caspase-3 responsive functionalized upconversion nanoparticles (CFUNs) were fabricated with three-in-one functional integration: near-infrared (NIR) triggered photodynamic damage along with caspase-3 activation, subsequent caspase-3 responsive drug release, and cascade chemotherapeutic activation. CFUNs were formulated from the self-assembly of caspase-3 responsive doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug tethered with DEVD peptide (DEVD-DOX), upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP), a photosensitizer (pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester, MPPa), and tumor-targeting cRGD-PEG-DSPE to afford multifunctional CFUNs, MPPa/UCNP-DEVD-DOX/cRGD. Upon cellular uptake and NIR irradiation, the visible light emission of UCNP could excite MPPa to produce reactive oxygen species for photodynamic therapy (PDT) along with the activation of caspase-3, which further cleaved DEVD peptide to release DOX within tumor cells, thus accomplishing NIR-triggered PDT and cascade chemotherapy. CFUNs presented silent therapeutic potency and negligible cytotoxicity in the dark, whereas in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated the NIR-triggered cascade therapeutic activation and tumor inhibition due to consecutive PDT and chemotherapy. Current NIR-activated cascade tumor therapy with two distinct mechanisms is significantly favorable to overcome multidrug resistance and tumor heterogeneity for persistent tumor treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Persistent Luminescent Nanocarrier as an Accurate Tracker in Vivo for Near Infrared-Remote Selectively Triggered Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Chen, Hong-Bin; Zhao, Pei-Qi; Pan, Hui-Zhuo; Wu, Xiao-Li; Gong, Xiao-Qun; Wang, Han-Jie; Chang, Jin

    2016-08-24

    Optical imaging-guidance of indocyanine green (ICG) for photothermal therapy (PTT) has great latent capacity in cancer therapy. However, the conventional optical image-guidance mode has caused strong tissue autofluorescence of the living tissue, which leads to the accurate infrared light irradiation cannot be conducted. In this article, ICG and persistent luminescence phosphors (PLPs) coloaded mesoporous silica nanocarriers ((ICG+PLPs)@mSiO2) were first designed and prepared for persistent luminescent imaging-guided PTT. The (ICG+PLPs)@mSiO2 nanocarriers could significantly improve signal-to-noise ratio during luminescence imaging-guided PTT, making the PLP promising for improving the accuracy of the tumor site for photothermal therapy in vivo. This paper is likely to develop a new way for accurately regulating cancer cell death based on luminescence imaging-guided PTT selectively triggered by near-infrared (NIR)-remote.

  19. ADDITIONAL EFFECT OF TRIGGER POINT THERAPY AND MYO FASCIAL RELEASE ON SECOND STAGE FROZEN SHOULDER AMONG INDUSTRIAL WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Nambi S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Frozen shoulder is a common condition commonly affecting 2-5% of the industrial population typically between 40 and 60 years of age. Most of the studies were analysed the individual interventions and did not investigate the combination of interventions. The purpose of this study is to find two different forms of massage techniques Trigger Point therapy and Myofascial release in second stage of Frozen Shoulder to reduce pain and improve the Range of motion. Subjects: 30 subjects working in industry with unilateral second stage frozen shoulder lasting 3 months or more and 25% decrease in passive joint mobility relative to the non affected side were enrolled in this study. Methods: Subjects who were willing to participate in the study and to fulfil the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study and they were divided into two Groups (A and B randomly. Group A was treated with Trigger Point therapy, Myofascial release, Scapula Stabilization Exercises, and Interferential Therapy (IFT and Group B were treated only with Scapula Stabilization Exercises and IFT. The duration of treatment was 4 weeks and they were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks. Outcome measures included pain intensity by Visual Analog Scale (VAS and Range of Motion (ROM by goniometer. Results: Subjects in both Groups improved over 4 weeks after intervention. Significant (p ≤ 0.05 difference were found between both Groups after 4 weeks in VAS and ROM. But statistically (p ≤ 0.05 greater change scores were found in the Group A for VAS and ROM than Group B. Discussion and Conclusion: Group A and B was effective in reducing pain and improving the ROM in patients with second stage of Frozen Shoulder. However, subjects in Group A, who received Trigger Point therapy and M yofascial release showed better improvement in reduce pain and improve the ROM than Group B. In conclusion the treatment program consisting of Trigger Point therapy and

  20. Multi-functional liposomes showing radiofrequency-triggered release and magnetic resonance imaging for tumor multi-mechanism therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Li, Hongyan; Zhao, Feifei; Su, Xiangjie; Cao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-03-01

    Recently, nanoplatforms with multiple functions, such as tumor-targeting drug carriers, MRI, optical imaging, thermal therapy etc., have become popular in the field of cancer research. The present study reports a novel multi-functional liposome for cancer theranostics. A dual targeted drug delivery with radiofrequency-triggered drug release and imaging based on the magnetic field influence was used advantageously for tumor multi-mechanism therapy. In this system, the surface of fullerene (C60) was decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles, and PEGylation formed a hybrid nanosystem (C60-Fe3O4-PEG2000). Thermosensitive liposomes (dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) with DSPE-PEG2000-folate wrapped up the hybrid nanosystem and docetaxel (DTX), which were designed to combine features of biological and physical (magnetic) drug targeting for fullerene radiofrequency-triggered drug release. The magnetic liposomes not only served as powerful tumor diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, but also as powerful agents for photothermal ablation of tumors. Furthermore, a remarkable thermal therapy combined chemotherapy multi-functional liposome nanoplatform converted radiofrequency energy into thermal energy to release drugs from thermosensitive liposomes, which was also observed during both in vitro and in vivo treatment. The multi-functional liposomes also could selectively kill cancer cells in highly localized regions via their excellent active tumor targeting and magnetic targeted abilities.

  1. Left ventricular performance during triggered left ventricular pacing in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy and left bundle branch block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Christoffer Tobias; Kronborg, Mads Brix; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    complex >150 ms, QRS complex narrowing under CRT, and sinus rhythm were included ≥3 months after CRT implantation. Echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), global peak systolic longitudinal strain (GLS), and contraction pattern by 2D strain was performed during intrinsic......PURPOSE: To assess the acute effect of triggered left ventricular pacing (tLVp) on left ventricular performance and contraction pattern in patients with heart failure, left bundle branch block (LBBB), and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). METHODS: Twenty-three patients with pre-implant QRS...

  2. A Near-Infrared Triggered Nanophotosensitizer Inducing Domino Effect on Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Burst for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhengze; Sun, Qiaoqiao; Pan, Wei; Li, Na; Tang, Bo

    2015-11-24

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a well-established modality for cancer therapy, which locally kills cancer cells when light irradiates a photosensitizer. However, conventional PDT is often limited by the extremely short lifespan and severely limited diffusion distance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by photosensitizer, as well as the penetration depth of visible light activation. Here, we develop a near-infrared (NIR) triggered nanophotosensitizer based on mitochondria targeted titanium dioxide-coated upconversion nanoparticles for PDT against cancer. When irradiated by NIR laser, the nanophotosensitizer could produce ROS in mitochondria, which induced the domino effect on ROS burst. The overproduced ROS accumulated in mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial collapse and irreversible cell apoptosis. Confocal fluorescence imaging indicated that the mitochondrial targeting and real-time imaging of ROS burst could be achieved in living cells. The complete removal of tumor in vivo confirmed the excellent therapeutic effect of the nanophotosensitizer.

  3. [Polymorphism in HLA and KIR genes and the impact on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation outcomes and unrelated donor selection: Guidelines from the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Valérie; Brignier, Anne; Elsermans, Vincent; Gagne, Katia; Kennel, Anne; Pedron, Béatrice; Picard, Christophe; Ravinet, Aurélie; Varlet, Pauline; Cesbron, Anne; Delbos, Florent; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Loiseau, Pascale

    2016-11-01

    In an attempt to harmonize clinical practices among French hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers, the Francophone Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy (SFGM-TC) held its sixth annual workshop series in September 2015 in Lille. This event brought together practitioners from across the country with the purpose of offering careful analysis of published studies on clinical practice issues that remain to be disputed. This article addresses the impact of HLA and KIR gene polymorphism on the outcome of the transplantation in order to optimize unrelated donor selection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Pretreatment anxiety and pain acceptance are associated with response to trigger point injection therapy for chronic myofascial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Gerard M; Finn, David P; O'Gorman, David A; Maharaj, Chris; Raftery, Miriam; Ruane, Nancy; Mitchell, Caroline; Sarma, Kiran; Bohacek, Marek; McGuire, Brian E

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the psychosocial profile of patients who responded or did not respond to trigger point injection therapy for chronic myofascial pain. Seventy one patients with a diagnosis of chronic myofascial pain of the paraspinous muscles completed a pretreatment questionnaire measuring demographic and social factors, and validated scales to assess pain intensity, pain interference (physical and emotional), and defined psychological characteristics (pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, pain self-efficacy, mood and anxiety). Trigger point injection therapy of the affected areas of myofascial pain was performed and follow-up was conducted by telephone at one week (n = 65) and one month (n = 63) post intervention to assess treatment outcome (pain intensity and pain-related physical interference). At one week follow-up and one-month follow-up, using pain-related physical interference as the outcome measure, we found that those who responded well to treatment were characterized by a lower level of pretreatment anxiety and a higher level of pain acceptance, with anxiety being the strongest predictor. These results suggest that responses to interventional pain management in chronic myofascial paraspinous pain may be influenced by psychological characteristics, especially pretreatment anxiety. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. HLA and pollinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehling, A; Baena-Cagnani, C E; Sanz, M L; Crisci, C D

    1979-01-01

    Sixty-two patients were selected who suffered from seasonal pollen-induced bronchial asthma and rhinitis. Histocompatibility antigen typing was carried out with a panel of 70 antisera (Behringwerke) of 33 HLA specificities. The results obtained at locus A of the most representative by percent phenotypic frequency of the HLA studies shows a decreased frecuency of HLA-A11. The phenotyic frequencies of the most representative HLA of B locus in the group of patients shows an increase in the frequency of HLA-B8. This represents 22.6% compared with 9.1% of the controls, which is definitely significant. The results obtained in a study of the haplotype frequency of three combinations of HLA antigens, in a group of allergic patients compared with the controls shows that the frequency of the haplotype A1 B8 is greater in the allergic patients than in the control group, a statistically significant finding. As regards the other two haplotypes A2 B12 and A3 B7, the respective results of the comparison were not significant in the first and marginally significant in the second. Even these few studied cases demonstrate the predominance of HLA-B8 in atopic or hyperreactive states. As regards the A1 B8 haplotype, we also find a slightly increased occurrence, in agreement with the literature. This suggests that the hyperergic response might be associated with the presence of the A1 B8 haplotype.

  6. Aspirin insensitive thrombophilia: Transcript profiling of blood identifies platelet abnormalities and HLA restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Payam; Katz, Richard; Toma, Ian; Li, Ranyang; Reiner, Jonathan; VanHouten, Kiersten; Carpio, Larry; Marshall, Lorraine; Lian, Yi; Bupp, Sujata; Fu, Sidney W.; Rickles, Frederick; Leitenberg, David; Lai, Yinglei; Weksler, Babette B.; Rebling, Frederik; Yang, Zhaoqing; McCaffrey, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    Aspirin is the most widely used antiplatelet agent because it is safe, efficient, and inexpensive. However, a significant subset of patients does not exhibit a full inhibition of platelet aggregation, termed ‘aspirin resistance’ (AR). Several major studies have observed that AR patients have a 4-fold increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and other thrombotic events. Arachidonic acid-stimulated whole blood aggregation was tested in 132 adults at risk for ischemic events, and identified an inadequate response to aspirin therapy in 9 patients (6.8%). Expression profiling of blood RNA by microarray was used to generate new hypotheses about the etiology of AR. Among the differentially expressed genes, there were decreases in several known platelet transcripts, including clusterin (CLU), glycoproteins IIb/IIIa (ITGA2B/3), lipocalin (LCN2), lactoferrin (LTF), and the thrombopoetin receptor (MPL), but with increased mRNA for the T-cell Th1 chemokine CXCL10. There was a strong association of AR with expression of HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DQA1. Similar HLA changes have been linked to autoimmune disorders, particularly antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), in which autoantibodies to phospholipid/protein complexes can trigger platelet activation. Consistent with APS, AR patients exhibited a 30% reduction in platelet counts. Follow-up testing for autoimmune antibodies observed only borderline titers in AR patients. Overall, these results suggest that AR may be related to changes in platelet gene expression creating a hyperreactive platelet, despite antiplatelet therapy. Future studies will focus on determining the protein levels of these differential transcripts in platelets, and the possible involvement of HLA restriction as a contributing factor. PMID:23454623

  7. Plasmonic enhancement of cyanine dyes for near-infrared light-triggered photodynamic/photothermal therapy and fluorescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mindan; Kang, Ning; Chen, Chuan; Yang, Liuqing; Li, Yang; Hong, Minghui; Luo, Xiangang; Ren, Lei; Wang, Xiumin

    2017-11-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) triggered cyanine dyes have attracted considerable attention in multimodal tumor theranostics. However, NIR cyanine dyes used in tumor treatment often suffer from low fluorescence intensity and weak singlet oxygen generation efficiency, resulting in inadequate diagnostic and therapy efficacy for tumors. It is still a great challenge to improve both the photodynamic therapy (PDT) and fluorescent imaging (FLI) efficacy of cyanine dyes in tumor applications. Herein, a novel multifunctional nanoagent AuNRs@SiO2-IR795 was developed to realize the integrated photothermal/photodynamic therapy (PTT/PDT) and FLI at a very low dosage of IR795 (0.4 μM) based on metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effects. In our design, both the fluorescence intensity and reactive oxygen species of AuNRs@SiO2-IR795 nanocomposites were significantly enhanced up to 51.7 and 6.3 folds compared with free IR795, owing to the localized surface plasmon resonance band of AuNRs overlapping with the absorption or fluorescence emission band of the IR795 dye. Under NIR laser irradiation, the cancer cell inhibition efficiency in vitro with synergetic PDT/PTT was up to 82.3%, compared with 10.3% for free IR795. Moreover, the enhanced fluorescence intensity of our designed nanocomposites was helpful to track their behavior in tumor cells. Therefore, our designed nanoagents highlight the applications of multimodal diagnostics and therapy in tumors based on MEF.

  8. Effect of myofascial trigger point therapy with an inflatable ball in elderlies with chronic non-specific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sejun; Kim, Minhee; Lee, Minyoung; Kim, Taeyeong; Lee, Dongshin; Yoon, Bumchul

    2017-08-04

    Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) are related to low back pain and back muscle stiffening, and secondarily to movement impairment. MTrP therapy with an inflatable ball would improve clinical outcomes for chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP) after 6 weeks. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MTrPs with an inflatable ball for the elderly with CNSLBP. Fifteen elderly patients with chronic non-specific low back pain were evaluated for pain, pressure sensitivity, and physical function at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 weeks of therapy. The visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT) were used to measure pain intensity and sensitivity, respectively. Straight-leg-raise (SLR) test, back range of motion (BROM), and Oswestry disability index were used to assess physical function. Significant differences were observed between the 3- and 6-week VAS scores (-34.6%; p= 0.03); baseline and 1-week (7%; p= 0.02), 1- and 3-week (-14%; p= 0.01), and 3- and 6-week PPTs (18%; p= 0.01); 3- and 6-week BROMs (Flexion, 7.1%; Extension, 41%; p= 0.048); baseline and 1-week (-6.9%; p= 0.02), 1- and 3-week (3%; p= 0.01), and 3- and 6-week active SLR test scores (7%; p= 0.011); and baseline and 1-week (-2.6%; p= 0.03), 1- and 3-week (8.34%; p= 0.01), and 3- and 6-week passive SLR test scores (5.3%; p= 0.025). Myofascial trigger point therapy with an inflatable ball relieved pain and improved physical function in the elderly with CNSLBP.

  9. A Previous Miscarriage and a Previous Successful Pregnancy Have a Different Impact on HLA Antibody Formation during a Subsequent Successful Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Hönger, Gideon; van Deutekom, Hanneke Wilhelmina Maria; Hösli, Irene Mathilde; Schaub, Stefan; Spierings, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Inherited paternal HLA antigens from the semi-allogeneic fetus may trigger maternal immune responses during pregnancy, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. The prevalence of these HLA antibodies increases with the number of successful pregnancies. In the present study, we

  10. EEG-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Restoring Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke with Severe Hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Marquez-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the therapeutic effects of integrating brain-computer interfacing technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore upper limb reaching movements in a 64-year-old man with severe left hemiplegia following a hemorrhagic stroke he sustained six years prior to this study. He completed 40 90-minute sessions of functional electrical stimulation therapy using a custom-made neuroprosthesis that facilitated 5 different reaching movements. During each session, the participant attempted to reach with his paralyzed arm repeatedly. Stimulation for each of the movement phases (e.g., extending and retrieving the arm was triggered when the power in the 18 Hz–28 Hz range (beta frequency range of the participant’s EEG activity, recorded with a single electrode, decreased below a predefined threshold. The function of the participant’s arm showed a clinically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE subscore (6 points as well as moderate improvement in Functional Independence Measure Self-Care subscore (7 points. The changes in arm’s function suggest that the combination of BCI technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary motor function in individuals with chronic hemiplegia which results in severe upper limb deficit (FMA-UE ≤ 15, a population that does not benefit from current best-practice rehabilitation interventions.

  11. The influence of Positional Release Therapy on the myofascial trigger points of the upper trapezius muscle in computer users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Kojidi, M; Okhovatian, F; Rahimi, A; Baghban, A A; Azimi, H

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of Positional Release Therapy (PRT) in computer users via latent trigger points (LTrPs) of the upper trapezius muscle. Twenty-eight women with the upper trapezius MTrPs participated in this study. Subjects were randomly classified into two groups (14 in each group): the subjects in the Group 1 received PRT in shortened position while those in the group 2 received sham control in the neutral position of the upper trapezius muscle. They received three therapy sessions every other day for one week. The local pain intensity and Pressure pain threshold (PPT) were measured via Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and algometry, respectively, before interventions and repeated 5 min after the first and third treatment sessions in each group. One-way ANOVA was used for data analysis. After treatment, between groups comparison revealed that for PPT and VAS, there were significant differences between the two groups (VAS and PPT; P < 0.05). Both groups (PRT and sham control) showed alleviation of pain and increase in PPT during three sessions of therapy although PRT showed to be more effective in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. EEG-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Restoring Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke with Severe Hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Aaron; Popovic, Milos R.

    2016-01-01

    We report the therapeutic effects of integrating brain-computer interfacing technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore upper limb reaching movements in a 64-year-old man with severe left hemiplegia following a hemorrhagic stroke he sustained six years prior to this study. He completed 40 90-minute sessions of functional electrical stimulation therapy using a custom-made neuroprosthesis that facilitated 5 different reaching movements. During each session, the participant attempted to reach with his paralyzed arm repeatedly. Stimulation for each of the movement phases (e.g., extending and retrieving the arm) was triggered when the power in the 18 Hz–28 Hz range (beta frequency range) of the participant's EEG activity, recorded with a single electrode, decreased below a predefined threshold. The function of the participant's arm showed a clinically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE) subscore (6 points) as well as moderate improvement in Functional Independence Measure Self-Care subscore (7 points). The changes in arm's function suggest that the combination of BCI technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary motor function in individuals with chronic hemiplegia which results in severe upper limb deficit (FMA-UE ≤ 15), a population that does not benefit from current best-practice rehabilitation interventions. PMID:27882256

  13. A Comparative Study of Trigger Point Therapy with Local Anaesthetic (0.5 % Bupivacaine) Versus Combined Trigger Point Injection Therapy and Levosulpiride in the Management of Myofascial Pain Syndrome in the Orofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pranav; Singh, Virendra; Sethi, Sujata; Kumar, Arun

    2016-09-01

    To compare the efficacy of combined local anesthetic injection with 0.5 % bupivacaine and levosulpiride versus local anesthetic injection alone on outcome measures including levels of pain intensity and depression in the management of myofascial pain syndrome in orofacial region. This was a prospective, randomized, controlled and open-label comparative clinical study. Seventy-four patients diagnosed to have myofascial pain syndrome and fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled for the study. Patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups. Group A received local anesthetic injection (0.5 % bupivacaine) on trigger points and Group B received combined trigger point injection therapy and 50 mg of tablet Levosulpiride orally B.I.D. They were assessed for pain intensity and depression at baseline and at follow-up of 1, 4, 6 and 12 week intervals. The mean age of patients was 44.54 + 15.977 years in group A and 39.97 + 14.107 years in group B (P value = 0.2). Group A comprised of 25 females (67.567 %) and 12 males (32.432 %) while group B had 27 females (75 %) and 9 males (25 %). 70.27 % were diagnosed with moderate depression in group A and 75 % in group B. 18.91 % in group A and 19.44 % in group B were diagnosed with severe depression. When the VAS score and BDI score was compared at the follow-up intervals with the baseline scores in both treatment groups, the mean difference was highly significant at all the follow-up intervals. However when the relative efficacies of two interventions were compared between the two groups, improvement in pain was significant at all the follow-up intervals except the 1st week follow-up whereas the improvement in depression was non-significant at 1st and 4th week interval while it was highly significant at 6th and 12th week intervals. The combined therapy with trigger point injection and levosulpiride as antidepressant significantly reduces pain and depression in the study subjects suffering from chronic

  14. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome: reduction of medication use after pelvic floor physical therapy with an internal myofascial trigger point wand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rodney U; Harvey, Richard H; Wise, David; Nevin Smith, J; Nathanson, Brian H; Sawyer, Tim

    2015-03-01

    This study documents the voluntary reduction in medication use in patients with refractory chronic pelvic pain syndrome utilizing a protocol of pelvic floor myofascial trigger point release with an FDA approved internal trigger point wand and paradoxical relaxation therapy. Self-referred patients were enrolled in a 6-day training clinic from October, 2008 to May, 2011 and followed the protocol for 6 months. Medication usage and symptom scores on a 1-10 scale (10 = most severe) were collected at baseline, and 1 and 6 months. All changes in medication use were at the patient's discretion. Changes in medication use were assessed by McNemar's test in both complete case and modified intention to treat (mITT) analyses. 374 out of 396 patients met inclusion criteria; 79.7 % were male, median age of 43 years and median symptom duration of 5 years. In the complete case analysis, the percent of patients using medications at baseline was 63.6 %. After 6 months of treatment the percentage was 40.1 %, a 36.9 % reduction (p < 0.001). In the mITT analysis, there was a 22.7 % overall reduction from baseline (p < 0.001). Medication cessation at 6 months was significantly associated with a reduction in total symptoms (p = 0.03).

  15. A Previous Miscarriage and a Previous Successful Pregnancy Have a Different Impact on HLA Antibody Formation during a Subsequent Successful Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsten Geneugelijk; Gideon Hönger; Hanneke Wilhelmina Maria van Deutekom; Irene Mathilde Hoesli; Stefan Schaub; Eric Spierings

    2016-01-01

    Inherited paternal HLA antigens from the semi-allogeneic fetus may trigger maternal immune responses during pregnancy, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. The prevalence of these HLA antibodies increases with the number of successful pregnancies. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a single prior miscarriage on HLA antibody formation during a subsequent successful pregnancy. Women with a successful pregnancy with one or more prior miscarriages (n = 229)...

  16. Key Triggers of Osteoclast-Related Diseases and Available Strategies for Targeted Therapies: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidi Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts, the only cells with bone resorption functions in vivo, maintain the balance of bone metabolism by cooperating with osteoblasts, which are responsible for bone formation. Excessive activity of osteoclasts causes many diseases such as osteoporosis, periprosthetic osteolysis, bone tumors, and Paget’s disease. In contrast, osteopetrosis results from osteoclast deficiency. Available strategies for combating over-activated osteoclasts and the subsequently induced diseases can be categorized into three approaches: facilitating osteoclast apoptosis, inhibiting osteoclastogenesis, and impairing bone resorption. Bisphosphonates are representative molecules that function by triggering osteoclast apoptosis. New drugs, such as tumor necrosis factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL inhibitors (e.g., denosumab have been developed for targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B /RANKL/osteoprotegerin system or CSF-1/CSF-1R axis, which play critical roles in osteoclast formation. Furthermore, vacuolar (H+-ATPase inhibitors, cathepsin K inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide 2 impair different stages of the bone resorption process. Recently, significant achievements have been made in this field. The aim of this review is to provide an updated summary of the current progress in research involving osteoclast-related diseases and of the development of targeted inhibitors of osteoclast formation.

  17. Reflux esophagitis triggered after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a noteworthy demerit of eradication therapy among the Japanese?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori eIijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the February 2013 Revision of Insured Medical Treatment, bacterial eradication for all Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals in Japan was covered under the insurance scheme. However, reflux esophagitis is believed to occur in approximately 10% of Japanese patients who undergo eradication therapy. Hence, the risk of reflux esophagitis among such cases should be carefully considered, particularly in the treatment for H. pylori-positive patients who are otherwise healthy. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori in cases of H. pylori-positive gastritis markedly suppresses gastric inflammation, and inhibits gastric mucosal atrophy and its progression to intestinal metaplasia. In a long-term follow-up study (10-20 years, eradication treatment was found to reduce the risk of subsequent gastric cancer. However, the fact that eradication-induced reflux esophagitis could increase the long-term risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma should also be considered in the Japanese population. Appropriate treatment with proton pump inhibitors should be taken into consideration for patients undergoing eradication therapy in clinical practice.

  18. Does fasting during Ramadan trigger non-adherence to oral hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed Abdelmabood; Gaber, Ayman Abdelsamee; Taha, Fatma Mohamed

    2012-09-01

    To estimate the effect of fasting during Ramadan (the ninth lunar month) on adherence to oral hormonal therapies (OHT) among breast cancer (BC) patients. During Ramadan 2010, 139 BC patients were interviewed at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute. They were asked about fasting as well as intake of OHT in Ramadan and in the preceding month. The median age was 50years and most patients were postmenopausal with good performance status and non-metastatic disease. The median number of fasting days was 18% and 93% of patients were fasting 80% or more of Ramadan. Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors were used in 64% and 36%, respectively. Adherence to OHT during Ramadan and its preceding month were 94.2% and 95.7%, respectively (p=0.77). In univariate analysis, non-adherence prior to Ramadan and shorter duration of OHT were predictors of non-adherence during Ramadan (PFasting, age, performance status, presence of metastases and type of hormonal therapy were not good predictors of adherence. While most of patients receiving OHT for BC are fasting during Ramadan, this does not negatively impact compliance with treatment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Effect of bloodletting therapy at local myofascial trigger points and acupuncture at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points on upper back myofascial pain syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guimei; Jia, Chao; Lin, Mode

    2016-02-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy of bloodletting therapy and acupuncture at Jiaji points for treating upper back myofascial pain syndrome (MPS), and compare this with lidocaine block therapy. A total of 66 upper back MPS patients were randomly assigned to either the treatment group or the control group in a 1: 1 ratio. The treatment group (n = 33) were treated with bloodletting therapy at local myofascial trigger points and acupuncture at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points; one treatment course consisted of five, single 20-min-treatments with a 2-day break between each treatment. The control group (n = 33) were treated with a lidocaine block at trigger points; one treatment course consisted of five sessions of lidocaine block therapy with a 2-day break between each session. The simplified McGill Scale (SF-MPQ) and tenderness threshold determination were used to assess pain before and after a course of treatment. After the third and fifth treatment, the SF-MPQ values were significantly decreased (P pain assessments between the two groups after three and five treatments (P > 0.05). There were five cases with minor adverse reactions reported in the control patients, while no adverse reactions were reported in the treatment group. Bloodletting therapy at local myofascial trigger points and acupuncture at Jiaji points was effective in treating upper back MPS. Clinically, bloodletting and acupuncture therapy had the same efficacy as the lidocaine block therapy, with fewer adverse reactions.

  20. HLA and fertility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ober, C. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The recent paper by Jin et al., reporting that class 11 region major histocompatibility complex genes may influence embryonic loss in outbred couples supports previous results of our studies of HLA and fertility in the Hutterites. However, the authors have incorrectly cited our work and have omitted the reference that is most relevant to their results. The paper by Kostyu et al. is incorrectly referred to in the introduction as providing evidence for HLA sharing being associated with recurrent spontaneous abortion. The Kostyu et al. paper does not include any data on fertility or reproduction but reports frequencies of individuals who are homozygous at the HLA-A, -C, -B, -DR, and -DQ loci in the Hutterite population. In fact, recurrent spontaneous abortion has not been observed in any of the couples in our sample of >500 Hutterite couples. References more appropriate to the association between HLA sharing and recurrent miscarriage are those by Komlos et al., Schacter et al., Gerencer and Kastelan, and Beer et al. It might also be worth pointing out that many studies of recurrent miscarriage in outbred couples have not found an association with HLA sharing; examples include the studies of Ergolu et al., Oksenberg et al., and Christiansen et al., among others. 11 refs.

  1. Radiation recall dermatitis triggered by sorafenib after radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwi Eon; Song, Hee-Sung; Ahn, Ki Jung; Kim, Young Suk

    2017-01-01

    Sorafenib is widely used for unresectable and metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) is an acute inflammatory reaction confined to previously irradiated skin that occurs after the administration of certain drugs. RRD after sorafenib treatment is rare; five cases have been reported thus far. We describe a 44-year-old man irradiated for chest wall bone metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma. Eight days after radiotherapy completion, systemic therapy for metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma was initiated with sorafenib treatment. Eleven days after starting sorafenib, the patient complained of erythematous rash with pruritus in the chest wall, in a location consistent with the previous radiation field. Sorafenib was continued at the same dose, despite the RRD. The skin reaction subsided over the next 2 weeks without any medical intervention. PMID:29037022

  2. Radiation recall dermatitis triggered by sorafenib after radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwi Eon; Song, Hee Sung; Kim, Young Suk [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Ki Jung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Sorafenib is widely used for unresectable and metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) is an acute inflammatory reaction confined to previously irradiated skin that occurs after the administration of certain drugs. RRD after sorafenib treatment is rare; five cases have been reported thus far. We describe a 44-year-old man irradiated for chest wall bone metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma. Eight days after radiotherapy completion, systemic therapy for metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma was initiated with sorafenib treatment. Eleven days after starting sorafenib, the patient complained of erythematous rash with pruritus in the chest wall, in a location consistent with the previous radiation field. Sorafenib was continued at the same dose, despite the RRD. The skin reaction subsided over the next 2 weeks without any medical intervention.

  3. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Carel; Wensing, Michel; Franssen, Jo Lm; Oostendorp, Rob Ab

    2007-11-05

    Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation) are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis), but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle). It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders.The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 - September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects have unilateral shoulder pain for at least six months

  4. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franssen Jo LM

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis, but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle. It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders. The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. Methods/Design This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 – September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects

  5. Titania coated upconversion nanoparticles for near-infrared light triggered photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucky, Sasidharan Swarnalatha; Muhammad Idris, Niagara; Li, Zhengquan; Huang, Kai; Soo, Khee Chee; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-27

    Because of the limited penetration depth of visible light that generally excites most of the available photosensitizers (PSs), conventional photodynamic therapy (PDT) is limited to the treatment of superficial and flat lesions. Recently, the application of deep penetrating near-infrared (NIR) light excitable upconversion nanoparticles (UCNs) in conjunction with PDT has shown to have clear potential in the treatment of solid tumors due to its ability to penetrate thick tissue. However, various constructs developed so far have certain limitations such as poor or unstable PS loading, reducing their therapeutic efficacy and limiting their application to solution or cell-based studies. In this work, we present a method to fabricate uniform core-shell structured nanoconstruct with a thin layer of photocatalyst or PS-titanium dioxide (TiO2) stably coated on individual UCN core. Our design allows controllable and highly reproducible PS loading, preventing any leakage of PS compared to previously developed nanoconstructs, thus ensuring repeatable PDT results. Further surface modification of the developed nanoconstructs with polyethylene glycol (PEG) rendered them biocompatible, demonstrating good therapeutic efficacy both in vitro and in vivo.

  6. HLA Haplotype Validator for quality assessments of HLA typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Mack, Steven J; Udell, Julia; Noonan, David A; Ozanne, Steven; Trachtenberg, Elizabeth; Prestegaard, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    HLA alleles are observed in specific haplotypes, due to Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) between particular alleles. Haplotype frequencies for alleles in strong LD have been established for specific ethnic groups and racial categories. Application of high-resolution HLA typing using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) is becoming a common practice in research and clinical laboratory settings. HLA typing errors using NGS occasionally occur due to allelic sequence imbalance or misalignment. Manual inspection of HLA genotypes is labor intensive and requires an in-depth knowledge of HLA alleles and haplotypes. We developed the "HLA Haplotype Validator (HLAHapV)" software, which inspects an HLA genotype for both the presence of common and well-documented alleles and observed haplotypes. The software also reports warnings when rare alleles, or alleles that do not belong to recognized haplotypes, are found. The software validates observable haplotypes in genotype data, providing increased confidence regarding the accuracy of the HLA typing, and thus reducing the effort involved in correcting potential HLA typing errors. The HLAHapV software is a powerful tool for quality control of HLA genotypes prior to the application of downstream analyses. We demonstrate the use of the HLAHapV software for identifying unusual haplotypes, which can lead to finding potential HLA typing errors. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Erythrocyte membrane-coated NIR-triggered biomimetic nanovectors with programmed delivery for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Lv, Yanlin; Ni, Dezhi; Wang, Jie; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wei, Wei; Ma, Guanghui

    2015-05-01

    A new type of photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents using upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with incorporated photosensitizers as the inner core and an erythrocyte membrane (RM) decorated with dual targeting moieties as the cloak is developed. Owing to the endogenous nature of RM, the RM-coating endows the PDT agents with perfect biocompatibility and stealth ability to escape from the entrapment by the reticulo-endothelial system (RES). More importantly, owing to the unique nature of erythrocyte as an oxygen carrier in the blood, the RM outer layer of the agents unequivocally facilitates the permeation of ground-state molecular oxygen (3O2) and the singlet oxygen (1O2) as compared to the previously developed PDT agents with other types of coating. Another salient feature of the as-prepared PDT platform is the decoration of RM with dual targeting moieties for selective recognition of cancer cells and mitochondrial targeting, respectively. The synergistic effect of RM coating and dual-targeting of such feature-packed agents are investigated in tumor-bearing mice and the improved PDT therapeutic efficacy is confirmed, which is the first paradigm where RM-coated NIR-triggered nanovectors with programmed delivery ability is applied in PDT of tumor in vivo.A new type of photodynamic therapy (PDT) agents using upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with incorporated photosensitizers as the inner core and an erythrocyte membrane (RM) decorated with dual targeting moieties as the cloak is developed. Owing to the endogenous nature of RM, the RM-coating endows the PDT agents with perfect biocompatibility and stealth ability to escape from the entrapment by the reticulo-endothelial system (RES). More importantly, owing to the unique nature of erythrocyte as an oxygen carrier in the blood, the RM outer layer of the agents unequivocally facilitates the permeation of ground-state molecular oxygen (3O2) and the singlet oxygen (1O2) as compared to the previously developed PDT agents with

  8. Association of HLA-A and Non-Classical HLA Class I Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Federico; Ferreira, Virginia; Buhler, Stéphane; Tous, Audrey; Eliaou, Jean-François; René, Céline; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-A locus is surrounded by HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, HLA-H, HLA-G and HLA-F. HLA class Ib molecules are involved in immuno-modulation with a central role for HLA-G and HLA-E, an emerging role for HLA-F and a yet unknown function for HLA-H. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to describe the main allelic associations between HLA-A and HLA-H, -G, -F and -E. Therefore, HLA-A, -E, -G, -H and -F coding polymorphisms, as well as HLA-G UnTranslated Region haplotypes (referred to as HLA-G UTRs), were explored in 191 voluntary blood donors. Allelic frequencies, Global Linkage Disequilibrium (GLD), Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) for specific pairs of alleles and two-loci haplotype frequencies were estimated. We showed that HLA-A, HLA-H, HLA-F, HLA-G and HLA-G UTRs were all in highly significant pairwise GLD, in contrast to HLA-E. Moreover, HLA-A displayed restricted associations with HLA-G UTR and HLA-H. We also confirmed several associations that were previously found to have a negative impact on transplantation outcome. In summary, our results suggest complex functional and clinical implications of the HLA-A genetic region. PMID:27701438

  9. HLA RTI performance evaluation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malinga, L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available ://www.cert.fr/CERTI 3 http://www.porticoproject.org 4 http://www.mak.com/products/rti.php sender. The round-trip time is then measured over a number of updates. In this paper, Version 1.3 of the High Level Architecture (HLA) specification as adopted...

  10. Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Versus Trigger Point Injection in the Treatment of Myofascial Pain Syndrome in the Quadratus Lumborum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jin Oh; Park, Joon Sang; Jeon, Dae Geun; Yoon, Wang Hyeon; Park, Jung Hyun

    2017-08-01

    To compare the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and trigger point injection (TPI) for the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome in the quadratus lumborum. In a retrospective study at our institute, 30 patients with myofascial pain syndrome in the quadratus lumborum were assigned to ESWT or TPI groups. We assessed ESWT and TPI treatment according to their affects on pain relief and disability improvement. The outcome measures for the pain assessment were a visual analogue scale score and pain pressure threshold. The outcome measures for the disability assessment were Oswestry Disability Index, Roles and Maudsley, and Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale scores. Both groups demonstrated statistically significant improvements in pain and disability measures after treatment. However, in comparing the treatments, we found ESWT to be more effective than TPI for pain relief. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to disability. Compared to TPI, ESWT showed superior results for pain relief. Thus, we consider ESWT as an effective treatment for myofascial pain syndrome in the quadratus lumborum.

  11. Association of HLA-A and Non-Classical HLA Class I Alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Carlini, Federico; Ferreira, Virginia; Buhler, St?phane; Tous, Audrey; Eliaou, Jean-Fran?ois; Ren?, C?line; Chiaroni, Jacques; Picard, Christophe; Di Cristofaro, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The HLA-A locus is surrounded by HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, HLA-H, HLA-G and HLA-F. HLA class Ib molecules are involved in immuno-modulation with a central role for HLA-G and HLA-E, an emerging role for HLA-F and a yet unknown function for HLA-H. Thus, the principal objective of this study was to describe the main allelic associations between HLA-A and HLA-H, -G, -F and -E. Therefore, HLA-A, -E, -G, -H and -F coding polymorphisms, as well as HLA-G UnTranslated Region haplotypes (referred to a...

  12. The pH-Triggered Triblock Nanocarrier Enabled Highly Efficient siRNA Delivery for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lili; Zhou, Junhui; Meng, Lingwei; Wang, Xiaoxia; Wang, Changrong; Huang, Yuanyu; Zheng, Shuquan; Deng, Liandong; Cao, Huiqing; Liang, Zicai; Dong, Anjie; Cheng, Qiang

    2017-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapies have been hampered by lack of delivery systems in the past decades. Nowadays, a few promising vehicles for siRNA delivery have been developed and it is gradually revealed that enhancing siRNA release from endosomes into cytosol is a very important factor for successful delivery. Here, we designed a novel pH-sensitive nanomicelle, PEG-PTTMA-P(GMA-S-DMA) (PTMS), for siRNA delivery. Owing to rapid hydrolysis in acidic environment, PTMS NPs underwent hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic transition in endosomes that enabled combination of proton sponge effect and raised osmotic pressure in endosomes, resulting in vigorous release of siRNAs from endosomes into cytosol. In vitro results demonstrated that PTMS/siRNA complexes exhibited excellent gene silencing effects in several cell lines. Their gene silencing efficiency could reach ~91%, ~87% and ~90% at the N/P ratio of 50/1 in MDA-MB-231, A549 and Hela cells respectively, which were better than that obtained with Lipofectamine 2000. The highly efficient gene silencing was then proven from enhanced siRNA endosomal release, which is mainly attributed to pH-triggered degradation of polymer and acid-accelerated siRNA release. In vivo experiments indicated that NPs/siRNA formulation rapidly accumulated in tumor sites after i.v. injection. Tumor growth was effectively inhibited and ~45% gene knockdown efficacy was determined at the siRRM2 dose of 1mg/kg. Meanwhile, no significant toxicity was observed during the whole treatment. We also found that PTMS/siRNA formulations could lead to significant gene silencing effects in liver (~63%) and skin (~80%) when injected by i.v. and s.c., respectively. This research work gives a rational strategy to optimize siRNA delivery systems for tumor treatments. PMID:28912886

  13. HLA typing in actinic prurigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, D P; Lane, P R; Irvine, J; Martel, M J; Hogan, D J

    1990-06-01

    Thirty-two actinic prurigo patients of Cree ancestry underwent human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) typing and were compared with 32 control subjects of Cree ancestry. We found a significantly increased frequency of HLA-A24 and Cw4 antigens and a significant decrease in the frequency of the A3 antigen in actinic prurigo patients. These HLA associations may be helpful in determining whether actinic prurigo is a distinct disease or a variant of polymorphous light eruption.

  14. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caocci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL, in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp deletion-insertion (del-ins polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.

  15. Comparison Between the Effects of Passive and Active Soft Tissue Therapies on Latent Trigger Points of Upper Trapezius Muscle in Women: Single-Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojidi, Marzieh Mohammadi; Okhovatian, Farshad; Rahimi, Abbas; Baghban, Alireza Akbaezade; Azimi, Hadi

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of passive versus active soft tissue therapies on pain and ranges of motion in women with latent myofascial trigger points. Forty-two female patients, aged 18 to 64 years, with a history of neck pain and latent myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle were randomly assigned to 3 groups: group A received passive soft tissue therapy, group B received active soft tissue therapy, and a control group C received a sham procedure. The treatment consisted of 3 sessions in a 1-week period with 1-day break between each session. The local pain intensity, measured with a visual analog scale and pain pressure threshold (PPT) using algometry, and active cervical contralateral flexion (ACLF) measured with goniometry, were obtained at baseline, after the third session, and a week after the third session. The results indicated a significant decrease in local pain intensity on the visual analog scale within each group (A and B) compared with the control group (C) (P .05). Both passive and active soft tissue therapies were determined to reduce pain intensity and increase ACLF range of motion, although passive therapy was more effective in increasing PPT in these patients compared with the control group.

  16. HLA-DRB1 as a risk factor in children with autoimmune hepatitis and its relation to hepatitis A infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Amal A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human leukocyte antigens (HLAs are proteins found in the membranes of nearly all nucleated cells. People with certain HLA antigens are more likely to develop certain autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA-DRB1 in children with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH as a risk factor for occurrence, its relation to preceding hepatitis A infection and treatment outcome. Subjects and methods 25 children with AIH were subjected to HLA-DRB 1 typing performed by sequence specific oligonucleotide probe technique and compared to HLA-DRB1 found in 548 normal populations. Results The most frequent alleles found in our children with AIH were HLA-DRB1*13 (36%, HLA-DRB1*04 (18% and HLA-DRB1*03 (14%. HLA-DRB1*13 was significantly more frequent in AIH patients compared to controls. In type I AIH patients HLA-DRB1*13 was the most frequent allele (32.4%, followed by HLA-DRB1*04 in (20.6% and HLA-DRB1*03 in (14.7%, While in type II, the most frequent alleles were HLA-DRB1*13 in (40%, HLA-DRB1*07 (20% and HLA-DRB1*15 in (20%. HLA-DRB1*12 was significantly more frequent in AIH patients with positive Hepatitis A IgM than in patients with negative hepatitis A IgM. No statistically significant difference between partial responders and complete responders to treatment as regards HLA-DRB1 subtypes. Conclusion It is concluded from the previous study that HLA-DRB1*13 may be a susceptibility allele for the occurrence of autoimmune hepatitis in our population. HLA-DRB1*07 and HLA-DRB1*15 may be susceptibility alleles for occurrence of autoimmune hepatitis type 2. HLA-DRB1*12 association with AIH in patients triggered by hepatitis A needs further studies.

  17. [Extending preimplantation genetic diagnosis to HLA typing: the Paris experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffann, J; Frydman, N; Burlet, P; Gigarel, N; Feyereisen, E; Kerbrat, V; Tachdjian, G; Munnich, A; Frydman, R

    2005-10-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) consists in the genetic analysis of one or two cells. These cells (blastomeres) are sampled from embryos, obtained by in vitro fertilization, at the third day of development. Since 1998, the bioethical laws (1994) and their decrees restricted PGD practices in France, strictly to the avoidance of the birth of a child affected with a genetic defect. In parallel, works on blood cord transplantation, taken at the birth of a compatible HLA sibling, showed very encouraging results, particularly for the treatment of Fanconi anemia. In 2001, Verlinsky et al., have reported the first PGD for Fanconi anaemia combined with HLA typing, allowing the birth of a healthy child, HLA-identical with his affected sister. The "designer baby" concept was born. The French law, which allowed PGD under specific conditions, i.e. when the genetic defect has been characterized in one parent at least, recently extended PGD to HLA typing when embryos are at risk of a genetic disorder. Article L.2131-4-1 (August 2004) allows the practice of HLA typing for PGD embryos when an elder sibling is affected with a genetic disorder and need stem cell transplantation. The HLA-matched offspring resulting from PGD can give cord blood at birth to supply the necessary therapy. This double selection give rise to serious ethical problems, but technical difficulties and legal restrictions will probably limit the development of such a procedure.

  18. HLA-B27 Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... also used to refer to the gene that codes for the HLA-B27 protein. The HLA-B27 ...

  19. Comparison of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 Loci Polymorphism between Kidney Transplants of Uremia Patients and Healthy Individuals in Central China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Shang

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease is becoming a global public health problem, which will usually cause uremia at the end stage of chronic kidney failure. So far, kidney transplant is the most effective and proper therapy for uremia, however, the short supply of matched donor kidney has been a persistent bottleneck for transplantation. HLA matching of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci is very important for the allocation of kidney transplants. In this study, we investigated genotypes of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci based on 1,464 uremia patients and 10,000 unrelated healthy individuals in Henan province of China, and compared the frequency distribution of these HLA alleles and corresponding haplotypes between patient and healthy groups. We detected 23 HLA-A, 49 HLA-B and 17 HLA-DRB1 alleles in total. The predominant alleles of HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci in patients are the same as those in healthy group. The seven most frequent alleles account for about 87%, 50%, and 77% at HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 loci, respectively. The haplotypes (combinations of HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 with significantly different frequency between patients and controls mostly account for less than 1%. Overall, this suggests that HLA matching is not a potential difficulty for kidney transplant of uremia patients. However, three of the top seven frequent HLA-DRB1 alleles have a significantly different distribution in patients and controls, while only one alleles for HLA-B and zero for HLA-A loci. These HLA-DRB1 alleles may be closely associated with uremia. This study sheds new lights on the composition and difference of HLA genotypes in uremia patients and healthy populations in Central China that can serve as a guide to HLA matching for kidney transplants and a resource for HLA typing-related studies.

  20. Dynamic triggering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, David P.; Prejean, Stephanie; Schubert, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic stresses propagating as seismic waves from large earthquakes trigger a spectrum of responses at global distances. In addition to locally triggered earthquakes in a variety of tectonic environments, dynamic stresses trigger tectonic (nonvolcanic) tremor in the brittle–plastic transition zone along major plate-boundary faults, activity changes in hydrothermal and volcanic systems, and, in hydrologic domains, changes in spring discharge, water well levels, soil liquefaction, and the eruption of mud volcanoes. Surface waves with periods of 15–200 s are the most effective triggering agents; body-wave trigger is less frequent. Triggering dynamic stresses can be < 1 kPa.

  1. Predicted indirectly recognizable HLA epitopes presented by HLA-DRB1 are related to HLA antibody formation during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, K.; Hönger, G.; Van Deutekom, H. W M; Thus, K. A.; Keşmir, C.; Hösli, I.; Schaub, S.; Spierings, E.

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy can prime maternal immune responses against inherited paternal HLA of the fetus, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. We previously demonstrated that donor-specific HLA antibody formation after kidney transplantation is associated with donor-derived HLA epitopes

  2. Predicted Indirectly Recognizable HLA Epitopes Presented by HLA-DRB1 Are Related to HLA Antibody Formation During Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, K; Hönger, G; van Deutekom, H W M; Thus, K A; Kesmir, C.; Hösli, I; Schaub, S; Spierings, E

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy can prime maternal immune responses against inherited paternal HLA of the fetus, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. We previously demonstrated that donor-specific HLA antibody formation after kidney transplantation is associated with donor-derived HLA epitopes

  3. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of gastroc-soleus trigger points in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtaderi, Alireza; Khosrawi, Saeid; Dehghan, Farnaz

    2014-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most common cause of heel pain. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is an alternative treatment for refractory cases of plantar fasciitis. Studies also demonstrated that ESWT may be an appropriate treatment for myofascial trigger points. This study was designed to evaluate its effectiveness by comparing the ESWT of Gastrocnemius/Soleus (gastroc-soleus) trigger points and heel region with the ESWT of the heel region alone. The study was carried out among 40 patients with a clinical diagnosis of plantar fasciitis, divided randomly to case (n = 20) and control (n = 20) groups. The case group received ESWT for the heel region and for the gastroc-soleus trigger points. The control group received ESWT just for the heel region. The protocol was the same in both groups and they were treated for three sessions every week. The pain score (100 mm visual analog score [VAS]) and the modified Roles and Maudsley score was evaluated before the first session and eight weeks after the last session. Eight weeks after the last session, although the mean VAS had decreased significantly in both groups, this decrement was more significant in the case group. (P = 0.04). According to the modified Roles and Maudsley score, there was a significant improvement in both the case (P plantar fasciitis and gastroc-soleus trigger points in treating patients with plantar fasciitis is more effective than utilizing it solely for plantar fasciitis.

  4. HLA-DM captures partially empty HLA-DR molecules for catalyzed removal of peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Call, Melissa J; Schulze, Monika-Sarah E D; Fowler, Kevin D; Schubert, David A; Seth, Nilufer P; Sundberg, Eric J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of HLA-DM-catalyzed peptide exchange remain uncertain. Here we found that all stages of the interaction of HLA-DM with HLA-DR were dependent on the occupancy state of the peptide-binding groove. High-affinity peptides were protected from removal by HLA-DM through two mechanisms: peptide binding induced the dissociation of a long-lived complex of empty HLA-DR and HLA-DM, and high-affinity HLA-DR-peptide complexes bound HLA-DM only very slowly. Nonbinding covalent HLA-DR-peptide complexes were converted into efficient HLA-DM binders after truncation of an N-terminal peptide segment that emptied the P1 pocket and disrupted conserved hydrogen bonds to HLA-DR. HLA-DM thus binds only to HLA-DR conformers in which a critical part of the binding site is already vacant because of spontaneous peptide motion.

  5. HLA-G expression levels influence the tolerogenic activity of human DC-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, Giada; Comi, Michela; Tomasoni, Daniela; Gianolini, Monica Emma; Rizzo, Roberta; LeMaoult, Joël; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Gregori, Silvia

    2015-04-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a non-classical HLA class I molecule with known immune-modulatory functions. Our group identified a subset of human dendritic cells, named DC-10, that induce adaptive interleukin-10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells via the interleukin-10-dependent HLA-G/ILT4 pathway. In this study we aimed at defining the role of HLA-G in DC-10-mediated Tr1 cell differentiation. We analyzed phenotype, functions, and genetic variations in the 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G locus of in vitro-differentiated DC-10 from 67 healthy donors. We showed that HLA-G expression on DC-10 is donor-dependent. Functional studies demonstrated that DC-10, independently of HLA-G expression, secrete interleukin-10 and negligible levels of interleukin-12. Interestingly, DC-10 with high HLA-G promote allo-specific anergic T cells that contain a significantly higher frequency of Tr1 cells, defined as interleukin-10-producing (P=0.0121) or CD49b(+)LAG-3(+) (P=0.0031) T cells, compared to DC-10 with low HLA-G. We found that the HLA-G expression on DC-10 is genetically imprinted, being associated with specific variations in the 3' untranslated region of the gene, and it may be finely tuned by microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation. These data highlight the important role of HLA-G in boosting DC-10 tolerogenic activity and confirm that interleukin-10 production by DC-10 is necessary but not sufficient to promote Tr1 cells at high frequency. These new insights into the role of HLA-G in DC-10-mediated induction of Tr1 cells provide additional information for clinical use in Tr1- or DC-10-based cell therapy approaches. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  6. Comparison of the effects of mirror therapy and electromyography-triggered neuromuscular stimulation on hand functions in stroke patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amasyali, Saliha Y; Yaliman, Ayşe

    2016-12-01

    To determine the effectiveness of mirror therapy and electromyography (EMG)-triggered neuromuscular stimulation on improvement of functions of the upper extremity in patients with subacute stroke in comparison with conventional therapy as well as to evaluate the advantage of each treatment over another, we conducted a prospective, randomized, and controlled trial involving 24 patients with ischemic stroke. The mean age and mean time since stroke of the patients were 58.79±11.49 years and 5.25±2.25 months. Patients were assigned randomly to a mirror therapy group (MT group, n=9), which consisted of therapy with a mirror box 5 days/week, 30 min/day, for 3 weeks, an electrostimulation group (ES group, n=7), which consisted of therapy with EMG-triggered stimulation (EMG-stim) of similar duration and frequency of treatment as the MT group, and a control group (n=8). All the groups received conventional physiotherapy for the same period as the MT group. Patients in the MT group practiced their therapy at home after supervised sessions. The Fugl-Meyer scores of the upper extremity, grip force, wrist extension, and Box and Block Test were evaluated at baseline, after treatment, and at 3 months after the treatment. All of these measures were evaluated by a blinded researcher. We found that there was no significant improvement in wrist extension range and grip force in control group. The MT and EMG-stim were effective in increasing the Fugl-Meyer motor scale for upper extremity (MT group: PTest (MT group and ES group PEMG-stim. We assume that this difference might be related to the feasibility of maintenance of MT at home.

  7. Upregulation of HLA Expression in Primary Uveal Melanoma by Infiltrating Leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Essen, T. Huibertus; van Pelt, Sake I.; Bronkhorst, Inge H. G.; Versluis, Mieke; Némati, Fariba; Laurent, Cécile; Luyten, Gregorius P. M.; van Hall, Thorbald; van den Elsen, Peter J.; van der Velden, Pieter A.; Decaudin, Didier; Jager, Martine J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Uveal melanoma (UM) with an inflammatory phenotype, characterized by infiltrating leukocytes and increased human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression, carry an increased risk of death due to metastases. These tumors should be ideal for T-cell based therapies, yet it is not clear why prognostically-infaust tumors have a high HLA expression. We set out to determine whether the level of HLA molecules in UM is associated with other genetic factors, HLA transcriptional regulators, or microenvironmental factors. Methods 28 enucleated UM were used to study HLA class I and II expression, and several regulators of HLA by immunohistochemistry, PCR microarray, qPCR and chromosome SNP-array. Fresh tumor samples of eight primary UM and four metastases were compared to their corresponding xenograft in SCID mice, using a PCR microarray and SNP array. Results Increased expression levels of HLA class I and II showed no dosage effect of chromosome 6p, but, as expected, were associated with monosomy of chromosome 3. Increased HLA class I and II protein levels were positively associated with their gene expression and with raised levels of the peptide-loading gene TAP1, and HLA transcriptional regulators IRF1, IRF8, CIITA, and NLRC5, revealing a higher transcriptional activity in prognostically-bad tumors. Implantation of fresh human tumor samples into SCID mice led to a loss of infiltrating leukocytes, and to a decreased expression of HLA class I and II genes, and their regulators. Conclusion Our data provides evidence for a proper functioning HLA regulatory system in UM, offering a target for T-cell based therapies. PMID:27764126

  8. A Comparative Pilot Study to Evaluate the Adjunctive Role of Levosulpride with Trigger Point Injection Therapy in the Management of Myofascial Pain Syndrome of Orofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pranav; Singh, Virendra; Sethi, Sujata; Kumar, Arun

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of therapy with levosulpride combined with conventional trigger point injection therapy in terms of pain and depression in the chronic myofascial pain syndrome patients. This was a comparative prospective study in which subjects with at least one trigger point and symptom duration of at least 3 months were recruited and randomized into two groups. Group A subjects received trigger point injections with 0.5 % bupivacaine and tablet levosulpride and group B received trigger point injections and a placebo. Subjects were assessed for pain with visual analog scale (VAS) and depression with Beck's depression inventory (BDI) at the follow-up periods of 1, 4, 6 and 12 weeks. The treatment effect was measured in terms of mean difference of BDI and VAS scores at various studied intervals from the baseline values. The sample was composed of 15 subjects with 8 in group A (6 females and 2 males, with a mean age of 41.88 ± 15.13 years, disease duration of 12.37 ± 16.11 months) and 7 in group B (6 females and 1 male, with a mean age of 43.86 ± 12.34 years, disease duration of 9.64 ± 9.34 months). The mean baseline VAS score and BDI score was 6.75 ± 1.03 in group A and 6.86 ± 1.06 in group B and 24.25 ± 10.20 in group A and 24.43 ± 11.16 in group B respectively. The mean difference of VAS scores at 12th week interval from the baseline values was highly significant. Although the mean difference of VAS scores at all the other intervals and mean difference of BDI scores at all the intervals was statistically nonsignificant, there was improvement in the mean differences at all the follow-up intervals in terms of both pain as well as depression. The combined therapy with conventional trigger point injection and levosulpride as antidepressant significantly reduce pain and depression in the study subjects suffering from chronic myofascial pain with moderate to severe depression in the orofacial region.

  9. HLA Class II Antigen Expression in Colorectal Carcinoma Tumors as a Favorable Prognostic Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sconocchia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of HLA class II antigen expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC tumors, its association with the clinical course of the disease, and the underlying mechanism(s. Two tissue microarrays constructed with 220 and 778 CRC tumors were stained with HLA-DR, DQ, and DP antigen-specific monoclonal antibody LGII-612.14, using the immunoperoxidase staining technique. The immunohistochemical staining results were correlated with the clinical course of the disease. The functional role of HLA class II antigens expressed on CRC cells was analyzed by investigating their in vitro interactions with immune cells. HLA class II antigens were expressed in about 25% of the 220 and 21% of the 778 tumors analyzed with an overall frequency of 23%. HLA class II antigens were detected in 19% of colorectal adenomas. Importantly, the percentage of stained cells and the staining intensity were significantly lower than those detected in CRC tumors. However, HLA class II antigen staining was weakly detected only in 5.4% of 37 normal mucosa tissues. HLA class II antigen expression was associated with a favorable clinical course of the disease. In vitro stimulation with interferon gamma (IFNγ induced HLA class II antigen expression on two of the four CRC cell lines tested. HLA class II antigen expression on CRC cells triggered interleukin-1α (IL-1α production by resting monocytes. HLA class II antigen expression in CRC tumors is a favorable prognostic marker. This association may reflect stimulation of IL-1α production by monocytes.

  10. HLA-VBSeq: accurate HLA typing at full resolution from whole-genome sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Nariai, Naoki; Kojima, Kaname; Saito, Sakae; Mimori, Takahiro; Sato, Yukuto; Kawai, Yosuke; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Yasuda, Jun; Nagasaki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Background Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genes play an important role in determining the outcome of organ transplantation and are linked to many human diseases. Because of the diversity and polymorphisms of HLA loci, HLA typing at high resolution is challenging even with whole-genome sequencing data. Results We have developed a computational tool, HLA-VBSeq, to estimate the most probable HLA alleles at full (8-digit) resolution from whole-genome sequence data. HLA-VBSeq simultaneously optimiz...

  11. Evaluation of dry needling and 0.5% lidocaine injection therapies in myofascial pain trigger points in masticatory muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Oliveira Ferreira da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of trigger points injections using lidocaine 0.5% and dry needling without any kind of home-based rehabilitation program. METHODS: Sixteen patients with myofascial pain and trigger points in masticatory muscles were randomly assigned to two groups and received only one application session. The pressure pain threshold (PPT was recorded before and after the injection: Ten minutes, 24 hours later, 7, 15, 21 and 30 days after the treatment. Visual analogue scale (VAS was used to in all evaluation periods. RESULTS: There were no difference between groups for PPT, but for all groups the PPT during the time significantly increased when compared the before treatment. VAS showed differences between groups and during the time. The 0.5% lidocaine had the lowest VAS values when compared to dry needling, but at 30 days there were no differences among them. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the differences in VAS and considering there were no differences in PPT increases, we concluded that, in this study, both groups were able to disrupt the mechanisms of trigger point and relieve the myofascial pain symptoms.

  12. Classification of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) supertypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Claesson, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    , the barrier to the development of peptide-based vaccines with maximum population coverage is that the restricting HLA genes are extremely polymorphic resulting in a vast diversity of peptide-binding HLA specificities and a low population coverage for any given peptide-HLA specificity. One way to reduce......Identification of new antigenic peptides, derived from infectious agents or cancer cells, which bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and II molecules, is of importance for the development of new effective vaccines capable of activating the cellular arm of the immune response. However...... this complexity is to group thousands of different HLA molecules into several so-called HLA supertypes: a classification that refers to a group of HLA alleles with largely overlapping peptide binding specificities. In this chapter, we focus on the state-of-the-art classification of HLA supertypes including HLA...

  13. Hypothesizing the body’s genius to trigger and self-organize its healing: 25 years using a standardized neurophysics therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Nora Ross

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We aim for this contribution to operate bi-directionally, both as a bedside to bench reverse-translational fractal physiological hypothesis and as a methodological innovation to inform clinical practice. In 25 years using gym equipment therapeutically in non-research settings, the standardized therapy is consistently observed to trigger universal responses of micro to macro waves of system transition dynamics in the human nervous system. These are associated with observably desirable impacts on disorders, injuries, diseases, and athletic performance. Requisite conditions are therapeutic coaching, erect posture, extremely slow movements in mild resistance exercises, and executive control over arousal and attention. To motivate research into the physiological improvements and in validation studies, we integrate from across disciplines to hypothesize explanations for the relationships among the methods, the system dynamics, and evident results. Some of the key hypotheses are: (1 Correctly-directed system efforts may reverse a system’s heretofore misdirected efforts, restoring healthier neurophysiology. (2 The enhanced information processing accompanying good posture is an essential initial condition. (3 Behaviors accompanying exercises performed with few degrees of freedom amplify information processing, triggering destabilization and transition dynamics. (4 Executive control over arousal and attention is essential to release system constraints, amplifying and complexifying information. (5 Dynamics create necessary and evidently sufficient conditions for the body to resolve or improve its own conditions within often short time periods. Literature indicates how the human system possesses material self-awareness. A broad explanation for the nature and effects of the therapy appears rooted in the cascading recursions of the systems’ dynamics, which appear to trigger health-fostering self-reorganizing processes in the presence of catalytic initial

  14. On-Demand Drug Release from Dual-Targeting Small Nanoparticles Triggered by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhanced Glioblastoma-Targeting Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zimiao; Jin, Kai; Pang, Qiang; Shen, Shun; Yan, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Ting; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Yu, Lei; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2017-09-20

    Glioblastoma is one of the most challenging and intractable tumors with the difficult treatment and poor prognosis. Unsatisfactory traditional systemic chemotherapies for glioblastoma are mainly attributed to the insufficient and nonspecific drug delivery into the brain tumors as well as the incomplete drug release at the tumor sites. Inspired by the facts that angiopep-2 peptide is an acknowledged dual-targeting moiety for brain tumor-targeting delivery and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is an ideal trigger for drug release with an ultrahigh energy and millimeter-sized focus ability, in the present study, a novel HIFU-responsive angiopep-2-modified small poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) hybrid nanoparticle (NP) drug delivery system holding doxorubicin/perfluorooctyl bromide (ANP-D/P) was designed to increase the intratumoral drug accumulation, further trigger on-demand drug release at the glioblastoma sites, and enhance glioblastoma therapy. It was shown that the ANP-D/P was stable and had a small size of 41 nm. The angiopep-2 modification endowed the ANP-D/P with improved blood-brain barrier transportation and specific accumulation in glioblastoma tissues by 17 folds and 13.4 folds compared with unmodified NPs, respectively. Under HIFU irradiation, the ANP-D/P could release 47% of the drug within 2 min and induce the apoptosis of most tumor cells. HIFU-triggered instantaneous drug release at the glioblastoma sites eventually enabled the ANP-D/P to achieve the strongest antiglioblastoma efficacy with the longest median survival time (56 days) of glioblastoma-bearing mice and the minimum vestiges of tumor cells in the pathological slices among all groups. In conclusion, the HIFU-responsive ANP-D/P in this study provided a new way for glioblastoma therapy with a great potential for clinical applications.

  15. HLA-G expression in placenta in relation to HLA-G genotype and polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Larsen, Lise Grupe; Hoegh, Anne Mette

    2004-01-01

    PROBLEM: The expression of the non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib gene, HLA-G, seems to be important at the feto-maternal interface. The HLA-G molecule is almost monomorphic and expressed in both membrane-bound and soluble isoforms. It has been shown to inhibit natural killer cell...... -mediated lysis and influence cytokine expression. HLA-G gene polymorphism has been linked to differences in gene expression profile of alternatively spliced HLA-G transcripts and levels of specific HLA-G messenger RNA (mRNA) isoforms. Furthermore, aberrant HLA-G expression has been reported in preeclamptic...... placentas. On this background it is of general interest to further elucidate any associations between HLA-G polymorphism and protein expression. METHODS: We have investigated HLA-G protein expression by immunohistochemistry in HLA-G genotyped placentas from term. HLA-G mRNA expression in preeclamptic...

  16. HLA class I and class II associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha Mahmoud Hamdi

    Full Text Available Chronic renal failure (CRF leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population.A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated control. Patients and control groups were typed by SSOP lumenix techniques. The alleles positively associated to the ESRD were: HLA-B*15, B*18, B*49 - DRB1*03, negatively associated alleles were A*26, HLA-B*39, B*50. The haplotypes positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A*01-DRB1*13 and HLA-A*30-DRBI*03. The negatively associated haplotypes were: HLA-A*02-B*39, A*02-B*50, A*24-B*35, A*24-B*58, A*24-DRB1*16, A*68-DRB1*04, A*02-DQB1*03, A*29-DQB1*02, A*29-DOB1*05 and B*27-DRB1*07 and the last one is the most significant protective haplotypes.The high Relative Risk (RR observed and its statistical correlation reflect the strength of the described association between HLA antigens and ESRD.

  17. HLA Class I and Class II Associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Nuha Mahmoud; Al-Hababi, Fadel Hassan; Eid, Amr Ekhlas

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure (CRF) leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population. Methodology A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated control. Patients and control groups were typed by SSOP lumenix techniques. The alleles positively associated to the ESRD were: HLA-B*15, B*18, B*49 - DRB1*03, negatively associated alleles were A*26, HLA-B*39, B*50. The haplotypes positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A*01-DRB1*13 and HLA-A*30-DRBI*03. The negatively associated haplotypes were: HLA-A*02-B*39, A*02-B*50, A*24-B*35, A*24-B*58, A*24-DRB1*16, A*68-DRB1*04, A*02-DQB1*03, A*29-DQB1*02, A*29-DOB1*05 and B*27-DRB1*07 and the last one is the most significant protective haplotypes. Conclusion The high Relative Risk (RR) observed and its statistical correlation reflect the strength of the described association between HLA antigens and ESRD. PMID:25380295

  18. Controlling the Immunological Crosstalk during Conception and Pregnancy: HLA-G in Reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynge Nilsson, Line; Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F.

    2014-01-01

    In several years after its discovery in the placenta, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib protein, HLA-G, was not given much attention, nor was it assigned great importance. As time has unraveled, HLA-G has proven to have distinctive functions and an unforeseen and possibly important role in reproduction. HLA-G is characterized mainly by its low polymorphism and restricted tissue distribution in non-pathological conditions. In fact, its expression pattern is primarily limited to extravillous cytotrophoblast cells at the maternal-fetal interface during pregnancy. Due to low polymorphism, almost the same protein is expressed by virtually all individuals. It is these unique features that make HLA-G differ from its highly polymorphic HLA class Ia counterparts, the HLA-A, -B, and -C molecules. Its function, seemingly diverse, is typically receptor-mediated, and involves interactions with a wide range of immune cells. As the expression of HLA-G primarily is limited to gestation, this has given rise to the hypothesis that HLA-G plays an important role in the immunological tolerance of the fetus by the mother. In keeping with this, it might not be surprising that polymorphisms in the HLA-G gene, and levels of HLA-G expression, have been linked to reproductive failure and pre-eclampsia. Based on recent studies, we speculate that HLA-G might be involved in mechanisms in reproductive immunology even before conception because HLA-G can be detected in the genital tract and in the blood of non-pregnant women, and is present in seminal fluid from men. In addition, HLA-G expression has been found in the pre-implanted embryo. Therefore, we propose that a combined contribution from the mother, the father, and the embryo/fetus is likely to be important. Furthermore, this review presents important aspects of HLA-G in relation to reproduction: from genetics to physiological effects, from pregnancy and pregnancy complications to a short discussion on future possible means of

  19. Expression of HLA-E molecules in the placental tissue of women infected with HIV-1 and uninfected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Juliana; Santiago, Mariana Rodrigues; Martelli-Palomino, Gustavo; Souza, Diego Agra de; Silva, Társia Giabardo Alves; Silva, Gyl Eanes Barros; Chahud, Fernando; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Fernandes, Ana Paula Morais

    2017-01-01

    Expression of HLA-E molecule in the placental extravillous trophoblast is associated with immune system cell inhibition, resulting in immune tolerance to fetus during pregnancy. HIV-1 can infect trophoblast cells and modify the expression of HLA-E, which may inhibit the cytotoxic activity of the immune system. The aim of this study was to evaluate HLA-E expression in third trimester placental tissue of women infected with HIV-1 and uninfected women. We performed an immunohistochemistry assay to evaluate HLA-E staining in the placental tissue of 99 HIV-1 infected and 85 uninfected women. A pathologist analyzed and classified the HLA-E expression in the placental cells. Irrespective of the HIV status, HLA-E staining was observed in the extravillous trophoblast cells, endothelial cells and Hofbauer cells, but not in the syncytiotrophoblast. HLA-E staining showed no significant difference between the placental tissue of women infected with HIV-1 and uninfected women (P = 0.76). Considering HIV-1 infected women, HLA-E staining was not influenced by HIV-1 viral load (P = 0.48), CD4+ T-cell count (P = 0.10) and antiretroviral therapy used during pregnancy (P = 0.54). Despite the presence of HIV-1 infection, the expression of HLA-E molecules in the placental tissue was not modified when the infection was under antiretroviral therapy control. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Antigens HLA-G, sHLA- G and sHLA- class I in reproductive failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Ronin-Walknowska

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It can be supposed that relation between HLA-G polymorphism and sHLA-G protein expression are associated with successful embryo implantation and pregnancy maintenance. The aim of the study was the estimation specific differences in expression of sHLA-G and sHLA- class I antigens in women with reproductive failure in comparison with fertile women. The study sample enrolled 80 women, divided into 2 groups. The study group (B enrolled 60 women with reproductive failure including 20 women with 3 recurrent spontaneous abortions in the first trimester of pregnancy (RSA, 20 women with empty sac (ES and 20 women with 3 consecutive in-vitro fertilization failures (IVFf. The control group (C enrolled 20 fertile women with at least 2 children. Soluble HLA- class I antigens (sHLA-I and soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G were determined using ELISA test kits from IBio Vendor Labolatory Medicine, Inc. HLA-G allele found in individuals in our study were identified by comparing the obtained bp sequences of exon 2., 3. and 4. with bp sequences of HLA-G antigen published at the Nolan Research Institute website. The highest concentration of sHLA-I is noted among women with HLA-G 10401 allele which differed significantly for the mean sHLA-I concentration calculated for all the remaining alleles (p<0.0001. The most prevalent alleles were: HLA-G 10101, 10102 and 10108 with sHLA-I concentrations among women bearing those alleles significantly lower in comparison to the HLA-G 10401 carriers (p<0.001. Allele 10101 and 10102 was related to the lower significantly plasma sHLA-I concentrations than 10108 allele (p<0.02. Lowest mean sHLA-G values were observed in the IVFf group with significant difference from the remaining groups (p<0.05. To conclude, sHLA-G molecules is associated to certain HLA-G alleles and imply that sHLA-G levels are under genetic control. Low concentration sHLA-G seems to be prognostically important in IVF failure.

  1. Comparison of the short-term outcomes between trigger point dry needling and trigger point manual therapy for the management of chronic mechanical neck pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas-Ramos, Rocio; Pecos-Martín, Daniel; Gallego-Izquierdo, Tomás; Llamas-Ramos, Inés; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Ortega-Santiago, Ricardo; Cleland, Joshua; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2014-11-01

    Randomized clinical study. To compare the effects of trigger point (TrP) dry needling (DN) and TrP manual therapy (MT) on pain, function, pressure pain sensitivity, and cervical range of motion in subjects with chronic mechanical neck pain. Recent evidence suggests that TrP DN could be effective in the treatment of neck pain. However, no studies have directly compared the outcomes of TrP DN and TrP MT in this population. Ninety-four patients (mean ± SD age, 31 ± 3 years; 66% female) were randomized into a TrP DN group (n = 47) or a TrP MT group (n = 47). Neck pain intensity (11-point numeric pain rating scale), cervical range of motion, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over the spinous process of C7 were measured at baseline, postintervention, and at follow-ups of 1 week and 2 weeks after treatment. The Spanish version of the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire was used to measure disability/function at baseline and the 2-week follow-up. Mixed-model, repeated-measures analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were used to determine if a time-by-group interaction existed on the effects of the treatment on each outcome variable, with time as the within-subject variable and group as the between-subject variable. The ANOVA revealed that participants who received TrP DN had outcomes similar to those who received TrP MT in terms of pain, function, and cervical range of motion. The 4-by-2 mixed-model ANOVA also revealed a significant time-by-group interaction (Peffects of TrP DN and TrP MT over long-term follow-up periods. Therapy, level 1b.

  2. HLA-G polymorphisms and HLA-G expression in sarcoidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, TVF; Milman, N; Hylenius, S

    2006-01-01

    HLA-G expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in granulomas from sarcoidosis patients, weak HLA-G expression was observed in only one patient. CONCLUSIONS: HLA-G alleles that include a 14-bp sequence polymorphism in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene are observed more often in sarcoidosis patients......BACKGROUND: The MHC class Ib molecule Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G may be important in induction and maintenance of immunological tolerance, and HLA-G expression may have a role in different cancers, in certain diseases with associations to HLA, and in organ transplantation. Sarcoidosis...... is a systemic granulomatous disease with unknown etiology but at the molecular level several studies have shown HLA associations. METHODS: In the present study, HLA-G alleles/polymorphisms were studied in sarcoidosis patients (n = 47) and controls (n = 129) by PCR techniques and HLA-G protein expression...

  3. LILRB2 interaction with HLA class I correlates with control of HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arman A Bashirova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural progression of HIV-1 infection depends on genetic variation in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I locus, and the CD8+ T cell response is thought to be a primary mechanism of this effect. However, polymorphism within the MHC may also alter innate immune activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 by changing interactions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules with leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILR, a group of immunoregulatory receptors mainly expressed on myelomonocytic cells including dendritic cells (DCs. We used previously characterized HLA allotype-specific binding capacities of LILRB1 and LILRB2 as well as data from a large cohort of HIV-1-infected individuals (N = 5126 to test whether LILR-HLA class I interactions influence viral load in HIV-1 infection. Our analyses in persons of European descent, the largest ethnic group examined, show that the effect of HLA-B alleles on HIV-1 control correlates with the binding strength between corresponding HLA-B allotypes and LILRB2 (p = 10(-2. Moreover, overall binding strength of LILRB2 to classical HLA class I allotypes, defined by the HLA-A/B/C genotypes in each patient, positively associates with viral replication in the absence of therapy in patients of both European (p = 10(-11-10(-9 and African (p = 10(-5-10(-3 descent. This effect appears to be driven by variations in LILRB2 binding affinities to HLA-B and is independent of individual class I allelic effects that are not related to the LILRB2 function. Correspondingly, in vitro experiments suggest that strong LILRB2-HLA binding negatively affects antigen-presenting properties of DCs. Thus, we propose an impact of LILRB2 on HIV-1 disease outcomes through altered regulation of DCs by LILRB2-HLA engagement.

  4. Efficacy of Kisspeptin-54 to Trigger Oocyte Maturation in Women at High Risk of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS) During In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbara, Ali; Jayasena, Channa N; Christopoulos, Georgios; Narayanaswamy, Shakunthala; Izzi-Engbeaya, Chioma; Nijher, Gurjinder M K; Comninos, Alexander N; Peters, Deborah; Buckley, Adam; Ratnasabapathy, Risheka; Prague, Julia K; Salim, Rehan; Lavery, Stuart A; Bloom, Stephen R; Szigeti, Matyas; Ashby, Deborah A; Trew, Geoffrey H; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2015-09-01

    In vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment is an effective therapy for infertility, but can result in the potentially life-threatening complication, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). This study aimed to investigate whether kisspeptin-54 can be used to effectively and safely trigger oocyte maturation in women undergoing IVF treatment at high risk of developing OHSS. This was a phase 2, multi-dose, open-label, randomized clinical trial of 60 women at high risk of developing OHSS carried out during 2013-2014 at Hammersmith Hospital IVF unit, London, United Kingdom. Following a standard recombinant FSH/GnRH antagonist protocol, patients were randomly assigned to receive a single injection of kisspeptin-54 to trigger oocyte maturation using an adaptive design for dose allocation (3.2 nmol/kg, n = 5; 6.4 nmol/kg, n = 20; 9.6 nmol/kg, n = 15; 12.8 nmol/kg, n = 20). Oocytes were retrieved 36 h after kisspeptin-54 administration, assessed for maturation, and fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection with subsequent transfer of one or two embryos. Women were routinely screened for the development of OHSS. Oocyte maturation was measured by oocyte yield (percentage of mature oocytes retrieved from follicles ≥ 14 mm on ultrasound). Secondary outcomes include rates of OHSS and pregnancy. Oocyte maturation occurred in 95% of women. Highest oocyte yield (121%) was observed following 12.8 nmol/kg kisspeptin-54, which was +69% (confidence interval, -16-153%) greater than following 3.2 nmol/kg. At all doses of kisspeptin-54, biochemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, and live birth rates per transfer (n = 51) were 63, 53, and 45%, respectively. Highest pregnancy rates were observed following 9.6 nmol/kg kisspeptin-54 (85, 77, and 62%, respectively). No woman developed moderate, severe, or critical OHSS. Kisspeptin-54 is a promising approach to effectively and safely trigger oocyte maturation in women undergoing IVF treatment at high risk of developing OHSS.

  5. Distribution of the natural killer-related receptor for HLA-C during highly active antiretroviral therapy for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, M C; Ensoli, F; Alario, C; Fiorelli, V; Sacco, G; Topino, S; Iebba, F; Mezzaroma, I; Aiuti, F

    2001-12-01

    Receptors interacting with Major Histocompatibility Complex class I molecules have been initially found on the surface of human natural killer (NK) cells, where they deliver inhibitory signals to the lysis, being thus defined killer inhibitory receptors (KIR). Subsequently, they were detected also on the surface of T-CD8(+) lymphocytes and are particularly expanded during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, where they downregulate HIV-specific cytolysis. The expression of KIR recognizing human leukocyte antigen-C alleles was assessed in HIV-infected patients, undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). To this end, the combined expression of CD16/CD56, of CD3 and CD8 as well as of KIR (CD158a and CD158b) surface molecules was analyzed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells by monoclonal antibodies, and flow cytometry. An increase of CD3(+)CD8(+)CD158b(+) cells was found after 6 months of HAART. This finding may have implications for the regulation of T-cell mediated cytolysis during HAART.

  6. A Previous Miscarriage and a Previous Successful Pregnancy Have a Different Impact on HLA Antibody Formation during a Subsequent Successful Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Hönger, Gideon; van Deutekom, Hanneke Wilhelmina Maria; Hösli, Irene Mathilde; Schaub, Stefan; Spierings, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Inherited paternal HLA antigens from the semi-allogeneic fetus may trigger maternal immune responses during pregnancy, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. The prevalence of these HLA antibodies increases with the number of successful pregnancies. In the present study, we investigated the effect of a single prior miscarriage on HLA antibody formation during a subsequent successful pregnancy. Women with a successful pregnancy with one or more prior miscarriages (n = 229) and women with a successful pregnancy without a prior miscarriage (n = 58), and their children were HLA typed. HLA antibody analyses were performed in these women to identify whether HLA antibodies were formed against mismatched HLA class-I antigens of the last child. The percentage of immunogenic antigens was significantly lower after a single successful pregnancy that was preceded by a single miscarriage (n = 18 women) compared to a successful pregnancy that was preceded by a first successful pregnancy (n = 62 women). Thus, our data suggest that a previous miscarriage has a different impact on child-specific HLA antibody formation during a subsequent successful pregnancy than a previous successful pregnancy. The lower immunogenicity in these women cannot be explained by reduced numbers of immunogenic B-cell and T-cell epitopes. In conclusion, our observations indicate that increasing gravidity is not related to an increased prevalence of HLA antibodies in a single successful pregnancy that was preceded by a single prior miscarriage.

  7. HLA-G in human reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2005-01-01

    will, in particular, discuss HLA-G and its role in human reproduction and in the human MHC. HLA-G seems to be important in the modulation of the maternal immune system during pregnancy and thereby the maternal acceptance of the semiallogenic fetus. Recent findings regarding aspects of HLA...

  8. Template Driven Code Generator for HLA Middleware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.E.J.; Prins, L.M.; Huiskamp, W.

    2007-01-01

    HLA is the accepted standard for simulation interoperability. However, the HLA services and the API that is provided for these services are relatively complex from the user point of view. Since the early days of HLA, federate developers have attempted to simplify their task by using middleware that

  9. Influence of HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DR matching on rejection of random corneal grafts using corneal tissue for retrospective DNA HLA typing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Bartels (Marjolijn); H.G. Otten; B.E. van Gelderen; A. van der Lelij (Allegonda)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractAIM: To establish if coincidental HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DR tissue matching is associated with a reduced likelihood of corneal graft rejection. METHODS: Organ culture preserved random donor corneas were used for penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). Corneal tissue from all

  10. Alteration of HLA-B27 Peptide Presentation after Infection of Transfected Murine L Cells by Shigella flexneri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisgérault, Florence; Mounier, Joëlle; Tieng, Vannary; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Khalil-Daher, Iman; Schmid, Michel; Sansonetti, Philippe; Charron, Dominique; Toubert, Antoine

    1998-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is a triggering agent for reactive arthritis in HLA-B27-susceptible individuals. Considering the intracellular multiplication of bacteria, it seems likely that bacterial peptides may be presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I pathway. To examine this hypothesis, we infected HLA-B*2705- and/or human β2-microglobulin-transfected murine L-cell lines with M90T, an invasive strain of S. flexneri. Bacterial infection induced no detectable modifications in the biosynthesis and expression level of HLA-B27, as assessed by immunoprecipitation, Northern blot analysis, and flow cytometry. Using confocal microscopy, we observed that bacterial infection induced a clustering of HLA-B27 molecules during macropinocytosis and before bacterial dissemination from cell to cell. Peptides naturally bound to HLA-B27 molecules were acid eluted from infected cells and separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Major differences were observed in high-performance liquid chromatography profiles and in the nature of peptides presented following bacterial infection. Although most of the antigens presented were not accessed by Edman degradation, we obtained two sequences partially homologous to bacterial proteins. These peptides lacked the major HLA-B27 peptide anchor (Arg) at position 2, and one had an unusual length of 14 amino acids. These data suggest that alterations in the peptide presentation by HLA-B27 occur during infection, which could be relevant to the pathogenesis of HLA-B27-related arthritis. PMID:9712804

  11. Haplótipos HLA mais freqüentes em doadores voluntários de medula óssea de Curitiba, Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bicalho Maria G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT is a therapy used to treat patients with hematological diseases. The success of the transplant relies on a HLA match between host and donor. The HLA is located in the Major Histocompatibility Complex in the 6p12.3 region of the chromosome 6. The HLA gene products are involved in the immunomodulation of the immune response due to their function of presenting peptides to the T cells. The HLA genes are the most polymorphic in humans and the most relevant genetic marker for clinical transplants and are largely used in population studies. The knowledge of the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotype frequencies of bone marrow donors is an important tool when a patient needs an identical HLA donor, and there are few population studies similar to this in Brazil. The HLA typing was performed in the LIGH of the UFPR by the PCR-SSP technique. The most common haplotypes among the population studied were HLA-A*01B*08DR*03, HLA-A*29B*44DR*07 and HLA-A*03B*07DR*15. The search of a Brazilian patient for an identical HLA donor is usually hopeless and the understanding of the HLA frequencies permits a real foreknowledge of the success of this search. Success depends on the eventual registration of the perfect donor in the national centers of bone marrow donation. Aiming to increase the perspectives of patients who need a BMT, the evaluation of the HLA frequencies and the enhancement of the national registrations of bone marrow donors are crucial for the accomplishment of this objective.

  12. Efficacy of Prompt Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in the Treatment of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Triggered by Uncontrolled Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan P. Fitzgerald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening, rapidly progressive hematologic disorder involving uncontrolled immune system activation. HLH has been associated with viral infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections. We report a case of a critically ill 30-year-old female who was hospitalized with HIV-associated HLH, with a CD4 count of 4 cells/mL and HIV viral load of 1,842,730 copies/mL. After ruling out other potential infectious causes of HLH, antiretroviral therapy (ART was initiated with darunavir, ritonavir, tenofovir, and emtricitabine. Within one week of initiation of ART, the patient began to improve clinically and hematologically and was stable enough for discharge from the hospital three weeks after starting therapy. This case suggests that treatment with ART in patients with HIV-associated HLH should be considered even in critically ill patients with low CD4 counts.

  13. Association between HLA-A, HLA-C and HLA-B Genes and Ankylosing Spondylitis in Macedonian Population

    OpenAIRE

    Kirijas, Meri; Mishevska-Perchinkova, Snezhana; Karadzova-Stojanoska, Anzelika; Efinska-Mladenovska, Olivija; Petlichkovski, Aleksandar; Trajkov, Dejan; Spiroski, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the association of HLA-A, -C and -B genes with ankylosing spondylitis in patients from the Republic of Macedonia.Material and Methods: This study included 307 subjects (250 healthy individuals and 57 patients with ankylosing spondylitis who were diagnosed at the University Clinic of Rheumatology in Skopje). The HLA typing of class 1 (HLA-A, HLA-C and HLA-B) genes was performed using the method of Reverse Line Strip, after isolation of DNK from the b...

  14. PECULIARITIES OF HLA-PHENOTYPES IN PATIENTS WITH PYELONEPHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiseniuk F

    2016-12-01

    out. HLA-А2 і В35 as protectors of PN associate with smaller frequency of presence the E. Cоli in urine of patients. Conclusion. The article analyzes the peculiarities of HLA-phenotypes in patients with pyelo- and glomerulonephritis, which allowed to establish a correlation between certain genes of histocompatibility complex and susceptibility to develop some diseases of the kidneys in humans. The HLA-phenotype analysis and infection activators for PN allows to take into account the additional prognostic markers not only of disease but also of its course, that provokes more individualized approach to the therapy of patients.

  15. ATL response to arsenic/interferon therapy is triggered by SUMO/PML/RNF4-dependent Tax degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassouki, Zeina; Sahin, Umut; El Hajj, Hiba; Jollivet, Florence; Kfoury, Youmna; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie; Hermine, Olivier; de Thé, Hugues; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2015-01-15

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1) Tax transactivator initiates transformation in adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), a highly aggressive chemotherapy-resistant malignancy. The arsenic/interferon combination, which triggers degradation of the Tax oncoprotein, selectively induces apoptosis of ATL cell lines and has significant clinical activity in Tax-driven murine ATL or human patients. However, the role of Tax loss in ATL response is disputed, and the molecular mechanisms driving degradation remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that ATL-derived or HTLV-1-transformed cells are dependent on continuous Tax expression, suggesting that Tax degradation underlies clinical responses to the arsenic/interferon combination. The latter enforces promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear body (NB) formation and partner protein recruitment. In arsenic/interferon-treated HTLV-1 transformed or ATL cells, Tax is recruited onto NBs and undergoes PML-dependent hyper-sumoylation by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)2/3 but not SUMO1, ubiquitination by RNF4, and proteasome-dependent degradation. Thus, the arsenic/interferon combination clears ATL through degradation of its Tax driver, and this regimen could have broader therapeutic value by promoting degradation of other pathogenic sumoylated proteins. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. A case study utilizing myofascial release, acupressure and trigger point therapy to treat bilateral "Stringhalt" in a 12 year old Akhal-Teke horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Tammy

    2017-07-01

    "Stringhalt" is a horse condition that causes one or both hind legs to spasm when walking, trotting or backing. The condition is thought to be related to a neurological cause from either plant toxicity or peripheral nerve injury. The prognosis is poor and the horse's performance and quality of life can be affected. Treatment has included surgically cutting the digital extensors with varied results. The objective of the study is to utilize soft tissue release via acupressure, trigger point and myofascial release to decrease symptoms of stringhalt. The case study is a 12 year old Akhal-Teke horse of excellent pedigree. In 2011, she was caught in barbed wire overnight and sustained lacerations to the bone in her hindlimbs. Shortly after the injury the horse was placed in a stall for several months and was unable to walk or run, developing stringhalt. Currently, her condition is aggravated by stress and alleviated by certain types of massage (myofascial, acupressure, and trigger point release). The incidence of stringhalt occurs every 3-5 min, with more frequent and severe symptoms on the right hindlimb. The horse is unable to run or back up. Six 1 to 1½ hour bi-weekly treatments were performed. The treatments consisted of myofascial release at the cervical, sacrum and iliums, acupressure of the bladder meridian (including c-spine, t-spine, l-spine, and hamstring), and trigger point release of the iliacus. The stringhalt symptoms were monitored for 30 min prior to each of the 6 treatment sessions. After 6 treatments, the horse was observed running and standing in a position that promotes hip extension. She has not been able to do either since the injury. The frequency and severity of the spasms have decreased to every 10-20 min. The horse's owners report that her disposition, stress and quality of life are much improved. The results suggest that myofascial release, acupressure and trigger point therapy may be utilized to provide a positive treatment outcome in the

  17. Effectiveness of water physical therapy on pain, pressure pain sensitivity, and myofascial trigger points in breast cancer survivors: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarero-Villanueva, Irene; Fernández-Lao, Carolina; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; López-Barajas, Isabel B; Del-Moral-Ávila, Rosario; de la-Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of an 8-week water physical therapy program on cervical and shoulder pain, pressure sensitivity, and the presence of trigger points (TrPs) in breast cancer survivors. Randomized, controlled trial. To date, no study has investigated effects of water therapy in breast cancer. Sixty-six breast cancer survivors were randomly assigned into two groups: WATER group, who received a water exercise program or CONTROL group who received the usual care treatment for breast cancer. The WATER therapy program consisted of 24 sessions (3 times/week over 8 weeks) of low-intensity exercises in a warm pool (32°C). Each session included 10-minute warm-up period; 35 minutes of aerobic, low-intensity endurance, and core stability training; and a 15-minute cool-down period (stretching and relaxation).  Neck and shoulder pain (visual analog scale, 0-100 mm), pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) over C5-C6 zygapophyseal joints, deltoid muscles, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscles, and the presence of TrPs in cervical-shoulder muscles were assessed at baseline and after the 8-week program by an assessor blinded to treatment allocation. The WATER group demonstrated a between-group improvement for neck pain of -31 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]-49 to -22, P  0.05). Finally, patients in the WATER program showed a greater reduction of active TrPs as compared with the CONTROL group (P < 0.05).  An 8-week water therapy program was effective for improving neck and shoulder/axillary pain, and reducing the presence of TrPs in breast cancer survivors as compared with usual care; however, no significant changes in widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia were found. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Triggering Klystrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  19. Idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and HLA antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerbase-DeLima

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to investigate a possible association between HLA class II antigens and idiopathic focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS. HLA-A, -B, -DR and -DQ antigens were determined in 19 Brazilian patients (16 white subjects and three subjects of Japanese origin with biopsy-proven FSGS. Comparison of the HLA antigen frequencies between white patients and white local controls showed a significant increase in HLA-DR4 frequency among FSGS patients (37.7 vs 17.2%, P<0.05. In addition, the three patients of Japanese extraction, not included in the statistical analysis, also presented HLA-DR4. In conclusion, our data confirm the association of FSGS with HLA-DR4 previously reported by others, thus providing further evidence for a role of genes of the HLA complex in the susceptibility to this disease

  20. HLA-G polymorphisms and HLA-G expression in sarcoidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Milman, Nils; Hylenius, Sine

    2006-01-01

    was investigated in granulomas from sarcoidosis patients with the use of immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The HLA-G*010102/-G*0106 alleles were observed more often in sarcoidosis patients (39.4%) than in controls (26.4%), p = 0.025 (Fisher's exact test); however, not significant after correction (p(c) = 0.15). When...... HLA-G expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry in granulomas from sarcoidosis patients, weak HLA-G expression was observed in only one patient. CONCLUSIONS: HLA-G alleles that include a 14-bp sequence polymorphism in exon 8 of the HLA-G gene are observed more often in sarcoidosis patients...... than in controls. The sequence variation may influence HLA-G mRNA stability and influence the expression of soluble isoforms of HLA-G. Only rare and weak expression of HLA-G was observed in granulomas from sarcoidosis patients. More studies are needed to further elucidate the possible role for HLA...

  1. EDITORIAL HLA SYSTEM AND CANCER

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ability to recognise antigen in its native conformation,. T cells recognise antigen that has been processed by other cells and presented to their surfaces by MHC molecules. The MHC molecules themselves are receptors for peptide antigens. The HLA gene system is divided into two classes - class I and class Il. Those in class.

  2. Feasibility study of a combined treatment of electromyography-triggered neuromuscular stimulation and mirror therapy in stroke patients: a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kosuke; Ikuno, Koki; Morii, Yuta; Tokuhisa, Kentaro; Morimoto, Shigeru; Shomoto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Mirror therapy (MT) and electromyography-triggered neuromuscular stimulation (ETMS) are both effective treatments for impaired upper limbs following stroke. A combination of these two treatments (ETMS-MT) may result in greater gain than either treatment alone. The feasibility and possible effects of ETMS-MT upon upper extremity function were investigated in stroke patients. Thirteen post-acute stroke patients were randomly assigned to an immediate ETMS-MT group or a delayed ETMS-MT group and then underwent an 8-week training program. The immediate ETMS-MT group received ETMS-MT in addition to physical and occupational therapy (PT+OT) for 4 weeks. They then received only PT+OT for the next 4 weeks. In the delayed ETMS-MT group, interventions were provided in the reverse order. The main outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA). The immediate ETMS-MT group showed significantly greater gain in FMA in the first 4 weeks. The delayed ETMS-MT group showed significantly greater gain in active range of motion during the latter 4 weeks. No adverse effects were reported following ETMS-MT. ETMS-MT might be as effective as independent MT or ETMS without causing any side effects. Future research should focus upon the direct comparisons between independent and combined interventions.

  3. Functionalized Eu(III)-Based Nanoscale Metal-Organic Framework To Achieve Near-IR-Triggered and -Targeted Two-Photon Absorption Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianguo; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Min; Shan, Changfu; Yan, Huicheng; Wu, Wenyu; Gao, Xuan; Cheng, Bo; Liu, Weisheng; Tang, Yu

    2018-01-02

    The postsynthetic-modified nanoscale metal-organic framework (NMOF) probes selected as potential drug delivery platforms and photodynamic therapy agents to fulfill the effective and safe treatment of neoplastic diseases have attracted increasing attention recently. Herein, a Eu(III)-based NMOF probe elaborately postsynthetically modified with a β-diketonate two-photon-absorbing (TPA) ligand is rationally designed and further functionalized by assembling the photosensitizer molecule (methylene blue, MB) in the pores and a cyclic peptide targeting motif on the surface of the NMOF, which could achieve highly efficient near-infrared (NIR)-triggered and -targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT). On the basis of the luminescence resonance energy transfer process between the NMOF donor and the photosensitizer MB acceptor, the probe can achieve a high tissue-penetrable TPA-PDT effect. Thus, the NMOFs in this study play the role of not only the nanocontainer for the photosensitizer but also the energy-transfer donor. Studies in vitro show enhanced cellular uptake and satisfactory PDT effectiveness toward cancer cells compared to the free photosensitizer MB. It is highly expected that this study contributes to the development of smart luminescent diagnostic and therapeutic probes.

  4. The immediate effect of triceps surae myofascial trigger point therapy on restricted active ankle joint dorsiflexion in recreational runners: a crossover randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieve, Rob; Cranston, Amy; Henderson, Andrew; John, Rachel; Malone, George; Mayall, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the immediate effect on restricted active ankle joint dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), after a single intervention of myofascial trigger point (MTrP) therapy on latent triceps surae MTrPs in recreational runners. A crossover randomised controlled trial. Twenty-two recreational runners (11 men and 11 women; mean age 24.57; ±8.7 years) with a restricted active ankle joint dorsiflexion and presence of latent MTrPs. Participants were screened for a restriction in active ankle dorsiflexion in either knee flexion (soleus) or knee extension (gastrocnemius) and the presence of latent MTrPs. Participants were randomly allocated a week apart to both the intervention (combined pressure release and 10 s passive stretch) and the control condition. A clinically meaningful (large effect size) and statistically significant increase in ankle ROM in the intervention compared to the control group was achieved, for the soleus (p = 0.004) and the gastrocnemius (p = 0.026). Apart from the statistical significance (p < 0.05), these results are clinically relevant due to the immediate increase in ankle dorsiflexion. These results must be viewed in caution due to the carry-over effect in the RCT crossover design and the combined MTrP therapy approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. HLA-DRB and HLA-DQA/HLA-DQB allele and haplotype frequencies in Iranian patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazi, M Mousavi; Solgi, G; Roosta, H Asl; Noshad, S; Moslemi, N; Sadrimanesh, R; Moradi, B; Amirzargar, A A

    2013-08-01

    Genetic backgrounds play a key role in susceptibility to and protection against a spectrum of periodontal diseases. Like other infectious diseases, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have been found to be associated with periodontitis. This study aimed to investigate differences in allele and haplotype frequencies of HLA class II antigens in a sample of Iranian patients with aggressive periodontitis compared with a healthy control group. Fifty unrelated patients with aggressive periodontitis and 130 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study. HLA genotyping for HLA-DRB, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 was performed using the PCR with sequence-specific primers. Allele and haplotype frequencies were compared across groups. The frequencies of HLA-DQA1*03:01, HLA-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DQB1*03:05 alleles, as well as that of the HLA-DRB1*04:01 allele, were significantly higher in patients with aggressive periodontitis compared with control subjects (p = 0.01, p = 0.04, p = 0.05 and p = 0.04, respectively). In contrast, the frequency of the HLA-DQB1*0603 allele was significantly lower in patients with aggressive periodontitis compared with control subjects (p = 0.006; odds ratio = 0.20). With regard to haplotype association, a significantly higher frequency of two haplotypes - HLA-DRB1*04:01/HLA-DQA1*03:01/HLA-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*16:01/HLA-DQA1*01:03/HLA-DQB1*05:01 - was observed in patients with aggressive periodontitis compared with healthy controls (p = 0.01, odds ratio = 2.56 and p = 0.05, odds ratio = 5.38, respectively). These results provide additional evidence that class II HLA polymorphisms, particularly in the DQ locus, are associated with protection against and susceptibility to aggressive periodontitis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR-restricted epitopes in GRA5 of toxoplasma gondii strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryati, S.; Sari, Y.; Prasetyo, A. A.; Sariyatun, R.

    2016-01-01

    The dense granular (GRA) proteins of Toxoplasma gondii(T. gondii) have been demonstrated as potential sources of T. gondii vaccine antigens. However, data of the GRA5 protein are limited. This study analyzed twenty-one complete GRA5 sequences of T. gondii GT1, RH, ME49, VEG, MAS, RUB, FOU, p89, VAND, and GAB2-2007-GAL-DOM2 strains to identify potential epitopes restricted by Major Histocompatibility Complex class II (MHC- II) molecules (human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR) in the protein. In all T. gondii strains, peptides positioned at amino acid (aa) 15-29, 16-30, 17-31, 18-32, 19-33, 83-97, 84-98, 86-100, 87-101, 89-103, and 90-104 were predicted to pose high affinity and binding with HLA-DRB1*0101, HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR17), HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4Dw4), HLA-DRB1*0701, HLA-DRB1*1101, HLA-DRB1*1501 (DR2b), and/or HLA-DRB5*0101. Considering the epitope's affinity, ligation strength, and hydrophilicity, LRLLRRRRRRAIQEE sequence (aa 90-104) restricted by HLA-DRB1*0101, HlA- DRB1*0301 (DR17), and HLA-DRB1*0401 (DR4Dw4) was considered as the most potential MHC-II epitope in GRA5 of T. gondii. These results would be useful for studies concerning in developing T. gondii vaccine and diagnostic method.

  7. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 allele distribution in a large Armenian population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matevosyan, L; Chattopadhyay, S; Madelian, V; Avagyan, S; Nazaretyan, M; Hyussian, A; Vardapetyan, E; Arutunyan, R; Jordan, F

    2011-07-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 gene frequencies were investigated in 4279 unrelated Armenian bone marrow donors. HLA alleles were defined by using PCR amplification with sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP) high- and low-resolution kits. The aim of this study was to examine the HLA diversity at the high-resolution level in a large Armenian population sample, and to compare HLA allele group distribution in Armenian subpopulations. The most frequently observed alleles in the HLA class I were HLA-A*0201, A*0101, A*2402, A*0301, HLA-B*5101, HLA-B*3501, and B*4901. Among DRB1 alleles, high frequencies of DRB1*1104 and DRB1*1501 were observed, followed by DRB1*1101 and DRB1*1401. The most common three-locus haplotype found in the Armenian population was A*33-B*14-DRB1*01, followed by A*03-B*35-DRB1*01. Our results show a similar distribution of alleles in Armenian subpopulations from different countries, and from different regions of the Republics of Armenia and Karabagh. The low level of genetic distances between subpopulations indicates a high level of population homogeneity, and the genetic distances between Armenians and other populations show Armenians as a distinct ethnic group relative to others, reflecting the fact that Armenians have been an 'isolated population' throughout centuries. This study is the first comprehensive investigation of HLA-allele group distribution in a subset of Armenian populations, and the first to provide HLA-allele and haplotype frequencies at a high-resolution level. It is a valuable reference for organ transplantation and for future studies of HLA-associated diseases in Armenian populations. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Involvement of HLA class I molecules in the immune escape of urologic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, R; Gil-Julio, H; Vázquez-Alonso, F; Garrido, F; Castiñeiras, J; Cózar, J M

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the influence of different alterations in human leukocyte antigen class I molecules (HLA I) in renal cell carcinoma, as well as in bladder and prostate cancer. We also study the correlation between HLA I expression and the progression of the disease and the response after immunotherapy protocols. It has been shown, experimentally, that the immune system can recognize and kill neoplastic cells. By analyzing the expression of HLA I molecules on the surface of cancer cells, we were able to study the tumor escape mechanisms against the immune system. Alteration or irreversible damage in HLA I molecules is used by the neoplastic cells to escape the immune system. The function of these molecules is to recognize endogenous peptides and present them to T cells of the immune system. There is a clear relationship between HLA I reversible alterations and success of therapy. Irreversible lesions also imply a lack of response to treatment. The immune system activation can reverse HLA I molecules expression in tumors with reversible lesions, whereas tumors with irreversible ones do not respond to such activation. Determine the type of altered HLA I molecules in tumors is of paramount importance when choosing the type of treatment to keep looking for therapeutic success. Those tumors with reversible lesions can be treated with traditional immunotherapy; however, tumour with irreversible alterations should follow alternative protocols, such as the use of viral vectors carrying the HLA genes to achieve damaged re-expression of the protein. From studies in urologic tumors, we can conclude that the HLA I molecules play a key role in these tumors escape to the immune system. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Effectiveness of myofascial trigger point manual therapy combined with a self-stretching protocol for the management of plantar heel pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renan-Ordine, Rômulo; Alburquerque-Sendín, Francisco; de Souza, Daiana Priscila Rodrigues; Cleland, Joshua A; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César

    2011-02-01

    A randomized controlled clinical trial. To investigate the effects of trigger point (TrP) manual therapy combined with a self-stretching program for the management of patients with plantar heel pain. Previous studies have reported that stretching of the calf musculature and the plantar fascia are effective management strategies for plantar heel pain. However, it is not known if the inclusion of soft tissue therapy can further improve the outcomes in this population. Sixty patients, 15 men and 45 women (mean ± SD age, 44 ± 10 years) with a clinical diagnosis of plantar heel pain were randomly divided into 2 groups: a self-stretching (Str) group who received a stretching protocol, and a self-stretching and soft tissue TrP manual therapy (Str-ST) group who received TrP manual interventions (TrP pressure release and neuromuscular approach) in addition to the same self-stretching protocol. The primary outcomes were physical function and bodily pain domains of the quality of life SF-36 questionnaire. Additionally, pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed over the affected gastrocnemii and soleus muscles, and over the calcaneus, by an assessor blinded to the treatment allocation. Outcomes of interest were captured at baseline and at a 1-month follow-up (end of treatment period). Mixed-model ANOVAs were used to examine the effects of the interventions on each outcome, with group as the between-subjects variable and time as the within-subjects variable. The primary analysis was the group-by-time interaction. The 2 × 2 mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant group-by-time interaction for the main outcomes of the study: physical function (P = .001) and bodily pain (P = .005); patients receiving a combination of self-stretching and TrP tissue intervention experienced a greater improvement in physical function and a greater reduction in pain, as compared to those receiving the self-stretching protocol. The mixed ANOVA also revealed significant

  10. Neurotensin-Conjugated Reduced Graphene Oxide with Multi-Stage Near-Infrared-Triggered Synergic Targeted Neuron Gene Transfection In Vitro and In Vivo for Neurodegenerative Disease Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Tsung-Ying; Huang, Wei-Chen; Kang, Yi-Da; Chu, Chao-Yi; Liao, Wen-Lin; Chen, You-Yin; Chen, San-Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Delivery efficiency with gene transfection is a pivotal point in achieving maximized therapeutic efficacy and has been an important challenge with central nervous system (CNS) diseases. In this study, neurotensin (NT, a neuro-specific peptide)-conjugated polyethylenimine (PEI)-modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoparticles with precisely controlled two-stage near-infrared (NIR)-laser photothermal treatment to enhance the ability to target neurons and achieve high gene transfection in neurons. First-stage NIR laser irradiation on the cells with nanoparticles attached on the surface can increase the permeability of the cell membrane, resulting in an apparent increase in cellular uptake compared to untreated cells. In addition, second-stage NIR laser irradiation on the cells with nanoparticles inside can further induce endo/lysosomal cavitation, which not only helps nanoparticles escape from endo/lysosomes but also prevents plasmid DNA (pDNA) from being digested by DNase I. At least double pDNA amount can be released from rGO-PEI-NT/pDNA under NIR laser trigger release compared to natural release. Moreover, in vitro differentiated PC-12 cell and in vivo mice (C57BL/6) brain transfection experiments have demonstrated the highest transfection efficiency occurring when NT modification is combined with external multi-stage stimuli-responsive NIR laser treatment. The combination of neuro-specific targeting peptide and external NIR-laser-triggered aid provides a nanoplatform for gene therapy in CNS diseases. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Efficacy of Kisspeptin-54 to Trigger Oocyte Maturation in Women at High Risk of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS) During In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbara, Ali; Jayasena, Channa N.; Christopoulos, Georgios; Narayanaswamy, Shakunthala; Izzi-Engbeaya, Chioma; Nijher, Gurjinder M. K.; Comninos, Alexander N.; Peters, Deborah; Buckley, Adam; Ratnasabapathy, Risheka; Prague, Julia K.; Salim, Rehan; Lavery, Stuart A.; Bloom, Stephen R.; Szigeti, Matyas; Ashby, Deborah A.; Trew, Geoffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Context: In vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment is an effective therapy for infertility, but can result in the potentially life-threatening complication, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). Objective: This study aimed to investigate whether kisspeptin-54 can be used to effectively and safely trigger oocyte maturation in women undergoing IVF treatment at high risk of developing OHSS. Setting and Design: This was a phase 2, multi-dose, open-label, randomized clinical trial of 60 women at high risk of developing OHSS carried out during 2013–2014 at Hammersmith Hospital IVF unit, London, United Kingdom. Intervention: Following a standard recombinant FSH/GnRH antagonist protocol, patients were randomly assigned to receive a single injection of kisspeptin-54 to trigger oocyte maturation using an adaptive design for dose allocation (3.2 nmol/kg, n = 5; 6.4 nmol/kg, n = 20; 9.6 nmol/kg, n = 15; 12.8 nmol/kg, n = 20). Oocytes were retrieved 36 h after kisspeptin-54 administration, assessed for maturation, and fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection with subsequent transfer of one or two embryos. Women were routinely screened for the development of OHSS. Main Outcome Measure: Oocyte maturation was measured by oocyte yield (percentage of mature oocytes retrieved from follicles ≥ 14 mm on ultrasound). Secondary outcomes include rates of OHSS and pregnancy. Results: Oocyte maturation occurred in 95% of women. Highest oocyte yield (121%) was observed following 12.8 nmol/kg kisspeptin-54, which was +69% (confidence interval, −16–153%) greater than following 3.2 nmol/kg. At all doses of kisspeptin-54, biochemical pregnancy, clinical pregnancy, and live birth rates per transfer (n = 51) were 63, 53, and 45%, respectively. Highest pregnancy rates were observed following 9.6 nmol/kg kisspeptin-54 (85, 77, and 62%, respectively). No woman developed moderate, severe, or critical OHSS. Conclusion: Kisspeptin-54 is a promising approach to effectively and safely

  12. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize target HLA specificities expressed on cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, J; Nakajima, F; Kamada, H; Tadokoro, K; Nagai, T; Satake, M

    2017-05-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, which are involved in the development of transfusion-related side effects such as transfusion-related lung injury, are sometimes found in males without a history of alloimmunization (eg, transplantation and transfusion). Whether HLA antibodies in male donors can interact with their target HLA specificities expressed on cells have not been completely investigated. The HLA antibodies detected in 7 male donors were characterized. Flow cytometry and immunocomplex capture fluorescence analysis were performed to evaluate the ability of these antibodies to bind with target HLA specificities expressed on cells. The association of these antibodies with complement was examined using anti-C1q antibody. Sustainability of HLA antibodies over time was compared in 26 male vs 57 female donors. The antibodies from all 7 donors recognized intact HLA molecules coated onto microbeads. The antibodies in 2 of 7 donors also recognized their target HLA specificities expressed on cells. Furthermore, the antibodies in one of these 2 donors showed HLA specificities that involved complement binding. Twenty-one of 26 initially positive male donors had turned negative for HLA antibody at least 1 year after their initial positive screening, whereas HLA antibody positivity was maintained for a long time in most female donors. Males without apparent alloimmunization could have HLA antibodies that recognize their target HLA specificities on cells and that could potentially modify molecular events in affected cells. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. HLA-DM interactions with intermediates in HLA-DR maturation and a role for HLA-DM in stabilizing empty HLA-DR molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, L K; Hammond, C; Cresswell, P

    1996-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-positive cell lines which lack HLA-DM expression accumulate class II molecules associated with residual invariant (I) chain fragments (class II-associated invariant chain peptides [CLIP]). In vitro, HLA-DM catalyzes CLIP dissociation from class II-CLIP complexes, promoting binding of antigenic peptides. Here the physical interaction of HLA-DM with HLA-DR molecules was investigated. HLA-DM complexes with class II molecules were detectable transiently in cells, peaking at the time when the class II molecules entered the MHC class II compartment. HLA-DR alpha beta dimers newly released from I chain, and those associated with I chain fragments, were found to associate with HLA-DM in vivo. Mature, peptide-loaded DR molecules also associated at a low level. These same species, but not DR-I chain complexes, were also shown to bind to purified HLA-DM molecules in vitro. HLA-DM interaction was quantitatively superior with DR molecules isolated in association with CLIP. DM-DR complexes generated by incubating HLA-DM with purified DR alpha beta CLIP contained virtually no associated CLIP, suggesting that this superior interaction reflects a prolonged HLA-DM association with empty class II dimers after CLIP dissociation. Incubation of peptide-free alpha beta dimers in the presence of HLA-DM was found to prolong their ability to bind subsequently added antigenic peptides. Stabilization of empty class II molecules may be an important property of HLA-DM in facilitating antigen processing.

  14. The dimeric form of HLA-G molecule is associated with the response of early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients to methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Farina, Ilaria; Bortolotti, Daria; Galuppi, Elisa; Padovan, Melissa; Di Luca, Dario; Govoni, Marcello

    2017-03-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates a possible involvement of HLA (human leukocyte antigen)-G antigens in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), mainly in the HLA-G dimeric isoform, the most active HLA-G form with the strongest immunosuppression, that showed an excellent anti-inflammatory effect in collagen-induced arthritis model mice. However, the relevance of HLA-G dimers in RA response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment is still unknown. We analyzed the HLA-G dimers' amount in plasma samples from early rheumatoid arthritis (ERA) patients before MTX therapy and evaluated the role of these molecules as biomarker of the different response to the treatment. Plasma sHLA-G levels were detected by ELISA, and HLA-G dimeric and monomeric forms were revealed by Western blot in 12 MTX responder (reaching DAS28 remission <2.6) and 8 MTX non-responder (DAS28 ≥5.1) patients before the therapy. The response to MTX was evaluated after 6 months of treatment. All ERA patients reaching remission showed higher plasma sHLA-G levels and the 78 kDa HLA-G dimeric form. Unresponsive ERA patients were characterized by lower plasma sHLA-G levels, and only one patient presented the 78 kDa HLA-G dimeric form (DAS28 5.1). Our preliminary results support the hypothesis that in ERA patients, sHLA-G and, in particular, the presence of the dimeric form in plasma samples before MTX therapy could be an a priori biomarker for the response to MTX treatment.

  15. Completion of HLA protein sequences by automated homology-based nearest-neighbor extrapolation of HLA database sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, K; Niemann, M; de Hoop, T; Spierings, E

    The IMGT/HLA database contains every publicly available HLA sequence. However, most of these HLA protein sequences are restricted to the alpha-1/alpha-2 domain for HLA class-I and alpha-1/beta-1 domain for HLA class-II. Nevertheless, also polymorphism outside these domains may play a role in

  16. Completion of HLA protein sequences by automated homology-based nearest-neighbor extrapolation of HLA database sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, K|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413648699; Niemann, M; de Hoop, T; Spierings, E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/195438728

    2016-01-01

    The IMGT/HLA database contains every publicly available HLA sequence. However, most of these HLA protein sequences are restricted to the alpha-1/alpha-2 domain for HLA class-I and alpha-1/beta-1 domain for HLA class-II. Nevertheless, also polymorphism outside these domains may play a role in

  17. HLA-DRB4 gene encoded HLA-DR53 specificity segregating with the HLA-DR7, -DQ9 haplotype: unusual association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardy, N M; van der Horst, A R; van de Weerd, M J; de Waal, L P; Bontrop, R E

    1998-02-01

    HLA phenotyping of a leukemia patient of Caucasoid origin revealed the presence of the serological HLA-DR53 specificity. Comprehensive pedigree analysis demonstrated that the HLA-DR53 specificity segregated with the HLA-DR7, -DQ3 haplotype. High resolution PCR- SSP genotyping of the HLA class II genes revealed the presence of the HLA-DRB4*0101101 allele segregating together with the HLA-DRB1*0701, -DQA1*0201 and DQB1*03032 alleles. This finding is in contrast to known linkages in that thus far, the HLA-DR7, -DQ9 haplotype has only been described in association with the non-expressed HLA-DRB4*0103102N allele. The existence of this "novel" haplotype may be explained by a homologous recombinational event that occurred between the HLA-DR7, -DR53, -DQ2 and the HLA-DR7, -DQ9 haplotypes.

  18. A novel multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of both HLA-A*31:01/HLA-B*15:02 alleles, which confer susceptibility to carbamazepine-induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D V; Vidal, C; Chi, H C; Do, N T Q; Fulton, R; Li, J; Fernando, S L

    2017-09-08

    HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 have been widely reported to confer genetic susceptibility to carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Accordingly, the screening for these alleles has been highly recommended to prevent SCAR prior to introducing CBZ therapy. Although a number of methods are available for screening of HLA-A*31:01 or HLA-B*15:02 alleles separately, developing an assay that can detect both these alleles would be more clinically practical, cost-effective and less time-consuming. Therefore, in this study, a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using TaqMan Probe was designed and validated to be able to detect HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02. In comparison with Luminex-SSO/SBT/SSB, the multiplex PCR assay for detection of HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 had a perfect agreement in the validation group of 125 samples. The method was able to detect the target genes at the DNA concentration of 0.037 ng/μL. The unit cost of this assay is less than $5 USD with total time of 110 minutes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. HLA-DM and HLA-DO, key regulators of MHC-II processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellins, Elizabeth D; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-02-01

    Peptide loading of class II MHC molecules in endosomal compartments is regulated by HLA-DM. HLA-DO modulates HLA-DM function, with consequences for the spectrum of MHC-bound epitopes presented at the cell surface for interaction with T cells. Here, we summarize and discuss recent progress in investigating the molecular mechanisms of action of HLA-DM and HLA-DO and in understanding their roles in immune responses. Key findings are the long-awaited structures of HLA-DM in complex with its class II substrate and with HLA-DO, and observation of a novel phenotype--autoimmunity combined with immunodeficiency--in mice lacking HLA-DO. We also highlight several areas where gaps persist in our knowledge about this pair of proteins and their molecular biology and immunobiology. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  1. First trimester human endovascular trophoblast cells express both HLA-C and HLA-G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröll, J; Blaschitz, A; Hutter, H; Dohr, G

    1999-07-01

    In human pregnancies, trophoblasts, in contrast to placental connective tissue and the fetus itself, come into direct contact with the maternal allorecognizing system at special sites. Villous syncytiotrophoblasts washed around by maternal blood lack HLA class I proteins, whereas extravillous trophoblasts, which deeply invade maternal uterine tissues, express high amounts of HLA-G and also HLA-C, the latter to a lesser degree, however. A subpopulation of extravillous trophoblasts, the endovascular trophoblast, enters maternal spiral artery lumen and, like syncytiotrophoblast, comes into direct contact with maternal blood. Less is known about HLA class I distribution on this endovascular trophoblast subpopulation. A comparative immununohistochemical analysis was done on decidual cryo-sections containing trophoblast-invaded spiral arteries using different anti-HLA class I monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a peroxidase-labeled streptavidinbiotin detection system. MAbs W6/32 (anti-HLA-A, -B, -C, -G), HCA2 (anti-HLA-A, -G) G233 and 87G (both anti-HLA-G) resulted in strong positivity on endovascular trophoblasts. L31 (anti-HLA-C) and HC10 (anti-HLA-B, -C) revealed clear positivity, whereas TU149 (anti-HLA-B, -C, some -A) produced a heterogeneous staining pattern, faintly positive on some endovascular trophoblastic cells and negative on others. MAb LA45 (anti-HLA-A, -B) did not bind to any endovascular trophoblast, neither did BFL.1 (anti-HLA-G) nor 16G1 (anti-HLA-G, soluble). This study shows that trophoblastic cells belonging to the endovascular subpopulation express considerable amounts of HLA-G and slightly less HLA-C.

  2. IL28B, HLA-C, and KIR variants additively predict response to therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus infection in a European Cohort: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayaprakash Suppiah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To date, drug response genes have not proved as useful in clinical practice as was anticipated at the start of the genomic era. An exception is in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infection with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin (PegIFN/R. Viral clearance is achieved in 40%-50% of patients. Interleukin 28B (IL28B genotype predicts treatment-induced and spontaneous clearance. To improve the predictive value of this genotype, we studied the combined effect of variants of IL28B with human leukocyte antigen C (HLA-C, and its ligands the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR, which have previously been implicated in HCV viral control.We genotyped chronic hepatitis C (CHC genotype 1 patients with PegIFN/R treatment-induced clearance (n = 417 and treatment failure (n = 493, and 234 individuals with spontaneous clearance, for HLA-C C1 versus C2, presence of inhibitory and activating KIR genes, and two IL28B SNPs, rs8099917 and rs12979860. All individuals were Europeans or of European descent. IL28B SNP rs8099917 "G" was associated with absence of treatment-induced clearance (odds ratio [OR] 2.19, p = 1.27×10(-8, 1.67-2.88 and absence of spontaneous clearance (OR 3.83, p = 1.71×10(-14, 2.67-5.48 of HCV, as was rs12979860, with slightly lower ORs. The HLA-C C2C2 genotype was also over-represented in patients who failed treatment (OR 1.52, p = 0.024, 1.05-2.20, but was not associated with spontaneous clearance. Prediction of treatment failure improved from 66% with IL28B to 80% using both genes in this cohort (OR 3.78, p = 8.83×10(-6, 2.03-7.04. There was evidence that KIR2DL3 and KIR2DS2 carriage also altered HCV treatment response in combination with HLA-C and IL28B.Genotyping for IL28B, HLA-C, and KIR genes improves prediction of HCV treatment response. These findings support a role for natural killer (NK cell activation in PegIFN/R treatment-induced clearance, partially mediated by IL28B.

  3. HLA Typing for the Next Generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neema P Mayor

    Full Text Available Allele-level resolution data at primary HLA typing is the ideal for most histocompatibility testing laboratories. Many high-throughput molecular HLA typing approaches are unable to determine the phase of observed DNA sequence polymorphisms, leading to ambiguous results. The use of higher resolution methods is often restricted due to cost and time limitations. Here we report on the feasibility of using Pacific Biosciences' Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT DNA sequencing technology for high-resolution and high-throughput HLA typing. Seven DNA samples were typed for HLA-A, -B and -C. The results showed that SMRT DNA sequencing technology was able to generate sequences that spanned entire HLA Class I genes that allowed for accurate allele calling. Eight novel genomic HLA class I sequences were identified, four were novel alleles, three were confirmed as genomic sequence extensions and one corrected an existing genomic reference sequence. This method has the potential to revolutionize the field of HLA typing. The clinical impact of achieving this level of resolution HLA typing data is likely to considerable, particularly in applications such as organ and blood stem cell transplantation where matching donors and recipients for their HLA is of utmost importance.

  4. First report on the antibody verification of HLA-DR, HLA-DQ and HLA-DP epitopes recorded in the HLA Epitope Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, Rene J; Marrari, Marilyn; Tambur, Anat R; Mulder, Arend; Sousa, Luiz Cláudio Demes da Mata; da Silva, Adalberto Socorro; do Monte, Semiramis J H

    2014-11-01

    The International Registry of Antibody-Defined HLA Epitopes (http://www.epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand humoral responses to HLA mismatches. These epitopes can be structurally defined as eplets by three-dimensional molecular modeling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. A major goal is to identify HLA eplets that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. This report addresses class II epitopes encoded by genes in the HLA-D region. Our analysis included reviews of many publications about epitope specificity of class II reactive human and murine monoclonal antibodies and informative alloantibodies from HLA sensitized patients as well as our own antibody testing results. As of July 1, 2014, 24 HLA-DRB1/3/4/5, 15 DQB, 3 DQA and 8 DPB antibody-verified epitopes have been identified and recorded. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Variants at HLA-A, HLA-C, and HLA-DQB1 confer risk of psoriasis vulgaris in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Jun; Hirota, Tomomitsu; Ozeki, Takeshi; Kanai, Masahiro; Sudo, Takeaki; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Hizawa, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sato, Shinichi; Mushiroda, Taisei; Saeki, Hidehisa; Tamari, Mayumi; Okada, Yukinori

    2017-10-12

    Psoriasis vulgaris (PsV) is an autoimmune disease of skin and joints with heterogeneity in epidemiological and genetic landscapes of global populations. We conducted an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication study of PsV in the Japanese population (606 PsV cases and 2,052 controls). We identified significant associations of the SNPs with PsV risk at TNIP1 and the MHC region (P = 3.7×10(-10) and 6.6×10(-15), respectively). By updating the HLA imputation reference panel of Japanese (n = 908) to expand HLA gene coverage, we fine-mapped the HLA variants associated with PsV risk. While we confirmed PsV risk of HLA-C*06:02 (odds ratio [OR] = 6.36, P = 0.0015), its impact was relatively small compared to those in other populations due to rare allele frequency in Japanese (0.4% in controls). Alternatively, HLA-A*02:07, which corresponds to the cysteine residue at HLA-A amino acid position 99 (HLA-A Cys99), demonstrated the most significant association with PsV (OR = 4.61, P = 1.2×10(-10)). In addition to HLA-A*02:07 and HLA-C*06:02, stepwise conditional analysis identified an independent PsV risk of HLA-DQβ1 Asp57 (OR = 2.19, P = 1.9×10(-6)). Our PsV GWAS in Japanese highlighted novel genetic architecture of PsV, including the identification of novel HLA risk variants. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Constitutive intracellular expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DO and HLA-DR but not HLA-DM in trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranella, Anthi; Vassiliadis, Simon; Mastora, Chrisa; Valentina, Michailidou; Dionyssopoulou, Eva; Athanassakis, Irene

    2005-01-01

    The nonclassic human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM molecules have been proved to positively regulate antigen presentation in classic antigen-presenting cells, whereas in B lymphocytes HLA-DO have been identified as negative regulators of the process. The present report examines whether the negative expression of classic class II molecules in trophoblasts implies negative regulation by HLA-DO. It was revealed by immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and subcellular fractionation techniques that human trophoblasts, although not expressing any surface HLA-DR antigens, constitutively express intracellular HLA-DR, HLA-DO, and CD74, but not HLA-DM. Administration of interferon-gamma to the cell culture increased HLA-DR and CD74, induced HLA-DM, but did not alter the expression of HLA-DO and induced HLA-DR release from the cells. These results were confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis except that HLA-DM mRNA was detected in control cells, indicating a posttranscriptional regulation. Under the same experimental conditions, human monocytes/macrophages were not expressing intracellular HLA-DO while exhibiting significant levels of HLA-DR, HLA-DM, and CD74. The results presented here reveal for the first time expression of HLA-DO in trophoblasts, which can be of great importance in maintaining the class II-negative state in these cells and consequently protecting the fetus from maternal immune attack.

  7. Triggering Artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst; Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents a general critique of the use of conceptual frameworks in design, illustrated by the well known synchronous/asynchronous, co-located/non-co-located framework. It argues that while frameworks are a necessary and inevitable starting point for design, the business of tailoring...... and adapting them to specific situations need not be ad hoc.Triggering artefacts are a way of systematically challenging both designers' preunderstandings and the conservatism of work practice. Experiences from the Great Belt tunnel and bridge project are used to illustrate howtriggering artefacts change...

  8. PyHLA: tests for the association between HLA alleles and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yanhui; Song, You-Qiang

    2017-02-06

    Recently, several tools have been designed for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array and next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. These tools provide high-throughput and cost-effective approaches for identifying HLA types. Therefore, tools for downstream association analysis are highly desirable. Although several tools have been designed for multi-allelic marker association analysis, they were designed only for microsatellite markers and do not scale well with increasing data volumes, or they were designed for large-scale data but provided a limited number of tests. We have developed a Python package called PyHLA, which implements several methods for HLA association analysis, to fill the gap. PyHLA is a tailor-made, easy to use, and flexible tool designed specifically for the association analysis of the HLA types imputed from genome-wide genotyping and NGS data. PyHLA provides functions for association analysis, zygosity tests, and interaction tests between HLA alleles and diseases. Monte Carlo permutation and several methods for multiple testing corrections have also been implemented. PyHLA provides a convenient and powerful tool for HLA analysis. Existing methods have been integrated and desired methods have been added in PyHLA. Furthermore, PyHLA is applicable to small and large sample sizes and can finish the analysis in a timely manner on a personal computer with different platforms. PyHLA is implemented in Python. PyHLA is a free, open source software distributed under the GPLv2 license. The source code, tutorial, and examples are available at https://github.com/felixfan/PyHLA.

  9. Association of genetic polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 antigens with the susceptibility to lepromatous leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESCAMILLA-TILCH, MONICA; TORRES-CARRILLO, NORA MAGDALENA; PAYAN, ROSALIO RAMOS; AGUILAR-MEDINA, MARIBEL; SALAZAR, MA ISABEL; FAFUTIS-MORRIS, MARY; ARENAS-GUZMAN, ROBERTO; ESTRADA-PARRA, SERGIO; ESTRADA-GARCIA, IRIS; GRANADOS, JULIO

    2013-01-01

    Despite the introduction of multidrug therapy and the overall reduction of leprosy prevalence in Mexico, the disease remains endemic in certain regions of the country. A genetic basis for the immune susceptibility to Mycobacterium leprae has already been established in different populations worldwide. In this study, we investigated the possible association of the HLA-DRB1 alleles with leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. The results demonstrated that the HLA-DRB1*01 allele is associated with lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy [P<0.001, odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.8–11.4; and P=0.03, OR=6.2, 95% CI: 1.1–31.6, respectively] and the frequency of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele was found to be significantly lower among leprosy patients compared to controls (P=0.046, OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1–5.8). In conclusion, although the association of the HLA-DR locus with leprosy has been established in different populations and several studies have demonstrated significant differences in the DR alleles, this study demonstrated an association of the HLA-DRB1*01 allele with susceptibility to lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy, as well as an association of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele with protection against leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. PMID:24649058

  10. Association of genetic polymorphism of HLA-DRB1 antigens with the susceptibility to lepromatous leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Tilch, Monica; Torres-Carrillo, Nora Magdalena; Payan, Rosalio Ramos; Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Salazar, Ma Isabel; Fafutis-Morris, Mary; Arenas-Guzman, Roberto; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-Garcia, Iris; Granados, Julio

    2013-11-01

    Despite the introduction of multidrug therapy and the overall reduction of leprosy prevalence in Mexico, the disease remains endemic in certain regions of the country. A genetic basis for the immune susceptibility to Mycobacterium leprae has already been established in different populations worldwide. In this study, we investigated the possible association of the HLA-DRB1 alleles with leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population. The results demonstrated that the HLA-DRB1*01 allele is associated with lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy [P<0.001, odds ratio (OR)=4.6, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.8-11.4; and P=0.03, OR=6.2, 95% CI: 1.1-31.6, respectively] and the frequency of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele was found to be significantly lower among leprosy patients compared to controls (P=0.046, OR=2.4, 95% CI: 1-5.8). In conclusion, although the association of the HLA-DR locus with leprosy has been established in different populations and several studies have demonstrated significant differences in the DR alleles, this study demonstrated an association of the HLA-DRB1*01 allele with susceptibility to lepromatous and dimorphic leprosy, as well as an association of the HLA-DRB1*08 allele with protection against leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo population.

  11. Angiotensinogen and HLA class II predict bevacizumab response in recurrent glioblastoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urup, Thomas; Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2016-01-01

    .0009) and high expression of a HLA class II gene (2-fold increase in HLA-DQA1; OR = 1.22; 95% CI: 1.01-1.47; P = 0.04). These two genes were included in a model that is able predict response to bevacizumab combination therapy in clinical practice. When stratified for a validated prognostic index, the predictive...... model for response was significantly associated with improved overall survival. Conclusion: Two genes (low angiotensinogen and high HLA-class II expression) were predictive for bevacizumab response and were included in a predictive model for response. This model can be used in clinical practice...... for bevacizumab response in recurrent glioblastoma patients. Methods: The study included a total of 82 recurrent glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab combination therapy whom were both response and biomarker evaluable. Gene expression of tumor tissue was analyzed by using a customized Nano...

  12. Symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the emergency department: a comparison with the standard fixed dose benzodiazepine regimen.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Eugene M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare symptom-triggered and standard benzodiazepine regimens for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in an emergency department clinical decision unit. The authors found that the symptom-triggered approach reduced cumulative benzodiazepine dose and length of stay.

  13. HLA epitope based matching for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, René J

    2014-06-01

    As important risk factors for transplant rejection and failure, HLA antibodies are now recognized as being specific for epitopes which can be defined structurally with amino acid differences between HLA alleles. Donor-recipient compatibility should therefore be assessed at the epitope rather than the antigen level. HLAMatchmaker is a computer algorithm that considers each HLA antigen as a series of small configurations of polymorphic residues referred to as eplets as essential components of HLA epitopes. It includes epitopes on antigens encoded by all HLA-A, B, C, DR, DQ and DP loci as well as MICA. HLA epitopes have two characteristics namely antigenicity, i.e. the reactivity with antibody and immunogenicity, i.e. the ability of eliciting an antibody response. This article addresses the relevance of determining epitope-specificities of HLA antibodies, the effect of epitope structure on technique-dependent antibody reactivity and the identification of acceptable mismatches for sensitized patients considered for transplantation. Permissible mismatching for non-sensitized patients aimed to prevent or reduce HLA antibody responses could consider epitope loads of mismatched antigens and the recently developed nonself-self paradigm of epitope immunogenicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. HLA and susceptibility to cervical neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krul, E. J.; Schipper, R. F.; Schreuder, G. M.; Fleuren, G. J.; Kenter, G. G.; Melief, C. J.

    1999-01-01

    The association between cervical neoplasia and certain HLA phenotypes observed in different studies has not been consistent. By serological typing, the association between HLA antigens, cervical carcinoma and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) was studied in a group of 172 and 116 patients,

  15. Lab-on-a-chip enabled HLA diagnostic: combined sample preparation and real time PCR for HLA-B57 diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    The diverse human HLA (human leukocyte antigen) system is responsible for antigen presentation and recognition. It is essential for the immune system to maintain a stable defense line, but also is also involved in autoimmunity as well as metabolic disease. HLA-haplotype (HLA-B27), for instance, is associated with inflammatory diseases such as Bechterew's disease. The administration of the HIV drug Abacavir in combination with another HLA-haplotype (HLAB57) is associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions. Accordingly, the HLA status has to be monitored for diagnosis or prior to start of therapy. Along this line, a miniaturized microfluidic platform has been developed allowing performing the complete analytical process from "sample-in" to "answer-out" in a point-of-care environment. The main steps of the analytical cascade inside the integrated system are blood cell lysis and DNA isolation, DNA purification, real-time PCR and quantitative monitoring of the rise of a fluorescent signal appearing during the PCR based sequence amplification. All bio-analytical steps were intended to be performed inside one chip and will be actuated, controlled and monitored by a matching device. This report will show that all required processes are established and tested and all device components work well and interact with the functional modules on the chips in a harmonized fashion.

  16. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Jostins, Luke; Beecham, Ashley H

    2015-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17......,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles...... (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01-HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01-HLA...

  17. Phthalocyanine-Conjugated Upconversion NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+@SiO2Nanospheres for NIR-Triggered Photodynamic Therapy in a Tumor Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiv, Uliana; Patsula, Vitalii; Noculak, Agnieszka; Podhorodecki, Artur; Větvička, David; Poučková, Pavla; Sedláková, Zdenka; Horák, Daniel

    2017-12-19

    980 nm wavelength. The results demonstrate that the NaYF 4 :Yb 3+ /Er 3+ @SiO 2 -PEI-Pc-PEG nanospheres have great potential as a novel NIR-triggered PDT nanoplatform for deep-tissue cancer therapy. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. HLA-G and IL-10 in serum in relation to HLA-G genotype and polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Rizzo, Roberta; Christiansen, Ole B

    2004-01-01

    -G mRNA isoforms. On this background it is of general interest to further elucidate any associations between HLA-G polymorphism and protein expression. We have HLA-G genotyped 85 individuals attending IVF treatment, and further studied sHLA-G1/HLA-G5 and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in serum samples. In 21......% of the serum samples sHLA-G1/HLA-G5 could be detected. There was no correlation between sHLA-G1/HLA-G5 and IL-10 concentrations in serum. Soluble HLA-G1/HLA-G5 was not detected in any samples homozygous for a 14-bp insertion polymorphism in exon 8 of the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-G gene ( P=0...

  19. Firearm trigger assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  20. HLA Footprints for Multipurpose Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, G.; Lubow, S.; Donaldson, T.; Gillies, K.; Budavari, T.; Szalay, A.

    2010-12-01

    Footprints from the science observations of the Hubble Space Telescope are defined by a set of hierarchical geometric regions of instrument coverage; exposures, combined observations, high level science products, and mosaics. In the growing global community of networked applications, the science end-user has several use cases for visualizing and accessing footprint data including scientific proposal preparation, research and analysis of generated science products, and interoperability between archives for correlation of coverage. The Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) at Space Telescope Science Institute, in coordination with ESO-ECF and CADC, has developed a web based science user interface built on a VO service oriented architecture system to enable varying levels of astronomical community access to science products derived from the HST archive. In this ADASS poster paper we describe new features and technologies for the HLA footprint component web browser visualization tool and the underlying footprint services utilized by the HST Astronomers Proposal Tool (APT) in compliance with an IVOA standard data access protocol. The service infrastructure is based on a high performance spherical geometric model developed by Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and database search algorithms co-developed by STScI and JHU.

  1. An HLA-B7-specific antibody in an HLA-B*07 positive patient explained by a nonexpressed allele (HLA-B*07:181N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenda, S; Faé, I; Fischer, G F

    2017-07-01

    Antibody identification by a bead array assay in a kidney patient revealed several HLA-specific antibodies including one directed against the HLA-B7 antigen. Low-resolution typing of the patient indicated the presence of an HLA-B*07 allele. To rule out an HLA-specific autoantibody the HLA-typing of the patient was further refined by nucleotide sequencing on a next-generation sequencing platform and eventually showed an HLA-B*39:01:01:03 and HLA-B*07:181N genotype. Thereby the allospecific nature of the antibody was proven. The HLA-B7-specific antibody could be explained by an immunization during the first kidney-transplantation in 1996 with an HLA-B*07 positive donor. When assessing the plausibility of antibodies, the presence of nonexpressed alleles should be taken into consideration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Transcriptional enhancers in the HLA-DQ subregion.

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, K E; Peterlin, B M

    1987-01-01

    Using transient expression assays, the HLA-DQ alpha and HLA-DQ beta genes of the human major histocompatibility complex were screened for cis-acting regulatory elements. Two regions in the HLA-DQ alpha gene and one in the HLA-DQ beta gene were identified which fulfilled the criteria for transcriptional enhancers.

  3. HLA genes in Chimila Amerindians (Colombia), the Peopling of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Also, specific genealogical comparisons were done between Chimila Amerindians and Pacific Islanders by using specific HLA alleles. Our conclusions are: 1) These new data and HLA extended haplotypes are useful for present and future Chimila Preventive Medicine (HLA linked diseases), HLA Pharmacogenomics and ...

  4. HLA-A alleles differentially associate with severity to Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA), particularly HLA-B and class II alleles have been differentially associated with disease outcomes in different populations following infection with the malaria Plasmodium falciparum. However, the effect of HLA-A on malaria infection and/or disease is not fully understood. Recently, HLA-A ...

  5. Characterization of the Endothelial Cell Cytoskeleton following HLA Class I Ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Mary E.; Souda, Puneet; Jin, Yi-Ping; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are a target of antibody-mediated allograft rejection. In vitro, when the HLA class I molecules on the surface of ECs are ligated by anti-HLA class I antibodies, cell proliferation and survival pathways are activated and this is thought to contribute to the development of antibody-mediated rejection. Crosslinking of HLA class I molecules by anti-HLA antibodies also triggers reorganization of the cytoskeleton, which induces the formation of F-actin stress fibers. HLA class I induced stress fiber formation is not well understood. Methodology and Principal Findings The present study examines the protein composition of the cytoskeleton fraction of ECs treated with HLA class I antibodies and compares it to other agonists known to induce alterations of the cytoskeleton in endothelial cells. Analysis by tandem mass spectrometry revealed unique cytoskeleton proteomes for each treatment group. Using annotation tools a candidate list was created that revealed 12 proteins, which were unique to the HLA class I stimulated group. Eleven of the candidate proteins were phosphoproteins and exploration of their predicted kinases provided clues as to how these proteins may contribute to the understanding of HLA class I induced antibody-mediated rejection. Three of the candidates, eukaryotic initiation factor 4A1 (eIF4A1), Tropomyosin alpha 4-chain (TPM4) and DDX3X, were further characterized by Western blot and found to be associated with the cytoskeleton. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that class I ligation stimulated increased eIF4A1 co-localization with F-actin and paxillin. Conclusions/Significance Colocalization of eIF4A1 with F-actin and paxillin following HLA class I ligation suggests that this candidate protein could be a target for understanding the mechanism(s) of class I mediated antibody-mediated rejection. This proteomic approach for analyzing the cytoskeleton of ECs can be applied to other agonists and various cells types

  6. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy of gastroc-soleus trigger points in patients with plantar fasciitis: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Moghtaderi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The combination of ESWT for both plantar fasciitis and gastroc-soleus trigger points in treating patients with plantar fasciitis is more effective than utilizing it solely for plantar fasciitis.

  7. HLA typing in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J L; Madsen, H O; Ryder, L P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients with ON refe......OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients...... with idiopathic ON, 66 with ON + CDMS), ethnically matched with 192 healthy volunteers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Relation between the HLA-DR15, -DR17, -DQA-1B, and -DQB-1B polymorphisms as defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and presence of plaques on T2-weighted brain MRI. RESULTS......: The frequency of HLA-DR15 was significantly increased in patients with ON + CDMS (52%) and ON (47%) compared with control subjects (31%). The frequency of HLA-DR17 was almost equal in the ON + CDMS (18%), ON (23%), and control (23%) groups. The frequencies of HLA-DQA-1B (55% in ON + CDMS, 58% in ON) and HLA...

  8. Ischaemic compression versus laser therapy of an active upper trapezius myofascial trigger point in the management of acute mechanical cervical spine pain

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.Tech. (Chiropractic) Purpose: Patients presenting with mechanical cervical spine pain demonstrate myofascial trigger points of the surrounding cervical spine musculature (De Las Penas, Alonso-Blanco, Alguacil-Diego and Miangolarra-Page, 2006). Myofascial trigger points, from specifically the cervical spine musculature, have been seen to be involved to a large extent with not only the local mechanical cervical spine pain but also the accompanying referred pain patterns and symptoms (De La...

  9. HLA diversity in the 1000 genomes dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Antoine Gourraud

    Full Text Available The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation by sequencing at a level that should allow the genome-wide detection of most variants with frequencies as low as 1%. However, in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, only the top 10 most frequent haplotypes are in the 1% frequency range whereas thousands of haplotypes are present at lower frequencies. Given the limitation of both the coverage and the read length of the sequences generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, the highly variable positions that define HLA alleles may be difficult to identify. We used classical Sanger sequencing techniques to type the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes in the available 1000 Genomes samples and combined the results with the 103,310 variants in the MHC region genotyped by the 1000 Genomes Project. Using pairwise identity-by-descent distances between individuals and principal component analysis, we established the relationship between ancestry and genetic diversity in the MHC region. As expected, both the MHC variants and the HLA phenotype can identify the major ancestry lineage, informed mainly by the most frequent HLA haplotypes. To some extent, regions of the genome with similar genetic or similar recombination rate have similar properties. An MHC-centric analysis underlines departures between the ancestral background of the MHC and the genome-wide picture. Our analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD decay in these samples suggests that overestimation of pairwise LD occurs due to a limited sampling of the MHC diversity. This collection of HLA-specific MHC variants, available on the dbMHC portal, is a valuable resource for future analyses of the role of MHC in population and disease studies.

  10. HLA-G in human early pregnancy: Control of uterine immune cell activation and likely

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Le Bouteiller

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite a number of controversies, the functional importance of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G in early human pregnancy is now sustained by a large amount of sound data. Membrane-bound and soluble HLA-G isoforms, either as β2-microglobulin-free or -associated as monomers or dimers, are expressed by different trophoblast subpopulations, the only fetal-derived cells that are directly in contact with maternal cells (maternal-fetal interfaces. Trophoblast HLA-G is the specific ligand of multiple cellular receptors present in maternal immune and non-immune cells, including CD8, leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor (LILR B1, LILRB2, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR 2DL4, and possibly CD160. Trophoblast HLA-G specific engagement of these cellular receptors triggers either inhibitory or activating signals in decidual CD8 + T cells, CD4 + T cells, natural killer (NK cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, or endothelial cells. Such HLA-G-receptor specific interactions first contribute to limit potentially harmful maternal anti-paternal immune response by impairment of decidual NK cell cytotoxicity, inhibition of CD4 + and CD8 + T-cell and B-cell proliferation, and induction of apoptosis of activated CD8 + T cells. Second, these HLA-G specific interactions contribute to stimulate placental development through secretion of angiogenic factors by decidual NK cells and macrophages, and to provide a protective effect for the outcome of pregnancy by the secretion of interleukin (IL-4 by decidual trophoblast antigen-specific CD4 + T cells.

  11. Inference of high resolution HLA types using genome-wide RNA or DNA sequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Ni, Min; Cooper, Blerta; Wei, Yi; Fury, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Accurate HLA typing at amino acid level (four-digit resolution) is critical in hematopoietic and organ transplantations, pathogenesis studies of autoimmune and infectious diseases, as well as the development of immunoncology therapies. With the rapid adoption of genome-wide sequencing in biomedical research, HLA typing based on transcriptome and whole exome/genome sequencing data becomes increasingly attractive due to its high throughput and convenience. However, unlike targeted amplicon sequencing, genome-wide sequencing often employs a reduced read length and coverage that impose great challenges in resolving the highly homologous HLA alleles. Though several algorithms exist and have been applied to four-digit typing, some deliver low to moderate accuracies, some output ambiguous predictions. Moreover, few methods suit diverse read lengths and depths, and both RNA and DNA sequencing inputs. New algorithms are therefore needed to leverage the accuracy and flexibility of HLA typing at high resolution using genome-wide sequencing data. We have developed a new algorithm named PHLAT to discover the most probable pair of HLA alleles at four-digit resolution or higher, via a unique integration of a candidate allele selection and a likelihood scoring. Over a comprehensive set of benchmarking data (a total of 768 HLA alleles) from both RNA and DNA sequencing and with a broad range of read lengths and coverage, PHLAT consistently achieves a high accuracy at four-digit (92%-95%) and two-digit resolutions (96%-99%), outcompeting most of the existing methods. It also supports targeted amplicon sequencing data from Illumina Miseq. PHLAT significantly leverages the accuracy and flexibility of high resolution HLA typing based on genome-wide sequencing data. It may benefit both basic and applied research in immunology and related fields as well as numerous clinical applications.

  12. HLA and celiac disease susceptibility: new genetic factors bring open questions about the HLA influence and gene-dosage effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Medrano

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a chronic inflammatory disorder triggered after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. The major genetic determinants are HLA-DQA1*05 and HLA-DQB1*02, which encode the DQ2 heterodimer. These alleles are commonly inherited in cis with DRB1*03∶01, which is associated with numerous immune-related disorders, in some cases contributing with a different amount of risk depending on the haplotype context. We aimed at investigating those possible differences involving DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes in CD susceptibility. A family (274 trios and a case-control sample (369 CD cases/461 controls were analyzed. DRB1*03∶01-carrying individuals were classified according to the haplotype present (ancestral haplotype (AH 8.1, AH 18.2 or non-conserved haplotype after genotyping of HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -B8, TNF -308, TNF -376 and the TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. We observe that the AH 8.1 confers higher risk than the remaining DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes, and this effect only involves individuals possessing a single copy of DQB1*02. CD risk for these individuals is similar to the one conferred by inherit DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 in trans. It seems that an additional CD susceptibility factor is present in the AH 8.1 but not in other DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes. This factor could be shared with individuals possessing DQ2.5 trans, according to the similar risk observed in those two groups of individuals.

  13. Recent progress of national banking project on homozygous HLA-typed induced pluripotent stem cells in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Nam, Yoojun; Ham, Dong-Sik; Kim, Ji-Won; Ha, Hye-Yeong; Jung, Ji-Won; Jung, Seung Min; Baek, In Cheol; Kim, Su-Yeon; Kim, Tai-Gyu; Song, Jihwan; Lee, Jennifer; Park, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2017-09-23

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated by introducing several factors into mature somatic cells. Banking of iPSCs can lead to wider application for treatment and research. In an economical view, it is important to store cells that can cover a high percentage of the population. Therefore, the use of homozygous human leukocyte antigen-iPSCs (HLA-iPSCs) is thought as a potential candidate for effective iPSC banking system for further clinical use. We screened the database stored in the Catholic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank of Korea and sorted the most frequent homozygous HLA types of the South Korean population. Blood cells with the selected homozygous HLA types were obtained and transferred to the GMP facility in the Catholic Institute of Cell Therapy. Cells were reprogrammed to iPSCs inside the facility and went through several quality controls. As a result, a total of 13 homozygous GMP-grade iPSC lines were obtained in the facility. The generated iPSCs showed high pluripotency and normal karyotype after reprogramming. Five HLA-homozygous iPSCs had the type that was included in the top five most frequent HLA types. Homozygous HLA-iPSCs can open a new opportunity for further application of iPSCs in clinical research and therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. HLA-G Haplotypes Are Differentially Associated with Asthmatic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Ribeyre

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-G, a HLA class Ib molecule, interacts with receptors on lymphocytes such as T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells to influence immune responses. Unlike classical HLA molecules, HLA-G expression is not found on all somatic cells, but restricted to tissue sites, including human bronchial epithelium cells (HBEC. Individual variation in HLA-G expression is linked to its genetic polymorphism and has been associated with many pathological situations such as asthma, which is characterized by epithelium abnormalities and inflammatory cell activation. Studies reported both higher and equivalent soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G expression in different cohorts of asthmatic patients. In particular, we recently described impaired local expression of HLA-G and abnormal profiles for alternatively spliced isoforms in HBEC from asthmatic patients. sHLA-G dosage is challenging because of its many levels of polymorphism (dimerization, association with β2-microglobulin, and alternative splicing, thus many clinical studies focused on HLA-G single-nucleotide polymorphisms as predictive biomarkers, but few analyzed HLA-G haplotypes. Here, we aimed to characterize HLA-G haplotypes and describe their association with asthmatic clinical features and sHLA-G peripheral expression and to describe variations in transcription factor (TF binding sites and alternative splicing sites. HLA-G haplotypes were differentially distributed in 330 healthy and 580 asthmatic individuals. Furthermore, HLA-G haplotypes were associated with asthmatic clinical features showed. However, we did not confirm an association between sHLA-G and genetic, biological, or clinical parameters. HLA-G haplotypes were phylogenetically split into distinct groups, with each group displaying particular variations in TF binding or RNA splicing sites that could reflect differential HLA-G qualitative or quantitative expression, with tissue-dependent specificities. Our results, based on a

  15. HLA Population Genetics in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kransdorf, Evan P; Pando, Marcelo J; Gragert, Loren; Kaplan, Bruce

    2017-09-01

    HLAs are fundamental to the adaptive immune response and play critical roles in the cellular and humoral response in solid organ transplantation. The genes encoding HLA proteins are the most polymorphic within the human genome, with thousands of different allelic variants known within the population. Application of the principles of population genetics to the HLA genes has resulted in the development of a numeric metric, the calculated panel-reactive antibody (CPRA) that predicts the likelihood of a positive crossmatch as a function of a transplant candidate's unacceptable HLA antigens. The CPRA is an indispensible measure of access to transplantation for sensitized candidates and is used as the official measure of sensitization for allocation of points in the US Kidney Allocation System and Eurotransplant. Here, we review HLA population genetics and detail the mathematical basis of the CPRA. An understanding of these principles by transplant clinicians will lay the foundation for continued innovation in the care of sensitized patients.

  16. HLA-restricted NY-ESO-1 peptide immunotherapy for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonpavde, Guru; Wang, Mingjun; Peterson, Leif E; Wang, Helen Y; Joe, Teresa; Mims, Martha P; Kadmon, Dov; Ittmann, Michael M; Wheeler, Thomas M; Gee, Adrian P; Wang, Rong-Fu; Hayes, Teresa G

    2014-04-01

    Given the immunogenicity of NY-ESO-1 peptides in prostate cancer, a phase I clinical trial was designed to evaluate HLA class-I and class-II restricted NY-ESO-1 peptides in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Patients with progressive mCRPC, Zubrod Performance Status ≤2, PSA ≥10 ng/ml who had appropriate HLA class I (A2) and class II haplotypes (DR4, DP4) were eligible. Three groups with 3 patients each received the vaccine subcutaneously every 2 weeks for 6 doses. Group 1 received a peptide presented by an HLA class I haplotype (HLA-A2), Group 2 with a peptide presented by HLA class II haplotype (DR4, DP4), and Group 3 with peptides presented by both Class I and II haplotypes. Androgen-deprivation was continued. Owing to a myocardial infarction, the protocol was amended to omit the use of GM-CSF. Fourteen patients were evaluable for toxicities and 9 received all 6 doses and were evaluable for efficacy. One death from myocardial infarction following GM-CSF occurred in a patient with generalized myalgias. After omitting GM-CSF, no grade >2 toxicities were observed. Among 9 patients evaluable for efficacy, the median PSA doubling time pre-therapy and during therapy were 3.1 and 4.92 months, respectively. NY-ESO-1 specific T-cell response observed by ELISPOT appeared more frequent in docetaxel-naïve patients (4 of 4) than docetaxel-pretreated patients (2 of 5). In men with mCRPC, individualized HLA class-I and/or class-II restricted NY-ESO-1 peptides were tolerable, appeared to slow PSA doubling time and yielded antigen-specific T-cell responses more often in chemonaïve patients.

  17. Enrichment of HLA Types and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Associated With Non-progression in a Strictly Defined Cohort of HIV-1 Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J. Westrop

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 controllers (HIC are extremely rare patients with the ability to control viral replication, maintain unchanging CD4 T-cell count, and evade disease progression for extensive periods of time, in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. In order to establish the representation of key genetic correlates of atypical disease progression within a cohort of HIV-1+ individuals who control viral replication, we examine four-digit resolution HLA type and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP previously identified to be correlated to non-progressive infection, in strictly defined HIC. Clinical histories were examined to identify patients exhibiting HIC status. Genomic DNA was extracted, and high definition HLA typing and genome-wide SNP analysis was performed. Data were compared with frequencies of SNP in European long-term non-progressors (LTNP and primary infection cohorts. HLA-B alleles associated with atypical disease progression were at very high frequencies in the group of five HIC studied. All four HIC of European ancestry were HLA-B*57+ and half were also HLA-B*27+. All HIC, including one of self-reported African ethnicity, had the HLA-Cw*0602 allele, and the HLA-DQ9 allele was present only in HIC of European ancestry. A median 95% of the top 19 SNP known to be associated with LTNP status was observed in European HIC (range 78–100%; 17/19 of the SNP considered mapped to chromosome 6 in the HLA region, whereas 2/19 mapped to chromosome 8. The HIC investigated here demonstrated high enrichment of HLA types and SNP previously associated with long-term non-progression. These findings suggest that the extreme non-progressive phenotype considered here is associated with a genetic signature characterized by a single-genetic unit centered around the HLA-B*57 haplotype and the possible additive effect of HLA-B*27.

  18. HLA-E polymorphism and soluble HLA-E plasma levels in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidi, I; Laaribi, A B; Bortolotti, D; Belhadj, M; Mehri, A; Yahia, H B; Babay, W; Chaouch, H; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boukadida, J; Di Luca, D; Hannachi, N; Rizzo, R

    2016-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection occurs in association to a deregulation of immune system. Human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) is an immune-tolerant nonclassical HLA class I molecule that could be involved in HBV progression. To measure soluble (s) HLA-E in patients with chronic HBV hepatitis (CHB). We tested the potential association of HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G gene polymorphism to CHB. Our cohort consisted of 93 Tunisian CHB patients (stratified in CHB with high HBV DNA levels and CHB with low HBV DNA levels) and 245 healthy donors. Plasma sHLA-E was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer. No association between HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G polymorphism and HBV DNA levels in CHB patients was found. G/G genotype is less frequent in CHB patients without significance. sHLA-E is significantly enhanced in CHB patients compared with healthy controls (P = 0.0017). Stratification according to HBV DNA levels showed that CHB patients with low HBV DNA levels have higher sHLA-E levels compared with CHB patients with high HBV DNA levels. CHB patients with G/G genotype have enhanced sHLA-E levels compared with other genotypes (P = 0.037). This significant difference is maintained only for CHB women concerning G/G genotypes (P = 0.042). Finally, we reported enhanced sHLA-E in CHB patients with advanced stages of fibrosis (P = 0.032). We demonstrate, for the first time, the association of sHLA-E to CHB. Owing to the positive correlation of HLA-E*01:01/01:03 A > G polymorphism and the association of sHLA-E to advanced fibrosis stages, HLA-E could be a powerful predictor for CHB progression. Further investigations will be required to substantiate HLA-E role as a putative clinical biomarker of CHB. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Definitive class I human leukocyte antigen expression in gestational placentation: HLA-F, HLA-E, HLA-C, and HLA-G in extravillous trophoblast invasion on placentation, pregnancy, and parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmon, Rinat; Pinnaduwage, Lakmini; Zhang, Jianhong; Lye, Stephen J; Geraghty, Daniel E; Dunk, Caroline E

    2017-06-01

    The extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) express HLA-C and HLA-G, but HLA-E and HLA-F are the subject of conflicting reports. In this study, we define the HLA expression profile during active EVT placental implantation, pregnancy development, and parturition. Immunohistochemistry, q-PCR, and Western blot were used to investigate HLA-C, HLA-E, and HLA-F placental expression across gestation from the early first trimester, late first trimester, second trimester (n=10 in each), preterm gestation (n=6) to elective term cesarean section and term vaginal deliveries (n=12, 38-41 weeks). EVT explants and Swan71 cells were used to assess HLA-C and HLA-F during active EVT migration. HLA-G, HLA-C, and HLA-F were expressed by 1st-trimester EVT and became intracellular and weaker as gestation progressed. HLA-E was only expressed in 1st-trimester placenta. HLA-F and HLA-C mRNA and protein expression levels showed a significant increase in the fetal villous mesenchyme across gestation. HLA-C levels increased with labor. We detected a 100-kDa HLA-F band in early pregnancy suggesting dimer formation on the EVT surface. These results were confirmed in EVT outgrowths and Swan71 trophoblast which showed that HLA-F and HLA-G are increased on the cell surface of migrating EVT, while HLA-C was internalized. Expression of HLA-F and HLA-G on the cell surface of actively migrating EVT supports their specific role in early EVT invasion and interactions with uterine natural killer cells. HLA-C's limited expression to the proliferative EVT suggests a protective role in the earliest events of implantation but not in active EVT invasion. We also show for the first time that HLA-C may be involved in parturition. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. HLA DQB1*06:02 negative narcolepsy with hypocretin/orexin deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Fang; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    compiled. HLA class I (A, B, C), class II (DRBs, DQA1, DQB1, DPA1, and DPB1), and whole exome sequencing were conducted in 9 DQB1*06:02 negative cases with low CSF hypocretin-1. Sanger sequencing of selected exons in DNMT1, HCRT, and MOG was performed to exclude mutations in known narcolepsy......-associated genes. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Classic narcolepsy markers DQB1*06:02 and low CSF hypocretin-1 were found in 87.4% of cases with cataplexy, and in 20.0% without cataplexy. Nine cases (all with cataplexy) were DQB1*06:02 negative with low CSF hypocretin-1, constituting 1.7% [0.8%-3.4%] of all cases...... with cataplexy and 1.8% [0.8%-3.4%] of cases with low CSF hypocretin independent of cataplexy across sites. Five HLA negative subjects had severe cataplexy, often occurring without clear triggers. Subjects had diverse ethnic backgrounds and HLA alleles at all loci, suggesting no single secondary HLA association...

  1. HLA Epitopes: The Targets of Monoclonal and Alloantibodies Defined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim El-Awar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitization to human leukocyte antigens (HLA in organ transplant patients causes graft rejection, according to the humoral theory of transplantation. Sensitization is almost ubiquitous as anti-HLA antibodies are found in almost all sera of transplant recipients. Advances in testing assays and amino acid sequencing of HLA along with computer software contributed further to the understanding of antibody-antigen reactivity. It is commonly understood that antibodies bind to HLA antigens. With current knowledge of epitopes, it is more accurate to describe that antibodies bind to their target epitopes on the surface of HLA molecular chains. Epitopes are present on a single HLA (private epitope or shared by multiple antigens (public epitope. The phenomenon of cross-reactivity in HLA testing, often explained as cross-reactive groups (CREGs of antigens with antibody, can be clearly explained now by public epitopes. Since 2006, we defined and reported 194 HLA class I unique epitopes, including 56 cryptic epitopes on dissociated HLA class I heavy chains, 83 HLA class II epitopes, 60 epitopes on HLA-DRB1, 15 epitopes on HLA-DQB1, 3 epitopes on HLA-DQA1, 5 epitopes on HLA-DPB1, and 7 MICA epitopes. In this paper, we provide a summary of our findings.

  2. HLA class Ib in pregnancy and pregnancy-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Gry; Melsted, Wenna Nascimento; Nilsson, Line Lynge; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2017-08-01

    The HLA class Ib genes, HLA-E, HLA-F, and HLA-G, were discovered long after the classical HLA class Ia genes. The elucidation of their functions had a modest beginning. However, their basic functions and involvement in pathophysiology and a range of diseases are now emerging. Although results from a range of studies support the functional roles for the HLA class Ib molecules in adult life, especially HLA-G and HLA-F have most intensively been, and were also primarily, studied in relation to reproduction and pregnancy. The expression of HLA class Ib proteins at the feto-maternal interface in the placenta seems to be important for the maternal acceptance of the semi-allogenic fetus. In contrast to the functions of HLA class Ia, HLA-G possesses immune-modulatory and tolerogenic functions. Here, we review an accumulating amount of data describing the functions of HLA class Ib molecules in relation to fertility, reproduction, and pregnancy, and a possible role for these molecules in certain pregnancy complications, such as implantation failure, recurrent spontaneous abortions, and pre-eclampsia. The results from different kinds of studies point toward a role for HLA class Ib, especially HLA-G, throughout the reproductive cycle from conception to the birth weight of the child.

  3. Doxorubicin-loaded NaYF4:Yb/Tm-TiO2 inorganic photosensitizers for NIR-triggered photodynamic therapy and enhanced chemotherapy in drug-resistant breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Leyong; Pan, Yuanwei; Tian, Ying; Wang, Xin; Ren, Wenzhi; Wang, Shouju; Lu, Guangming; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-07-01

    The combination therapy has exhibited important potential for the treatment of cancers, especially for drug-resistant cancers. In this report, bi-functional nanoprobes based on doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded NaYF4:Yb/Tm-TiO2 inorganic photosensitizers (FA-NPs-DOX) were synthesized for in vivo near infrared (NIR)-triggered inorganic photodynamic therapy (PDT) and enhanced chemotherapy to overcome the multidrug resistance (MDR) in breast cancers. Using the up-conversion luminescence (UCL) performance of NaYF4:Yb/Tm converting near-infrared (NIR) into ultraviolent (UV) lights, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were triggered from TiO2 inorganic photosensitizers for PDT under the irradiation of a 980 nm laser, by which the deep-penetration and low photo-damage could be reached. Moreover, nanocarrier delivery and folic acid (FA) targeting promoted the cellular uptake, and accelerated the release of DOX in drug-sensitive MCF-7 and resistant MCF-7/ADR cells. The toxicity assessment in vitro and in vivo revealed the good biocompatibility of the as-prepared FA-NPs-DOX nanocomposites. By the combination of enhanced chemotherapy and NIR-triggered inorganic PDT, the viability of MCF-7/ADR cells could decrease by 53.5%, and the inhibition rate of MCF-7/ADR tumors could increase up to 90.33%, compared with free DOX. Therefore, the MDR of breast cancers could be obviously overcome by enhanced chemotherapy and NIR-triggered inorganic PDT of FA-NPs-DOX nanocomposites under the excitation of a 980 nm laser. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. HLA DQB1*06:02 Negative Narcolepsy with Hypocretin/Orexin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara; Pizza, Fabio; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Ollila, Hanna M.; Nevsimalova, Sona; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Winkelmann, Juliane; Coquillard, Cristin; Babrzadeh, Farbod; Strom, Tim M.; Wang, Chunlin; Mindrinos, Michael; Vina, Marcelo Fernandez; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To identify rare allelic variants and HLA alleles in narcolepsy patients with hypocretin (orexin, HCRT) deficiency but lacking DQB1*06:02. Settings: China (Peking University People's Hospital), Czech Republic (Charles University), Denmark (Golstrup Hospital), Italy (University of Bologna), Korea (Catholic University), and USA (Stanford University). Design: CSF hypocretin-1, DQB1*06:02, clinical and polysomnographic data were collected in narcolepsy patients (552 with and 144 without cataplexy) from 6 sites. Numbers of cases with and without DQB1*06:02 and low CSF hypocretin-1 were compiled. HLA class I (A, B, C), class II (DRBs, DQA1, DQB1, DPA1, and DPB1), and whole exome sequencing were conducted in 9 DQB1*06:02 negative cases with low CSF hypocretin-1. Sanger sequencing of selected exons in DNMT1, HCRT, and MOG was performed to exclude mutations in known narcolepsy-associated genes. Measurements and Results: Classic narcolepsy markers DQB1*06:02 and low CSF hypocretin-1 were found in 87.4% of cases with cataplexy, and in 20.0% without cataplexy. Nine cases (all with cataplexy) were DQB1*06:02 negative with low CSF hypocretin-1, constituting 1.7% [0.8%-3.4%] of all cases with cataplexy and 1.8% [0.8%-3.4%] of cases with low CSF hypocretin independent of cataplexy across sites. Five HLA negative subjects had severe cataplexy, often occurring without clear triggers. Subjects had diverse ethnic backgrounds and HLA alleles at all loci, suggesting no single secondary HLA association. The rare subtype DPB1*0901, and homologous DPB1*10:01 subtype, were present in 5 subjects, suggesting a secondary association with HLA-DP. Preprohypocretin sequencing revealed no mutations beyond one previously reported in a very early onset case. No new MOG or DNMT1 mutations were found, nor were suspicious or private variants in novel genes identified through exome sequencing. Conclusions: Hypocretin, MOG, or DNMT1 mutations are exceptional findings in DQB1

  5. External triggering and triggered targeting strategies for drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfei; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2017-06-01

    Drug delivery systems that are externally triggered to release drugs and/or target tissues hold considerable promise for improving the treatment of many diseases by minimizing nonspecific toxicity and enhancing the efficacy of therapy. These drug delivery systems are constructed from materials that are sensitive to a wide range of external stimuli, including light, ultrasound, electrical and magnetic fields, and specific molecules. The responsiveness conferred by these materials allows the release of therapeutics to be triggered on demand and remotely by a physician or patient. In this Review, we describe the rationales for such systems and the types of stimuli that can be deployed, and provide an outlook for the field.

  6. HLA-A*7401-mediated control of HIV viremia is independent of its linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B*5703

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Philippa C; Adland, Emily; Listgarten, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The potential contribution of HLA-A alleles to viremic control in chronic HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection has been relatively understudied compared with HLA-B. In these studies, we show that HLA-A*7401 is associated with favorable viremic control in extended southern African cohorts of >2100 C......-clade-infected subjects. We present evidence that HLA-A*7401 operates an effect that is independent of HLA-B*5703, with which it is in linkage disequilibrium in some populations, to mediate lowered viremia. We describe a novel statistical approach to detecting additive effects between class I alleles in control of HIV-1...... disease, highlighting improved viremic control in subjects with HLA-A*7401 combined with HLA-B*57. In common with HLA-B alleles that are associated with effective control of viremia, HLA-A*7401 presents highly targeted epitopes in several proteins, including Gag, Pol, Rev, and Nef, of which the Gag...

  7. HLA associations and HLA sharing in recurrent miscarriage : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Tess; Lashley, Lisa E L O; Dekkers, Olaf M.; van Lith, Jan M M; Claas, Frans H J; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M

    2015-01-01

    Problem: The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate whether specific maternal HLA alleles and HLA sharing of couples are associated with the occurrence of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Method of study: A systematic literature search was performed for studies that evaluated the association between

  8. A NOVel ELISPOT assay to quantify HLA-specific B cells in HLA-immunized individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidt, S.; Roelen, D.L.; Vaal, Y.J. de; Kester, M.G.; Eijsink, C.; Thomas, S.; Besouw, N.M. van; Volk, H.D.; Weimar, W.; Claas, F.H.; Mulder, A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the humoral alloimmune response is generally achieved by measuring serum HLA antibodies, which provides no information about the cells involved in the humoral immune response. Therefore, we have developed an HLA-specific B-cell ELISPOT assay allowing for quantification of B cells

  9. HLA class Ib in pregnancy and pregnancy-related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gry; Melsted, Wenna Nascimento; Nilsson, Line Lynge

    2017-01-01

    a range of studies support the functional roles for the HLA class Ib molecules in adult life, especially HLA-G and HLA-F have most intensively been, and were also primarily, studied in relation to reproduction and pregnancy. The expression of HLA class Ib proteins at the feto-maternal interface...... to fertility, reproduction, and pregnancy, and a possible role for these molecules in certain pregnancy complications, such as implantation failure, recurrent spontaneous abortions, and pre-eclampsia. The results from different kinds of studies point toward a role for HLA class Ib, especially HLA-G, throughout...

  10. Panuveíte em artrite indiferenciada HLA-B27 positiva Panuveitis in HLA-B27 positive undifferentiated arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Sérgio Ferreira Santos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Entre os vários tipos de inflamação ocular associados às doenças reumatológicas, a uveíte anterior é particularmente comum nas espondiloartropatias, em especial quando associada à presença do genótipo HLA-B27. Relatou-se o caso de um paciente com artrite indiferenciada HLA-B27 positivo, complicado com panuveíte e vasculite da retina, refratária ao tratamento imunossupressor tradicional, que obteve boa resposta clínica ao uso de anti-TNF-alfa.Among the several types of ocular inflammation associated to the rheumatic diseases, anterior uveitis is particularly common in the spondyloarthropathies, especially when associated to the presence of the HLA-B27 genotype. We report the case of HLA-B27 positive patient with undifferentiated arthritis, complicated with panuveitis and retinal vasculitis, that was refractory to the traditional imunossupressive treatment, and had a good clinical response with anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

  11. HLA-Cw*04 allele associated with nevirapine-induced rash in HIV-infected Thai patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunthanathip Preecha

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high incidence of rash has been reported in HIV-1 patients who received the anti-retroviral drug nevirapine. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms of human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes may play important roles in nevirapine-induced rash. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of different HLA-C alleles on rash associated with nevirapine in patients who started highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART containing nevirapine in Thailand. Results A case-control study was carried out involving HIV-1 patients under treatment at Bamrasnaradura Infectious Diseases Institute, Nonthaburi, Thailand between March 2007 and March 2008. The study included all HIV/AIDS patients being treated with nevirapine-containing regimens. The study population comprised 287 HIV/AIDS patients of whom 248 were nevirapine-tolerant and 39 developed rash after nevirapine treatment. From the nevirapine-tolerant patients, 60 were selected as the control group on the basis of age, sex, and therapy history matched for nevirapine-induced rash cases. We observed significantly more HLA-Cw*04 alleles in nevirapine-induced rash cases than in nevirapine-tolerant group, with frequencies of 20.51% and 7.50%, respectively (P = 0.009. There were no significant differences between the rash and tolerant groups for other HLA-C alleles except for HLA-Cw*03 (P = 0.015. Conclusion This study suggests that HLA-Cw*04 is associated with rash in nevirapine treated Thais. Future screening of patients' HLA may reduce the number of nevirapine-induced rash cases, and patients with alleles associated with nevirapine-induced rash should be started on anti-retroviral therapy without nevirapine.

  12. Confirmation of HLA class II independent type 1 diabetes associations in the major histocompatibility complex including HLA-B and HLA-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, J. M. M.; Walker, N. M.; Clayton, D.; Todd, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim Until recently, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II-independent associations with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) region were not adequately characterized owing to insufficient map coverage, inadequate statistical approaches and strong linkage disequilibrium spanning the entire MHC. Here we test for HLA class II-independent associations in the MHC using fine mapping data generated by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC). Methods We have applied recursive partitioning to the modelling of the class II loci and used stepwise conditional logistic regression to test ~1534 loci between 29 and 34 Mb on chromosome 6p21, typed in 2240 affected sibpair (ASP) families. Results Preliminary analyses confirm that HLA-B (at 31.4 Mb), HLA-A (at 30.0 Mb) are associated with T1D independently of the class II genes HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 (P = 6.0 × 10−17 and 8.8 × 10−13, respectively). In addition, a second class II region of association containing the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs439121, and the class II locus HLA-DPB1, was identified as a T1D susceptibility effect which is independent of HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1 and HLA-B (P = 9.2 × 10−8). A younger age-at-diagnosis of T1D was found for HLA-B*39 (P = 7.6 × 10−6), and HLA-B*38 was protective for T1D. Conclusions These analyses in the T1DGC families replicate our results obtained previously in ~2000 cases and controls and 850 families. Taking both studies together, there is evidence for four T1D-associated regions at 30.0 Mb (HLA-A), 31.4 Mb (HLA-B), 32.5 Mb (rs9268831/HLA-DRA) and 33.2 Mb (rs439121/HLA-DPB1) that are independent of HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQB1. Neither study found evidence of independent associations at HLA-C, HLA-DQA1 loci nor in the UBD/MAS1L or ITPR3 gene regions. These studies show that to find true class II-independent effects, large, well-powered sample collections are required and be genotyped with a dense map of markers. In addition, a robust

  13. Distribution of HLA-B alleles in Mexican Amerindian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Hernández-Pacheco, Guadalupe; Zuñiga, Joaquín; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Pérez-Hernández, Nonanzit; Rangel, Carlos; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; Martínez-Laso, Jorge; Granados, Julio; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2003-02-01

    In the present study we analyzed by PCR-SSO technique the HLA-B gene frequencies in 281 healthy individuals from four Mexican Amerindian populations (66 Mayos, 90 Mazatecans, 72 Nahuas and 53 Teenek). The most frequent alleles in all studied populations were HLA-B35, HLA-B39, and HLA-B40; however, some differences were observed between populations. The HLA-B35 allele was the most frequent in three of the four populations studied (Mayos, Nahuas and Teenek), whereas in Mazatecans the most frequent allele was HLA-B39. HLA-B40 presented frequencies higher than 10% in all groups. On the other hand, only Mayos presented an HLA-B51 gene frequency higher than 10%. When comparisons were made, important differences between groups were observed. The Teenek group presented an increased frequency of HLA-B35 when compared to Mazatecans and the HLA-B52 allele was increased in Nahuas and Teenek when compared to Mayos. An increased frequency of HLA-B39 was observed in Mazatecans when compared to Nahuas, Mayos and Teenek. Also, an increased frequency of HLA-B51 was observed in Mayos when compared to Mazatecans and Nahuas. These data corroborate the restricted polymorphism of HLA-B alleles and the high frequency of HLA-B35, HLA-B39 and HLA-B40 alleles in autochthonous American populations. In spite of the restriction in this polymorphism, differences in frequencies of HLA-B alleles could be helpful in distinguishing each of these populations.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells upregulate Treg cells via sHLA-G in SLE patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen; Liang, Jun; Yao, Genhong; Chen, Haifeng; Shi, Bingyu; Zhang, Zhuoya; Zhao, Cheng; Zhang, Huayong; Sun, Lingyun

    2017-03-01

    Soluble human leukocyte antigen-G (sHLA-G) is a non-classical HLA class I molecule, exhibiting strong immunosuppressive properties by inducing the differentiation of T regulatory cells (Treg). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation alleviates disease progression in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. However, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. To explore whether sHLA-G is involved in upregulating effects of MSCs on Treg, which contributes to therapeutic effects of MSCs transplantation in SLE. The serum sHLA-G levels of SLE patients and healthy controls were detected by ELISA. The percentages of peripheral blood CD4+ILT2+, CD8+ILT2+, CD19+ILT2+ cells and Treg cells were examined by flow cytometry. Ten patients with active SLE, refractory to conventional therapies, were infused with umbilical cord derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) and serum sHLA-G was measured 24h and 1month after infusion. The mice were divided into three groups: C57BL/6 mice, B6.MRL-Fas(lpr) mice infused with phosphate buffer saline (PBS), and B6.MRL-Fas(lpr) mice infused with bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs). Then, the concentrations of serum Qa-2 were detected. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from SLE patients and co-cultured with UC-MSCs for 3days at different ratios (50:1, 10:1, and 2:1) with or without HLA-G antibody, and the frequencies of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells were then determined by flow cytometry. The concentrations of serum sHLA-G were comparable between SLE patients and healthy controls. However, there was a negative correlation between sHLA-G levels and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) scores in active SLE patients (SLEDAI>4). We found that serum sHLA-G levels were negatively correlated with blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine and 24-hour urine protein in SLE patients. The sHLA-G levels were significantly lower in SLE patients with renal involvement than those without renal involvement. The expression of ILT2 on CD4+ T cells from SLE patients

  15. Genes in the HLA region indicative for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, J.; Rozemuller, E.H.; Weide, P. van der; Oka, A.; Slootweg, P.J.; Inoko, H.; Tilanus, M.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of genes in the HLA region are directly or indirectly involved in immunological functions. They comprise HLA, HLA-related and non-HLA-related genes. Aberrant HLA expression patterns, including heterogeneous and negative HLA expression, are observed in specimens from head and neck

  16. HLA-DM: arbiter conformationis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The recognition by CD4(+) T cells of peptides bound to class II MHC (MHCII) molecules expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells is a key step in the initiation of an adaptive immune response. Presentation of peptides is the outcome of an intracellular selection process occurring in dedicated endosomal compartments involving, among others, an MHCII-like molecule named HLA-DM (DM). The impact of DM on the epitope selection machinery has been known for more than 15 years. However, the mechanism by which DM skews the presented repertoire in favour of kinetically stable complexes has remained elusive. Here, a review of the most recent observations in the field is presented, pointing to the possibility that DM decides the survival of a peptide-MHCII complex (pMHCII) on the basis of its conformational flexibility, which is a function of the 'tightness' of interaction between the peptide and the MHCII at a specific region of the binding site. © 2012 The Author. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Molecular and cellular analyses of HLA class II-associated susceptibility to autoimmune diseases in the Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y; Ito, H; Fujii, S; Tabata, H; Tokano, Y; Chen, Y Z; Matsuda, I; Mitsuya, H; Kira, J; Hashimoto, H; Senju, S; Matsushita, S

    2001-06-01

    Abstract It is well known that individuals who are positive for particular HLA class II alleles show a high risk of developing autoimmune diseases. HLA class II molecules expressed on antigen-presenting cells present antigenic peptides to CD4(+) T cells. Their extensive polymorphism affects the structures of peptides bound to HLA class II molecules to create individual differences in immune responses to antigenic peptides. In order to gain a better understanding of mechanisms of the association between HLA class II alleles and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases, it is important to identify self-peptides presented by disease-susceptible HLA class II molecules and triggering disease-causative T cells. Many of the autoimmune diseases are observed in all ethnic groups, whereas the incidence of diseases, clinical manifestations and disease-susceptible HLA class II alleles are different among various ethnic groups for some autoimmune diseases. These phenomena suggest that differences in autoimmune self-peptide(s) in the context of disease-susceptible HLA class II molecules may cause these differences. Therefore, comparisons among disease-susceptible HLA class II alleles, autoantigenic peptides, and clinical manifestations of autoimmune diseases in different ethnic groups would be helpful in elucidating the pathogenesis of the diseases. In this review, we describe our recent findings on (1) the uniqueness of both clinical manifestations and the HLA-linked genetic background of Asian-type (opticospinal form) multiple sclerosis, (2) the characteristics of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) or β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) autoreactive T cells in Japanese patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or anti-β2-GPI antibody-associated autoimmunity, respectively, and (3) the generation of an efficient delivery system of peptides to the HLA class II-restricted antigen presentation path-way by utilizing a class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP

  18. Endogenous HLA class II epitopes that are immunogenic in vivo show distinct behavior toward HLA-DM and its natural inhibitor HLA-DO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Anita N; van der Meijden, Edith D; Honders, Maria W; Goeman, Jelle J; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Griffioen, Marieke

    2012-10-18

    CD4(+) T cells play a central role in adaptive immunity. The acknowledgment of their cytolytic effector function and the finding that endogenous antigens can enter the HLA class II processing pathway make CD4(+) T cells promising tools for immunotherapy. Expression of HLA class II and endogenous antigen, however, does not always correlate with T-cell recognition. We therefore investigated processing and presentation of endogenous HLA class II epitopes that induced CD4(+) T cells during in vivo immune responses. We demonstrate that the peptide editor HLA-DM allowed antigen presentation of some (DM-resistant antigens) but abolished surface expression of other natural HLA class II epitopes (DM-sensitive antigens). DM sensitivity was shown to be epitope specific, mediated via interaction between HLA-DM and the HLA-DR restriction molecule, and reversible by HLA-DO. Because of the restricted expression of HLA-DO, presentation of DM-sensitive antigens was limited to professional antigen-presenting cells, whereas DM-resistant epitopes were expressed on all HLA class II-expressing cells. In conclusion, our data provide novel insights into the presentation of endogenous HLA class II epitopes and identify intracellular antigen processing and presentation as a critical factor for CD4(+) T-cell recognition. This opens perspectives to exploit selective processing capacities as a new approach for targeted immunotherapy.

  19. HLA-DR4 antigen and idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy susceptibility: a meta-analysis involving 11,761 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, B; Ni, H; Geshang, Q; Li, Y; Shen, W; Shi, H

    2011-02-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC) has been hypothesized as a multifactorial disorder initiated by an environment trigger in individuals with predisposing human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Published data on the association between HLA-DR4 antigen and IDC risk are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis was performed. Studies in English-language articles were identified by a search of PubMed and Embase database (inception to June 2010). A total of 19 case-control studies including 1378 cases and 10,383 controls provided data on the association between HLA-DR4 antigen and genetic susceptibility to IDC. Overall, statistically elevated frequency of HLA-DR4 allele [OR (odds ratio), 1.58; 95% CI (confidence interval), 1.21-2.07; P = 0.0009] was found in patients with IDC compared with controls. When stratified by myocardial biopsy or non-biopsy cases, statistically increased risks were found for IDC in both subgroups. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, significantly increased risk was found among Europeans from 12 case-control studies (OR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.11-2.12; P = 0.009). In conclusion, our results suggest that HLA-DR4 antigen is a low-penetrant risk factor for developing IDC in Europeans. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Signal transduction by HLA class II antigens expressed on activated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Martin, P J; Schieven, G L

    1991-01-01

    Human T cells express HLA class II antigens upon activation. Although activated, class II+ T cells can present alloantigens under certain circumstances, the functional role of class II antigens on activated T cells remains largely unknown. Here, we report that cross-linking of HLA-DR molecules...... after cross-linking CD4. Ligation of CD4 and class II molecules generated a synergistic effect of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration response that required an interaction between the molecules on the cell surface. Since class II is the natural ligand for CD4, the present data suggest that class...... expressed on allospecific, CD4+ T clones and cell lines can function as transduction elements that trigger rapid cellular responses including tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins and mobilization of Ca2+ from internal stores. The proteins phosphorylated on tyrosine were distinct from those observed...

  1. Contribution of a Non-classical HLA Gene, HLA-DOA, to the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Ikari, Katsunori; Terao, Chikashi; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Higasa, Koichiro; Akiyama, Masato; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kanai, Masahiro; Hirata, Jun; Suita, Naomasa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Xu, Huji; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Takahashi, Atsushi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Matsuda, Koichi; Momohara, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Kubo, Michiaki; Brown, Matthew A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-04

    Despite the progress in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) causal variant mapping, independent localization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) risk from classical HLA genes is challenging. Here, we conducted a large-scale MHC fine-mapping analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a Japanese population (6,244 RA cases and 23,731 controls) population by using HLA imputation, followed by a multi-ethnic validation study including east Asian and European populations (n = 7,097 and 23,149, respectively). Our study identified an independent risk of a synonymous mutation at HLA-DOA, a non-classical HLA gene, on anti-citrullinated protein autoantibody (ACPA)-positive RA risk (p = 1.4 × 10(-9)), which demonstrated a cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) effect on HLA-DOA expression. Trans-ethnic comparison revealed different linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in HLA-DOA and HLA-DRB1, explaining the observed HLA-DOA variant risk heterogeneity among ethnicities, which was most evident in the Japanese population. Although previous HLA fine-mapping studies have identified amino acid polymorphisms of the classical HLA genes as driving genetic susceptibility to disease, our study additionally identifies the dosage contribution of a non-classical HLA gene to disease etiology. Our study contributes to the understanding of HLA immunology in human diseases and suggests the value of incorporating additional ancestry in MHC fine-mapping. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G during pregnancy part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Klitkou, Louise; Christiansen, Ole B

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a class Ib molecule with restricted tissue distribution expressed on the extra-villous trophoblast and seems to have immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy. Studies have linked HLA-G polymorphisms to pregnancy complications such as preeclampsia and recurrent...... miscarriage. Levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in blood plasma from non-pregnant donors seem to be associated with these polymorphisms. In the current study, we have genotyped 246 mothers and their offspring for HLA-G polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) and measured sHLA-G in maternal blood...... plasma samples from gestational week 20 and at term, as well as in fetal umbilical cord blood samples. This is the first large study simultaneously performing HLA-G genotyping of mother and offspring and measuring sHLA-G in both maternal and umbilical cord blood. The results showed that increasing...

  3. HLA markers in familial Lichen sclerosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanian, Flavia M N P; Marques, Maria Teresa Q; Matos, Haroldo J; Pontes, Luciane F S; Porto, Luis Cristóvão S; Azevedo, Lucia M S; Filgueira, Absalom L

    2006-10-01

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) has been identified with increased frequency in families,often associated with HLA markers, mainly DQ7. A genetic co-etiology seems likely in this setting. Moreover, there is an association of LS with autoimmune disorders, such as the presence of anti-thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO), a hallmark of autoimmune thyroid diseases. In 3 families affected by LS, we verified their HLA markers, and identified previously undiagnosed cases of LS and autoimmune disorders. 30 individuals were examined with history, skin biopsy, HLA class I and II typing by PCR-SSP, and measurement of anti-TPO, free thyroxine and thyroidstimulating hormones (TSH) levels. There were 8 cases of LS, 50 % of them anti-TPO+. Autoimmune disorders were found in 40 % (total) and in 87.5 % of those affected. Most common HLA markers were B*15, B*57, CW*03, CW*07, CW*18, DRB1*04, DRB1*07, DRB4*. The three latter have been previously associated with LS. New cases of LS and autoimmune disorders can be detected in first degree relatives of patients with LS. The presence of anti-TPO antibodies strongly suggests autoimmune thyroiditis. There is intra-familial association between the haplotype HLA-B*15 -DRB1*04 -DRB4* and anti-TPO,emphasizing their link with thyroiditis. New familial approaches might help to make clear the pathogenesis of LS and its association with autoimmune diseases.

  4. Peptide motif analysis predicts alphaviruses as triggers for rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeboom, Charissa

    2015-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) develops in response to both genetic and environmental factors. The strongest genetic determinant is HLA-DR, where polymorphisms within the P4 and P6 binding pockets confer elevated risk. However, low disease concordance across monozygotic twin pairs underscores the importance of an environmental factor, probably infectious. The goal of this investigation was to predict the microorganism most likely to interact with HLA-DR to trigger RA under the molecular mimicry hypothesis. A set of 185 structural proteins from viruses or intracellular bacteria was scanned for regions of sequence homology with a collagen peptide that binds preferentially to DR4; candidates were then evaluated against a motif required for T cell cross-reactivity. The plausibility of the predicted agent was evaluated by comparison of microbial prevalence patterns to epidemiological characteristics of RA. Peptides from alphavirus capsid proteins provided the closest fit. Variations in the P6 position suggest that the HLA binding preference may vary by species, with Ross River virus, Chikungunya virus, and Mayaro virus peptides binding preferentially to DR4, and peptides from Sindbis/Ockelbo virus showing stronger affinity to DR1. The predicted HLA preference is supported by epidemiological studies of post-infection chronic arthralgia. Parallels between the cytokine profiles of RA and chronic alphavirus infection are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  6. Association between HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chien Tsai

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality. Genes whose products play a critical role in regulation of the immune response include the HLA antigen and cytokine families of genes. Oral cancer is common in men in developing countries, and its frequency is increased by using betel-quid, tobacco, and alcohol. The association between certain HLA Class I and Class II haplotypes and cancer has been documented in a variety of tumors. There was no previous data concerning the association of specific HLA Class II DQA1, DQB1 alleles, or haplotypes with oral cancer patients. In this study, we enrolled 134 Taiwanese patients with histologically confirmed oral cancer and 268 age- and gender-matched healthy Taiwanese adults as control group to investigate the association between HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies and oral cancer patients by using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. We found that both HLA-DQA1* and HLA-DQB1* allele frequencies in oral cancer patients revealed no significant difference from those of control groups. Haplotype frequencies of HLA*DQA1-0103-DQB1*0601 in oral cancer patients were significantly lower than those of the control group (odds ratio: 0.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.054–0.583, pc=0.02. Our data suggest that HLA DQA1*0103-DQB1*0601 haplotype may be protective with regard to the development of oral cancer.

  7. Indirect recognition of HLA epitopes in solid organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, C.C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Alloreactivity due to HLA mismatches between donor and recipient remains the major limiting factor in successful graft outcome after solid organ transplantation. However, the immunogenicity of individual HLA mismatches is highly variable. Therefore, epitope-based HLA matching may be a sophisticated

  8. New insights into HLA-G mediated tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodio, G; Sales de Albuquerque, R; Gregori, S

    2014-09-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen G (HLA-G) is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule with well-characterized immunomodulatory activities. HLA-G was first described as a regulatory molecule that allows the fetus to elude the maternal immune response. In the last decade it has become evident that HLA-G is involved in modulating both innate and adaptive immune responses, in maintaining tolerance in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases and after transplantation, and in promoting immune escape in cancer and infectious diseases. HLA-G exerts its modulatory/regulatory functions directly by interacting with specific inhibitory receptors. The expression of HLA-G is finely tuned by genetic variations in the noncoding region of the locus. The recent discovery of dendritic cells-10 (DC-10) as naturally occurring HLA-G-expressing dendritic cells opens new perspectives in the identification of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying HLA-G-mediated tolerance. An overview on the HLA-G-mediated inhibition of innate and adaptive immune cells, on the genetic influence on HLA-G expression, and on HLA-G-expressing DC-10 is presented. Moreover, we discuss the central and critical role of DC-10 in the HLA-G-mediated tolerance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. HLA-G polymorphisms in couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Hylenius, S; Hoegh, A M

    2002-01-01

    not been conclusive. Furthermore, these antigens are not expressed in the placenta with the exception of HLA-C. However, HLA-G is expressed on especially invasive cytotrophoblasts and exists in both membrane and soluble forms. HLA-G may be involved in materno-fetal tolerance. Therefore, 61 RSA couples...

  10. Maternal HL-A antibodies and fetal sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, K; Festenstein, H

    1974-10-26

    In a study of 960 pregnancies a significantly higher male to female birth ratio was found among primigravidae who developed HL-A antibodies, which was highest where these were monospecific. In the whole group male births predominated in women with antibodies to HL-A 1 and 11 (first locus) and HL-A 5, 12, and 13 and TYT (second locus).

  11. HLA Type Inference via Haplotypes Identical by Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, Manu N.; Gusev, Alexander; Pe'Er, Itsik

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) genes play a major role in adaptive immune response and are used to differentiate self antigens from non self ones. HLA genes are hyper variable with nearly every locus harboring over a dozen alleles. This variation plays an important role in susceptibility to multiple autoimmune diseases and needs to be matched on for organ transplantation. Unfortunately, HLA typing by serological methods is time consuming and expensive compared to high throughput Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) data. We present a new computational method to infer per-locus HLA types using shared segments Identical By Descent (IBD), inferred from SNP genotype data. IBD information is modeled as graph where shared haplotypes are explored among clusters of individuals with known and unknown HLA types to identify the latter. We analyze performance of the method in a previously typed subset of the HapMap population, achieving accuracy of 96% in HLA-A, 94% in HLA-B, 95% in HLA-C, 77% in HLA-DR1, 93% in HLA-DQA1 and 90% in HLA-DQB1 genes. We compare our method to a tag SNP based approach and demonstrate higher sensitivity and specificity. Our method demonstrates the power of using shared haplotype segments for large-scale imputation at the HLA locus.

  12. Process modeling of a HLA research lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Bruna G. C.; Sena, Alexandre C.; Silva, Dilson; Marzulo, Leandro A. J.

    2017-11-01

    Bioinformatics has provided tremendous breakthroughs in the field of molecular biology. All this evolution has generated a large volume of biological data that increasingly require the use of computing for analysis and storage of this information. The identification of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes is critical to the success of organ transplants in humans. HLA typing involves not only laboratory tests but also DNA sequencing, with the participation of several professionals responsible for different stages of the process. Thus, the objective of this paper is to map the main steps in HLA typing in a laboratory specialized in performing such procedures, analyzing each process and proposing solutions to speed up the these steps, avoiding mistakes.

  13. Hubble Legacy Archive (HLA) Pipeline Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rachel E.; Casertano, S.; Lindsay, K.

    2013-01-01

    The HLA maintains a strong commitment to continuing improvement of our Hubble Space Telescope data processing pipelines with the goal of generating better science-ready data products. The HLA image processing pipeline is transitioning from the use of MultiDrizzle to AstroDrizzle for image registration and combination. It is expected that this change will allow for the creation of higher quality science products with improved astrometric solutions. Headerlets, a newly developed tool for AstroDrizzle, will be utilized and made available to simplify access to multiple astrometric solutions for a given data set. The capabilities of AstroDrizzle will allow for functionally simplified data processing, standardizing and streamlining the data reduction process and making it easier for users to reproduce our results. We are beginning with the HLA WFC3 data processing pipeline, and then plan to extend its application to other HST instrument data.

  14. Association study between HLA-DRB, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and breast cancer in Iranian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirzargar AA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Based on the reports, high frequency of special alleles of HLA class II genes might be associated with susceptibility to or protective from a particular cancer. These alleles might vary depending on the geographical region. Here we investigate the association between alleles of HLA class II genes and breast cancer in Iranian women."n"nMethods: 100 patients with pathologically proved breast cancer who referred to Cancer Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran, were divided to two groups based on ages (40 years old and less/ or more than 40 years old and were randomly selected and compared with a group of 80 healthy blood donor subjects. HLA class II alleles were determined by amplification of DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR method followed by HLA-typing using sequence-specific primer (SSP for each allele."n"nResults: The most frequent alleles in the DR and DQ regions in group 1 (40 years old and less in comparison with control group were HLA-DQA1*0301 (p=0.002 and HLA-DQB1*0302 (p>0.05. In contrast HLA-DQA1*0505 (p=0.004 had significantly lower frequency in this group compared with control group. Patients of group two (more than 40 years old had a higher frequencies of HLA

  15. HLA-B*13:01 and the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F-R; Liu, H; Irwanto, A; Fu, X-A; Li, Y; Yu, G-Q; Yu, Y-X; Chen, M-F; Low, H-Q; Li, J-H; Bao, F-F; Foo, J-N; Bei, J-X; Jia, X-M; Liu, J; Liany, H; Wang, N; Niu, G-Y; Wang, Z-Z; Shi, B-Q; Tian, H-Q; Liu, H-X; Ma, S-S; Zhou, Y; You, J-B; Yang, Q; Wang, C; Chu, T-S; Liu, D-C; Yu, X-L; Sun, Y-H; Ning, Y; Wei, Z-H; Chen, S-L; Chen, X-C; Zhang, Z-X; Liu, Y-X; Pulit, S L; Wu, W-B; Zheng, Z-Y; Yang, R-D; Long, H; Liu, Z-S; Wang, J-Q; Li, M; Zhang, L-H; Wang, H; Wang, L-M; Xiao, P; Li, J-L; Huang, Z-M; Huang, J-X; Li, Z; Liu, J; Xiong, L; Yang, J; Wang, X-D; Yu, D-B; Lu, X-M; Zhou, G-Z; Yan, L-B; Shen, J-P; Zhang, G-C; Zeng, Y-X; de Bakker, P I W; Chen, S-M; Liu, J-J

    2013-10-24

    Dapsone is used in the treatment of infections and inflammatory diseases. The dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome, which is associated with a reported mortality of 9.9%, develops in about 0.5 to 3.6% of persons treated with the drug. Currently, no tests are available to predict the risk of the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome. We performed a genomewide association study involving 872 participants who had received dapsone as part of multidrug therapy for leprosy (39 participants with the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome and 833 controls), using log-additive tests of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and imputed HLA molecules. For a replication analysis, we genotyped 24 SNPs in an additional 31 participants with the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome and 1089 controls and performed next-generation sequencing for HLA-B and HLA-C typing at four-digit resolution in an independent series of 37 participants with the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome and 201 controls. Genomewide association analysis showed that SNP rs2844573, located between the HLA-B and MICA loci, was significantly associated with the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome among patients with leprosy (odds ratio, 6.18; P=3.84×10(-13)). HLA-B*13:01 was confirmed to be a risk factor for the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome (odds ratio, 20.53; P=6.84×10(-25)). The presence of HLA-B*13:01 had a sensitivity of 85.5% and a specificity of 85.7% as a predictor of the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome, and its absence was associated with a reduction in risk by a factor of 7 (from 1.4% to 0.2%). HLA-B*13:01 is present in about 2 to 20% of Chinese persons, 1.5% of Japanese persons, 1 to 12% of Indians, and 2 to 4% of Southeast Asians but is largely absent in Europeans and Africans. HLA-B*13:01 was associated with the development of the dapsone hypersensitivity syndrome among patients with leprosy. (Funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China and others.).

  16. Measuring ambiguity in HLA typing methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Paunić

    Full Text Available In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, donor selection is based primarily on matching donor and patient HLA genes. These genes are highly polymorphic and their typing can result in exact allele assignment at each gene (the resolution at which patients and donors are matched, but it can also result in a set of ambiguous assignments, depending on the typing methodology used. To facilitate rapid identification of matched donors, registries employ statistical algorithms to infer HLA alleles from ambiguous genotypes. Linkage disequilibrium information encapsulated in haplotype frequencies is used to facilitate prediction of the most likely haplotype assignment. An HLA typing with less ambiguity produces fewer high-probability haplotypes and a more reliable prediction. We estimated ambiguity for several HLA typing methods across four continental populations using an information theory-based measure, Shannon's entropy. We used allele and haplotype frequencies to calculate entropy for different sets of 1,000 subjects with simulated HLA typing. Using allele frequencies we calculated an average entropy in Caucasians of 1.65 for serology, 1.06 for allele family level, 0.49 for a 2002-era SSO kit, and 0.076 for single-pass SBT. When using haplotype frequencies in entropy calculations, we found average entropies of 0.72 for serology, 0.73 for allele family level, 0.05 for SSO, and 0.002 for single-pass SBT. Application of haplotype frequencies further reduces HLA typing ambiguity. We also estimated expected confirmatory typing mismatch rates for simulated subjects. In a hypothetical registry with all donors typed using the same method, the entropy values based on haplotype frequencies correspond to confirmatory typing mismatch rates of 1.31% for SSO versus only 0.08% for SBT. Intermediate-resolution single-pass SBT contains the least ambiguity of the methods we evaluated and therefore the most certainty in allele prediction. The presented measure

  17. HLA-G allelic variants are associated with differences in the HLA-G mRNA isoform profile and HLA-G mRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Hylenius, Sine; Rørbye, Christina

    2003-01-01

    HLA-G polymorphisms and the mRNA levels of the different alternatively spliced HLA-G isoforms in first trimester trophoblast cell populations is reported. Several alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA isoforms, including a 14-bp polymorphism in the 3'UTR end (exon 8) of the HLA-G gene, are expressed......During pregnancy, the human extra-villous trophoblast in the contact zone between maternal and fetal tissue in the placenta does not express the classical MHC class I and II molecules. Instead, HLA-G and -C, and possibly HLA-E, are expressed. HLA-G may modulate the immunological relationship...... between mother and fetus in several ways. Finally, the expression of membrane-bound HLA-G and soluble HLA-G has been proposed to influence the outcome of pregnancy, and an aberrant HLA-G expression in pre-eclamptic placentas and spontaneous abortions has been reported. Here, an association between certain...

  18. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  19. Expression of HLA Class I and HLA Class II by Tumor Cells in Chinese Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Xin; van den Berg, Anke; Gao, Zifen; Visser, Lydia; Nolte, Ilja; Vos, Hans; Hepkema, Bouke; Kooistra, Wierd; Poppema, Sibrand; Diepstra, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Background: In Caucasian populations, the tumor cells of Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-positive classical Hodgkin Lymphomas (cHL) patients more frequently express HLA class I and HLA class II molecules compared to EBV-negative cHL patients. HLA expression (in relation to EBV) in Asian cHL patients has

  20. HLA profile in patients with AIDS and tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Fernando de Castro Figueiredo

    Full Text Available Studies carried out in various populations have reported an association between some HLA specificities and susceptibility to tuberculosis. We investigated the class I and class II HLA profile in Brazilian patients of various ethnic backgrounds who had AIDS and tuberculosis. Twenty-two adult patients with AIDS and tuberculosis (Group I, 103 patients with AIDS without tuberculosis (Group II and 423 healthy individuals not infected with HIV (Group III were evaluated. Diagnosis of HIV infection was made by ELISA, confirmed by a gelatin particle agglutination test. Diagnosis of tuberculosis was made based on clinical/radiological presentation and direct bacilloscopy or clinical specimen cultures. Class I antigens were typed by microlymphotoxicity. Class II alleles were characterized by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Differences in frequency of HLA specificities between groups were found in the following antigens/alleles: Group I x Group II: HLA-A31 - p=0.026; HLA-B41 - p= 0.037; HLA-DRB1*10 - p=0.037; HLA-DQB1*5 - p=0.009. Group I x Group III (control: HLA-A31 - p = 0.000008; odds ratio (OR=31.75; HLA-B41 - p=0.003; HLA-DQB1*5 - p=0.02. HLA-A31 and HLA-B41 antigens and the HLA-DRB1*10 and HLA-DQB1*05 alleles were over-represented in patients with AIDS and tuberculosis (Group I, suggesting that these HLA molecules are associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis in Brazilian patients with AIDS.

  1. Human thymic epithelial cells express functional HLA-DP molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Röpke, C; Nielsen, M

    1996-01-01

    T lymphocytes, we examined whether human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) expressed HLA-DP molecules. We present evidence that TEC obtained from short time culture express low but significant levels of HLA-DP molecules. The expression of HLA-DP molecules was comparable to or higher than the expression...... of HLA-DP allospecific primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) CD4 T cell lines. IFN-gamma treatment strongly upregulated the HLA-DP allospecific PLT responses whereas other PLT responses remained largely unchanged. In conclusion, these data indicate that human thymus epithelial cells express significant levels...

  2. HLA Alleles are Genetic Markers for Susceptibility and Resistance towards Leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Escamilla-Tilch, Monica; Frías-Castro, Luis Octavio; Romero-Quintana, Geovanni; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Granados, Julio; Arambula Meraz, Eliakym; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Khader, Shabaana Abdul; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2017-01-01

    Despite the use of multidrug therapy, leprosy remains endemic in some countries. The association of several human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and gene polymorphisms with leprosy has been demonstrated in many populations, but the major immune contributors associated to the spectrum of leprosy have not been defined yet. In this study, genotyping of HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ alleles was performed in leprosy patients (n = 113) and control subjects (n = 117) from the region with the highest incidence for the disease in México. The odds of developing leprosy and lepromatous subtype were 2.12- and 2.74-fold higher in carriers of HLA-A*28, and 2.48- and 4.14-fold higher for leprosy and dimorphic subtype in carriers of DQB1*06. Interestingly, DQB1*07 was overrepresented in healthy individuals, compared to patients with leprosy (OR = 0.08) and the lepromatous subtype (OR = 0.06). These results suggest that HLA-A*28 is a marker for predisposition to leprosy and the lepromatous subtype and DQB1*06 to leprosy and the dimorphic subtype, while DQB1*07 might be a resistance marker in this Mestizo population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  3. Narcolepsy associated with primary temporal lobe B-cells lymphoma in a HLA DR2 negative subject.

    OpenAIRE

    Onofrj, M; Curatola, L; Ferracci, F; Fulgente, T

    1992-01-01

    Narcolepsy and cataplexy began one year before treatment of a left mid-temporal primary B-cells lymphoma in a HLA DR2 negative man. Treatment with radio therapy and immunosuppression induced regression of the lymphoma and disappearance of narcolepsy and cataplexy.

  4. Au25 cluster functionalized metal-organic nanostructures for magnetically targeted photodynamic/photothermal therapy triggered by single wavelength 808 nm near-infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Yang, Guixin; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; An, Guanghui; Dai, Yunlu; Lv, Ruichan; Yang, Piaoping

    2015-11-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) light-induced cancer therapy has gained considerable interest, but pure inorganic anti-cancer platforms usually suffer from degradation issues. Here, we designed metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of Fe3O4/ZIF-8-Au25 (IZA) nanospheres through a green and economic procedure. The encapsulated Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only produce hyperthemal effects upon NIR light irradiation to effectively kill tumor cells, but also present targeting and MRI imaging capability. More importantly, the attached ultrasmall Au25(SR)18- clusters (about 2.5 nm) produce highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) to cause photodynamic effects through direct sensitization under NIR light irradiation. Furthermore, the Au25(SR)18- clusters also give a hand to the hyperthemal effect as photothermal fortifiers. This nanoplatform exhibits high biocompatibility and an enhanced synergistic therapeutic effect superior to any single therapy, as verified by in vitro and in vivo assay. This image-guided therapy based on a metal-organic framework may stimulate interest in developing other kinds of metal-organic materials with multifunctionality for tumor diagnosis and therapy.Near-infrared (NIR) light-induced cancer therapy has gained considerable interest, but pure inorganic anti-cancer platforms usually suffer from degradation issues. Here, we designed metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) of Fe3O4/ZIF-8-Au25 (IZA) nanospheres through a green and economic procedure. The encapsulated Fe3O4 nanocrystals not only produce hyperthemal effects upon NIR light irradiation to effectively kill tumor cells, but also present targeting and MRI imaging capability. More importantly, the attached ultrasmall Au25(SR)18- clusters (about 2.5 nm) produce highly reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) to cause photodynamic effects through direct sensitization under NIR light irradiation. Furthermore, the Au25(SR)18- clusters also give a hand to the hyperthemal effect as photothermal fortifiers. This nanoplatform exhibits high

  5. HLA polymorphism in the Havasupai: Evidence for balancing selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markow, T.; Hedrick, P.W.; Armstrong, C.; Martin, J. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)); Zuerlein, K. (Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ (United States)); Vyvial, T.; Danilov, J.

    1993-10-01

    The characterization and analysis of genetic variation at the HLA loci provides important insight for population geneticists trying to understand the evolutionary forces that have shaped human populations. This study describes the HLA-A and HLA-B loci serotyping and statistical analysis on an isolated Native American population, the Havasupai of Arizona. Four alleles at the HLA-A locus were identified, while eight alleles were found at the HLA-B locus. These variants were present as 20 of 32 potential two-locus haplotypes, with five of the six most common haplotypes exhibiting high positive linkage disequilibrium. Significant homozygote deficiency (heterozygosity excess) was detected both at HLA-A and at HLA-B. This deviation from Hardy-Weinberg proportions was not attributable to nonselective causes such as different alleles at both HLA-A and HLA-B was more even than expected from neutrality theory; that is, the observed Hardy-Weinberg homozygosity was only 62.4% of that expected under neutrality. These observations suggest that balancing selection is of major importance in maintaining genetic variation at HLA-A and HLA-B. 52 refs., 5 tabs.

  6. Mechanisms of peptide repertoire selection by HLA-DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pos, Wouter; Sethi, Dhruv K; Wucherpfennig, Kai W

    2013-10-01

    Recently, crystal structures of key complexes in antigen presentation have been reported. HLA-DM functions in antigen presentation by catalyzing dissociation of an invariant chain remnant from the peptide binding groove and stabilizing empty MHC class II proteins in a peptide-receptive conformation. The crystal structure of a MHC class II-HLA-DM complex explains how HLA-DM stabilizes an otherwise short-lived transition state and promotes a rapid peptide exchange process that favors the highest-affinity ligands. HLA-DO has sequence similarity with MHC class II molecules yet inhibits antigen presentation. The structure of the HLA-DO-HLA-DM complex shows that it blocks HLA-DM activity as a substrate mimic. Alterations in the efficiency of DM-mediated peptide selection may contribute to autoimmune pathologies, which will be an exciting area for future investigation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. HLA-G gene polymorphism segregation within CEPH reference families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirszenbaum, M; Djoulah, S; Hors, J; Le Gall, I; de Oliveira, E B; Prost, S; Dausset, J; Carosella, E D

    1997-04-01

    HLA-G, a nonclassical HLA class I antigen, presents tissue-restricted expression on human trophoblasts and may play an important role in immune tolerance of mother-versus-fetus. In this work we have demonstrated extensive HLA-G genomic polymorphism within three CEPH reference families, by PCR-SSCP analysis and direct sequencing. Among six unrelated parents we assigned eight HLA-G alleles, seven of which are new. We observed the segregation of HLA-G alleles of heterozygous parents among their offspring that matched the segregation of the HLA class I haplotypes. Only one of the mutations observed was found to be nonsynonymous indicating low polymorphism of the HLA-G molecule.

  8. Preimplantation HLA typing for stem cell transplantation treatment of hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anver Kuliev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD for HLA typing is steadily becoming an option for at risk couples with thalassemic children, requiring HLA matched bone marrow transplantation treatment. The paper presents the world’s largest PGD experience of 475 cases for over 2 dozens thalassemia mutations, resulting in birth of 132 unaffected children. A total of 146 cases were performed together with preimplantation HLA typing, resulting in detection and transfer of HLA matched unaffected embryos in 83 of them, yielding the birth of 16 HLA matched children, potential donors for their affected siblings. The presented experience of HLA matched stem cell transplantation for thalassemia, following PGD demonstrated a successful hematopoietic reconstitution both for younger and older patients. The data show that PGD is an efficient approach for HLA matched stem cell transplantation treatment for thalassemia.

  9. HLA: The Major Histocompatibility Complex of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    purpura . This susceptibility probably Australia, the haplotype HLA-Bw22, SB45 was found also relates to defective handling of immune com- to be increased...for pathogens. For instance, the Duffy red cell iae and other enteric bacteria (Shigella, Yersinia) antigen acts as a receptor for malarial parasites

  10. hTERT inhibition triggers Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle and apoptosis in immortalized and transformed B cells: a basis for new therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunco, Silvia; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Keppel, Sonia; Celeghin, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Dal Col, Jessica; Mastorci, Katy; De Rossi, Anita

    2013-04-15

    Induction of viral lytic cycle, which induces death of host cells, may constitute a useful adjunct to current therapeutic regimens for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven malignancies. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), essential for the oncogenic process, may modulate the switch from latent to lytic infection. The possible therapeutic role of hTERT inhibition combined with antiviral drugs was investigated. EBV-negative BL41 and convertant EBV-positive BL41/B95.8 Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines and lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) were infected with retroviral vector encoding short hairpin RNA (shRNA) anti-hTERT and cultured with or without the prodrug ganciclovir. The effects on EBV lytic replication, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were characterized. hTERT silencing by shRNA induced the expression of BZLF1, EA-D, and gp350 EBV lytic proteins and triggered a complete lytic cycle. This effect was associated with downregulation of BATF, a negative regulator of BZLF1 transcription. hTERT silencing also resulted in antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects. In particular, hTERT inhibition induced an accumulation of cells in the S-phase, an effect likely due to the dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1, an AKT1-dependent substrate, which results in a decreased availability of proteins needed for cell-cycle progression. Besides inducing cell death through activation of complete EBV lytic replication, hTERT inhibition triggered AKT1/FOXO3/NOXA-dependent apoptosis in EBV-positive and -negative Burkitt's lymphoma cells. Finally, ganciclovir enhanced the apoptotic effect induced by hTERT inhibition in EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphomas and LCLs. These results suggest that combination of antiviral drugs with strategies able to inhibit hTERT expression may result in therapeutically relevant effects in patients with EBV-related malignancies.

  11. The Role of HLA-G Molecule and HLA-G Gene Polymorphisms in Tumors, Viral Hepatitis, and Parasitic Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Dias, Fabrício C.; Castelli, Erick C.; Collares, Cristhianna V. A.; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Considering that the non-classical HLA-G molecule has well-recognized tolerogenic properties, HLA-G expression is expected to be deleterious when present in tumor cells and in cells chronically infected by viruses, whereas HLA-G expression is expected to be advantageous in autoimmune disorders. The expression of HLA-G on tissue or peripheral blood cells, the levels of soluble HLA-G and polymorphic sites along the gene have been studied in several disorders. In this study, we revised the role ...

  12. Phthalocyanine-conjugated upconversion NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+@SiO2 nanospheres for NIR-triggered photodynamic therapy in a tumor mouse model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostiv, Uliana; Patsula, Vitalii; Noculak, A.; Podhorodecki, A.; Větvička, D.; Poučková, P.; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Horák, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, Issue 24 (2017), s. 2066-2073 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01897S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : upconversion nanospheres * phthalocyanine * photodynamic therapy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.225, year: 2016

  13. Serum antibodies to human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E, HLA-F and HLA-G in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) during disease flares: Clinical relevance of HLA-F autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucaud, V; Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Hiepe, F; Rose, T; Biesen, R

    2016-03-01

    T lymphocyte hyperactivity and progressive inflammation in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients results in over-expression of human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-Ib on the surface of lymphocytes. These are shed into the circulation upon inflammation, and may augment production of antibodies promoting pathogenicity of the disease. The objective was to evaluate the association of HLA-Ib (HLA-E, HLA-F and HLA-G) antibodies to the disease activity of SLE. The immunoglobulin (Ig)G/IgM reactivity to HLA-Ib and β2m in the sera of 69 German, 29 Mexican female SLE patients and 17 German female controls was measured by multiplex Luminex(®)-based flow cytometry. The values were expressed as mean flourescence intensity (MFI). Only the German SLE cohort was analysed in relation to the clinical disease activity. In the controls, anti-HLA-G IgG predominated over other HLA-Ib antibodies, whereas SLE patients had a preponderance of anti-HLA-F IgG over the other HLA-Ib antibodies. The disease activity index, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI)-2000, was reflected only in the levels of anti-HLA-F IgG. Anti-HLA-F IgG with MFI level of 500-1999 was associated with active SLE, whereas inactive SLE revealed higher MFI (>2000). When anti-HLA-F IgG were cross-reactive with other HLA-Ib alleles, their reactivity was reflected in the levels of anti-HLA-E and -G IgG. The prevalence of HLA-F-monospecific antibodies in SLE patients was also associated with the clinical disease activity. Anti-HLA-F IgG is possibly involved in the clearance of HLA-F shed from lymphocytes and inflamed tissues to lessen the disease's severity, and thus emerges as a beneficial immune biomarker. Therefore, anti-HLA-Ib IgG should be considered as a biomarker in standard SLE diagnostics. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Imputing Variants in HLA-DR Beta Genes Reveals That HLA-DRB1 Is Solely Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangwoo; Bang, So-Young; Yoo, Dae Hyun; Cho, Soo-Kyung; Choi, Chan-Bum; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Shim, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Shin-Seok; Lee, Jisoo; Chung, Won Tae; Kim, Seong-Kyu; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Nath, Swapan K; Lee, Hye-Soon; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    The genetic association of HLA-DRB1 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is well documented, but association with other HLA-DR beta genes (HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DRB5) has not been thoroughly studied, despite their similar functions and chromosomal positions. We examined variants in all functional HLA-DR beta genes in RA and SLE patients and controls, down to the amino-acid level, to better understand disease association with the HLA-DR locus. To this end, we improved an existing HLA reference panel to impute variants in all protein-coding HLA-DR beta genes. Using the reference panel, HLA variants were inferred from high-density SNP data of 9,271 RA-control subjects and 5,342 SLE-control subjects. Disease association tests were performed by logistic regression and log-likelihood ratio tests. After imputation using the newly constructed HLA reference panel and statistical analysis, we observed that HLA-DRB1 variants better accounted for the association between MHC and susceptibility to RA and SLE than did the other three HLA-DRB variants. Moreover, there were no secondary effects in HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, or HLA-DRB5 in RA or SLE. Of all the HLA-DR beta chain paralogs, those encoded by HLA-DRB1 solely or dominantly influence susceptibility to RA and SLE.

  15. Trigger pointy v širších souvislostech

    OpenAIRE

    Sobotková, Petra

    2010-01-01

    Title: Terminology problems in myofascial trigger points concept Objectives: The main aim of this work is to organize information in the field of myofascial pain syndrome and myofascial trigger points, and to show unclearness in using terminology. Another aim is to describe trigger points from the view of the etiology, the diagnosis and the therapy. Subsidiary aim is to evaluate the relation among trigger points, tender points and acupuncture points. Methods: Design review was used in this th...

  16. The Immunogenicity of HLA Class II Mismatches: The Predicted Presentation of Nonself Allo-HLA-Derived Peptide by the HLA-DR Phenotype of the Recipient Is Associated with the Formation of DSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jucaud, Vadim

    2017-01-01

    The identification of permissible HLA class II mismatches can prevent DSA in mismatched transplantation. The HLA-DR phenotype of recipients contributes to DSA formation by presenting allo-HLA-derived peptides to T-helper cells, which induces the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. Comparing the binding affinity of self and nonself allo-HLA-derived peptides for recipients' HLA class II antigens may distinguish immunogenic HLA mismatches from nonimmunogenic ones. The binding affinities of allo-HLA-derived peptides to recipients' HLA-DR and HLA-DQ antigens were predicted using the NetMHCIIpan 3.1 server. HLA class II mismatches were classified based on whether they induced DSA and whether self or nonself peptide was predicted to bind with highest affinity to recipients' HLA-DR and HLA-DQ. Other mismatch characteristics (eplet, hydrophobic, electrostatic, and amino acid mismatch scores and PIRCHE-II) were evaluated. A significant association occurred between DSA formation and the predicted HLA-DR presentation of nonself peptides (P = 0.0169; accuracy = 80%; sensitivity = 88%; specificity = 63%). In contrast, mismatch characteristics did not differ significantly between mismatches that induced DSA and the ones that did not, except for PIRCHE-II (P = 0.0094). This methodology predicts DSA formation based on HLA mismatches and recipients' HLA-DR phenotype and may identify permissible HLA mismatches to help optimize HLA matching and guide donor selection.

  17. The Immunogenicity of HLA Class II Mismatches: The Predicted Presentation of Nonself Allo-HLA-Derived Peptide by the HLA-DR Phenotype of the Recipient Is Associated with the Formation of DSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The identification of permissible HLA class II mismatches can prevent DSA in mismatched transplantation. The HLA-DR phenotype of recipients contributes to DSA formation by presenting allo-HLA-derived peptides to T-helper cells, which induces the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. Comparing the binding affinity of self and nonself allo-HLA-derived peptides for recipients' HLA class II antigens may distinguish immunogenic HLA mismatches from nonimmunogenic ones. The binding affinities of allo-HLA-derived peptides to recipients' HLA-DR and HLA-DQ antigens were predicted using the NetMHCIIpan 3.1 server. HLA class II mismatches were classified based on whether they induced DSA and whether self or nonself peptide was predicted to bind with highest affinity to recipients' HLA-DR and HLA-DQ. Other mismatch characteristics (eplet, hydrophobic, electrostatic, and amino acid mismatch scores and PIRCHE-II) were evaluated. A significant association occurred between DSA formation and the predicted HLA-DR presentation of nonself peptides (P = 0.0169; accuracy = 80%; sensitivity = 88%; specificity = 63%). In contrast, mismatch characteristics did not differ significantly between mismatches that induced DSA and the ones that did not, except for PIRCHE-II (P = 0.0094). This methodology predicts DSA formation based on HLA mismatches and recipients' HLA-DR phenotype and may identify permissible HLA mismatches to help optimize HLA matching and guide donor selection. PMID:28331856

  18. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN CARBAMAZEPINE INDUCED SEVERE CUTANEOUS ADVERSE DRUG REACTION AND HLA POLIMORPHISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safrina Dewi Ratnaningrum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbamazepine as an antiepileptic drug that is used widely and was known can cause severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions like SJS-TEN. These adverse drug reactions is known to be associated with some specific HLA polymorphism in European populations (HLA-A*31: 01, China (HLA-A*31: 01; HLA-B*15:02, Japan (HLA-A*31 : 01; HLA-B*15: 11, Korea HLA-A*31: 01; HLA-B*15: 02; HLA-B*15: 11, India (HLA-B*15:02, Thailand (HLA-B*15: 02, and Malaysia (HLA-B*15: 02. Information related to certain HLA polymorphism is important to prevent adverse drug reaction but there is no sufficient data on the population of Indonesia.

  19. The potential of HLA-G-bearing extracellular vesicles as a future element in HLA-G immune biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera eRebmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-G molecule is a member of the non-classical HLA class I family. Its surface expression is physiologically restricted to the maternal-fetal interface and to immune privileged adult tissues. Despite the restricted tissue expression, HLA-G is detectable in body fluids as secreted soluble molecules. A unique feature of HLA-G is the structural diversity as surface-expressed and as secreted molecules. Secreted HLA-G can be found in various body fluids either as free soluble HLA-G or as part of extracellular vesicles (EVs, which are composed of various antigens/ligands/receptors, bioactive lipids, cytokines, growth factors and genetic information such as mRNA and microRNA. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to play a crucial role in the network of immune-regulatory tolerance mechanisms, preferentially interacting with the cognate inhibitory receptors LILRB1 and LILRB2. The HLA-G mediated tolerance is described in processes of pregnancy, inflammation, and cancer. However, almost all functional and clinical implications of HLA-G in vivo and in vitro have been established based on simple single ligand/receptor interactions at the cell surface, whereas HLA-G-bearing EVs were in minor research focus. Indeed, cytotrophoblast cells, mesenchymal stem cells and cancer cells were recently described to secrete HLA-G-bearing EVs, displaying immunosuppressive effects and modulating the tumor microenvironment. However, numerous functional and clinical open questions persist. Here, we (i introduce basic aspects of EVs biology, (ii summarize the functional knowledge, clinical implications and open questions of HLA-G-bearing EVs and (iii discuss HLA-G-bearing EVs as a future element in HLA-G biology.

  20. The ALICE trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Krivda, M; Evans, D; Jones, G T; Jovanovic, P; Jusko, A; Králik, I; Lazzeroni, C; Lietava, R; Scott, H; Sándor, L; Tapia Takaki, D; Urbán, J; Villalobos Baillie, O

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE trigger system (TRG) consists of a Central Trigger Processor (CTP) and up to 24 Local Trigger Units (LTU) for each sub-detector. The CTP receives and processes trigger signals from trigger detectors and the outputs from the CTP are 3 levels of hardware triggers: L0, L1 and L2. The 24 sub-detectors are dynamically partitioned in up to 6 independent clusters. The trigger information is propagated through the LTUs to the Front-end electronics (FEE) of each sub-detector via LVDS cables and optical fibres. The trigger information sent from LTU to FEE can be monitored online for possible errors using the newly developed TTCit board. After testing and commissioning of the trigger system itself on the surface, the ALICE trigger electronics has been installed and tested in the experimental cavern with appropriate ALICE experimental software. Testing the Alice trigger system with detectors on the surface and in the experimental cavern in parallel is progressing very well. Currently one setup is used for testi...

  1. Near-Infrared Light Triggered ROS-activated Theranostic Platform based on Ce6-CPT-UCNPs for Simultaneous Fluorescence Imaging and Chemo-Photodynamic Combined Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Caixia; Zhang, Chunlei; Alfranca, Gabriel; Yang, Yao; Jiang, Xinquan; Yang, Yuming; Pan, Fei; de la Fuente, Jesús M.; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    Many drug controlled release methods have been integrated in multifunctional nanoparticles, such as pH-, redox-, temperature-, enzyme-, and light-responsive release. However, few report is associated with the ROS responsive drug controlled release. Herein, a thioketal linker-based ROS responsive drug (camptothecin conjugated with thioketal linker, abbreviated as TL-CPT) was prepared and the thioketal linker could be cleaved by ROS(reactive oxygen species). To achieve cancer simultaneous optical imaging, photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy, the photosensitizer Chlorin e6(Ce6), TL-CPT and carboxyl-mPEG were loaded on the upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which were named as Ce6-CPT-UCNPs. Under 980 nm laser irradiation, Ce6-CPT-UCNPs emitted a narrow emission band at 645-675 nm which was overlapped with Ce6 absorption peak. Ce6 absorbed the light to produce ROS, which was used for photodynamic therapy and to cleave the thioketal linker in Ce6-CPT-UCNPs to release camptothecin for chemotherapy. Meanwhile, Ce6 absorbed the light, was used for near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The in vivo biodistribution studies showed that the prepared nanoparticles had high orthotopic lung cancer targeting efficiency. The in vivo therapeutic results demonstrated that NCI-H460 lung cancers could be completely eliminated by combining chemo- and photodynamic therapy under 980 nm laser irradiation. The prepared multifunctional Ce6-CPT-UCNPs have great potential in applications such as cancer targeted fluorescent imaging, simultaneous ROS activated chemo- and photodynamic therapy in near future. PMID:26941840

  2. Near-Infrared Light Triggered ROS-activated Theranostic Platform based on Ce6-CPT-UCNPs for Simultaneous Fluorescence Imaging and Chemo-Photodynamic Combined Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Caixia; Zhang, Chunlei; Alfranca, Gabriel; Yang, Yao; Jiang, Xinquan; Yang, Yuming; Pan, Fei; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Cui, Daxiang

    2016-01-01

    Many drug controlled release methods have been integrated in multifunctional nanoparticles, such as pH-, redox-, temperature-, enzyme-, and light-responsive release. However, few report is associated with the ROS responsive drug controlled release. Herein, a thioketal linker-based ROS responsive drug (camptothecin conjugated with thioketal linker, abbreviated as TL-CPT) was prepared and the thioketal linker could be cleaved by ROS(reactive oxygen species). To achieve cancer simultaneous optical imaging, photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy, the photosensitizer Chlorin e6(Ce6), TL-CPT and carboxyl-mPEG were loaded on the upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs), which were named as Ce6-CPT-UCNPs. Under 980 nm laser irradiation, Ce6-CPT-UCNPs emitted a narrow emission band at 645-675 nm which was overlapped with Ce6 absorption peak. Ce6 absorbed the light to produce ROS, which was used for photodynamic therapy and to cleave the thioketal linker in Ce6-CPT-UCNPs to release camptothecin for chemotherapy. Meanwhile, Ce6 absorbed the light, was used for near-infrared fluorescence imaging. The in vivo biodistribution studies showed that the prepared nanoparticles had high orthotopic lung cancer targeting efficiency. The in vivo therapeutic results demonstrated that NCI-H460 lung cancers could be completely eliminated by combining chemo- and photodynamic therapy under 980 nm laser irradiation. The prepared multifunctional Ce6-CPT-UCNPs have great potential in applications such as cancer targeted fluorescent imaging, simultaneous ROS activated chemo- and photodynamic therapy in near future.

  3. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification...... and where cutaneous and mucosal trigger zones are located. Methods Clinical characteristics focusing on trigger factors were collected from 140 patients with trigeminal neuralgia, in a cross-sectional study design. Results Provocation of paroxysmal pain by various trigger manoeuvres was reported by 136...... of the 140 patients. The most frequent manoeuvres were gentle touching of the face (79%) and talking (54%). Trigger zones were predominantly reported in the perioral and nasal region. Conclusion This study confirms that in trigeminal neuralgia, paroxysmal pain is associated with triggers in virtually all...

  4. Graphene oxide-fullerene C60 (GO-C60) hybrid for photodynamic and photothermal therapy triggered by near-infrared light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Hong, Liang; Li, Hongguang; Liu, Chenguang

    2017-03-15

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) are two promising methodologies for cancer therapy. Although a variety of materials which can be used in PDT and PTT have been developed in the past decades, those showing the combined effect of PDT and PTT under NIR irradiation are rare. Graphene oxide (GO) and fullerene C60 (denoted as C60 hereafter) with unique physical and chemical properties are promising candidates for PTT and PDT, respectively. Here, by using a stepwise conjugation method, a new GO-C60 hybrid which contains hydrophilic methoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) and mono-substituted C60 was constructed for combined PDT and PTT. The hybrid shows good solubility in different environments including physiological solutions. The introduction of C60 to GO did not decrease the photothermal properties of GO, while the conjugation of GO to C60 activated the ability of C60 to generate singlet oxygen (1O2) in near infrared (NIR) region in aqueous solution. The GO-C60 hybrid also shows good ability to induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Hela cells. Due to the synergistic effect between GO and C60, GO-C60 hybrid exhibits superior performance in the inhibition of cancer cells compared to both individuals, indicating its high potential in practical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma susceptibility genes in the HLA region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Judith

    2006-01-01

    The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on the short arm of chromosome 6 includes the classical HLA genes and in addition HLA-related and non-HLA related genes. The majority of the genes located in this region are directly or indirectly involved in the immune response. The polymorphic HLA

  6. Linkage and association of HLA class II genes with vitiligo in a Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamani, M.; Spaepen, M.; Sghar, S. S.; Huang, C.; Westerhof, W.; Nieuweboer-Krobotova, L.; Cassiman, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Serological typing of HLA has shown discrepancies in HLA associations with vitiligo in different ethnic populations. To perform genotyping of HLA class II genes on a Dutch vitiligo population in order clearly to identify susceptible and protective HLA alleles in vitiligo. HLA typing was carried out

  7. HLA class I and class II HLA DRB profiles in Egyptian children with rheumatic valvular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hagrassy, Nashwa; El-Chennawi, Farha; Zaki, Maysaa El-Sayed; Fawzy, Hossam; Zaki, Adel; Joseph, Nabeil

    2010-07-01

    Poststreptococcal sequelae, especially acute rheumatic fever/rheumatic heart disease continues to occur in significant proportions in many parts of the world, especially in less developed countries. An important factor in the study of rheumatic heart disease is the human genetic susceptibility to the disease. The aim of the present study was to detect the most prevalent HLA class I and class II types associated with risk of rheumatic heart disease in Egyptian children. Our study was performed on 100 patients with rheumatic valvular heart diseases and 71 control subjects. Patients were recruited from the Heart Institute, Embaba, Egypt. HLA typing for HLA class I was performed by serotyping and HLDR allele genotyping was performed using INNO-LiPA kits. In the study of HLA class I, there was a statistically significant increase in the B5 allele (P = 0.03; odds ratio, 3.46 [1.12-10.72]) in patients compared to controls, while B49 and B52 alleles (P = 0.004 and P = 0.02) were found in controls only. There was a statistically significant increase in HLA DR* 04-02, 3.46 (1.12-10.72) and HLA DR *10-0101 5.75 (1.27-25.98) in patients. Meanwhile HLA DR*1309120 was found only in controls (P = 0.02). Our study provides further information on the genetic predisposition for rheumatic valvular disease and the protective genotypes in rheumatic heart disease. Further insight into the molecular mechanisms of the disease will be a useful tool for predicting clinical outcome in those patients and, thus, potentially offer new means and approaches to treatment and prophylaxis, including a potential vaccine.

  8. Intermediate steroid withdrawal after renal transplantation and anti-HLA antibodies (HLA-Abs) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfá, Elena; San Segundo, David; San Millán, Juan Carlos Ruiz; Sanabria, Judith; Albines, Zoila; Rodrigo, Emilio; Romón, Iñigo; Asensio, Esther; Arias, Manuel; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    Steroid withdrawal in renal transplantation is desirable to avoid their adverse effects. However, by decreasing the immunosuppression, could lead to an increased risk for the development of HLA-Abs. Evaluate the relationship between steroid withdrawal and development of HLA-Abs in renal transplantation. We analyzed sera by Luminex from 182 kidney transplants performed from 1998 to 2011, before and two years after transplantation. All the patients had a pretransplant PRA (panel reactive of antibodies) Abs after two years (pNS). Despite excluding patients with PRA >20%, we detected HLA-Abs pretransplant by Luminex in 11.5% of patients in both groups, of which, 66.6%, versus 53% (p 0.058), developed new specificities, with a similar percentage of donor specific antibodies (DSA) in both groups (33.33% vs 36.36%), pNS. In the subgroup without pretransplant HLA-Abs (group-I; n=115, group-II; n=45), 6.08% developed de novo HLA-Abs, being DSA 3.4% (Group-I) versus 7.69% in group II with 3.84% DSA (pNS). Steroid withdrawal at 7 months of renal transplantation does not entail a higher risk in terms of HLA-Abs development in patients without pretransplant HLA-Abs and treatment with tacrolimus and MMF, although larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. HLA in Chileans with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, H; Wegmann, M E; Segovia, N; Cuchacovich, M; Jadresic, E; Contador, M; Fuentes, C; Meléndez, M

    1982-01-01

    A possible association between intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and human-leukocyte histocompatibility (HLA) antigens--used as genetic markers--was studied in 100 women with ICP compared to 100 multiparous women without a past history of the disease. Because we previously found a higher frequency of ICP in women with an overt Araucanian Indian descent than in Chilean Caucasoids, women from both ethnic groups were studied. Among the 37 specificities of the HLA system studied (17 of HLA-A, 16 of HLA-B, and 4 of HLA-C series), only HLA-BW16 showed a tendency to be more frequent in women with ICP rather than in control women. This finding appears to be related with ethnic origin and not ICP, HLA-BW16 was significantly more frequent in women with Araucanian Indian descent (43.4%) than in Chilean Caucasoids (16.3%) (p less than 0.01). The high frequency of HLA-BW16 in the predominantly Caucasoid population in Chile, in comparison with Caucasians in Europe and in North America, may be another indicator of their ethnic admixture with aborigine groups. The high frequency of HLA-BW16 reported in North American Indian-admixed groups (16%) suggests that HLA-BW16 may be a genetic characteristic common to some aboriginal populations in North and South America.

  10. Efficacious early antiviral activity of HIV Gag- and Pol-specific HLA-B 2705-restricted CD8+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Rebecca P; Kløverpris, Henrik; Sacha, Jonah B

    2010-01-01

    The association between HLA-B 2705 and the immune control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has previously been linked to the targeting of the HLA-B 2705-restricted Gag epitope KRWIILGLNK (KK10) by CD8(+) T cells. In order to better define the mechanisms of the HLA-B 2705 immune...... control of HIV, we first characterized the CD8(+) T-cell responses of nine highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naïve B 2705-positive subjects. Unexpectedly, we observed a strong response to an HLA-B 2705-restricted Pol epitope, KRKGGIGGY (KY9), in 8/9 subjects. The magnitude of the KY9 response...... by the respective CD8(+) T-cell response. By comparing inhibitions of viral replication by CD8(+) T cells specific for the Gag KK10, Pol KY9, and Vpr VL9 HLA-B 2705-restricted epitopes, we observed a consistent hierarchy of antiviral efficacy (Gag KK10 > Pol KY9 > Vpr VL9). This hierarchy was associated with early...

  11. Clinical utility of celiac disease associated HLA testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallav, Kumar; Kabbani, Toufic; Tariq, Sohaib; Vanga, Rohini; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Leffler, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Negative predictive value (NPV) of Celiac Disease (CD) related human leukocyte antigens (HLA) DQ2 and DQ8 approaches 100% in individual patients. However, studies evaluating its exclusionary utility in patient groups are lacking. Aim We aim to assess the performance of HLA testing when applied to patient groups with varying characteristics and propose evidence-based recommendations for its clinical use. Methods Demographic and clinical information was recorded in patients undergoing HLA testing. Using predetermined criteria, patients were classified as CD, Non CD or indeterminate. Diagnostic yield of HLA testing was defined as the percentage of patients in whom CD could be excluded based on negative HLA test. Results 256 patients underwent testing for CD related HLA DQ2 and DQ8. 102 (100 Non CD, 2 CD) patients tested HLA negative for a 98% NPV and 39% diagnostic yield. Diagnostic yield was highest (60%) in patients with intraepithelial lymphocytosis plus normal IgA tissue transglutaminase antibody (IgA-tTG) and lowest in patients with positive IgA-tTG plus villous atrophy (0%). CD was diagnosed in 2 HLA negative patients, who carried half of DQ2.5 trans genotype. Conclusions Diagnostic yield of CD related HLA testing varies widely depending on clinical indication. HLA testing is a practical and valuable test for most patients in whom initial evaluation for CD is inconclusive. A negative HLA result usually obviates the need for further celiac testing including endoscopy and gluten challenge. Rarely, in patients reported as HLA negative, half of HLA DQ2.5 (cis or trans) is sufficient for development of CD. PMID:24705698

  12. Non-HLA Antibodies May Accelerate Immune Responses After Intestinal and Multivisceral Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Undine Ariane; Lachmann, Nils; Ranucci, Giuseppina; Sawitzki, Birgit; Schoenemann, Constanze; Pratschke, Johann; Dragun, Duska; Pascher, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Non-HLA alloantibodies and autoantibodies are involved in allograft rejection in kidney and heart transplantation. Their role in intestinal transplantation has not yet been described. We examined the development of antiangiotensin II type I receptor antibodies (anti-AT1R) and antiendothelin type A receptor antibodies associated with the clinical course and histopathological findings of intestinal transplantation recipients. Thirty-seven patients underwent intestinal or multivisceral transplantation. Non-HLA antibodies (non-HLAabs) were screened in 29 transplant recipients. Antibody-levels greater than 12 U/L were considered positive and were evaluated retrospectively regarding rejection episodes. Twenty patients developed anti-AT1R and/or antiendothelin type A receptor antibodies (non-HLAabs group), 9 did not (control group). The non-HLAabs group had a higher rate of allograft rejection than controls (80% vs 55%), especially a higher rate of antibody-mediated rejections (55% vs 11%, P < 0.01) with detection of donor-specific anti-HLAabs. All rejection episodes in the non-HLAabs group appeared around the time of positive non-HLAabs detection. Five patients had acute cellular rejections at the time of non-HLAabs development, 4 had viral infections. Our data suggest that antibody-mediated mechanisms targeting antigens beyond HLA may trigger and accelerate immune responses. Given the possibility of pharmacologic targeting of non-HLA receptors, future studies will focus on the explanation of mechanisms how non-HLAabs may enhance rejection and affect long-term allograft survival.

  13. A Copper-Mediated Disulfiram-Loaded pH-Triggered PEG-Shedding TAT Peptide-Modified Lipid Nanocapsules for Use in Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Tian, Bin; Li, Yi; Lei, Tian; Meng, Jia; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Fen; Zhang, Haotian; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Yu; Tang, Xing

    2015-11-18

    Disulfiram, which exhibits marked tumor inhibition mediated by copper, was encapsulated in lipid nanocapsules modified with TAT peptide (TATp) and pH-triggered sheddable PEG to target cancer cells on the basis of tumor environmental specificity. PEG-shedding lipid nanocapsules (S-LNCs) were fabricated from LNCs by decorating short PEG chains with TATp (HS-PEG(1k)-TATp) to form TATp-LNCs and then covered by pH-sensitive graft copolymers of long PEG chains (PGA-g-PEG(2k)). The DSF-S-LNCs had sizes in the range of 60-90 nm and were stable in the presence of 50% plasma. DSF-S-LNCs exhibited higher intracellular uptake and antitumor activity at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. The preincubation of Cu showed that the DSF cytotoxicity was based on the accumulation of Cu in Hep G2 cells. Pharmacokinetic studies showed the markedly improved pharmacokinetic profiles of DSF-S-LNCs (AUC= 3921.391 μg/L·h, t(1/2z) = 1.294 h) compared with free DSF (AUC = 907.724 μg/L·h, t(1/2z) = 0.252 h). The in vivo distribution of S-LNCs was investigated using Cy5.5 as a fluorescent probe. In tumor-bearing mice, the delivery efficiency of S-LNCs was found to be 496.5% higher than that of free Cy5.5 and 74.5% higher than that of LNCs in tumors. In conclusion, DSF-S-LNCs increased both the stability and tumor internalization and further increased the cytotoxicity because of the higher copper content.

  14. Crystal Structure of the HLA-DM - HLA-DR1 Complex Defines Mechanisms for Rapid Peptide Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pos, Wouter; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Call, Melissa J.; Schulze, Monika-Sarah E. D.; Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Pyrdol, Jason; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary HLA-DR molecules bind microbial peptides in an endosomal compartment and present them on the cell surface for CD4 T cell surveillance. HLA-DM plays a critical role in the endosomal peptide selection process. The structure of the HLA-DM – HLA-DR complex shows major rearrangements of the HLA-DR peptide binding groove. Flipping of a tryptophan away from the HLA-DR1 P1 pocket enables major conformational changes that position hydrophobic HLA-DR residues into the P1 pocket. These conformational changes accelerate peptide dissociation and stabilize the empty HLA-DR peptide binding groove. Initially, incoming peptides have access to only part of the HLA-DR groove and need to compete with HLA-DR residues for access to the P2 site and the hydrophobic P1 pocket. This energetic barrier creates a rapid and stringent selection process for the highest-affinity binders. Insertion of peptide residues into the P2 and P1 sites reverses the conformational changes, terminating selection through DM dissociation. PMID:23260142

  15. Cutting edge: HLA-DO impairs the incorporation of HLA-DM into exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Fangming; Côté, Marie-Hélène; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Brunet, Alexandre; Gauvreau, Marie-Élaine; Shaw, Andrew; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2011-08-15

    In multivesicular bodies, HLA-DM (DM) assists the loading of antigenic peptides on classical MHC class II molecules such as HLA-DR. In cells expressing HLA-DO (DO), DM is redistributed from the internal vesicles to the limiting membrane of these organelles. This suggests that DO might reduce DM incorporation into exosomes, which are shed upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. To test this hypothesis, we used the 721.45 B lymphoblastoid cell line and different HeLa cell transfectants. We demonstrate that the poor recovery of DM in exosomes as compared with HLA-DR is not the mere reflection of differences in protein expression. Indeed, we found that DO contributes to the inefficient transfer of DM to exosomes. This negative regulation requires an intact di-leucine endosomal sorting motif in the cytoplasmic tail of HLA-DOβ. These results demonstrate that canonical sorting signals and protein-protein interactions modulate the selection of MHC protein cargos.

  16. Haplotypes of the HLA-G 3' Untranslated Region Respond to Endogenous Factors of HLA-G+ and HLA-G- Cell Lines Differentially.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Poras

    Full Text Available The immune checkpoint HLA-G prevents maternal rejection of the fetus and contributes in cancer invasion and acceptance of allografts. The 5' and 3' regulatory regions of the HLA-G gene are polymorphic and balancing selection probably maintains this variability. It is proposed that nucleotide variations may affect the level of HLA-G expression. To investigate this issue we aimed to analyze how haplotypes of the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR with highest worldwide frequencies, namely UTR-1, UTR-2, UTR-3, UTR-4, UTR-5, UTR-18 and UTR-7, impact the expression of a luciferase reporter gene in vitro. Experiments performed with the HLA-G positive cell lines JEG-3 (choricarcinoma and FON (melanoma, and with the HLA-G negative cell lines M8 (melanoma and U251MG (glioblastoma showed that the HLA-G 3'UTR polymorphism influences the response to endogenous cellular factors and may vary according to the cell type. UTR-5 and UTR-7 impact the activity of luciferase the most whereas UTR-2, UTR-3, UTR-4, and UTR-18 have intermediate impact, and UTR-1 has the lowest impact. These results corroborate the previous associations between amounts of plasma sHLA-G levels and 3'UTR haplotypes in healthy individuals and reinforce that 3'UTR typing may be a predictor of the genetic predisposition of an individual to express different levels of HLA-G.

  17. Development of a clinical prediction rule for identifying women with tension-type headache who are likely to achieve short-term success with joint mobilization and muscle trigger point therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis; Caminero, Ana Belén; Guillem-Mesado, Amparo; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2011-02-01

    To identify prognostic factors from the history and physical examination in women with tension-type headache (TTH) who are likely to experience self-perceived clinical improvement following a multimodal physical therapy session including joint mobilization and muscle trigger point (TrP) therapies. No definitive therapeutic intervention is available for TTH. It would be useful for clinicians to have a clinical prediction rule for selecting which TTH patients may experience improved outcomes following a multimodal physical therapy program. Women diagnosed with pure TTH by 3 experienced neurologists according to the International Headache Society criteria from different neurology departments were included. They underwent a standardized examination (neck mobility, pressure pain thresholds, total tenderness score, presence of muscle TrPs, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Neck Disability Index [NDI], the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Headache Disability Inventory) and then a multimodal physical therapy session including joint mobilization and TrP therapies. The treatment session included a 30-second grade III or IV central posterior-anterior nonthrust mobilization applied from T4 to T1 thoracic vertebrae, at C7-T1 cervico-thoracic junction and C1-C2 vertebrae for an overall intervention time of 5 minutes Different TrP techniques, particularly soft tissue stroke, pressure release, or muscle energy were applied to head and neck-shoulder muscles (temporalis, suboccipital, upper trapezius, splenius capitis, semispinalis capitis, sternocleidomastoid) to inactivate active muscle TrPs. Participants were classified as having achieved a successful outcome 1 week after the session based on their self-perceived recovery. Potential prognostic variables were entered into a stepwise logistic regression model to determine the most accurate set of variables for prediction of success. Data for 76 subjects were included in the analysis, of which 36 experienced a

  18. Role of HLA adaptation in HIV evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Leslie, Alasdair; Goulder, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Killing of HIV-infected cells by CD8+ T-cells imposes strong selection pressure on the virus toward escape. The HLA class I molecules that are successful in mediating some degree of control over the virus are those that tend to present epitopes in conserved regions of the proteome, such as in p24...... Gag, in which escape also comes at a significant cost to viral replicative capacity (VRC). In some instances, compensatory mutations can fully correct for the fitness cost of such an escape variant; in others, correction is only partial. The consequences of these events within the HIV-infected host......, and at the population level following transmission of escape variants, are discussed. The accumulation of escape mutants in populations over the course of the epidemic already shows instances of protective HLA molecules losing their impact, and in certain cases, a modest decline in HIV virulence in association...

  19. HLA-G genotype is associated with fetoplacental growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert

    2004-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells in the feto-maternal contact zone. Polymorphisms have been described in the HLA-G gene and have been linked with differences in HLA-G mRNA alternative splicing patterns and protein expression. Differences...... in the isoform profile or the degree of HLA-G expression may influence cytokine production and, thereby, placental and fetal growth. Associations between a 14 bp deletion polymorphism in the 3'UTR part of the HLA-G gene and birth weight in relation to gestational age and placental weight were studied in 47...... pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and 87 with no preeclampsia. An HLA-G genotype homozygous for the presence of the 14 bp sequence polymorphism was significantly associated with increased birth weight in relation to gestational age (one-way analysis of variance; 2 degrees of freedom: p = 0...

  20. HLA-G Molecules in Autoimmune Diseases and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Bortolotti, Daria; Bolzani, Silvia; Fainardi, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G molecule, a non-classical HLA-Ib molecule, is less polymorphic when compared to classical HLA class I molecules. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) was first detected on cytotrophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface but its expression is prevalent during viral infections and several autoimmune diseases. HLA-G gene is characterized by polymorphisms at the 3′ un-translated region and 5′ upstream regulatory region that regulate its expression and are associated with autoimmune diseases and viral infection susceptibility, creating an unbalanced and pathologic environment. This review focuses on the role of HLA-G genetic polymorphisms, mRNA, and protein expression in autoimmune conditions and viral infections. PMID:25477881

  1. HLA polymorphism in Sudanese renal donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer M Dafalla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to provide a database for renal transplantation in Sudan and to determine the HLA antigens and haplotype frequencies (HFs in the study subjects. HLA typing was performed using the complement-dependant lymphocytotoxicity test in 250 unrelated healthy individuals selected as donors in the Sudanese Renal Transplantation Program. Considerable polymorphism was observed at each locus; A2 (0.28, A30 (0.12, A3 (0.09, A24 (0.09, A1 (0.09, and A68 (0.06 were the most frequent antigens in the A locus, while B51 (0.092, B41 (0.081, B39 (0.078, B57 (0.060, B35 (0.068, B 50 (0.053 and B 52 (0.051 were the most common B locus antigens. DR13 (0.444 and DR15 (0.160 showed the highest antigen frequencies (AFs in the DR locus. In the DQ locus, DQ1 showed the highest gene frequency (0.498, while DQ2 and DQ3 AFs were (0.185 and (0.238, respectively. The most common HLA-A and -B haplotypes in positive linkage disequilibrium were A24, B38; A1, B7; and A3, B52. The common HLA-A and -B HFs in positive linkage disequilibrium in the main three tribe-stocks of the study subjects (Gaalia, Nile Nubian and Johyna were A24, B38 for Gaalia; A24, B38 and A2, B7 for Johyna; and A2, B64 and A3, B53 for Nile Nubian. These results suggest that both class I and class II polymorphisms of the study subjects depict considerable heterogeneity, which reflects recent admixture of this group with neighboring Arabs and African populations.

  2. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  3. [Experience in using the LABType SSO reagent kits in the practice of a HLA typing laboratory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginova, M A; Paramonov, I V; Trofimova, N P

    2011-04-01

    HLA was typed from HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 loci (to the second place) in 443 patients, by applying the LABType SSO reagent kits (One Lambda, USA). The findings were analyzed using the software Arlequin version 3.1. There were no deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg law. Overall, the authors identified 16, 27, and 13 allelic variants ofHLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 loci, respectively. There were also 4 most common haplotypes of HLA-A-B-DRBII: HLA-A *03-B*35-DRB1 *01 (4.29%), HLA-A *01-B*08-DRBl *03 (3.5%), HLA-A*03-B*07-DRBI *15 (3.37%), and HLA-A *02-B*07-DRBI *15 (2.93%).

  4. Logistic transmission modeling of HLA and ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scofield, R.H.; Neas, B.R.; Harley, J.B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    1994-09-01

    A nonparametric and general method of linkage analysis has been developed and used to evaluate histocompatibility (HLA) linkage to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) from the data of Berg & Moller. The conditional logistic function has been used to establish linkage by stepwise modelling of transmission from parent to progeny. Logistic transmission models have been explored to better understand the relationship of HLA to AS. The alleles at HLA-A and -B were determined in 38 families (32 monoplex and 6 multiplex). We have found that linkage is supported in this data over the random transmission of alleles at only HLA-B. Models constructed at HLA-B are powerful with, for example, coefficients for B27 of 1.9 (S.E. = 0.4) and B40 of 1.6 (S.E. = 0.8) contributing to a model with {chi}{sup 2} = 30 with 2 df and p < 3x10{sup -7}. No models are found supporting linkage at HLA-A and, therefore, the data at HLA-A does not add support for linkage beyond that present at HLA-B (e.g., {chi}{sup 2} for improvement < 1). These results establish that HLA-B is linked to AS. They further provide evidence that the gene responsible for AS is located nearer to HLA-B than it is to HLA-A. Also, the analysis shows that a number of HLA-B alleles may contribute to the risk of AS, beyond the B27 allele which has repeatedly been associated with AS.

  5. HLA Genes in Mayos Population from Northeast Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Moscoso, J; Granados, J; Serrano-Vela, J.I; de la Peña, A.; Reguera, R; Ferri, A; Seclen, E; Izaguirre, R; Perez-Hernandez, N; Vargas-Alarcon, G

    2007-01-01

    HLA class I and class II alleles have been studied in 60 unrelated people belonging to Mayos ethnic group, which lives in the Mexican Pacific Sinaloa State. Mayos HLA profile was compared to other Amerindians and worldwide populations’ profile. A total of 14,896 chromosomes were used for comparisons. Genetic distances between populations, Neigbour-Joining dendrograms and correspondence analyses were performed to determine the genetic relationship among population. The new specific Mayo HLA haplotypes found are: HLA-A*02-B*35-DRB1*1406-DQB1*0301; HLA-A*02-B*48-DRB1*0404-DQB1*0302; HLA-A*24-B*51-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302 and HLA-A*02-B*08-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302. However, the typical Meso American HLADRB1*0407 represents a 40% of all DRB1 alleles. While common HLA characteristics are found in Amerindian distant ethnic groups, still new group specific HLA haplotypes are being found, suggesting that a common founder effect (i.e. high DRB1*0407) is noticed. Moreover, new HLA haplotypes are almost certainly appearing along time probably due to specific pathogen (?) selection for diversity. Mayo language is close to the Tarahumara one (another geographically close group); notwithstanding both groups are not genetically close according to our results, showing again the different evolution of genes and languages, which do not correlate. Finally, Sinaloa is one of the Mexican States in which more European genes are found. However, the results presented in this paper, where no European HLA genes are seen in Mayos, should have a bearing in establishing transplant programs and in HLA and disease studies. PMID:19412332

  6. HLA Genes in Mayos Population from Northeast Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Moscoso, J; Granados, J; Serrano-Vela, J I; de la Peña, A; Reguera, R; Ferri, A; Seclen, E; Izaguirre, R; Perez-Hernandez, N; Vargas-Alarcon, G

    2007-11-01

    HLA class I and class II alleles have been studied in 60 unrelated people belonging to Mayos ethnic group, which lives in the Mexican Pacific Sinaloa State. Mayos HLA profile was compared to other Amerindians and worldwide populations' profile. A total of 14,896 chromosomes were used for comparisons. Genetic distances between populations, Neigbour-Joining dendrograms and correspondence analyses were performed to determine the genetic relationship among population. The new specific Mayo HLA haplotypes found are: HLA-A*02-B*35-DRB1*1406-DQB1*0301; HLA-A*02-B*48-DRB1*0404-DQB1*0302; HLA-A*24-B*51-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302 and HLA-A*02-B*08-DRB1*0407-DQB1*0302. However, the typical Meso American HLADRB1*0407 represents a 40% of all DRB1 alleles. While common HLA characteristics are found in Amerindian distant ethnic groups, still new group specific HLA haplotypes are being found, suggesting that a common founder effect (i.e. high DRB1*0407) is noticed. Moreover, new HLA haplotypes are almost certainly appearing along time probably due to specific pathogen (?) selection for diversity. Mayo language is close to the Tarahumara one (another geographically close group); notwithstanding both groups are not genetically close according to our results, showing again the different evolution of genes and languages, which do not correlate. Finally, Sinaloa is one of the Mexican States in which more European genes are found. However, the results presented in this paper, where no European HLA genes are seen in Mayos, should have a bearing in establishing transplant programs and in HLA and disease studies.

  7. Mold-sensitivity in children with moderate-severe asthma is associated with HLA-DR and HLA-DQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, A P; Vijay, H M; Kumar, V; Kariuki, B; Santiago, L A; Graff, R; Wofford, J D; Shah, M R

    2010-11-01

    Several epidemiologic studies in the United States and Europe have linked Alternaria sensitivity to both persistence and severity of asthma. In this study, we examined T cell responses and HLA class II alleles in children with moderate-severe asthma. Ninety-six children with moderate-severe asthma were compared to 90 children with mild asthma. HLA class II genotyping was performed to determine HLA allelic frequencies. Th1/Th2 Alternaria-specific T cell cytokine responses were determined by the use of Alternaria-stimulated cultures. HLA class II restriction was examined by inhibition of Alternaria-stimulated lymphoproliferative responses with blocking anti-HLA class II monoclonal antibodies. Children with moderate-severe asthma had significantly increased sensitivities to Aspergillus fumigatus; sensitivities to Alternaria were similar in both moderate-severe and mild asthmatics. The frequency of HLA-DRB1*13 alleles were increased in mold-sensitive moderate-severe asthmatic children. HLA-DRB1*03 tended to be increased in mold-sensitive moderate-severe asthmatics. The frequency of HLA-DQB1*03 alleles was significantly decreased in mold and Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma. HLA class II blocking monoclonal antibodies demonstrated HLA-DR restriction. Alternaria-stimulated IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis was significantly increased in moderate-severe asthmatics. IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis was significantly increased in Alternaria-stimulated lymphocyte cultures of HLA-DQB1*03- asthmatics compared to HLA-DQB1*03+ asthmatics. In children with Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma, there was increased Th2 sensitivity to Alternaria stimulation. This was associated with HLA-DR restriction and with increased frequency of HLA-DRB1*13 and HLA-DRB1*03. There was decreased frequency of HLA-DQB1*03 in Alternaria-sensitive moderate-severe asthma, suggesting HLA-DQB1*03 may be protective of the development of Alternaria-sensitive severe asthma. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Coexpression of the human HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 heavy chain gene and human beta 2-microglobulin gene in L cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernabeu, C.; Maziarz, R.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J.; Burakoff, S. J.; Terhorst, C.

    1984-01-01

    L cells expressing human HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 class I antigen heavy chains are not recognized by human cytotoxic T lymphocytes directed at HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 antigens. To test whether the absence of human beta 2-m was the cause of the lack of recognition by the human cytotoxic T lymphocytes, coexpression

  9. Multiple HLA Epitopes Contribute to Type 1 Diabetes Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, Christina L.; Anderson, Kirsten M.; Simon, Lucas J.; Schuyler, Ronald P.; Aubrey, Michael T.; Freed, Brian M.

    2014-01-01

    Disease susceptibility for type 1 diabetes is strongly associated with the inheritance of specific HLA alleles. However, conventional allele frequency analysis can miss HLA associations because many alleles are rare. In addition, disparate alleles that have similar peptide-binding sites, or shared epitopes, can be missed. To identify the HLA shared epitopes associated with diabetes, we analyzed high-resolution genotyping for class I and class II loci. The HLA epitopes most strongly associated with susceptibility for disease were DQB1 A57, DQA1 V76, DRB1 H13, and DRB1 K71, whereas DPB1 YD9,57, HLA-B C67, and HLA-C YY9,116 were more weakly associated. The HLA epitopes strongly associated with resistance were DQB1 D57, DQA1 Y80, DRB1 R13, and DRB1 A71. A dominant resistance phenotype was observed for individuals bearing a protective HLA epitope, even in the presence of a susceptibility epitope. In addition, an earlier age of disease onset correlated with significantly greater numbers of susceptibility epitopes and fewer resistance epitopes (P epitopes was higher in patients than in control subjects and was not exclusively a result of linkage disequilibrium, suggesting that multiple HLA epitopes may work together to increase the risk of developing diabetes. PMID:24357703

  10. HLA Haplotypes and Genotypes Frequencies in Brazilian Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Ângela Sippert

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigens (HLA have a pivotal role in immune response and may be involved in antigen recognition of periodontal pathogens. However, the associations of HLA with chronic periodontitis (CP have not been previously studied in the Brazilian population. In an attempt to clarify the issue of genetic predisposition to CP, we examined the distribution of HLA alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes in patients from Southern Brazil. One hundred and eight CP patients and 151 healthy and unrelated controls with age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched were HLA investigated by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific oligonucleotides. To exclude smoking as a predisposing factor, statistical analyses were performed in the total sample and in nonsmoking individuals. The significant results showed a positive association of the A∗02/HLA-B∗40 haplotype with CP (total samples: 4.2% versus 0%, Pc = 0.03; nonsmokers: 4.3% versus 0%, Pc = 0.23 and a lower frequency of HLA-B∗15/HLA-DRB1∗11 haplotype in CP compared to controls (total samples: 0.0% versus 4.3%, Pc = 0.04; nonsmokers: 0 versus 5.1%, Pc = 1.0. In conclusion, the HLA-A∗02/B∗40 haplotype may contribute to the development of CP, while HLA-B∗15/DRB1∗11 haplotype might indicate resistance to disease among Brazilians.

  11. The Relevance of HLA Sequencing in Population Genetics Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Sanchez-Mazas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS is currently being adapted by different biotechnological platforms to the standard typing method for HLA polymorphism, the huge diversity of which makes this initiative particularly challenging. Boosting the molecular characterization of the HLA genes through efficient, rapid, and low-cost technologies is expected to amplify the success of tissue transplantation by enabling us to find donor-recipient matching for rare phenotypes. But the application of NGS technologies to the molecular mapping of the MHC region also anticipates essential changes in population genetic studies. Huge amounts of HLA sequence data will be available in the next years for different populations, with the potential to change our understanding of HLA variation in humans. In this review, we first explain how HLA sequencing allows a better assessment of the HLA diversity in human populations, taking also into account the methodological difficulties it introduces at the statistical level; secondly, we show how analyzing HLA sequence variation may improve our comprehension of population genetic relationships by facilitating the identification of demographic events that marked human evolution; finally, we discuss the interest of both HLA and genome-wide sequencing and genotyping in detecting functionally significant SNPs in the MHC region, the latter having also contributed to the makeup of the HLA molecular diversity observed today.

  12. HLA-DP antigens in patients with alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, N; Georgsen, J

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of HLA-DP antigens were studied in 41 patients with alopecia areata (AA) and 188 ethnically matched controls. An increase of DR4 and possibly DR5 in 24 of these patients has previously been reported. HLA-DP typing for DPw1 through w6 and the local specificity, CDP HEI, was perfor......The distribution of HLA-DP antigens were studied in 41 patients with alopecia areata (AA) and 188 ethnically matched controls. An increase of DR4 and possibly DR5 in 24 of these patients has previously been reported. HLA-DP typing for DPw1 through w6 and the local specificity, CDP HEI...

  13. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G during pregnancy part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitkou, Louise; Dahl, Mette; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a class Ib molecule with restricted tissue distribution expressed on trophoblast cells and has been proposed to have immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy. Soluble HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1) can be generated by the shedding of membrane-bound HLA-G molecules; however......, three soluble isoforms also exist (HLA-G5 to -G6). During pregnancy, it is unknown whether there is a correlation between sHLA-G levels in maternal and fetal blood. In 246 pregnancies, we have measured the levels of sHLA-G1/-G5 in maternal blood plasma samples from gestational week 20 (GW20) and at term......, as well as in umbilical cord blood samples. Soluble HLA-G levels declined by 38.4% in maternal blood from GW20 to term, and sHLA-G levels were significantly lower in maternal blood at term than in GW20 (PHLA-G levels were significantly higher in maternal blood than in umbilical...

  14. HLA Haplotypes and Genotypes Frequencies in Brazilian Chronic Periodontitis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippert, Emília Ângela; Silva, Cléverson de Oliveira e; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Marques, Silvia Barbosa Dutra; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Sell, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigens (HLA) have a pivotal role in immune response and may be involved in antigen recognition of periodontal pathogens. However, the associations of HLA with chronic periodontitis (CP) have not been previously studied in the Brazilian population. In an attempt to clarify the issue of genetic predisposition to CP, we examined the distribution of HLA alleles, genotypes, and haplotypes in patients from Southern Brazil. One hundred and eight CP patients and 151 healthy and unrelated controls with age-, gender-, and ethnicity-matched were HLA investigated by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific oligonucleotides. To exclude smoking as a predisposing factor, statistical analyses were performed in the total sample and in nonsmoking individuals. The significant results showed a positive association of the A∗02/HLA-B∗40 haplotype with CP (total samples: 4.2% versus 0%, P c = 0.03; nonsmokers: 4.3% versus 0%, P c = 0.23) and a lower frequency of HLA-B∗15/HLA-DRB1∗11 haplotype in CP compared to controls (total samples: 0.0% versus 4.3%, P c = 0.04; nonsmokers: 0 versus 5.1%, P c = 1.0). In conclusion, the HLA-A∗02/B∗40 haplotype may contribute to the development of CP, while HLA-B∗15/DRB1∗11 haplotype might indicate resistance to disease among Brazilians. PMID:26339134

  15. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...... epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D), stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA...... inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding...

  16. Lessons from (triggered) tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    I test a “clock-advance” model that implies triggered tremor is ambient tremor that occurs at a sped-up rate as a result of loading from passing seismic waves. This proposed model predicts that triggering probability is proportional to the product of the ambient tremor rate and a function describing the efficacy of the triggering wave to initiate a tremor event. Using data mostly from Cascadia, I have compared qualitatively a suite of teleseismic waves that did and did not trigger tremor with ambient tremor rates. Many of the observations are consistent with the model if the efficacy of the triggering wave depends on wave amplitude. One triggered tremor observation clearly violates the clock-advance model. The model prediction that larger triggering waves result in larger triggered tremor signals also appears inconsistent with the measurements. I conclude that the tremor source process is a more complex system than that described by the clock-advance model predictions tested. Results of this and previous studies also demonstrate that (1) conditions suitable for tremor generation exist in many tectonic environments, but, within each, only occur at particular spots whose locations change with time; (2) any fluid flow must be restricted to less than a meter; (3) the degree to which delayed failure and secondary triggering occurs is likely insignificant; and 4) both shear and dilatational deformations may trigger tremor. Triggered and ambient tremor rates correlate more strongly with stress than stressing rate, suggesting tremor sources result from time-dependent weakening processes rather than simple Coulomb failure.

  17. Frequency determination of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Bazrafshani

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The HLA cluster might affect on susceptibility to vesicoureteral reflux es-pecially by locus which located close to HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes. This study demonstrates for the first time in Iran. However, further extensive researches with a large number of samples from different populations and ethnicities are required to val-idate the results obtained in this study.

  18. AMY trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Yoshihide [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  19. Complement-Mediated Enhancement of Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells by HLA Antibodies, and Blockade by a Specific Inhibitor of the Classical Complement Cascade, TNT003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.; Mulder, Arend; Parry, Graham C.; Panicker, Sandip; Reed, Elaine F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of most solid organs is characterized by evidence of complement activation and/or intragraft macrophages (C4d + and CD68+ biopsies). We previously demonstrated that crosslinking of HLA I by antibodies triggered endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. We hypothesized that activation of the classical complement pathway at the endothelial cell surface by HLA antibodies would enhance monocyte adhesion through soluble split product generation, in parallel with direct endothelial activation downstream of HLA signaling. Methods Primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were stimulated with HLA class I antibodies in the presence of intact human serum complement. C3a and C5a generation, endothelial P-selectin expression, and adhesion of human primary and immortalized monocytes (Mono Mac 6) were measured. Alternatively, HAEC or monocytes were directly stimulated with purified C3a or C5a. Classical complement activation was inhibited by pretreatment of complement with an anti-C1s antibody (TNT003). Results Treatment of HAEC with HLA antibody and human complement increased the formation of C3a and C5a. Monocyte recruitment by human HLA antibodies was enhanced in the presence of intact human serum complement or purified C3a or C5a. Specific inhibition of the classical complement pathway using TNT003 or C1q-depleted serum significantly reduced adhesion of monocytes in the presence of human complement. Conclusions Despite persistent endothelial viability in the presence of HLA antibodies and complement, upstream complement anaphylatoxin production exacerbates endothelial exocytosis and leukocyte recruitment. Upstream inhibition of classical complement may be therapeutic to dampen mononuclear cell recruitment and endothelial activation characteristic of microvascular inflammation during AMR. PMID:28640789

  20. Separate Developmental Programs for HLA-A and -B Cell Surface Expression during Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells to Lymphocytes, Adipocytes and Osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabir, Hardee J; Nehlin, Jan O; Qanie, Diyako

    2013-01-01

    -A, but not -B) is seen on some multipotent stem cells, and this raises the question how this is in other stem cells and how it changes during differentiation. In this study, we have used flow cytometry to investigate the cell surface expression of HLA-A and -B on human embryonic stem cells (hESC), human......A major problem of allogeneic stem cell therapy is immunologically mediated graft rejection. HLA class I A, B, and Cw antigens are crucial factors, but little is known of their respective expression on stem cells and their progenies. We have recently shown that locus-specific expression (HLA...... hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC), human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and their fully-differentiated progenies such as lymphocytes, adipocytes and osteoblasts. hESC showed extremely low levels of HLA-A and no -B. In contrast, multipotent hMSC and hHSC generally expressed higher levels of HLA-A and clearly HLA...

  1. HLA-B*57 Micropolymorphism shapes HLA allele-specific epitope immunogenicity, selection pressure, and HIV immune control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik Nyhus; Buus, Anette Stryhn; van der Stok, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism that has the greatest impact on immune control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is expression of HLA-B*57. Understanding of the mechanism for this strong effect remains incomplete. HLA-B*57 alleles and the closely related HLA-B*5801 are often grouped together...... because of their similar peptide-binding motifs and HIV disease outcome associations. However, we show here that the apparently small differences between HLA-B*57 alleles, termed HLA-B*57 micropolymorphisms, have a significant impact on immune control of HIV. In a study cohort of >2,000 HIV C......-clade-infected subjects from southern Africa, HLA-B*5703 is associated with a lower viral-load set point than HLA-B*5702 and HLA-B*5801 (medians, 5,980, 15,190, and 19,000 HIV copies/ml plasma; P = 0.24 and P = 0.0005). In order to better understand these observed differences in HLA-B*57/5801-mediated immune control...

  2. Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) expression of primary trophoblast cells and placental cell lines, determined using single antigen beads to characterize allotype specificities of anti-HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Richard; Murphy, Shawn P; Fernando, Raymond; Gardner, Lucy; Ahad, Tashmeeta; Moffett, Ashley

    2009-05-01

    Human trophoblast cells express an unusual repertoire of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules which has been difficult to define. Close homology between and extreme polymorphism at the classical HLA class-I (HLA-I) loci has made it difficult to generate locus-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The problem of defining an antibody's reactivity against the thousands of existing HLA-I allotypes has often made it impossible to determine the HLA bound by a mAb in biological samples from a normal outbred population. Here we have used commercially available beads coated with individual HLA-I to characterize experimentally the reactivity of nine mAb against 96 common HLA-I allotypes. In conjunction with donor HLA-I genotyping, we could then define the specific HLA molecules bound by these antibodies in normal individuals. We used this approach to analyse the HLA expression of primary trophoblast cells from normal pregnancies; the choriocarcinoma cells JEG-3 and JAR; and the placental cell lines HTR-8/SVneo, Swan-71 and TEV-1. We confirm that primary villous trophoblast cells are HLA null whereas extravillous trophoblast cells express HLA-C, HLA-G and HLA-E, but not HLA-A, HLA-B or HLA-DR molecules in normal pregnancy. Tumour-derived JEG-3 and JAR cells reflect extravillous and villous trophoblast HLA phenotypes, respectively, but the HLA repertoire of the in vitro derived placental cell lines is not representative of either in vivo trophoblast phenotype. This study raises questions regarding the validity of using the placental cell lines that are currently available as model systems for immunological interactions between fetal trophoblast and maternal leucocytes bearing receptors for HLA molecules.

  3. HLA II class antigens and susceptibility to coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is a systemic autoimmune, complex and multifactorial disorder, which is caused by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. The only established genetic risk factors so far are the human leucocyte antigens. The aim of this study was to assess the distribution of II class human leukocyte antigens (HLA in patients with coeliac disease and to investigate the susceptibility to coeliac disease in family members. We typed HLA DR and DQ antigens in 37 patients from Vojvodina with coeliac disease, 23 first-degree relatives, and 210 controls, serologically using standard lymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA DQ5(1, DQ6(1, DR11(5, DQ7(3, DQ2 and DR15(2 were the most common antigens in the control group. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 was higher in CD patients than in the control group. The relative risks for HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR7 were 4.846, 6.986 and 2.106, respectively, while positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3 and CD. Frequency of HLA DQ2, DR3 and DR16(2 was higher in first-degree relatives than in the control group while a positive association was found between HLA DQ2 and DR3. A negative association was found between HLA DQ5(1 and DQ6(1 in coeliac patients from Vojvodina and their relatives, in addition to HLA DR11(5 in the group of relatives (RR=0.363,PF=0.232. These findings indicate the impact of the HLA testing for CD in clinical practice in order to rule out the possibility to CD in doubtful cases or in at-risk subjects.

  4. The role of HLA-G in parasitic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, A; Sonon, P; Sadissou, I; Mendes-Junior, C T; Garcia, A; Donadi, E A; Courtin, D

    2018-01-25

    Little attention has been devoted to the role of HLA-G gene and molecule on parasitic disorders, and the available studies have focused on malaria, African and American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniosis, toxoplasmosis and echinococcosis. After reporting a brief description regarding the role of the cells of innate and adaptive immune system against parasites, we reviewed the major features of the HLA-G gene and molecule and the role of HLA-G on the major cells of immune system. Increased levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) have been observed in patients presenting toxoplasmosis and in the active phase of echinococcosis. In addition, increased sHLA-G has also been associated with increased susceptibility to malaria and increased susceptibility to develop human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). In contrast, decreased membrane-bound HLA-G has been reported in placenta of patients infected with Plasmodium falciparum and in heart and colon of patients presenting Chagas disease. The 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene has been the main focus of studies on malaria, HAT and Chagas disease, exhibiting distinct patterns of associations. Considering that HLA-G is an immune checkpoint molecule, inhibiting the activity of several cells of the immune system, the excessive neoexpression and the increased sHLA-G levels together with the decreased constitutive tissue expression of membrane-bound HLA-G may be detrimental to the host infected with parasite agents. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. A comparison of self-reported joint symptoms following infection with different enteric pathogens: effect of HLA-B27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiellerup, P.; Krogfelt, K.A.; Locht, H.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We conducted a case-case comparison study to estimate the attack-rate of reactive joint pain (JPrea) following intestinal infections, and evaluated whether the susceptibility and severity of joint symptoms was associated with the tissue-type HLA-B27. METHODS: Consecutive patients...... with positive fecal culture for Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, Shigella, and E. coli were addressed by questionnaires inquiring about gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and the occurrence of joint pain in a previously healthy joint within 4 weeks after onset of infection. A blood sample was requested for HLA......-B27 typing. RESULTS: Of 3146 patients invited, 2105 (67%) responded to the survey questionnaire. The triggering infections were Campylobacter, 1003; Salmonella, 619; E. coli, 290; Shigella, 102; and Yersinia, 91. JPrea was reported by 294 subjects: Campylobacter, 131 (13.1%); Salmonella, 104 (16...

  6. Association between HLA-G genotype and risk of pre-eclampsia: a case-control study using family triads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hylenius, Sine; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Melbye, Mads

    2004-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia affects 2-7% of all pregnancies with varying severity and is a leading cause of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. The aetiology involves almost certainly a combination of genetic predisposition with maternal and fetal contributions and environmental factors. Research points...... towards pathologies in the placenta as the triggering factor which leads to systemic endothelial dysfunction in the mother, probably as the result of interaction with released placental factors circulating in the maternal blood. One prominent hypothesis regarding the aetiology of pre-eclampsia suggests......RNA splicing. The results may also indicate that combined mother-child HLA-G genotypes could influence the risk of developing pre-eclampsia. Overall, the study suggests that HLA-G genotypes and expression might have a significant influence on development of pre-eclampsia....

  7. Full-length cDNA nucleotide sequence of a serologically undetectable HLA-DQA1 allele: HLA-DQA1*"LA".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardy, N M; Otting, N; van der Horst, A R; Bontrop, R E; de Waal, L P

    1997-10-01

    This study describes the characterization of a serological HLA-DQ"blank" specificity that segregates with the HLA-A2, -B7, -DR14, -DR52 haplotype. Although conventional serological typing techniques could not detect an HLA-DQ product on the haplotype positive for the HLA-DQ"blank" specificity, sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) dot-blot analysis demonstrated the presence of the HLA-DQA1*01 and HLA-DQB1*05 alleles. Full-length cDNA nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the HLA-DQB1 allele that segregated with the HLA-DQ"blank" specificity was identical to HLA-DQB1*05031. As for the HLA DQA1 allele, one nucleotide substitution distinguished the HLA-DQA1 "blank" allele from HLA-DQA1*0104. In exon 2 at nucleotide position 304 a C was substituted for a T (Arg-->Cys). Pending official recognition by the WHO Nomenclature Committee, this HLA-DQA1 "blank" allele is termed HLA-DQA1*"LA". Furthermore, it is postulated that the introduction of cysteine at amino acid position 102 abrogates the classical HLA-DQ1 specificity.

  8. Association between the major histocompatibility complex and clinical response to infliximab therapy in patients with Behçet uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, Kana; Sakai, Tsutomu; Kohno, Hideo; Okano, Kiichiro; Akiyama, Goichi; Aoyagi, Ranko; Inaba, Mayumi; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to investigate whether major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphisms are associated with response to infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with Behçet uveitis (BU). We retrospectively reviewed 24 patients (17 men and seven women) treated with infliximab for BU. Of them, ten patients were genotyped as HLA A*2601, and nine as HLA B*5101. Therapeutic response levels in the two groups were compared based on ocular attacks and the Behçet disease ocular attack score 24 (BOS24) over 24 months of treatment. Mean frequencies of ocular attacks at 13-18 and 19-24 months after the start of treatment were significantly higher in the HLA A*2601 group (P = 0.0392 and 0.0177, respectively). Mean BOS24-6 M values for months 1-6, 7-12, 13-18, and 19-24 were also significantly higher in the HLA A*2601 group (P = 0.0459, 0.0150, 0.0394, and 0.0178, respectively). Shortening of the infusion interval was required in eight patients in the HLA A*2601 group but in one only in the HLA B*5101 group. Behçet-disease-related adverse events occurred in eight patients in the HLA A*2601 group and two in the HLA B*5101 group. Nonocular adverse events occurred in four patients in the HLA A*2601 group and none in the HLA B*5101 group. Although mean change from baseline in the number of ocular attack scores in the HLA A26 and HLA B51 groups seemed to be similar, the HLA-A26 group had a more severe disease course under infliximab therapy for ocular/extraocular involvement. These data suggest that response to infliximab therapy in Japanese patients with BU is partly due to genetic determinants in the HLA complex.

  9. ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, B A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During the data taking period from 2009 until 2011, the ATLAS trigger has been very successfully used to collect proton-proton data at LHC centre-of-mass energies between 900 GeV and 7 TeV. The three-level trigger system reduces the event rate from the design bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to an average recording rate of about 300 Hz. Using custom electronics with input from the calorimeter and muon detectors, the first level rejects most background collisions in less than 2.5 microseconds. Then follow two levels of software-based triggers. The trigger system is designed to select events by identifying muons, electrons, photons, taus, jets and B hadron candidates, as well as using global event signatures, such as missing transverse energy. We give an overview of the strategy and performance of the different trigger selections based mainly on the experience during the 2011 LHC run, where the trigger menu needed quick adaptations to the continuous increase of luminosity throughout the year. Examples of trigger e...

  10. Development of an assay system for large scale analysis of HLA class II-binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyadera, Hiroko; Noguchi, Emiko; Mizokami, Masashi; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2017-01-01

    Genes encoding the human leukocyte antigens (HLA) are associated with diverse immunological disorders, including autoimmune diseases and infections. Recently, significant progresses have been made in the HLA typing technologies through the use of next generation sequencers. The reliable platforms for the SNP-based imputation of HLA genotypes have also been established. These technical advancements should enable further identification of HLA associations with diseases. One of the remaining questions is the mechanism through which HLA confer disease susceptibility. As a first step toward comprehensive understanding of functional variations among HLA allele products, we established a protocol to analyze the HLA-binding peptides through quantification of cell-surface HLA expression in an engineered cell line. In this article, we summarize the overview of the cell-surface HLA expression assay, which we plan to use for screening and collection of HLA-peptide interaction profiles for large sets of HLA alleles and peptides.

  11. Creation of an immunodeficient HLA-transgenic mouse (HUMAMICE and functional validation of human immunity after transfer of HLA-matched human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zeng

    Full Text Available Research on human immunology has been hindered by the lack of optimal small animal models, given that the protective immune responses of human and non-human species show significant differences. However, due to ethical constraints[1] and the high cost of clinical trials, it is urgent to improve the current animal models that can mimic faithfully human physiology, particularly the human immune system (HIS. HIS mice had been generated recently by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSCs or human peripheral mononuclear cells (hPBMCs into highly immuno-deficient mice such as NSG, NOG or NRG mice. However, a major experimental drawback for studies using these models is the rapid onset of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD. In the present study, we overcome this limitation by generating new immuno-deficient mice named "HUMAMICE" (HLA-A2+/+/DR1+/+/H-2-β2m-/-/IAβ-/-/Rag2-/-/IL2rγ-/-/Perf-/- mice, which expressed human HLA molecules instead of mouse MHC molecules (H-2, and whose immuno-deficient status was reversed by transferring functional HLA-matched PBMCs thus producing mice with an immuno-competent status with a functional human immune system. We showed that in this HLA-matched context, the hPBMC-transfer led to high lymphocytes engraftment rates without GvHD over three months in this novel mouse model. Furthermore, to evaluate the utility of the hPBMC-HUMAMICE, we immunized them with commercial vaccine of Hepatitis B virus (HBsAg, Hepvac@ which resulted in robust and reproducible production of high levels of HBsAg-specific antibodies, implying that both transferred T and B lymphocytes were functional in HUMAMICE. These responses are comparable to those observed in human clinical trials with this identical vaccine. In conclusion, these findings indicated that the HLA-matched-hPBMC-HUMAMICE represents a promising model for dissecting human immune responses in various human diseases, including infectious diseases, cancers and tumors, and to

  12. Association between CTL precursor frequency to HLA-C mismatches and HLA-C antigen cell surface expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe eIsraeli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed the relevance of the cytotoxic T cell precursor frequency assay (CTLp for prediction of the outcome of HLA mismatched hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT. Recently it has been shown that HLA-C cell surface expression is correlated with virus specific cytotoxic T cell responses and viremia control in HIV patients.The aim of the current study was to investigate the association between HLA-C antigen expression and the CTLp frequency to the mismatched HLA-C antigen.In total 115 recipient–donor pairs, for whom a successful CTLp assay was performed, were evaluated for this pilot study. All donor-recipient pairs were matched at 9/10 alleles with a single mismatch at the HLA-C locus. Antigen expression level of the mismatched HLA-C allele for each recipient and donor was based on the MFI values as described by Apps et al (Science, 2013.The cell surface expression of recipient’s mismatched HLA-C antigen was significantly lower among CTLp negative (n=59 compared to CTLp positive (n=56 pairs (154 and 193 MFI units, respectively; p=0.0031. This difference was more pronounced in donor-recipient pairs that were mismatched for amino-acid residue-116 located in the groove of the HLA-C antigen, suggesting the importance of peptide binding in the allo-recognition. Furthermore, in the particular case of low expression of the recipient mismatched HLA-C antigen (MFI<115, CTLp reactivity depended on HLA-C expression level in the donor; the median MFI of donor’s mismatched HLA-C antigen was 114 in CTLp negative cases (n=26, while in CTLp positive cases (n=15 the median MFI of donor’s HLA-C antigen was 193. (P=0.0093.We conclude that the expression level of the donor and recipient mismatched HLA-C antigens affect CTLp outcome. HLA-C antigen expression levels in combination with the CTLp assay may prove useful for the prediction of the clinical outcome of HLA-C mismatched HCT.

  13. HLA-DR7 and HLA-DQ2: Transgenic mouse strains tested as a model system for ximelagatran hepatotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Lundgren

    Full Text Available The oral thrombin inhibitor ximelagatran was withdrawn in the late clinical trial phase because it adversely affected the liver. In approximately 8% of treated patients, drug-induced liver injury (DILI was expressed as transient alanine transaminase (ALT elevations. No evidence of DILI had been revealed in the pre-clinical in vivo studies. A whole genome scan study performed on the clinical study material identified a strong genetic association between the major histocompatibility complex alleles for human leucocyte antigens (HLA (HLA-DR7 and HLA-DQ2 and elevated ALT levels in treated patients. An immune-mediated pathogenesis was suggested. Here, we evaluated whether HLA transgenic mice models could be used to investigate whether the expression of relevant HLA molecules was enough to reproduce the DILI effects in humans. In silico modelling performed in this study revealed association of both ximelagatran (pro-drug and melagatran (active drug to the antigen-presenting groove of the homology modelled HLA-DR7 molecule suggesting "altered repertoire" as a key initiating event driving development of DILI in humans. Transgenic mouse strains (tgms expressing HLA of serotype HLA-DR7 (HLA-DRB1*0701, -DRA*0102, and HLA-DQ2 (HLA-DQB1*0202,-DQA1*0201 were created. These two lines were crossed with a human (hCD4 transgenic line, generating the two tgms DR7xhCD4 and DQ2xhCD4. To investigate whether the DILI effects observed in humans could be reproduced in tgms, the mice were treated for 28 days with ximelagatran. Results revealed no signs of DILI when biomarkers for liver toxicity were measured and histopathology was evaluated. In the ximelagatran case, presence of relevant HLA-expression in a pre-clinical model did not fulfil the prerequisite for reproducing DILI observed in patients. Nonetheless, for the first time an HLA-transgenic mouse model has been investigated for use in HLA-associated DILI induced by a low molecular weight compound. This study

  14. Expression of the nonclassical HLA-G and HLA-E molecules in laryngeal lesions as biomarkers of tumor invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tarsia G; Crispim, Janaina C O; Miranda, Fabiana A; Hassumi, Marcela K; de Mello, Júlia M Y; Simões, Renata T; Souto, Francisco; Soares, Edson G; Donadi, Eduardo A; Soares, Christiane P

    2011-12-01

    HLA-G and HLA-E are two nonclassical class I molecules, which have been well recognized as modulators of innate and adaptive immune responses, and the expression of these molecules in virus infected cells has been associated with subversion of the immune response. In this study we performed a cross-sectional study, systematically comparing the expression of HLA-G and HLA-E in benign, pre-malignant and malignant laryngeal lesions, correlating with demographic and clinical variables and with the presence of high-risk and low-risk HPV types. Laryngeal lesions were collected from 109 patients and stratified into 27 laryngeal papillomas, 17 dysplasias, 10 in situ laryngeal carcinomas, 27 laryngeal carcinomas without metastases, 28 laryngeal carcinomas with metastasis along with their respective draining cervical lymph nodes, and 10 normal larynx specimens. The expression of HLA-G and HLA-E molecules was determined by immunohistochemistry. HPV DNA detection and typing was performed using generic and specific primers. HLA nonclassical molecules showed a distinct distribution pattern, according to the larynx lesion grade. HLA-G expression increased in benign and premalignant lesions, and gradually decreased in invasive carcinomas and in respective draining cervical lymph nodes. Conversely, HLA-E expression increased as far as lesion grade increased, including increased molecule expression in the draining lymph nodes of malignant lesions. Only 17 (15.6%) patients were HPV DNA positive. Overexpression of HLA-E and underexpression of HLA-G appear to be good markers for malignant larynx lesion.

  15. Soluble-HLA-E: A follow up biomarker in Takayasu arteritis, independent of HLA-E genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Ruchika; Kabeerdoss, Jayakanthan; Mohan, Hindhumathi; Danda, Sumita; Jayaseelan, Visali; Kumar, T Sathish; Jude, John; Bacon, Paul; Joseph, George; Danda, Debashish

    2018-02-01

    Disease activity assessment in Takayasu arteritis (TA) is challenging. Human leukocyte antigen E (HLA-E) is shed from endothelium into serum as a soluble molecule (sHLA-E) in response to inflammation. We aimed to study: (i) utility of sHLA-E as a biomarker of disease activity; and (ii) association of HLA-E polymorphism rs1264457 with clinical disease in Asian-Indian TA patients. In phase-1, sHLA-E levels were estimated in sera of 50 consecutive TA patients at baseline visit and 27 healthy controls. Serial estimations were performed in 27 of them. In phase-2, DNA of 150 TA patients and 264 healthy controls were genotyped for rs1264457 polymorphism. At baseline visit, disease was classified as active, stable and grumbling in 23, 18 and nine patients, respectively. sHLA-E levels were higher in active TA (43; interquartile range [IQR]: 25.3-64.6) pg/mL) than stable disease (12.9; IQR: 7.6-21.6 pg/mL) (P = 0.001). At first follow-up visit, sHLA-E levels were numerically higher in active disease than stable disease (P = 0.06) but this trend was blunted at second follow-up. sHLA-E levels increased in 54% versus 25% of patients with persistently active/relapsing and persistent stable course, respectively. rs1264457 polymorphism was not associated with susceptibility to TA and did not affect sHLA-E levels. sHLA-E level is useful as a biomarker of disease activity and course in TA patients. rs1264457 polymorphism is neither associated with susceptibility nor did it influence sHLA-E levels in TA. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. HLA-G and classical HLA class I expression in primary colorectal cancer and associated liver metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swets, Marloes; König, Marion H; Zaalberg, Anniek; Dekker-Ensink, Neeltje G; Gelderblom, Hans; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; van den Elsen, Peter J; Kuppen, Peter J K

    2016-09-01

    De novo expression of HLA-G has been demonstrated in colorectal cancer. HLA-G, amongst others, inhibits natural killer cell function, contributing to host immune defense evasion. Another mechanism to escape anti-tumor immunity is loss of HLA class I. Therefore, we determined HLA-G and HLA class I expression on primary colorectal tumors and associated liver metastases, in order to get insight in the metastasizing process regarding escaping anti-tumor immunity. HLA-G expression was evaluated using three mAbs; 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2. In total 81 colorectal cancer patients were evaluated. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections of primary tumors and associated liver metastases, were immunohistochemically stained. A concordance between expression or loss/downregulation in the primary tumor and associated liver metastasis regarding HLA class I expression was observed in 80% of the cases. In contrast with the hypothesis of escaping NK cell-killing, we demonstrated for each HLA-G detecting mAbs used in this study, that the majority of the primary tumors that positively stained for HLA-G did not express HLA-G in the associated liver metastasis. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of non-specific binding and in addition we found that the different epitopes of HLA-G detected by 4H84, MEM-G/1 and MEM-G/2 mAbs were expressed differentially in colorectal tumor tissues. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. HLA-DR expression and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Elling, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1986-01-01

    -DR antigens on rectal epithelial cells of patients with UC could not be predicted from the clinical, rectoscopic, or histologic findings. HLA-DR expression is normally restricted to immunocompetent cells. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on epithelial cells may be a consequence of immunological reactions...

  18. Association between HLA-DQA1 gene copy number polymorphisms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-21

    Apr 21, 2014 ... cells. Genetic variations including sequence and CN of HLA genes contribute to enhance the recognition repertoire of the immune system, as well as to wide range of disease suscepti- bility. Specific alleles and gene-dosage of HLA-DQA1 have been associated with celiac disease (Docampo et al. 2010).

  19. HLA class I binding prediction via convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, Yeeleng S; Xie, Xiaohui

    2017-09-01

    Many biological processes are governed by protein-ligand interactions. One such example is the recognition of self and non-self cells by the immune system. This immune response process is regulated by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein which is encoded by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. Understanding the binding potential between MHC and peptides can lead to the design of more potent, peptide-based vaccines and immunotherapies for infectious autoimmune diseases. We apply machine learning techniques from the natural language processing (NLP) domain to address the task of MHC-peptide binding prediction. More specifically, we introduce a new distributed representation of amino acids, name HLA-Vec, that can be used for a variety of downstream proteomic machine learning tasks. We then propose a deep convolutional neural network architecture, name HLA-CNN, for the task of HLA class I-peptide binding prediction. Experimental results show combining the new distributed representation with our HLA-CNN architecture achieves state-of-the-art results in the majority of the latest two Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) weekly automated benchmark datasets. We further apply our model to predict binding on the human genome and identify 15 genes with potential for self binding. Codes to generate the HLA-Vec and HLA-CNN are publicly available at: https://github.com/uci-cbcl/HLA-bind . xhx@ics.uci.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Criteria to define HLA haplotype loss in human solid tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramal, LM; van der Zwan, AW; Collado, A; Lopez-Nevot, MA; Tilanus, M; Garrido, F

    Short tandem repeat (STR) markers are currently used to define loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of genes and chromosomes in tumors. Chromosome 6 and chromosome 15 STR markers are applied to define loss of HLA and related genes (e.g. TAP and beta(2)m) The number of STR identified in the HLA region is

  1. Relationship between the HLA-B*1502 allele and carbamazepine-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangamornsuksan, Wimonchat; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn; Somkrua, Ratchadaporn; Lohitnavy, Manupat; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra

    2013-09-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration recommends screening for the HLA-B*1502 allele before initiation of carbamazepine therapy in patients of Asian ancestry, but there remains unclear evidence of a relationship between HLA-B*1502 and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) among carbamazepine users, especially in some racial/ethnic populations. To determine the relationship between the HLA-B*1502 allele and carbamazepine-induced SJS and TEN. A comprehensive search of the following data sources was performed without language restriction from the inception of the database until January 8, 2013: EMBASE, PubMed, clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane Library, IPA (International Pharmaceutical Abstracts), HuGENet (Human Genome Epidemiology Network), and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), and the reference lists of identified studies. Inclusion criteria were studies that investigated the relationship between HLA-B*1502 and carbamazepine-induced SJS and TEN and that reported sufficient data for calculating the frequency of HLA-B*1502 carriers among cases and controls. The search yielded 525 articles, of which 16 met the inclusion criteria. The studies included 227 SJS or TEN cases, 602 matched control subjects, and 2949 population control subjects. Two reviewers independently extracted the following data: study design, eligibility criteria, diagnostic criteria, patient demographics, genotype distribution, HLA-B genotyping technique, selection of cases and controls, dosage of carbamazepine and duration of use, and results of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the control group. The Newcastle-Ottawa Scale was used to assess the quality of studies. The overall odds ratios (ORs) with corresponding 95% CIs were calculated using a random-effects model. The primary analysis was based on matched control studies. Subgroup analyses by race/ethnicity were also performed. The primary outcome was carbamazepine-induced SJS and TEN. The

  2. Ultraspecific probes for high throughput HLA typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggers Rick

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The variations within an individual's HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen genes have been linked to many immunological events, e.g. susceptibility to disease, response to vaccines, and the success of blood, tissue, and organ transplants. Although the microarray format has the potential to achieve high-resolution typing, this has yet to be attained due to inefficiencies of current probe design strategies. Results We present a novel three-step approach for the design of high-throughput microarray assays for HLA typing. This approach first selects sequences containing the SNPs present in all alleles of the locus of interest and next calculates the number of base changes necessary to convert a candidate probe sequences to the closest subsequence within the set of sequences that are likely to be present in the sample including the remainder of the human genome in order to identify those candidate probes which are "ultraspecific" for the allele of interest. Due to the high specificity of these sequences, it is possible that preliminary steps such as PCR amplification are no longer necessary. Lastly, the minimum number of these ultraspecific probes is selected such that the highest resolution typing can be achieved for the minimal cost of production. As an example, an array was designed and in silico results were obtained for typing of the HLA-B locus. Conclusion The assay presented here provides a higher resolution than has previously been developed and includes more alleles than previously considered. Based upon the in silico and preliminary experimental results, we believe that the proposed approach can be readily applied to any highly polymorphic gene system.

  3. The short-term effects of trigger point therapy, stretching and medicine ball exercises on accuracy and back swing hip turn in elite, male golfers - A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Samantha-Lynn; Olivier, Benita; Wood, Wendy-Ann

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of myofascial trigger point therapy (MTPT) and stretching, MTPT and medicine ball exercises, and no intervention, on hip flexor length (HFL), golf swing biomechanics and performance in elite, male golfers. Single blind, randomised controlled trial with two experimental groups (stretch group: MTPT and stretching; and the ball group: MTPT, a single stretch and medicine ball exercises) and one control group (no intervention). Professional golf academy. One hundred, elite, male golfers aged 16-25 years. HFL, 3D biomechanical analysis of the golf swing, club head speed (CHS), smash ratio, accuracy and distance at baseline and after the interventions. Backswing hip turn (BSHT) improved in the ball group relative to the control group (p = 0.0248). Accuracy in the ball group and the stretch group improved relative to the control group (Fisher's exact = 0.016). Other performance parameters such as: smash ratio, distance and CHS were not compromised by either intervention. This study advocates the use of MTPT combined with medicine ball exercises over MTPT combined with stretching in the treatment of golfers with shortened hip flexors - even immediately preceding a tournament. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of the Classical and Nonclassical HLA Molecules in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Gisela Bevilacqua Rolfsen Ferreira; Silva, Tarsia Giabardo Alves; Duarte, Roberta Aparecida; Neto, Nicolino Lia; Carrara, Hélio Humberto Angotti; Donadi, Eduardo Antônio; Gonçalves, Maria Alice Guimarães; Soares, Edson Garcia; Soares, Christiane Pienna

    2013-01-01

    Considering that downregulation of HLA expression could represent a potential mechanism for breast carcinogenesis and metastasis, the aim of the present study was to use immunohistochemical methods to analyze the expression of HLA-Ia, HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, HLA-E, and HLA-G in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast and to relate this HLA profile to anatomopathological parameters. Fifty-two IDC from breast biopsies were stratified according to histological differentiation (well, moderately, and poorly differentiated) and to the presence of metastases in axillary lymph nodes. The expression of HLA molecules was assessed by immunohistochemistry, using a computer-assisted system. Overall, 31 (59.6%) out of the 52 IDC breast biopsies exhibited high expression of HLA-G, but only 14 (26.9%) showed high expression of HLA-E. A large number (41, 78.8%) of the biopsies showed low expression of HLA-Ia, while 45 (86.5%) showed high expression of HLA-DQ and 36 (69.2%) underexpressed HLA-DR. Moreover, 24 (41.2%) of 52 biopsies had both low HLA-Ia expression and high HLA-G expression, while 11 (21.2%) had low HLA-Ia expression and high HLA-E expression. These results suggest that, by different mechanisms, the downregulation of HLA-Ia, HLA-E, and HLA-DR and the upregulation of HLA-G and HLA-DQ are associated with immune response evasion and breast cancer aggressiveness. PMID:24363939

  5. HLA, aging, and longevity: a critical reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, C; Candore, G; Colonna Romano, G; Lio, D; Bonafè, M; Valensin, S; Franceschi, C

    2000-09-01

    Despite a large number of studies, available data do not allow at present to reach definitive and clear conclusions on role of HLA on longevity, owing to major methodological problems, such as serological and molecular typing of different loci, insufficient sample sizes, different inclusion criteria and age cut-off, inappropriate mixing of data referred to people from 58 to over 100 years of age, inappropriate control matching, and neglected consideration of sex-related effects and the different genetic make-up of studied populations. However, within this confused scenario, some data emerge. First, two studies that do not fit the biases above discussed show that some HLA alleles are associated with longevity. However, some of these alleles may confer an increased risk to undergo a variety of diseases. Second, longevity may be associated with an increased homozygosity at HLA loci. Third, an intriguing association between longevity and the 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH), which has been proven to be associated with a variety of immune dysfunctions and autoimmune diseases, apparently emerges. This association appears to be a sex-specific (males) longevity contributor, and it is particularly interesting, taking into account that a type 2 (early infancy) --> type 1 (adulthood) --> type 2 (aging) shift of cytokine profile occurs lifelong, and that individuals bearing this haplotype show a type 2 immune responsiveness (note that type 1 cytokines mainly enhance cellular responses, whereas type 2 cytokines predominantly enhance humoral responses). On the whole, the (sex specific) association of longevity with alleles or haplotypes of several genes related to risk factors for a variety of diseases (cardiovascular diseases, cancer), including HLA alleles and haplotypes, is not unexpected on the basis of previous studies on the genetics of longevity in centenarians. This association can be interpreted under the perspective of a well known evolutionary theory of aging

  6. The interaction between smoking and HLA genes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedström, Anna Karin; Katsoulis, Michail; Hössjer, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between environment and genetics may contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) development. We investigated whether the previously observed interaction between smoking and HLA genotype in the Swedish population could be replicated, refined and extended to include other populations. We used...... populations from the Nordic studies (6265 cases, 8401 controls). In both the pooled analyses and in the combined Nordic material, interactions were observed between HLA-DRB*15 and absence of HLA-A*02 and between smoking and each of the genetic risk factors. Two way interactions were observed between each...... combination of the three variables, invariant over categories of the third. Further, there was also a three way interaction between the risk factors. The difference in MS risk between the extremes was considerable; smokers carrying HLA-DRB1*15 and lacking HLA-A*02 had a 13-fold increased risk compared...

  7. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Hauser, R

    2004-01-01

    ATLAS is one of two general-purpose detectors at the next generation proton-proton collider, the LHC. The high rate of interactions and the large number of read-out channels make the trigger system for ATLAS a challenging task. The initial bunch crossing rate of 40~MHz has to be reduced to about 200 Hz while preserving the physics signals against a large background. ATLAS uses a three-level trigger system, with the first level implemented in custom hardware, while the high level trigger systems are implemented in software on commodity hardware. This note describes the physics motivation, the various selection strategies for different channels as well as the physical implementation of the trigger system.

  8. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the fingers glide easily with the help of pulleys. These pulleys hold the tendons close to the bone. This ... rod (Figure 1). Trigger finger occurs when the pulley becomes too thick, so the tendon cannot glide ...

  9. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  10. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asthma. Dogs, cats, rodents (including hamsters and guinea pigs) and other warm-blooded mammals can trigger asthma ... Page Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem. Asthma Indoor Air Quality ...

  11. A multicentre study of acute kidney injury in severe sepsis and septic shock: association with inflammatory phenotype and HLA genotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Payen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To investigate the association between severity of acute kidney injury (AKI and outcome, systemic inflammatory phenotype and HLA genotype in severe sepsis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prospective multicenter observational study done in 4 intensive care units in two university hospitals. Severe sepsis and septic shock patients with at least 2 organ failures based on the SOFA score were classified: 1 "no AKI", 2 "mild AKI" (grouping stage 1 and 2 of AKIN score and 3 "severe AKI" (stage 3 of AKIN score. Sequential measurements: The vasopressor dependency index (VDI; dose and types of drugs to evaluate the association between hemodynamic status and the development of early AKI; plasma levels of IL-10, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF, IL-6 and HLA-DR monocyte expression. Genotyping of the 13 HLA-DRB1 alleles with deduction of presence of HLA-DRB3, -DRB4 and -DRB5 genes. We used multivariate analysis with competitive risk model to study associations. Overall, 176 study patients (146 with septic shock were classified from AKIN score as "no AKI" (n = 43, "mild AKI" (n = 74 or "severe AKI" (n = 59. The VDI did not differ between groups of AKI. After adjustment, "mild and severe AKI" were an independent risk factor for mortality (HR 2.42 95%CI[1.01-5.83], p = 0.048 and HR 1.99 95%CI[1.30-3.03], p = 0.001 respectively. "Severe AKI" had higher levels of plasma IL-10, MIF and IL-6 compared to "no AKI" and mild AKI (p<0.05 for each, with no difference in mHLA-DR at day 0. HLA-DRB genotyping showed a significantly lower proportion of 4 HLA-DRB alleles among patients requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT (58% than in patients with severe AKI who did not receive RRT (84% (p = 0.004. CONCLUSIONS: AKI severity is independently associated with mortality and plasma IL-10, MIF or IL-6 levels. Presence of 4 alleles of HLA-DRB in severe AKI patients seems associated with a lower need of RRT.

  12. 2017 Tau Trigger Efficiencies

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Triggers selecting events with hadronically decaying $\\tau$ leptons ($\\tau_h$) are used in a wide variety of CMS analyses, in particular those targeting processes with a $H \\rightarrow \\tau\\tau$ decay. The performance of the $\\tau_h$ triggers is presented for data collected in 2017, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 41.5\\,fb$^{-1}$ at 13 TeV, and compared with simulation.

  13. The ATLAS Trigger System

    CERN Document Server

    Owen, Rhys Edward; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment employs a complex trigger system to enable the collaborations physics program. The LHC is now well in to its second running period delivering proton proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with high instantaneous luminosity. This talk will describe the two level hardware and software trigger used to select events in this environment including recent improvements and the latest performance results.

  14. First report on the antibody verification of HLA-ABC epitopes recorded in the website-based HLA Epitope Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, R J; Marrari, M; Mulder, A; Sousa, L C D da Mata; da Silva, A S; do Monte, S J H

    2014-06-01

    The International Registry of Antibody-Defined HLA Epitopes ( http://www.epregistry.com.br) has been recently established as a tool to understand humoral responses to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches. These epitopes are defined structurally by three-dimensional molecular modeling and amino acid sequence differences between HLA antigens. So-called eplets represent essential components of HLA epitopes and they are defined by polymorphic residues. A major goal is to identify HLA epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. Our analysis has also included data in many publications. As of 1 November 2013, 95 HLA-ABC antibody-verified epitopes have been recorded, 62 correspond to eplets and 33 are defined by eplets paired with other residue configurations. The Registry is still a work-in-progress and will become a useful resource for HLA professionals interested in histocompatibility testing at the epitope level and investigating antibody responses to HLA mismatches in transplant patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A genomic study on distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A and HLA-B alleles in Lak population of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Shahsavar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological studies based on the highly polymorphic gene, human leukocyte antigen (HLA, provide useful information for bone marrow donor registry, forensic medicine, disease association studies, as well as infertility treatment, designing peptide vaccines against tumors, and infectious or autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in 100 unrelated Lak/lᴂk/individuals from Lorestan province of Iran. Finally, we compared the results with that previously described in Iranian population. Commercial HLA-Type kits from BAG (Lich, Germany company were used for determination of the HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in genomic DNA, based on polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP assay. The differences between the populations in distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles were estimated by chi-squared test with Yate's correction. The most frequent HLA-A alleles were *24 (20%, *02 (18%, *03 (12% and *11 (10%, and the most frequent HLA-B alleles were *35 (24%, *51 (16%, *18 (6% and *38 (6% in Lak population. HLA-A*66 (1%, *74(1% and HLA-B*48 (1%, *55(1% were the least observed frequencies in Lak population. Our results based on HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies showed that Lak population possesses the previously reported general features of Iranians but still with unique.

  16. An increased HLA DR2 frequency is seen in aplastic anemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimer, S D; Ireland, P; Meshkinpour, A; Frane, M

    1994-08-01

    The underlying etiology of aplastic anemia is unknown in the majority of patients, although medications, chemical exposure, or viral infections can be implicated in some. Genetic susceptibility to a variety of diseases has been shown and it has recently been suggested that aplastic anemia is more common in individuals who are HLA DR2+ than in the general population. To examine this question, we retrospectively analyzed the results of HLA-DR typing in 75 aplastic anemia patients who received antithymocyte globulin (ATG) therapy or an HLA-matched sibling bone marrow transplant at UCLA between 1978 and 1989. Thirty-one patients were DR2+, a 1.9-fold higher incidence than the expected number of 16.6 patients (P < .0005). Of the 37 patients who received ATG, 33 were evaluable for a response; 14 patients had either a complete (4 patients) or partial (10 patients) response, for an overall response rate of 42.4%. Of the 14 DR2+ patients who received ATG, 7 responded, for a 50% response rate, which is not significantly higher than the response rate for the DR2- patients (7 of 19 [36.8%]; P = .50). The median survival of patients who are DR2+ was slightly, but not significantly, longer than that of the DR2- patients in the ATG group (P = .19). Although the incidence of HLA DR2 was clearly increased in these patients with aplastic anemia, response rates to ATG were not significantly different in the DR2+ and DR2- patients.

  17. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00400931; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-23

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. ...

  18. Topological Trigger Developments

    CERN Multimedia

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected an almost 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%, and its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and uBoost. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. These inclu...

  19. TCR Gene Transfer: MAGE-C2/HLA-A2 and MAGE-A3/HLA-DP4 Epitopes as Melanoma-Specific Immune Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudy Straetemans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with TCR gene-engineered T cells provides an attractive and feasible treatment option for cancer patients. Further development of TCR gene therapy requires the implementation of T-cell target epitopes that prevent “on-target” reactivity towards healthy tissues and at the same time direct a clinically effective response towards tumor tissues. Candidate epitopes that meet these criteria are MAGE-C2336-344/HLA-A2 (MC2/A2 and MAGE-A3243-258/HLA-DP4 (MA3/DP4. We molecularly characterized TCRαβ genes of an MC2/A2-specific CD8 and MA3/DP4-specific CD4 T-cell clone derived from melanoma patients who responded clinically to MAGE vaccination. We identified MC2/A2 and MA3/DP4-specific TCR-Vα3/Vβ28 and TCR-Vα38/Vβ2 chains and validated these TCRs in vitro upon gene transfer into primary human T cells. The MC2 and MA3 TCR were surface-expressed and mediated CD8 T-cell functions towards melanoma cell lines and CD4 T-cell functions towards dendritic cells, respectively. We intend to start testing these MAGE-specific TCRs in phase I clinical trial.

  20. Impact of genetic variations and transcriptional alterations of HLA class I genes on cervical cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Ghosh, Damayanti; Mukhopadhyay, Indranil; Bhattacharya, Amrapali; Roy Chowdhury, Rahul; Mandal, Nidhu Ranjan; Roy, Sudipta; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2017-06-01

    In a novel attempt to understand the variations in DNA sequences underlying HLA class I alleles associated with HPV16-related CaCx, we determined the alleles by reconstructing SNP-based haplotypes from resequencing of the most polymorphic exons 2 and 3 of HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C. We also determined the impact of SNPs and transcriptional alterations of the genes on CaCx. A high density of SNPs was identified from resequencing. HLA expression was determined by real-time PCR. We identified that even a single associated HLA allele had many underlying SNP-based haplotypes. Out of the most frequent (≥5%) HLA class I alleles, HLA-B*40:06 and HLA-B*15:02 respectively imparted significant risk towards and protection from CaCx as well as HPV16 infection. Employing median-joining networks to detect clusters of sequence-variations for specific HLA alleles, we found the protective SNP-based signature, GAATTTA, in all SNP-based haplotypes of HLA-B*15:02 allele. The signature was derived from seven SNPs within HLA-B which were newly associated with the disease. Contrarily, similarly derived risk-signature, TTGCGCC, mapped only to 52% of SNP-based haplotypes of HLA-B*40:06 allele. This indicated that all SNP-based haplotypes underlying a particular associated HLA allele might or might not have a single signature of risk/protection. HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C expressions were downregulated among CaCx cases compared to asymptomatic infections and HPV-negative controls. HLA-A and HLA-B were repressed in both cases harbouring episomal and integrated HPV16, whereas HLA-C in only the latter. Novel genetic variations and differential downregulation-patterns of HLA class I have a significant bearing on HPV16-related CaCx pathogenesis. © 2017 UICC.

  1. [Unclassifiable inflammatory rheumatism with HLA B27].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, O; Vignoli, M; Ryckewaert, A

    1982-01-01

    The authors report on 25 patients carrying the HLA B27 histocompatibility antigen and suffering from un-classifiable inflammatory rheumatism. The group included 12 men and 13 women. At the time of the initial observation, the inflammatory rheumatism was localised particularly in the lower limbs, knees, ankles and heels, in 14 of the cases; 7 of the cases revealed chronic polyarthritis, with a largely symmetrical involvement of the joints in the fingers. At the end of the observation period, which lasted 38 months, on average (from 6 months to 1 1/2 years), the series included 3 cases of sero-negative polyarthritis, with symmetrical involvement of the fingers and bony erosions which can probably be classified with cases of rheumatoid polyarthritis (HLA B27 being a coincidence), 2 certain and 3 possible cases of ankylosing spondylarthritis. For several years following the onset of the disease, the majority of the other patient continued to suffer rheumatism of the lower limbs in exacerbations and often accompanied by talalgia.

  2. Donor-reactive cytokine profiles after HLA-identical living-related kidney transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Gerrits (Jeroen); J. van de Wetering (Jacqueline); J.J. Drabbels (Jos); F.H.J. Claas (Frans); W. Weimar (Willem); N.M. van Besouw (Nicole)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. After HLA-identical living-related (LR) kidney transplantation, only non-HLA antigen mismatches between donor and recipient may exist. We questioned whether donor-reactive responses against non-HLA antigens could be found after HLA-identical LR kidney transplantation, and

  3. Computational Approaches to Facilitate Epitope-Based HLA Matching in Solid Organ Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Geneugelijk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epitope-based HLA matching has been emerged over the last few years as an improved method for HLA matching in solid organ transplantation. The epitope-based matching concept has been incorporated in both the PIRCHE-II and the HLAMatchmaker algorithm to find the most suitable donor for a recipient. For these algorithms, high-resolution HLA genotype data of both donor and recipient is required. Since high-resolution HLA genotype data is often not available, we developed a computational method which allows epitope-based HLA matching from serological split level HLA typing relying on HLA haplotype frequencies. To validate this method, we simulated a donor-recipient population for which PIRCHE-II and eplet values were calculated when using both high-resolution HLA genotype data and serological split level HLA typing. The majority of the serological split level HLA-determined ln(PIRCHE-II/ln(eplet values did not or only slightly deviate from the reference group of high-resolution HLA-determined ln(PIRCHE-II/ln(eplet values. This deviation was slightly increased when HLA-C or HLA-DQ was omitted from the input and was substantially decreased when using two-field resolution HLA genotype data of the recipient and serological split level HLA typing of the donor. Thus, our data suggest that our computational approach is a powerful tool to estimate PIRCHE-II/eplet values when high-resolution HLA genotype data is not available.

  4. Strain-based HLA association analysis identified HLA-DRB1*09:01 associated with modern strain tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyo-Oka, L; Mahasirimongkol, S; Yanai, H; Mushiroda, T; Wattanapokayakit, S; Wichukchinda, N; Yamada, N; Smittipat, N; Juthayothin, T; Palittapongarnpim, P; Nedsuwan, S; Kantipong, P; Takahashi, A; Kubo, M; Sawanpanyalert, P; Tokunaga, K

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) occurs as a result of complex interactions between the host immune system and pathogen virulence factors. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules play an important role in the host immune system. However, no study has assessed the association between HLA class II genes and susceptibility to TB caused by specific strains. This study investigated the possible association of HLA class II genes with TB caused by modern and ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The study included 682 patients with TB and 836 control subjects who were typed for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles. MTB strains were classified using a large sequence polymorphism typing method. Association analysis was performed using common HLA alleles and haplotypes in different MTB strains. HLA association analysis of patients infected with modern MTB strains showed significant association for HLA-DRB1*09:01 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82; P-value = 9.88 × 10-4 ) and HLA-DQB1*03:03 alleles (OR = 1.76; P-value = 1.31 × 10-3 ) with susceptibility to TB. Haplotype analysis confirmed that these alleles were in strong linkage disequilibrium and did not exert an interactive effect. Thus, the results of this study showed an association between HLA class II genes and susceptibility to TB caused by modern MTB strains, suggesting the importance of strain-specific analysis to determine susceptibility genes associated with TB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Tregs and HLA-DR expression in sputum cells of COPD patients treated with tiotropium and formoterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holownia, A; Wielgat, P; Stasiak-Barmuta, A; Kwolek, A; Jakubow, P; Szepiel, P; Chyczewska, E; Braszko, J J; Mroz, R M

    2015-01-01

    Immune cells expressing the activation markers HLA-DR and regulatory T cells (Tregs) may be involved in the regulation of chronic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this study we analyzed native and activated cell profiles in sputum of 22 stable COPD patients receiving formoterol (F) or formoterol + tiotropium (F + T) for 3 months. Cells were isolated from induced sputum and were examined on Coulter flow cytometer using fluorescent antibodies specific for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD14, CD19, CD25, CD127, and HLA-DR antigens. Cell profiles and cell activation were assessed by analysis of HLA-DR, CD25, and CD127 co-expression in double-stained samples. Tregs were defined as CD4⁺CD25(high) CD127(low) cells. We found that the combined therapy significantly decreased the CD8⁺ cell number (p DR was expressed in about 10 % of sputum T or B cells and a higher expression was found on monocytes. The HLA-DR expression on lymphocytes, but not monocytes, was significantly lower (p DR expression in airway lymphocytes.

  6. Machine learning competition in immunology – Prediction of HLA class I binding peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Guang Lan; Ansari, Hifzur Rahman; Bradley, Phil

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies of immune system and related applications such as characterization of immune responses against pathogens, vaccine design, or optimization of therapies are combinatorially complex, time-consuming and expensive. The main methods for large-scale identification of T-cell epitopes...... of peptide binding, therefore, determines the accuracy of the overall method. Computational predictions of peptide binding to HLA, both class I and class II, use a variety of algorithms ranging from binding motifs to advanced machine learning techniques ( [Brusic et al., 2004] and [Lafuente and Reche, 2009...

  7. SIMPLIFYING CELIAC DISEASE PREDISPOSING HLA-DQ ALLELES DETERMINATION BY THE REAL TIME PCR METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole SELLESKI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Genetic susceptibility is associated with two sets of alleles, DQA1*05 - DQB1*02 and DQA1*03 - DQB1*03:02, which code for class II MHC DQ2 and DQ8 molecules, respectively. Approximately 90%-95% of celiac patients are HLA-DQ2 positive, and half of the remaining patients are HLA-DQ8 positive. In fact, during a celiac disease diagnostic workup, the absence of these specific DQA and DQB alleles has a near perfect negative predictive value. Objective Improve the detection of celiac disease predisposing alleles by combining the simplicity and sensitivity of real-time PCR (qPCR and melting curve analysis with the specificity of sequence-specific primers (SSP. Methods Amplifications of sequence-specific primers for DQA1*05 (DQ2, DQB1*02 (DQ2, and DQA1*03 (DQ8 were performed by the real time PCR method to determine the presence of each allele in independent reactions. Primers for Human Growth Hormone were used as an internal control. A parallel PCR-SSP protocol was used as a reference method to validate our results. Results Both techniques yielded equal results. From a total of 329 samples the presence of HLA predisposing alleles was determined in 187 (56.8%. One hundred fourteen samples (61% were positive for a single allele, 68 (36.3% for two alleles, and only 5 (2.7% for three alleles. Conclusion Results obtained by qPCR technique were highly reliable with no discordant results when compared with those obtained using PCR-SSP.

  8. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  9. CMS Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    During its second run of operation (Run 2) which started in 2015, the LHC will deliver a peak instantaneous luminosity that may reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with an average pile-up of about 55, far larger than the design value. Under these conditions, the online event selection is a very challenging task. In CMS, it is realized by a two-level trigger system the Level-1 (L1) Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has been through a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT go through big improvements; in particular, new appr...

  10. The CMS trigger system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; Damiao, D. De Jesus; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; El Sawy, M.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. 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C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. 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P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P., III; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, τ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  11. The CMS trigger system

    CERN Document Server

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Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; El Sawy, Mai; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Jain, Sandhya; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukherjee, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kothekar, Kunal; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellato, Marco; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Passaseo, Marina; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pegoraro, Matteo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Ventura, Sandro; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pozniak, Krzysztof; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kaminskiy, Alexandre; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, Rachel; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; 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Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; 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Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Cocoros, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; 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Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; 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Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; 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Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-01-24

    This paper describes the CMS trigger system and its performance during Run 1 of the LHC. The trigger system consists of two levels designed to select events of potential physics interest from a GHz (MHz) interaction rate of proton-proton (heavy ion) collisions. The first level of the trigger is implemented in hardware, and selects events containing detector signals consistent with an electron, photon, muon, $\\tau$ lepton, jet, or missing transverse energy. A programmable menu of up to 128 object-based algorithms is used to select events for subsequent processing. The trigger thresholds are adjusted to the LHC instantaneous luminosity during data taking in order to restrict the output rate to 100 kHz, the upper limit imposed by the CMS readout electronics. The second level, implemented in software, further refines the purity of the output stream, selecting an average rate of 400 Hz for offline event storage. The objectives, strategy and performance of the trigger system during the LHC Run 1 are described.

  12. Trigger Monitoring at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition system for the ATLAS experiment has to reduce the 40 MHz of LHC bunch crossing rate to ~200 Hz of recording rate. This is achieved through a complex distributed system composed by $sim$ 1.000 CPUs, about a third of the expected final size of the system. Monitoring the trigger behavior through all the trigger level is of fundamental importance to assess the quality of the data taken, to give fast feedback for the trigger configuration design and to monitor the stability of the HLT farm components. In this paper we will present the online monitoring framework and the various tools available in the ATLAS trigger system going from the ones that build the basic monitoring infrastructure and test the basic functionalities of the system to the more elaborated ones that checks the quality of the data taking looking at physics variables reconstructed online. The early experience in the 2009 cosmics data taking period will also be shown.

  13. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  14. HLA-DM Captures Partially Empty HLA-DR Molecules for Catalyzed Peptide Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Call, Melissa J.; Schulze, Monika-Sarah E. D.; Fowler, Kevin D.; Schubert, David A.; Seth, Nilufer P.; Sundberg, Eric J.; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms of HLA-DM catalyzed peptide exchange remain uncertain. We found that all stages of the interaction of DM with HLA-DR were dependent on the occupancy state of the peptide binding groove. High-affinity peptides were protected from removal by DM through two mechanisms: peptide binding induced dissociation of a long-lived complex of empty DR and DM, and high-affinity DR-peptide complexes bound DM only very slowly. Non-binding covalent DR-peptide complexes were converted to efficient DM binders upon truncation of an N-terminal peptide segment that emptied the P1 pocket and disrupted conserved hydrogen bonds to MHC. DM thus only binds to DR conformers in which a critical part of the binding site is vacant, due to spontaneous peptide motion. PMID:21131964

  15. Developmental Trigger Thumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twu, Jonathan; Angeles, Jovito

    2016-04-01

    Developmental trigger thumb, although uncommon, can be easily identifiable in the pediatric outpatient visit. Patients often present with their thumb locked in flexion and a firm nodule at the base of the thumb. The thumb is usually passively correctable and nonpainful. It is important to examine the opposite thumb as bilateral trigger thumbs occur at a rate of 25% to 30%. Nonsurgical options have been proposed in the past including watchful waiting, extension exercises, splinting, and steroid injections with mixed results. Surgical intervention is indicated when there is painful triggering or the thumb is not passively correctable. Surgical treatment is an outpatient procedure that involves releasing the thumb flexor tendon from a small fibrous sheath called the A1 pulley. The overall recurrence rate after surgery is 1.4%. Our recommendation is for early referral to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon to evaluate for the need for surgical intervention. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  17. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W [Tijeras, NM; Schare, Joshua M [Albuquerque, NM; Bunch, Kyle [Albuquerque, NM

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  18. Distributed Interactive Simulation: From DIS to HLA (Gedistribueerde Interactieve Simulatie: Van DIS naar HLA),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-01

    Data FOM Federation Object Model HLA High Level Architecture IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IP Internet Protocol (RFC 791...ra; CO ^!äi* ra <i<!^ to 5 <: ^!^ to; ra S!5 <: co < o ca z co z CO: CO CO ra co zjrajzlz Z; ro| ra ra to Z: CO; C0 co Z=2]2 co z 2JZ CO; CO 2

  19. HLA-DR expression and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Elling, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1986-01-01

    In 12 patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC) the rectal epithelial cells were analyzed for HLA-DR antigens by an immunohistochemical technique. The clinical, rectoscopic, and histologic stages were also determined. The investigations were carried out at the beginning of the study and 2 weeks......-DR antigens on rectal epithelial cells of patients with UC could not be predicted from the clinical, rectoscopic, or histologic findings. HLA-DR expression is normally restricted to immunocompetent cells. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on epithelial cells may be a consequence of immunological reactions...

  20. [Expression of HLA-G protein in trophoblast cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-qiu; Chen, Shi-ling; Xing, Fu-qi

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the expression of human leucocyte antigen protein G (HLA-G) in different trophoblast cells and different stages of pregnancy. The expression of HLA-G protein in normal placenta and trophoblasts of different trimesters was detected using immunohistochemical method (SP). HLA-G protein expression exhibited spatio-temporal changes, which located in the extravillous trophoblast (EVT) and was higher in the placenta of the first and second trimesters while lower in the third trimester (PHLA-G protein expression in different stages of pregnancy and different trophoblasts may be related to the controlled invasion of the trophoblast.

  1. Metabolic triggered inflammation in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Hunter, D; Xu, J; Ding, C

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common chronic joint disorder with a multifactorial etiology including genetic and environmental factors. Metabolic triggered inflammation, induced by nutrient overload and metabolic surplus, consists of components such as obesity, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines, abnormal metabolites, acute phase proteins, vitamin D deficiency, and deregulated microRNAs that may play a role in OA pathophysiology. Obesity-related metabolic factors, especially adipokines, contribute to OA development by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines and degradative enzymes, leading to cartilage matrix impairment and subchondral bone remodeling. Ectopic metabolite deposition and low-grade systemic inflammation can contribute to a toxic internal environment that exacerbates OA. Complement components highly expressed in osteoarthritic joints have also been proposed as causative factors. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with obesity and is implicated to be associated with cartilage loss in OA. Metabolic microRNAs may explain the inflammatory link between obesity and OA. Therapies targeting metabolic-triggered inflammation and its components are anticipated to have potential for the treatment of OA. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ALICE High Level Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Alt, T

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is a computing farm designed and build for the real-time, online processing of the raw data produced by the ALICE detectors. Events are fully reconstructed from the raw data, analyzed and compressed. The analysis summary together with the compressed data and a trigger decision is sent to the DAQ. In addition the reconstruction of the events allows for on-line monitoring of physical observables and this information is provided to the Data Quality Monitor (DQM). The HLT can process event rates of up to 2 kHz for proton-proton and 200 Hz for Pb-Pb central collisions.

  3. Biological basis of the HLA-B8,DR3-associated progression of acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candore, G; Romano, G C; D'Anna, C; Di Lorenzo, G; Gervasi, F; Lio, D; Modica, M A; Potestio, M; Caruso, C

    1998-01-01

    The factors influencing the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are not fully known, but the host genotype undoubtedly plays a role in determining the outcome of the disease by affecting the immune response to HIV. The role of the host human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype in the regulation of susceptibility to HIV infection and expression has been studied extensively in different major risk groups. Certain HLA alleles and haplotypes, being associated with aberrant immune responses independently from HIV infection, have been reported to facilitate the rapid progression of disorders related to HIV infection. Particularly, the association of rapid acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) progression with genes from the HLA-B8,DR3 haplotype has been reported by different research groups. It is well known that this haplotype is associated in all Caucasian populations with a wide variety of diseases with autoimmune features and in healthy subjects with a number of immune system dysfunctions, as a reduced production of T helper (Th)1 type cytokine. HIV infection may act on this genetic background triggering immunopathogenetic mechanisms leading to AIDS with a dominant Th2 profile as a common feature.

  4. Xenobiotics-induced hepatotoxicity and an influence of HLA typisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žunić Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increased reporting of cases of drug-induced liver injuries, reflects the growing number of new agents introduced into clinical practice in the last decades. It should be added to the modernization of industries, and new chemicals which it applied. Drug-induced liver injuries make up a persisting and challenging problem for physicians, health agencies and pharmaceutical firms. Research objectives: The aim of the study is the determination of the most common causes of drug-induced liver injury in our surroundings. We compared the importance of hepatotoxic action of drugs in relation to other noxa in human environment. We determinated the importance of the body sensitivity on the acting agents. We also examined the importance of different drugs in the development of hepatotoxicity, regardless the dose. Materials and methods: We analyzed 52 patients with a diagnosis of hepa-totoxic liver injury (medical history, detailed clinical evaluation of patients, histopathological analysis of the liver, abdominal ultra sound, laboratory determination of standard liver function tests and followed up for 12 months. In the period from 01.04. 2005 to 01.04.2009, in these patients of the Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade, we monitored liver functional tests and morphological findings. We used biological markers relevant for the differential diagnosis, monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy. The results of the patients with hepatotoxic liver injury were compared with the values of the findings of the 52 patients in the control group, with the diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis, hospitalized in the same institution during the same time. Results: The causes of toxic liver damage in our study were following agents, classified into groups: Industrial toxins (8 patients, Food and beverages (9 pts, Antirheumatics and analgesics (6 pts, Antiarrhythmic drugs (4 pts Antilipemic (4 pts

  5. HLA-DRB and HLA-DQB Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in Iranian Patients with Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Shamsolmoulouk; Mohammadzadeh, Mahsa; Zare Bidoki, Alireza; Meighani, Ghasem; Aslani, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mahdi; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is known as the most common chronic disease of the oral cavity, which affects a range of 5-25% of the population. RAS appears to be associated with some human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II alleles and haplotypes. This study attempts to survey the distribution of HLA-DRB and -DQB alleles among Iranian RAS patients and healthy controls. In order to evaluate the association of HLA-DR and DQ alleles and haplotypes, 54 patients with RAS and 100 unrelated healthy subjects as control group were investigated. Our data indicated that DRB1*13:17, DRB1*15:01, and DRB5*01 were significantly more frequent in RAS patients in comparison to controls. However, DRB3:01allele frequency was higher in the controls compared to the patients. The significantly frequent allele in the patients compared with the healthy subjects was HLA-DQB1*03:02. However, both HLA-DQB1*02:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01 alleles were most frequent in the healthy individuals rather than the patients. The DRB*04/DQB1*03:01 and DRB*01:01/DQB1*02:01 haplotypes were significantly distributed in healthy subjects compared with patients. However, DRB*07:01/DQB1*03:02 haplotype was found to be significantly frequent in patients than controls. In respect of HLA genes, factors are involved in the incidence of RAS; various HLA-DRB and HLA-DQB1 alleles and the related haplotypes are suggested to be the three main RAS susceptibility factors in our population study.

  6. Linkage disequilibrium between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II and HLA-G--possible implications for human reproduction and autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Christiansen, Ole B

    2005-01-01

    A line of investigation indicates that one or several genes in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influences reproductive success. Studies have revealed associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes and risk of recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) and pre......-eclampsia. However, these genes are not expressed at the feto-maternal interface. Furthermore, associations between polymorphisms in the nonclassical HLA class Ib gene, HLA-G, and reproductive outcome have been demonstrated. HLA-G is expressed by extravillous trophoblast during pregnancy, making it a more obvious...... candidate gene for a possible influence on pregnancy outcome. HLA-G has immunomodulatory functions. We have studied linkage disequilibrium between HLA class II genes, primarily HLA-DRB1 alleles, and HLA-G alleles in women with RSA and their partners (n = 103) and in control women and their partners (n = 92...

  7. Differential expression of the HLA class I multigene family by human embryonal carcinoma and choriocarcinoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinke de Wit, T. F.; Vloemans, S.; van den Elsen, P. J.; Haworth, A.; Stern, P. L.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the expression of both HLA class and the recently described HLA class I-like genes (HLA-E and HLA-6.0) in two human developmental tumor cell lines, that serologically could not be typed for HLA-A, -B, and -C. Evidence is presented that the teratocarcinoma Tera-2 stem cells express

  8. PD1/PD1L pathway, HLA-G and T regulatory cells as new markers of immunosuppression in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Własiuk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate function of the immune system depends on the effective regulation of the immune response on multiple levels. The key element of an effective immune response to antigenic stimulation is maintaining a homeostasis between activation and inhibitory function of immunocompetent cells and molecules. In pathological conditions such as chronic infections, autoimmune diseases or cancer there are significant alterations, and prevalence of signals of one type over another. Main markers of these dysfunctions are altered expressions of molecules, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1, Human Leukocyte Antigen G (HLA-G, or changed percentages of T regulatory cells (Treg. These indicators of immune system dysfunction may contribute to disease progression, but also could represent good targets for treatment. Interestingly, in recent years there are many new, interesting reports which showed that the role of PD-1, HLA-G or Treg is ambiguous and not always their higher expression or frequency lead to the progression of disease. Recent studies have shown that Treg can suppress bacteria-driven inflammation which promotes carcinogenesis and thus protect the host from cancer development. Moreover, proliferation of hematological tumor cells expressing ILT-2 receptor can be inhibited by HLA-G, in contrast to solid tumors where HLA-G favors tumor escape. In this paper we present characteristics of expressions of PD-1 and its ligands, HLA-G, and frequency of Treg cells in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with chronic infections, autoimmune diseases and cancer. The understanding of the complex interactions between the functional elements of immune system is essential for a detailed characteristics of the mechanisms leading to the development of diseases and identification of more effective targeted therapies.

  9. Unveiling the Peptide Motifs of HLA-C and HLA-G from Naturally Presented Peptides and Generation of Binding Prediction Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Marco, Moreno; Schuster, Heiko; Backert, Linus; Ghosh, Michael; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan

    2017-10-15

    The classical HLA-C and the nonclassical HLA-E and HLA-G molecules play important roles both in the innate and adaptive immune system. Starting already during embryogenesis and continuing throughout our lives, these three Ags exert major functions in immune tolerance, defense against infections, and anticancer immune responses. Despite these important roles, identification and characterization of the peptides presented by these molecules has been lacking behind the more abundant HLA-A and HLA-B gene products. In this study, we elucidated the peptide specificities of these HLA molecules using a comprehensive analysis of naturally presented peptides. To that end, the 15 most frequently expressed HLA-C alleles as well as HLA-E*01:01 and HLA-G*01:01 were transfected into lymphoblastoid C1R cells expressing low endogenous HLA. Identification of naturally presented peptides was performed by immunoprecipitation of HLA and subsequent analysis of HLA-bound peptides by liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry. Peptide motifs of HLA-C unveil anchors in position 2 or 3 with high variances between allotypes, and a less variable anchor at the C-terminal end. The previously reported small ligand repertoire of HLA-E was confirmed within our analysis, and we could show that HLA-G combines a large ligand repertoire with distinct features anchoring peptides at positions 3 and 9, supported by an auxiliary anchor in position 1 and preferred residues in positions 2 and 7. The wealth of HLA ligands resulted in prediction matrices for octa-, nona-, and decamers. Matrices were validated in terms of their binding prediction and compared with the latest NetMHC prediction algorithm NetMHCpan-3.0, which demonstrated their predictive power. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Soluble monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles: the three dimensions of structural complexity to use HLA-G as a clinical biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, F da Silva; König, L; Wagner, B; Giebel, B; Santos Manvailer, L F; Rebmann, V

    2016-09-01

    The HLA-G molecule belongs to the family of nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I. At variance to classical HLA class I, HLA-G displays (i) a low number of nucleotide variations within the coding region, (ii) a high structural diversity, (iii) a restricted peptide repertoire, (iv) a limited tissue distribution and (v) strong immune-suppressive properties. The physiological HLA-G surface expression is restricted to the maternal-fetal interface and to immune-privileged adult tissues. Soluble forms of HLA-G (sHLA-G) are detectable in various body fluids. Cellular activation and pathological processes are associated with an aberrant or a neo-expression of HLA-G/sHLA-G. Functionally, HLA-G and its secreted forms are considered to be key players in the induction of short- and long-term tolerance. Thus, its unique expression profile and tolerance-inducing functions render HLA-G/sHLA-G an attractive biomarker to monitor the systemic health/disease status and disease activity/progression for clinical approaches in disease management and treatments. Here, we place emphasis on (i) the current status of the tolerance-inducing functions by HLA-G/sHLA-G, (ii) the current complexity to implement this molecule as a meaningful clinical biomarker regarding the three dimensions of structural diversity (monomers, dimers and HLA-G-expressing extracellular vesicles) with its functional implications, and (iii) novel and future approaches to detect and quantify sHLA-G structures and functions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Acyclovir Has Low but Detectable Influence on HLA-B*57:01 Specificity without Inducing Hypersensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imir G Metushi

    Full Text Available Immune mediated adverse drug reactions (IM-ADRs remain a significant source of patient morbidity that have more recently been shown to be associated with specific class I and/or II human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles. Abacavir-induced hypersensitivity syndrome is a CD8+ T cell dependent IM-ADR that is exclusively mediated by HLA-B*57:01. We and others have previously shown that abacavir can occupy the floor of the peptide binding groove of HLA-B*57:01 molecules, increasing the affinity of certain self peptides resulting in an altered peptide-binding repertoire. Here, we have identified another drug, acyclovir, which appears to act in a similar fashion. As with abacavir, acyclovir showed a dose dependent increase in affinity for peptides with valine and isoleucine at their C-terminus. In agreement with the binding studies, HLA-B*57:01 peptide-elution studies performed in the presence of acyclovir revealed an increased number of endogenously bound peptides with a C-terminal isoleucine. Accordingly, we have hypothesized that acyclovir acts by the same mechanism as abacavir, although our data also suggest the overall effect is much smaller: the largest changes of peptide affinity for acyclovir were 2-5 fold, whereas for abacavir this effect was as much as 1000-fold. Unlike abacavir, acyclovir is not known to cause IM-ADRs. We conclude that the modest effect of acyclovir on HLA binding affinity in contrast to the large effect of abacavir is insufficient to trigger a hypersensitivity syndrome. We further support this by functional in vitro studies where acyclovir, unlike abacavir, was unable to produce an increase in IFN-γ upon expansion of HLA-B*57:01+ PBMCs from healthy donors. Using abacavir and acyclovir as examples we therefore propose an in vitro pre-clinical screening strategy, whereby thresholds can be applied to MHC-peptide binding assays to determine the likelihood that a drug could cause a clinically relevant IM-ADR.

  12. Role of HLA antigens in Rh (D) alloimmunized pregnant women ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    responders) and fifty four mothers who did not develop Rh (D) isoimmunization despite positive pregnancies (nonresponders) were selected for the study. Standard methods of serological HLA typing, ABO and Rh (D) groups, and screening for ...

  13. Implementation of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) for HLA Genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It has become increasingly difficult to attain high resolution HLA typing without ambiguities when employing SBT and PCR-SSP. NGS is well-suited for HLA typing as it delivers highly accurate and unambiguous results. We validated a NGS protocol developed for use with the Illumina Mi......Seq. Methods and Materials Without any prior NGS experience, we implemented a protocol consisting of LR-PCR of 5 loci (HLA-A, B, C, DRB1, and DQB1), library prep with two different indexing strategies: a) locus-specific indexing and b) sample-specific indexing. Sequencing was paired-end 250 bp sequencing......, and sequence analysis was performed with Twin HLA (Omixon). Results Two sequencing runs of the Omixon Holotype X4 kit yielded an average output of 5.3 Gb per run. Analysis was limited to 20K reads for all the indexes resulting in an average consensus coverage of 332 for locus specific indexing and 59...

  14. Transcervical Inoculation with Chlamydia trachomatis Induces Infertility in HLA-DR4 Transgenic and Wild-Type Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sukumar; Tifrea, Delia F; Zhong, Guangming; de la Maza, Luis M

    2018-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of infection-induced infertility in women. Attempts to control this epidemic with screening programs and antibiotic therapy have failed. Currently, a vaccine to prevent C. trachomatis infections is not available. In order to develop an animal model for evaluating vaccine antigens that can be applied to humans, we used C. trachomatis serovar D (strain UW-3/Cx) to induce infertility in mice whose major histocompatibility complex class II antigen was replaced with the human leukocyte antigen DR4 (HLA-DR4). Transcervical inoculation of medroxyprogesterone-treated HLA-DR4 transgenic mice with 5 × 105C. trachomatis D inclusion forming units (IFU) induced a significant reduction in fertility, with a mean number of embryos/mouse of 4.4 ± 1.3 compared to 7.8 ± 0.5 for the uninfected control mice (P < 0.05). A similar fertility reduction was elicited in the wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice (4.3 ± 1.4 embryos/mouse) compared to the levels of the WT controls (9.1 ± 0.4 embryos/mouse) (P < 0.05). Following infection, WT mice mounted more robust humoral and cellular immune responses than HLA-DR4 mice. As determined by vaginal shedding, HLA-DR4 mice were more susceptible to a transcervical C. trachomatis D infection than WT mice. To assess if HLA-DR4 transgenic and WT mice could be protected by vaccination, 104 IFU of C. trachomatis D was delivered intranasally, and mice were challenged transcervically 6 weeks later with 5 × 105 IFU of C. trachomatis D. As determined by severity and length of vaginal shedding, WT C57BL/6 and HLA-DR4 mice were significantly protected by vaccination. The advantages and limitations of the HLA-DR4 transgenic mouse model for evaluating human C. trachomatis vaccine antigens are discussed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  15. Additive and interaction effects at three amino acid positions in HLA-DQ and HLA-DR molecules drive type 1 diabetes risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Xinli; Deutsch, Aaron J; Lenz, Tobias L; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Han, Buhm; Chen, Wei-Min; Howson, Joanna M M; Todd, John A; de Bakker, Paul I W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/342957082; Rich, Stephen S; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    Variation in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes accounts for one-half of the genetic risk in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Amino acid changes in the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ molecules mediate most of the risk, but extensive linkage disequilibrium complicates the localization of independent effects. Using

  16. The effect of HLA mismatches, shared cross-reactive antigen groups, and shared HLA-DR antigens on the outcome after pediatric liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E; Hepkema, BG; Peeters, PMJG; Ten Vergert, EM; De Jong, KP; Porte, RJ; Bijleveld, CMA; van den Berg, AP; Lems, SPM; Gouw, ASH; Slooff, MJH

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and HLA-DR mismatching, sharing cross-reactive antigen groups (CREGs), and sharing HLA-DR antigens on the outcome after pediatric liver transplantation. Outcome parameters were graft survival, acute rejection,

  17. KIR genes and HLA class I ligands in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairo, Filippo; Portela, Pâmela; Salim, Patrícia H; Jobim, Mariana; Netto, Cristina; Dorneles, Alicia; Mittlestadt, Suzana; Jobim, Luiz Fernando; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa D

    2013-03-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by reduced activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which leads to a buildup of glucocerebroside within the cells and chronic stimulation of the immune system. GD is associated with clinical variability even in the same family, which suggests the influence of modifier genes. Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the immune response, and their number is decreased in GD. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) regulate the activity of NK cells through an interaction with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on target cells. To analyze the variability of KIR genes in a sample of GD patients from Southern Brazil, and look for associations between variants and clinical manifestations. Thirty-one GD patients (24 mild, 4 moderate, and 3 severe) were included in the study. Fifteen KIR genes, HLA-C and HLA-Bw4 were analyzed using SSP-PCR. Clinical, biochemical, and radiological data were collected by means of a chart review. Age at symptom onset was associated with KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 in combination with the ligand HLA-C1 (p=0.038). Patients who have the HLA-C2 variant appear to have more mono- and polyclonal bands on protein electrophoresis (p=0.007, OR 21.3). There was no between-group significant difference in the frequencies of KIR/HLA variants. Although exploratory our data suggest a possible association of KIR/HLA variants and the severity of GD. Further study of KIR/HLA variants is required, as they seem to be a phenotype-modifying factor in this disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of HLA in cord blood transplantation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, A; Paviglianiti, A; Gluckman, E; Rocha, V

    2016-06-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) emerged in the last 20 years as a valid alternative source of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) in allogeneic transplantation setting, mainly in the absence of a fully human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling. The probability of finding a matched unrelated donor through the registries varies from 20 to 70%, depending on the ethnicity of the patients. Therefore, patients in need may benefit of an HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from haploidentical donors or from UCB. One of the advantages of using UCB is the lower incidence of acute graft-versus-host-disease and allowance of greater HLA mismatch. Conversely, the low number of HSCs and lymphocytes and specific immunological features of T cells are associated with delayed engraftment and immune reconstitution and consequently, increased opportunistic infections. Nevertheless, retrospective studies showed similar results comparing UCB with other stem cell sources, both in pediatric and adult setting. The ability to use partially HLA-matched UCB units allows expanding the donor pool. Many UCB banks have strategies to increase their inventory including UCB grafts that have rare haplotypes. HLA and cell dose are very important factors associated with outcomes after umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) that interact with each other. Increasing cell dose counterbalances the number of HLA disparities. Understanding those interactions, the role of HLA mismatches and other immunogenic factors, are important to allow clinicians to choose the best cord blood graft for patients. This review will describe the role of HLA in UCBT setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein 42 Suggests a Mechanism for Triggering Receptor-Activated Virus Entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschner, Austin N.; Sorem, Jessica; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; (NWU); (Stanford-MED)

    2009-05-26

    Epstein-Barr virus requires glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42 to fuse its lipid envelope with B cells. Gp42 is a type II membrane protein consisting of a flexible N-terminal region, which binds gH/gL, and a C-terminal lectin-like domain that binds to the B-cell entry receptor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II. Gp42 triggers membrane fusion after HLA binding, a process that requires simultaneous binding to gH/gL and a functional hydrophobic pocket in the lectin domain adjacent to the HLA binding site. Here we present the structure of gp42 in its unbound form. Comparisons to the previously determined structure of a gp42:HLA complex reveals additional N-terminal residues forming part of the gH/gL binding site and structural changes in the receptor binding domain. Although the core of the lectin domain remains similar, significant shifts in two loops and an {alpha} helix bordering the essential hydrophobic pocket suggest a structural mechanism for triggering fusion.

  20. Negative regulation by HLA-DO of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, L K; Sant'Angelo, D B; Hammond, C; Surman, M J; Cresswell, P

    1997-10-03

    HLA-DM is a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-like molecule that facilitates antigen processing by catalyzing the exchange of invariant chain-derived peptides (CLIP) from class II molecules for antigenic peptides. HLA-DO is a second class II-like molecule that physically associates with HLA-DM in B cells. HLA-DO was shown to block HLA-DM function. Purified HLA-DM-DO complexes could not promote peptide exchange in vitro. Expression of HLA-DO in a class II+ and DM+, DO- human T cell line caused the accumulation of class II-CLIP complexes, indicating that HLA-DO blocked DM function in vivo and suggesting that HLA-DO is an important modulator of class II-restricted antigen processing.

  1. HLA-G in human reproduktion: aspects of genetics, function, and pregnancy complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, TVF

    2006-01-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib genes, HLA-E, -G and -F, are located on chromosome 6 in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA class Ib antigens resemble the HLA class Ia antigens in many ways, but several major differences have been described. This review...... will, in particular, discuss HLA-G and its role in human reproduction and in the human MHC. HLA-G seems to be important in the modulation of the maternal immune system during pregnancy and thereby the maternal acceptance of the semiallogenic fetus. Recent findings regarding aspects of HLA......-G polymorphism, the possible significance of this polymorphism in respect to HLA-G function and certain complications of pregnancy (such as pre-eclampsia and recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSA)) are discussed together with possible importance to IVF. Finally, aspects of a possible role of HLA-G in organ...

  2. Polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Meldgaard, M; Sørensen, Steen

    1997-01-01

    HLA-G is a non-classical MHC class I gene with a limited tissue distribution. The most pronounced expression is detected in the cytotrophoblast of first trimester placenta. It is possible to detect mRNA for HLA-G in preimplantation blastocysts where expression is correlated with a high cleavage...... compared to the sequence of HLA-6.0 (G*01011); one of these has not been reported before. We also found a deletion of the first base of codon 130 or the third of codon 129 in a heterozygous individual. This study, together with previous results, suggests that the polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene...... rate of embryos. HLA-G seems to play an important role in the feto-maternal relationship. The polymorphism of the HLA-G locus is not fully clarified. One study has shown extensive nucleotide sequence variation in the exon 3 (alpha-2 domain) in healthy African Americans. A few studies in other...

  3. Maternal KIR and fetal HLA-C: a fine balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chazara, Olympe; Xiong, Shiqiu; Moffett, Ashley

    2011-10-01

    NK cell effector function is regulated by a range of activating and inhibitory receptors, and many of their known ligands are MHC class I molecules. Human NK receptors encoded by the Killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene family recognize polymorphic HLA-C as well as some HLA-A and HLA-B molecules. KIRs are expressed by uterine NK (uNK) cells, which are distinctive NK cells directly in contact with the invading fetal placental cells that transform the uterine arteries during the first trimester. Trophoblast cells express both maternal and paternal HLA-C allotypes and can therefore potentially interact with KIRs expressed by uNK. Therefore, allorecognition of paternal HLA-C by maternal KIR might influence trophoblast invasion and vascular remodeling, with subsequent effects on placental development and the outcome of pregnancy. We discuss here the studies relating to KIR/HLA-C interactions with an emphasis on how these function during pregnancy to regulate placentation.

  4. Types of HLA in the bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Erkan; Uğur Özalp, Ali; Cekmen, Arman; Eren, Bülent; Onal, Bülent; Akkuş, Emre; Erdoğan, Ergun

    2013-02-01

    HLA plays a complementary role in the interaction between tumor and body immunology. The aim of this study was to determine the existence of the association between the HLA system and transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Using standard micro-lymphocytotoxic method of Terasaki, HLA-A, B, DR and DQ antigen types of 30 patients with TCC of the bladder were compared with the control group (30 healthy people). In the TCC patient group, HLA -DQ6(1) and HLA -DQ7(3) antigens were detected with a significantly higher frequency than in the control group (p=0.018 and p=0.038, respectively), whereas HLA-A10, B4, DR53 and DQ1 antigens were detected with significantly higher frequency in the control group (p less 0.05 in all). It suggests that patients who had the antigens detected were at higher risk of TCC, and the ones who had the antigens displaying protective features as were detected in the control group, were at lesser risk.

  5. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  6. Promoter polymorphisms of the HLA-G gene, but not the HLA-E and HLA-F genes, is associated with non-segmental vitiligo patients in the Korean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Kang; Hong, Mi Sook; Shin, Min Kyung; Uhm, Yoon Kyung; Chung, Joo-Ho; Lee, Mu-Hyoung

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether or not promoter polymorphisms of the class I major histocompatibility complex (HLA-E, HLA-F, and HLA-G) are associated with susceptibility to vitiligo. To identify a possible association with vitiligo, 241 patients with non-segmental vitiligo (NSV) and 395 healthy controls were recruited in this study. Three promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs1264459 of HLA-E, rs9258170 of HLA-F, and rs1736936 of HLA-G) were analyzed using a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique and direct sequencing. Multiple logistic regression models (co-dominant 1, co-dominant 2, dominant, recessive, and log-additive models) were applied for odds ratios (ORs), 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and P values. To obtain the defined results, P values were recalculated by a Bonferroni correction. After the Bonferroni correction, the genotype of the SNP (rs1736936) of HLA-G was shown to have significant association with NSV (P = 0.045 in the recessive model). The genotype frequencies of the HLA-G SNP (rs1736936) had a significant correlation with the age of onset of NSV (P = 0.016 in the co-dominant 1 model and P = 0.027 in the dominant model). Our results suggest that HLA-G, but not HLA-E and HLA-F, may be associated with susceptibility to NSV in the Korean population.

  7. The Type 1 Diabetes - HLA Susceptibility Interactome - Identification of HLA Genotype-Specific Disease Genes for Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, C.; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Bergholdt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The individual contribution of genes in the HLA region to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) is confounded by the high linkage disequilibrium (LD) in this region. Using a novel approach we have combined genetic association data with information on functional protein......-protein interactions to elucidate risk independent of LD and to place the genetic association into a functional context. Methodology/Principal Findings: Genetic association data from 2300 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HLA region was analysed in 2200 T1D family trios divided into six risk groups based...... on HLA-DRB1 genotypes. The best SNP signal in each gene was mapped to proteins in a human protein interaction network and their significance of clustering in functional network modules was evaluated. The significant network modules identified through this approach differed between the six HLA risk groups...

  8. HLA alleles and HLA-B27 haplotypes associated with susceptibility and severity of ankylosing spondylitis in a Portuguese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Santos, F M; Matos, M; Ligeiro, D; Mourão, A F; Ribeiro, C; Costa, J; Santos, H; Barcelos, A; Pinto, P; Cruz, M; Sousa, E; Santos, R A; Fonseca, J E; Trindade, H; Guedes-Pinto, H; Branco, J C

    2013-12-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is the mostly known major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Nonetheless, there is substantial evidence that other MHC genes appear to be associated with the disease, although it has not yet been established whether these associations are driven by direct associations or by linkage disequilibrium (LD) mechanisms. We aimed to investigate the contributions of HLA class I and II alleles and B27-haplotypes for AS in a case-control study. A total of 188 HLA-B27 AS cases and 189 HLA-B27 healthy controls were selected and typed for HLA class I and II by the Luminex polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP) method. Allelic and haplotypic distributions were estimated by maximum likelihood method using Arlequin v3.11 and statistical analysis were performed by Stata10.1. No associations were found between non-HLA-B27 loci and AS susceptibility, but several associations were observed for phenotypic features of the disease. DRB1*08 was identified as a risk factor for uveitis and DQB1*04 seems to provide protection for AS severity (functional, metrological and radiological indexes). A*02/B27/C*02/DRB1*01/DQB1*05 [P<0.0001; odds ratio (OR) = 39.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) (2.34-651)] is the only haplotype that seems to confer susceptibility to AS. Moreover, the haplotype A*02/B27/C*01/DRB1*08/DQB1*04 seems to provide protection for disease functional and radiological repercussions. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that other genes within the HLA region besides HLA-B27 might play some role in AS susceptibility and severity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Non-HLA type 1 diabetes genes modulate disease risk together with HLA-DQ and islet autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziarz, M; Hagopian, W; Palmer, J P; Sanjeevi, C B; Kockum, I; Breslow, N; Lernmark, Å

    2015-12-01

    The possible interrelations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ, non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and islet autoantibodies were investigated at clinical onset in 1-34-year-old type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients (n=305) and controls (n=203). Among the non-HLA SNPs reported by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium, 24% were supported in this Swedish replication set including that the increased risk of minor PTPN22 allele and high-risk HLA was modified by GAD65 autoantibodies. The association between T1D and the minor AA+AC genotype in ERBB3 gene was stronger among IA-2 autoantibody-positive patients (comparison P=0.047). The association between T1D and the common insulin (AA) genotype was stronger among insulin autoantibody (IAA)-positive patients (comparison P=0.008). In contrast, the association between T1D and unidentified 26471 gene was stronger among IAA-negative (comparison P=0.049) and IA-2 autoantibody-negative (comparison P=0.052) patients. Finally, the association between IL2RA and T1D was stronger among IAA-positive than among IAA-negative patients (comparison P=0.028). These results suggest that the increased risk of T1D by non-HLA genes is often modified by both islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ. The interactions between non-HLA genes, islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ should be taken into account in T1D prediction studies as well as in prevention trials aimed at inducing immunological tolerance to islet autoantigens.

  10. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ and Zʹ), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented.

  11. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (Wʹ′ and Zʹ′), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this poster, and the latest performance measurements are presented.

  12. Physics issues on triggering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detector at the international linear collider (ILC) should be able to run 'trig- gerless' which means that all events can be read out and then be analysed with the offline reconstruction program in a trigger farm. The event rates for 'high Q2' events like W-pairs or q¯q are low, about 0.1/train. However, there is a significant.

  13. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. High-resolution HLA class I typing in the CEPH families: analysis of linkage disequilibrium among HLA loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugawan, T L; Klitz, W; Blair, A; Erlich, H A

    2000-11-01

    The HLA region on the short arm of chromosome 6 (6p21.3) contains the most polymorphic coding sequences in the human genome. High-resolution DNA-based HLA typing of population samples of the polymorphic class I loci, HLA-A, -B, and -C has only recently become feasible. Here, we report molecular HLA typing on family-based samples of European origin (the CEPH repository), which demonstrated very high polymorphism, with 20 A alleles, 38 B alleles and 19 C alleles in the sample of 248 independent haplotypes. In general, allele frequency distributions are consistently more even (lower observed homozygosity statistic) than expected from a past of selective neutrality suggesting a history of balancing selection. This was also true for the class II loci, DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1 in these samples, but not for the DPA1 and DPB1 loci, whose allelic frequency distributions were more skewed (higher observed homozygosity statistic) than expected under a neutral model. Although linkage disequilibrium is a prominent feature across the HLA region, only 19% of the eight locus haplotypes were sampled more than once. The relative age of some of the B alleles could be inferred from the pattern of B-C haplotypic associations. We suggest that the observed patterns of linkage disequilibrium reflect the operation of selection on nearly all HLA alleles.

  15. [Mifepristone inhibits the progesterone-induced expressions of HLA-G, -E, -F genes in trophoblasts during first trimester].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Yang; Liao, Ai-hua

    2012-01-03

    To explore the effects of mifepristone on the expressions of HLA-G, HLA-E and HLA-F in extravillous cytotrophoblasts (EVCT). Cultured EVCT during the first trimester were treated in vitro with progesterone and mifepristone. And the transcription levels of HLA-G, HLA-E and HLA-F genes were detected by RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction). As compared with the controls, the levels of HLA-G, HLA-E and HLA-F mRNA significantly increased in EVCT after incubating with 0.1 ng/L progesterone (P HLA-G, HLA-E and HLA-F mRNA in trophoblasts during the first trimester.

  16. HLA-DP related suppression of mixed lymphocyte reaction with alloactivated lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hofmann, B; Jakobsen, B K

    1986-01-01

    We studied the influence of HLA class I and class II antigens on the suppression of the MLR induced by primed lymphocytes (PLs) alloactivated in vitro. The suppression of 14 different PLs of 83 MLRs was analyzed. The PLs were primed against (i) HLA-DP (SB) (ii) HLA-DR/DQ or (iii) both HLA-DP and DR...... changes in the kinetics of the MLR. Thus, HLA-DP antigens can-like DR/DQ antigens - induce PLs with the ability to suppress the MLR in an HLA-class II (DP or DR/DQ) related, and possibly a class I related, as well as an unspecific fashion....

  17. Anti-HLA-E mAb 3D12 mimics MEM-E/02 in binding to HLA-B and HLA-C alleles: Web-tools validate the immunogenic epitopes of HLA-E recognized by the antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Pham, Tho; El-Awar, Nadim; Kaneku, Hugo; Terasaki, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    HLA-E shares several peptide sequences with HLA-class Ia molecules. Therefore, anti-HLA-E antibodies that recognize the shared sequences may bind to HLA-class Ia alleles. This hypothesis was validated with a murine anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibody (mAb) MEM-E/02, which reacted with microbeads coated with several HLA-B and HLA-C antigens. In this report, the hypothesis was reexamined with another mAb 3D12, considered to be specific for HLA-E. The antibody binding is evaluated by measuring mean fluorescence index [MFI] with Luminex Multiplex Flow-Cytometric technology. The peptide-inhibition experiments are carried out with synthetic shared peptides, most prevalent to HLA-E and HLA-Ia alleles. The results showed that mAb 3D12 simulated MEM-E/02 in recognizing several HLA-B and HLA-C antigens. Both 3D12 and MEM-E/02 did not bind to HLA-A, HLA-F and HLA-G molecules. As observed with MEM-E/02, binding of 3D12 to HLA-E is inhibited by the peptides sequences (115)QFAYDGKDY(123) and (137)DTAAQI(142). Decrease in binding of mAb 3D12 to HLA class Ia, after heat treatment of antigen coated microbeads, supports the contention that the epitope may be located at the outside of the "thermodynamically stable" α-helix conformations of HLA-E. Several sequence and structure-based web-tools were employed to validate the discontinuous epitopes recognized by the mAbs. The scores obtained by these web-tools distinguished the shared peptide sequences that inhibited the mAb binding to HLA-E. Furthermore, ElliPro web tool points out that both mAbs recognize the conformational discontinuous epitopes (the shared inhibitory peptide sequences) in the secondary structure of the HLA-E molecule. The study favors the contention that the domain of the shared inhibitory peptide sequences may be the most immunogenic site of HLA-E molecule. It also postulates and clarifies that amino acid substitution on or near the binding domains may account for the lack of cross reactivity of 3D12 and MEM-E/02 with

  18. HLA-DR-expressing cells and T-lymphocytes in sural nerve biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Olsson, T; Solders, G

    1988-01-01

    was confirmed. HLA-DR expression was found in all biopsies and thus was not restricted to any particular type of neuropathy. The HLA-DR expression appeared to correlate with severity and activity of the neuropathy. HLA-DR-expressing macrophages wrapping myelinated fibers were prominent in primary demyelinating......Thirty-five sural nerve biopsies were stained immunohistochemically for HLA-DR antigen. HLA-DR was expressed on nonmyelinating Schwann cells, macrophages, vascular endothelium, and perineurium. By means of double immunofluorescence staining the identity of the HLA-DR presenting structures...

  19. Oligoclonal band phenotypes in MS differ in their HLA class II association, while specific KIR ligands at HLA class I show association to MS in general

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsen, Marte W; Viken, Marte K; Celius, Elisabeth G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated...... the association of HLA alleles and KIR ligands according to OCB status in MS patients (n=3876). Specific KIR ligands were associated with patients when compared to controls (n=3148), supporting a role for NK cells in MS pathogenesis. HLA class I alleles and KIR ligands did not differ between OCB phenotypes......, but HLA class II associations were convincingly replicated....

  20. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding

  1. Soluble HLA-G and HLA-E Levels in Bone Marrow Plasma Samples Are Related to Disease Stage in Neuroblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morandi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of nonclassical HLA-class Ib molecules HLA-G and HLA-E in the progression of Neuroblastoma (NB, the most common pediatric extracranial solid tumor, has been characterized in the last years. Since BM infiltration by NB cells is an adverse prognostic factor, we have here analyzed for the first time the concentration of soluble (sHLA-G and HLA-E in bone marrow (BM plasma samples from NB patients at diagnosis and healthy donors. sHLA-G and sHLA-E are present in BM plasma samples, and their levels were similar between NB patients and controls, thus suggesting that these molecules are physiologically released by resident or stromal BM cell populations. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that sHLA-G and sHLA-E levels did not correlate with BM infiltration and other adverse prognostic factors (MYCN amplification and age at diagnosis. In contrast, BM plasma levels of both molecules were higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized NB, thus suggesting that concentration of these molecules might be correlated with disease progression. The prognostic role of sHLA-G and sHLA-E concentration in the BM plasma for NB patients will be evaluated in future studies, by analyzing the clinical outcome of the same NB patients at follow-up.

  2. Platelet transfusion refractoriness attributable to HLA antibodies produced by donor-derived cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from one HLA-antigen-mismatched mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Naoki; Hori, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Masaki; Inazawa, Natsuko; Iesato, Kotoe; Miyazaki, Toru; Ikeda, Hisami; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2011-12-01

    PTR is a serious problem in patients being treated for hematologic disorders. Two patients with acute leukemia developed PTR after allogeneic BMT from one HLA-antigen-mismatched mother attributable to HLA antibodies, which could not be detected in their serum before BMT. HLA antibodies, whose specificity resembled that of each patient, were detected in each donor's serum. Each donor had probably been immunized during pregnancy by their partner's HLA antigens expressed by the fetus, consequently, transplanted donor-derived cells provoked HLA antibodies in each recipient early after BMT, and those HLA antibodies induced PTR. If the mothers are selected as donors for their children, they should be tested for the presence of HLA antibodies. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Soluble plasma HLA peptidome as a potential source for cancer biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Avivi, Irit; Katz, Tami; Admon, Arie

    2010-01-01

    The HLA molecules are membrane-bound transporters that carry peptides from the cytoplasm to the cell surface for surveillance by circulating T lymphocytes. Although low levels of soluble HLA molecules (sHLA) are normally released into the blood, many types of tumor cells release larger amounts of these sHLA molecules, presumably to counter immune surveillance by T cells. Here we demonstrate that these sHLA molecules are still bound with their authentic peptide repertoires, similar to those of the membranal HLA molecules (mHLA). Therefore, a single immunoaffinity purification of the plasma sHLA molecules, starting with a few milliliters of patients’ blood, allows for identification of very large sHLA peptidomes by mass spectrometry, forming a foundation for development of a simple and universal blood-based cancer diagnosis. The new methodology was validated using plasma and tumor cells of multiple-myeloma and leukemia patients, plasma of healthy controls, and with cultured cancer cells. The analyses identified thousands of sHLA peptides, including some cancer-related peptides, present among the sHLA peptidomes of the cancer patients. Furthermore, because the HLA peptides are the degradation products of the cellular proteins, this sHLA peptidomics approach opens the way for investigation of the patterns of protein synthesis and degradation within the tumor cells. PMID:20974924

  4. Biological significance of HLA locus matching in unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwase, Koichi; Matsuo, Keitaro; Azuma, Fumihiro; Morishima, Satoko; Onizuka, Makoto; Yabe, Toshio; Murata, Makoto; Doki, Noriko; Eto, Tetsuya; Mori, Takehiko; Miyamura, Koichi; Sao, Hiroshi; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Saji, Hiroo; Kato, Shunichi; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kawa, Keisei; Kodera, Yoshihisa; Sasazuki, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that the compatibility of each HLA loci between donor and patient induced divergent transplant-related immunologic responses, which attributed to the individualized manifestation of clinical outcomes. Here, we analyzed 7898 Japanese pairs transplanted with T-cell–replete marrow from an unrelated donor with complete HLA allele typing data. Multivariable competing risk regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the relative risk (RR) of clinical outcomes after transplantation. A significant RR of HLA allele mismatch compared with match was seen with HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DPB1 for grade III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and HLA-C for chronic GVHD. Of note, only HLA-C and HLA-DPB1 mismatch reduced leukemia relapse, and this graft-versus-leukemia effect of HLA-DPB1 was independent of chronic GVHD. HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 double (DRB1_DQB1) mismatch was revealed to be a significant RR for acute GVHD and mortality, whereas single mismatch was not. Thus, the number of HLA-A, -B, -C, -DPB1, and DRB1_DQB1 mismatches showed a clear-cut risk difference for acute GVHD, whereas the number of mismatches for HLA-A, -B, -C, and DRB1_DQB1 showed the same for mortality. In conclusion, we determined the biological response to HLA locus mismatch in transplant-related immunologic events, and provide a rationale for use of a personalized algorithm for unrelated donor selection. PMID:25519752

  5. Comparative profiling of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ associated factor VIII peptides presented by monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyron, Ivan; Hartholt, Robin B; Pedró-Cos, Laura; van Alphen, Floris; Ten Brinke, Anja; Lardy, Neubury; Meijer, Sander; Voorberg, Jan

    2017-10-12

    The development of anti-factor VIII antibodies represents a major complication in the treatment of patients with hemophilia A. Generation of high affinity anti-factor VIII antibodies is dependent on help provided by CD4+ T cells that recognize factor VIII-derived peptides presented on class II major histocompatibility complex on the surface of antigen presenting cells. In order to identify the immune-dominant epitopes that can be presented to CD4+ T cells, we previously developed a mass-spectrometry based method to identify factor VIII derived peptides that are presented on human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR. In the present work, we compared the repertoire of FVIII-derived peptide presented on HLA-DR and HLA-DQ. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells from 9 HLA-typed healthy donors were pulsed with recombinant factor VIII. HLA-DR and HLA-DQ molecules were purified using monoclonal antibodies. Our data show that HLA-DQ and HLA-DR present a similar repertoire of factor VIII-derived peptides. However, the number of peptides associated with HLA-DQ was lower when compared to HLA-DR. We also identified a peptide, within the acidic a3 domains of factor VIII that is presented with higher frequency on HLA-DQ. Interestingly, this peptide was found to have a higher predicted affinity for HLA-DQ when compared to HLA-DR. Taken together, our data suggest that HLA-DQ participates in the presentation of factor VIII peptides, thereby contributing to the development of inhibitory antibodies in a proportion of patients with severe hemophilia A. Copyright © 2017, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  6. Synthesis of Trigger Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferman, Orna; Vardi, Moshe Y.

    In automated synthesis, we transform a specification into a system that is guaranteed to satisfy the specification. In spite of the rich theory developed for temporal synthesis, little of this theory has been reduced to practice. This is in contrast with model-checking theory, which has led to industrial development and use of formal verification tools. We address this problem here by considering a certain class of PSL properties; this class covers most of the properties used in practice by system designers. We refer to this class as the class of trigger properties.

  7. Comparing HLA shared epitopes in French Caucasian patients with scleroderma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doua F Azzouz

    Full Text Available Although many studies have analyzed HLA allele frequencies in several ethnic groups in patients with scleroderma (SSc, none has been done in French Caucasian patients and none has evaluated which one of the common amino acid sequences, (67FLEDR(71, shared by HLA-DRB susceptibility alleles, or (71TRAELDT(77, shared by HLA-DQB1 susceptibility alleles in SSc, was the most important to develop the disease. HLA-DRB and DQB typing was performed for a total of 468 healthy controls and 282 patients with SSc allowing FLEDR and TRAELDT analyses. Results were stratified according to patient's clinical subtypes and autoantibody status. Moreover, standardized HLA-DRß1 and DRß5 reverse transcriptase Taqman PCR assays were developed to quantify ß1 and ß5 mRNA in 20 subjects with HLA-DRB1*15 and/or DRB1*11 haplotypes. FLEDR motif is highly associated with diffuse SSc (χ(2 = 28.4, p<10-6 and with anti-topoisomerase antibody (ATA production (χ(2 = 43.9, p<10-9 whereas TRAELDT association is weaker in both subgroups (χ(2 = 7.2, p = 0.027 and χ(2 = 14.6, p = 0.0007 respectively. Moreover, FLEDR motif- association among patients with diffuse SSc remains significant only in ATA subgroup. The risk to develop ATA positive SSc is higher with double dose FLEDR than single dose with respectively, adjusted standardised residuals of 5.1 and 2.6. The increase in FLEDR motif is mostly due to the higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*11 and DRB1*15 haplotypes. Furthermore, FLEDR is always carried by the most abundantly expressed ß chain: ß1 in HLA DRB1*11 haplotypes and ß5 in HLA-DRB1*15 haplotypes.In French Caucasian patients with SSc, FLEDR is the main presenting motif influencing ATA production in dcSSc. These results open a new field of potential therapeutic applications to interact with the FLEDR peptide binding groove and prevent ATA production, a hallmark of severity in SSc.

  8. Intra HLA-D/DR region recombinant detected by primed lymphocyte typing (PLT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, B K; Kristensen, T; Lamm, L U

    1983-01-01

    The chromosome 6 markers, HLA-ABC, D, DR, MT, properdin factor Bf, and complement factors 2 (C2) and 5 (C4), were studied in three families, each of which included two HLA identical siblings, one or both of whom were known to be HLA-B: GLO recombinants. The families were also typed with primed...... lymphocyte typing (PLT) for HLA-D/DR region associated DP antigens. None of these studies gave evidence that the recombinations had occurred within the HLA region. Mixed leucocyte culture (MLC) tests within the families showed no detectable stimulation between the HLA identical siblings in two...... of the families, but a very weak stimulation between the HLA identical siblings (H and G) in the third family (GG). No reactive PLT reagents were generated when cells from the HLA identical siblings of the first two families were primed against each other. In contrast, priming between cells of H and G gave rise...

  9. Clinical guidelines for IVF with PGD for HLA matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur-Kaspa, Ilan; Jeelani, Roohi

    2015-02-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing is an established procedure for conceiving a child who may donate cord blood or haematopoietic stem cells for transplantation to save an ill sibling. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from related matched donors improves overall survival compared with unrelated or non-matched donors. Since HSCT from related matched-donors is unavailable for 70% of patients, IVF for PGD-HLA is a relevant clinical option. Recent success of HSCT after PGD-HLA, and excellent health and family support of the children born, suggests that debate over this kind of 'designer baby' and 'gift of life' should subside. Discussions about IVF for PGD-HLA should be held with families when a related matched-donor is unavailable, when HSCT can wait at least 9-12 months, within weeks of diagnosis irrespective of prognosis, and when the mother is of reproductive age. Related half-matched egg donors may also be considered. National and international collaborations should be established, and couples choosing this modality should be referred to experienced IVF and PGD centres. Clinical guidelines will improve physician and patient awareness of IVF for PGD-HLA and its role in advancing the clinical care of children in need of HSCT. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in chronic hepatitis B (CHB. These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN and nucleot(side analogue (NA treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  11. HLA Mismatching Strategies for Solid Organ Transplantation - a Balancing Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A. Zachary

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available HLA matching provides numerous benefits in organ transplantation including better graft function, fewer rejection episodes, longer graft survival, and the possibility of reduced immunosuppression. Mismatches are attended by more frequent rejection episodes that require increased immunosuppression that, in turn, can increase the risk of infection and malignancy. HLA mismatches also incur the risk of sensitization, which can reduce the opportunity and increase waiting time for a subsequent transplant. However, other factors such as donor age, donor type, and immunosuppression protocol, can affect the benefit derived from matching. Further, finding a well matched donor may not be possible for all patients and usually prolongs waiting time. Strategies to optimize transplantation for patients without a well matched donor should take into account the immunologic barrier represented by different mismatches: what are the least immunogenic mismatches considering the patient’s HLA phenotype; should repeated mismatches be avoided; is the patient sensitized to HLA and, if so, what are the strengths of the patient’s antibodies? This information can then be used to define the HLA type of an immunologically optimal donor and the probability of such a donor occurring. A probability that is considered to be too low, may require expanding the donor population through paired donation or modifying what is acceptable which may require employing treatment to overcome immunologic barriers such as increased immunosuppression or desensitization. Thus, transplantation must strike a balance between the risk associated with waiting for the optimal donor and the risk associated with a less than optimal donor.

  12. [Gene organization of HLA and its association with ocular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuki, N; Ohno, S

    1992-04-01

    It is now evident that the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human leucocyte-associated antigen (HLA), regulates the immune response through discrimination between autologous and non autologous substances thereby displaying a high degree of genetic polymorphism. In recent years, the three-dimensional structure of HLA has been clarified by crystal analysis and provides the attractive hypothesis, the so-called hotdog model, explaining the interactions of foreign antigens (or autologous antigens), HLA and T cell receptors and has a great impact on various studies on immunogenetic mechanisms underlying the development of many diseases. Thus, several HLA-associated ocular diseases such as Behçet's disease and Harada's disease have also been analyzed from this point of view by means of recombinant DNA techniques, enabling elucidation of molecular mechanisms of susceptibility to these diseases. This paper describes a general outline of HLA, especially its genetical structure, as well as recent analysis of molecular mechanisms of the predisposition to representative ocular diseases.

  13. Polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Meldgaard, Michael; Sørensen, S

    1997-01-01

    rate of embryos. HLA-G seems to play an important role in the feto-maternal relationship. The polymorphism of the HLA-G locus is not fully clarified. One study has shown extensive nucleotide sequence variation in the exon 3 (alpha-2 domain) in healthy African Americans. A few studies in other...... populations have only revealed a limited polymorphism. We investigated the polymorphism of the exon 3 of HLA-G by means of Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)-Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP)- and DNA sequencing analysis in a Danish population. We detected four single-base substitutions in exon 3...... compared to the sequence of HLA-6.0 (G*01011); one of these has not been reported before. We also found a deletion of the first base of codon 130 or the third of codon 129 in a heterozygous individual. This study, together with previous results, suggests that the polymorphism of exon 3 of the HLA-G gene...

  14. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger-Champagne, C; Bosman, M; Brenner, R; Casado, MP; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Demers, S; Farrington, S; Igonkina, O; Kalinowski, A; Kanaya, N; Osuna, C; Pérez, E; Ptacek, E; Reinsch, A; Saavedra, A; Sopczak, A; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Tsuno, S; Vorwerk, V; Watson, A; Xella, S

    2008-01-01

    Moving to the high energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons will become a necessary and very powerful tool, allowing a discovery of physics beyond Standard Model. Many models, among them light SM Higgs and various SUSY models, predict an abundant production of taus with respect to other leptons. The reconstruction of hadronic tau decays, although a very challenging task in hadronic enviroments, allows to increase a signal efficiency by at least of factor 2, and provides an independent control sample to disantangle lepton tau decays from prompt electrons and muons. Thanks to the advanced calorimetry and tracking, the ATLAS experiment has developed tools to efficiently identify hadronic taus at the trigger level. In this presentation we will review the characteristics of taus and the methods to suppress low-multiplicity, low-energy jets contributions as well as we will address the tau trigger chain which provide a rejection rate of 10^5. We will further present plans for commissioning the ATLA...

  16. Recognition of nonclassical HLA class I antigens by gamma delta T cells during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakonyi, Aliz; Kovacs, Katalin T; Miko, Eva; Szereday, Laszlo; Varga, Peter; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2002-03-15

    The healthy trophoblast does not express classical HLA-A and HLA-B products; therefore, an MHC-restricted recognition of trophoblast-presented Ags is unlikely. In the decidua and also in peripheral blood of healthy pregnant women, gammadelta T cells significantly increase in number. We investigated the possible role of gammadelta T cells in recognition of trophoblast-presented Ags. PBL and isolated gammadelta T cells from healthy pregnant women as well as from those at risk for premature pregnancy termination were conjugated to choriocarcinoma cells (JAR) transfected with nonclassical HLA Ags (HLA-E, HLA-G). To investigate the involvement of killer-inhibitory/killer-activatory receptors in trophoblast recognition, we tested the effect of CD94 block on cytotoxic activity of Vdelta2(+) enriched gammadelta T cells to HLA-E- and/or HLA-G-transfected targets. Lymphocytes from healthy pregnant women preferentially recognized HLA(-) choriocarcinoma cells, whereas those from pathologically pregnant patients did not discriminate between HLA(+) and HLA(-) cells. Normal pregnancy Vdelta2(+) T cells conjugated at a significantly increased rate to HLA-E transfectants, whereas Vdelta2(+) lymphocytes from pathologically pregnant women did not show a difference between those and HLA(-) cells. Blocking of the CD94 molecule of Vdelta2(+) lymphocytes from healthy pregnant women resulted in an increased cytotoxic activity to HLA-E-transfected target cells. These data indicate that Vdelta2(+) lymphocytes of healthy pregnant women recognize HLA-E on the trophoblast, whereas Vdelta1 cells react with other than HLA Ags. In contrast to Vdelta2(+) lymphocytes from healthy pregnant women, those from women with pathological pregnancies do not recognize HLA-E via their killer-inhibitory receptors and this might account for their high cytotoxic activity.

  17. Non-classical transcriptional regulation of HLA-G: an update

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Philippe; Flajollet, S?bastien; Edgardo D Carosella

    2009-01-01

    Human leucocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) plays a key role in maternal?foetal tolerance and allotransplantation acceptance and is also implicated in tumour escape from the immune system. The modulation of HLA-G expression can prove to be very important to therapeutic goals in some pregnancy complications, transplantation, cancer and possibly autoimmune diseases. In spite of substantial similarities with classical HLA-class I genes, HLA-G is characterized by a restricted tissue-specific expression in ...

  18. Pathophysiology of Trigger Points in Myofascial Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Money, Sarah

    2017-06-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. Trigger point pathophysiology in myofascial pain syndrome, which involves muscle stiffness, tenderness, and pain that radiates to other areas of the body, is considered. The causes of trigger points and several theories about how they develop are reviewed, and treatment approaches, including stretching, physical therapy, dry needling, and injections, are offered.

  19. Recipient HLA-G +3142 CC Genotype and Concentrations of Soluble HLA-G Impact on Occurrence of CMV Infection after Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberina, Hana; Tomoya Michita, Rafael; Dolff, Sebastian; Bienholz, Anja; Trilling, Mirko; Heinemann, Falko M; Horn, Peter A; Kribben, Andreas; Witzke, Oliver; Rebmann, Vera

    2017-11-05

    The expression modulation of the immunosuppressive non-classical Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G) molecule and its soluble isoforms is an immune evasion strategy being deployed by cytomegalovirus (CMV). The +3142 C>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) is of crucial importance for the regulation of HLA-G expression. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of the +3142 C>G HLA-G SNP on the occurrence of CMV infection in a cohort of 178 living-donor kidney recipients and their 178 corresponding donors. In addition, soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) levels were quantified before and after transplantation. The presence of the HLA-G +3142 CC genotype in recipients, but not donors of our cohort as along with elevated sHLA-G levels (≥ 6.1 ng/mL) were associated with higher susceptibility to CMV infection after transplantation. Our results provided evidence that i) HLA-G is implicated in the establishment of CMV after living-donor kidney transplantation and ii) recipient HLA-G +3142 CC genotype and sHLA-G concentration levels could represent important predictive risk markers for CMV infection.

  20. Recipient HLA-G +3142 CC Genotype and Concentrations of Soluble HLA-G Impact on Occurrence of CMV Infection after Living-Donor Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Guberina

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The expression modulation of the immunosuppressive non-classical Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G molecule and its soluble isoforms is an immune evasion strategy being deployed by cytomegalovirus (CMV. The +3142 C>G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP located within the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR is of crucial importance for the regulation of HLA-G expression. Therefore, we analyzed the influence of the +3142 C>G HLA-G SNP on the occurrence of CMV infection in a cohort of 178 living-donor kidney recipients and their 178 corresponding donors. In addition, soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G levels were quantified before and after transplantation. The presence of the HLA-G +3142 CC genotype in recipients, but not donors of our cohort as along with elevated sHLA-G levels (≥ 6.1 ng/mL were associated with higher susceptibility to CMV infection after transplantation. Our results provided evidence that i HLA-G is implicated in the establishment of CMV after living-donor kidney transplantation and ii recipient HLA-G +3142 CC genotype and sHLA-G concentration levels could represent important predictive risk markers for CMV infection.

  1. Single molecule real-time DNA sequencing of HLA genes at ultra-high resolution from 126 International HLA and Immunogenetics Workshop cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T R; Hayhurst, J D; Hayward, D R; Bultitude, W P; Barker, D J; Robinson, J; Madrigal, J A; Mayor, N P; Marsh, S G E

    2018-02-01

    The hyperpolymorphic HLA genes play important roles in disease and transplantation and act as genetic markers of migration and evolution. A panel of 107 B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (B-LCLs) was established in 1987 at the 10th International Histocompatibility Workshop as a resource for the immunogenetics community. These B-LCLs are well characterised and represent diverse ethnicities and HLA haplotypes. Here we have applied Pacific Biosciences' Single Molecule Real-Time (SMRT) DNA sequencing to HLA type 126 B-LCL, including the 107 International HLA and Immunogenetics Workshop (IHIW) cells, to ultra-high resolution. Amplicon sequencing of full-length HLA class I genes (HLA-A, -B and -C) and partial length HLA class II genes (HLA-DRB1, -DQB1 and -DPB1) was performed. We typed a total of 931 HLA alleles, 895 (96%) of which were consistent with the typing in the IPD-IMGT/HLA Database (Release 3.27.0, January 20, 2017), with 595 (64%) typed at a higher resolution. Discrepant types, including novel alleles (n = 10) and changes in zygosity (n = 13), as well as previously unreported types (n = 34) were observed. In addition, patterns of linkage disequilibrium were distinguished by four-field resolution typing of HLA-B and HLA-C. By improving and standardising the HLA typing of these B-LCLs, we have ensured their continued usefulness as a resource for the immunogenetics community in the age of next generation DNA sequencing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Unique features of HLA-mediated HIV evolution in a Mexican cohort: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brumme Zabrina L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mounting evidence indicates that HLA-mediated HIV evolution follows highly stereotypic pathways that result in HLA-associated footprints in HIV at the population level. However, it is not known whether characteristic HLA frequency distributions in different populations have resulted in additional unique footprints. Methods The phylogenetic dependency network model was applied to assess HLA-mediated evolution in datasets of HIV pol sequences from free plasma viruses and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC-integrated proviruses in an immunogenetically unique cohort of Mexican individuals. Our data were compared with data from the IHAC cohort, a large multi-center cohort of individuals from Canada, Australia and the USA. Results Forty three different HLA-HIV codon associations representing 30 HLA-HIV codon pairs were observed in the Mexican cohort (q Conclusion Our data support universal HLA-mediated HIV evolution at the population level, resulting in detectable HLA-associated footprints in the circulating virus. However, it also strongly suggests that unique genetic backgrounds in different HIV-infected populations may influence HIV evolution in a particular direction as particular HLA-HIV codon associations are determined by specific HLA frequency distributions. Our analysis also suggests a dynamic HLA-associated evolution in HIV with fewer HLA-HIV codon associations observed in the proviral compartment, which is likely enriched in early archived HIV sequences, compared to the plasma virus compartment. These results highlight the importance of comparative HIV evolutionary studies in immunologically different populations worldwide.

  3. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Lammers, G.J.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.; Mayer, G.; Nowak, J.; Pfister, C.; Dubois, V.; Eliaou, J.F.; Eberhard, H.P.; Liblau, R.; Wierzbicka, A.; Geisler, P.; Bassetti, C.L.; Mathis, J.; Lecendreux, M.; Khatami, R.; Heinzer, R.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Feketeova, E.; Baumann, C.R.; Kutalik, Z.; Tiercy, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an

  4. The impact of next-generation sequencing technologies on HLA research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Shiina, Takashi; Tajima, Atsushi; Inoue, Ituro

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, the development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has paved the way for whole-genome analysis in individuals. Research on the human leukocyte antigen (HLA), an extensively studied molecule involved in immunity, has benefitted from NGS technologies. The HLA region, a 3.6-Mb segment of the human genome at 6p21, has been associated with more than 100 different diseases, primarily autoimmune diseases. Recently, the HLA region has received much attention because severe adverse effects of various drugs are associated with particular HLA alleles. Owing to the complex nature of the HLA genes, classical direct sequencing methods cannot comprehensively elucidate the genomic makeup of HLA genes. Thus far, several high-throughput HLA-typing methods using NGS have been developed. In HLA research, NGS facilitates complete HLA sequencing and is expected to improve our understanding of the mechanisms through which HLA genes are modulated, including transcription, regulation of gene expression and epigenetics. Most importantly, NGS may also permit the analysis of HLA-omics. In this review, we summarize the impact of NGS on HLA research, with a focus on the potential for clinical applications. PMID:26311539

  5. c-myc down-regulates class I HLA expression in human melanomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, R.; NOORDERMEER, I. A.; Krüse-Wolters, M.; Ruiter, D. J.; Schrier, P. I.

    1988-01-01

    Expression of class I HLA antigen has been shown to be reduced in a number of human tumours. Here we show that in a panel of 11 melanoma cell lines with variable class I HLA expression an inverse correlation exists between the mRNA levels of c-myc and class I HLA. This suggests that high expression

  6. HLA-G expression on blasts and tolerogenic cells in patients affected by acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locafaro, Grazia; Amodio, Giada; Tomasoni, Daniela; Tresoldi, Cristina; Ciceri, Fabio; Gregori, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) contributes to cancer cell immune escape from host antitumor responses. The clinical relevance of HLA-G in several malignancies has been reported. However, the role of HLA-G expression and functions in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is still controversial. Our group identified a subset of tolerogenic dendritic cells, DC-10 that express HLA-G and secrete IL-10. DC-10 are present in the peripheral blood and are essential in promoting and maintaining tolerance via the induction of adaptive T regulatory (Treg) cells. We investigated HLA-G expression on blasts and the presence of HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4(+) T cells in the peripheral blood of AML patients at diagnosis. Moreover, we explored the possible influence of the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) of HLA-G, which has been associated with HLA-G expression, on AML susceptibility. Results showed that HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4(+) T cells are highly represented in AML patients with HLA-G positive blasts. None of the HLA-G variation sites evaluated was associated with AML susceptibility. This is the first report describing HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4(+) T cells in AML patients, suggesting that they may represent a strategy by which leukemic cells escape the host's immune system. Further studies on larger populations are required to verify our findings.

  7. HLA-G, immunocompetent cells and pregnancy outcome : a case of modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmer, Peter Martin

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we address the immunomodulatory role of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G). The placental trophoblast cells express HLA-G as membrane bound and soluble form (due to alternative splicing) at the fetomaternal interface. HLA-G putatively interacts with the maternal endometrial (decidual)

  8. Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G polymorphism and expression in breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seri Jeong

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen-G (HLA-G is known to be implicated in a tumor-driven immune escape mechanism in malignancies. The purpose of this study was to investigate HLA-G polymorphism and expression in breast cancer. HLA-G alleles were determined by direct DNA sequencing procedures from blood samples of 80 breast cancer patients and 80 healthy controls. Soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA from serum specimens. HLA-G expression in breast cancer lesions was also analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining. The presence of HLA-G 3' untranslated region (UTR 14-bp sequence was analyzed and found to be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer susceptibility based on HLA-G expression in tissues (P = 0.0407. Levels of sHLA-G were higher in the breast cancer group (median 117.2 U/mL compared to the control group (median 10.1 U/mL, P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AU-ROC values of sHLA-G for differentiating breast cancer from normal controls and for detecting metastasis from other stages of breast cancer were 0.89 and 0.79, respectively. HLA-G polymorphism and expression may be involved in breast carcinogenesis and sHLA-G concentrations could be used as a diagnostic marker for detecting breast cancer.

  9. Biology and clinical relevance of T-cell allo-HLA reactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amir, Avital

    2012-01-01

    Allo-HLA reactive T-cells can mediate graft versus host disease (GVHD) after HLA mismatched stem cell transplantation (SCT) and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). In addition, these T-cells can mediate graft rejection after HLA mismatched solid organ transplantation and SCT. Both GVHD and graft

  10. The HLA-G genotype is associated with IL-10 levels in activated PBMCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Stignani, Marina

    2005-01-01

    splicing and in the stability of HLA-G mRNA transcripts have been associated with HLA-G polymorphisms, especially a 14 bp deletion/insertion polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region of the HLA-G gene. We have investigated the secretion of HLA-G5/soluble HLA-G1 and interleukin-10 (IL-10......) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear lymphocytes (PBMCs) in relation to the HLA-G 14 bp genotype. No HLA-G5/sHLA-G1 could be detected in the non-activated control PBMC culture media, and there were no significant differences among the three HLA-G 14 bp genotypes regarding IL-10...... concentrations. In LPS-activated PBMC cultures, no significant differences among the three HLA-G 14 bp genotypes regarding HLA-G5/sHLA-G1 concentrations were observed. However, this was in contrast to the IL-10 levels (P=0.0004, Kruskal-Wallis test). The +14/+14 bp PBMC samples expressed higher levels of IL-10...

  11. Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, P.; Sidney, J.; Kim, Y.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects...... affinities for a set of 11 HLA DP and DQ alleles. We also expanded our dataset for HLA DR alleles resulting in a total of 40,000 MHC class II binding affinities covering 26 allelic variants. Utilizing this dataset, we generated prediction tools utilizing several machine learning algorithms and evaluated...... include all training data for maximum performance. 4) The recently developed NN-align prediction method significantly outperformed all other algorithms, including a naïve consensus based on all prediction methods. A new consensus method dropping the comparably weak ARB prediction method could outperform...

  12. Implication of HLA-DMA Alleles in Corsican IDDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cucchi-Mouillot

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-DM molecule catalyses the CLIP/antigen peptide exchange in the classical class II peptide-binding groove. As such, DM is an antigen presentation regulator and may be linked to autoimmune diseases. Using PCR derived methods, a relationship was revealed between DM gene polymorphism and IDDM, in a Corsican population. The DMA*0101 allele was observed to confer a significant predisposition to this autoimmune disease while the DMA*0102 allele protected significantly. Experiments examining polymorphism of the HLA-DRB1 gene established that these relationships are not a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 alleles implicated in this pathology. The study of the DMA gene could therefore be an additional tool for early IDDM diagnosis in the Corsican population.

  13. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantú de León, David; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Villavicencio, Verónica; García Carranca, Alejandro; Mohar Betancourt, Alejandro; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; López-Tello, Alberto; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Barquera, Rodrigo; Yu, Neng; Yunis, Edmond J; Granados, Julio

    2009-02-05

    The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 - 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027-0.223, p = 0.00001). Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican population where high resolutions HLA

  14. Desensitization in HLA-incompatible kidney recipients and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Robert A; Lonze, Bonnie E; King, Karen E; Kraus, Edward S; Kucirka, Lauren M; Locke, Jayme E; Warren, Daniel S; Simpkins, Christopher E; Dagher, Nabil N; Singer, Andrew L; Zachary, Andrea A; Segev, Dorry L

    2011-07-28

    More than 20,000 candidates for kidney transplantation in the United States are sensitized to HLA and may have a prolonged wait for a transplant, with a reduced transplantation rate and an increased rate of death. One solution is to perform live-donor renal transplantation after the depletion of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies. Whether such antibody depletion results in a survival benefit as compared with waiting for an HLA-compatible kidney is unknown. We used a protocol that included plasmapheresis and the administration of low-dose intravenous immune globulin to desensitize 211 HLA-sensitized patients who subsequently underwent renal transplantation (treatment group). We compared rates of death between the group undergoing desensitization treatment and two carefully matched control groups of patients on a waiting list for kidney transplantation who continued to undergo dialysis (dialysis-only group) or who underwent either dialysis or HLA-compatible transplantation (dialysis-or-transplantation group). In the treatment group, Kaplan-Meier estimates of patient survival were 90.6% at 1 year, 85.7% at 3 years, 80.6% at 5 years, and 80.6% at 8 years, as compared with rates of 91.1%, 67.2%, 51.5%, and 30.5%, respectively, for patients in the dialysis-only group and rates of 93.1%, 77.0%, 65.6%, and 49.1%, respectively, for patients in the dialysis-or-transplantation group (PLive-donor transplantation after desensitization provided a significant survival benefit for patients with HLA sensitization, as compared with waiting for a compatible organ. By 8 years, this survival advantage more than doubled. These data provide evidence that desensitization protocols may help overcome incompatibility barriers in live-donor renal transplantation. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the Charles T. Bauer Foundation.).

  15. Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects a significant gap in knowledge as HLA DP and DQ molecules are presumably equally important, and have only been studied less because they are more difficult to handle experimentally. Results In this study, we aimed to narrow this gap by providing a large scale dataset of over 17,000 HLA-peptide binding affinities for a set of 11 HLA DP and DQ alleles. We also expanded our dataset for HLA DR alleles resulting in a total of 40,000 MHC class II binding affinities covering 26 allelic variants. Utilizing this dataset, we generated prediction tools utilizing several machine learning algorithms and evaluated their performance. Conclusion We found that 1 prediction methodologies developed for HLA DR molecules perform equally well for DP or DQ molecules. 2 Prediction performances were significantly increased compared to previous reports due to the larger amounts of training data available. 3 The presence of homologous peptides between training and testing datasets should be avoided to give real-world estimates of prediction performance metrics, but the relative ranking of different predictors is largely unaffected by the presence of homologous peptides, and predictors intended for end-user applications should include all training data for maximum performance. 4 The recently developed NN-align prediction method significantly outperformed all other algorithms, including a naïve consensus based on all prediction methods. A new consensus method dropping the comparably weak ARB prediction method could outperform the NN-align method, but further research into how to best combine MHC class II binding predictions is required.

  16. [Anti-erythrocyte and anti-HLA immunization in hemoglobinopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salah, N; El Borgi, W; Ben Lakhal, F; Ben Mansour, M; Gouider, E; Gorgi, Y; Bardi, R; Zoueri, B; Hafsia, R

    2014-12-01

    Evaluate the anti-erythrocyte and anti-HLA immunization rates in hemoglobinopathies. Cross-sectional study (October 2009-March 2010) on 83 patients followed for hemoglobinopathies. The irregular antibodies research is realized by two techniques: indirect Coombs and enzymatic technique on gel cards. The search for anti-HLA class I antibodies is done by complement dependent lymphocytotoxicity. The mean age was 30 years (14-64 years), the sex ratio M/F is 0.84. Our series included 42 cases of sickle cell disease (29 homozygous sickle cell anemia and 13 sickle-thalassemia) and 41 cases of thalassemia syndromes (26 major and 15 intermediate). The anti-erythrocyte alloimmunization rate is 10.84% without difference between thalassemia syndromes and sickle cell disease. The autoimmunization rate (22.89%) is higher in thalassemia syndromes (41.46%) than in the sickle cell disease (7.14%) (P<0.001). The anti-HLA immunization rate is 31.6% without difference between thalassemia syndromes and sickle cell disease. The young age, transfusion at a young age and the total number of transfusions are the factors that increase the risk of anti-erythrocyte autoimmunization. No clinicobiological parameter does influence the anti-erythrocyte and anti-HLA alloimmunization. There is no significant association between anti-erythrocyte and anti-HLA immunization. The erythrocyte and anti-HLA anti-immunization rates are high in our series. Preventive strategy is needed to ensure optimal blood safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Adrenomedullin 2/intermedin regulates HLA-G in human trophoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Madhu; Balakrishnan, Meena; Yallampalli, Uma; Endsley, Janice; Hankins, Gary D V; Theiler, Regan; Yallampalli, Chandra

    2011-12-01

    Adrenomedullin 2 (ADM2), also referred to as intermedin (IMD), is expressed in trophoblast cells in human placenta and enhances the invasion and migration of first-trimester HTR-8SV/neo cells. Further infusion of ADM2 antagonist in pregnant rat causes fetoplacental growth restriction, suggesting a role for ADM2 in maintaining a successful pregnancy. This study was undertaken to assess whether ADM2 protein is present in decidual tissue and colocalized with HLA-G-positive cytotrophoblast cells and natural killer cells; to assess whether ADM2 regulates expression of HLA-G in trophoblast cells; and to identify whether mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved in ADM2-induced trophoblast cell invasion and migration. Using immunohistochemical methods and RT-PCR, this study shows that ADM2 protein is colocalized with HLA-G-expressing cytotrophoblast cells as well as with NCAM1 (CD56) immunoreactivity in human first-trimester decidual tissue, and that ADM2 mRNA is expressed in peripheral blood natural killer cells. Further, ADM2 dose dependently increases the expression of HLA-G antigen in HTR-8SV/neo cells as well as in term placental villi explants, suggesting involvement of ADM2 in the regulation of HLA-G in trophoblast cells. In addition, interference with the activity of RAF and MAPK3/1 by their inhibitors, manumycin and U0126, respectively, reduces ADM2-induced HTR-8SV/neo cell invasion and migration. In summary, this study suggests a potential involvement for ADM2 in regulating HLA-G antigen at the maternal-fetal interface in human pregnancy and facilitating trophoblast invasion and migration via MAPK3/1 phosphorylation.

  18. NetMHCIIpan-3.0, a common pan-specific MHC class II prediction method including all three human MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael; Blicher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    importance for understanding the nature of immune responses and identifying T cell epitopes for the design of new vaccines and immunotherapies. Given the large number of MHC variants, and the costly experimental procedures needed to evaluate individual peptide–MHC interactions, computational predictions have......MHCIIpan-3.0 method is the first pan-specific predictor covering all HLA class II molecules with known sequences including HLA-DR, HLA-DP, and HLA-DQ. The NetMHCpan-3.0 method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.0....

  19. Latent myofascial trigger points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hong-You; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2011-10-01

    A latent myofascial trigger point (MTP) is defined as a focus of hyperirritability in a muscle taut band that is clinically associated with local twitch response and tenderness and/or referred pain upon manual examination. Current evidence suggests that the temporal profile of the spontaneous electrical activity at an MTP is similar to focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials, which contribute significantly to the induction of local tenderness and pain and motor dysfunctions. This review highlights the potential mechanisms underlying the sensory-motor dysfunctions associated with latent MTPs and discusses the contribution of central sensitization associated with latent MTPs and the MTP network to the spatial propagation of pain and motor dysfunctions. Treating latent MTPs in patients with musculoskeletal pain may not only decrease pain sensitivity and improve motor functions, but also prevent latent MTPs from transforming into active MTPs, and hence, prevent the development of myofascial pain syndrome.

  20. Conservative treatment for trigger thumb in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Hamada, Y; Toshima, T; Nagasawa, K

    2001-07-01

    Conservative treatment was performed for 60 trigger thumbs (19 right, 17 left, 12 bilateral) in 48 children (19 boys, 29 girls); the age at initial diagnosis ranged from 0 to 48 months old (mean 26 months). In this approach, only passive exercise of the affected thumb was performed by the mother. As a result, two patients (two thumbs) dropped out of treatment. Fifty-six thumbs out of 58 showed a satisfactory result (96%). Sixteen thumbs (in stage 2) and eight thumbs (in stage 3) showed completely recovery. Four thumbs (in stage 3) have not yet improved. In conclusion, we suggest that conservative treatment is effective for trigger thumbs in stage 2, while surgical therapy was thought to be indicated for stage 3 before the age of 3 years to avoid flexion deformity.

  1. El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad humano: sistema HLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando García

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available

    El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad humano, o sistema HLA, está localizado en el brazo corto del cromosoma 6. Sus genes codifican tres tipos de moléculas. Los antígenos clase I (HLA-A, B, C y E están formados por una cadena pesada unida no covalentemente a la β2-microglobulina y se expresan en la superficie de la mayoría de las células nucleadas del organismo. Estos antígenos actúan como elementos de restricción en la activación de los linfocitos T CD8+. Los antígenos clase II son dímeros compuestos por cadenas α y β y su distribución tisular está limitada sólo a algunos tipos de células. Estas moléculas actúan restringiendo la presentación de antígenos a los linfocitos CD4+. Los antígenos de clase III son proteínas plasmáticas del sistema del complemento. Los diferentes loci del sistema HLA son muy polimórficos y sus productos se heredan en bloques conocidos como haplotipos. Debido a que los diferentes grupos étnicos presentan variaciones en la frecuencia de ale ios y haplotipos, el HLA ha sido muy útil en los estudios antropogenéticos. Algunos antígenos HLA están presentes en pacientes con determinadas enfermedades con una frecuencia significativamente diferente a la encontrada en la población general. Estos hallazgos han sido de gran importancia para comprender la patogénesis y los mecanismos genéticos de resistencia o susceptibilidad a dichas enfermedades. En el campo de los transplantes de órganos, la compatibilidad HLA donante-receptor correlaciona con la sobrevida del injerto. El sistema HLA también parece tener mucha importancia en los fenómenos inmunológicos que ocurren durante el

  2. HLA-DM mediates peptide exchange by interacting transiently and repeatedly with HLA-DR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Kedar; Su, Katherine W; Chou, Chih-Ling; Khoruzhenko, Stanislav; Sadegh-Nasseri, Scheherazade

    2009-09-01

    The peptide editor HLA-DM (DM) catalyzes the exchange of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules within antigen presenting cells by generating a "peptide-receptive" MHC class II conformation (MHC(receptive)) to which peptides readily bind and rapidly unbind. While recent work has uncovered the determinants of DM recognition and effector functions, the nature of MHC(receptive) and its interaction with DM remains unclear. Here, we show that DM induces but does not stabilize MHC(receptive) in the absence of peptides. We demonstrate that DM is out-competed by certain superantigens, and increasing solvent viscosity inhibits DM-induced peptide association. We suggest that DM mediates peptide exchange by interacting transiently and repeatedly with MHC class II molecules, continually generating MHC(receptive). The simultaneous presence of peptide and DM in the milieu is thus crucial for the efficient generation of specific peptide-MHC class II complexes over time.

  3. Crystal structures of two peptide-HLA-B*1501 complexes; structural characterization of the HLA-B62 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roder, G; Blicher, Thomas; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl

    2006-01-01

    from other HLA supertypes define and explain the specificity of the P2 and P9 peptide anchor preferences in the B62 HLA supertype. The P2 peptide residue binds to the B-pocket in HLA-B*1501. This pocket is relatively large because of the small Ser67 residue located at the bottom. The peptide proximal...... part of the B-pocket is hydrophobic, which is consistent with P2 anchor residue preference for Leu. The specificity of the B-pocket is determined by the Met45, Ile66 and Ser67 residues. The apex of the B-pocket is hydrophilic because of the Ser67 residue. The P9 peptide residue binds to the F...

  4. Mapping the HLA-DO/HLA-DM complex by FRET and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Taejin; Macmillan, Henriette; Mortimer, Sarah E; Jiang, Wei; Rinderknecht, Cornelia H; Stern, Lawrence J; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2012-07-10

    HLA-DO (DO) is a nonclassic class II heterodimer that inhibits the action of the class II peptide exchange catalyst, HLA-DM (DM), and influences DM localization within late endosomes and exosomes. In addition, DM acts as a chaperone for DO and is required for its egress from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). These reciprocal functions are based on direct DO/DM binding, but the topology of DO/DM complexes is not known, in part, because of technical limitations stemming from DO instability. We generated two variants of recombinant soluble DO with increased stability [zippered DOαP11A (szDOv) and chimeric sDO-Fc] and confirmed their conformational integrity and ability to inhibit DM. Notably, we found that our constructs, as well as wild-type sDO, are inhibitory in the full pH range where DM is active (4.7 to ∼6.0). To probe the nature of DO/DM complexes, we used intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and mutagenesis and identified a lateral surface spanning the α1 and α2 domains of szDO as the apparent binding site for sDM. We also analyzed several sDM mutants for binding to szDOv and susceptibility to DO inhibition. Results of these assays identified a region of DM important for interaction with DO. Collectively, our data define a putative binding surface and an overall orientation of the szDOv/sDM complex and have implications for the mechanism of DO inhibition of DM.

  5. Repeated BCG treatment of mouse bladder selectively stimulates small GTPases and HLA antigens and inhibits single-spanning uroplakins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Donnell Michael A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite being a mainstay for treating superficial bladder carcinoma and a promising agent for interstitial cystitis, the precise mechanism of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG remains poorly understood. It is particularly unclear whether BCG is capable of altering gene expression beyond its well-recognized pro-inflammatory effects and how this relates to its therapeutic efficacy. The objective of this study was to determine differentially expressed genes in the mouse bladder following repeated intravesical BCG therapy. Methods Mice were transurethrally instilled with BCG or pyrogen-free on days 1, 7, 14, and 21. Seven days after the last instillation, urothelia along with the submucosa was removed and amplified ds-DNA was prepared from control- and BCG-treated bladder mucosa and used to generate suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH. Plasmids from control- and BCG-specific differentially expressed clones and confirmed by Virtual Northern were then purified and the inserts were sequenced and annotated. Finally, chromatin immune precipitation combined with real-time polymerase chain reaction assay (ChIP/Q-PCR was used to validate SSH-selected transcripts. Results Repeated intravesical BCG treatment induced an up regulation of genes associated with antigen presentation (B2M, HLA-A, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB2, HLA-E, HLA-G, IGHG, and IGH and representatives of two IFNγ-induced small GTPase families: the GBPs (GBP1, GBP2, and GBP5 and the p47GTPases (IIGTP1, IIGTP2, and TGTP. Genes expressed in saline-treated bladders but down-regulated by BCG included: the single-spanning uroplakins (UPK3a and UPK2, SPRR2G, GSTM5, and RSP 19. Conclusion Here we introduced a hypothesis-generator approach to determine key genes involved in the urothelium/sumbmucosa responses to BCG therapy. Urinary bladder responds to repeated BCG treatment by up-regulating not only antigen presentation-related genes, but also GBP and p47 small GTPases, both potentially

  6. The CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  7. The CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  8. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naive inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau trig...

  9. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naïve inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau tri...

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies new HLA class II haplotypes strongly protective against narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hor, Hyun; Kutalik, Zoltán; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder with the strongest human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association ever reported. Since the associated HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype is common in the general population (15-25%), it has been suggested that it is almost necessary but not sufficient for developing......*0602. We found association with a protective variant near HLA-DQA2 (rs2858884; P ... ratio = 0.02; P HLA haplotype suggests a virtually causal involvement of the HLA region in narcolepsy susceptibility....

  11. Inhibition of HLA-DM Mediated MHC Class II Peptide Loading by HLA-DO Promotes Self Tolerance

    OpenAIRE

    Denzin, Lisa K.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) molecules are loaded with peptides derived from foreign and self-proteins within the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen presenting cells (APCs). This process is mediated by interaction of MHCII with the conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule HLA-DM (DM). DM activity is directly opposed by HLA-DO (DO), another conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule. DO is an MHCII substrate mimic. Binding of DO to DM prevents MHCII from binding to DM, t...