WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapy triggers hla

  1. Splint therapy for trigger finger in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyuguchi, Y; Tada, K; Kawaii, H

    1983-02-01

    During the last 9 years, 83 trigger digits in 65 children were treated using a modified coil spring splint which maintains the interphalangeal (IP) joint in neutral extension or hyperextension. Sixty-two digits (75%) were completely healed following splint therapy alone, after an average period of splinting for 9.4 months. Eight digits which did not improve with splinting were surgically treated. Splint therapy to maintain the IP joint in neutral extension or hyperextension proved markedly effective in our series.

  2. KIR-HLA genotypes in HIV-infected patients lacking immunological recovery despite effective antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Soria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In HIV-infected individuals, mechanisms underlying unsatisfactory immune recovery during effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART have yet to be fully understood. We investigated whether polymorphism of genes encoding immune-regulating molecules, such as killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and their ligands class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA, could influence immunological response to cART. METHODS: KIR and HLA frequencies were analyzed in 154 HIV-infected and cART-treated patients with undetectable viral load divided into two groups: 'immunological non responders' (INR, N = 50, CD4(+ T-cell count 350/mm(3. Molecular KIR were typed using polymerase chain reaction-based genotyping. Comparisons were adjusted for baseline patient characteristics. RESULTS: The frequency of KIR2DL3 allele was significantly higher in FR than in INR (83.7% vs. 62%, P = 0.005. The functional compound genotype HLA-C1(+/KIR2DL3(+, even at multivariable analysis, when adjusted for nadir CD4(+ T-cell count, was associated with reduced risk of INR status: odds ratio (95% Confidence Intervals 0.34 (0.13-0.88, P = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced presence of the inhibitory KIR2DL3 genotype detected in INR might provoke an imbalance in NK function, possibly leading to increased immune activation, impaired killing of latently infected cells, and higher proviral burden. These factors would hinder full immune recovery during therapy.

  3. Immune Profiles to Predict Response to Desensitization Therapy in Highly HLA-Sensitized Kidney Transplant Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabu, Julie M; Siebert, Janet C; Maecker, Holden T

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective treatment for end-stage kidney disease. Sensitization, the formation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, remains a major barrier to successful kidney transplantation. Despite the implementation of desensitization strategies, many candidates fail to respond. Current progress is hindered by the lack of biomarkers to predict response and to guide therapy. Our objective was to determine whether differences in immune and gene profiles may help identify which candidates will respond to desensitization therapy. Single-cell mass cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) phenotyping, gene arrays, and phosphoepitope flow cytometry were performed in a study of 20 highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization therapy. Responders to desensitization therapy were defined as 5% or greater decrease in cumulative calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) levels, and non-responders had 0% decrease in cPRA. Using a decision tree analysis, we found that a combination of transitional B cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies at baseline before initiation of desensitization therapy could distinguish responders from non-responders. Using a support vector machine (SVM) and longitudinal data, TRAF3IP3 transcripts and HLA-DR-CD38+CD4+ T cells could also distinguish responders from non-responders. Combining all assays in a multivariate analysis and elastic net regression model with 72 analytes, we identified seven that were highly interrelated and eleven that predicted response to desensitization therapy. Measuring baseline and longitudinal immune and gene profiles could provide a useful strategy to distinguish responders from non-responders to desensitization therapy. This study presents the integration of novel translational studies including CyTOF immunophenotyping in a multivariate analysis model that has potential applications to predict response to desensitization, select candidates, and personalize

  4. Innate Immune Activation Can Trigger Experimental Spondyloarthritis in HLA-B27/Huβ2m Transgenic Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tok, Melissa N.; Satumtira, Nimman; Dorris, Martha; Pots, Desirée; Slobodin, Gleb; van de Sande, Marleen G.; Taurog, Joel D.; Baeten, Dominique L.; van Duivenvoorde, Leonie M.

    2017-01-01

    Spondyloarthritis (SpA) does not display the typical features of auto-immune disease. Despite the strong association with MHC class I, CD8(+) T cells are not required for disease induction in the HLA-B27/Huβ2m transgenic rats. We used Lewis HLA-B27/Huβ2m transgenic rats [21-3 × 283-2]F1,

  5. B cell repertoires in HLA-sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beausang, John F; Fan, H Christina; Sit, Rene; Hutchins, Maria U; Jirage, Kshama; Curtis, Rachael; Hutchins, Edward; Quake, Stephen R; Yabu, Julie M

    2017-01-13

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. Sensitization refers to pre-existing antibodies against human leukocyte antigen (HLA) protein and remains a major barrier to successful transplantation. Despite implementation of desensitization strategies, many candidates fail to respond. Our objective was to determine whether measuring B cell repertoires could differentiate candidates that respond to desensitization therapy. We developed an assay based on high-throughput DNA sequencing of the variable domain of the heavy chain of immunoglobulin genes to measure changes in B cell repertoires in 19 highly HLA-sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization and 7 controls with low to moderate HLA sensitization levels. Responders to desensitization had a decrease of 5% points or greater in cumulated calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) levels, and non-responders had no decrease in cPRA. Dominant B cell clones were not observed in highly sensitized candidates, suggesting that the B cells responsible for sensitization are either not present in peripheral blood or present at comparable levels to other circulating B cells. Candidates that responded to desensitization therapy had pre-treatment repertoires composed of a larger fraction of class-switched (IgG and IgA) isotypes compared to non-responding candidates. After B cell depleting therapy, the proportion of switched isotypes increased and the mutation frequencies of the remaining non-switched isotypes (IgM and IgD) increased in both responders and non-responders, perhaps representing a shift in the repertoire towards memory B cells or plasmablasts. Conversely, after transplantation, non-switched isotypes with fewer mutations increased, suggesting a shift in the repertoire towards naïve B cells. Relative abundance of different B cell isotypes is strongly perturbed by desensitization therapy and transplantation, potentially reflecting changes in the relative

  6. Innate Immune Activation Can Trigger Experimental Spondyloarthritis in HLA-B27/Huβ2m Transgenic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa N. van Tok

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Spondyloarthritis (SpA does not display the typical features of auto-immune disease. Despite the strong association with MHC class I, CD8+ T cells are not required for disease induction in the HLA-B27/Huβ2m transgenic rats. We used Lewis HLA-B27/Huβ2m transgenic rats [21-3 × 283-2]F1, HLA-B7/Huβ2m transgenic rats [120-4 × 283-2]F1, and wild-type rats to test our hypothesis that SpA may be primarily driven by the innate immune response. In vitro, splenocytes were stimulated with heat-inactivated Mycobacterium tuberculosis and cytokine expression and production was measured. In vivo, male and female rats were immunized with 30, 60, or 90 µg of heat-inactivated M. tuberculosis and clinically monitored for spondylitis and arthritis development. After validation of the model, we tested whether prophylactic and therapeutic TNF targeting affected spondylitis and arthritis. In vitro stimulation with heat-inactivated M. tuberculosis strongly induced gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF, IL-6, IL-1α, and IL-1β, in the HLA-B27 transgenic rats compared with controls. In vivo immunization induced an increased spondylitis and arthritis incidence and an accelerated and synchronized onset of spondylitis and arthritis in HLA-B27 transgenic males and females. Moreover, immunization overcame the protective effect of orchiectomy. Prophylactic TNF targeting resulted in delayed spondylitis and arthritis development and reduced arthritis severity, whereas therapeutic TNF blockade did not affect spondylitis and arthritis severity. Collectively, these data indicate that innate immune activation plays a role in the initiation of HLA-B27-associated disease and allowed to establish a useful in vivo model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms of disease initiation and progression.

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The hardware of the trigger components has been mostly finished. The ECAL Endcap Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC) are in production while Barrel TCC firmware has been upgraded, and the Trigger Primitives can now be stored by the Data Concentrator Card for readout by the DAQ. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) system is complete, and the timing is being finalized. All 502 HCAL trigger links to RCT run without error. The HCAL muon trigger timing has been equalized with DT, RPC, CSC and ECAL. The hardware and firmware for the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) jet triggers are being commissioned and data from these triggers is available for readout. The GCT energy sums from rings of trigger towers around the beam pipe beam have been changed to include two rings from both sides. The firmware for Drift Tube Track Finder, Barrel Sorter and Wedge Sorter has been upgraded, and the synchronization of the DT trigger is satisfactory. The CSC local trigger has operated flawlessly u...

  8. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Roberta Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Studies Group (TSG) The Trigger Studies Group has just concluded its third 2013 workshop, where all POGs presented the improvements to the physics object reconstruction, and all PAGs have shown their plans for Trigger development aimed at the 2015 High Level Trigger (HLT) menu. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger menu development, path timing, Trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – this last task in collaboration with PdmV (Physics Data and Monte Carlo Validation group). In the last months the group has delivered several HLT rate estimates and comparisons, using the available data and Monte Carlo samples. The studies were presented at the Trigger workshops in September and December, and STEAM has contacted POGs and PAGs to understand the origin of the discrepancies observed between 8 TeV data and Monte Carlo simulations. The most recent results show what the...

  9. HLA class I antibodies trigger increased adherence of monocytes to endothelial cells by eliciting an increase in endothelial P-selectin and, depending on subclass, by engaging FcγRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Nicole M; Mulder, Arend; Reed, Elaine F

    2013-06-15

    Ab-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants is characterized by intragraft macrophages. It is incompletely understood how donor-specific Ab binding to graft endothelium promotes monocyte adhesion, and what, if any, contribution is made by the Fc region of the Ab. We investigated the mechanisms underlying monocyte recruitment by HLA class I (HLA I) Ab-activated endothelium. We used a panel of murine mAbs of different subclasses to crosslink HLA I on human aortic, venous, and microvascular endothelial cells and measured the binding of human monocytic cell lines and peripheral blood monocytes. Both anti-HLA I murine (m)IgG1 and mIgG2a induced endothelial P-selectin, which was required for monocyte adhesion to endothelium irrespective of subclass. mIgG2a but not mIgG1 could bind human FcγRs. Accordingly, HLA I mIgG2a but not mIgG1 treatment of endothelial cells significantly augmented recruitment, predominantly through FcγRI, and, to a lesser extent, FcγRIIa. Moreover, HLA I mIgG2a promoted firm adhesion of monocytes to ICAM-1 through Mac-1, which may explain the prominence of monocytes during AMR. We confirmed these observations using human HLA allele-specific mAbs and IgG purified from transplant patient sera. HLA I Abs universally elicit endothelial exocytosis leading to monocyte adherence, implying that P-selectin is a putative therapeutic target to prevent macrophage infiltration during AMR. Importantly, the subclass of donor-specific Ab may influence its pathogenesis. These results imply that human IgG1 and human IgG3 should have a greater capacity to trigger monocyte infiltration into the graft than IgG2 or IgG4 due to enhancement by FcγR interactions.

  10. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger synchronization procedures for running with cosmic muons and operating with the LHC were reviewed during the May electronics week. Firmware maintenance issues were also reviewed. Link tests between the new ECAL endcap trigger concentrator cards (TCC48) and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger have been performed. Firmware for the energy sum triggers and an upgraded tau trigger of the Global Calorimeter Triggers has been developed and is under test. The optical fiber receiver boards for the Track-Finder trigger theta links of the DT chambers are now all installed. The RPC trigger is being made more robust by additional chamber and cable shielding and also by firmware upgrades. For the CSC’s the front-end and trigger motherboard firmware have been updated. New RPC patterns and DT/CSC lookup tables taking into account phi asymmetries in the magnetic field configuration are under study. The motherboard for the new pipeline synchronizer of the Global Trigg...

  11. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2012-01-01

      Level-1 Trigger The Level-1 Trigger group is ready to deploy improvements to the L1 Trigger algorithms for 2012. These include new high-PT patterns for the RPC endcap, an improved CSC PT assignment, a new PT-matching algorithm for the Global Muon Trigger, and new calibrations for ECAL, HCAL, and the Regional Calorimeter Trigger. These should improve the efficiency, rate, and stability of the L1 Trigger. The L1 Trigger group also is migrating the online systems to SLC5. To make the data transfer from the Global Calorimeter Trigger to the Global Trigger more reliable and also to allow checking the data integrity online, a new optical link system has been developed by the GCT and GT groups and successfully tested at the CMS electronics integration facility in building 904. This new system is now undergoing further tests at Point 5 before being deployed for data-taking this year. New L1 trigger menus have recently been studied and proposed by Emmanuelle Perez and the L1 Detector Performance Group...

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the March meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, the program of trigger pattern tests and vertical slice tests and planning for the Global Runs starting this summer. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and integration testing is in full swing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. After full checkout, trigger subsystems will be then operated in the CMS Global Runs. Continuous...

  13. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The production of the trigger hardware is now basically finished, and in time for the turn-on of the LHC. The last boards produced are the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcaps (TCC-EE). After the recent installation of the four EE Dees, the TCC-EE prototypes were used for their commissioning. Production boards are arriving and are being tested continuously, with the last ones expected in November. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger hardware is fully integrated after installation of the last EE cables. Pattern tests from the HCAL up to the GCT have been performed successfully. The HCAL triggers are fully operational, including the connection of the HCAL-outer and forward-HCAL (HO/HF) technical triggers to the Global Trigger. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) board firmware has been updated to permit recording of the tower “feature bit” in the data. The Global Calorimeter Trigger hardware is installed, but some firmware developments are still n...

  14. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The overall status of the L1 trigger has been excellent and the running efficiency has been high during physics fills. The timing is good to about 1%. The fine-tuning of the time synchronization of muon triggers is ongoing and will be completed after more than 10 nb-1 of data have been recorded. The CSC trigger primitive and RPC trigger timing have been refined. A new configuration for the CSC Track Finder featured modified beam halo cuts and improved ghost cancellation logic. More direct control was provided for the DT opto-receivers. New RPC Cosmic Trigger (RBC/TTU) trigger algorithms were enabled for collision runs. There is further work planned during the next technical stop to investigate a few of the links from the ECAL to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT). New firmware and a new configuration to handle trigger rate spikes in the ECAL barrel are also being tested. A board newly developed by the tracker group (ReTRI) has been installed and activated to block re...

  15. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The Level-1 Trigger hardware has performed well during both the recent proton-proton and heavy ion running. Efforts were made to improve the visibility and handling of alarms and warnings. The tracker ReTRI boards that prevent fixed frequencies of Level-1 Triggers are now configured through the Trigger Supervisor. The Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) team has introduced a buffer cleanup procedure at stops and a reset of the QPLL during configuring to ensure recalibration in case of a switch from the LHC clock to the local clock. A device to test the cables between the Regional Calorimeter Trigger and the GCT has been manufactured. A wrong charge bit was fixed in the CSC Trigger. The ECAL group is improving crystal masking and spike suppression in the trigger primitives. New firmware for the Drift Tube Track Finder (DTTF) sorters was developed to improve fake track tagging and sorting. Zero suppression was implemented in the DT Sector Collector readout. The track finder b...

  16. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Trigger Hardware The status of the trigger components was presented during the September CMS Week and Annual Review and at the monthly trigger meetings in October and November. Procedures for cold and warm starts (e.g. refreshing of trigger parameters stored in registers) of the trigger subsystems have been studied. Reviews of parts of the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) and the Global Trigger (GT) have taken place in October and November. The CERN group summarized the status of the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) system. All TTC crates and boards are installed in the underground counting room, USC55. The central clock system will be upgraded in December (after the Global Run at the end of November GREN) to the new RF2TTC LHC machine interface timing module. Migration of subsystem's TTC PCs to SLC4/ XDAQ 3.12 is being prepared. Work is on going to unify the access to Local Timing Control (LTC) and TTC CMS interface module (TTCci) via SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol, a lightweight XML-based messaging ...

  17. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos

    2010-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Since nearly all of the Level-1 (L1) Trigger hardware at Point 5 has been commissioned, activities during the past months focused on the fine-tuning of synchronization, particularly for the ECAL and the CSC systems, on firmware upgrades and on improving trigger operation and monitoring. Periodic resynchronizations or hard resets and a shortened luminosity section interval of 23 seconds were implemented. For the DT sector collectors, an automatic power-off was installed in case of high temperatures, and the monitoring capabilities of the opto-receivers and the mini-crates were enhanced. The DTTF and the CSCTF now have improved memory lookup tables. The HCAL trigger primitive logic implemented a new algorithm providing better stability of the energy measurement in the presence of any phase misalignment. For the Global Calorimeter Trigger, additional Source Cards have been manufactured and tested. Testing of the new tau, missing ET and missing HT algorithms is underw...

  18. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The final parts of the Level-1 trigger hardware are now being put in place. For the ECAL endcaps, more than half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are now available at CERN, such that one complete endcap can be covered. The Global Trigger now correctly handles ECAL calibration sequences, without being influenced by backpressure. The Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) hardware is complete and working in USC55. Intra-crate tests of all 18 RCT crates and the Global Calorimeter Trigger (GCT) are regularly taking place. Pattern tests have successfully captured data from HCAL through RCT to the GCT Source Cards. HB/HE trigger data are being compared with emulator results to track down the very few remaining hardware problems. The treatment of hot and dead cells, including their recording in the database, has been defined. For the GCT, excellent agreement between the emulator and data has been achieved for jets and HF ET sums. There is still som...

  19. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The trigger system has been constantly in use in cosmic and commissioning data taking periods. During CRAFT running it delivered 300 million muon and calorimeter triggers to CMS. It has performed stably and reliably. During the abort gaps it has also provided laser and other calibration triggers. Timing issues, namely synchronization and latency issues, have been solved. About half of the Trigger Concentrator Cards for the ECAL Endcap (TCC-EE) are installed, and the firmware is being worked on. The production of the other half has started. The HCAL Trigger and Readout (HTR) card firmware has been updated, and new features such as fast parallel zero-suppression have been included. Repairs of drift tube (DT) trigger mini-crates, optical links and receivers of sector collectors are under way and have been completed on YB0. New firmware for the optical receivers of the theta links to the drift tube track finder is being installed. In parallel, tests with new eta track finde...

  20. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Carlin with contributions from D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Data-taking continues at cruising speed, with high availability of all components of the Level-1 trigger. We have operated the trigger up to a luminosity of 7.6E33, where we approached 100 kHz using the 7E33 prescale column.  Recently, the pause without triggers in case of an automatic "RESYNC" signal (the "settle" and "recover" time) was reduced in order to minimise the overall dead-time. This may become very important when the LHC comes back with higher energy and luminosity after LS1. We are also preparing for data-taking in the proton-lead run in early 2013. The CASTOR detector will make its comeback into CMS and triggering capabilities are being prepared for this. Steps to be taken include improved cooperation with the TOTEM trigger system and using the LHC clock during the injection and ramp phases of LHC. Studies are being finalised that will have a bearing on the Trigger Technical Design Report (TDR), which is to be rea...

  1. HLA class I antibodies trigger increased adherence of monocytes to endothelial cells by eliciting an increase in endothelial P-selectin and, depending on subclass, by engaging FcγRs1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Nicole M; Mulder, Arend; Reed, Elaine F

    2013-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants is characterized by intragraft macrophages. It is incompletely understood how donor specific antibody binding to graft endothelium promotes monocyte adhesion, and what, if any, contribution is made by the Fc region of the antibody. We investigated the mechanisms underlying monocyte recruitment by HLA class I antibody-activated endothelium. We used a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies of different subclasses to crosslink HLA I on human aortic, venous and microvascular endothelial cells, and measured the binding of human monocytic cell lines and peripheral blood monocytes. Both anti-HLA I murine IgG1 and mIgG2a induced endothelial P-selectin, which was required for monocyte adhesion to endothelium irrespective of subclass. Mouse IgG2a but not mIgG1 could bind human FcγRs. Accordingly, HLA I mIgG2a but not mIgG1 treatment of endothelial cells significantly augmented recruitment, predominantly through FcγRI, and, to a lesser extent, FcγRIIa. Moreover, HLA I mIgG2a promoted firm adhesion of monocytes to ICAM-1 through Mac-1, which may explain the prominence of monocytes during antibody mediated rejection. We confirmed these observations using human HLA allele specific monoclonal antibodies and IgG purified from transplant patient sera. HLA I antibodies universally elicit endothelial exocytosis leading to monocyte adherence, implying that P-selectin is a putative therapeutic target to prevent macrophage infiltration during antibody-mediated rejection. Importantly, the subclass of donor specific antibody may influence its pathogenesis. These results imply that hIgG1 and hIgG3 should have a greater capacity to trigger monocyte infiltration into the graft than IgG2 or IgG4 due to enhancement by FcγR interactions. PMID:23690477

  2. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    At the December meeting, the CMS trigger group reported on progress in production, tests in the Electronics Integration Center (EIC) in Prevessin 904, progress on trigger installation in the underground counting room at point 5, USC55, and results from the Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge (MTCC) phase II. The trigger group is engaged in the final stages of production testing, systems integration, and software and firmware development. Most systems are delivering final tested electronics to CERN. The installation in USC55 is underway and moving towards integration testing. A program of orderly connection and checkout with subsystems and central systems has been developed. This program includes a series of vertical subsystem slice tests providing validation of a portion of each subsystem from front-end electronics through the trigger and DAQ to data captured and stored. This is combined with operations and testing without beam that will continue until startup. The plans for start-up, pilot and early running tri...

  3. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software New Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) for rapidity gap measurements have been installed and integrated into the Trigger recently. For the Global Muon Trigger, tuning of quality criteria has led to improvements in muon trigger efficiencies. Several subsystems have started campaigns to increase spares by recovering boards or producing new ones. The barrel muon sector collector test system has been reactivated, new η track finder boards are in production, and φ track finder boards are under revision. In the CSC track finder, an η asymmetry problem has been corrected. New pT look-up tables have also improved efficiency. RPC patterns were changed from four out of six coincident layers to three out of six in the barrel, which led to a significant increase in efficiency. A new PAC firmware to trigger on heavy stable charged particles allows looking for chamber hit coincidences in two consecutive bunch-crossings. The redesign of the L1 Trigger Emulator...

  4. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith, from contributions of D. Acosta

    2012-01-01

      The L1 Trigger group deployed several major improvements this year. Compared to 2011, the single-muon trigger rate has been reduced by a factor of 2 and the η coverage has been restored to 2.4, with high efficiency. During the current technical stop, a higher jet seed threshold will be applied in the Global Calorimeter Trigger in order to significantly reduce the strong pile-up dependence of the HT and multi-jet triggers. The currently deployed L1 menu, with the “6E33” prescales, has a total rate of less than 100 kHz and operates with detector readout dead time of less than 3% for luminosities up to 6.5 × 1033 cm–2s–1. Further prescale sets have been created for 7 and 8 × 1033 cm–2s–1 luminosities. The L1 DPG is evaluating the performance of the Trigger for upcoming conferences and publication. Progress on the Trigger upgrade was reviewed during the May Upgrade Week. We are investigating scenarios for stagin...

  5. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith from contributions of C. Leonidopoulos, I. Mikulec, J. Varela and C. Wulz.

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Over the past few months, the Level-1 trigger has successfully recorded data with cosmic rays over long continuous stretches as well as LHC splash events, beam halo, and collision events. The L1 trigger hardware, firmware, synchronization, performance and readiness for beam operation were reviewed in October. All L1 trigger hardware is now installed at Point 5, and most of it is completely commissioned. While the barrel ECAL Trigger Concentrator Cards are fully operational, the recently delivered endcap ECAL TCC system is still being commissioned. For most systems there is a sufficient number of spares available, but for a few systems additional reserve modules are needed. It was decided to increase the overall L1 latency by three bunch crossings to increase the safety margin for trigger timing adjustments. In order for CMS to continue data taking during LHC frequency ramps, the clock distribution tree needs to be reset. The procedures for this have been tested. A repl...

  6. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    R. Arcidiacono

    2013-01-01

      In 2013 the Trigger Studies Group (TSG) has been restructured in three sub-groups: STEAM, for the development of new HLT menus and monitoring their performance; STORM, for the development of HLT tools, code and actual configurations; and FOG, responsible for the online operations of the High Level Trigger. The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for Trigger Menu development, path timing, trigger performance studies coordination, HLT offline DQM as well as HLT release, menu and conditions validation – in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Since the end of proton-proton data taking, the group has started preparing for 2015 data taking, with collisions at 13 TeV and 25 ns bunch spacing. The reliability of the extrapolation to higher energy is being evaluated comparing the trigger rates on 7 and 8 TeV Monte Carlo samples with the data taken in the past two years. The effect of 25 ns bunch spacing is being studied on the d...

  7. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software The road map for the final commissioning of the level-1 trigger system has been set. The software for the trigger subsystems is being upgraded to run under CERN Scientific Linux 4 (SLC4). There is also a new release for the Trigger Supervisor (TS 1.4), which implies upgrade work by the subsystems. As reported by the CERN group, a campaign to tidy the Trigger Timing and Control (TTC) racks has begun. The machine interface was upgraded by installing the new RF2TTC module, which receives RF signals from LHC Point 4. Two Beam Synchronous Timing (BST) signals, one for each beam, can now be received in CMS. The machine group will define the exact format of the information content shortly. The margin on the locking range of the CMS QPLL is planned for study for different subsystems in the next Global Runs, using a function generator. The TTC software has been successfully tested on SLC4. Some TTC subsystems have already been upgraded to SLC4. The TTCci Trigger Supervisor ...

  8. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    by Wesley Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software After the winter shutdown minor hardware problems in several subsystems appeared and were corrected. A reassessment of the overall latency has been made. In the TTC system shorter cables between TTCci and TTCex have been installed, which saved one bunch crossing, but which may have required an adjustment of the RPC timing. In order to tackle Pixel out-of-syncs without influencing other subsystems, a special hardware/firmware re-sync protocol has been introduced in the Global Trigger. The link between the Global Calorimeter Trigger and the Global Trigger with the new optical Global Trigger Interface and optical receiver daughterboards has been successfully tested in the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. New firmware in the GCT now allows a setting to remove the HF towers from energy sums. The HF sleeves have been replaced, which should lead to reduced rates of anomalous signals, which may allow their inclusion after this is validated. For ECAL, improvements i...

  9. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    2011-01-01

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware and Software Overall the L1 trigger hardware has been running very smoothly during the last months of proton running. Modifications for the heavy-ion run have been made where necessary. The maximal design rate of 100 kHz can be sustained without problems. All L1 latencies have been rechecked. The recently installed Forward Scintillating Counters (FSC) are being used in the heavy ion run. The ZDC scintillators have been dismantled, but the calorimeter itself remains. We now send the L1 accept signal and other control signals to TOTEM. Trigger cables from TOTEM to CMS will be installed during the Christmas shutdown, so that the TOTEM data can be fully integrated within the CMS readout. New beam gas triggers have been developed, since the BSC-based trigger is no longer usable at high luminosities. In particular, a special BPTX signal is used after a quiet period with no collisions. There is an ongoing campaign to provide enough spare modules for the different subsystems. For example...

  10. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Alimena

    2013-01-01

    Trigger Strategy Group The Strategy for Trigger Evolution And Monitoring (STEAM) group is responsible for the development of future High-Level Trigger menus, as well as of its DQM and validation, in collaboration and with the technical support of the PdmV group. Taking into account the beam energy and luminosity expected in 2015, a rough estimate of the trigger rates indicates a factor four increase with respect to 2012 conditions. Assuming that a factor two can be tolerated thanks to the increase in offline storage and processing capabilities, a toy menu has been developed using the new OpenHLT workflow to estimate the transverse energy/momentum thresholds that would halve the current trigger rates. The CPU time needed to run the HLT has been compared between data taken with 25 ns and 50 ns bunch spacing, for equivalent pile-up: no significant difference was observed on the global time per event distribution at the only available data point, corresponding to a pile-up of about 10 interactions. Using th...

  11. The perfect storm: HLA antibodies, complement, FcγRs, and endothelium in transplant rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kimberly A; Valenzuela, Nicole M; Reed, Elaine F

    2015-05-01

    The pathophysiology of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in solid organ transplants is multifaceted and predominantly caused by antibodies directed against polymorphic donor human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Despite the clearly detrimental impact of HLA antibodies (HLA-Abs) on graft function and survival, the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of AMR remain a challenge. The histological manifestations of AMR reflect the signatures of HLA-Ab-triggered injury, specifically endothelial changes, recipient leukocytic infiltrate, and complement deposition. We review the interconnected mechanisms of HLA-Ab-mediated injury that might synergize in a 'perfect storm' of inflammation. Characterization of antibody features that are critical for effector functions may help to identify HLA-Abs that are more likely to cause rejection. We also highlight recent advances that may pave the way for new, more effective therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. TRIGGER

    CERN Multimedia

    W. Smith

    Level-1 Trigger Hardware The CERN group is working on the TTC system. Seven out of nine sub-detector TTC VME crates with all fibers cabled are installed in USC55. 17 Local Trigger Controller (LTC) boards have been received from production and are in the process of being tested. The RF2TTC module replacing the TTCmi machine interface has been delivered and will replace the TTCci module used to mimic the LHC clock. 11 out of 12 crates housing the barrel ECAL off-detector electronics have been installed in USC55 after commissioning at the Electronics Integration Centre in building 904. The cabling to the Regional Calorimeter Trigger (RCT) is terminated. The Lisbon group has completed the Synchronization and Link mezzanine board (SLB) production. The Palaiseau group has fully tested and installed 33 out of 40 Trigger Concentrator Cards (TCC). The seven remaining boards are being remade. The barrel TCC boards have been tested at the H4 test beam, and good agreement with emulator predictions were found. The cons...

  13. What is new HLA-B27 acute anterior uveitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Denis; Chang, John H; Amjadi, Shahriar; Maconochie, Zoe; Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed; McCluskey, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Acute anterior uveitis (AAU) is the most common form of uveitis, accounting for approximately 90% of all cases. Half of all cases of AAU are HLA-B27 positive. The disease is typically acute in onset, unilateral, nongranulomatous inflammation involving the iris and ciliary body, with a tendency to recurrent attacks. Approximately 50% of all patients with HLA-B27 AAU develop an associated seronegative arthritis (SNA), while approximately 25% of the patients initially diagnosed with HLA-B27 SNA develop AAU. Environmental factors play a critical role in the pathogenesis of AAU; in particular, bacterial triggers have been strongly implicated in the development of this disease. Topical corticosteroids and cycloplegic agents remain the cornerstones of treatment for AAU. Salazopirine and methotrexate are effective in decreasing recurrent attacks. Biological agents such as anti-TNF and anti-CD20 therapy may be effective in refractory severe AU but are rarely required.

  14. Evaluating Human T-Cell Therapy of Cytomegalovirus Organ Disease in HLA-Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV can cause severe disease in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although preclinical research in murine models as well as clinical trials have provided 'proof of concept' for infection control by pre-emptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy, there exists no predictive model to experimentally evaluate parameters that determine antiviral efficacy of human T cells in terms of virus control in functional organs, prevention of organ disease, and host survival benefit. We here introduce a novel mouse model for testing HCMV epitope-specific human T cells. The HCMV UL83/pp65-derived NLV-peptide was presented by transgenic HLA-A2.1 in the context of a lethal infection of NOD/SCID/IL-2rg-/- mice with a chimeric murine CMV, mCMV-NLV. Scenarios of HCMV-seropositive and -seronegative human T-cell donors were modeled by testing peptide-restimulated and T-cell receptor-transduced human T cells, respectively. Upon transfer, the T cells infiltrated host tissues in an epitope-specific manner, confining the infection to nodular inflammatory foci. This resulted in a significant reduction of viral load, diminished organ pathology, and prolonged survival. The model has thus proven its potential for a preclinical testing of the protective antiviral efficacy of HCMV epitope-specific human T cells in the evaluation of new approaches to an immunotherapy of CMV disease.

  15. The effect of trigger point management by positional release therapy on tension type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Ali; Rahimijaberi, Abbas; Mohamadi, Marzieh; Abbasi, Leila; Sarvestani, Fahimeh Kamali

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of trigger points' management by Positional Release Therapy (PRT) and routine medical therapy in treatment of Tension Type Headache. Tension Type Headache is the most frequent headache with the basis of myofascial and trigger point disorders. PRT is an indirect technique that treats trigger points. 30 Patients with active trigger points in cervical muscles entered to the study. They were randomly assigned to PRT or medical therapy group. Headache frequency, intensity and duration and tablet count were recorded by use of a daily headache diary. Sensitivity of trigger points was assessed by numeric pain intensity and by use of a digital force gauge (FG 5020). Both groups showed significant reduction in headache frequency and duration and tablet count after treatment phase. However, the reduction of study variables was persisted only in PRT group after follow up phase. There was no significant reduction in headache intensity, neither in PRT and nor in medication group. Sensitivity of trigger points was significantly reduced. In comparison of the two study groups, there was no significant difference in headache frequency, intensity, duration and tablet count (p> 0.05). Both procedures were equally effective according to the study. Thus, PRT can be a treatment choice for patients with T.T.H.

  16. Muscle trigger point therapy in tension-type headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Blanco, Cristina; de-la-Llave-Rincón, Ana Isabel; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César

    2012-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that active trigger points (TrPs) in neck and shoulder muscles contribute to tension-type headache. Active TrPs within the suboccipital, upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, temporalis, superior oblique and lateral rectus muscles have been associated with chronic and episodic tension-type headache forms. It seems that the pain profile of this headache may be provoked by referred pain from active TrPs in the posterior cervical, head and shoulder muscles. In fact, the presence of active TrPs has been related to a higher degree of sensitization in tension-type headache. Different therapeutic approaches are proposed for proper TrP management. Preliminary evidence indicates that inactivation of TrPs may be effective for the management of tension-type headache, particularly in a subgroup of patients who may respond positively to this approach. Different treatment approaches targeted to TrP inactivation are discussed in the current paper, focusing on tension-type headache. New studies are needed to further delineate the relationship between muscle TrP inactivation and tension-type headache.

  17. Diet as a Trigger or Therapy for Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James D; Abreu, Maria T

    2017-02-01

    The most common question asked by patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is, "Doctor, what should I eat?" Findings from epidemiology studies have indicated that diets high in animal fat and low in fruits and vegetables are the most common pattern associated with an increased risk of IBD. Low levels of vitamin D also appear to be a risk factor for IBD. In murine models, diets high in fat, especially saturated animal fats, also increase inflammation, whereas supplementation with omega 3 long-chain fatty acids protect against intestinal inflammation. Unfortunately, omega 3 supplements have not been shown to decrease the risk of relapse in patients with Crohn's disease. Dietary intervention studies have shown that enteral therapy, with defined formula diets, helps children with Crohn's disease and reduces inflammation and dysbiosis. Although fiber supplements have not been shown definitively to benefit patients with IBD, soluble fiber is the best way to generate short-chain fatty acids such as butyrate, which has anti-inflammatory effects. Addition of vitamin D and curcumin has been shown to increase the efficacy of IBD therapy. There is compelling evidence from animal models that emulsifiers in processed foods increase risk for IBD. We discuss current knowledge about popular diets, including the specific carbohydrate diet and diet low in fermentable oligo-, di-, and monosaccharides and polyols. We present findings from clinical and basic science studies to help gastroenterologists navigate diet as it relates to the management of IBD. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Nanoparticle-triggered in situ catalytic chemical reactions for tumour-specific therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Han; Chen, Yu; Shi, Jianlin

    2018-03-21

    Tumour chemotherapy employs highly cytotoxic chemodrugs, which kill both cancer and normal cells by cellular apoptosis or necrosis non-selectively. Catalysing/triggering the specific chemical reactions only inside tumour tissues can generate abundant and special chemicals and products locally to initiate a series of unique biological and pathologic effects, which may enable tumour-specific theranostic effects to combat cancer without bringing about significant side effects on normal tissues. Nevertheless, chemical reaction-initiated selective tumour therapy strongly depends on the advances in chemistry, materials science, nanotechnology and biomedicine. This emerging cross-disciplinary research area is substantially different from conventional cancer-theranostic modalities in clinics. In response to the fast developments in cancer theranostics based on intratumoural catalytic chemical reactions, this tutorial review summarizes the very-recent research progress in the design and synthesis of representative nanoplatforms with intriguing nanostructures, compositions, physiochemical properties and biological behaviours for versatile catalytic chemical reaction-enabled cancer treatments, mainly by either endogenous tumour microenvironment (TME) triggering or exogenous physical irradiation. These unique intratumoural chemical reactions can be used in tumour-starving therapy, chemodynamic therapy, gas therapy, alleviation of tumour hypoxia, TME-responsive diagnostic imaging and stimuli-responsive drug release, and even externally triggered versatile therapeutics. In particular, the challenges and future developments of such a novel type of cancer-theranostic modality are discussed in detail to understand the future developments and prospects in this research area as far as possible. It is highly expected that this kind of unique tumour-specific therapeutics by triggering specific in situ catalytic chemical reactions inside tumours would provide a novel but efficient

  19. Internal and External Triggering Mechanism of "Smart" Nanoparticle-Based DDSs in Targeted Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiana, Xian-Ling; Li, Jun; Wei, Ran; Lin, Hui; Xiong, Li-Xia

    2018-05-09

    Anticancer chemotherapeutics have a lot of problems via conventional drug delivery systems (DDSs), including non-specificity, burst release, severe side-effects, and damage to normal cells. Owing to its potential to circumventing these problems, nanotechnology has gained increasing attention in targeted tumor therapy. Chemotherapeutic drugs or genes encapsulated in nanoparticles could be used to target therapies to the tumor site in three ways: "passive", "active", and "smart" targeting. To summarize the mechanisms of various internal and external "smart" stimulating factors on the basis of findings from in vivo and in vitro studies. A thorough search of PubMed was conducted in order to identify the majority of trials, studies and novel articles related to the subject. Activated by internal triggering factors (pH, redox, enzyme, hypoxia, etc.) or external triggering factors (temperature, light of different wavelengths, ultrasound, magnetic fields, etc.), "smart" DDSs exhibit targeted delivery to the tumor site, and controlled release of chemotherapeutic drugs or genes. In this review article, we summarize and classify the internal and external triggering mechanism of "smart" nanoparticle-based DDSs in targeted tumor therapy, and the most recent research advances are illustrated for better understanding. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Impact of identifying factors which trigger bothersome tinnitus on the treatment outcome in tinnitus retraining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molini, Egisto; Faralli, Mario; Calzolaro, Lucia; Ricci, Giampietro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to ascertain any differences in the effectiveness of rehabilitation therapy in relation to the presence or absence of a known negative reinforcement responsible for the tinnitus-related pathology. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2008, we recruited 294 subjects suffering from incapacitating tinnitus and/or hyperacusis. The patients underwent tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) according to the methods described by Jastreboff and Hazell [Tinnitus Retraining Therapy: Implementing the Neurophysiological Model. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp 121-133]. We clinically assessed the presence or absence of known phenomena of associative learning, regarding the presence of adverse events temporally correlated with tinnitus and the treatment outcome. The separate analysis of the 2 subgroups shows a statistically significant difference in the improvement rate between the group with a known triggering factor and the group without a triggering factor, with a preponderance of the former with a 91% improvement rate versus approximately 56% for the latter. In our study, the inability to identify factors triggering bothersome tinnitus negatively affected the treatment outcome in TRT. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis of HLA-B*58: 01 genetic testing before initiation of allopurinol therapy to prevent allopurinol-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis in a Malaysian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Huey Yi; Lim, Yi Heng; Prawjaeng, Juthamas; Tassaneeyakul, Wichittra; Mohamed, Zahurin; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2018-02-01

    Studies found a strong association between allopurinol-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) and the HLA-B*58:01 allele. HLA-B*58:01 screening-guided therapy may mitigate the risk of allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN. This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HLA-B*58:01 screening before allopurinol therapy initiation compared with the current practice of no screening for Malaysian patients with chronic gout in whom a hypouricemic agent is indicated. This cost-effectiveness analysis adopted a societal perspective with a lifetime horizon. A decision tree model coupled with Markov models were developed to estimate the costs and outcomes, represented by quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained, of three treatment strategies: (a) current practice (allopurinol initiation without HLA-B*58:01 screening); (b) HLA-B*58:01 screening before allopurinol initiation; and (c) alternative treatment (probenecid) without HLA-B*58:01 screening. The model was populated with data from literature review, meta-analysis, and published government documents. Cost values were adjusted for the year 2016, with costs and health outcomes discounted at 3% per annum. A series of sensitivity analysis including probabilistic sensitivity analysis were carried out to determine the robustness of the findings. Both HLA-B*58:01 screening and probenecid prescribing were dominated by current practice. Compared with current practice, HLA-B*58:01 screening resulted in 0.252 QALYs loss per patient at an additional cost of USD 322, whereas probenecid prescribing resulted in 1.928 QALYs loss per patient at an additional cost of USD 2203. One SJS/TEN case would be avoided for every 556 patients screened. At the cost-effectiveness threshold of USD 8695 per QALY, the probability of current practice being the best choice is 99.9%, in contrast with 0.1 and 0% in HLA-B*58:01 screening and probenecid prescribing, respectively. This is because of the low incidence of

  2. Influence of HLA Matching on the Efficacy of Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Therapies for Osteoarthritis and Degenerative Disc Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier García-Sancho, MD, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. This lack of reactivity is presumably due to the cooperation of 2 factors, (1 downregulation of the host immune responses by the transplanted MSCs and (2 effective insulation of these cells inside the articular cavity or the intervertebral disc, respectively. Interestingly, better HLA matching did not enhance efficacy. These observations have medical relevance as they support the clinical use of allogeneic cells, at least as a single-dose administration. Multiple-dose applications will require further research to exclude possible sensitization.

  3. Pelvic floor myofascial trigger points: manual therapy for interstitial cystitis and the urgency-frequency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J M

    2001-12-01

    The effectiveness of manual physical therapy was evaluated in patients with interstitial cystitis and the urethral syndrome, that is urgency-frequency with or without pelvic pain. The rationale was based on the hypothesis that pelvic floor myofascial trigger points are not only a source of pain and voiding symptoms, but also a trigger for neurogenic bladder inflammation via antidromic reflexes. From September 1995 to November 2000, 45 women and 7 men, including 10 with interstitial cystitis and 42 with the urgency-frequency syndrome, underwent manual physical therapy to the pelvic floor for 1 to 2 visits weekly for 8 to 12 weeks. Results were determined by patient completed symptom score sheets indicating the rate of improvement according to outcome parameters, including 25% to 50%-mild, 51% to 75%-moderate, 76% to 99%-marked and 100%-complete resolution. In 10 cases these subjective results were confirmed by measuring resting pelvic floor tension by electromyography before and after the treatment course. Of the 42 patients with the urgency-frequency syndrome with or without pain 35 (83%) had moderate to marked improvement or complete resolution, while 7 of the 10 (70%) with interstitial cystitis had moderate to marked improvement. The mean duration of symptoms before treatment in those with interstitial cystitis and the urgency-frequency syndrome was 14 (median 12) and 6 years (median 2.5), respectively. In patients with no symptoms or brief, low intensity flares mean followup was 1.5 years. In 10 patients who underwent electromyography mean resting pelvic floor tension decreased from 9.73 to 3.61 microV., which was a 65% improvement. Pelvic floor manual therapy for decreasing pelvic floor hypertonus effectively ameliorates the symptoms of the urgency/frequency syndrome and interstitial cystitis.

  4. HLA-DPB1 and HLA class I confer risk of and protection from narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ollila, Hanna M; Ravel, Jean-Marie; Han, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, a disorder caused by a lack of hypocretin (orexin), is so strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II HLA-DQA1(∗)01:02-DQB1(∗)06:02 (DQ0602) that very few non-DQ0602 cases have been reported. A known triggering factor for narcolepsy is pandemic 2009 influenza......-class-II-independent associations with HLA-A(∗)11:01 (OR = 1.32 [1.13-1.54], p = 4.92 × 10(-4)), HLA-B(∗)35:03 (OR = 1.96 [1.41-2.70], p = 5.14 × 10(-5)), and HLA-B(∗)51:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.25-1.78], p = 1.09 × 10(-5)) were also seen across ethnic groups in the HLA class I region. These effects might reflect modulation...... of autoimmunity or indirect effects of HLA class I and HLA-DP alleles on response to viral infections such as that of influenza....

  5. The Perfect Storm: HLA Antibodies, Complement, FcγRs and Endothelium in Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Kimberly A.; Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in solid organ transplants is multi-faceted and predominantly caused by antibodies directed against polymorphic donor human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Despite the clearly detrimental impact of HLA antibodies (HLA-Ab) on graft function and survival, the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of AMR remain a challenge. Histological manifestations of AMR reflect signatures of HLA-Ab-triggered injury, specifically endothelial changes, recipient...

  6. Type 1 Diabetes and Interferon Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kan; Kawasaki, Eiji; Imagawa, Akihisa; Awata, Takuya; Ikegami, Hiroshi; Uchigata, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Shimada, Akira; Nakanishi, Koji; Makino, Hideichi; Maruyama, Taro; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Interferon therapy can trigger induction of several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. To assess the clinical, immunologic, and genetic characteristics of type 1 diabetes induced by interferon therapy, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Clinical characteristics, anti-islet autoantibodies, and HLA-DR typing were examined in 91 patients for whom type 1 diabetes developed during or shortly after interferon therapy. RESULTS Median ...

  7. KIR3DS1/HLA-B Bw4-80Ile Genotype Is Correlated with the IFN-α Therapy Response in hepatitis B e antigen-Positive Chronic Hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available To date, several on-treatment-level virological and serological indices that may predict the response to interferon alpha (IFN-α have been reported. However, no effective predictors, such as drug–response genes, that can be detected before administration of anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV therapy with IFN-α, have been found. In the diverse range of chronic viral infection, genes that affect human immunity play important roles in understanding host and viral co-evolution. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which are highly polymorphic at the allele and haplotype levels, participate in the antiviral function of natural killer (NK cells via fine-tuning inhibition and activation of NK-cell responses that occur when the NK cells interact with human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I molecules on target cells. For each individual, the pairing of KIR and HLA ligand is genetically determined. To investigate whether a particular KIR and HLA repertoire influences the risk of HBV infection and response to IFN-α treatment for chronic hepatitis B (CHB, we genotyped the KIRs and HLA ligands of 119 hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg-positive CHB patients. These patients included 43 patients who achieved sustained response (SR induced by IFN-α treatment for 48 weeks, 76 patients who achieved no response (NR, and 96 healthy subjects as controls. SR was defined as HBeAg loss with HBV DNA < 2,000 IU/ml and alanine aminotransferase normalization at 24 weeks posttreatment (week 72. In this study, we showed that activating KIR genes were less prevalent in Han Chinese, especially in Han Chinese with CHB, than in Caucasians. Furthermore, the KIR3DS1 gene, in combination with HLA-B Bw4-80Ile, strongly influenced the therapeutic outcomes for CHB patients who were treated with IFN-α. The frequency of the combination of genes encoding KIR3DS1 and HLA-B Bw4-80Ile was higher in patients who had a sustained treatment response than in patients who had NR [35

  8. Involvement of position-147 for HLA-E expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunami, Katsuyoshi; Kusama, Tamiko; Okura, Eiji; Shirakura, Ryota; Fukuzawa, Masahiro; Miyagawa, Shuji

    2006-01-01

    HLA-E functions as an inhibitory signaling molecule of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytolysis. However, the cell surface expression of HLA-E molecules is quite restricted because of the limited repertoire of binding peptide sequences, such as signal peptides of other HLA molecules, especially on xenogeneic cells. In this study, we successfully determined that position-147 is an important amino acid position for cell surface expression by producing point substitutions. For further studies concerning transplantation therapy, the point substitution, Ser147Cys, that resulted in a single atom change, oxygen to sulfur, designated as HLA-Ev(147), led to a much higher expression on the human and pig cell surface and a greater inhibitory function against human NK cells than wild type HLA-E in an in vitro model system of pig to human xenotransplantation. Consequently, HLA-Ev(147) might be a promising alternative gene tool for future transplantation therapy such as xenotransplantation

  9. Buccal viral DNA as a trigger for brincidofovir therapy in the mousepox model of smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, Ryan; Korom, Maria; Buller, R Mark; Parker, Scott

    2017-03-01

    Orthopoxviruses continue to pose a significant threat to the population as potential agents of bioterrorism. An intentional release of natural or engineered variola virus (VARV) or monkeypox viruses would cause mortality and morbidity in the target population. To address this, antivirals have been developed and evaluated in animal models of smallpox and monkeypox. One such antiviral, brincidofovir (BCV, previously CMX001), has demonstrated high levels of efficacy against orthopoxviruses in animal models and is currently under clinical evaluation for prevention and treatment of diseases caused by cytomegaloviruses and adenoviruses. In this study we use the mousepox model of smallpox to evaluate the relationship between the magnitude of the infectious virus dose and an efficacious BCV therapy outcome when treatment is initiated concomitant with detection of ectromelia virus viral DNA (vDNA) in mouse buccal swabs. We found that vDNA could be detected in buccal swabs of some, but not all infected mice over a range of challenge doses by day 3 or 4 postexposure, when initiation of BCV treatment was efficacious, suggesting that detection of vDNA in buccal swabs could be used as a trigger to initiate BCV treatment of an entire potentially exposed population. However, buccal swabs of some mice did not become positive until 5 days postexposure, when initiation of BCV therapy failed to protect mice that received high doses of virus. And finally, the data suggest that the therapeutic window for efficacious BCV treatment decreases as the virus infectious dose increases. Extrapolating these findings to VARV, the data suggest that treatment should be initiated as soon as possible after exposure and not rely on a diagnostic tool such as the measurement of vDNA in buccal cavity swabs; however, consideration should be given to the fact that the behavior/disease-course of VARV in humans is different from that of ectromelia virus in the mouse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All

  10. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy in inflammatory diseases: molecular mechanism that triggers anti-inflammatory action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariotto, Sofia; de Prati, Alessandra Carcereri; Cavalieri, Elisabetta; Amelio, Ernesto; Marlinghaus, Ernst; Suzuki, Hisanori

    2009-01-01

    Shock waves (SW), defined as a sequence of single sonic pulses characterised by high peak pressure (100 MPa), a fast rise in pressure (conveyed by an appropriate generator to a specific target area at an energy density ranging from 0.03 to 0.11 mJ/mm(2). Extracorporeal SW (ESW) therapy was first used on patients in 1980 to break up kidney stones. During the last ten years, this technique has been successfully employed in orthopaedic diseases such as pseudoarthosis, tendinitis, calcarea of the shoulder, epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis and several inflammatory tendon diseases. In particular, treatment of the tendon and muscle tissues was found to induce a long-time tissue regeneration effect in addition to having a more immediate anthalgic and anti-inflammatory outcome. In keeping with this, an increase in neoangiogenesis in the tendons of dogs was observed after 4-8 weeks of ESW treatment. Furthermore, clinical observations indicate an immediate increase in blood flow around the treated area. Nevertheless, the biochemical mechanisms underlying these effects have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present review, we briefly detail the physical properties of ESW and clinical cases treated with this therapy. We then go on to describe the possible molecular mechanism that triggers the anti-inflammatory action of ESW, focusing on the possibility that ESW may modulate endogenous nitric oxide (NO) production either under normal or inflammatory conditions. Data on the rapid enhancement of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity in ESW-treated cells suggest that increased NO levels and the subsequent suppression of NF-kappaB activation may account, at least in part, for the clinically beneficial action on tissue inflammation.

  11. HLA-B*14

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitman, Ellen M.; Willberg, Christian B.; Tsai, Ming Han

    2017-01-01

    Immune control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) infection is typically associated with effective Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. We here focus on HLA-B*14, which protects against HIV disease progression, but the immunodominant HLA-B*14-restricted anti-HIV response is Env specific...... higher functional avidity (P associated protection against HIV disease progression...... is significantly greater for HLA-B*14:02 than for HLA-B*14:01, consistent with the superior antiviral efficacy of the HLA-B*14-EL9 response. Thus, although Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses may usually have greater anti-HIV efficacy, factors independent of protein specificity, including functional avidity...

  12. Smart pH-responsive upconversion nanoparticles for enhanced tumor cellular internalization and near-infrared light-triggered photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Chunhong; Su, Lin; Wang, Hanjie; Chang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A smart pH-responsive photodynamic therapy system based on upconversion nanoparticle loaded PEG coated polymeric lipid vesicles (RB-UPPLVs) was designed and prepared. These RB-UPPLVs which are promising agents for deep cancer photodynamic therapy applications can achieve enhanced tumor cellular internalization and near-infrared light-triggered photodynamic therapy.

  13. HSA/PSS coated gold nanorods as thermo-triggered drug delivery vehicles for combined cancer photothermal therapy and chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ting-Yu; Yang, Shu-Jyuan; Wang, Chung-Hao; Lee, Shin-Yu; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2018-02-01

    Drug delivery systems combined multimodal therapy strategies are very promising in cancer theranostic applications. In this work, a new drug-delivery vehicles based on human serum albumin (HSA)-coated gold nanorods (GNR/PSS/HSA NPs) was developed. The success of coating was verified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, it is demonstrated that doxorubicin (DOX) is successfully loaded among multilayered gold nanorods by the electrostatic and hydrophobic force, and DOX@GNR/PSS/HSA NPs were highly biocompatible and stable in various physiological solutions. The NPs possess strong absorbance in nearinfrared (NIR) region, and high photothermal conversion efficiency for outstanding photothermal therapy applications. A bimodal drug release triggered by proteinase or NIR irradiation has been revealed, resulting in a significant chemotherapeutic effect in tumor sites because of the preferential drug accumulation and triggered release. Importantly, the in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that DOX@GNR/PSS/HSA NPs, which combined photothermal and chemotherapy for cancer therapy, revealing a remarkably superior synergistic anticancer effect over either monotherapy. All these results suggested a considerable potential of DOX@GNR/PSS/HSA NPs nano-platform for antitumor therapy.

  14. Prevalence of right atrial non-pulmonary vein triggers in atrial fibrillation patients treated with thyroid hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Hun; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Mohanty, Prasant; Trivedi, Chintan; Morris, Eli Hamilton; Santangeli, Pasquale; Bai, Rong; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Burkhardt, John David; Gallinghouse, Joseph G; Horton, Rodney; Sanchez, Javier E; Bailey, Shane; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Zagrodzky, Jason; Kim, Soo G; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is known to enhance arrhythmogenicity, and high-normal thyroid function is related with an increased recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after catheter ablation. However, the impact of thyroid hormone replacement (THR) on AF ablation is not well known. This study evaluated 1163 consecutive paroxysmal AF patients [160 (14%) on THR and 1003 (86%) without THR] undergoing their first catheter ablation. A total of 146 patients on THR and 146 controls were generated by propensity matching, based on calculated risk factor scores, using a logistic model (age, sex, body mass index, and left atrium size). The presence of non-pulmonary vein (PV) triggers was disclosed by a high-dose isoproterenol challenge (up to 30 μg/min) after PV isolation. Clinical characteristics were not different between the groups. When compared to the control, non-PV triggers were significantly greater in the THR patients [112 (77%) vs. 47 (32%), P atrial appendage (47 vs. 34%, P = 0.03), crista terminalis/superior vena cava (11 vs. 8%, P = 0.43), and mitral valve annulus (7 vs. 5%, P = 0.45) (THR vs. control), respectively. After mean follow-up of 14.7 ± 5.2 months, success rate was lower in patients on THR therapy [94 (64.4%)] compared to patients not receiving THR therapy [110 (75.3%), log-rank test value = 0.04]. Right atrial non-PV triggers were more prevalent in AF patients treated with THR. Elimination of non-PV triggers provided better arrhythmia-free survival in the non-THR group.

  15. Enzyme-triggered nanomedicine: Drug release strategies in cancer therapy (Invited Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Thompson, David H.; Kaasgaard, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    -based strategies are particularly interesting as they require no prior knowledge of the tumour localization. The basis of this review is an evaluation of the current status of drug delivery strategies focused on triggered drug release by disease-associated enzymes. We limit ourselves to reviewing the liposome...

  16. Immunomodulation of classical and non-classical HLA molecules by ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Cristina E; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2016-05-01

    Radiotherapy has been employed for the treatment of oncological patients for nearly a century, and together with surgery and chemotherapy, radiation oncology constitutes one of the three pillars of cancer therapy. Ionizing radiation has complex effects on neoplastic cells and on tumor microenvironment: beyond its action as a direct cytotoxic agent, tumor irradiation triggers a series of alterations in tumoral cells, which includes the de novo synthesis of particular proteins and the up/down-regulation of cell surface molecules. Additionally, ionizing radiation may induce the release of "danger signals" which may, in turn lead to cellular and molecular responses by the immune system. This immunomodulatory action of ionizing radiation highlights the importance of the combined use (radiotherapy plus immunotherapy) for cancer healing. Major histocompatibility complex antigens (also called Human Leukocyte Antigens, HLA in humans) are one of those molecules whose expression is modulated after irradiation. This review summarizes the modulatory properties of ionizing radiation on the expression of HLA class I (classical and non-classical) and class II molecules, with special emphasis in non-classical HLA-I molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A Previous Miscarriage and a Previous Successful Pregnancy Have a Different Impact on HLA Antibody Formation during a Subsequent Successful Pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Hönger, Gideon; van Deutekom, Hanneke Wilhelmina Maria; Hösli, Irene Mathilde; Schaub, Stefan; Spierings, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Inherited paternal HLA antigens from the semi-allogeneic fetus may trigger maternal immune responses during pregnancy, leading to the production of child-specific HLA antibodies. The prevalence of these HLA antibodies increases with the number of successful pregnancies. In the present study, we

  18. Temperature responsive porous silicon nanoparticles for cancer therapy - spatiotemporal triggering through infrared and radiofrequency electromagnetic heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarov, Konstantin; Xu, Wujun; Osminkina, Liubov; Zinovyev, Sergey; Soininen, Pasi; Kudryavtsev, Andrey; Gongalsky, Maxim; Gaydarova, Azha; Närvänen, Ale; Timoshenko, Victor; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka

    2016-11-10

    One critical functionality of the carrier system utilized in targeted drug delivery is its ability to trigger the release of the therapeutic cargo once the carrier has reached its target. External triggering is an alluring approach as it can be applied in a precise spatiotemporal manner. In the present study, we achieved external triggering through the porous silicon (PSi) nanoparticles (NPs) by providing a pulse of infrared or radiofrequency radiation. The NPs were grafted with a temperature responsive polymer whose critical temperature was tailored to be slightly above 37°C. The polymer coating improved the biocompatibility of the NPs significantly in comparison with their uncoated counterparts. Radiation induced a rapid temperature rise, which resulted in the collapse of the polymer chains facilitating the cargo release. Both infrared and radiofrequency radiation were able to efficiently trigger the release of the encapsulated drug in vitro and induce significant cell death in comparison to the control groups. Radiofrequency radiation was found to be more efficient in vitro, and the treatment efficacy was verified in vivo in a lung carcinoma (3LL) mice model. After a single intratumoral administration of the carrier system combined with radiofrequency radiation, there was clear suppression of the growth of the carcinoma and a prolongation of the survival time of the animals. The temperature responsive (TR) polymer grafted on the surface of porous silicon nanoparticles (PSi NPs) changes its conformation in response to the heating induced by infrared or radiofrequency radiation. The conformation change allows the loaded doxorubicin to escape from the pores, achieving controlled drug release from TR PSi NPs, which displayed efficacy against malignant cells both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Tumor-Triggered Geometrical Shape Switch of Chimeric Peptide for Enhanced in Vivo Tumor Internalization and Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Weiyun; Wang, Shibo; Xu, Luming; Zhang, Chi; Zhang, Xianzheng; Han, Heyou

    2017-03-28

    Geometrical shape of nanoparticles plays an important role in cellular internalization. However, the applicability in tumor selective therapeutics is still scarcely reported. In this article, we designed a tumor extracellular acidity-responsive chimeric peptide with geometrical shape switch for enhanced tumor internalization and photodynamic therapy. This chimeric peptide could self-assemble into spherical nanoparticles at physiological condition. While at tumor extracellular acidic microenvironment, chimeric peptide underwent detachment of acidity-sensitive 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride groups. The subsequent recovery of ionic complementarity between chimeric peptides resulted in formation of rod-like nanoparticles. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that this acidity-triggered geometrical shape switch endowed chimeric peptide with accelerated internalization in tumor cells, prolonged accumulation in tumor tissue, enhanced photodynamic therapy, and minimal side effects. Our results suggested that fusing tumor microenvironment with geometrical shape switch should be a promising strategy for targeted drug delivery.

  20. HLA in bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Kimiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    It has been well understood that human major histocompatibility antigen system, HLA is the most important role in the allo transplantation. Therefore, the structure of HLA genes was presented by the recent information (1987). Moreover, their functions in vitro and in vivo also were described. Finally, bone marrow transplantation and HLA network system in Japan against HLA mismatched case was proposed. It is eagerly expected that functional and clinical bone marrow transplantation in Japan could be succeeded. (author)

  1. Colchicine triggered severe rhabdomyolysis after long-term low-dose simvastatin therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydrychowicz, Clara; Pasieka, Bastian; Pierer, Matthias; Mueller, Wolf; Petros, Sirak; Weidhase, Lorenz

    2017-01-04

    Rhabdomyolysis is a widely recognized yet rare complication in statin use. Rhabdomyolysis might be triggered by the prescription of high doses of statins or by statin accumulation due to interactions with concomitant medication. Muscle cell destruction as evidenced by myoglobin elevation can induce potentially life-threatening acute renal failure. We report a case of a 70-year-old obese white man with sudden onset of severe rhabdomyolysis with consecutive renal failure. His medication included low-dose simvastatin, which he had taken for 6 years up until the event. The statin was withdrawn immediately. After 3 days of veno-venous hemofiltration his renal function was completely restored. Clinicians in both primary and special care might be unaware that side effects of statins do occur even after a long uneventful statin medication; they should be advised not to exclude that possibility upfront, even if a patient has tolerated the medication for years.

  2. EEG-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Restoring Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke with Severe Hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Marquez-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the therapeutic effects of integrating brain-computer interfacing technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore upper limb reaching movements in a 64-year-old man with severe left hemiplegia following a hemorrhagic stroke he sustained six years prior to this study. He completed 40 90-minute sessions of functional electrical stimulation therapy using a custom-made neuroprosthesis that facilitated 5 different reaching movements. During each session, the participant attempted to reach with his paralyzed arm repeatedly. Stimulation for each of the movement phases (e.g., extending and retrieving the arm was triggered when the power in the 18 Hz–28 Hz range (beta frequency range of the participant’s EEG activity, recorded with a single electrode, decreased below a predefined threshold. The function of the participant’s arm showed a clinically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE subscore (6 points as well as moderate improvement in Functional Independence Measure Self-Care subscore (7 points. The changes in arm’s function suggest that the combination of BCI technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary motor function in individuals with chronic hemiplegia which results in severe upper limb deficit (FMA-UE ≤ 15, a population that does not benefit from current best-practice rehabilitation interventions.

  3. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome: reduction of medication use after pelvic floor physical therapy with an internal myofascial trigger point wand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Rodney U; Harvey, Richard H; Wise, David; Nevin Smith, J; Nathanson, Brian H; Sawyer, Tim

    2015-03-01

    This study documents the voluntary reduction in medication use in patients with refractory chronic pelvic pain syndrome utilizing a protocol of pelvic floor myofascial trigger point release with an FDA approved internal trigger point wand and paradoxical relaxation therapy. Self-referred patients were enrolled in a 6-day training clinic from October, 2008 to May, 2011 and followed the protocol for 6 months. Medication usage and symptom scores on a 1-10 scale (10 = most severe) were collected at baseline, and 1 and 6 months. All changes in medication use were at the patient's discretion. Changes in medication use were assessed by McNemar's test in both complete case and modified intention to treat (mITT) analyses. 374 out of 396 patients met inclusion criteria; 79.7 % were male, median age of 43 years and median symptom duration of 5 years. In the complete case analysis, the percent of patients using medications at baseline was 63.6 %. After 6 months of treatment the percentage was 40.1 %, a 36.9 % reduction (p < 0.001). In the mITT analysis, there was a 22.7 % overall reduction from baseline (p < 0.001). Medication cessation at 6 months was significantly associated with a reduction in total symptoms (p = 0.03).

  4. Key Triggers of Osteoclast-Related Diseases and Available Strategies for Targeted Therapies: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haidi Bi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts, the only cells with bone resorption functions in vivo, maintain the balance of bone metabolism by cooperating with osteoblasts, which are responsible for bone formation. Excessive activity of osteoclasts causes many diseases such as osteoporosis, periprosthetic osteolysis, bone tumors, and Paget’s disease. In contrast, osteopetrosis results from osteoclast deficiency. Available strategies for combating over-activated osteoclasts and the subsequently induced diseases can be categorized into three approaches: facilitating osteoclast apoptosis, inhibiting osteoclastogenesis, and impairing bone resorption. Bisphosphonates are representative molecules that function by triggering osteoclast apoptosis. New drugs, such as tumor necrosis factor and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL inhibitors (e.g., denosumab have been developed for targeting the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B /RANKL/osteoprotegerin system or CSF-1/CSF-1R axis, which play critical roles in osteoclast formation. Furthermore, vacuolar (H+-ATPase inhibitors, cathepsin K inhibitors, and glucagon-like peptide 2 impair different stages of the bone resorption process. Recently, significant achievements have been made in this field. The aim of this review is to provide an updated summary of the current progress in research involving osteoclast-related diseases and of the development of targeted inhibitors of osteoclast formation.

  5. Near-infrared light-triggered theranostics for tumor-specific enhanced multimodal imaging and photothermal therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu B

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bo Wu,1,* Bing Wan,2,* Shu-Ting Lu,1 Kai Deng,3 Xiao-Qi Li,1 Bao-Lin Wu,1 Yu-Shuang Li,1 Ru-Fang Liao,1 Shi-Wen Huang,3 Hai-Bo Xu1,2 1Department of Radiology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 2Department of Radiology, Union Hospital of Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 3Department of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Polymers, Ministry of Education, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The major challenge in current clinic contrast agents (CAs and chemotherapy is the poor tumor selectivity and response. Based on the self-quench property of IR820 at high concentrations, and different contrast effect ability of Gd-DOTA between inner and outer of liposome, we developed “bomb-like” light-triggered CAs (LTCAs for enhanced CT/MRI/FI multimodal imaging, which can improve the signal-to-noise ratio of tumor tissue specifically. IR820, Iohexol and Gd-chelates were firstly encapsulated into the thermal-sensitive nanocarrier with a high concentration. This will result in protection and fluorescence quenching. Then, the release of CAs was triggered by near-infrared (NIR light laser irradiation, which will lead to fluorescence and MRI activation and enable imaging of inflammation. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that LTCAs with 808 nm laser irradiation have shorter T1 relaxation time in MRI and stronger intensity in FI compared to those without irradiation. Additionally, due to the high photothermal conversion efficiency of IR820, the injection of LTCAs was demonstrated to completely inhibit C6 tumor growth in nude mice up to 17 days after NIR laser irradiation. The results indicate that the LTCAs can serve as a promising platform for NIR-activated multimodal imaging and photothermal therapy. Keywords: light triggered, near-infrared light, tumor-specific, multimodal imaging, photothermal therapy, contrast agents

  6. Does fasting during Ramadan trigger non-adherence to oral hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeeneldin, A.A.; Gaber, A.A.; Taha, F.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the effect of fasting during Ramadan (the ninth lunar month) on adherence to oral hormonal therapies (OHT) among breast cancer (BC) patients. Patients and Methods: During Ramadan 2010, 139 BC patients were interviewed at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute. They were asked about fasting as well as intake of OHT in Ramadan and in the preceding month. Results: The median age was 50 years and most patients were postmenopausal with good performance status and non-metastatic disease. The median number of fasting days was 18% and 93% of patients were fasting 80% or more of Ramadan. Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors were used in 64% and 36%, respectively. Adherence to OHT during Ramadan and its preceding month were 94.2% and 95.7%, respectively (p = 0.77). In univariate analysis, non-adherence prior to Ramadan and shorter duration of OHT were predictors of non-adherence during Ramadan (P < 0.001, 0.003, respectively). Fasting, age, performance status, presence of metastases and type of hormonal therapy were not good predictors of adherence. Conclusions: While most of patients receiving OHT for BC are fasting during Ramadan, this does not negatively impact compliance with treatment

  7. Reflux esophagitis triggered after Helicobacter pylori eradication: a noteworthy demerit of eradication therapy among the Japanese?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori eIijima

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the February 2013 Revision of Insured Medical Treatment, bacterial eradication for all Helicobacter pylori-positive individuals in Japan was covered under the insurance scheme. However, reflux esophagitis is believed to occur in approximately 10% of Japanese patients who undergo eradication therapy. Hence, the risk of reflux esophagitis among such cases should be carefully considered, particularly in the treatment for H. pylori-positive patients who are otherwise healthy. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori in cases of H. pylori-positive gastritis markedly suppresses gastric inflammation, and inhibits gastric mucosal atrophy and its progression to intestinal metaplasia. In a long-term follow-up study (10-20 years, eradication treatment was found to reduce the risk of subsequent gastric cancer. However, the fact that eradication-induced reflux esophagitis could increase the long-term risk of Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma should also be considered in the Japanese population. Appropriate treatment with proton pump inhibitors should be taken into consideration for patients undergoing eradication therapy in clinical practice.

  8. HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 in Celiac disease predisposition: practical implications of the HLA molecular typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megiorni Francesca

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Celiac disease (CD is a multifactorial disorder with an estimated prevalence in Europe and USA of 1:100 and a female:male ratio of approximately 2:1. The disorder has a multifactorial etiology in which the triggering environmental factor, the gluten, and the main genetic factors, Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 loci, are well known. About 90-95% of CD patients carry DQ2.5 heterodimers, encoded by DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles both in cis or in trans configuration, and DQ8 molecules, encoded by DQB1*03:02 generally in combination with DQA1*03 variant. Less frequently, CD occurs in individuals positive for the DQ2.x heterodimers (DQA1≠*05 and DQB1*02 and very rarely in patients negative for these DQ predisposing markers. HLA molecular typing for Celiac disease is, therefore, a genetic test with a negative predictive value. Nevertheless, it is an important tool able to discriminate individuals genetically susceptible to CD, especially in at-risk groups such as first-degree relatives (parents, siblings and offspring of patients and in presence of autoimmune conditions (type 1 diabetes, thyroiditis, multiple sclerosis or specific genetic disorders (Down, Turner or Williams syndromes.

  9. Radiation recall dermatitis triggered by sorafenib after radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwi Eon; Song, Hee Sung; Kim, Young Suk [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Ki Jung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Sorafenib is widely used for unresectable and metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Radiation recall dermatitis (RRD) is an acute inflammatory reaction confined to previously irradiated skin that occurs after the administration of certain drugs. RRD after sorafenib treatment is rare; five cases have been reported thus far. We describe a 44-year-old man irradiated for chest wall bone metastasis from hepatocellular carcinoma. Eight days after radiotherapy completion, systemic therapy for metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma was initiated with sorafenib treatment. Eleven days after starting sorafenib, the patient complained of erythematous rash with pruritus in the chest wall, in a location consistent with the previous radiation field. Sorafenib was continued at the same dose, despite the RRD. The skin reaction subsided over the next 2 weeks without any medical intervention.

  10. Treatment of myofascial trigger points in common shoulder disorders by physical therapy: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN75722066].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bron, Carel; Wensing, Michel; Franssen, Jo Lm; Oostendorp, Rob Ab

    2007-11-05

    Shoulder disorders are a common health problem in western societies. Several treatment protocols have been developed for the clinical management of persons with shoulder pain. However available evidence does not support any protocol as being superior over others. Systematic reviews provide some evidence that certain physical therapy interventions (i.e. supervised exercises and mobilisation) are effective in particular shoulder disorders (i.e. rotator cuff disorders, mixed shoulder disorders and adhesive capsulitis), but there is an ongoing need for high quality trials of physical therapy interventions. Usually, physical therapy consists of active exercises intended to strengthen the shoulder muscles as stabilizers of the glenohumeral joint or perform mobilisations to improve restricted mobility of the glenohumeral or adjacent joints (shoulder girdle). It is generally accepted that a-traumatic shoulder problems are the result of impingement of the subacromial structures, such as the bursa or rotator cuff tendons. Myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) in shoulder muscles may also lead to a complex of symptoms that are often seen in patients diagnosed with subacromial impingement or rotator cuff tendinopathy. Little is known about the treatment of MTrPs in patients with shoulder disorders.The primary aim of this study is to investigate whether physical therapy modalities to inactivate MTrPs can reduce symptoms and improve shoulder function in daily activities in a population of chronic a-traumatic shoulder patients when compared to a wait-and-see strategy. In addition we investigate the recurrence rate during a one-year-follow-up period. This paper presents the design for a randomized controlled trial to be conducted between September 2007 - September 2008, evaluating the effectiveness of a physical therapy treatment for non-traumatic shoulder complaints. One hundred subjects are included in this study. All subjects have unilateral shoulder pain for at least six months

  11. Additional Effect of Static Ultrasound and Diadynamic Currents on Myofascial Trigger Points in a Manual Therapy Program for Patients With Chronic Neck Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; de Oliveira, Alessandra Kelly; Girasol, Carlos Eduardo; Dias, Fabiana Rodrigues Cancio; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2017-04-01

    To assess the additional effect of static ultrasound and diadynamic currents on myofascial trigger points in a manual therapy program to treat individuals with chronic neck pain. A single-blind randomized trial was conducted. Both men and women, between ages 18 and 45, with chronic neck pain and active myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius were included in the study. Subjects were assigned to 3 different groups: group 1 (n = 20) was treated with manual therapy; group 2 (n = 20) was treated with manual therapy and static ultrasound; group 3 (n = 20) was treated with manual therapy and diadynamic currents. Individuals were assessed before the first treatment session, 48 hours after the first treatment session, 48 hours after the tenth treatment session, and 4 weeks after the last session. There was no group-versus-time interaction for Numeric Rating Scale, Neck Disability Index, Pain-Related Self-Statement Scale, pressure pain threshold, cervical range of motion, and skin temperature (F-value range, 0.089-1.961; P-value range, 0.106-0.977). Moreover, we found no differences between groups regarding electromyographic activity (P > 0.05). The use of static ultrasound or diadynamic currents on myofascial trigger points in upper trapezius associated with a manual therapy program did not generate greater benefits than manual therapy alone.

  12. Does fasting during Ramadan trigger non-adherence to oral hormonal therapy in breast cancer patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeneldin, Ahmed Abdelmabood; Gaber, Ayman Abdelsamee; Taha, Fatma Mohamed

    2012-09-01

    To estimate the effect of fasting during Ramadan (the ninth lunar month) on adherence to oral hormonal therapies (OHT) among breast cancer (BC) patients. During Ramadan 2010, 139 BC patients were interviewed at the Egyptian National Cancer Institute. They were asked about fasting as well as intake of OHT in Ramadan and in the preceding month. The median age was 50years and most patients were postmenopausal with good performance status and non-metastatic disease. The median number of fasting days was 18% and 93% of patients were fasting 80% or more of Ramadan. Tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors were used in 64% and 36%, respectively. Adherence to OHT during Ramadan and its preceding month were 94.2% and 95.7%, respectively (p=0.77). In univariate analysis, non-adherence prior to Ramadan and shorter duration of OHT were predictors of non-adherence during Ramadan (PRamadan, this does not negatively impact compliance with treatment. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Caocci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL, in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp deletion-insertion (del-ins polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.

  14. HLA RTI performance evaluation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Malinga, L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available size of the UDP packet of the network, namely 64 KB, when using the best effort mode. The performance analysis task of the different RTIs was undertaken for two reasons. The first is to re-establish a High Level Architecture (HLA) in our Research... exchange messages over the network with the RTI Gateway process, via TCP sockets or UDP in order to realise the services associated with the RTI. The allocation of CPU resources to the federate and the RTIA process is exclusively managed...

  15. HLA-G in human reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2005-01-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib genes, HLA-E, -G and -F, are located on chromosome 6 in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA class Ib antigens resemble the HLA class Ia antigens in many ways, but several major differences have been described. This review ...... transplantation and in inflammatory or autoimmune disease, and of HLA-G in an evolutionary context, are also briefly examined....

  16. HLA-B27 Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Malhotra, P. et. al. (Updated 2015 December 30) Immunology of Transplant Rejection. Medscape Reference. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/432209-overview#showall. Accessed February 2017. (© 2017). HLA ...

  17. During Stably Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy Integrated HIV-1 DNA Load in Peripheral Blood is Associated with the Frequency of CD8 Cells Expressing HLA-DR/DP/DQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ruggiero

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: The observed positive association between integrated HIV-1 DNA load and frequency of CD8+DR/DP/DQ+ cells indicates that a close correlation between HIV persistence and immune activation continues during consistently suppressive therapy. The inducers of the distinct activation profile warrant further investigation.

  18. Polymorphism of HLA in the Romanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, E; Ho, E; Lupu, F; McManus, P; Vasilescu, R; Foca-Rodi, A; Suciu-Foca, N

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the HLA-class I and class II polymorphism in a population of 83 Romanians using conventional serology together with PCR amplification and oligonucleotide typing of HLA-class II genes. Romanians show a higher frequency of HLA-A11, B13, B18, B37, B39, B51 and DR2 than other European populations. HLA-DRB1*1501 and 1601 account for the high frequency of the serologic specificity DR2. In Romanians, HLA-DR2 is in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B18 and HLA-Bw52 rather than with HLA-B7 as in the case in other Europeans. Unexpected HLA-DR2 haplotypes include HLA-DRB1*1502, DQA1*0102, DQB1*0601; HLA-DRB1*1602, DQA1*0102, DQB1*0502. Other unusual haplotypes include HLA-DRB1*0405, DQA1*03, DQB1*0302; HLA-DRB1*1305, DQA1*0103, DQB1*0603; and HLA-DRB1*1405, DQA1*0101, DQB1*05032. Analysis of the genetic distance between Romanians and other Europeans who have been studied serologically are consistent with the hypothesis that Romanians descend from Roman ancestors who colonized Dacia between the 1st century B.C. and 1st century A.D.

  19. Trigger finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... digit; Trigger finger release; Locked finger; Digital flexor tenosynovitis ... cut or hand Yellow or green drainage from the cut Hand pain or discomfort Fever If your trigger finger returns, call your surgeon. You may need another surgery.

  20. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

    OpenAIRE

    Yazmin Rocío Árias-Murillo; Miguel Ángel Castro-Jiménez; María Fernanda Ríos-Espinosa; Juan Javier López-Rivera; Sandra Johanna Echeverry-Coral; Oscar Martínez-Nieto

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants. Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA. Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Col...

  1. Therapeutic preparations of IVIg contain naturally occurring anti-HLA-E antibodies that react with HLA-Ia (HLA-A/-B/-Cw) alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, Mepur H; Terasaki, Paul I; Pham, Tho; Jucaud, Vadim; Kawakita, Satoru

    2013-03-14

    The US Food and Drug Administration approved intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), extracted from the plasma of thousands of blood donors, for removing HLA antibodies (Abs) in highly sensitized patients awaiting organ transplants. Since the blood of healthy individuals has HLA Abs, we tested different IVIg preparations for reactivity to HLA single antigen Luminex beads. All preparations showed high levels of HLA-Ia and -Ib reactivity. Since normal nonalloimmunized males have natural antibodies to the heavy chains (HCs) of HLA antigens, the preparations were then tested against iBeads coated only with intact HLA antigens. All IVIg preparations varied in level of antibody reactivity to intact HLA antigens. We raised monoclonal Abs against HLA-E that mimicked IVIg's HLA-Ia and HLA-Ib reactivity but reacted only to HLA-I HCs. Inhibition experiments with synthetic peptides showed that HLA-E shares epitopes with HLA-Ia alleles. Importantly, depleting anti-HLA-E Abs from IVIg totally eliminated the HLA-Ia reactivity of IVIg. Since anti-HLA-E mAbs react with HLA-Ia, they might be useful in suppressing HLA antibody production, similar to the way anti-RhD Abs suppress production. At the same time, anti-HLA-E mAb, which reacts only to HLA-I HCs, is unlikely to produce transfusion-related acute lung injury, in contrast to antibodies reacting to intact-HLA.

  2. HLA-B27-Homodimer-Specific Antibody Modulates the Expansion of Pro-Inflammatory T-Cells in HLA-B27 Transgenic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osiris Marroquin Belaunzaran

    Full Text Available HLA-B27 is a common genetic risk factor for the development of Spondyloarthritides (SpA. HLA-B27 can misfold to form cell-surface heavy chain homodimers (B272 and induce pro-inflammatory responses that may lead to SpA pathogenesis. The presence of B272 can be detected on leukocytes of HLA-B27+ Ankylosing spondylitis (AS patients and HLA-B27 transgenic rats. We characterized a novel B272-specific monoclonal antibody to study its therapeutic use in HLA-B27 associated disorders.The monoclonal HD5 antibody was selected from a phage library to target cell-surface B272 homodimers and characterized for affinity, specificity and ligand binding. The immune modulating effect of HD5 was tested in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Onset and progression of disease profiles were monitored during therapy. Cell-surface B272 and expansion of pro-inflammatory cells from blood, spleen and draining lymph nodes were assessed by flow cytometry.HD5 bound B272 with high specificity and affinity (Kd = 0.32 nM. HD5 blocked cell-surface interaction of B272 with immune regulatory receptors KIR3DL2, LILRB2 and Pirb. In addition, HD5 modulated the production of TNF from CD4+ T-cells by limiting B272 interactions in vitro. In an HLA-B27 transgenic rat model repetitive dosing of HD5 reduced the expansion of pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cells, and decreased the levels of soluble TNF and number of cell-surface B272 molecules.HD5 predominantly inhibits early TNF production and expansion of pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cells in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Monoclonal antibodies targeting cell-surface B272 propose a new concept for the modulation of inflammatory responses in HLA-B27 related disorders.

  3. HLA-B27-Homodimer-Specific Antibody Modulates the Expansion of Pro-Inflammatory T-Cells in HLA-B27 Transgenic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroquin Belaunzaran, Osiris; Kleber, Sascha; Schauer, Stefan; Hausmann, Martin; Nicholls, Flora; Van den Broek, Maries; Payeli, Sravan; Ciurea, Adrian; Milling, Simon; Stenner, Frank; Shaw, Jackie; Kollnberger, Simon; Bowness, Paul; Petrausch, Ulf; Renner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Objectives HLA-B27 is a common genetic risk factor for the development of Spondyloarthritides (SpA). HLA-B27 can misfold to form cell-surface heavy chain homodimers (B272) and induce pro-inflammatory responses that may lead to SpA pathogenesis. The presence of B272 can be detected on leukocytes of HLA-B27+ Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients and HLA-B27 transgenic rats. We characterized a novel B272–specific monoclonal antibody to study its therapeutic use in HLA-B27 associated disorders. Methods The monoclonal HD5 antibody was selected from a phage library to target cell-surface B272 homodimers and characterized for affinity, specificity and ligand binding. The immune modulating effect of HD5 was tested in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Onset and progression of disease profiles were monitored during therapy. Cell-surface B272 and expansion of pro-inflammatory cells from blood, spleen and draining lymph nodes were assessed by flow cytometry. Results HD5 bound B272 with high specificity and affinity (Kd = 0.32 nM). HD5 blocked cell-surface interaction of B272 with immune regulatory receptors KIR3DL2, LILRB2 and Pirb. In addition, HD5 modulated the production of TNF from CD4+ T-cells by limiting B272 interactions in vitro. In an HLA-B27 transgenic rat model repetitive dosing of HD5 reduced the expansion of pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cells, and decreased the levels of soluble TNF and number of cell-surface B272 molecules. Conclusion HD5 predominantly inhibits early TNF production and expansion of pro-inflammatory CD4+ T-cells in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. Monoclonal antibodies targeting cell-surface B272 propose a new concept for the modulation of inflammatory responses in HLA-B27 related disorders. PMID:26125554

  4. Moving Beyond HLA: A Review of nHLA Antibodies in Organ Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2013-01-01

    Given the finite graft life expectancy of HLA identical organ transplants and the recognition of humoral graft injury in the absence of donor directed anti-HLA antibodies, the clinical impact of antibodies against non-HLA (nHLA) antigens in transplant injury is being increasingly recognized. The recognition of the impact of nHLA antigen discrepancies between donor and recipient on transplant outcomes is timely given the advances in rapid and lower cost sequencing methods that can soon provide...

  5. Template Driven Code Generator for HLA Middleware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.E.J.; Prins, L.M.; Huiskamp, W.

    2007-01-01

    HLA is the accepted standard for simulation interoperability. However, the HLA services and the API that is provided for these services are relatively complex from the user point of view. Since the early days of HLA, federate developers have attempted to simplify their task by using middleware that

  6. Haplótipos HLA mais freqüentes em doadores voluntários de medula óssea de Curitiba, Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bicalho Maria G.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT is a therapy used to treat patients with hematological diseases. The success of the transplant relies on a HLA match between host and donor. The HLA is located in the Major Histocompatibility Complex in the 6p12.3 region of the chromosome 6. The HLA gene products are involved in the immunomodulation of the immune response due to their function of presenting peptides to the T cells. The HLA genes are the most polymorphic in humans and the most relevant genetic marker for clinical transplants and are largely used in population studies. The knowledge of the HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-DR haplotype frequencies of bone marrow donors is an important tool when a patient needs an identical HLA donor, and there are few population studies similar to this in Brazil. The HLA typing was performed in the LIGH of the UFPR by the PCR-SSP technique. The most common haplotypes among the population studied were HLA-A*01B*08DR*03, HLA-A*29B*44DR*07 and HLA-A*03B*07DR*15. The search of a Brazilian patient for an identical HLA donor is usually hopeless and the understanding of the HLA frequencies permits a real foreknowledge of the success of this search. Success depends on the eventual registration of the perfect donor in the national centers of bone marrow donation. Aiming to increase the perspectives of patients who need a BMT, the evaluation of the HLA frequencies and the enhancement of the national registrations of bone marrow donors are crucial for the accomplishment of this objective.

  7. HLA typing in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Faré

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: the aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between Systemic Sclerosis (SSc and HLA antigens, and to correlate these antigens with the clinical manifestations of the disease. Materials and methods: 55 patients were stratified according a to the cutaneous involvement b to the positivity of Scl- 70 and anticentromere antibody and c to the internal organ involvement, in particular we used HRCT to demonstrate lung fibrosis, echocardiography for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension, blood creatinine, urinalysis and arterial hypertension to demonstrate renal failure, and esophagus double-countrast barium swallow for the diagnosis of esophagopathy. The control group consisting of 2000 healthy Caucasian subjects was recruited from the same population. Results: the frequency of the antigens A23 (p=0.003, RR=3.69, B18 (p<0.0001, RR=3.57, and DR11 (p<0.0001, RR=6.18 was statistically increased in the patients population compared with the healthy controls. Although there is no any significant correlation between HLA antigens and different clinical subsets of scleroderma, antigens B18 and DR11 could be associated with more severe clinical features. Conclusions: the presence of a significant association between SSc and specific HLA antigens (A23, B18, and DR11 could link the HLA system with SSc.

  8. Efficacy of Prompt Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy in the Treatment of Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Triggered by Uncontrolled Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan P. Fitzgerald

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening, rapidly progressive hematologic disorder involving uncontrolled immune system activation. HLH has been associated with viral infections, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infections. We report a case of a critically ill 30-year-old female who was hospitalized with HIV-associated HLH, with a CD4 count of 4 cells/mL and HIV viral load of 1,842,730 copies/mL. After ruling out other potential infectious causes of HLH, antiretroviral therapy (ART was initiated with darunavir, ritonavir, tenofovir, and emtricitabine. Within one week of initiation of ART, the patient began to improve clinically and hematologically and was stable enough for discharge from the hospital three weeks after starting therapy. This case suggests that treatment with ART in patients with HIV-associated HLH should be considered even in critically ill patients with low CD4 counts.

  9. Role of ER stress response in photodynamic therapy: ROS generated in different subcellular compartments trigger diverse cell death pathways

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moserová, Irena; Králová, Jarmila

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2012), e32972 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA ČR GA203/09/1311; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : photodynamic therapy * porphyrin derivatives * cell death * ER stress Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  10. Trigger Finger

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a bent position. People whose work or hobbies require repetitive gripping actions are at higher risk ... developing trigger finger include: Repeated gripping. Occupations and hobbies that involve repetitive hand use and prolonged gripping ...

  11. HLA Dr beta 1 alleles in Pakistani patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 alleles in rheumatoid arthritis in Pakistani patients. Study Design: Cross sectional / analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Rheumatology departments of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi and Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Methodology: HLA DR beta 1 genotyping of one hundred Pakistani patients, diagnosed as having RA as per American College of Rheumatology revised criteria 1987, was done. HLA DR beta 1 genotyping was carried out at allele group level (DR beta 1*01-DR beta 1*16) by sequence specific primers in RA patients. Comparison of HLA DR beta 1 allele frequencies between patients and control groups was made using Pearson's chi-square test to find possible association of HLA DR?1 alleles with RA in Pakistani rheumatoid patients. Results: HLA DR beta 1*04 was expressed with significantly increased frequency in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (p <0.05). HLA DR?1*11 was expressed statistically significantly more in control group as compared to rheumatoid patients indicating a possible protective effect. There was no statistically significant difference observed in frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 allele *01, DR beta 1 allele *03, DR beta 1 allele *07, DR beta 1 allele *08, DR beta 1 allele *09, DR beta 1 allele *10, DR beta 1 allele *12, DR beta 1 allele *13, DR beta 1 allele *14, DR?1 allele *15 and DR beta 1 allele *16 between patients and control groups. Conclusion: The identification of susceptible HLA DR beta 1 alleles in Pakistani RA patients may help physicians to make early decisions regarding initiation of early intensive therapy with disease modifying anti rheumatic medicines and biological agents decreasing disability in RA patients. (author)

  12. Involvement of HLA class I molecules in the immune escape of urologic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretero, R; Gil-Julio, H; Vázquez-Alonso, F; Garrido, F; Castiñeiras, J; Cózar, J M

    2014-04-01

    To analyze the influence of different alterations in human leukocyte antigen class I molecules (HLA I) in renal cell carcinoma, as well as in bladder and prostate cancer. We also study the correlation between HLA I expression and the progression of the disease and the response after immunotherapy protocols. It has been shown, experimentally, that the immune system can recognize and kill neoplastic cells. By analyzing the expression of HLA I molecules on the surface of cancer cells, we were able to study the tumor escape mechanisms against the immune system. Alteration or irreversible damage in HLA I molecules is used by the neoplastic cells to escape the immune system. The function of these molecules is to recognize endogenous peptides and present them to T cells of the immune system. There is a clear relationship between HLA I reversible alterations and success of therapy. Irreversible lesions also imply a lack of response to treatment. The immune system activation can reverse HLA I molecules expression in tumors with reversible lesions, whereas tumors with irreversible ones do not respond to such activation. Determine the type of altered HLA I molecules in tumors is of paramount importance when choosing the type of treatment to keep looking for therapeutic success. Those tumors with reversible lesions can be treated with traditional immunotherapy; however, tumour with irreversible alterations should follow alternative protocols, such as the use of viral vectors carrying the HLA genes to achieve damaged re-expression of the protein. From studies in urologic tumors, we can conclude that the HLA I molecules play a key role in these tumors escape to the immune system. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Separate developmental programs for HLA-A and -B cell surface expression during differentiation from embryonic stem cells to lymphocytes, adipocytes and osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardee J Sabir

    Full Text Available A major problem of allogeneic stem cell therapy is immunologically mediated graft rejection. HLA class I A, B, and Cw antigens are crucial factors, but little is known of their respective expression on stem cells and their progenies. We have recently shown that locus-specific expression (HLA-A, but not -B is seen on some multipotent stem cells, and this raises the question how this is in other stem cells and how it changes during differentiation. In this study, we have used flow cytometry to investigate the cell surface expression of HLA-A and -B on human embryonic stem cells (hESC, human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC and their fully-differentiated progenies such as lymphocytes, adipocytes and osteoblasts. hESC showed extremely low levels of HLA-A and no -B. In contrast, multipotent hMSC and hHSC generally expressed higher levels of HLA-A and clearly HLA-B though at lower levels. IFNγ induced HLA-A to very high levels on both hESC and hMSC and HLA-B on hMSC. Even on hESC, a low expression of HLA-B was achieved. Differentiation of hMSC to osteoblasts downregulated HLA-A expression (P = 0.017. Interestingly HLA class I on T lymphocytes differed between different compartments. Mature bone marrow CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells expressed similar HLA-A and -B levels as hHSC, while in the peripheral blood they expressed significantly more HLA-B7 (P = 0.0007 and P = 0.004 for CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, respectively. Thus different HLA loci are differentially regulated during differentiation of stem cells.

  14. An Anti-C1s Monoclonal, TNT003, Inhibits Complement Activation Induced by Antibodies Against HLA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, K A; Valenzuela, N M; Gjertson, D; Mulder, A; Fishbein, M C; Parry, G C; Panicker, S; Reed, E F

    2015-08-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of solid organ transplants (SOT) is characterized by damage triggered by donor-specific antibodies (DSA) binding donor Class I and II HLA (HLA-I and HLA-II) expressed on endothelial cells. While F(ab')2 portions of DSA cause cellular activation and proliferation, Fc regions activate the classical complement cascade, resulting in complement deposition and leukocyte recruitment, both hallmark features of AMR. We characterized the ability of an anti-C1s monoclonal antibody, TNT003, to inhibit HLA antibody (HLA-Ab)-induced complement activation. Complement deposition induced by HLA-Ab was evaluated using novel cell- and bead-based assays. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were cultured with HLA-Ab and human complement; production of activated complement proteins was measured by flow cytometry. Additionally, C3d deposition was measured on single antigen beads (SAB) mixed with HLA-Ab and human complement. TNT003 inhibited HLA-Ab mediated complement deposition on HAEC in a concentration-dependent manner; C3a, C4a and C5a anaphylatoxin production was also diminished by TNT003. Finally, TNT003 blocked C3d deposition induced by Class I (HLAI-Ab)- and Class II (HLAII-Ab)-specific antibodies on SAB. These data suggest TNT003 may be useful for modulating the effects of DSA, as TNT003 inhibits complement deposition and split product formation generated by HLA-I/II-Ab in vitro. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Transplantation Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Poly(acrylic acid) conjugated hollow mesoporous carbon as a dual-stimuli triggered drug delivery system for chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xian; Liu, Chang; Wang, Shengyu; Jiao, Jian; Di, Donghua; Jiang, Tongying; Zhao, Qinfu, E-mail: zqf021110505@163.com; Wang, Siling, E-mail: silingwang@syphu.edu.cn

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we described the development of the redox and pH dual stimuli-responsive drug delivery system and combination of the chemotherapy and photothermal therapy for cancer treatment. The poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was conjugated on the outlets of hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) via disulfide bonds. PAA was used as a capping to block drug within the mesopores of HMC for its lots of favorable advantages, such as good biocompatibility, appropriate molecular weight to block the mesopores of HMC, extension of the blood circulation, and the improvement of the dispersity of the nano-carriers in physiological environment. The DOX loaded DOX/HMC-SS-PAA had a high drug loading amount up to 51.9%. The in vitro drug release results illustrated that DOX/HMC-SS-PAA showed redox and pH dual-responsive drug release, and the release rate could be further improved by the near infrared (NIR) irradiation. Cell viability experiment indicated that DOX/HMC-SS-PAA had a synergistic therapeutic effect by combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy. This work suggested that HMC-SS-PAA exhibited dual-responsive drug release property and could be used as a NIR-adsorbing drug delivery system for chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy. - Highlights: • Poly(acrylic acid) was grafted on hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) via disulfide bonds. • The grafted PAA could increase the biocompatibility and stability of HMC. • The DOX-loaded DOX/HMC-SS-PAA had a high drug loading efficiency up to 51.9%. • DOX/HMC-SS-PAA showed redox/pH dual-responsive and NIR-triggered drug release. • DOX/HMC-SS-PAA showed a chemo/photothermal synergistic therapy effect.

  16. Poly(acrylic acid) conjugated hollow mesoporous carbon as a dual-stimuli triggered drug delivery system for chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xian; Liu, Chang; Wang, Shengyu; Jiao, Jian; Di, Donghua; Jiang, Tongying; Zhao, Qinfu; Wang, Siling

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we described the development of the redox and pH dual stimuli-responsive drug delivery system and combination of the chemotherapy and photothermal therapy for cancer treatment. The poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was conjugated on the outlets of hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) via disulfide bonds. PAA was used as a capping to block drug within the mesopores of HMC for its lots of favorable advantages, such as good biocompatibility, appropriate molecular weight to block the mesopores of HMC, extension of the blood circulation, and the improvement of the dispersity of the nano-carriers in physiological environment. The DOX loaded DOX/HMC-SS-PAA had a high drug loading amount up to 51.9%. The in vitro drug release results illustrated that DOX/HMC-SS-PAA showed redox and pH dual-responsive drug release, and the release rate could be further improved by the near infrared (NIR) irradiation. Cell viability experiment indicated that DOX/HMC-SS-PAA had a synergistic therapeutic effect by combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy. This work suggested that HMC-SS-PAA exhibited dual-responsive drug release property and could be used as a NIR-adsorbing drug delivery system for chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy. - Highlights: • Poly(acrylic acid) was grafted on hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) via disulfide bonds. • The grafted PAA could increase the biocompatibility and stability of HMC. • The DOX-loaded DOX/HMC-SS-PAA had a high drug loading efficiency up to 51.9%. • DOX/HMC-SS-PAA showed redox/pH dual-responsive and NIR-triggered drug release. • DOX/HMC-SS-PAA showed a chemo/photothermal synergistic therapy effect.

  17. Moving beyond HLA: a review of nHLA antibodies in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, Tara K; Sarwal, Minnie M

    2013-11-01

    Given the finite graft life expectancy of HLA identical organ transplants and the recognition of humoral graft injury in the absence of donor directed anti-HLA antibodies, the clinical impact of antibodies against non-HLA (nHLA) antigens in transplant injury is being increasingly recognized. The recognition of the impact of nHLA antigen discrepancies between donor and recipient on transplant outcomes is timely given the advances in rapid and lower cost sequencing methods that can soon provide complete maps of all recipient and donor HLA and nHLA mismatch data. In this review, we present a summary of recent reports evaluating the role of nHLA antibodies and their relevance to the field of organ transplantation. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. HLA Match Likelihoods for Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Grafts in the U.S. Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragert, Loren; Eapen, Mary; Williams, Eric; Freeman, John; Spellman, Stephen; Baitty, Robert; Hartzman, Robert; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Horowitz, Mary; Confer, Dennis; Maiers, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potentially lifesaving therapy for several blood cancers and other diseases. For patients without a suitable related HLA-matched donor, unrelated-donor registries of adult volunteers and banked umbilical cord–blood units, such as the Be the Match Registry operated by the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP), provide potential sources of donors. Our goal in the present study was to measure the likelihood of finding a suitable donor in the U.S. registry. Methods Using human HLA data from the NMDP donor and cord-blood-unit registry, we built population-based genetic models for 21 U.S. racial and ethnic groups to predict the likelihood of identifying a suitable donor (either an adult donor or a cord-blood unit) for patients in each group. The models incorporated the degree of HLA matching, adult-donor availability (i.e., ability to donate), and cord-blood-unit cell dose. Results Our models indicated that most candidates for HSCT will have a suitable (HLA-matched or minimally mismatched) adult donor. However, many patients will not have an optimal adult donor — that is, a donor who is matched at high resolution at HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, and HLA-DRB1. The likelihood of finding an optimal donor varies among racial and ethnic groups, with the highest probability among whites of European descent, at 75%, and the lowest probability among blacks of South or Central American descent, at 16%. Likelihoods for other groups are intermediate. Few patients will have an optimal cord-blood unit — that is, one matched at the antigen level at HLA-A and HLA-B and matched at high resolution at HLA-DRB1. However, cord-blood units mismatched at one or two HLA loci are available for almost all patients younger than 20 years of age and for more than 80% of patients 20 years of age or older, regardless of racial and ethnic background. Conclusions Most patients likely to benefit from HSCT will have a donor. Public investment in

  19. HLA typing in acute optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J L; Madsen, H O; Ryder, L P

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients with ON refe......OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients......: The frequency of HLA-DR15 was significantly increased in patients with ON + CDMS (52%) and ON (47%) compared with control subjects (31%). The frequency of HLA-DR17 was almost equal in the ON + CDMS (18%), ON (23%), and control (23%) groups. The frequencies of HLA-DQA-1B (55% in ON + CDMS, 58% in ON) and HLA...

  20. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilthey, Alexander T; Xifara, Dionysia K; Ban, Maria; Shah, Tejas S; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Alfredsson, Lars; Anderson, Carl A; Attfield, Katherine E; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barrett, Jeffrey; Binder, Thomas M C; Booth, David; Buck, Dorothea; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cotsapas, Chris; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Dendrou, Calliope A; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Fontaine, Bertrand; Fugger, Lars; Goris, An; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Hemmer, Bernhard; Hillert, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Leslie, Stephen; Lill, Christina M; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Spurkland, Anne; Taylor, Bruce; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zipp, Frauke; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Spencer, Chris C A; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Harbo, Hanne F; Hauser, Stephen L; De Jager, Philip L; Compston, Alastair; McCauley, Jacob L; Sawcer, Stephen; McVean, Gil

    2016-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17,465 cases and 30,385 controls from 11 cohorts of European ancestry, in combination with imputation of classical HLA alleles, to build a high-resolution map of HLA genetic risk and assess the evidence for interactions involving classical HLA alleles. Among new and previously identified class II risk alleles (HLA-DRB1*15:01, HLA-DRB1*13:03, HLA-DRB1*03:01, HLA-DRB1*08:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:02) and class I protective alleles (HLA-A*02:01, HLA-B*44:02, HLA-B*38:01 and HLA-B*55:01), we find evidence for two interactions involving pairs of class II alleles: HLA-DQA1*01:01–HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DQB1*03:01–HLA-DQB1*03:02. We find no evidence for interactions between classical HLA alleles and non-HLA risk-associated variants and estimate a minimal effect of polygenic epistasis in modulating major risk alleles. PMID:26343388

  1. Describing the Peptide Binding Specificity of HLA-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Nielsen, Morten

    for 5 HLA-C molecules and for all, but one, molecule we find a high frequency of binders, >70%, among these peptides. To extend the examined peptide space, we use bioinformatic prediction tools to search for additional binders. Finally, we update our prediction tool, NetMHCpan, with the HLA-C affinity......Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) presents peptides to T-cells for immune scrutiny. Whereas HLA-A and -B have been described in great detail, HLA-C has received much less attention. Here, to increase the coverage of HLA-C and the accuracy of the corresponding tools, we have generated HLA-C molecules...... data and show that the predictive performance for HLA-C molecules now is increased to a level comparable withthat of HLA-A and -B. These novel HLA-C molecules and predictors are successfully used to generate HLA-C tetramers and validate HLA-C-restricted T cell responses....

  2. Influence of HLA-C Expression Level on HIV Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apps, Richard; Qi, Ying; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Chen, Haoyan; Gao, Xiaojiang; Thomas, Rasmi; Yuki, Yuko; Del Prete, Greg Q.; Goulder, Philip; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Brumme, Chanson J.; John, Mina; Mallal, Simon; Nelson, George; Bosch, Ronald; Heckerman, David; Stein, Judy L.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Moody, M. Anthony; Denny, Thomas N.; Zeng, Xue; Fang, Jingyuan; Moffett, Ashley; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Goedert, James J.; Buchbinder, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D.; Fellay, Jacques; McLaren, Paul; Deeks, Steven G.; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce; Michael, Nelson L.; Weintrob, Amy; Wolinsky, Steven; Liao, Wilson; Carrington, Mary

    2013-01-01

    A variant upstream of human leukocyte antigen C (HLA-C) shows the most significant genome-wide effect on HIV control in European Americans and is also associated with the level of HLA-C expression. We characterized the differential cell surface expression levels of all common HLA-C allotypes and tested directly for effects of HLA-C expression on outcomes of HIV infection in 5243 individuals. Increasing HLA-C expression was associated with protection against multiple outcomes independently of individual HLA allelic effects in both African and European Americans, regardless of their distinct HLA-C frequencies and linkage relationships with HLA-B and HLA-A. Higher HLA-C expression was correlated with increased likelihood of cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses and frequency of viral escape mutation. In contrast, high HLA-C expression had a deleterious effect in Crohn’s disease, suggesting a broader influence of HLA expression levels in human disease. PMID:23559252

  3. HL-A27 and anterior uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, J C; Mapstone, R; Anderson, J; Usher, N

    1975-09-01

    HL-A types were determined in 90 successive patients with non-granulomatous uveitis. Fifty-one were HL-A27 positive (55.7%) compared to 8.2% of controls. Of 16 patients with ankylosing spondylitis, 13 were HL-A27 positive, as were two patients with a history of Reiter's syndrome. Twenty-eight patients were HL-A27 positive but had no evidence of rheumatic disease. The findings are discussed in relation to the possible pathogenesis of uveitis.

  4. Triggering Artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst; Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    and adapting them to specific situations need not be ad hoc.Triggering artefacts are a way of systematically challenging both designers' preunderstandings and the conservatism of work practice. Experiences from the Great Belt tunnel and bridge project are used to illustrate howtriggering artefacts change...

  5. HLA-G allelic variants are associated with differences in the HLA-G mRNA isoform profile and HLA-G mRNA levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Hylenius, Sine; Rørbye, Christina

    2003-01-01

    between mother and fetus in several ways. Finally, the expression of membrane-bound HLA-G and soluble HLA-G has been proposed to influence the outcome of pregnancy, and an aberrant HLA-G expression in pre-eclamptic placentas and spontaneous abortions has been reported. Here, an association between certain...... HLA-G polymorphisms and the mRNA levels of the different alternatively spliced HLA-G isoforms in first trimester trophoblast cell populations is reported. Several alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA isoforms, including a 14-bp polymorphism in the 3'UTR end (exon 8) of the HLA-G gene, are expressed...

  6. HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 allele diversity and its extended haplotypes in Madeira Island (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spínola, H; Lemos, A; Couto, A R; Parreira, B; Soares, M; Dutra, I; Bruges-Armas, J; Brehm, A

    2017-02-01

    This study shows, for the first time, high-resolution allele frequencies of HLA-DQA1 loci in Madeira Island (Portugal) and allows us to better understand and refine present knowledge on DQB1 variation, with the identification of several alleles not previously reported in this population. Estimates on haplotype profile, involving HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1, are also reported. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. DIFFERENTIAL IMPACT OF HLA-A, HLA-B AND HLA-DR COMPATIBILITY ON THE RENAL ALLOGRAFT SURVIVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Y. Abramov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the long-term results of 532 deceased donor kidney transplantations to investigate the impact of HLA match on the survival of renal allograft. All transplants were performed in our center in 1996–2009 and moni- tored prospectively for 1–14 years. We found, the survival of 58 kidneys grafted with 0–2 mismatch for HLA- ABDR to be significantly better (Plogrank = 0,016 than the survival of the kidneys grafted with 3–6 HLA-ABDR mismatch. The full compatibility for HLA-A (n = 75 did not influence the long-term survival (Plogrank = 0,48. The absence of HLA-DR mismatch had a beneficial effect for survival of 68 kidneys (Plogrank = 0,07. Eighteen cases with the full HLA-B compatibility between graft and recipient demonstrated excellent long-term survival (Plogrank = 0,007. HLA-B compatibility influenced significantly (P = 0,042 the survival of transplanted kidney in the Cox regression model adjusted for donor and recipient age, panel-reactive antibody level, re-transplant, and immunosuppression protocol. The data obtained support the conclusion, that HLA compatibility should be one of the criteria of deceased donor kidney allocation. 

  8. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis with HLA matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechitsky, Svetlana; Kuliev, Anver; Tur-Kaspa, Illan; Morris, Randy; Verlinsky, Yury

    2004-08-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) has recently been offered in combination with HLA typing, which allowed a successful haematopoietic reconstitution in affected siblings with Fanconi anaemia by transplantation of stem cells obtained from the HLA-matched offspring resulting from PGD. This study presents the results of the first PGD practical experience performed in a group of couples at risk for producing children with genetic disorders. These parents also requested preimplantation HLA typing for treating the affected children in the family, who required HLA-matched stem cell transplantation. Using a standard IVF procedure, oocytes or embryos were tested for causative gene mutations simultaneously with HLA alleles, selecting and transferring only those unaffected embryos, which were HLA matched to the affected siblings. The procedure was performed for patients with children affected by Fanconi anaemia (FANC) A and C, different thalassaemia mutations, Wiscott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, X-linked hyperimmunoglobulin M syndrome and X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal displasia with immune deficiency. Overall, 46 PGD cycles were performed for 26 couples, resulting in selection and transfer of 50 unaffected HLA-matched embryos in 33 cycles, yielding six HLA-matched clinical pregnancies and the birth of five unaffected HLA-matched children. Despite the controversy of PGD use for HLA typing, the data demonstrate the usefulness of this approach for at-risk couples, not only to avoid the birth of affected children with an inherited disease, but also for having unaffected children who may also be potential HLA-matched donors of stem cells for treatment of affected siblings.

  9. HLA restriction of non-HLA-A, -B, -C and -D cell mediated lympholysis (CML)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulmy, E.; Termijtelen, A.; Bradley, B.A.; Rood, J.J. van

    1976-01-01

    The aim of our study was to define target determinations other than those coded for by the classical HLA-A, -B, -C or -D loci which were responsible for killing in CML. In one of the families studied, strong evidence was found for the existence of a determinant coded for within the HLA region. CML was restricted to targets carrying the classical HLA-Bw35 and Cw4 determinants but the targets were neither HLA-Bw35 nor Cw4 themselves. We therefore concluded that this new HLA determinant was either the product of a new locus closely associated with HLA-B or that it was a product of the classical HLA-B locus which has not been recognized by serology. (author)

  10. HLA matching and the United Network for Organ Sharing Allocation System: impact of HLA matching on African-American recipients of cadaveric kidney transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebellato, Lorita M; Arnold, Angelo N; Bozik, Karen M; Haisch, Carl E

    2002-12-15

    A recent proposal supports the elimination of allocation points for human leukocyte antigen (HLA) mismatches (MM) in cadaveric kidney transplantation. The intent is to increase access for some racial groups that might be disadvantaged by the representation of race-specific HLA in a largely white donor pool. We report our experience from two transplant centers that serve a large African American (AA) patient population. All cadaveric transplants into AA recipients from 1994 to 2000 (n=162) were included in a retrospective review. Superior graft survival was observed in AA recipients of 0 MM transplants. When induction therapy was used, the graft survival at 3 years for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-BDR MM grades given allocation points (0,1,2 MM) was 82% versus only 49% for BDR MM grades not given points (3,4 MM: =0.0022). Our collective experience demonstrates that AA patients having HLA-BDR MM grades given allocation points had better graft survival. Removing points for HLA from the national allocation system may result in significantly poorer outcome in AA kidney recipients.

  11. Lab-on-a-chip enabled HLA diagnostic: combined sample preparation and real time PCR for HLA-B57 diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    The diverse human HLA (human leukocyte antigen) system is responsible for antigen presentation and recognition. It is essential for the immune system to maintain a stable defense line, but also is also involved in autoimmunity as well as metabolic disease. HLA-haplotype (HLA-B27), for instance, is associated with inflammatory diseases such as Bechterew's disease. The administration of the HIV drug Abacavir in combination with another HLA-haplotype (HLAB57) is associated with severe hypersensitivity reactions. Accordingly, the HLA status has to be monitored for diagnosis or prior to start of therapy. Along this line, a miniaturized microfluidic platform has been developed allowing performing the complete analytical process from "sample-in" to "answer-out" in a point-of-care environment. The main steps of the analytical cascade inside the integrated system are blood cell lysis and DNA isolation, DNA purification, real-time PCR and quantitative monitoring of the rise of a fluorescent signal appearing during the PCR based sequence amplification. All bio-analytical steps were intended to be performed inside one chip and will be actuated, controlled and monitored by a matching device. This report will show that all required processes are established and tested and all device components work well and interact with the functional modules on the chips in a harmonized fashion.

  12. Acidity-Triggered Tumor Retention/Internalization of Chimeric Peptide for Enhanced Photodynamic Therapy and Real-Time Monitoring of Therapeutic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Zhang, Wei-Yun; Ma, Zhao-Yu; Wang, Shi-Bo; Xu, Lu-Ming; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Han, He-You

    2017-05-17

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) holds great promise in tumor treatment. Nevertheless, it remains highly desirable to develop easy-to-fabricated PDT systems with improved tumor accumulation/internalization and timely therapeutic feedback. Here, we report a tumor-acidity-responsive chimeric peptide for enhanced PDT and noninvasive real-time apoptosis imaging. Both in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that a tumor mildly acidic microenvironment could trigger rapid protonation of carboxylate anions in chimeric peptide, which led to increased ζ potential, improved hydrophobicity, controlled size enlargement, and precise morphology switching from sphere to spherocylinder shape of the chimeric peptide. All of these factors realized superfast accumulation and prolonged retention in the tumor region, selective cellular internalization, and enhanced PDT against the tumor. Meanwhile, this chimeric peptide could further generate reactive oxygen species and initiate cell apoptosis during PDT. The subsequent formation of caspase-3 enzyme hydrolyzed the chimeric peptide, achieving a high signal/noise ratio and timely fluorescence feedback. Importantly, direct utilization of the acidity responsiveness of a biofunctional Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-Gly (DEVDG, caspase-3 enzyme substrate) peptide sequence dramatically simplified the preparation and increased the performance of the chimeric peptide furthest.

  13. Progress in Desensitization of the Highly HLA Sensitized Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, S C; Choi, J; Kahwaji, J; Vo, A

    2016-04-01

    The presence of HLA antibodies remains a significant and often impenetrable barrier to kidney transplantation, leading to increased morbidity and mortality for patients remaining on long-term dialysis. In recent years, a number of new approaches have been developed to overcome these barriers. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) remains the lynchpin of HLA desensitization therapy and has been shown in a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to improve transplantation rates. In addition, IVIG used in low doses with plasma exchange is a reliable protocol for desensitization. Another significant advancement was the addition of rituximab (anti-B-cell therapy) to IVIG and plasma exchange-based desensitization. This approach has significantly improved rates of transplantation and outcomes. There is limited experience with bortezomib (anti-plasma cell therapy) and eculizumab (complement inhibition) for desensitization. However, recent data from a completed trial of eculizumab failed to show a significant benefit for prevention of antibody-mediated rejection compared with standard therapy plus placebo, and bortezomib produced inconsistent results. There is a growing interest in developing new therapeutic agents for desensitization. Newer approaches that address antibody reduction with B-cell depletion are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. HLA-G and IL-10 in serum in relation to HLA-G genotype and polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Rizzo, Roberta; Christiansen, Ole B

    2004-01-01

    -mediated cell lysis and influence cytokine expression. Recently, a possible boarder immunoregulatory function of HLA-G also in adult life has been recognized. HLA-G gene polymorphism has been linked to differences in gene expression profile of alternatively spliced HLA-G transcripts and levels of specific HLA......% of the serum samples sHLA-G1/HLA-G5 could be detected. There was no correlation between sHLA-G1/HLA-G5 and IL-10 concentrations in serum. Soluble HLA-G1/HLA-G5 was not detected in any samples homozygous for a 14-bp insertion polymorphism in exon 8 of the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of the HLA-G gene ( P=0...

  15. HLA-DR alpha 2 mediates negative signalling via binding to Tirc7 leading to anti-inflammatory and apoptotic effects in lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grit-Carsta Bulwin

    Full Text Available Classically, HLA-DR expressed on antigen presenting cells (APC initiates lymphocyte activation via presentation of peptides to TCR bearing CD4+ T-Cells. Here we demonstrate that HLA-DR alpha 2 domain (sHLA-DRalpha2 also induces negative signals by engaging TIRC7 on lymphocytes. This interaction inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells via activation of the intrinsic pathway. Proliferation inhibition is associated with SHP-1 recruitment by TIRC7, decreased phosphorylation of STAT4, TCR-zeta chain & ZAP70, and inhibition of IFN-gamma and FasL expression. HLA-DRalpha2 and TIRC7 co-localize at the APC-T cell interaction site. Triggering HLA-DR - TIRC7 pathway demonstrates that sHLA-DRalpha2 treatment inhibits proinflammatory-inflammatory cytokine expression in APC & T cells after lipopolysaccaride (LPS stimulation in vitro and induces apoptosis in vivo. These results suggest a novel antiproliferative role for HLA-DR mediated via TIRC7, revise the notion of an exclusive stimulatory interaction of HLA-DR with CD4+ T cells and highlights a novel physiologically relevant regulatory pathway.

  16. Clinicopathologic significance of HLA-G and HLA-E molecules in Tunisian patients with ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babay, Wafa; Ben Yahia, Hamza; Boujelbene, Nadia; Zidi, Nour; Laaribi, Ahmed Baligh; Kacem, Dhikra; Ben Ghorbel, Radhia; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Ouzari, Hadda-Imene; Rizzo, Roberta; Rebmann, Vera; Mrad, Karima; Zidi, Inès

    2018-06-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G and HLA-E, non classical HLA class I molecules, have been highly implicated in immune tolerance. HLA-G and HLA-E molecules were proposed as putative markers of several advanced cancers. As a step towards a better understanding of ovarian carcinoma, we evaluated the expression of both HLA-G and HLA-E molecules and explored their prognostic implication. HLA-G and HLA-E expression were studied by immunohistochemistry on ovarian carcinoma tissues. This expression was semi-quantitatively scored into four expression groups and correlated to clinicopathological parameters and patients' survival. HLA-G and HLA-E have been found to be highly expressed in ovarian carcinoma tissues (Respectively, 72.4% and 96.8%). They are frequently co-expressed. Univariate and multivariate analysis revealed that a positive HLA-G expression status in tumor tissue is a promising candidate parameter to predict disease recurrence in addition to the disease status in Tunisian patients with ovarian carcinoma. Moreover, the elevated HLA-E expression was associated with serous ovarian carcinoma subtype as well as with advanced stages of ovarian carcinoma. HLA-G and HLA-E are highly represented in ovarian carcinoma suggesting a potential association with progressive disease mechanism. HLA-G and HLA-E molecules might be new candidates' markers for ovarian carcinoma progression. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Donor-derived HLA antibody production in patients undergoing SCT from HLA antibody-positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Hayashi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Onuma, T; Fujii, N; Kusunoki, Y; Soma, T; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-10-01

    Pre-existing donor-specific HLA antibodies in patients undergoing HLA-mismatched SCT have increasingly been recognized as a risk factor for primary graft failure. However, the clinical implications of the presence of HLA antibodies in donors remain unknown. We prospectively examined 123 related donors for the presence of HLA antibodies by using a Luminex-based single antigen assay. Of these, 1/57 (1.8%) male, 6/27 (22%) parous female and 0/39 (0%) nonparous female donors were HLA antibody-positive. Then, we determined the presence of HLA antibodies in seven patients who received SCT from antibody-positive donors. Of these, four became HLA antibody-positive after SCT. The specificities of the antibodies that emerged in the patients closely resembled those of the antibodies found in the donors, indicating their production by donor-derived plasma cells. Moreover, the kinetics of the HLA antibody levels were similar in all four patients: levels started increasing within 1 week after SCT and peaked at days 10-21, followed by a gradual decrease. These results suggest that donor-derived HLA antibody production frequently occurs in patients undergoing SCT from antibody-positive donors. Further studies are warranted for clarifying the clinical significance of donor-derived HLA antibodies, including the role of these antibodies in post transplant platelet transfusion refractoriness.

  18. HLA-DR expression and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Elling, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1986-01-01

    and 3 months later. The rectal epithelial cells were HLA-DR-positive in all patients at the first two examinations. After 3 months five patients had changed to an HLA-DR-negative stage, whereas the other seven patients remained HLA-DR-positive. Closer analyses showed that expression/nonexpression of HLA...

  19. HLA-A alleles differentially associate with severity to Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA), particularly HLA-B and class II alleles have been differentially associated with disease outcomes in different populations following infection with the malaria Plasmodium falciparum. However, the effect of HLA-A on malaria infection and/or disease is not fully understood. Recently, HLA-A ...

  20. A retrospective investigation of HLA-B*5801 in hyperuricemia patients in a Han population of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Heng; Yan, Dewen; Zuo, Xin; Liu, Junying; Liu, Wenlan; Zhang, Youming

    2018-05-01

    Hyperuricemia and gout have become increasingly prevalent in China. Allopurinol is an effective urate-lowering therapy, but it has severe side effects. HLA-B*5801 is highly associated with the allopurinol-induced toxic epidermal necrolysis and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. In this retrospective report, we had genotyped HLA-B*5801 in 253 cases of hyperuricemia and gout patients in a Han population in Shenzhen and analyzed the clinical management of medications. We found 30 carriers of the HLA-B*5801 allele in 253 cases of hyperuricemia or gout patients in the population (11.9%). Allopurinol was prescribed in both HLA-B*5801-positive and HLA-B*5801-negative groups. The evaluation of four models with or without genetic screening and management of allopurinol or febuxostat indicated that the HLA-B*5801 screening had significant cost benefit for clinical management. For appropriate management and cost-effectiveness, the HLA-B*5801 allele should be screened in all patients with hyperuricemia and gout in the Chinese population.

  1. Characterization of the Endothelial Cell Cytoskeleton following HLA Class I Ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Mary E.; Souda, Puneet; Jin, Yi-Ping; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) are a target of antibody-mediated allograft rejection. In vitro, when the HLA class I molecules on the surface of ECs are ligated by anti-HLA class I antibodies, cell proliferation and survival pathways are activated and this is thought to contribute to the development of antibody-mediated rejection. Crosslinking of HLA class I molecules by anti-HLA antibodies also triggers reorganization of the cytoskeleton, which induces the formation of F-actin stress fibers. HLA class I induced stress fiber formation is not well understood. Methodology and Principal Findings The present study examines the protein composition of the cytoskeleton fraction of ECs treated with HLA class I antibodies and compares it to other agonists known to induce alterations of the cytoskeleton in endothelial cells. Analysis by tandem mass spectrometry revealed unique cytoskeleton proteomes for each treatment group. Using annotation tools a candidate list was created that revealed 12 proteins, which were unique to the HLA class I stimulated group. Eleven of the candidate proteins were phosphoproteins and exploration of their predicted kinases provided clues as to how these proteins may contribute to the understanding of HLA class I induced antibody-mediated rejection. Three of the candidates, eukaryotic initiation factor 4A1 (eIF4A1), Tropomyosin alpha 4-chain (TPM4) and DDX3X, were further characterized by Western blot and found to be associated with the cytoskeleton. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that class I ligation stimulated increased eIF4A1 co-localization with F-actin and paxillin. Conclusions/Significance Colocalization of eIF4A1 with F-actin and paxillin following HLA class I ligation suggests that this candidate protein could be a target for understanding the mechanism(s) of class I mediated antibody-mediated rejection. This proteomic approach for analyzing the cytoskeleton of ECs can be applied to other agonists and various cells types

  2. HLA engineering of human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Hirata, Roli K; Turtle, Cameron J; Wang, Pei-Rong; Gornalusse, German G; Zavajlevski, Maja; Riddell, Stanley R; Russell, David W

    2013-06-01

    The clinical use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives is limited by the rejection of transplanted cells due to differences in their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. This has led to the proposed use of histocompatible, patient-specific stem cells; however, the preparation of many different stem cell lines for clinical use is a daunting task. Here, we develop two distinct genetic engineering approaches that address this problem. First, we use a combination of gene targeting and mitotic recombination to derive HLA-homozygous embryonic stem cell (ESC) subclones from an HLA-heterozygous parental line. A small bank of HLA-homozygous stem cells with common haplotypes would match a significant proportion of the population. Second, we derive HLA class I-negative cells by targeted disruption of both alleles of the Beta-2 Microglobulin (B2M) gene in ESCs. Mixed leukocyte reactions and peptide-specific HLA-restricted CD8(+) T cell responses were reduced in class I-negative cells that had undergone differentiation in embryoid bodies. These B2M(-/-) ESCs could act as universal donor cells in applications where the transplanted cells do not express HLA class II genes. Both approaches used adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for efficient gene targeting in the absence of potentially genotoxic nucleases, and produced pluripotent, transgene-free cell lines.

  3. HLA Engineering of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riolobos, Laura; Hirata, Roli K; Turtle, Cameron J; Wang, Pei-Rong; Gornalusse, German G; Zavajlevski, Maja; Riddell, Stanley R; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    The clinical use of human pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives is limited by the rejection of transplanted cells due to differences in their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. This has led to the proposed use of histocompatible, patient-specific stem cells; however, the preparation of many different stem cell lines for clinical use is a daunting task. Here, we develop two distinct genetic engineering approaches that address this problem. First, we use a combination of gene targeting and mitotic recombination to derive HLA-homozygous embryonic stem cell (ESC) subclones from an HLA-heterozygous parental line. A small bank of HLA-homozygous stem cells with common haplotypes would match a significant proportion of the population. Second, we derive HLA class I–negative cells by targeted disruption of both alleles of the Beta-2 Microglobulin (B2M) gene in ESCs. Mixed leukocyte reactions and peptide-specific HLA-restricted CD8+ T cell responses were reduced in class I–negative cells that had undergone differentiation in embryoid bodies. These B2M−/− ESCs could act as universal donor cells in applications where the transplanted cells do not express HLA class II genes. Both approaches used adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors for efficient gene targeting in the absence of potentially genotoxic nucleases, and produced pluripotent, transgene-free cell lines. PMID:23629003

  4. HLA diversity in the 1000 genomes dataset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Antoine Gourraud

    Full Text Available The 1000 Genomes Project aims to provide a deep characterization of human genome sequence variation by sequencing at a level that should allow the genome-wide detection of most variants with frequencies as low as 1%. However, in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, only the top 10 most frequent haplotypes are in the 1% frequency range whereas thousands of haplotypes are present at lower frequencies. Given the limitation of both the coverage and the read length of the sequences generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, the highly variable positions that define HLA alleles may be difficult to identify. We used classical Sanger sequencing techniques to type the HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes in the available 1000 Genomes samples and combined the results with the 103,310 variants in the MHC region genotyped by the 1000 Genomes Project. Using pairwise identity-by-descent distances between individuals and principal component analysis, we established the relationship between ancestry and genetic diversity in the MHC region. As expected, both the MHC variants and the HLA phenotype can identify the major ancestry lineage, informed mainly by the most frequent HLA haplotypes. To some extent, regions of the genome with similar genetic or similar recombination rate have similar properties. An MHC-centric analysis underlines departures between the ancestral background of the MHC and the genome-wide picture. Our analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD decay in these samples suggests that overestimation of pairwise LD occurs due to a limited sampling of the MHC diversity. This collection of HLA-specific MHC variants, available on the dbMHC portal, is a valuable resource for future analyses of the role of MHC in population and disease studies.

  5. Rational design of a comprehensive cancer therapy platform using temperature-sensitive polymer grafted hollow gold nanospheres: simultaneous chemo/photothermal/photodynamic therapy triggered by a 650 nm laser with enhanced anti-tumor efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoran; Chen, Yinyin; Cheng, Ziyong; Deng, Kerong; Ma, Ping'an; Hou, Zhiyao; Liu, Bei; Huang, Shanshan; Jin, Dayong; Lin, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of ``gate molecules'' for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation owing to the temperature-sensitive property of the polymer and the photothermal effect of HAuNs. The HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)-Ce6-DOX nanocomposites with 650 nm laser radiation show effective inhibition of cancer cells in vitro and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. In contrast, control groups without laser radiation show little cytotoxicity. The nanocomposite demonstrates a way of ``killing three birds with one stone'', that is, chemotherapy, photothermal and photodynamic therapy are triggered simultaneously by the 650 nm laser stimulation. Therefore, the nanocomposites show the great advantages of multi-modal synergistic effects for cancer therapy by a remote-controlled laser stimulus.Combining multi-model treatments within one single system has attracted great interest for the purpose of synergistic therapy. In this paper, hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNs) coated with a temperature-sensitive polymer, poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) methacrylate-co-2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate) (p(OEGMA-co-MEMA)), co-loaded with DOX and a photosensitizer Chlorin e6 (Ce6) were successfully synthesized. As high as 58% DOX and 6% Ce6 by weight could be loaded onto the HAuNs-p(OEGMA-co-MEMA) nanocomposites. The grafting polymer brushes outside the HAuNs play the role of ``gate molecules'' for controlled drug release by 650 nm laser radiation

  6. Symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the emergency department: a comparison with the standard fixed dose benzodiazepine regimen.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Eugene M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare symptom-triggered and standard benzodiazepine regimens for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in an emergency department clinical decision unit. The authors found that the symptom-triggered approach reduced cumulative benzodiazepine dose and length of stay.

  7. HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 Allele and Haplotype Frequencies in Renal Transplant Candidates in a Population in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Patrícia Keiko; Yamakawa, Roger Haruki; Noguti, Erika Noda; Bedendo, Gustavo Borelli; Júnior, Waldir Veríssimo da Silva; Yamada, Sérgio Seiji; Borelli, Sueli Donizete

    2016-05-01

    Very few studies have examined the diversity of human leukocyte antigens (HLA) in the Brazilian renal transplant candidates. The frequencies of the HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 alleles, haplotypes and phenotypes were studied in 522 patients with chronic renal failure, renal transplant candidates, registered at the Transplant Centers in north/northwestern Paraná State, southern Brazil. Patients were classified according to the ethnic group (319 whites [Caucasians], 134 mestizos [mixed race descendants of Europeans, Africans, and Amerindians; browns or "pardos"] and 69 blacks). The HLA typing was performed by the polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide method (PCR-SSO), combined with Luminex technology. In the analysis of the total samples, 20 HLA-A, 32 HLA-B, and 13 HLA-DRB1 allele groups were identified. The most frequent allele groups for each HLA locus were HLA-A*02 (25.4%), HLA-B*44 (10.9%), and HLA-DRB1*13 (13.9%). The most frequent haplotypes were HLA-A*01-B*08-DRB1*03 (2.3%), A*02-B*44-DRB1*07 (1.2%), and A*03-B*07-DRB1*11 (1.0%). Significant differences (P < 0.05) were observed in the HLA-A*68, B*08, and B*58 allele frequencies among ethnic groups. This study provides the first data on the HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-DRB1 allele, phenotype and haplotype frequencies of renal transplant candidates in a population in southern Brazil. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Long-term control of HIV-1 in hemophiliacs carrying slow-progressing allele HLA-B*5101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Yuka; Kuse, Nozomi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Naruto, Takuya; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Dohki, Sachi; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Maenaka, Katsumi; Goulder, Philip; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2010-07-01

    HLA-B*51 alleles are reported to be associated with slow disease progression to AIDS, but the mechanism underlying this association is still unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of HLA-B*5101 on clinical outcome for Japanese hemophiliacs who had been infected with HIV-1 before 1985 and had been recruited in 1998 for this study. HLA-B*5101(+) hemophiliacs exhibited significantly slow progression. The analysis of HLA-B*5101-restricted HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to 4 HLA-B*-restricted epitopes in 10 antiretroviral-therapy (ART)-free HLA-B*5101(+) hemophiliacs showed that the frequency of Pol283-8-specific CD8(+) T cells was inversely correlated with the viral load, whereas the frequencies of CD8(+) T cells specific for 3 other epitopes were positively correlated with the viral load. The HLA-B*5101(+) hemophiliacs whose HIV-1 replication had been controlled for approximately 25 years had HIV-1 possessing the wild-type Pol283-8 sequence or the Pol283-8V mutant, which does not critically affect T-cell recognition, whereas other HLA-B*5101(+) hemophiliacs had HIV-1 with escape mutations in this epitope. The results suggest that the control of HIV-1 over approximately 25 years in HLA-B*5101-positive hemophiliacs is associated with a Pol283-8-specific CD8(+) T-cell response and that lack of control of HIV-1 is associated with the appearance of Pol283-8-specific escape mutants.

  9. Long-Term Control of HIV-1 in Hemophiliacs Carrying Slow-Progressing Allele HLA-B*5101▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Yuka; Kuse, Nozomi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Naruto, Takuya; Fujiwara, Mamoru; Dohki, Sachi; Akahoshi, Tomohiro; Maenaka, Katsumi; Goulder, Philip; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2010-01-01

    HLA-B*51 alleles are reported to be associated with slow disease progression to AIDS, but the mechanism underlying this association is still unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of HLA-B*5101 on clinical outcome for Japanese hemophiliacs who had been infected with HIV-1 before 1985 and had been recruited in 1998 for this study. HLA-B*5101+ hemophiliacs exhibited significantly slow progression. The analysis of HLA-B*5101-restricted HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to 4 HLA-B*-restricted epitopes in 10 antiretroviral-therapy (ART)-free HLA-B*5101+ hemophiliacs showed that the frequency of Pol283-8-specific CD8+ T cells was inversely correlated with the viral load, whereas the frequencies of CD8+ T cells specific for 3 other epitopes were positively correlated with the viral load. The HLA-B*5101+ hemophiliacs whose HIV-1 replication had been controlled for approximately 25 years had HIV-1 possessing the wild-type Pol283-8 sequence or the Pol283-8V mutant, which does not critically affect T-cell recognition, whereas other HLA-B*5101+ hemophiliacs had HIV-1 with escape mutations in this epitope. The results suggest that the control of HIV-1 over approximately 25 years in HLA-B*5101-positive hemophiliacs is associated with a Pol283-8-specific CD8+ T-cell response and that lack of control of HIV-1 is associated with the appearance of Pol283-8-specific escape mutants. PMID:20410273

  10. Recent progress of national banking project on homozygous HLA-typed induced pluripotent stem cells in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Nam, Yoojun; Ham, Dong-Sik; Kim, Ji-Won; Ha, Hye-Yeong; Jung, Ji-Won; Jung, Seung Min; Baek, In Cheol; Kim, Su-Yeon; Kim, Tai-Gyu; Song, Jihwan; Lee, Jennifer; Park, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Nak-Gyun; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2018-03-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated by introducing several factors into mature somatic cells. Banking of iPSCs can lead to wider application for treatment and research. In an economical view, it is important to store cells that can cover a high percentage of the population. Therefore, the use of homozygous human leukocyte antigen-iPSCs (HLA-iPSCs) is thought as a potential candidate for effective iPSC banking system for further clinical use. We screened the database stored in the Catholic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank of Korea and sorted the most frequent homozygous HLA types of the South Korean population. Blood cells with the selected homozygous HLA types were obtained and transferred to the GMP facility in the Catholic Institute of Cell Therapy. Cells were reprogrammed to iPSCs inside the facility and went through several quality controls. As a result, a total of 13 homozygous GMP-grade iPSC lines were obtained in the facility. The generated iPSCs showed high pluripotency and normal karyotype after reprogramming. Five HLA-homozygous iPSCs had the type that was included in the top five most frequent HLA types. Homozygous HLA-iPSCs can open a new opportunity for further application of iPSCs in clinical research and therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. HLA-G Haplotypes Are Differentially Associated with Asthmatic Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Ribeyre

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-G, a HLA class Ib molecule, interacts with receptors on lymphocytes such as T cells, B cells, and natural killer cells to influence immune responses. Unlike classical HLA molecules, HLA-G expression is not found on all somatic cells, but restricted to tissue sites, including human bronchial epithelium cells (HBEC. Individual variation in HLA-G expression is linked to its genetic polymorphism and has been associated with many pathological situations such as asthma, which is characterized by epithelium abnormalities and inflammatory cell activation. Studies reported both higher and equivalent soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G expression in different cohorts of asthmatic patients. In particular, we recently described impaired local expression of HLA-G and abnormal profiles for alternatively spliced isoforms in HBEC from asthmatic patients. sHLA-G dosage is challenging because of its many levels of polymorphism (dimerization, association with β2-microglobulin, and alternative splicing, thus many clinical studies focused on HLA-G single-nucleotide polymorphisms as predictive biomarkers, but few analyzed HLA-G haplotypes. Here, we aimed to characterize HLA-G haplotypes and describe their association with asthmatic clinical features and sHLA-G peripheral expression and to describe variations in transcription factor (TF binding sites and alternative splicing sites. HLA-G haplotypes were differentially distributed in 330 healthy and 580 asthmatic individuals. Furthermore, HLA-G haplotypes were associated with asthmatic clinical features showed. However, we did not confirm an association between sHLA-G and genetic, biological, or clinical parameters. HLA-G haplotypes were phylogenetically split into distinct groups, with each group displaying particular variations in TF binding or RNA splicing sites that could reflect differential HLA-G qualitative or quantitative expression, with tissue-dependent specificities. Our results, based on a

  12. HLA Typing and Celiac Disease in Moroccans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Piancatelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors are responsible for differences in the prevalence of some diseases across countries. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA allele frequencies in North African populations show some differences in their distribution compared to Europeans, Mediterraneans, and sub-Saharans, and some specific alleles and haplotypes could be clinically relevant. Celiac disease (CD has been fast increasing in prevalence in North Africa; but few immunogenetic data are available for this area, in which a high prevalence of the disease has been described. In this report, we assess and discuss results of HLA class II (HLA-DQA1/DQB1/DRB1 typing in Moroccan patients with CD and compare them with a control population from Morocco—genetically well characterized—and with other North African, Mediterranean, and European populations. The classical HLA-DQ associations were confirmed in Moroccans with CD. The high frequency of DQ2.5 homozygosity (45.2% found in Moroccans with CD was noteworthy as compared with other populations (23%–32%. The genetic risk gradient for CD, identified by previous studies, has been confirmed in Moroccans with some differences, mainly concerning DQ8 genotypes. This study provides the immunogenetic framework of CD in Moroccans and confirms the need to learn more about associations with additional HLA and non-HLA genetic factors.

  13. HLA-C and guttate psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, E; Bunce, M; Savoie, H; Rowe, A; Newson, R; Gotch, F; Bunker, C B

    2000-12-01

    Psoriasis is a heterogeneous disease in its clinical expression. Both genetic and environmental factors are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of the inflammatory and hyperproliferative components of the typical skin lesions. Predisposing genetic influences include associations with human leucocyte antigens (HLA) of which that with HLA-Cw6 is the strongest. Guttate psoriasis is a specific clinical manifestation of psoriasis frequently associated with group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal throat infection. We set out to determine whether further clinical subdivision of psoriasis is associated with tighter correlation with HLA-C alleles. We determined the HLA-C locus genotype of 29 caucasian patients with guttate psoriasis presenting consecutively with guttate psoriasis associated with a history of a sore throat and/or an antistreptolysin O titre > 200 IU mL-1. Polymerase chain reaction typing using sequence-specific primers was used to detect all known HLA-C alleles. These data were compared with a control population of 604 random caucasian cadaver donors. All patients (100%) with guttate psoriasis carried the Cw*0602 allele compared with 20% of the control population (odds ratio = infinity; 95% confidence limits 25.00-infinity; Pcorrected < 0.0000002). This result is consistent with HLA-Cw*0602 playing a part directly in the pathogenesis of guttate psoriasis.

  14. HLA-B27 subtypes among the Chukotka native groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, M.Y.; Alexeeva, L.I.; Erdesz, S.; Benevolenskaya, L.I.; Reveille, J.D.; Arnett, F.C.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of the known HLA-B27 subtypes in HLA-B27 positive Chukotka natives, which have higher frequencies of HLA-B27 (to 40%) and spondylarthropathies (to 2%) than the Russian Caucasian population. Using oligotyping of the polymerase-chain reaction amplified second and third exons of the HLA-B27 gene in 86 DNA samples from HLA-B27 positive individuals were successfully typed. All had HLA-B*2705, including 4 patients with Reiter's syndrome and 5 with ankylosing spondyloarthritis, except one Eskimo who had HLA-B*2702. None had HLA-B*2704, a frequent subtype in Orientals. With respect to HLA-B27 subtypes the indigenous populations from the eastern part of the Chukotka Peninsula are genetically more closely related to Caucasians than to Orientals. (author). 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  15. HLA-B27 subtypes among the Chukotka native groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krylov, M.Y.; Alexeeva, L.I.; Erdesz, S.; Benevolenskaya, L.I. [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Revmatizma; Reveille, J.D.; Arnett, F.C. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relative frequency of the known HLA-B27 subtypes in HLA-B27 positive Chukotka natives, which have higher frequencies of HLA-B27 (to 40%) and spondylarthropathies (to 2%) than the Russian Caucasian population. Using oligotyping of the polymerase-chain reaction amplified second and third exons of the HLA-B27 gene in 86 DNA samples from HLA-B27 positive individuals were successfully typed. All had HLA-B*2705, including 4 patients with Reiter`s syndrome and 5 with ankylosing spondyloarthritis, except one Eskimo who had HLA-B*2702. None had HLA-B*2704, a frequent subtype in Orientals. With respect to HLA-B27 subtypes the indigenous populations from the eastern part of the Chukotka Peninsula are genetically more closely related to Caucasians than to Orientals. (author). 18 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  16. HLA class Ib in pregnancy and pregnancy-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Gry; Melsted, Wenna Nascimento; Nilsson, Line Lynge; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2017-08-01

    The HLA class Ib genes, HLA-E, HLA-F, and HLA-G, were discovered long after the classical HLA class Ia genes. The elucidation of their functions had a modest beginning. However, their basic functions and involvement in pathophysiology and a range of diseases are now emerging. Although results from a range of studies support the functional roles for the HLA class Ib molecules in adult life, especially HLA-G and HLA-F have most intensively been, and were also primarily, studied in relation to reproduction and pregnancy. The expression of HLA class Ib proteins at the feto-maternal interface in the placenta seems to be important for the maternal acceptance of the semi-allogenic fetus. In contrast to the functions of HLA class Ia, HLA-G possesses immune-modulatory and tolerogenic functions. Here, we review an accumulating amount of data describing the functions of HLA class Ib molecules in relation to fertility, reproduction, and pregnancy, and a possible role for these molecules in certain pregnancy complications, such as implantation failure, recurrent spontaneous abortions, and pre-eclampsia. The results from different kinds of studies point toward a role for HLA class Ib, especially HLA-G, throughout the reproductive cycle from conception to the birth weight of the child.

  17. Trigger circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verity, P.R.; Chaplain, M.D.; Turner, G.D.J.

    1984-01-01

    A monostable trigger circuit comprises transistors TR2 and TR3 arranged with their collectors and bases interconnected. The collector of the transistor TR2 is connected to the base of transistor TR3 via a capacitor C2 the main current path of a grounded base transistor TR1 and resistive means R2,R3. The collector of transistor TR3 is connected to the base of transistor TR2 via resistive means R6, R7. In the stable state all the transistors are OFF, the capacitor C2 is charged, and the output is LOW. A positive pulse input to the base of TR2 switches it ON, which in turn lowers the voltage at points A and B and so switches TR1 ON so that C2 can discharge via R2, R3, which in turn switches TR3 ON making the output high. Thus all three transistors are latched ON. When C2 has discharged sufficiently TR1 switches OFF, followed by TR3 (making the output low again) and TR2. The components C1, C3 and R4 serve to reduce noise, and the diode D1 is optional. (author)

  18. Spontaneous control of HIV-1 viremia in a subject with protective HLA-B plus HLA-C alleles and HLA-C associated single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Marco; Ghezzi, Silvia; Baroli, Paolo; Heltai, Silvia; De Battista, Davide; Pensieroso, Simone; Cavarelli, Mariangela; Dispinseri, Stefania; Vanni, Irene; Pastori, Claudia; Zerbi, Pietro; Tosoni, Antonella; Vicenzi, Elisa; Nebuloni, Manuela; Wong, Kim; Zhao, Hong; McHugh, Sarah; Poli, Guido; Lopalco, Lucia; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Biassoni, Roberto; Mullins, James I; Malnati, Mauro S; Alfano, Massimo

    2014-12-05

    Understanding the mechanisms by which some individuals are able to naturally control HIV-1 infection is an important goal of AIDS research. We here describe the case of an HIV-1(+) woman, CASE1, who has spontaneously controlled her viremia for the last 14 of her 20 years of infection. CASE1 has been clinically monitored since 1993. Detailed immunological, virological and histological analyses were performed on samples obtained between 2009 and 2011. As for other Elite Controllers, CASE1 is characterized by low to undetectable levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA, peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) associated HIV-1 DNA and reduced in vitro susceptibility of target cells to HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, a slow rate of virus evolution was demonstrated in spite the lack of assumption of any antiretroviral agent. CASE1 failed to transmit HIV-1 to either her sexual male partner or to her child born by vaginal delivery. Normal values and ratios of T and B cells were observed, along with normal histology of the intestinal mucosa. Attempts to isolate HIV-1 from her PBMC and gut-derived cells were unsuccessful, despite expression of normal cell surface levels of CD4, CCRC5 and CXCR4. CASE1 did not produce detectable anti-HIV neutralizing antibodies in her serum or genital mucosal fluid although she displayed potent T cell responses against HIV-1 Gag and Nef. CASE1 also possessed multiple genetic polymorphisms, including HLA alleles (B*14, B*57, C*06 and C*08.02) and HLA-C single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs9264942 C/C and rs67384697 del/del), that have been previously individually associated with spontaneous control of plasma viremia, maintenance of high CD4(+) T cell counts and delayed disease progression. CASE1 has controlled her HIV-1 viremia below the limit of detection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy for more than 14 years and has not shown any sign of immunologic deterioration or disease progression. Co-expression of multiple protective HLA alleles, HLA

  19. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G during pregnancy part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitkou, Louise; Dahl, Mette; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is a class Ib molecule with restricted tissue distribution expressed on trophoblast cells and has been proposed to have immunomodulatory functions during pregnancy. Soluble HLA-G1 (sHLA-G1) can be generated by the shedding of membrane-bound HLA-G molecules; however...... of importance for production of sHLA-G in the mother and child, or it may support the theory that sHLA-G in the pregnant woman and the fetus is partly derived from a "shared organ", the placenta....

  20. A comparative review of HLA associations with hepatitis B and C viral infections across global populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rashmi Singh; Rashmi Kaul; Anil Kaul; Khalid Khan

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) viral infection or co-infection leads to risk of development of chronic infection, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Immigration and globalization have added to the challenges of public health concerns regarding chronic HBV and HCV infections worldwide. The aim of this study is to review existing global literature across ethnic populations on HBV and HCV related human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations in relation to susceptibility, viral persistence and treatment. Extensive literature search was conducted to explore the HLA associations in HBV and HCV infections reported across global populations over the past decade to understand the knowledge status, weaknesses and strengths of this information in different ethnic populations. HLA DR13 is consistently associated with HBV clearance globally. HLADRB1*11/*12 alleles and DQB1*0301 are associated with HBV persistence but with HCV clearance worldwide. Consistent association of DRB1*03 and *07 is observed with HCV susceptibility and non-responsiveness to HBV vaccination across the population. HLA DR13 is protective for vertical HBV and HCV transmission in Chinese and Italian neonates, but different alleles are associated with their susceptibility in these populations. HLA class I molecule interactions with Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptors (KIR) of natural killer (NK) cells modulate HCV infection outcome via regulating immune regulatory cells and molecules. HLA associations with HBV vaccination, interferon therapy in HBV and HCV, and with extra hepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis are also discussed. Systematic studies in compliance with global regulatory standards are required to identify the HLA specific viral epitope, stage specific T cell populations interacting with different HLA alleles during disease progression and viral clearance ofchronic HBV or HCV infections among different ethnic populations. These studies would facilitate stage specific

  1. Cytotoxic T cell recognition of an endogenous class I HLA peptide presented by a class II HLA molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B P; Madrigal, A; Parham, P

    1990-09-01

    Human leukocytes were stimulated in vitro with peptides corresponding in sequence to the highly variable helix of the alpha 1 domain of various HLA-B and -C molecules. A CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T cell line, CTL-AV, that is specific for the HLA-B7 peptide presented by HLA-DR11.1 was obtained. The HLA-DR11.2 molecule, which only differs at three residues from HLA-DR11.1, did not present the HLA-B7 peptide to CTL-AV. Peptides from the alpha 1 domain helix of other HLA-A and HLA-B molecules, but not HLA-C molecules, competed with the HLA-B7 peptide for binding to HLA-DR11.1. A cell line (WT50) that coexpresses HLA-B7 and HLA-DR11.1 was killed by CTL-AV in the absence of any added HLA-B7 peptide. The processing and presentation of HLA-B7 in these cells appears to be through the endogenous, and not the exogenous, pathway of antigen presentation. Thus, Brefeldin A inhibits presentation and chloroquine does not. Furthermore, introduction of purified HLA-B7 molecules into HLA-DR11.1+, HLA-B7- cells by cytoplasmic loading via osmotic lysis of pinosomes, but not by simple incubation, rendered them susceptible to CTL-AV killing. These results provide an example of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presentation of a constitutively synthesized self protein that uses the endogenous pathway of antigen presentation. They also emphasize the capacity for presentation of MHC peptides by MHC molecules.

  2. Panuveíte em artrite indiferenciada HLA-B27 positiva Panuveitis in HLA-B27 positive undifferentiated arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Sérgio Ferreira Santos

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Entre os vários tipos de inflamação ocular associados às doenças reumatológicas, a uveíte anterior é particularmente comum nas espondiloartropatias, em especial quando associada à presença do genótipo HLA-B27. Relatou-se o caso de um paciente com artrite indiferenciada HLA-B27 positivo, complicado com panuveíte e vasculite da retina, refratária ao tratamento imunossupressor tradicional, que obteve boa resposta clínica ao uso de anti-TNF-alfa.Among the several types of ocular inflammation associated to the rheumatic diseases, anterior uveitis is particularly common in the spondyloarthropathies, especially when associated to the presence of the HLA-B27 genotype. We report the case of HLA-B27 positive patient with undifferentiated arthritis, complicated with panuveitis and retinal vasculitis, that was refractory to the traditional imunossupressive treatment, and had a good clinical response with anti-TNF-alpha therapy.

  3. HLA Class-II Associated HIV Polymorphisms Predict Escape from CD4+ T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Erdmann

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy, antibody and CD8+ T cell-mediated responses targeting human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 exert selection pressure on the virus necessitating escape; however, the ability of CD4+ T cells to exert selective pressure remains unclear. Using a computational approach on HIV gag/pol/nef sequences and HLA-II allelic data, we identified 29 HLA-II associated HIV sequence polymorphisms or adaptations (HLA-AP in an African cohort of chronically HIV-infected individuals. Epitopes encompassing the predicted adaptation (AE or its non-adapted (NAE version were evaluated for immunogenicity. Using a CD8-depleted IFN-γ ELISpot assay, we determined that the magnitude of CD4+ T cell responses to the predicted epitopes in controllers was higher compared to non-controllers (p<0.0001. However, regardless of the group, the magnitude of responses to AE was lower as compared to NAE (p<0.0001. CD4+ T cell responses in patients with acute HIV infection (AHI demonstrated poor immunogenicity towards AE as compared to NAE encoded by their transmitted founder virus. Longitudinal data in AHI off antiretroviral therapy demonstrated sequence changes that were biologically confirmed to represent CD4+ escape mutations. These data demonstrate an innovative application of HLA-associated polymorphisms to identify biologically relevant CD4+ epitopes and suggests CD4+ T cells are active participants in driving HIV evolution.

  4. Determinants of gingival overgrowth severity in organ transplant patients. An examination of the rôle of HLA phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, J M; Seymour, R A; Ellis, J S; Kelly, P J; Parry, G; Dark, J; Wilkinson, R; Ilde, J R

    1996-07-01

    The role of HLA phenotype as a risk factor for drug-induced gingival overgrowth was investigated in a cohort of 172 transplant recipients. Clinically significant overgrowth warranting surgical correction was observed in 72 patients (42%). Using stepwise regression modelling, 6 clinical parameters were identified as significant risk factors for the severity of gingival overgrowth. These were; age, sex, creatinine plasma level, duration of therapy, papilla bleeding index and concomitant medication with a calcium channel blocking drug. 3 HLA alleles were also identified as risk factors when adjusted for other clinically significant risk factors (HLA -DR2, A24, B37). However, when the p-values for the HLA variables were corrected to compensate for the use of multiple significance testing, only HLA-B37 remained statistically significant at the 5% level. Organ transplant patients are at risk of developing gingival overgrowth, with approximately 25% medicated with cyclosporin alone requiring corrective gingival surgery. This figure more than doubles in patients concomitantly medicated with a calcium blocking drug. The data at present available would suggest that the severity of gingival overgrowth is also significantly associated with the HLA-B37 phenotype.

  5. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II β-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this β-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP β-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP β-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP α-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DPα-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP α- and β-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion

  6. Extended HLA-D region haplotype associated with celiac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, M.D.; Smith, J.R.; Austin, R.K.; Kelleher, D.; Nepom, G.T.; Volk, B.; Kagnoff, M.F.

    1988-01-01

    Celiac disease has one of the strongest associations with HLA (human leukocyte antigen) class II markers of the known HLA-linked diseases. This association is primarily with the class II serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2. The authors previously described a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) characterized by the presence of a 4.0-kilobase Rsa I fragment derived from an HLA class II ..beta..-chain gene, which distinguishes the class II HLA haplotype of celiac disease patients from those of many serologically matched controls. They now report the isolation of this ..beta..-chain gene from a bacteriophage genomic library constructed from the DNA of a celiac disease patient. Based on restriction mapping and differential hybridization with class II cDNA and oligonucleotide probes, this gene was identified as one encoding an HLA-DP ..beta..-chain. This celiac disease-associated HLA-DP ..beta..-chain gene was flanked by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..-chain genes and, therefore, was probably in its normal chromosomal location. The HLA-DP..cap alpha..-chain genes of celiac disease patients also were studied by RFLP analysis. Celiac disease is associated with a subset of HLA-DR3, -DQw2 haplotypes characterized by HLA-DP ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-chain gene RFLPs. Within the celiac-disease patient population, the joint segregation of these HLA-DP genes with those encoding the serologic specificities HLA-DR3 and -DQw2 indicates: (i) that the class II HLA haplotype associated with celiac disease is extended throughout the entire HLA-D region, and (ii) that celiac-disease susceptibility genes may reside as far centromeric on this haplotype as the HLA-DP subregion.

  7. Enhancement by gamma-interferon of in vivo tumor radiolocalization by a monoclonal antibody against HLA-DR antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlinson, G.; Balkwill, F.; Snook, D.; Hooker, G.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Athymic nu/nu (nude) mice bearing s.c. human breast tumors were treated systemically with recombinant human gamma-interferon. These tumors were phenotypically negative for HLA-DR prior to therapy, but after 4 days of treatment, 80% of the cells expressed this antigen in vivo as assessed by immunoperoxidase (F. R. Balkwill et al., Eur. J. Cancer Clin. Oncol., in press, 1986). A radioiodine-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (TAL-1B5) against HLA-DR specifically localized to the tumors in recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated but not in control mice. An isotype-identical murine monoclonal antibody that did not react with control or recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated tumors did not show any specific localization. These results demonstrate that specific localization to tumors of radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR can be facilitated by systemic therapy with gamma-interferon

  8. HLA-A AND HLA-B ALLELES ASSOCIATED IN PSORIASIS PATIENTS FROM MUMBAI, WESTERN INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umapathy, Shankarkumar; Pawar, Aruna; Mitra, R; Khuperkar, D; Devaraj, J P; Ghosh, K; Khopkar, U

    2011-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis, a common autoimmune disorder characterized by T cell-mediated keratinocyte hyperproliferation, is known to be associated with the presence of certain specific Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) alleles. Aim: To evaluate distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles and hence identify the susceptible allele of psoriasis from patients in Western India. Materials and Methods: The study design included 84 psoriasis patients and 291 normal individuals as controls from same geographical region. HLA-A and HLA-B typing was done using Serology typing. Standard statistical analysis was followed to identify the odds ratio (OR), allele frequencies, and significant P value using Graphpad software. Results: The study revealed significant increase in frequencies of HLA-A2 (OR-3.976, P<0.0001), B8 (OR-5.647, P<0.0001), B17 (OR-5.452, P<0.0001), and B44 (OR-50.460, P<0.0001), when compared with controls. Furthermore, the frequencies of HLA-A28 (OR-0.074, P=0.0024), B5 (OR-0.059, P<0.0001), B12 (OR-0.051, P=0.0002), and B15 (OR-0.237, P=0.0230) were significantly decreased in psoriasis patients. Conclusion: This study shows the strong association of HLA-A2, B8, and B17 antigens with psoriasis conferring susceptibility to psoriasis patients from Western India, while the antigens HLA-A28, B5, and B12 show strong negative association with the disease. PMID:22121262

  9. Association between HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chien Tsai

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality. Genes whose products play a critical role in regulation of the immune response include the HLA antigen and cytokine families of genes. Oral cancer is common in men in developing countries, and its frequency is increased by using betel-quid, tobacco, and alcohol. The association between certain HLA Class I and Class II haplotypes and cancer has been documented in a variety of tumors. There was no previous data concerning the association of specific HLA Class II DQA1, DQB1 alleles, or haplotypes with oral cancer patients. In this study, we enrolled 134 Taiwanese patients with histologically confirmed oral cancer and 268 age- and gender-matched healthy Taiwanese adults as control group to investigate the association between HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 allele frequencies and oral cancer patients by using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers. We found that both HLA-DQA1* and HLA-DQB1* allele frequencies in oral cancer patients revealed no significant difference from those of control groups. Haplotype frequencies of HLA*DQA1-0103-DQB1*0601 in oral cancer patients were significantly lower than those of the control group (odds ratio: 0.18, 95% confidence interval: 0.054–0.583, pc=0.02. Our data suggest that HLA DQA1*0103-DQB1*0601 haplotype may be protective with regard to the development of oral cancer.

  10. Process modeling of a HLA research lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Bruna G. C.; Sena, Alexandre C.; Silva, Dilson; Marzulo, Leandro A. J.

    2017-11-01

    Bioinformatics has provided tremendous breakthroughs in the field of molecular biology. All this evolution has generated a large volume of biological data that increasingly require the use of computing for analysis and storage of this information. The identification of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotypes is critical to the success of organ transplants in humans. HLA typing involves not only laboratory tests but also DNA sequencing, with the participation of several professionals responsible for different stages of the process. Thus, the objective of this paper is to map the main steps in HLA typing in a laboratory specialized in performing such procedures, analyzing each process and proposing solutions to speed up the these steps, avoiding mistakes.

  11. Production of human anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M.C.; Mercier, F.; Roger, J.; Varin, M.

    1986-03-01

    Only 40% of the several hundred anti-HLA murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that have been made detect HLA-A,B,C or DR specificities previously defined by human alloantisera, the range of recognized specificities is very narrow, and few of the MAbs have proven useful as tissue typing reagents. In hopes of obtaining HLA typing reagents, the authors are developing a protocol for the production of human anti-HLA MAbs from HLA-antigen (Ag) immunized peripheral blood B cells of volunteering renal patients, immunized to one or more HLA Ags through therapeutic blood transfusions. A simple enrichment of the donor B cells has not been sufficient for anti-HLA MAb production, the authors are currently delineating the conditions necessary for increasing the number of HLA-specific donor B cells by in vitro stimulation with cells expressing the HLA Ag to which the B cell donor is immunized. For the production of MAbs, the stimulated B cells are transformed with Epstein-Barr virus and subsequently fused with KR-4 lymphoblastoid cells. Hybridomas are selected by HAT and Ouabain. Supernatants are screened for anti-HLA activity against lymphocyte targets expressing the original immunizing HLA Ag by complement mediated /sup 51/Cr release assay. Antibody specificity is determined by the complement-dependent microcytotoxicity test used for HLA typing.

  12. Indirect recognition of HLA epitopes in solid organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geneugelijk, C.C.A.

    2017-01-01

    Alloreactivity due to HLA mismatches between donor and recipient remains the major limiting factor in successful graft outcome after solid organ transplantation. However, the immunogenicity of individual HLA mismatches is highly variable. Therefore, epitope-based HLA matching may be a sophisticated

  13. Association study between HLA-DRB, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1 and breast cancer in Iranian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirzargar AA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Based on the reports, high frequency of special alleles of HLA class II genes might be associated with susceptibility to or protective from a particular cancer. These alleles might vary depending on the geographical region. Here we investigate the association between alleles of HLA class II genes and breast cancer in Iranian women."n"nMethods: 100 patients with pathologically proved breast cancer who referred to Cancer Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran, were divided to two groups based on ages (40 years old and less/ or more than 40 years old and were randomly selected and compared with a group of 80 healthy blood donor subjects. HLA class II alleles were determined by amplification of DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR method followed by HLA-typing using sequence-specific primer (SSP for each allele."n"nResults: The most frequent alleles in the DR and DQ regions in group 1 (40 years old and less in comparison with control group were HLA-DQA1*0301 (p=0.002 and HLA-DQB1*0302 (p>0.05. In contrast HLA-DQA1*0505 (p=0.004 had significantly lower frequency in this group compared with control group. Patients of group two (more than 40 years old had a higher frequencies of HLA

  14. HLA DQB1*06:02 negative narcolepsy with hypocretin/orexin deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Lin, Ling; Schormair, Barbara; Pizza, Fabio; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Ollila, Hanna M; Nevsimalova, Sona; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Winkelmann, Juliane; Coquillard, Cristin; Babrzadeh, Farbod; Strom, Tim M; Wang, Chunlin; Mindrinos, Michael; Fernandez Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-10-01

    To identify rare allelic variants and HLA alleles in narcolepsy patients with hypocretin (orexin, HCRT) deficiency but lacking DQB1*06:02. China (Peking University People's Hospital), Czech Republic (Charles University), Denmark (Golstrup Hospital), Italy (University of Bologna), Korea (Catholic University), and USA (Stanford University). CSF hypocretin-1, DQB1*06:02, clinical and polysomnographic data were collected in narcolepsy patients (552 with and 144 without cataplexy) from 6 sites. Numbers of cases with and without DQB1*06:02 and low CSF hypocretin-1 were compiled. HLA class I (A, B, C), class II (DRBs, DQA1, DQB1, DPA1, and DPB1), and whole exome sequencing were conducted in 9 DQB1*06:02 negative cases with low CSF hypocretin-1. Sanger sequencing of selected exons in DNMT1, HCRT, and MOG was performed to exclude mutations in known narcolepsy-associated genes. Classic narcolepsy markers DQB1*06:02 and low CSF hypocretin-1 were found in 87.4% of cases with cataplexy, and in 20.0% without cataplexy. Nine cases (all with cataplexy) were DQB1*06:02 negative with low CSF hypocretin-1, constituting 1.7% [0.8%-3.4%] of all cases with cataplexy and 1.8% [0.8%-3.4%] of cases with low CSF hypocretin independent of cataplexy across sites. Five HLA negative subjects had severe cataplexy, often occurring without clear triggers. Subjects had diverse ethnic backgrounds and HLA alleles at all loci, suggesting no single secondary HLA association. The rare subtype DPB1*0901, and homologous DPB1*10:01 subtype, were present in 5 subjects, suggesting a secondary association with HLA-DP. Preprohypocretin sequencing revealed no mutations beyond one previously reported in a very early onset case. No new MOG or DNMT1 mutations were found, nor were suspicious or private variants in novel genes identified through exome sequencing. Hypocretin, MOG, or DNMT1 mutations are exceptional findings in DQB1*06:02 negative cases with hypocretin deficiency. A secondary HLA-DP association may be

  15. Measuring ambiguity in HLA typing methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Paunić

    Full Text Available In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, donor selection is based primarily on matching donor and patient HLA genes. These genes are highly polymorphic and their typing can result in exact allele assignment at each gene (the resolution at which patients and donors are matched, but it can also result in a set of ambiguous assignments, depending on the typing methodology used. To facilitate rapid identification of matched donors, registries employ statistical algorithms to infer HLA alleles from ambiguous genotypes. Linkage disequilibrium information encapsulated in haplotype frequencies is used to facilitate prediction of the most likely haplotype assignment. An HLA typing with less ambiguity produces fewer high-probability haplotypes and a more reliable prediction. We estimated ambiguity for several HLA typing methods across four continental populations using an information theory-based measure, Shannon's entropy. We used allele and haplotype frequencies to calculate entropy for different sets of 1,000 subjects with simulated HLA typing. Using allele frequencies we calculated an average entropy in Caucasians of 1.65 for serology, 1.06 for allele family level, 0.49 for a 2002-era SSO kit, and 0.076 for single-pass SBT. When using haplotype frequencies in entropy calculations, we found average entropies of 0.72 for serology, 0.73 for allele family level, 0.05 for SSO, and 0.002 for single-pass SBT. Application of haplotype frequencies further reduces HLA typing ambiguity. We also estimated expected confirmatory typing mismatch rates for simulated subjects. In a hypothetical registry with all donors typed using the same method, the entropy values based on haplotype frequencies correspond to confirmatory typing mismatch rates of 1.31% for SSO versus only 0.08% for SBT. Intermediate-resolution single-pass SBT contains the least ambiguity of the methods we evaluated and therefore the most certainty in allele prediction. The presented measure

  16. Measuring Ambiguity in HLA Typing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madbouly, Abeer; Freeman, John; Maiers, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, donor selection is based primarily on matching donor and patient HLA genes. These genes are highly polymorphic and their typing can result in exact allele assignment at each gene (the resolution at which patients and donors are matched), but it can also result in a set of ambiguous assignments, depending on the typing methodology used. To facilitate rapid identification of matched donors, registries employ statistical algorithms to infer HLA alleles from ambiguous genotypes. Linkage disequilibrium information encapsulated in haplotype frequencies is used to facilitate prediction of the most likely haplotype assignment. An HLA typing with less ambiguity produces fewer high-probability haplotypes and a more reliable prediction. We estimated ambiguity for several HLA typing methods across four continental populations using an information theory-based measure, Shannon's entropy. We used allele and haplotype frequencies to calculate entropy for different sets of 1,000 subjects with simulated HLA typing. Using allele frequencies we calculated an average entropy in Caucasians of 1.65 for serology, 1.06 for allele family level, 0.49 for a 2002-era SSO kit, and 0.076 for single-pass SBT. When using haplotype frequencies in entropy calculations, we found average entropies of 0.72 for serology, 0.73 for allele family level, 0.05 for SSO, and 0.002 for single-pass SBT. Application of haplotype frequencies further reduces HLA typing ambiguity. We also estimated expected confirmatory typing mismatch rates for simulated subjects. In a hypothetical registry with all donors typed using the same method, the entropy values based on haplotype frequencies correspond to confirmatory typing mismatch rates of 1.31% for SSO versus only 0.08% for SBT. Intermediate-resolution single-pass SBT contains the least ambiguity of the methods we evaluated and therefore the most certainty in allele prediction. The presented measure objectively evaluates HLA

  17. HLA-DR typing by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tosi, R.; Tanigaki, N.; Centis, D.; Rossi, P.L.; Alfano, G.; Ferrara, G.B.; Pressman, D.

    1980-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay procedure is described by which peripheral blood lymphocytes can be typed for HLA-DR specificities. The major advantages of this method are the following: simple and reproducible procedure, no need for B lymphocyte separation, no need for optimal viability, and no need for preabsorption of antisera with platelets. This method will find an application in the genetic and biochemical analysis of the HLA complex, and in the clinical tests of Ia antigens for diagnostic or prognostic purposes and in retrospective transplant studies

  18. HLA class I expression predicts prognosis and therapeutic benefits from tyrosine kinase inhibitors in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajun; Liu, Li; Qu, Yang; Xi, Wei; Xia, Yu; Bai, Qi; Xiong, Ying; Long, Qilai; Xu, Jiejie; Guo, Jianming

    2018-01-01

    Classical HLA class I antigen is highly involved in antigen presentation and adaptive immune response against tumor. In this study, we explored its predictive value for treatment response and survival in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. A TKI cohort of 111 mRCC patients treated with sunitinib or sorafenib and a non-TKI cohort of 160 mRCC patients treated with interleukin-2 or interferon-α-based immunotherapy at a single institution were retrospectively enrolled. HLA class I expression and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) density was assessed by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. Association between HLA class I and CTL was also assessed in the TCGA KIRC cohort. In the TKI cohort, down-regulated HLA class I was associated with lower objective response rate of TKI therapy (P = 0.004), shorter overall survival (OS) (P = 0.001), and shorter progression free survival (PFS) (P class I was not significantly associated with survival. HLA class I expression was associated with CTL infiltration and function, and its prognostic value was more predominant in CTL high-density tumors (P class I expression can serve as a potential predictive biomarker for TKI therapy in mRCC patients. Its predictive value was restricted in CTL high-density tumors. However, further external validations and functional investigations are still required.

  19. Human thymic epithelial cells express functional HLA-DP molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, A; Röpke, C; Nielsen, M

    1996-01-01

    T lymphocytes, we examined whether human thymic epithelial cells (TEC) expressed HLA-DP molecules. We present evidence that TEC obtained from short time culture express low but significant levels of HLA-DP molecules. The expression of HLA-DP molecules was comparable to or higher than the expression...... of HLA-DP allospecific primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) CD4 T cell lines. IFN-gamma treatment strongly upregulated the HLA-DP allospecific PLT responses whereas other PLT responses remained largely unchanged. In conclusion, these data indicate that human thymus epithelial cells express significant levels...

  20. HLA Alleles are Genetic Markers for Susceptibility and Resistance towards Leprosy in a Mexican Mestizo Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Medina, Maribel; Escamilla-Tilch, Monica; Frías-Castro, Luis Octavio; Romero-Quintana, Geovanni; Estrada-García, Iris; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Granados, Julio; Arambula Meraz, Eliakym; Sánchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Khader, Shabaana Abdul; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Ramos-Payán, Rosalío

    2017-01-01

    Despite the use of multidrug therapy, leprosy remains endemic in some countries. The association of several human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and gene polymorphisms with leprosy has been demonstrated in many populations, but the major immune contributors associated to the spectrum of leprosy have not been defined yet. In this study, genotyping of HLA-A, -B, -DR, and -DQ alleles was performed in leprosy patients (n = 113) and control subjects (n = 117) from the region with the highest incidence for the disease in México. The odds of developing leprosy and lepromatous subtype were 2.12- and 2.74-fold higher in carriers of HLA-A*28, and 2.48- and 4.14-fold higher for leprosy and dimorphic subtype in carriers of DQB1*06. Interestingly, DQB1*07 was overrepresented in healthy individuals, compared to patients with leprosy (OR = 0.08) and the lepromatous subtype (OR = 0.06). These results suggest that HLA-A*28 is a marker for predisposition to leprosy and the lepromatous subtype and DQB1*06 to leprosy and the dimorphic subtype, while DQB1*07 might be a resistance marker in this Mestizo population. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  1. The LHCb trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korolko, I.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes progress in the development of the LHCb trigger system since the letter of intent. The trigger philosophy has significantly changed, resulting in an increase of trigger efficiency for signal B events. It is proposed to implement a level-1 vertex topology trigger in specialised hardware. (orig.)

  2. HLA-G molecule as inductor of immunotolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso Valdes, Maria E

    2009-01-01

    HLA-G are molecules are (non-classic) class I antigens from main histocompatibility system. There are sis isoforms of HLA-G antigen codifying four proteins united to a membrane (HLA-G1, HLA-G2, HLA-G3, HLA-G4), and three soluble isoforms (HLA-G5, HLA-G6, HLA-G7). The first ones are expressed in cells of placental extravillous cytotrophoblast (Langhans' layer), amnios epithelial cells, fetal endothelial cells, mesenchymal macrophages of chorionic villi, and in epithelial cells of thymus medulla; the second ones in amniotic fluid, in maternal peripheral blood and that of the umbilical cord. There was a HLA-G expression in some types of tumors, stroma cells under inflammation conditions, virus-infected cells and in serum of transplant patients. There are strong evidences of HLA-G molecules role in tolerance induction to these physiological and pathological situations through suppression of lithic activity of NK cells and of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This knowledge may be very useful in future therapeutical management of these entities as well as to favor the success of tissue and organ transplant

  3. HLA-DR expression and disease activity in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, L O; Elling, P; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1986-01-01

    In 12 patients with active ulcerative colitis (UC) the rectal epithelial cells were analyzed for HLA-DR antigens by an immunohistochemical technique. The clinical, rectoscopic, and histologic stages were also determined. The investigations were carried out at the beginning of the study and 2 weeks...... and 3 months later. The rectal epithelial cells were HLA-DR-positive in all patients at the first two examinations. After 3 months five patients had changed to an HLA-DR-negative stage, whereas the other seven patients remained HLA-DR-positive. Closer analyses showed that expression/nonexpression of HLA-DR...... antigens on rectal epithelial cells of patients with UC could not be predicted from the clinical, rectoscopic, or histologic findings. HLA-DR expression is normally restricted to immunocompetent cells. The presence of HLA-DR antigens on epithelial cells may be a consequence of immunological reactions...

  4. Preimplantation HLA typing for stem cell transplantation treatment of hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anver Kuliev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD for HLA typing is steadily becoming an option for at risk couples with thalassemic children, requiring HLA matched bone marrow transplantation treatment. The paper presents the world’s largest PGD experience of 475 cases for over 2 dozens thalassemia mutations, resulting in birth of 132 unaffected children. A total of 146 cases were performed together with preimplantation HLA typing, resulting in detection and transfer of HLA matched unaffected embryos in 83 of them, yielding the birth of 16 HLA matched children, potential donors for their affected siblings. The presented experience of HLA matched stem cell transplantation for thalassemia, following PGD demonstrated a successful hematopoietic reconstitution both for younger and older patients. The data show that PGD is an efficient approach for HLA matched stem cell transplantation treatment for thalassemia.

  5. Spontaneous retinopathy in HLA-A29 transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpak, Yann; Vieville, Jean-Claude; Tabary, Thierry; Naud, Marie-Christine; Chopin, Martine; Edelson, Catherine; Cohen, Jacques H. M.; Dausset, Jean; de Kozak, Yvonne; Pla, Marika

    2001-01-01

    Humans who have inherited the class I major histocompatibility allele HLA-A29 have a markedly increased relative risk of developing the eye disease termed birdshot chorioretinopathy. This disease affecting adults is characterized by symmetrically scattered, small, cream-colored spots in the fundus associated with retinal vasculopathy and inflammatory signs causing damage to the ocular structures, leading regularly to visual loss. To investigate the role of HLA-A29 in this disease, we introduced the HLA-A29 gene into mice. Aging HLA-A29 transgenic mice spontaneously developed retinopathy, showing a striking resemblance to the HLA-A29-associated chorioretinopathy. These results strongly suggest that HLA-A29 is involved in the pathogenesis of this disease. Elucidation of the role of HLA-A29 should be assisted by this transgenic model. PMID:11226280

  6. Imputing Variants in HLA-DR Beta Genes Reveals That HLA-DRB1 Is Solely Associated with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangwoo Kim

    Full Text Available The genetic association of HLA-DRB1 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is well documented, but association with other HLA-DR beta genes (HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4 and HLA-DRB5 has not been thoroughly studied, despite their similar functions and chromosomal positions. We examined variants in all functional HLA-DR beta genes in RA and SLE patients and controls, down to the amino-acid level, to better understand disease association with the HLA-DR locus. To this end, we improved an existing HLA reference panel to impute variants in all protein-coding HLA-DR beta genes. Using the reference panel, HLA variants were inferred from high-density SNP data of 9,271 RA-control subjects and 5,342 SLE-control subjects. Disease association tests were performed by logistic regression and log-likelihood ratio tests. After imputation using the newly constructed HLA reference panel and statistical analysis, we observed that HLA-DRB1 variants better accounted for the association between MHC and susceptibility to RA and SLE than did the other three HLA-DRB variants. Moreover, there were no secondary effects in HLA-DRB3, HLA-DRB4, or HLA-DRB5 in RA or SLE. Of all the HLA-DR beta chain paralogs, those encoded by HLA-DRB1 solely or dominantly influence susceptibility to RA and SLE.

  7. HLA-A*7401-mediated control of HIV viremia is independent of its linkage disequilibrium with HLA-B*5703

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthews, Philippa C; Adland, Emily; Listgarten, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    -clade-infected subjects. We present evidence that HLA-A*7401 operates an effect that is independent of HLA-B*5703, with which it is in linkage disequilibrium in some populations, to mediate lowered viremia. We describe a novel statistical approach to detecting additive effects between class I alleles in control of HIV-1...... epitopes appear immunodominant. We identify eight novel putative HLA-A*7401-restricted epitopes, of which three have been defined to the optimal epitope. In common with HLA-B alleles linked with slow progression, viremic control through an HLA-A*7401-restricted response appears to be associated...... with the selection of escape mutants within Gag epitopes that reduce viral replicative capacity. These studies highlight the potentially important contribution of an HLA-A allele to immune control of HIV infection, which may have been concealed by a stronger effect mediated by an HLA-B allele with which...

  8. [HLA genetic markers and auto-antibody profile in a Mapuche family with a case affected of type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Sylvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Pérez, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (DM1) is caused by an autoimmune process that destroys beta cells of pancreas. Not all carriers of susceptible HLA genes and positive for autoantibodies develop the disease. Environmental factors play a role in triggering the autoimmune process. To analyze an exceptional case of DM1 in a Mapuche family in the context of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. A study of a family with an affected female child was carried out in a Mapuche community in Southern Chile (VIII region). This is an unique and sporadic DM1 case with Mapuche heritage. Nutritional and viral infections data were collected by interview and clinical records. A genetic analysis by PCR was done to detect class I and II HLA genes by reverse dot blot. The proband, her mother and sister had positive islet cell antibodies (ICA). Her father and brother were negative. All thefamily was positive for anti glutamic decarboxylase antibodies (GAD65). All subjects had HLA-DRB1 0407/0407 and HLA-DQB1 0302/0302 alleles. The index case and her father were homozygotes for the HLA-A1:A*68012/A*68012 allele. Mean breastfeeding lapse was 18 months in all children. No evidences for viral infections such as rubella, mumps or measles were found in this family. There was an altered profile of autoantibodies in the family of the index case. All genotypes were comparable with the European population where the diabetogenic combination DR4/DQB1*0302 is the most prevalent. No environmental factors could be incriminated as triggers of the disease.

  9. Presentation of human minor histocompatibility antigens by HLA-B35 and HLA-B38 molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Junji; Kariyone, Ai; Kano, Kyoichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi; Akiyama, Nobuo

    1990-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for human minor histocompatibility antigens (hmHAs) were produced from a patient who had been grafted with the kidneys from his mother and two HLA-identical sisters. Of eight CTL clones generated, four recognized an hmHA (hmHA-1) expressed on cells from the mother and sister 3 (second donor); two recognized another antigen (hmHA-2) on cells from the father, sister (third donor), and sister 3; and the remaining two clones recognized still another antigen (hmHA-3) on cells from the father and sister 3. Panel studies revealed that CTL recognition of hmHA-1 was restricted by HLA-B35 and that of hmHA-2 and hmHA-3 was restricted by HLA-B38. The HLA-B35 restriction of the hmHA-1 -specific CTL clones was substantiated by the fact that they killed HLA-A null/HLA-B null Hmy2CIR targets transfected with HLA-B35 but not HLA-B51, -Bw52, or -Bw53 transfected Hmy2CIR targets. These data demonstrated that the five amino acids substitutions on the α 1 domain between HLA-B35 and -Bw53, which are associated with Bw4/Bw6 epitopes, play a critical role in the relationship of hmHA-1 to HLA-B35 molecules. The fact that the hmHA-1-specific CTLs failed to kill Hmy2CIR cells expressing HLA-B35/51 chimeric molecules composed of the α 1 domain of HLA-B35 and other domains of HLA-B51 indicated that eight residues on the α 2 domain also affect the interaction of hmHA-1 and the HLA-B35 molecules

  10. Desensitization protocol enabling pediatric crossmatch-positive renal transplantation: successful HLA-antibody-incompatible renal transplantation of two highly sensitized children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamusiak, Anna M; Stojanovic, Jelena; Shaw, Olivia; Vaughan, Robert; Sebire, Neil J; Drage, Martin; Kessaris, Nicos; Marks, Stephen D; Mamode, Nizam

    2017-02-01

    Renal transplantation improves quality of life (QoL) and survival in children requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Sensitization with development of a broad-spectrum of anti-HLA antibodies as a result of previous transplantation or after receiving blood products is an increasing problem. There are no published reports of desensitization protocols in children allowing renal transplantation from HLA-antibody-incompatible living donors. We adopted our well-established adult desensitization protocol for this purpose and undertook HLA antibody-incompatible living donor renal transplants in two children: a 14-year-old girl and a 13-year-old boy. After 2 and 1.5 years of follow-up, respectively, both patients have stable renal allograft function despite a rise in donor-specific antibodies in one case. HLA-incompatible transplantation should be considered in selected cases for sensitized children.

  11. HLA-E expression by gynecological cancers restrains tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gooden, Marloes; Lampen, Margit; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.; Leffers, Ninke; Trimbos, J. Baptist; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Nijman, Hans; van Hall, Thorbald

    2011-01-01

    HLA-E is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule, which differs from classical HLA molecules by its nonpolymorphic, conserved nature. Expression and function of HLA-E in normal tissues and solid tumors is not fully understood. We investigated HLA-E protein expression on tissue sections of 420 ovarian

  12. The Central Trigger Processor (CTP)

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The Central Trigger Processor (CTP) receives trigger information from the calorimeter and muon trigger processors, as well as from other sources of trigger. It makes the Level-1 decision (L1A) based on a trigger menu.

  13. Upregulation of HLA Class I Expression on Tumor Cells by the Anti-EGFR Antibody Nimotuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Garrido

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Defining how epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeting therapies influence the immune response is essential to increase their clinical efficacy. A growing emphasis is being placed on immune regulator genes that govern tumor – T cell interactions. Previous studies showed an increase in HLA class I cell surface expression in tumor cell lines treated with anti-EGFR agents. In particular, earlier studies of the anti-EGFR blocking antibody cetuximab, have suggested that increased tumor expression of HLA class I is associated with positive clinical response. We investigated the effect of another commercially available anti-EGFR antibody nimotuzumab on HLA class I expression in tumor cell lines. We observed, for the first time, that nimotuzumab increases HLA class I expression and its effect is associated with a coordinated increase in mRNA levels of the principal antigen processing and presentation components. Moreover, using 7A7 (a specific surrogate antibody against murine EGFR, we obtained results suggesting the importance of the increased MHC-I expression induced by EGFR-targeted therapies display higher in antitumor immune response. 7A7 therapy induced upregulation of tumor MHC-I expression in vivo and tumors treated with this antibody display higher susceptibility to CD8+ T cells-mediated lysis. Our results represent the first evidence suggesting the importance of the adaptive immunity in nimotuzumab-mediated antitumor activity. More experiments should be conducted in order to elucidate the relevance of this mechanism in cancer patients. This novel immune-related antitumor mechanism mediated by nimotuzumab opens new perspectives for its combination with various immunotherapeutic agents and cancer vaccines.

  14. HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM) component expression and PD-1:PD-L1 pathway activation in HIV-infected head and neck cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Sara I; Jack Lee, J; Carey, Thomas E; Westra, William H; Ferrone, Soldano; Moore, Charles; Mosunjac, Marina B; Shin, Dong M; Ferris, Robert L

    2018-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals are at increased risk for developing several non-AIDS related malignancies and are often excluded from cancer immunotherapy regimens. To evaluate the immune competence of this cancer patient population, we evaluated HLA class I antigen presenting machinery (APM) component expression and PD-1:PD-L1 pathway upregulation in HIV(+) and HIV(-) head and neck cancers (HNCs). Sixty-two HIV(+) and 44 matched HIV(-) controls diagnosed with HNC between 1991 and 2011 from five tertiary care referral centers in the United States were identified. HLA class I APM component, PD-1, and PD-L1 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Clinical data was abstracted from the medical records. There was no significant difference between the cases and controls in LMP2, TAP1, HLA-A and HLA-B/C, as well as PD-1 and PD-L1 expression. Overall, 62% of all subjects had high PD-1 expression and 82% of the subjects expressed PD-L1 within the tumor microenvironment. LMP2, HLA-A and HLA-B/C expression were significantly associated with moderate to high PD-1 expression in the HIV(+) HNC cases (p = .004, p = .026, and p = .006, respectively) but not in the HIV(-) controls. In addition, HLA-A expression was significantly associated with PD-L1 expression in the HIV(+) HNC cases only (p = .029). HIV-infected individuals diagnosed with HNC do not have any detectable defects in HLA class I APM component expression and in PD-1:PD-L1 pathway activation. Given the current successes of HAART therapy in maintaining immune cell counts, HIV(+) patients diagnosed with cancer may benefit from the recently FDA-approved immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. HLA class I-mediated control of HIV-1 in the Japanese population, in which the protective HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27 alleles are absent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, Takuya; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Nelson, George; Sakai, Keiko; Carrington, Mary; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the effect of HLA class I alleles on clinical parameters for HIV-1 disease progression in the Japanese population, where two strongly protective alleles, HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*27, are virtually nonexistent. HLA-B alleles showed a dominant role, primarily through HLA-B*67:01 and the HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotype. Neither a rare-allele nor a heterozygote advantage was found, suggesting that the effect of HLA alleles in the Japanese population is either different from those observed in Africans and Caucasians or undetectable due to limited power.

  16. Phthalocyanine-conjugated upconversion NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+@SiO2 nanospheres for NIR-triggered photodynamic therapy in a tumor mouse model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kostiv, Uliana; Patsula, Vitalii; Noculak, A.; Podhorodecki, A.; Větvička, D.; Poučková, P.; Sedláková, Zdeňka; Horák, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, Issue 24 (2017), s. 2066-2073 ISSN 1860-7179 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01897S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : upconversion nanospheres * phthalocyanine * photodynamic therapy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.225, year: 2016

  17. A novel cancer vaccine strategy based on HLA-A*0201 matched allogeneic plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Aspord

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of effective cancer vaccines still remains a challenge. Despite the crucial role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs in anti-tumor responses, their therapeutic potential has not yet been worked out. We explored the relevance of HLA-A*0201 matched allogeneic pDCs as vectors for immunotherapy. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Stimulation of PBMC from HLA-A*0201(+ donors by HLA-A*0201 matched allogeneic pDCs pulsed with tumor-derived peptides triggered high levels of antigen-specific and functional cytotoxic T cell responses (up to 98% tetramer(+ CD8 T cells. The pDC vaccine demonstrated strong anti-tumor therapeutic in vivo efficacy as shown by the inhibition of tumor growth in a humanized mouse model. It also elicited highly functional tumor-specific T cells ex-vivo from PBMC and TIL of stage I-IV melanoma patients. Responses against MelA, GP100, tyrosinase and MAGE-3 antigens reached tetramer levels up to 62%, 24%, 85% and 4.3% respectively. pDC vaccine-primed T cells specifically killed patients' own autologous melanoma tumor cells. This semi-allogeneic pDC vaccine was more effective than conventional myeloid DC-based vaccines. Furthermore, the pDC vaccine design endows it with a strong potential for clinical application in cancer treatment. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight HLA-A*0201 matched allogeneic pDCs as potent inducers of tumor immunity and provide a promising immunotherapeutic strategy to fight cancer.

  18. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I restricted epitope discovery in yellow fewer and dengue viruses: importance of HLA binding strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Lund

    Full Text Available Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV and dengue fever virus (DENV restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV epitopes were selected using the EpiSelect algorithm to allow for optimal coverage of viral strains. The selected predicted epitopes were synthesized and approximately 75% were found to bind the predicted restricting HLA molecule with an affinity, K(D, stronger than 500 nM. The immunogenicity of 25 HLA-A*02:01, 28 HLA-A*24:02 and 28 HLA-B*07:02 binding peptides was tested in three HLA-transgenic mice models and led to the identification of 17 HLA-A*02:01, 4 HLA-A*2402 and 4 HLA-B*07:02 immunogenic peptides. The immunogenic peptides bound HLA significantly stronger than the non-immunogenic peptides. All except one of the immunogenic peptides had K(D below 100 nM and the peptides with K(D below 5 nM were more likely to be immunogenic. In addition, all the immunogenic peptides that were identified as having a high functional avidity had K(D below 20 nM. A*02:01 transgenic mice were also inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding in shaping the immune response.

  19. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies recognizing HLA-G or HLA-E: new tools to analyze the expression of nonclassical HLA class I molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Menier, C.; Saez, B.; Hořejší, Václav; Martinozzi, S.; Krawice-Radanne, I.; Bruel, S.; Le Danff, C.; Reboul, M.; Hilgert, Ivan; Rabreau, M.; Larrad, M. L.; Pla, M.; Carosella, E. D.; Rouas-Freiss, N.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 64, č. 3 (2003), s. 315-326 ISSN 0198-8859 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HLA-G * HLA-E * monoclonal antibody Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.619, year: 2003

  20. Systems modeling of anti-apoptotic pathways in prostate cancer: psychological stress triggers a synergism pattern switch in drug combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Sun

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer patients often have increased levels of psychological stress or anxiety, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between psychological stress and prostate cancer as well as therapy resistance have been rarely studied and remain poorly understood. Recent reports show that stress inhibits apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via epinephrine/beta2 adrenergic receptor/PKA/BAD pathway. In this study, we used experimental data on the signaling pathways that control BAD phosphorylation to build a dynamic network model of apoptosis regulation in prostate cancer cells. We then compared the predictive power of two different models with or without the role of Mcl-1, which justified the role of Mcl-1 stabilization in anti-apoptotic effects of emotional stress. Based on the selected model, we examined and quantitatively evaluated the induction of apoptosis by drug combination therapies. We predicted that the combination of PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and inhibition of BAD phosphorylation at S112 would produce the best synergistic effect among 8 interventions examined. Experimental validation confirmed the effectiveness of our predictive model. Moreover, we found that epinephrine signaling changes the synergism pattern and decreases efficacy of combination therapy. The molecular mechanisms responsible for therapeutic resistance and the switch in synergism were explored by analyzing a network model of signaling pathways affected by psychological stress. These results provide insights into the mechanisms of psychological stress signaling in therapy-resistant cancer, and indicate the potential benefit of reducing psychological stress in designing more effective therapies for prostate cancer patients.

  1. Role of HLA adaptation in HIV evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; Leslie, Alasdair; Goulder, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Killing of HIV-infected cells by CD8+ T-cells imposes strong selection pressure on the virus toward escape. The HLA class I molecules that are successful in mediating some degree of control over the virus are those that tend to present epitopes in conserved regions of the proteome, such as in p24...... Gag, in which escape also comes at a significant cost to viral replicative capacity (VRC). In some instances, compensatory mutations can fully correct for the fitness cost of such an escape variant; in others, correction is only partial. The consequences of these events within the HIV-infected host......, and at the population level following transmission of escape variants, are discussed. The accumulation of escape mutants in populations over the course of the epidemic already shows instances of protective HLA molecules losing their impact, and in certain cases, a modest decline in HIV virulence in association...

  2. HLA-G genotype is associated with fetoplacental growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert

    2004-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G is expressed by extravillous cytotrophoblast cells in the feto-maternal contact zone. Polymorphisms have been described in the HLA-G gene and have been linked with differences in HLA-G mRNA alternative splicing patterns and protein expression. Differences...... in the isoform profile or the degree of HLA-G expression may influence cytokine production and, thereby, placental and fetal growth. Associations between a 14 bp deletion polymorphism in the 3'UTR part of the HLA-G gene and birth weight in relation to gestational age and placental weight were studied in 47...... pregnancies complicated with preeclampsia and 87 with no preeclampsia. An HLA-G genotype homozygous for the presence of the 14 bp sequence polymorphism was significantly associated with increased birth weight in relation to gestational age (one-way analysis of variance; 2 degrees of freedom: p = 0...

  3. Clinical outcomes of ABO- and HLA-incompatible kidney transplantation: a nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eun Jeong; Yu, Ji Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha

    2017-12-01

    This was a nationwide cohort study to investigate the impact of anti-A/B and donor-specific anti-HLA (HLA-DSA) antibodies on the clinical outcomes in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). We classified a total of 1964 KTRs into four groups: transplants from ABO-incompatible donors (ABOi, n = 248); transplants in recipients with HLA-DSA (HLAi, n = 144); transplants from combined ABOi and HLAi donors (ABOi + HLAi, n = 31); and a control group for whom neither ABOi nor HLAi was applicable (CONT, n = 1541). We compared the incidence of biopsy-proven acute rejection (BPAR), allograft and patient survival rates. The incidence of BPAR was higher in the HLAi and ABOi + HLAi groups relative to the CONT group; in contrast, it was not higher in the ABOi group. Death-censored graft survival rates did not differ across the four groups. However, relative to the CONT group, patient survival rate was reduced in the ABOi and ABOi + HLAi groups, and with infection being the most common cause of death. Further, multivariable analysis revealed that desensitization therapy because of ABOi or HLAi was independent risk factors for patient mortality. HLAi was a more important risk factor for BPAR compared with ABOi. However, pretransplant desensitization therapy for either ABOi or HLAi significantly increased the risk of infection-related mortality. © 2017 Steunstichting ESOT.

  4. Low immunosuppressive burden after HLA-matched related or unrelated BMT using posttransplantation cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakry, Christopher G; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Kasamon, Yvette L; Zahurak, Marianna; Durakovic, Nadira; Furlong, Terry; Mielcarek, Marco; Medeot, Marta; Gojo, Ivana; Smith, B Douglas; Kanakry, Jennifer A; Borrello, Ivan M; Brodsky, Robert A; Gladstone, Douglas E; Huff, Carol Ann; Matsui, William H; Swinnen, Lode J; Cooke, Kenneth R; Ambinder, Richard F; Fuchs, Ephraim J; de Lima, Marcos J; Andersson, Borje S; Varadhan, Ravi; O'Donnell, Paul V; Jones, Richard J; Luznik, Leo

    2017-03-09

    The intensive and prolonged immunosuppressive therapy required to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation (alloBMT) puts patients at substantial risk for life-threatening infections, organ toxicity, and disease relapse. Posttransplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) can function as single-agent GVHD prophylaxis after myeloablative, HLA-matched related (MRD), or HLA-matched unrelated (MUD) donor T-cell-replete bone marrow allografting, obviating the need for additional prophylactic immunosuppression. However, patients who develop GVHD require supplemental treatment. We assessed the longitudinal requirement for immunosuppressive therapy in 339 patients treated with this transplantation platform: 247 receiving busulfan/cyclophosphamide (BuCy) conditioning (data collected retrospectively) and 92 receiving busulfan/fludarabine (BuFlu) conditioning (data collected prospectively). Approximately 50% of MRD patients and 30% of MUD patients never required immunosuppression beyond PTCy. In patients requiring further immunosuppression, typically only 1 to 2 agents were required, and the median durations of systemic pharmacologic immunosuppression for the BuCy MRD, BuFlu MRD, BuCy MUD, and BuFlu MUD groups all were 4.5 to 5 months. For these 4 groups, 1-year probabilities of being alive and off all systemic immunosuppression were 61%, 53%, 53%, and 51% and 3-year probabilities were 53%, 48%, 49%, and 56%, respectively. These data suggest that PTCy minimizes the global immunosuppressive burden experienced by patients undergoing HLA-matched alloBMT.

  5. HLA: The Major Histocompatibility Complex of Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    be used in conjunction with asthma, hay fever, urticaria, and eczema have been solid organ transplantations. Numerous new ap- sought but have not been...IgE levels are controlled by a second. non-HLA-linked Raum (1981) and Svejgaard (1983) have reported ex- locus (or loci). Atopic patients showed an...Products Asia-Oceania ttistocompatibility Workshop Conference. Sapporo. Japan . Hlokkaido University Press. 1986. Alper. CA.. Awdeh. Z.L.. Raum. D.D

  6. HLA polymorphism in Sudanese renal donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer M Dafalla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to provide a database for renal transplantation in Sudan and to determine the HLA antigens and haplotype frequencies (HFs in the study subjects. HLA typing was performed using the complement-dependant lymphocytotoxicity test in 250 unrelated healthy individuals selected as donors in the Sudanese Renal Transplantation Program. Considerable polymorphism was observed at each locus; A2 (0.28, A30 (0.12, A3 (0.09, A24 (0.09, A1 (0.09, and A68 (0.06 were the most frequent antigens in the A locus, while B51 (0.092, B41 (0.081, B39 (0.078, B57 (0.060, B35 (0.068, B 50 (0.053 and B 52 (0.051 were the most common B locus antigens. DR13 (0.444 and DR15 (0.160 showed the highest antigen frequencies (AFs in the DR locus. In the DQ locus, DQ1 showed the highest gene frequency (0.498, while DQ2 and DQ3 AFs were (0.185 and (0.238, respectively. The most common HLA-A and -B haplotypes in positive linkage disequilibrium were A24, B38; A1, B7; and A3, B52. The common HLA-A and -B HFs in positive linkage disequilibrium in the main three tribe-stocks of the study subjects (Gaalia, Nile Nubian and Johyna were A24, B38 for Gaalia; A24, B38 and A2, B7 for Johyna; and A2, B64 and A3, B53 for Nile Nubian. These results suggest that both class I and class II polymorphisms of the study subjects depict considerable heterogeneity, which reflects recent admixture of this group with neighboring Arabs and African populations.

  7. Adopting HLA standard for interdependency study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, Cen; Eusgeld, Irene

    2011-01-01

    In recent decades, modern Critical Infrastructure (CI) has become increasingly automated and interlinked as more and more resources and information are required to maintain its day-to-day operation. A system failure, or even just a service debilitation, of any CI may have significant adverse effects on other infrastructures it is connected/interconnected with. It is vital to study the interdependencies within and between CIs and provide advanced modeling and simulation techniques in order to prevent or at least minimize these adverse effects. The key limitation of traditional mathematical models such as complex network theory is their lacking the capabilities of providing sufficient insights into interrelationships between CIs due to the complexities of these systems. A comprehensive method, a hybrid approach combining various modeling/simulation techniques in a distributed simulation environment, is presented in this paper. High Level Architecture (HLA) is an open standard (IEEE standard 1516) supporting simulations composed of different simulation components, which can be regarded as the framework for implementing such a hybrid approach. The concept of adopting HLA standard for the interdependency study is still under discussion by many researchers. Whether or not this HLA standard, or even the distributed simulation environment, is able to meet desired model/simulation requirements needs to be carefully examined. This paper presents the results from our experimental test-bed, which recreates the architecture of a typical Electricity Power Supply System (EPSS) with its own Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system, for the purpose of investigating the capabilities of the HLA technique as a standard to perform interdependency studies.

  8. HLA-D: The T Cell Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    offspring of consanguineous marriage, in which case the cells are almost always homosygous for all HLA-region products; in other cases, HTCs are...story. Certain relationships exist between the class II serologically defined (I&) and T lymphocyte defined (Dw/LD) specificities. One speaks of one...DRwI4 specificities; in addition, certain of the DRI-DRwl4 specificities are supertypic to the various Dw specificities. The relationships of these

  9. GDEVS/HLA Environment: A Time Management Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharewicz , Gregory; Giambiasi , Norbert; Frydman , Claudia

    2005-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a distributed discrete event simulation environment based on GDEVS and HLA concepts. The chosen local simulation structure is “flatten” to reduce the exchange of messages between simulation components regarding with classical structure of DEVS simulators. Moreover, we present an integration method to create GDEVS models HLA-compliant; for that purpose, we introduce an effective algorithm of conservative synchronization using the HLA lookahead and so...

  10. HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell tranplantation for pediatric solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pession

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Even if the overall survival of children with cancer is significantly improved over these decades, the cure rate of high-risk pediatric solid tumors such as neuroblastoma, Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors or rhabdomiosarcoma remain challenging. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT allows chemotherapy dose intensification beyond marrow tolerance and has become a fundamental tool in the multimodal therapeutical approach of these patients. Anyway this procedure does not allow to these children an eventfree survival approaching more than 50% at 5 years. New concepts of allogeneic HSCT and in particular HLA-mismatched HSCT for high risk solid tumors do not rely on escalation of chemo therapy intensity and tumor load reduction but rather on a graft-versus-tumor effect. We here report an experimental study design of HLA-mismatched HSCT for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors and the inherent preliminary results.

  11. HLA associations and risk of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in Danish population-based cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vase, Maja Ølholm; Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Strandhave, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Background: Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a feared complication to organ transplantation, associated with substantial morbidity and inferior survival. Risk factors for PTLD include T cell–depleting induction therapy and primary infection or reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus....... Possible associations between certain HLA types and the risk of developing PTLD have been reported by other investigators; however, results are conflicting. Methods: We conducted a retrospective, population-based study on 4295 Danish solid organ transplant patients from the Scandiatransplant database...... can be clinically useful after transplantation in personalized monitoring schemes. Given the strong linkage disequilibrium in the HLA region, the associations must be interpreted carefully. The large size, virtually complete ascertainment of cases and no loss to follow-up remain important strengths...

  12. Preceding immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and ciclosporin increases the incidence of graft rejection in children with aplastic anaemia who underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from HLA-identical siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Ryoji; Yabe, Hiromasa; Hara, Junichi; Morimoto, Akira; Tsuchida, Masahiro; Mugishima, Hideo; Ohara, Akira; Tsukimoto, Ichiro; Kato, Koji; Kigasawa, Hisato; Tabuchi, Ken; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Ohga, Shoichi; Kojima, Seiji

    2006-12-01

    The incidence of graft rejection was determined in 66 children with acquired aplastic anaemia (AA) following bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from a related donor. Eleven of 65 evaluable patients experienced either early or late rejection. Multivariate analysis identified previous immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte-globulin (ATG) and ciclosporin (CsA) as a risk factor for graft rejection (relative risk: 16.6, P = 0.001). Patients who received ATG and CsA had a significantly lower probability of failure-free survival than those who did not (69.7 +/- 6.2% vs. 87.9 +/- 8.0%, P = 0.044). These results suggest that BMT should be instituted immediately in children with severe AA who have human leucocyte antigen-identical siblings.

  13. Successful Renal Transplantation Across HLA Barrier: Report from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, G; Tiwari, A K; Dorwal, P; Chauhan, R; Arora, D; Dara, R C; Kher, V

    2017-01-01

    Organ donors are sometimes found "unsuitable" due to the presence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies in the recipient. In recent years, improved desensitization protocols have successfully helped to overcome HLA incompatibility hurdle. We present three cases where optimum desensitization was achieved in patients with the donor-specific anti-HLA antibody (DSA) leading to successful renal transplantation. All patient-donor pair underwent HLA typing, complement dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDC-XM), flow cytometry XM (FC-XM), and panel reactive antibody. If any of the three tests was positive, single antigen bead assay was performed to determine the specificity of the anti-HLA antibody (s). Patients with DSA were offered organ-swap or anti-HLA antibody desensitization followed by transplantation. Desensitization protocol consisted of single dose rituximab and cascade plasmapheresis (CP) along with standard triple immunosuppression. The target DSA mean fluorescence index (MFI) was HLA DSA, who did not find a suitable match in organ swap program, consented to anti-HLA antibody desensitization, followed by transplantation. Mean pre-desensitization antibody MFI was 1740 (1422-2280). Mean number of CP required to achieve the target MFI was 2.3 (2-3). All the three patients are on regular follow-up and have normal renal function test at a mean follow-up of 8 months. This report underlines successful application of desensitization protocol leading to successful HLA-antibody incompatible renal transplants and their continued normal renal functions.

  14. The Dual Role of HLA-G in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Rouas-Freiss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We here review the current data on the role of HLA-G in cancer based on recent findings of an unexpected antitumor activity of HLA-G in hematological malignancies. For the past decade, HLA-G has been described as a tumor-escape mechanism favoring cancer progression, and blocking strategies have been proposed to counteract it. Aside from these numerous studies on solid tumors, recent data showed that HLA-G inhibits the proliferation of malignant B cells due to the interaction between HLA-G and its receptor ILT2, which mediates negative signaling on B cell proliferation. These results led to the conjecture that, according to the malignant cell type, HLA-G should be blocked or conversely induced to counteract tumor progression. In this context, we will here present (i the dual role of HLA-G in solid and liquid tumors with special emphasis on (ii the HLA-G active structures and their related ILT2 and ILT4 receptors and (iii the current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of HLA-G expression in tumors.

  15. Frequency determination of HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Bazrafshani

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: The HLA cluster might affect on susceptibility to vesicoureteral reflux es-pecially by locus which located close to HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 genes. This study demonstrates for the first time in Iran. However, further extensive researches with a large number of samples from different populations and ethnicities are required to val-idate the results obtained in this study.

  16. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Class I Restricted Epitope Discovery in Yellow Fewer and Dengue Viruses: Importance of HLA Binding Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Nascimento, Eduardo J. M.; Maciel, Milton, Jr

    2011-01-01

    Epitopes from all available full-length sequences of yellow fever virus (YFV) and dengue fever virus (DENV) restricted by Human Leukocyte Antigen class I (HLA-I) alleles covering 12 HLA-I supertypes were predicted using the NetCTL algorithm. A subset of 179 predicted YFV and 158 predicted DENV...... inoculated twice with the 17DD YFV vaccine strain. Three of the YFV A*02:01 restricted peptides activated T-cells from the infected mice in vitro. All three peptides that elicited responses had an HLA binding affinity of 2 nM or less. The results indicate the importance of the strength of HLA binding...

  17. Characterisation of the HLA-DRB1*07:01 biomarker for lapatinib-induced liver toxicity during treatment of early-stage breast cancer patients with lapatinib in combination with trastuzumab and/or taxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraggs, C F; Parham, L R; Briley, L P; Warren, L; Williams, L S; Fraser, D J; Jiang, Z; Aziz, Z; Ahmed, S; Demetriou, G; Mehta, A; Jackson, N; Byrne, J; Andersson, M; Toi, M; Harris, L; Gralow, J; Zujewski, J A; Crescenzo, R; Armour, A; Perez, E; Piccart, M

    2017-08-08

    HLA-DRB1*07:01 allele carriage was characterised as a risk biomarker for lapatinib-induced liver injury in a large global study evaluating lapatinib, alone and in combination with trastuzumab and taxanes, as adjuvant therapy for advanced breast cancer (adjuvant lapatinib and/or trastuzumab treatment optimisation). HLA-DRB1*07:01 carriage was associated with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevations in lapatinib-treated patients (odds ratio 6.5, P=3 × 10 -26 , n=4482) and the risk and severity of ALT elevation for lapatinib-treated patients was higher in homozygous than heterozygous HLA-DRB1*07:01 genotype carriers. A higher ALT case incidence plus weaker HLA association observed during concurrent administration of lapatinib and taxane suggested a subset of liver injury in this combination group that was HLA-DRB1*07:01 independent. Furthermore, the incidence of ALT elevation demonstrated an expected correlation with geographic HLA-DRB1*07:01 carriage frequency. Robust ALT elevation risk estimates for HLA-DRB1*07:01 may support causality discrimination and safety risk management during the use of lapatinib combination therapy for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/tpj.2017.39.

  18. Separate Developmental Programs for HLA-A and -B Cell Surface Expression during Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells to Lymphocytes, Adipocytes and Osteoblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabir, Hardee J; Nehlin, Jan O; Qanie, Diyako

    2013-01-01

    -A, but not -B) is seen on some multipotent stem cells, and this raises the question how this is in other stem cells and how it changes during differentiation. In this study, we have used flow cytometry to investigate the cell surface expression of HLA-A and -B on human embryonic stem cells (hESC), human...... hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC), human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) and their fully-differentiated progenies such as lymphocytes, adipocytes and osteoblasts. hESC showed extremely low levels of HLA-A and no -B. In contrast, multipotent hMSC and hHSC generally expressed higher levels of HLA-A and clearly HLA......A major problem of allogeneic stem cell therapy is immunologically mediated graft rejection. HLA class I A, B, and Cw antigens are crucial factors, but little is known of their respective expression on stem cells and their progenies. We have recently shown that locus-specific expression (HLA...

  19. Complement-Mediated Enhancement of Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells by HLA Antibodies, and Blockade by a Specific Inhibitor of the Classical Complement Cascade, TNT003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Thomas, Kimberly A.; Mulder, Arend; Parry, Graham C.; Panicker, Sandip; Reed, Elaine F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) of most solid organs is characterized by evidence of complement activation and/or intragraft macrophages (C4d + and CD68+ biopsies). We previously demonstrated that crosslinking of HLA I by antibodies triggered endothelial activation and monocyte adhesion. We hypothesized that activation of the classical complement pathway at the endothelial cell surface by HLA antibodies would enhance monocyte adhesion through soluble split product generation, in parallel with direct endothelial activation downstream of HLA signaling. Methods Primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) were stimulated with HLA class I antibodies in the presence of intact human serum complement. C3a and C5a generation, endothelial P-selectin expression, and adhesion of human primary and immortalized monocytes (Mono Mac 6) were measured. Alternatively, HAEC or monocytes were directly stimulated with purified C3a or C5a. Classical complement activation was inhibited by pretreatment of complement with an anti-C1s antibody (TNT003). Results Treatment of HAEC with HLA antibody and human complement increased the formation of C3a and C5a. Monocyte recruitment by human HLA antibodies was enhanced in the presence of intact human serum complement or purified C3a or C5a. Specific inhibition of the classical complement pathway using TNT003 or C1q-depleted serum significantly reduced adhesion of monocytes in the presence of human complement. Conclusions Despite persistent endothelial viability in the presence of HLA antibodies and complement, upstream complement anaphylatoxin production exacerbates endothelial exocytosis and leukocyte recruitment. Upstream inhibition of classical complement may be therapeutic to dampen mononuclear cell recruitment and endothelial activation characteristic of microvascular inflammation during AMR. PMID:28640789

  20. BAT Triggering Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Kassandra M.; Fenimore, E. E.; Palmer, D. M.; BAT Team

    2006-09-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift has detected and located about 160 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in its first twenty months of operation. BAT employs two triggering systems to find GRBs: image triggering, which looks for a new point source in the field of view, and rate triggering, which looks for a significant increase in the observed counts. The image triggering system looks at 1 minute, 5 minute, and full pointing accumulations of counts in the detector plane in the energy range of 15-50 keV, with about 50 evaluations per pointing (about 40 minutes). The rate triggering system looks through 13 different time scales (from 4ms to 32s), 4 overlapping energy bins (covering 15-350 keV), 9 regions of the detector plane (from the full plane to individual quarters), and two background sampling models to search for GRBs. It evaluates 27000 trigger criteria in a second, for close to 1000 criteria. The image triggering system looks at 1, 5, and 40 minute accumulations of counts in the detector plane in the energy range of 15-50 keV. Both triggering systems are working very well with the settings from before launch and after we turned on BAT. However, we now have more than a year and a half of data to evaluate these triggering systems and tweak them for optimal performance, as well as lessons learned from these triggering systems.

  1. Development of a clinical prediction rule for identifying women with tension-type headache who are likely to achieve short-term success with joint mobilization and muscle trigger point therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Palomeque-del-Cerro, Luis; Caminero, Ana Belén; Guillem-Mesado, Amparo; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2011-02-01

    To identify prognostic factors from the history and physical examination in women with tension-type headache (TTH) who are likely to experience self-perceived clinical improvement following a multimodal physical therapy session including joint mobilization and muscle trigger point (TrP) therapies. No definitive therapeutic intervention is available for TTH. It would be useful for clinicians to have a clinical prediction rule for selecting which TTH patients may experience improved outcomes following a multimodal physical therapy program. Women diagnosed with pure TTH by 3 experienced neurologists according to the International Headache Society criteria from different neurology departments were included. They underwent a standardized examination (neck mobility, pressure pain thresholds, total tenderness score, presence of muscle TrPs, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Neck Disability Index [NDI], the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Headache Disability Inventory) and then a multimodal physical therapy session including joint mobilization and TrP therapies. The treatment session included a 30-second grade III or IV central posterior-anterior nonthrust mobilization applied from T4 to T1 thoracic vertebrae, at C7-T1 cervico-thoracic junction and C1-C2 vertebrae for an overall intervention time of 5 minutes Different TrP techniques, particularly soft tissue stroke, pressure release, or muscle energy were applied to head and neck-shoulder muscles (temporalis, suboccipital, upper trapezius, splenius capitis, semispinalis capitis, sternocleidomastoid) to inactivate active muscle TrPs. Participants were classified as having achieved a successful outcome 1 week after the session based on their self-perceived recovery. Potential prognostic variables were entered into a stepwise logistic regression model to determine the most accurate set of variables for prediction of success. Data for 76 subjects were included in the analysis, of which 36 experienced a

  2. A comparison of self-reported joint symptoms following infection with different enteric pathogens: effect of HLA-B27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiellerup, P.; Krogfelt, K.A.; Locht, H.

    2008-01-01

    with positive fecal culture for Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, Shigella, and E. coli were addressed by questionnaires inquiring about gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and the occurrence of joint pain in a previously healthy joint within 4 weeks after onset of infection. A blood sample was requested for HLA......-B27 typing. RESULTS: Of 3146 patients invited, 2105 (67%) responded to the survey questionnaire. The triggering infections were Campylobacter, 1003; Salmonella, 619; E. coli, 290; Shigella, 102; and Yersinia, 91. JPrea was reported by 294 subjects: Campylobacter, 131 (13.1%); Salmonella, 104 (16.......8%); Yersinia, 21 (23.1%); Shigella, 10 (9.8%); and E. coli, 28 (9.7%). There was a significant association between severity of gastroenteritis and development of arthralgia (p = 0.001). The odds ratio (OR) for JPrea in an HLA-B27-positive individual was 2.62 (95% CI 1.67-3.93) for the entire group...

  3. HLA-G polymorphisms and HLA-G expression in sarcoidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Milman, Nils; Hylenius, Sine

    2006-01-01

    was investigated in granulomas from sarcoidosis patients with the use of immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The HLA-G*010102/-G*0106 alleles were observed more often in sarcoidosis patients (39.4%) than in controls (26.4%), p = 0.025 (Fisher's exact test); however, not significant after correction (p(c) = 0.15). When...

  4. HLA and skin cancer HLA e câncer de pele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renan Rangel Bonamigo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer - melanoma and non melanoma - are common neoplasm with rising incidence over the last decades. It is an important public health problem. Its pathogenesis is not completely understood and the same happens with the genetic factors involved. The genes that encode the HLA are associated with some tumors and they may be responsible for one of the mechanisms that take part in the development of the before mentioned cancers. We have reviewed the literature on the subject of HLA antigens, melanoma and non melanoma skin cancer.Os cânceres da pele - melanoma e não-melanoma - são neoplasias comuns e com incidência crescente ao longo de décadas. Representam um importante problema de saúde pública. A patogênese destas neoplasias não é completamente compreendida, assim como não o são os fatores genéticos envolvidos. Os genes HLA estão associados a alguns tumores e podem representar um dos mecanismos implicados no desenvolvimento do câncer de pele. Apresenta-se uma revisão atualizada sobre a relação entre antígenos HLA, câncer da pele não-melanoma e melanoma.

  5. Stay away from asthma triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... clothes. They should leave the coat outside or away from your child. Ask people who work at ...

  6. Triggers of Substance Abuse Slip and Relapse During Outpatient Treatment in Methadone/Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Clinics: A Predictive Model with Emphasis on Treatment-Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Komasi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Most addicts relapse in the first year of treatment especially in the first 3 - 6 months, which is the most vulnerable period. Objectives The present study aimed to assess the predictors of substance abuse slip and relapse among addicts in the first 6 months of treatment with an emphasis on treatment related factors. Methods The data of this cross-sectional study collected through assessment of 148 patients who were referred to the Methadone/Buprenorphine maintenance therapy clinics of Kermanshah city during April to September of 2015. Demographic, history, treatment checklist, comorbidity index, and medical records were used for collecting data. Data was analyzed through chi-square, t-test, and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results The mean age of total participants was 42.4 ± 11.3 years and 98% of them were male. 27% and 35.1% of the patients, respectively, had a slip and relapse during the first 6 months of treatment. After adjustment for all demographic data, it was indicated that self-employment (P = 0.037, more treatment costs (P = 0.049, previous treatment history (P = 0.027, not satisfied dose of medication (P = 0.012, and lack of medical therapy history under physicians supervision (P = 0.046 can increase the possibility of a slip significantly. Conclusions Despite the fact that prevention of re-abuse and relapse of disease includes multi-factorial approach, it seems that the treatment-related factors are as the most major factors in relapse and slip during the first 6 months of treatment. Health practitioners’ special attention to treatment related factors in addiction, especially previous treatment history as the most important predictor of relapse, are probably effective in the control and decrease of a slip and relapse.

  7. HLA typing: Conventional techniques v. next-generation sequencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The large number of population-specific polymorphisms present in the HLA complex in the South African (SA) population reduces the probability of finding an adequate HLA-matched donor for individuals in need of an unrelated haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Next-generation sequencing ...

  8. The role of HLA-E polymorphism in immunological response

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    Milena Iwaszko

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-E protein is one of the most extensively studied MHC class Ib antigens and the least polymorphic one compared to other MHC class I molecules. In the human population there have been reported just ten alleles encoding three different peptides. Only two of these alleles, namely HLA-E*0101 and HLA-E*0103, are widely distributed (around 50�0each. The proteins encoded by these alleles differ from each other in one amino acid at position 107. In HLA-E*0101 it is arginine and in HLA-E*0103 it is glycine. The difference between these proteins manifests itself in surface expression levels, affinities to leader peptides and thermal stabilities of their complexes.The HLA-E molecule is a ligand for CD94/NKG2 receptors on NK cells and TCR receptors on NK-CTL (NK-cytotoxic T lymphocyte cells, so it plays a double role in both innate and adaptive immunity. This paper reviews the knowledge on the role of the HLA-E molecule in the immunological response. Aspects related to polymorphism of the HLA-E gene and the course of several diseases including type I diabetes, ankylosing spondylitis, HCV and HIV infections, nasopharyngeal cancer and recurrent spontaneous abortions, as well as the outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are presented and discussed in more detail.

  9. HLA Association with Drug-Induced Adverse Reactions

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    Wen-Lang Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse drug reactions (ADRs remain a common and major problem in healthcare. Severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome (SJS/toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN with mortality rate ranges from 10% to more than 30%, can be life threatening. A number of recent studies demonstrated that ADRs possess strong genetic predisposition. ADRs induced by several drugs have been shown to have significant associations with specific alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes. For example, hypersensitivity to abacavir, a drug used for treating of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, has been proposed to be associated with allele 57:01 of HLA-B gene (terms HLA-B∗57:01. The incidences of abacavir hypersensitivity are much higher in Caucasians compared to other populations due to various allele frequencies in different ethnic populations. The antithyroid drug- (ATDs- induced agranulocytosis are strongly associated with two alleles: HLA-B∗38:02 and HLA-DRB1∗08:03. In addition, HLA-B∗15:02 allele was reported to be related to carbamazepine-induced SJS/TEN, and HLA-B∗57:01 in abacavir hypersensitivity and flucloxacillin induced drug-induced liver injury (DILI. In this review, we summarized the alleles of HLA genes which have been proposed to have association with ADRs caused by different drugs.

  10. HLA-DP antigens in patients with alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, N; Georgsen, J

    1990-01-01

    The distribution of HLA-DP antigens were studied in 41 patients with alopecia areata (AA) and 188 ethnically matched controls. An increase of DR4 and possibly DR5 in 24 of these patients has previously been reported. HLA-DP typing for DPw1 through w6 and the local specificity, CDP HEI, was perfor...

  11. Association of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with HLA-DR7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridama, V.; Hara, Y.; Fauchet, R.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy-four American white thyroid cancer patients were typed for HLA-A, B, and DR antigens. A significant increase in HLA-DR7 was found in the nonradiation-associated thyroid cancer patients (42.5%, 20/47 cases), compared to 22.8% of 979 normal controls. The association is stronger in the follicular and mixed papillary-follicular subgroup (52.0%, 13/25 cases, P corrected less than 0.01). The occurrence of various malignancies in family members was found in 57.9% of HLA-DR7 positive patients, versus 20% of HLA-DR7 negative patients, in a retrospective record review. Although the frequency of HLA-DR7 was not increased in the radiation-associated thyroid cancer patients (22.2%, 6/27 cases), the interval from the irradiation date to the onset date of thyroid cancer was shorter in HLA-DR7 positive cases (17.3 +/- 6.2 years) than in HLA-DR7 negative patients (29.4 +/- 11.5 years). This data suggest that HLA-DR7 is associated with and may influence development of thyroid cancer

  12. Ultraspecific probes for high throughput HLA typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eggers Rick

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The variations within an individual's HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen genes have been linked to many immunological events, e.g. susceptibility to disease, response to vaccines, and the success of blood, tissue, and organ transplants. Although the microarray format has the potential to achieve high-resolution typing, this has yet to be attained due to inefficiencies of current probe design strategies. Results We present a novel three-step approach for the design of high-throughput microarray assays for HLA typing. This approach first selects sequences containing the SNPs present in all alleles of the locus of interest and next calculates the number of base changes necessary to convert a candidate probe sequences to the closest subsequence within the set of sequences that are likely to be present in the sample including the remainder of the human genome in order to identify those candidate probes which are "ultraspecific" for the allele of interest. Due to the high specificity of these sequences, it is possible that preliminary steps such as PCR amplification are no longer necessary. Lastly, the minimum number of these ultraspecific probes is selected such that the highest resolution typing can be achieved for the minimal cost of production. As an example, an array was designed and in silico results were obtained for typing of the HLA-B locus. Conclusion The assay presented here provides a higher resolution than has previously been developed and includes more alleles than previously considered. Based upon the in silico and preliminary experimental results, we believe that the proposed approach can be readily applied to any highly polymorphic gene system.

  13. Expression of the Classical and Nonclassical HLA Molecules in Breast Cancer

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    Gisela Bevilacqua Rolfsen Ferreira da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering that downregulation of HLA expression could represent a potential mechanism for breast carcinogenesis and metastasis, the aim of the present study was to use immunohistochemical methods to analyze the expression of HLA-Ia, HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, HLA-E, and HLA-G in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC of the breast and to relate this HLA profile to anatomopathological parameters. Fifty-two IDC from breast biopsies were stratified according to histological differentiation (well, moderately, and poorly differentiated and to the presence of metastases in axillary lymph nodes. The expression of HLA molecules was assessed by immunohistochemistry, using a computer-assisted system. Overall, 31 (59.6% out of the 52 IDC breast biopsies exhibited high expression of HLA-G, but only 14 (26.9% showed high expression of HLA-E. A large number (41, 78.8% of the biopsies showed low expression of HLA-Ia, while 45 (86.5% showed high expression of HLA-DQ and 36 (69.2% underexpressed HLA-DR. Moreover, 24 (41.2% of 52 biopsies had both low HLA-Ia expression and high HLA-G expression, while 11 (21.2% had low HLA-Ia expression and high HLA-E expression. These results suggest that, by different mechanisms, the downregulation of HLA-Ia, HLA-E, and HLA-DR and the upregulation of HLA-G and HLA-DQ are associated with immune response evasion and breast cancer aggressiveness.

  14. Role of HLA in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meerim Park

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The selection of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT donors includes a rigorous assessment of the availability and human leukocyte antigen (HLA match status of donors. HLA plays a critical role in HSCT, but its involvement in HSCT is constantly in flux because of changing technologies and variations in clinical transplantation results. The increased availability of HSCT through the use of HLA-mismatched related and unrelated donors is feasible with a more complete understanding of permissible HLA mismatches and the role of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR genes in HSCT. The influence of nongenetic factors on the tolerability of HLA mismatching has recently become evident, demonstrating a need for the integration of both genetic and nongenetic variables in donor selection.

  15. Influence of HLA on human partnership and sexual satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromer, J; Hummel, T; Pietrowski, D; Giani, A S; Sauter, J; Ehninger, G; Schmidt, A H; Croy, I

    2016-08-31

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC, called HLA in humans) is an important genetic component of the immune system. Fish, birds and mammals prefer mates with different genetic MHC code compared to their own, which they determine using olfactory cues. This preference increases the chances of high MHC variety in the offspring, leading to enhanced resilience against a variety of pathogens. Humans are also able to discriminate HLA related olfactory stimuli, however, it is debated whether this mechanism is of behavioural relevance. We show on a large sample (N = 508), with high-resolution typing of HLA class I/II, that HLA dissimilarity correlates with partnership, sexuality and enhances the desire to procreate. We conclude that HLA mediates mate behaviour in humans.

  16. PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE PREDISPOSING GENOTYPES, INCLUDING HLA-DQ2.2 VARIANT, IN BRAZILIAN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleski, Nicole; Almeida, Lucas Malta; Almeida, Fernanda Coutinho de; Pratesi, Claudia Beatriz; Nóbrega, Yanna Karla de Medeiros; Gandolfi, Lenora

    2018-01-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Almost all celiac patients carry immune recognition genes coding for HLA-DQ2.5 and DQ8 heterodimers. Over the last few years, great importance has been given to HLA-DQ2.2 as probable predisposing variant, although controversies still exist regarding its relevance. The aim of our study was to determine the possible existence of an association between HLA-DQ2.2 and celiac disease in Brazilian children by analyzing the prevalence of the predisposing variants for celiac disease in a representative group of children of a population in which this determination is still missing. HLA-DQ typing was performed in samples from a group of celiac (n=100) and non-celiac children (n=110). All samples were tested for the presence of the following variants: DQA1*05-DQB1*02 (DQ2.5), DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 (DQ8) and DQA1*02:01-DQB1*02:02 (DQ2.2). Fisher`s exact test was used for statistical analysis. In the group of 100 celiac children, 78 (78%) were positive for DQ2, 13 (13 %) were DQ2/DQ8 and 6 (6%) were DQ8 positives. The HLA-DQ pattern in the 110 non-celiac children was as follows: positive for DQ2 in 33 (29.9%) samples, in 2 (1.8 %) was positive for DQ2/DQ8 and in 15 (13.6%) was positive for DQ8. We found significant differences between the distribution of some but not all of the analyzed alleles when comparing celiac and non-celiac children. The genotyping of celiac disease HLA-DQ predisposing alleles showed similarities with HLA-DQ patterns found in both European and non-European populations, which may be a reflection of the miscegenation, which gave origin to the current Brazilian population. No significant association was found between DQ2.2 variant and celiac disease in the studied population.

  17. PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE PREDISPOSING GENOTYPES, INCLUDING HLA-DQ2.2 VARIANT, IN BRAZILIAN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole SELLESKI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy triggered by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Almost all celiac patients carry immune recognition genes coding for HLA-DQ2.5 and DQ8 heterodimers. Over the last few years, great importance has been given to HLA-DQ2.2 as probable predisposing variant, although controversies still exist regarding its relevance. OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to determine the possible existence of an association between HLA-DQ2.2 and celiac disease in Brazilian children by analyzing the prevalence of the predisposing variants for celiac disease in a representative group of children of a population in which this determination is still missing. METHODS: HLA-DQ typing was performed in samples from a group of celiac (n=100 and non-celiac children (n=110. All samples were tested for the presence of the following variants: DQA1*05-DQB1*02 (DQ2.5, DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 (DQ8 and DQA1*02:01-DQB1*02:02 (DQ2.2. Fisher`s exact test was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: In the group of 100 celiac children, 78 (78% were positive for DQ2, 13 (13 % were DQ2/DQ8 and 6 (6% were DQ8 positives. The HLA-DQ pattern in the 110 non-celiac children was as follows: positive for DQ2 in 33 (29.9% samples, in 2 (1.8 % was positive for DQ2/DQ8 and in 15 (13.6% was positive for DQ8. We found significant differences between the distribution of some but not all of the analyzed alleles when comparing celiac and non-celiac children. CONCLUSION: The genotyping of celiac disease HLA-DQ predisposing alleles showed similarities with HLA-DQ patterns found in both European and non-European populations, which may be a reflection of the miscegenation, which gave origin to the current Brazilian population. No significant association was found between DQ2.2 variant and celiac disease in the studied population.

  18. A smart upconversion-based light-triggered polymer for synergetic chemo-photodynamic therapy and dual-modal MR/UCL imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bin; Han, Shuping; Zhao, Feifei; Lim, Kok Hwa; Xi, Hongwei; Su, Xiangjie; Yao, Hanchun; Zhou, Jie

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a novel nanocomposite to achieve effective therapy and live surveillance of tumor tissue. In this study, fullerene (C 60 ) with iron oxide (Fe 3 O 4 ) nanoparticles and upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) was loaded into N-succinyl-N'-4-(2-nitrobenzyloxy)-succinyl-chitosan micelles (SNSC) with good biocompatibility. In addition, hydrophobic anticancer drug docetaxel (DTX) was also loaded into the nanocomposites. The experiments conducted in vitro and in vivo demonstrated that C 60 /Fe 3 O 4 -UCNPs@DTX@SNSC can act synergistically to kill tumor cells by releasing chemotherapy drugs at specific target site as well as generating reactive oxygen using 980nm. In addition, it can also be used for non-invasive deep magnetic resonance and upconversion fluorescence dual-mode imaging. The results indicated that this system provided an efficient method to surmount the drawback of UV or visible light-responsive polymeric systems for controlled drug release and generated reactive oxygen in deep tissues and ultimately realized the integration of dual-modal imaging and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. HLA matching in unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, D J

    1996-11-01

    The availability of an HLA-matched sibling donor in only 30% to 35% of patients requiring allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has led to the proposal of unrelated donors as an alternative source of bone marrow. The greater HLA incompatibility, which, although present, was undetected until recently in many unrelated donor BMT cases, has resulted in a higher rate of posttransplant complications and impaired acturial survival when compared with HLA-matched sibling BMT. Molecular HLA typing enables us to evaluate the impact of incompatibility at each locus in the outcome of unrelated donor BMT. The overall retrospective data would recommend that HLA-A, -B and -C allelic molecular matching should be implemented in addition to HLA-DR allelic matching. Further retrospective analysis is needed in order to assess which incompatibility or combinations are better tolerated than others. Only the definitive knowledge at the sequence level of the donor and the recipient HLA allelic diversity involved in controlling the allogeneic immune response will allow us to understand the precise biologic rationale of the graft-versus-host disease. Knowledge and control of the HLA incompatibilities should allow us to offset the detrimental effects of histoincompatibility while developing strategies to take advantage of the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effect. Also the role of minor histocompatibility antigens remains largely unknown and will require careful evaluation before minor antigens can be used as a selection criterion in BMT. Carefully designed prospective studies will enable us to test the impact of each HLA locus. HLA typing and BMT represent a successful example of productive cooperation between basic and clinical sciences that should be pursued for the improvement of the clinical outcome of unrelated donor BMT.

  20. Lessons from (triggered) tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Joan

    2010-01-01

    I test a “clock-advance” model that implies triggered tremor is ambient tremor that occurs at a sped-up rate as a result of loading from passing seismic waves. This proposed model predicts that triggering probability is proportional to the product of the ambient tremor rate and a function describing the efficacy of the triggering wave to initiate a tremor event. Using data mostly from Cascadia, I have compared qualitatively a suite of teleseismic waves that did and did not trigger tremor with ambient tremor rates. Many of the observations are consistent with the model if the efficacy of the triggering wave depends on wave amplitude. One triggered tremor observation clearly violates the clock-advance model. The model prediction that larger triggering waves result in larger triggered tremor signals also appears inconsistent with the measurements. I conclude that the tremor source process is a more complex system than that described by the clock-advance model predictions tested. Results of this and previous studies also demonstrate that (1) conditions suitable for tremor generation exist in many tectonic environments, but, within each, only occur at particular spots whose locations change with time; (2) any fluid flow must be restricted to less than a meter; (3) the degree to which delayed failure and secondary triggering occurs is likely insignificant; and 4) both shear and dilatational deformations may trigger tremor. Triggered and ambient tremor rates correlate more strongly with stress than stressing rate, suggesting tremor sources result from time-dependent weakening processes rather than simple Coulomb failure.

  1. A genomic study on distribution of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A and HLA-B alleles in Lak population of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Shahsavar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological studies based on the highly polymorphic gene, human leukocyte antigen (HLA, provide useful information for bone marrow donor registry, forensic medicine, disease association studies, as well as infertility treatment, designing peptide vaccines against tumors, and infectious or autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to determine HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in 100 unrelated Lak/lᴂk/individuals from Lorestan province of Iran. Finally, we compared the results with that previously described in Iranian population. Commercial HLA-Type kits from BAG (Lich, Germany company were used for determination of the HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies in genomic DNA, based on polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP assay. The differences between the populations in distribution of HLA-A and HLA-B alleles were estimated by chi-squared test with Yate's correction. The most frequent HLA-A alleles were *24 (20%, *02 (18%, *03 (12% and *11 (10%, and the most frequent HLA-B alleles were *35 (24%, *51 (16%, *18 (6% and *38 (6% in Lak population. HLA-A*66 (1%, *74(1% and HLA-B*48 (1%, *55(1% were the least observed frequencies in Lak population. Our results based on HLA-A and HLA-B allele frequencies showed that Lak population possesses the previously reported general features of Iranians but still with unique.

  2. TCR Gene Transfer: MAGE-C2/HLA-A2 and MAGE-A3/HLA-DP4 Epitopes as Melanoma-Specific Immune Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudy Straetemans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with TCR gene-engineered T cells provides an attractive and feasible treatment option for cancer patients. Further development of TCR gene therapy requires the implementation of T-cell target epitopes that prevent “on-target” reactivity towards healthy tissues and at the same time direct a clinically effective response towards tumor tissues. Candidate epitopes that meet these criteria are MAGE-C2336-344/HLA-A2 (MC2/A2 and MAGE-A3243-258/HLA-DP4 (MA3/DP4. We molecularly characterized TCRαβ genes of an MC2/A2-specific CD8 and MA3/DP4-specific CD4 T-cell clone derived from melanoma patients who responded clinically to MAGE vaccination. We identified MC2/A2 and MA3/DP4-specific TCR-Vα3/Vβ28 and TCR-Vα38/Vβ2 chains and validated these TCRs in vitro upon gene transfer into primary human T cells. The MC2 and MA3 TCR were surface-expressed and mediated CD8 T-cell functions towards melanoma cell lines and CD4 T-cell functions towards dendritic cells, respectively. We intend to start testing these MAGE-specific TCRs in phase I clinical trial.

  3. HLA-DRB and HLA-DQ genetic variability in patients with aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeilzadeh, Hossein; Nabavi, Mohammad; Amirzargar, Ali Akbar; Aryan, Zahra; Arshi, Saba; Bemanian, Mohammad Hassan; Fallahpour, Morteza; Mortazavi, Negar; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II is involved in T-cell activation, cytokine secretion, and induction of immune responses. Cytokines, staphylococcus super antigens, and eosinophil activation are proposed to play important roles in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). This study is aimed at investigating the association of HLA-DRB and DQ genetic variabilities in patients with AERD. A genetic association analysis in three different groups, including 33 patients with AERD, 17 patients with aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA), and 100 healthy controls was performed. Oral aspirin challenge (OAC) test was performed to identify aspirin hypersensitivity. Pulmonary function test (PFT) was performed for all patients. Eosinophil percentage in nasal smear and peripheral blood and serum immunoglobin (Ig)E were investigated. HLA-DRB, HLA-DQA1, and HLA-DQB1 were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction. HLA-DQB1*0302 (OR, 5.49, 95% confidence interval [CI],(2.40-12.59)), HLA-DQA1*0301 (OR, 2.90, 95% CI, (1.49-5.67)), HLA-DRB4 (OR, 2.94, 95% CI, (1.61-5.36)), and HLA-DRB1*04 (OR, 3.19, 95% CI, (1.57-6.47)) were higher in patients with AERD compared with controls. In patients with AERD, HLA-DQB1*0301 (OR,0.22, 95% CI, (0.09-0.54)), HLA-DQA1*0501 (OR, 0.42, 95% CI, (0.21-0.81)), HLA-DRB1*11 (OR, 0.30, 95% CI, (0.12-0.73)), and HLA-DRB3 (OR, 0.38, 95% CI, (0.21-0.70)) were significantly lower compared with healthy controls. Patients with AERD had lower frequencies of HLA-DQB1*0301 (OR, 0.27, 95% CI, (0.08-0.86)), and HLA-DRB1*011 (OR, 0.27, 95% CI, (0.08-0.86)) compared with ATA. Haplotypes of HLA-DRB1*04/ DQA1*0301/ DQB1*0302 (OR, 4.25, 95% CI, (1.94-9.29)) and HLA-DRB1*07 /DQA1*0201/ DQB1*0201 (OR, 3.52, 95% CI, (1.54-8.06)) were higher in patients with AERD compared with controls (all p < 0.05). Results of this study suggest that HLA-DQB1*0302 and HLA-DRB1*04 and their related haplotypes are genes involved in predisposing patients to AERD, whereas HLA-DQB1

  4. HLA-DRB1*03:01 and HLA-DRB1*04:01 modify the presentation and outcome in autoimmune hepatitis type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gerven, N M F; de Boer, Y S; Zwiers, A; Verwer, B J; Drenth, J P H; van Hoek, B; van Erpecum, K J; Beuers, U; van Buuren, H R; den Ouden, J W; Verdonk, R C; Koek, G H; Brouwer, J T; Guichelaar, M M J; Vrolijk, J M; Coenraad, M J; Kraal, G; Mulder, C J J; van Nieuwkerk, C M J; Bloemena, E; Verspaget, H W; Kumar, V; Zhernakova, A; Wijmenga, C; Franke, L; Bouma, G

    2015-06-01

    The classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*03:01 and HLA-DRB1*04:01 alleles are established autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) risk alleles. To study the immune-modifying effect of these alleles, we imputed the genotypes from genome-wide association data in 649 Dutch AIH type-1 patients. We therefore compared the international AIH group (IAIHG) diagnostic scores as well as the underlying clinical characteristics between patients positive and negative for these HLA alleles. Seventy-five percent of the AIH patients were HLA-DRB1*03:01/HLA-DRB1*04:01 positive. HLA-DRB1*03:01/HLA-DRB1*04:01-positive patients had a higher median IAIHG score than HLA-DRB1*03:01/HLA-DRB1*04:01-negative patients (P<0.001). We did not observe associations between HLA alleles and alanine transaminase levels (HLA-DRB1*03:01: P=0.2; HLA-DRB1*04:01; P=0.5); however, HLA-DRB1*03:01 was independently associated with higher immunoglobulin G levels (P=0.04). The HLA-DRB1*04:01 allele was independently associated with presentation at older age (P=0.03) and a female predominance (P=0.04). HLA-DRB1*03:01-positive patients received immunosuppressive medication and liver transplantation. In conclusion, the HLA-DRB1*03:01 and HLA-DRB1*04:01 alleles are both independently associated with the aggregate diagnostic IAIHG score in type-1 AIH patients, but are not essential for AIH development. HLA-DRB1*03:01 is the strongest genetic modifier of disease severity in AIH.

  5. Triggering trigeminal neuralgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Stefano, Giulia; Maarbjerg, Stine; Nurmikko, Turo

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Although it is widely accepted that facial pain paroxysms triggered by innocuous stimuli constitute a hallmark sign of trigeminal neuralgia, very few studies to date have systematically investigated the role of the triggers involved. In the recently published diagnostic classification...

  6. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)

  7. Trigger Menu in 2017

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This document summarises the trigger menu deployed by the ATLAS experiment during 2017 data taking at proton-proton collision centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=5$ TeV at the LHC and describes the improvements with respect to the trigger system and menu used in 2016 data taking.

  8. Causality and headache triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  9. The LHCb trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Hernando Morata, Jose Angel

    2006-01-01

    The LHCb experiment relies on an efficient trigger to select a rate up to 2 kHz of events useful for physics analysis from an initial rate of 10 MHz of visible collisions. In this contribution, we describe the different LHCb trigger algorithms and present their expected performance.

  10. The NA27 trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizzarri, R.; Di Capua, E.; Falciano, S.; Iori, M.; Marel, G.; Piredda, G.; Zanello, L.; Haupt, L.; Hellman, S.; Holmgren, S.O.; Johansson, K.E.

    1985-05-01

    We have designed and implemented a minimum bias trigger together with a fiducial volume trigger for the experiment NA27, performed at the CERN SPS. A total of more than 3 million bubble chamber pictures have been taken with a triggered cross section smaller than 75% of the total inelastic cross section. Events containing charm particles were triggered with an efficiency of 98 +2 sub(-3)%. With the fiducial volume trigger, the probability for a picture to contain an interaction in the visible hydrogen increased from 47.3% to 59.5%, reducing film cost and processing effort with about 20%. The improvement in data taking rate is shown to be negligible. (author)

  11. Strain-based HLA association analysis identified HLA-DRB1*09:01 associated with modern strain tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyo-Oka, L; Mahasirimongkol, S; Yanai, H; Mushiroda, T; Wattanapokayakit, S; Wichukchinda, N; Yamada, N; Smittipat, N; Juthayothin, T; Palittapongarnpim, P; Nedsuwan, S; Kantipong, P; Takahashi, A; Kubo, M; Sawanpanyalert, P; Tokunaga, K

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) occurs as a result of complex interactions between the host immune system and pathogen virulence factors. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II molecules play an important role in the host immune system. However, no study has assessed the association between HLA class II genes and susceptibility to TB caused by specific strains. This study investigated the possible association of HLA class II genes with TB caused by modern and ancient Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). The study included 682 patients with TB and 836 control subjects who were typed for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles. MTB strains were classified using a large sequence polymorphism typing method. Association analysis was performed using common HLA alleles and haplotypes in different MTB strains. HLA association analysis of patients infected with modern MTB strains showed significant association for HLA-DRB1*09:01 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.82; P-value = 9.88 × 10 -4 ) and HLA-DQB1*03:03 alleles (OR = 1.76; P-value = 1.31 × 10 -3 ) with susceptibility to TB. Haplotype analysis confirmed that these alleles were in strong linkage disequilibrium and did not exert an interactive effect. Thus, the results of this study showed an association between HLA class II genes and susceptibility to TB caused by modern MTB strains, suggesting the importance of strain-specific analysis to determine susceptibility genes associated with TB. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. HLA-DP related suppression of mixed lymphocyte reaction with alloactivated lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hofmann, B; Jakobsen, B K

    1986-01-01

    We studied the influence of HLA class I and class II antigens on the suppression of the MLR induced by primed lymphocytes (PLs) alloactivated in vitro. The suppression of 14 different PLs of 83 MLRs was analyzed. The PLs were primed against (i) HLA-DP (SB) (ii) HLA-DR/DQ or (iii) both HLA-DP and ...

  13. HLA-DP related suppression of mixed lymphocyte reaction with alloactivated lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hofmann, B; Jakobsen, B K

    1986-01-01

    We studied the influence of HLA class I and class II antigens on the suppression of the MLR induced by primed lymphocytes (PLs) alloactivated in vitro. The suppression of 14 different PLs of 83 MLRs was analyzed. The PLs were primed against (i) HLA-DP (SB) (ii) HLA-DR/DQ or (iii) both HLA-DP and DR...

  14. HLA-A2 reactive antibodies in a patient who types as HLA-A2: The importance of high resolution typing and epitope-based antibody analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, A B; Bravo-Egana, V; Jackstadt, J L; Conti, D J; Duquesnoy, R J

    2015-06-01

    This report describes a case of a highly sensitized patient who had serum antibodies reacting with HLA-A2 but whose phenotype included HLA-A2. The determination of HLA mismatch acceptability at the antigen level was problematic, but high-resolution HLA typing information and epitope-based antibody specificity analysis based on the nonself-self paradigm of HLA epitope immunogenicity have provided a solution. This case supports the concept that HLA typing at the allele level offers a better approach to identifying suitable donors for sensitized patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikura, Takahito; Yamamoto, Izumi; Nakada, Yasuyuki; Kamejima, Sahoko; Katsumata, Haruki; Yamakawa, Takafumi; Furuya, Maiko; Mafune, Aki; Kobayashi, Akimitsu; Tanno, Yudo; Miki, Jun; Yamada, Hiroki; Ohkido, Ichiro; Tsuboi, Nobuo; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    We report a case of probable C4d-negative accelerated acute antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA antibodies. A 44 year-old male was admitted to our hospital for a kidney transplant. The donor, his wife, was an ABO minor mismatch (blood type O to A) and had Gitelman syndrome. Graft function was delayed; his serum creatinine level was 10.1 mg/dL at 3 days after transplantation. Open biopsy was performed immediately; no venous thrombosis was observed during surgery. Histology revealed moderate peritubular capillaritis and mild glomerulitis without C4d immunoreactivity. Flow cytometric crossmatching was positive, but no panel-reactive antibodies against HLA or donor-specific antibodies (DSAbs) to major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) were detected. Taken together, we diagnosed him with probable C4d-negative accelerated antibody-mediated rejection due to non-HLA, non-MICA antibodies, the patient was treated with steroid pulse therapy (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day for 3 days), plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin (40 g/body), and rituximab (200 mg/body) were performed. Biopsy at 58 days after transplantation, at which time S-Cr levels were 1.56 mg/dL, found no evidence of rejection. This case, presented with a review of relevant literature, demonstrates that probable C4d-negative accelerated acute AMR can result from non-HLA antibodies. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  16. De nonklassiske humant leukocyt-antigen (HLA)-vaevstyper--fra implantation til transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2006-01-01

    ), other functional HLA genes have been detected, the so-called non-classical HLA class Ib genes: HLA-E, -G and -F. They resemble the HLA class Ia antigens in many ways, but several major differences have been described. They are almost monomorphic and generally have a restricted pattern of expression. One...... has a role in implantation. A very strong expression of HLA-G is observed in the invasive trophoblast cells in the placenta. HLA-G may be involved in certain complications of pregnancy and the genetic predisposition to these. Finally, HLA-G expression has been associated with a reduced risk...

  17. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G during pregnancy part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Mette; Klitkou, Louise; Christiansen, Ole B

    2015-01-01

    plasma samples from gestational week 20 and at term, as well as in fetal umbilical cord blood samples. This is the first large study simultaneously performing HLA-G genotyping of mother and offspring and measuring sHLA-G in both maternal and umbilical cord blood. The results showed that increasing...... miscarriage. Levels of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in blood plasma from non-pregnant donors seem to be associated with these polymorphisms. In the current study, we have genotyped 246 mothers and their offspring for HLA-G polymorphisms in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) and measured sHLA-G in maternal blood...... numbers of 14bp ins (rs66554220) alleles in the mother-child genotype combinations were associated with higher maternal sHLA-G levels at term when restricting the analysis to 14bp ins/del heterozygous mothers (p=0.015). Furthermore, increasing numbers of 14InsG haplotypes (14bp ins/del and +3142C/G (rs...

  18. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  19. Distribution of HLA-A, -B, and -C Alleles and HLA/KIR Combinations in Han Population in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsong Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated polymorphisms of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (A, B, and C loci of a Han population (n, 239 from the Yunnan province, Southwest China, using high-resolution polymerase chain reaction-Luminex (PCR-Luminex typing. We combined the HLA data from this study with the KIR genotypes from a previous study of this Han population to analyze the combination of KIR/HLA ligands. A total of 27 HLA-A, 54 HLA-B, and 31 HLA-C alleles were found in this population. The frequencies of A*11:01, A*24:02, B*40:01, B*46:01, C*01:02, C*03:04, and C*07:02 were all > 10%. The following haplotypes were common, with frequencies > 5%: 1 A-B (A*02:07-B*46:01, 2 A-C (A*02:07-C*01:02, and A*11:01-C*07:02, 4 C-B (B*13:01-C*03:04, B*40:01-C*07:02, B*46:01-C*01:02 and B*58:01-C*03:02, and 1 A-C-B (A*02:07-C*01:02-B*46:01. Analysis of KIR3D and their ligands HLA-A3/A11 and HLA-Bw4 showed that the frequencies of 3DL2+-A3/A11+ and 3DL2+-A3/A11− were 0.527 and 0.473, and the frequencies of 3DL1+-Bw4+, 3DL1+-Bw4−, 3DL1−-Bw4+, and 3DL1−-Bw4− were 0.552, 0.397, 0.038, and 0.013, respectively. The results of KIR/HLA-C combination analysis showed that all individuals had at least one inhibitory or activating KIR/HLA-C pair, and one KIR/HLA-C pair was the most frequent (157/239, followed by two pairs (46/239, three pairs (33/239, and no pairs (3/239. Comparison of KIR gene and HLA gene and their pair frequency between Yunnan Han and the isolated Han (FYDH who also lived in Yunnan province showed no significant difference (P>0.05 in KIR frequencies, but significant differences (P0.05 between the two populations for KIR/HLA pairs.

  20. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Ilten, Philip; Williams, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays. (paper)

  1. NOMAD Trigger Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varvell, K.

    1995-01-01

    The author reports on the status of an offline study of the NOMAD triggers, which has several motivations. Of primary importance is to demonstrate, using offline information recorded by the individual subdetectors comprising NOMAD, that the online trigger system is functioning as expected. Such an investigation serves to complement the extensive monitoring which is already carried out online. More specific to the needs of the offline software and analysis, the reconstruction of tracks and vertices in the detector requires some knowledge of the time at which the trigger has occurred, in order to locate relevant hits in the drift chambers and muon chambers in particular. The fact that the different triggers allowed by the MIOTRINO board take varying times to form complicates this task. An offline trigger algorithm may serve as a tool to shed light on situations where the online trigger status bits have not been recorded correctly, as happens in a small number of cases, or as an aid to studies with the aim of further refinement of the online triggers themselves

  2. Infection and HLA-G Molecules in Nasal Polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Rizzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sinonasal polyposis (SNP is a chronic inflammatory pathology with an unclear aetiopathogenesis. Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is one candidate for the development of SNP for its epithelial cell trophism, hyperproliferative effect, and the induction of immune-modulatory molecules as HLA-G. We enrolled 10 patients with SNP without concomitant allergic diseases (SNP-WoAD, 10 patients with SNP and suffering from allergic diseases (SNP-WAD, and 10 control subjects who underwent rhinoplasty. We analyzed the presence of high- and low-risk HPV DNA and the expression of membrane HLA-G (mHLA-G and IL-10 receptor (IL-10R and of soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G and IL-10 by polyp epithelial cells. The results showed the presence of HPV-11 in 50% of SNP-WoAD patients (OR:5.5, all characterized by a relapsing disease. HPV-11 infection was absent in nonrelapsing SNP-WoAD patients, in SNP-WAD patients and in controls, supporting the hypothesis that HPV-11 increases risk of relapsing disease. HPV-11 positive SNP-WoAD patients presented with mHLA-G and IL-10R on epithelial cells from nasal polyps and showed secretion of sHLA-G and IL-10 in culture supernatants. No HLA-G expression was observed in HPV negative polyps. These data highlight new aspects of polyposis aetiopathogenesis and suggest HPV-11 and HLA-G/IL-10 presence as prognostic markers in the follow-up of SNP-WoAD.

  3. Successful renal transplantation across HLA barrier: Report from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Aggarwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ donors are sometimes found “unsuitable” due to the presence of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies in the recipient. In recent years, improved desensitization protocols have successfully helped to overcome HLA incompatibility hurdle. We present three cases where optimum desensitization was achieved in patients with the donor-specific anti-HLA antibody (DSA leading to successful renal transplantation. All patient–donor pair underwent HLA typing, complement dependent cytotoxicity crossmatch (CDC-XM, flow cytometry XM (FC-XM, and panel reactive antibody. If any of the three tests was positive, single antigen bead assay was performed to determine the specificity of the anti-HLA antibody (s. Patients with DSA were offered organ-swap or anti-HLA antibody desensitization followed by transplantation. Desensitization protocol consisted of single dose rituximab and cascade plasmapheresis (CP along with standard triple immunosuppression. The target DSA mean fluorescence index (MFI was <500, along with negative CDC-XM and FC-XM for both T- and B-cells. Three patients with anti-HLA DSA, who did not find a suitable match in organ swap program, consented to anti-HLA antibody desensitization, followed by transplantation. Mean pre-desensitization antibody MFI was 1740 (1422–2280. Mean number of CP required to achieve the target MFI was 2.3 (2–3. All the three patients are on regular follow-up and have normal renal function test at a mean follow-up of 8 months. This report underlines successful application of desensitization protocol leading to successful HLA-antibody incompatible renal transplants and their continued normal renal functions.

  4. Evolving paradigms for desensitization in managing broadly HLA sensitized transplant candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinsmoen, Nancy L; Lai, Chi-Hung; Vo, Ashley; Jordan, Stanley C

    2012-04-01

    The broadly human leukocyte antigen (HLA) sensitized patient awaiting organ transplantation remains a persistent and significant problem for transplant medicine. Sensitization occurs as a consequence of exposure to HLA antigens through pregnancy, blood and platelet transfusions, and previous transplants. Early experience with desensitization protocols coupled with improved diagnostics for donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) and renal pathology have greatly improved transplant rates and outcomes for patients once considered un-transplantable or at high risk for poor outcomes. More recent advances have occurred through implementation of a national allocation system requiring the entering of unacceptable antigens that reduces the rate of crossmatch positivity. Current desensitization therapies include high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasma exchange (PLEX) with low-dose IVIG, and IVIG combined with rituximab. Developing therapies include proteasome inhibitors aimed at plasma cells and modifiers of complement-mediated injury. Here we discuss the important advancements in desensitization including defining the risk for antibody-mediated rejection prior to transplantation and the evolution of therapies aimed at reducing the impact of antibody injury on allografts.

  5. HLA-DQ Mismatching and Kidney Transplant Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeaphorn, Napat; Pena, Jeremy Ryan A; Thamcharoen, Natanong; Khankin, Eliyahu V; Pavlakis, Martha; Cardarelli, Francesca

    2018-05-07

    Recent evidence suggests that HLA epitope-mismatching at HLA-DQ loci is associated with the development of anti-DQ donor-specific antibodies and adverse graft outcomes. However, the clinical significance of broad antigen HLA-DQ mismatching for graft outcomes is not well examined. Using the United Network Organ Sharing/the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (UNOS/OPTN) data, patients with primary kidney transplants performed between 2005 and 2014 were included. Patients were classified as having either zero HLA-DQ mismatches, or one or two HLA-DQ mismatches. Primary outcomes were death-censored graft survival and incidence of acute rejection. A total of 93,782 patients were included. Of these, 22,730 (24%) and 71,052 (76%) received zero and one or two HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys, respectively. After adjusting for variables including HLA-ABDR, HLA-DQ mismatching was associated with a higher risk of graft loss in living kidney donor recipients with an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of 1.18 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.07 to 1.30; P HLA-DQ mismatching was associated with a higher risk of graft loss in deceased kidney donor recipients with cold ischemic time ≤17 hours (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.27; P =0.002), but not in deceased kidney donor recipients with cold ischemic time >17 hours (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.06; P =0.49) ( P value for interaction HLA-DQ mismatched kidneys had a higher incidence of acute rejection at 1 year, with adjusted odds ratios of 1.13 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.23; P transplant recipients. Specific donor-DQ mismatches seemed to be associated with the risk of acute rejection and graft failure, whereas others did not. HLA-DQ mismatching is associated with lower graft survival independent of HLA-ABDR in living donor kidney transplants and deceased donor kidney transplants with cold ischemia time ≤17 hours, and a higher 1-year risk of acute rejection in living and deceased donor kidney transplants. Copyright © 2018 by the American

  6. HLA-G polymorphisms in couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Hylenius, S; Hoegh, A M

    2002-01-01

    % of the RSA women carried the HLA-G*0106 allele compared to 2% of the control women. The 14 bp deletion polymorphism in exon 8 was investigated separately. There were a greater number of heterozygotes for the 14 bp polymorphism in the group of fertile control women than expected, according to Hardy-Weinberg...... equilibrium. Furthermore, the HLA-G alleles without the 14 bp sequence were prominent in the RSA males in contrast to the RSA women in whom alleles including the 14 bp sequence were frequently observed, especially as homozygotes. These results are discussed in relation to two hypotheses concerning HLA...

  7. Interplay between immune responses to HLA and non-HLA self-antigens in allograft rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angaswamy, Nataraju; Tiriveedhi, Venkataswarup; Sarma, Nayan J; Subramanian, Vijay; Klein, Christina; Wellen, Jason; Shenoy, Surendra; Chapman, William C; Mohanakumar, T

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies strongly suggest an increasing role for immune responses against self-antigens (Ags) which are not encoded by the major histocompatibility complex in the immunopathogenesis of allograft rejection. Although, improved surgical techniques coupled with improved methods to detect and avoid sensitization against donor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have improved the immediate and short term function of transplanted organs. However, acute and chronic rejection still remains a vexing problem for the long term function of the transplanted organ. Immediately following organ transplantation, several factors both immune and non immune mechanisms lead to the development of local inflammatory milieu which sets the stage for allograft rejection. Traditionally, development of antibodies (Abs) against mismatched donor HLA have been implicated in the development of Ab mediated rejection. However, recent studies from our laboratory and others have demonstrated that development of humoral and cellular immune responses against non-HLA self-Ags may contribute in the pathogenesis of allograft rejection. There are reports demonstrating that immune responses to self-Ags especially Abs to the self-Ags as well as cellular immune responses especially through IL17 has significant pro-fibrotic properties leading to chronic allograft failure. This review summarizes recent studies demonstrating the role for immune responses to self-Ags in allograft immunity leading to rejection as well as present recent evidence suggesting there is interplay between allo- and autoimmunity leading to allograft dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma Levels of Soluble HLA-E and HLA-F at Diagnosis May Predict Overall Survival of Neuroblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morandi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify the plasma/serum biomarkers that are able to predict overall survival (OS of neuroblastoma (NB patients. Concentration of soluble (s biomarkers was evaluated in plasma (sHLA-E, sHLA-F, chromogranin, and B7H3 or serum (calprotectin samples from NB patients or healthy children. The levels of biomarkers that were significantly higher in NB patients were then analyzed considering localized or metastatic subsets. Finally, biomarkers that were significantly different in these two subsets were correlated with patient’s outcome. With the exception of B7H3, levels of all molecules were significantly higher in NB patients than those in controls. However, only chromogranin, sHLA-E, and sHLA-F levels were different between patients with metastatic and localized tumors. sHLA-E and -F levels correlated with each other but not chromogranin. Chromogranin levels correlated with different event-free survival (EFS, whereas sHLA-E and -F levels also correlated with different OS. Association with OS was also detected considering only patients with metastatic disease. In conclusion, low levels of sHLA-E and -F significantly associated with worse EFS/OS in the whole cohort of NB patients and in patients with metastatic NB. Thus, these molecules deserve to be tested in prospective studies to evaluate their predictive power for high-risk NB patients.

  9. Acute exacerbation of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis triggered by Aspergillus empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Suzuki

    Full Text Available Acute exacerbation (AE is a severe and life-threatening complication of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. In 2016, the definition and diagnostic criteria for AE-IPF were updated by an international working group. The new definition includes any acute, clinically significant respiratory deterioration (both idiopathic and triggered events characterized by evidence of new widespread alveolar abnormality in patients with IPF. There are no currently proven beneficial management strategies for idiopathic and triggered AE-IPF. This is the first report describing AE-IPF triggered by Aspergillus empyema, which was improved by a combination of corticosteroid, systemic antifungal therapy, local antifungal therapy, and additional pharmacological therapies. Future research may reveal optimal strategies for both idiopathic and triggered AE-IPF. Keywords: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, Acute exacerbation, AE-IPF, Triggered AE, Aspergillus infection

  10. Xenobiotics-induced hepatotoxicity and an influence of HLA typisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žunić Miodrag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The increased reporting of cases of drug-induced liver injuries, reflects the growing number of new agents introduced into clinical practice in the last decades. It should be added to the modernization of industries, and new chemicals which it applied. Drug-induced liver injuries make up a persisting and challenging problem for physicians, health agencies and pharmaceutical firms. Research objectives: The aim of the study is the determination of the most common causes of drug-induced liver injury in our surroundings. We compared the importance of hepatotoxic action of drugs in relation to other noxa in human environment. We determinated the importance of the body sensitivity on the acting agents. We also examined the importance of different drugs in the development of hepatotoxicity, regardless the dose. Materials and methods: We analyzed 52 patients with a diagnosis of hepa-totoxic liver injury (medical history, detailed clinical evaluation of patients, histopathological analysis of the liver, abdominal ultra sound, laboratory determination of standard liver function tests and followed up for 12 months. In the period from 01.04. 2005 to 01.04.2009, in these patients of the Institute of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Clinical Center of Serbia in Belgrade, we monitored liver functional tests and morphological findings. We used biological markers relevant for the differential diagnosis, monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy. The results of the patients with hepatotoxic liver injury were compared with the values of the findings of the 52 patients in the control group, with the diagnosis of chronic viral hepatitis, hospitalized in the same institution during the same time. Results: The causes of toxic liver damage in our study were following agents, classified into groups: Industrial toxins (8 patients, Food and beverages (9 pts, Antirheumatics and analgesics (6 pts, Antiarrhythmic drugs (4 pts Antilipemic (4 pts

  11. Calo trigger acquisition system

    CERN Multimedia

    Franchini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Calo trigger acquisition system - Evolution of the acquisition system from a multiple boards system (upper, orange cables) to a single board one (below, light blue cables) where all the channels are collected in a single board.

  12. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Igonkina, O; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Alexandre, G; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Backlund, S; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Bauss, B; Bee, C; Behera, P; Bell, P; Bendel, M; Benslama, K; Berry, T; Bogaerts, A; Bohm, C; Bold, T; Booth, J R A; Bosman, M; Boyd, J; Bracinik, J; Brawn, I, P; Brelier, B; Brooks, W; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Casadei, D; Casado, P; Cerri, A; Charlton, D G; Childers, J T; Collins, N J; Conde Muino, P; Coura Torres, R; Cranmer, K; Curtis, C J; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Damazio, D; Davis, A O; De Santo, A; Degenhardt, J; Delsart, P A; Demers, S; Demirkoz, B; Di Mattia, A; Diaz, M; Djilkibaev, R; Dobson, E; Dova, M, T; Dufour, M A; Eckweiler, S; Ehrenfeld, W; Eifert, T; Eisenhandler, E; Ellis, N; Emeliyanov, D; Enoque Ferreira de Lima, D; Faulkner, P J W; Ferland, J; Flacher, H; Fleckner, J E; Flowerdew, M; Fonseca-Martin, T; Fratina, S; Fhlisch, F; Gadomski, S; Gallacher, M P; Garitaonandia Elejabarrieta, H; Gee, C N P; George, S; Gillman, A R; Goncalo, R; Grabowska-Bold, I; Groll, M; Gringer, C; Hadley, D R; Haller, J; Hamilton, A; Hanke, P; Hauser, R; Hellman, S; Hidvgi, A; Hillier, S J; Hryn'ova, T; Idarraga, J; Johansen, M; Johns, K; Kalinowski, A; Khoriauli, G; Kirk, J; Klous, S; Kluge, E-E; Koeneke, K; Konoplich, R; Konstantinidis, N; Kwee, R; Landon, M; LeCompte, T; Ledroit, F; Lei, X; Lendermann, V; Lilley, J N; Losada, M; Maettig, S; Mahboubi, K; Mahout, G; Maltrana, D; Marino, C; Masik, J; Meier, K; Middleton, R P; Mincer, A; Moa, T; Monticelli, F; Moreno, D; Morris, J D; Mller, F; Navarro, G A; Negri, A; Nemethy, P; Neusiedl, A; Oltmann, B; Olvito, D; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panes, B; Parodi, F; Perera, V J O; Perez, E; Perez Reale, V; Petersen, B; Pinzon, G; Potter, C; Prieur, D P F; Prokishin, F; Qian, W; Quinonez, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reinsch, A; Rieke, S; Riu, I; Robertson, S; Rodriguez, D; Rogriquez, Y; Rhr, F; Saavedra, A; Sankey, D P C; Santamarina, C; Santamarina Rios, C; Scannicchio, D; Schiavi, C; Schmitt, K; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schfer, U; Segura, E; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S; Sivoklokov, S; Sjlin, J; Staley, R J; Stamen, R; Stelzer, J; Stockton, M C; Straessner, A; Strom, D; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tamsett, M; Tan, C L A; Tapprogge, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, P D; Torrence, E; Tripiana, M; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Vachon, B; Vercesi, V; Vorwerk, V; Wang, M; Watkins, P M; Watson, A; Weber, P; Weidberg, T; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wheeler-Ellis, S; Whiteson, D; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wildt, M; Winklmeier, F; Wu, X; Xella, S; Zhao, L; Zobernig, H; de Seixas, J M; dos Anjos, A; Asman, B; Özcan, E

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 105 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  13. BTeV Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, Erik E.

    2006-01-01

    BTeV was designed to conduct precision studies of CP violation in BB-bar events using a forward-geometry detector in a hadron collider. The detector was optimized for high-rate detection of beauty and charm particles produced in collisions between protons and antiprotons. The trigger was designed to take advantage of the main difference between events with beauty and charm particles and more typical hadronic events-the presence of detached beauty and charm decay vertices. The first stage of the BTeV trigger was to receive data from a pixel vertex detector, reconstruct tracks and vertices for every beam crossing, reject at least 98% of beam crossings in which neither beauty nor charm particles were produced, and trigger on beauty events with high efficiency. An overview of the trigger design and its evolution to include commodity networking and computing components is presented

  14. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igonkina, O; Achenbach, R; Andrei, V; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Bauss, B; Bendel, M; Alexandre, G; Anduaga, X; Aracena, I; Backlund, S; Bogaerts, A; Baines, J; Barnett, B M; Bee, C; P, Behera; Bell, P; Benslama, K; Berry, T; Bohm, C

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 | 10 5 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  15. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igonkina, O.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Alexandre, G.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Backlund, S.; Baines, J.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bee, C.; Behera, P.; Bell, P.; Bendel, M.; Benslama, K.; Berry, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Bohm, C.; Bold, T.; Booth, J.R.A.; Bosman, M.; Boyd, J.; Bracinik, J.; Brawn, I.P.; Brelier, B.; Brooks, W.; Brunet, S.; Bucci, F.; Casadei, D.; Casado, P.; Cerri, A.; Charlton, D.G.; Childers, J.T.; Collins, N.J.; Conde Muino, P.; Coura Torres, R.; Cranmer, K.; Curtis, C.J.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Damazio, D.; Davis, A.O.; De Santo, A.; Degenhardt, J.

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10 5 to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  16. Calorimetry triggering in ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igonkina, O [Nikhef National Institute for Subatomic Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Achenbach, R; Andrei, V [Kirchhoff Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Adragna, P [Physics Department, Queen Mary, University of London, London (United Kingdom); Aharrouche, M; Bauss, B; Bendel, M [Institut fr Physik, Universitt Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Alexandre, G [Section de Physique, Universite de Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Anduaga, X [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina); Aracena, I [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Stanford (United States); Backlund, S; Bogaerts, A [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Baines, J; Barnett, B M [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom); Bee, C [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, IN2P3-CNRS, Marseille (France); P, Behera [Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa (United States); Bell, P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Benslama, K [University of Regina, Regina (Canada); Berry, T [Department of Physics, Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, Egham (United Kingdom); Bohm, C [Fysikum, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-04-01

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2 | 10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  17. HLA antigens in juvenile onset diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, T; Toyota, T; Ouchi, E

    1980-11-01

    To study association between juvenile onset diabetes (JOD) and major histocompatibility gene complex, 40 patients with childhood onset diabetes and 120 healthy subjects were typed for HLA. Bw54 was present in 33 percent of the patients with JOD, while it appeared in 8 percent of the controls. Expressed as a relative risk, the antigen Bw54 confers a susceptibility to the development of JOD which is 5.3 times that in the controls. JOD shows a little high degree of association with A9 (78%). However, the A9-antigen is common in the Japanese and appears in 58 percent. Though less striking, the decreased frequency of B12 was 3 percent of JOD, less than 15 percent of the controls (p less than 0.05). There was no association between Bw54 and JOD with family history of diabetes.

  18. HLA-A*01:03, HLA-A*24:02, HLA-B*08:01, HLA-B*27:05, HLA-B*35:01, HLA-B*44:02, and HLA-C*07:01 Monochain Transgenic/H-2 Class I Null Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boucherma, Rachid; Kridane-Miledi, Hédia; Bouziat, Romain

    2013-01-01

    We have generated a panel of transgenic mice expressing HLA-A*01:03, -A*24:02, -B*08:01, -B*27:05, -B*35:01, -B*44:02, or -C*07:01 as chimeric monochain molecules (i.e., appropriate HLA α1α2 H chain domains fused with a mouse α3 domain and covalently linked to human β2-microglobulin). Whereas...... a quantitative and qualitative restoration of the peripheral CD8(+) T cell repertoire, which exhibited a TCR diversity comparable with C57BL/6 WT mice. Potent epitope-specific, HLA-restricted, IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) T cell responses were generated against known reference T cell epitopes after either peptide...

  19. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00400931; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-23

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. ...

  20. Topological Trigger Developments

    CERN Multimedia

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so-called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected an almost 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%, and its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and uBoost. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all "interesting" decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. These inclu...

  1. PD1/PD1L pathway, HLA-G and T regulatory cells as new markers of immunosuppression in cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Własiuk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate function of the immune system depends on the effective regulation of the immune response on multiple levels. The key element of an effective immune response to antigenic stimulation is maintaining a homeostasis between activation and inhibitory function of immunocompetent cells and molecules. In pathological conditions such as chronic infections, autoimmune diseases or cancer there are significant alterations, and prevalence of signals of one type over another. Main markers of these dysfunctions are altered expressions of molecules, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1, Human Leukocyte Antigen G (HLA-G, or changed percentages of T regulatory cells (Treg. These indicators of immune system dysfunction may contribute to disease progression, but also could represent good targets for treatment. Interestingly, in recent years there are many new, interesting reports which showed that the role of PD-1, HLA-G or Treg is ambiguous and not always their higher expression or frequency lead to the progression of disease. Recent studies have shown that Treg can suppress bacteria-driven inflammation which promotes carcinogenesis and thus protect the host from cancer development. Moreover, proliferation of hematological tumor cells expressing ILT-2 receptor can be inhibited by HLA-G, in contrast to solid tumors where HLA-G favors tumor escape. In this paper we present characteristics of expressions of PD-1 and its ligands, HLA-G, and frequency of Treg cells in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with chronic infections, autoimmune diseases and cancer. The understanding of the complex interactions between the functional elements of immune system is essential for a detailed characteristics of the mechanisms leading to the development of diseases and identification of more effective targeted therapies.

  2. Genetic modelling in schizophrenia according to HLA typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeraldi, E; Macciardi, F; Gasperini, M; Orsini, A; Bellodi, L; Fabio, G; Morabito, A

    1986-09-01

    Studying families of schizophrenic patients, we observed that the risk of developing the overt form of the illness could be enhanced by some factors. Among these various factors we focused our attention on a biological variable, namely the presence or the absence of particular HLA antigens: partitioning our schizophrenic patients according to their HLA structure (i.e. those with HLA-A1 or CRAG-A1 antigens and those with HLA-non-CRAG-A1 antigens, respectively), revealed different illness distribution in the two groups. From a genetic point of view, this finding suggests the presence of heterogeneity in the hypothetical liability system related to schizophrenia and we evaluated the heterogeneity hypothesis by applying alternative genetic models to our data, trying to detect more biologically homogeneous subgroups of the disease.

  3. The interaction between smoking and HLA genes in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedström, Anna Karin; Katsoulis, Michail; Hössjer, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between environment and genetics may contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) development. We investigated whether the previously observed interaction between smoking and HLA genotype in the Swedish population could be replicated, refined and extended to include other populations. We us...

  4. Origin of Azeris (Iran) according to HLA genes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    toshiba

    2017-10-17

    Oct 17, 2017 ... ... Complutense, School of Medicine, Madrid Regional Blood Center, Madrid, ... between donor and receptor in organ transplantation and several HLA alleles ..... adverse reactions, according to the presence of frequent HLA ...

  5. Pacific Islanders and Amerindian relatedness according to HLA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    groups of populations, like the presence of South American sweet potato in earlier .... Aymara (Bolivia), Uros (Peru) and Lamas (Peru) populations were .... Redish to yellow colours mean a gradient of HLA relatedness according to geography.

  6. Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, P.; Sidney, J.; Kim, Y.

    2010-01-01

    a significant gap in knowledge as HLA DP and DQ molecules are presumably equally important, and have only been studied less because they are more difficult to handle experimentally. RESULTS: In this study, we aimed to narrow this gap by providing a large scale dataset of over 17,000 HLA-peptide binding...... affinities for a set of 11 HLA DP and DQ alleles. We also expanded our dataset for HLA DR alleles resulting in a total of 40,000 MHC class II binding affinities covering 26 allelic variants. Utilizing this dataset, we generated prediction tools utilizing several machine learning algorithms and evaluated...... include all training data for maximum performance. 4) The recently developed NN-align prediction method significantly outperformed all other algorithms, including a naïve consensus based on all prediction methods. A new consensus method dropping the comparably weak ARB prediction method could outperform...

  7. Transcervical Inoculation with Chlamydia trachomatis Induces Infertility in HLA-DR4 Transgenic and Wild-Type Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sukumar; Tifrea, Delia F; Zhong, Guangming; de la Maza, Luis M

    2018-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of infection-induced infertility in women. Attempts to control this epidemic with screening programs and antibiotic therapy have failed. Currently, a vaccine to prevent C. trachomatis infections is not available. In order to develop an animal model for evaluating vaccine antigens that can be applied to humans, we used C. trachomatis serovar D (strain UW-3/Cx) to induce infertility in mice whose major histocompatibility complex class II antigen was replaced with the human leukocyte antigen DR4 (HLA-DR4). Transcervical inoculation of medroxyprogesterone-treated HLA-DR4 transgenic mice with 5 × 10 5 C. trachomatis D inclusion forming units (IFU) induced a significant reduction in fertility, with a mean number of embryos/mouse of 4.4 ± 1.3 compared to 7.8 ± 0.5 for the uninfected control mice ( P < 0.05). A similar fertility reduction was elicited in the wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice (4.3 ± 1.4 embryos/mouse) compared to the levels of the WT controls (9.1 ± 0.4 embryos/mouse) ( P < 0.05). Following infection, WT mice mounted more robust humoral and cellular immune responses than HLA-DR4 mice. As determined by vaginal shedding, HLA-DR4 mice were more susceptible to a transcervical C. trachomatis D infection than WT mice. To assess if HLA-DR4 transgenic and WT mice could be protected by vaccination, 10 4 IFU of C. trachomatis D was delivered intranasally, and mice were challenged transcervically 6 weeks later with 5 × 10 5 IFU of C. trachomatis D. As determined by severity and length of vaginal shedding, WT C57BL/6 and HLA-DR4 mice were significantly protected by vaccination. The advantages and limitations of the HLA-DR4 transgenic mouse model for evaluating human C. trachomatis vaccine antigens are discussed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Enhanced Contribution of HLA in Pediatric Onset Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Suresh; Prince, Jarod; Cutler, David J; Marigorta, Urko M; Okou, David T; Prahalad, Sampath; Mack, David; Boyle, Brendan; Walters, Thomas; Griffiths, Anne; Sauer, Cary G; LeLeiko, Neal; Keljo, David; Markowitz, James; Baker, Susan S; Rosh, Joel; Pfefferkorn, Marian; Heyman, Melvin B; Patel, Ashish; Otley, Anthony; Baldassano, Robert; Noe, Joshua; Rufo, Paul; Oliva-Hemker, Maria; Davis, Sonia; Zwick, Michael E; Gibson, Greg; Denson, Lee A; Hyams, Jeffrey; Kugathasan, Subra

    2018-03-19

    The genetic contributions to pediatric onset ulcerative colitis (UC), characterized by severe disease and extensive colonic involvement, are largely unknown. In adult onset UC, Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) has identified numerous loci, most of which have a modest susceptibility risk (OR 0.84-1.14), with the exception of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region on Chromosome 6 (OR 3.59). To study the genetic contribution to exclusive pediatric onset UC, a GWAS was performed on 466 cases with 2099 healthy controls using UK Biobank array. SNP2HLA was used to impute classical HLA alleles and their corresponding amino acids, and the results are compared with adult onset UC. HLA explained the almost entire association signal, dominated with 191 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (p = 5 x 10-8 to 5 x 10-10). Although very small effects, established SNPs in adult onset UC loci had similar direction and magnitude in pediatric onset UC. SNP2HLA imputation identified HLA-DRB1*0103 (odds ratio [OR] = 6.941, p = 1.92*10-13) as the most significant association for pediatric UC compared with adult onset UC (OR = 3.59). Further conditioning showed independent effects for HLA-DRB1*1301 (OR = 2.25, p = 7.92*10-9) and another SNP rs17188113 (OR = 0.48, p = 7.56*10-9). Two HLA-DRB1 causal alleles are shared with adult onset UC, while at least 2 signals are unique to pediatric UC. Subsequent stratified analyses indicated that HLA-DRB1*0103 has stronger association for extensive disease (E4: OR = 8.28, p = 4.66x10-10) and female gender (OR = 8.85, p = 4.82x10-13). In pediatric onset UC, the HLA explains almost the entire genetic associations. In addition, the HLA association is approximately twice as strong in pediatric UC compared with adults, due to a combination of novel and shared effects. We speculate the paramount importance of antigenic stimulation either by infectious or noninfectious stimuli as a causal event in pediatric UC onset.

  9. Allorecognition of HLA-C mismatches by CD8+ T cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a complex interplay between mismatched peptide binding region residues, HLA-C expression and HLA-DPB1 disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Bettens

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available HLA-C locus mismatches are the most frequent class I disparities in unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and have a detrimental impact on clinical outcome. Recently, a few retrospective clinical studies have reported some variability in the immunogenicity of HLA-C incompatibilities. To get better insight into presumably permissive HLA-C mismatches we have developed a one-way in vitro mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR assay allowing to quantify activated CD56-CD137+CD8+ lymphocytes in HLA-C incompatible combinations. T cell-mediated alloresponses were correlated with genetic markers such as HLA-C mRNA expression and the number of amino acid mismatches in the α1/α2 domains (peptide binding region. Because of the high rate of HLA-DPB1 incompatibilities in HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 matched unrelated HSCT patient/donor pairs, the impact of HLA-DPB1 mismatching, a potential bystander of CD4+ T cell activation, was also considered. Heterogeneous alloresponses were measured in 63 HLA-C mismatched pairs with a positive assay in 52% of the combinations (2.3-18.6% activated CTLs, representing 24 different HLA-A~B~DRB1~DQB1 haplotypes. There was no correlation between measured alloresponses and mRNA expression of the mismatched HLA-C alleles. The HLA-C*03:03/03:04 mismatch did not induce any positive alloresponse in 5 MLRs. We also identified HLA-C*02:02 and HLA-C*06:02 as mismatched alleles with lower immunogenicity, and HLA-C*14:02 as a more immunogenic mismatch. A difference of at least 10 amino acid residues known to impact peptide/TCR binding and a bystander HLA-DPB1 incompatibility had a significant impact on CTL alloreactivity (p=0.021. The same HLA-C mismatch, when recognized by two different responders with the same HLA haplotypes, was recognized differently, emphasizing the role of the T-cell repertoire of responding cells. In conclusion, mismatched HLA-C alleles differing by10 or more amino acids in the peptide/TCR binding

  10. The role of HLA antibodies in allogeneic SCT: is the 'type-and-screen' strategy necessary not only for blood type but also for HLA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, S; Taniguchi, K; Ogawa, H; Saji, H

    2012-12-01

    The role of HLA antibodies in SCT has drawn increasing attention because of the significantly increased number of patients who receive HLA-mismatched SCT, including cord blood transplantation, haploidentical SCT and unrelated SCT. Technical advancements in the methods of HLA Ab testing have realized rapid, accurate and objective identification, as well as quantification of specific HLA antibodies. Recent clinical studies have suggested that the presence of donor-specific HLA antibodies (DSA) in patients is associated with graft failure in HLA-mismatched SCT when the above-listed stem cell sources are used and results in different impacts. Of note, most of the 'HLA-matched' unrelated SCT actually involve HLA mismatches in HLA-DP and the presence of antibodies against this locus has been reported to be associated with graft failure. Thus, HLA Ab should be examined as a work-up for all patients who undergo SCT from 'alternative donors.' The simplest route for preventing HLA Ab-mediated graft failure in Ab-positive patients is to avoid donors who possess the target Ag of HLA antibodies. If SCT from such donors must be performed, treatment for DSA before SCT may improve the chances of successful donor engraftment.

  11. Additive and interaction effects at three amino acid positions in HLA-DQ and HLA-DR molecules drive type 1 diabetes risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Xinli; Deutsch, Aaron J; Lenz, Tobias L; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Han, Buhm; Chen, Wei-Min; Howson, Joanna M M; Todd, John A; de Bakker, Paul I W; Rich, Stephen S; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    Variation in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes accounts for one-half of the genetic risk in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Amino acid changes in the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ molecules mediate most of the risk, but extensive linkage disequilibrium complicates the localization of independent effects. Using

  12. Expression of the major histocompatibility antigens HLA-A2 and HLA-B7 by DNA-mediated gene transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernabeu, C.; Finlay, D.; van de Rijn, M.; Maziarz, R. T.; Biro, P. A.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J.; Terhorst, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    Genes coding for the heavy chain of the class I antigens HLA-A2 or HLA-B7 of the human major histocompatibility complex have been introduced into mouse LtK- cells by cotransfection with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. HAT-resistant colonies were isolated expressing either HLA-A2 or

  13. The effect of HLA mismatches, shared cross-reactive antigen groups, and shared HLA-DR antigens on the outcome after pediatric liver transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieders, E; Hepkema, BG; Peeters, PMJG; Ten Vergert, EM; De Jong, KP; Porte, RJ; Bijleveld, CMA; van den Berg, AP; Lems, SPM; Gouw, ASH; Slooff, MJH

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and HLA-DR mismatching, sharing cross-reactive antigen groups (CREGs), and sharing HLA-DR antigens on the outcome after pediatric liver transplantation. Outcome parameters were graft survival, acute rejection,

  14. Influence of HLA-DRB1* incompatibility on the occurrence of rejection episodes and graft survival in serologically HLA-DR-matched renal transplant combinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lardy, N. M.; van der Horst, A. R.; ten Berge, I. J.; Surachno, S.; Wilmink, J. M.; de Waal, L. P.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of HLA-DRB1* mismatches on graft function and graft survival in 92 patients who received serologically HLA-DR split antigen-matched cadaveric renal transplants. METHODS: The polymorphic second exon of the HLA-DRB1 alleles was typed

  15. Clinical cytometry and progress in HLA antibody detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Robert A; Tarsitani, Christine; Gebel, Howard M; Lee, Jar-How

    2011-01-01

    For most solid organ and selected stem cell transplants, antibodies against mismatched HLA antigens can lead to early and late graft failure. In recognition of the clinical significance of these antibodies, HLA antibody identification is one of the most critical functions of histocompatibility laboratories. Early methods employed cumbersome and insensitive complement-dependent cytotoxicity assays with a visual read-out. A little over 20 years ago flow cytometry entered the realm of antibody detection with the introduction of the flow cytometric crossmatch. Cytometry's increased sensitivity and objectivity quickly earned it popularity as a preferred crossmatch method especially for sensitized recipients. Although a sensitive method, the flow crossmatch was criticized as being "too sensitive" as false positive reactions were a know drawback. In part, the shortcomings of the flow crossmatch were due to the lack of corresponding sensitive and specific HLA antibody screening assays. However, in the mid 1990s, solid phase assays, capable of utilizing standard flow cytometers, were developed. These assays used microparticles coated with purified HLA molecules. Hence, the era of solid-phase, microparticle technology for HLA antibody detection was born permitting the sensitive and specific detection of HLA antibody. It was now possible to provide better correlation between HLA antibody detection and the flow cytometric crossmatch. This flow-based technology was soon followed by adaptation to the Luminex platform permitting a mutltiplexed approach for the identification and characterization of HLA antibodies. It is hoped that these technologies will ultimately lead to the identification of parameters that best correlate with and/or predict transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Strategien zur HLA-Typisierung mit PyrosequencingTM

    OpenAIRE

    Entz, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Der Haupthistokompatibilitätskomplex ist durch seine biologische Funktion eine für die Diagnostik und Forschung äußerst wichtige Region im humanen Genom. Die Untersuchung von HLA-Genorten stellt ein wichtiges Instrument in der molekulargenetischen Praxis dar. Die Pyrosequencing-Technik ist gut geeignet, um kurze DNA-Abschnitte mit weitgehend bekannter Sequenz schnell und effizient zu untersuchen. Ziel dieser Arbeit war die Entwicklung von Pyrosequencing-basierten Methoden zur HLA-Typisierung....

  17. Defective HLA class I antigen processing machinery in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lei; Michelakos, Theodoros; Yamada, Teppei; Fan, Song; Wang, Xinhui; Schwab, Joseph H; Ferrone, Cristina R; Ferrone, Soldano

    2018-02-27

    Malignant transformation of cells is frequently associated with defective HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM) component expression. This abnormality may have functional relevance, since it may have a negative impact on tumor cell recognition by cognate T cells. Furthermore, HLA class I APM abnormalities appear to have clinical significance, since they are associated with poor prognosis in several malignant diseases and may play a role in the resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitor-based immunotherapy. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature describing abnormalities in HLA class I APM component expression in many types of cancer. These abnormalities have been reported in all types of cancer analyzed with a frequency ranging between a minimum of 35.8% in renal cancer and a maximum of 87.9% in thyroid cancer for HLA class I heavy chains. In addition, we have described the molecular mechanisms underlying defects in HLA class I APM component expression and function by malignant cells. Lastly, we have discussed the clinical significance of HLA class I APM component abnormalities in malignant tumors.

  18. Utility of HLA Antibody Testing in Kidney Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalinka, Ana

    2015-01-01

    HLA antigens are polymorphic proteins expressed on donor kidney allograft endothelium and are critical targets for recipient immune recognition. HLA antibodies are risk factors for acute and chronic rejection and allograft loss. Solid-phase immunoassays for HLA antibody detection represent a major advance in sensitivity and specificity over cell-based methods and are widely used in organ allocation and pretransplant risk assessment. Post-transplant, development of de novo donor–specific HLA antibodies and/or increase in donor-specific antibodies from pretransplant levels are associated with adverse outcomes. Although single antigen bead assays have allowed sensitive detection of recipient HLA antibodies and their specificities, a number of interpretive considerations must be appreciated to understand test results in clinical and research contexts. This review, which is especially relevant for clinicians caring for transplant patients, discusses the technical aspects of single antigen bead assays, emphasizes their quantitative limitations, and explores the utility of HLA antibody testing in identifying and managing important pre- and post-transplant clinical outcomes. PMID:25804279

  19. New insights of HLA class I association to Behçet's disease in Portuguese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, A; Pereira, C; Carvalho, L; Carvalho, C; Patto, J V; Bastos, M; Silva, A M; Barros, R; Vasconcelos, C; Paiva, P; Costa, L; Costa, P P; Mendonça, D; Correia, J; Silva, B M

    2008-10-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*51 is a well-known genetic factor associated with Behçet's disease (BD). To analyse the influence of HLA-B*51 and other HLA class I alleles in BD susceptibility in a Portuguese population and its association with disease severity, we studied 78 BD patients and 208 healthy controls. The patients were classified into two severity groups as described by Gul et al. As expected, a higher frequency of HLA-B*51 was found. The frequency of HLA-Cw*16 alleles was significantly higher in patients. Regarding severity, HLA-B*27 frequency was higher in the severe group compared with controls and with the mild group. Thus, HLA-B*51 and HLA-Cw*16 seem to confer susceptibility to BD in this patients. HLA-B*27 may be important as a prognostic factor.

  20. Popular sweetner sucralose as a migraine trigger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajendrakumar M; Sarma, Rakesh; Grimsley, Edwin

    2006-09-01

    Sucralose (trichlorogalactosucrose, or better known as Splenda) is an artificial sweetener from native sucrose that was approved by the FDA on April 1, 1998 (April Fool's Day). This observation of a potential causal relationship between sucralose and migraines may be important for physicians to remember this can be a possible trigger during dietary history taking. Identifying further triggers for migraine headaches, in this case sucralose, may help alleviate some of the cost burden (through expensive medical therapy or missed work opportunity) as well as provide relief to migraineurs.

  1. The Type 1 Diabetes - HLA Susceptibility Interactome - Identification of HLA Genotype-Specific Disease Genes for Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsson, C.; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Bergholdt, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The individual contribution of genes in the HLA region to the risk of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) is confounded by the high linkage disequilibrium (LD) in this region. Using a novel approach we have combined genetic association data with information on functional protein......-protein interactions to elucidate risk independent of LD and to place the genetic association into a functional context. Methodology/Principal Findings: Genetic association data from 2300 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HLA region was analysed in 2200 T1D family trios divided into six risk groups based...... on HLA-DRB1 genotypes. The best SNP signal in each gene was mapped to proteins in a human protein interaction network and their significance of clustering in functional network modules was evaluated. The significant network modules identified through this approach differed between the six HLA risk groups...

  2. CMS Trigger Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    During its second run of operation (Run 2) which started in 2015, the LHC will deliver a peak instantaneous luminosity that may reach $2 \\cdot 10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ with an average pile-up of about 55, far larger than the design value. Under these conditions, the online event selection is a very challenging task. In CMS, it is realized by a two-level trigger system the Level-1 (L1) Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. In order to face this challenge, the L1 trigger has been through a major upgrade compared to Run 1, whereby all electronic boards of the system have been replaced, allowing more sophisticated algorithms to be run online. Its last stage, the global trigger, is now able to perform complex selections and to compute high-level quantities, like invariant masses. Likewise, the algorithms that run in the HLT go through big improvements; in particular, new appr...

  3. HLA alleles and HLA-B27 haplotypes associated with susceptibility and severity of ankylosing spondylitis in a Portuguese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel-Santos, F M; Matos, M; Ligeiro, D; Mourão, A F; Ribeiro, C; Costa, J; Santos, H; Barcelos, A; Pinto, P; Cruz, M; Sousa, E; Santos, R A; Fonseca, J E; Trindade, H; Guedes-Pinto, H; Branco, J C

    2013-12-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is the mostly known major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Nonetheless, there is substantial evidence that other MHC genes appear to be associated with the disease, although it has not yet been established whether these associations are driven by direct associations or by linkage disequilibrium (LD) mechanisms. We aimed to investigate the contributions of HLA class I and II alleles and B27-haplotypes for AS in a case-control study. A total of 188 HLA-B27 AS cases and 189 HLA-B27 healthy controls were selected and typed for HLA class I and II by the Luminex polymerase chain reaction-sequence specific oligonucleotide probe (PCR-SSOP) method. Allelic and haplotypic distributions were estimated by maximum likelihood method using Arlequin v3.11 and statistical analysis were performed by Stata10.1. No associations were found between non-HLA-B27 loci and AS susceptibility, but several associations were observed for phenotypic features of the disease. DRB1*08 was identified as a risk factor for uveitis and DQB1*04 seems to provide protection for AS severity (functional, metrological and radiological indexes). A*02/B27/C*02/DRB1*01/DQB1*05 [P<0.0001; odds ratio (OR) = 39.06; 95% confidence interval (CI) (2.34-651)] is the only haplotype that seems to confer susceptibility to AS. Moreover, the haplotype A*02/B27/C*01/DRB1*08/DQB1*04 seems to provide protection for disease functional and radiological repercussions. Our findings are compatible with the hypothesis that other genes within the HLA region besides HLA-B27 might play some role in AS susceptibility and severity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Dam, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN’s LHC has implemented a dedicated tau trigger system to select hadronically decaying tau leptons from the enormous background of QCD jets. This promises a significant increase in the discovery potential to the Higgs boson and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. The three level trigger system has been optimised for effciency and good background rejection. The first level uses information from the calorimeters only, while the two higher levels include also information from the tracking detectors. Shower shape variables and the track multiplicity are important variables to distinguish taus from QCD jets. At the initial lumonosity of 10^31 cm^−2 s^−1, single tau triggers with a transverse energy threshold of 50 GeV or higher can be run standalone. Below this level, the tau signatures will be combined with other event signature

  5. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Rados, PK; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Physics processes involving tau leptons play a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the high energy frontier. The ability to efficiently trigger on events containing hadronic tau decays is therefore of particular importance to the ATLAS experiment. During the 2012 run, the Large Hadronic Collder (LHC) reached instantaneous luminosities of nearly $10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ with bunch crossings occurring every $50 ns$. This resulted in a huge event rate and a high probability of overlapping interactions per bunch crossing (pile-up). With this in mind it was necessary to design an ATLAS tau trigger system that could reduce the event rate to a manageable level, while efficiently extracting the most interesting physics events in a pile-up robust manner. In this poster the ATLAS tau trigger is described, its performance during 2012 is presented, and the outlook for the LHC Run II is briefly summarized.

  6. Intra HLA-D/DR region recombinant detected by primed lymphocyte typing (PLT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, B K; Kristensen, T; Lamm, L U

    1983-01-01

    The chromosome 6 markers, HLA-ABC, D, DR, MT, properdin factor Bf, and complement factors 2 (C2) and 5 (C4), were studied in three families, each of which included two HLA identical siblings, one or both of whom were known to be HLA-B: GLO recombinants. The families were also typed with primed...... lymphocyte typing (PLT) for HLA-D/DR region associated DP antigens. None of these studies gave evidence that the recombinations had occurred within the HLA region. Mixed leucocyte culture (MLC) tests within the families showed no detectable stimulation between the HLA identical siblings in two...

  7. HLA-DR-expressing cells and T-lymphocytes in sural nerve biopsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Olsson, T; Solders, G

    1988-01-01

    was confirmed. HLA-DR expression was found in all biopsies and thus was not restricted to any particular type of neuropathy. The HLA-DR expression appeared to correlate with severity and activity of the neuropathy. HLA-DR-expressing macrophages wrapping myelinated fibers were prominent in primary demyelinating......Thirty-five sural nerve biopsies were stained immunohistochemically for HLA-DR antigen. HLA-DR was expressed on nonmyelinating Schwann cells, macrophages, vascular endothelium, and perineurium. By means of double immunofluorescence staining the identity of the HLA-DR presenting structures...

  8. Association of HLA genotypes with phenobarbital hypersensitivity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Likkasittipan, Plernpit; Kamchaisatian, Wasu; Wattanapokayakit, Sukanya; Inunchot, Wimala; Visudtibhan, Anannit; Wichukchinda, Nuanjun; Benjaponpitak, Suwat

    2016-10-01

    Phenobarbital hypersensitivity is one of the common drug hypersensitivity syndromes in children. Clinical symptoms of phenobarbital hypersensitivity vary from maculopapular rashes (MPs) to severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions (SCARs) including drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN). Drug hypersensitivity has been demonstrated to be associated with variations in the HLA genotypes. This study was to investigate the association between the variations of HLA genotypes and phenobarbital hypersensitivity in Thai children. The cases were Thai children, between 0 and 18 years of age, who were diagnosed with phenobarbital hypersensitivity, which included SCARs and MPs. The control patients were Thai children of a corresponding age who had taken phenobarbital for at least 12 weeks without any hypersensitivity reaction. Blood samples were collected for HLA genotyping by using a reverse-sequence-specific oligonucleotide (SSO) probes method. The carrier rates of HLA alleles were compared between 47 cases (27 SCARs and 20 MPs) and 54 controls. The carrier rates of HLA-A*01:01 and HLA-B*13:01 were significantly higher in the phenobarbital-induced SCARs than in the tolerant controls (18.5% vs. 1.85%, p = 0.01, odds ratio [OR] 11.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-578.19; 37.04% vs. 11.11%, p = 0.009, OR 4.60, 95%CI 1.29-17.98). There was a trend of a higher carrier rate of HLA-C*06:02 in the phenobarbital-induced SCARs when compared with those in the tolerant controls (29.63% vs. 11.11%, p = 0.059, OR 3.31, 95% CI 0.88-13.31). In contrast to the phenobarbital-induced SCARs, only the HLA-A*01:01 carrier rate in the phenobarbital-induced MPs was significantly higher than those in the tolerant controls (20% vs. 1.85%, p = 0.017, OR 12.69, 95% CI 1.15-661.62). An association between phenobarbital hypersensitivity and HLA-A*01:01 and HLA-B*13:01 has been demonstrated in Thai children

  9. Characterization of a novel HLA-B*39:01:01-related allele, HLA-B*39:130, by cloning and phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L X; Tian, W; Zhu, F M; Wang, W Y; Cai, J H

    2017-12-01

    A novel HLA-B*39:01:01-related variant, HLA-B*39:130, has been identified in a normal individual of Han ethnicity in Hunan province, southern China. Following Sanger polymerase chain reaction-sequence-based typing (PCR-SBT), this new allele was further confirmed by cloning, phasing and sequencing. Aligned with HLA-B*39:01:01, HLA-B*39:130 has a nonsynonymous thymine substitution at nucleotide position 94 in exon 4, resulting in amino acid change from threonine to isoleucine at codon 214 (ACA→ATA) of the mature HLA-BmRNA molecule. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Polymorphism in the 5' upstream regulatory and 3' untranslated regions of the HLA-G gene in relation to soluble HLA-G and IL-10 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Rizzo, Roberta; Melchiorri, Loredana

    2006-01-01

    The nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib gene HLA-G may be important for the induction and maintenance of immune tolerance between the mother and the semi-allogeneic fetus during pregnancy. Expression of HLA-G can influence cytokine and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses. Different HLA......-G peripheral blood mononuclear cells after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. This study finds that polymorphism in the 5' upstream regulatory region (5'URR) of the HLA-G gene may also be implicated in differences in IL-10 secretion. However, this may also be due to linkage disequilibrium with the 14-bp...

  11. ALICE High Level Trigger

    CERN Multimedia

    Alt, T

    2013-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger (HLT) is a computing farm designed and build for the real-time, online processing of the raw data produced by the ALICE detectors. Events are fully reconstructed from the raw data, analyzed and compressed. The analysis summary together with the compressed data and a trigger decision is sent to the DAQ. In addition the reconstruction of the events allows for on-line monitoring of physical observables and this information is provided to the Data Quality Monitor (DQM). The HLT can process event rates of up to 2 kHz for proton-proton and 200 Hz for Pb-Pb central collisions.

  12. Trigger and decision processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, G.

    1980-11-01

    In recent years there have been many attempts in high energy physics to make trigger and decision processes faster and more sophisticated. This became necessary due to a permanent increase of the number of sensitive detector elements in wire chambers and calorimeters, and in fact it was possible because of the fast developments in integrated circuits technique. In this paper the present situation will be reviewed. The discussion will be mainly focussed upon event filtering by pure software methods and - rather hardware related - microprogrammable processors as well as random access memory triggers. (orig.)

  13. Role of humoral immune reactions as target for antirejection therapy in recipients of a spousal-donor kidney graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmig, G A; Regele, H; Säemann, M D; Exner, M; Druml, W; Kovarik, J; Hörl, W H; Zlabinger, G J; Watschinger, B

    2000-04-01

    Excellent graft outcome has been reported for spousal-donor kidney transplantation. In husband-to-wife transplantation, however, a tendency toward inferior graft survival has been described for recipients who were previously pregnant. In our series of spousal-kidney transplantations (nine transplantations; three female recipients), actual graft survival is 100% (median observation time, 339 days). Five patients experienced early allograft rejection. In four transplant recipients, rejection was easily reversible by conventional antirejection therapy. In a multiparous recipient, however, mild interstitial allograft rejection associated with early graft dysfunction was resistant to anticellular treatment (antilymphocyte antibody, tacrolimus rescue therapy). The particular finding of polymorphonuclear neutrophils in peritubular capillaries and the finding of diffuse capillary deposits of the complement split product, C4d, in a posttransplantation biopsy specimen suggested a role of antibody-mediated graft injury. Retrospective flow cytometry cross-matching showed the presence of preformed immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to HLA class I antigens that were not detectable by pretransplantation lymphocytotoxic cross-match testing or screening for panel reactive antibodies. After transplantation, however, complement-fixing antibodies, also presumably triggered by reexposure to spousal-donor HLA antigens, could be detected in the patient's serum. These findings suggested antibody-mediated allograft rejection and led to the initiation of immunoadsorption therapy (14 sessions) with staphylococcal protein A. Selective removal of recipient IgG resulted in complete reversal of graft dysfunction. Our findings suggest that in husband-to-wife transplantation, donor-specific antibodies, presumably triggered by previous pregnancies, might occasionally induce sustained allograft dysfunction. Thus, in this particular setting, a detailed immunologic and histopathologic work-up regarding

  14. Structure of Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein 42 Suggests a Mechanism for Triggering Receptor-Activated Virus Entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschner, Austin N.; Sorem, Jessica; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; (NWU); (Stanford-MED)

    2009-05-26

    Epstein-Barr virus requires glycoproteins gH/gL, gB, and gp42 to fuse its lipid envelope with B cells. Gp42 is a type II membrane protein consisting of a flexible N-terminal region, which binds gH/gL, and a C-terminal lectin-like domain that binds to the B-cell entry receptor human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II. Gp42 triggers membrane fusion after HLA binding, a process that requires simultaneous binding to gH/gL and a functional hydrophobic pocket in the lectin domain adjacent to the HLA binding site. Here we present the structure of gp42 in its unbound form. Comparisons to the previously determined structure of a gp42:HLA complex reveals additional N-terminal residues forming part of the gH/gL binding site and structural changes in the receptor binding domain. Although the core of the lectin domain remains similar, significant shifts in two loops and an {alpha} helix bordering the essential hydrophobic pocket suggest a structural mechanism for triggering fusion.

  15. Soluble HLA-G and HLA-E Levels in Bone Marrow Plasma Samples Are Related to Disease Stage in Neuroblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Morandi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of nonclassical HLA-class Ib molecules HLA-G and HLA-E in the progression of Neuroblastoma (NB, the most common pediatric extracranial solid tumor, has been characterized in the last years. Since BM infiltration by NB cells is an adverse prognostic factor, we have here analyzed for the first time the concentration of soluble (sHLA-G and HLA-E in bone marrow (BM plasma samples from NB patients at diagnosis and healthy donors. sHLA-G and sHLA-E are present in BM plasma samples, and their levels were similar between NB patients and controls, thus suggesting that these molecules are physiologically released by resident or stromal BM cell populations. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that sHLA-G and sHLA-E levels did not correlate with BM infiltration and other adverse prognostic factors (MYCN amplification and age at diagnosis. In contrast, BM plasma levels of both molecules were higher in patients with metastatic disease than in patients with localized NB, thus suggesting that concentration of these molecules might be correlated with disease progression. The prognostic role of sHLA-G and sHLA-E concentration in the BM plasma for NB patients will be evaluated in future studies, by analyzing the clinical outcome of the same NB patients at follow-up.

  16. Assessment of Impact of HLA Type on Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Brian T; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Beitinjaneh, Amer; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cerny, Jan; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Grunwald, Michael R; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kindwall-Keller, Tamila; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F; Saad, Ayman; Seftel, Matthew; Seo, Sachiko; Szer, Jeffrey; Tallman, Martin; Ustun, Celalettin; Wiernik, Peter H; Maziarz, Richard T; Kalaycio, Matt; Alyea, Edwin; Popat, Uday; Sobecks, Ronald; Saber, Wael

    2018-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common hematologic malignancy with many highly effective therapies. Chemorefractory disease, often characterized by deletion of chromosome 17p, has historically been associated with very poor outcomes, leading to the application of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) for medically fit patients. Although the use of allo-HCT has declined since the introduction of novel targeted therapy for the treatment of CLL, there remains significant interest in understanding factors that may influence the efficacy of allo-HCT, the only known curative treatment for CLL. The potential benefit of transplantation is most likely due to the presence of alloreactive donor T cells that mediate the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. The recognition of potentially tumor-specific antigens in the context of class I and II major histocompatibility complex on malignant B lymphocytes by donor T cells may be influenced by subtle differences in the highly polymorphic HLA locus. Given previous reports of specific HLA alleles impacting the incidence of CLL and the clinical outcomes of allo-HCT for CLL, we sought to study the overall survival and progression-free survival of a large cohort of patients with CLL who underwent allo-HCT from fully HLA-matched related and unrelated donors at Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research transplantation centers. We found no statistically significant association of allo-HCT outcomes in CLL based on previously reported HLA combinations. Additional study is needed to further define the immunologic features that portend a more favorable GVL effect after allo-HCT for CLL. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Linkage disequilibrium between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II and HLA-G--possible implications for human reproduction and autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Christiansen, Ole B

    2005-01-01

    ). We found a significant linkage disequilibrium between HLA-DR3 and HLA-G*010102 in both the RSA and control populations. For all four studied HLA loci, the alleles in the haplotype HLA-DRB1*03.DQA1*05.DQB1*02.G*010102 was in clear linkage disequilibrium. This HLA haplotype has repeatedly been...... associated with different autoimmune diseases but also with RSA. The G*010102 allele includes a 14-bp sequence polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region of the gene, which has been associated with differences in HLA-G mRNA alternative splicing and stability. This 14-bp polymorphism has also been associated...... with RSA, pre-eclampsia, and outcome of in vitro fertilization. Implications of HLA polymorphism--and other polymorphic genes in the MHC for pregnancy outcome--and for autoimmune diseases during pregnancy are discussed....

  18. Platelet transfusion refractoriness attributable to HLA antibodies produced by donor-derived cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation from one HLA-antigen-mismatched mother.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Naoki; Hori, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Masaki; Inazawa, Natsuko; Iesato, Kotoe; Miyazaki, Toru; Ikeda, Hisami; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2011-12-01

    PTR is a serious problem in patients being treated for hematologic disorders. Two patients with acute leukemia developed PTR after allogeneic BMT from one HLA-antigen-mismatched mother attributable to HLA antibodies, which could not be detected in their serum before BMT. HLA antibodies, whose specificity resembled that of each patient, were detected in each donor's serum. Each donor had probably been immunized during pregnancy by their partner's HLA antigens expressed by the fetus, consequently, transplanted donor-derived cells provoked HLA antibodies in each recipient early after BMT, and those HLA antibodies induced PTR. If the mothers are selected as donors for their children, they should be tested for the presence of HLA antibodies. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. HLA polymorphisms in Sindhi community in Mumbai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhaya, S; Desai, S; Saranath, D

    2010-10-01

    Indian population is an amalgamation of various ethnicities, cultural and linguistic diversities, primarily due to marriages within a community. HLA-A, B and DRB1 alleles and haplotype frequencies were investigated in the Sindhi and compared with Marathi, Gujarati and North Indian population from Mumbai. This work is a part of a larger effort aimed at analysis of the HLA profile of diverse Indian ethnics to establish an umbilical cord stem cell panel in India. HLA polymorphisms at the HLA-A, B and DRB1 loci were determined in 413 cord blood samples by the molecular method of polymerase chain reaction using sequence-specific primer amplification. The most frequent alleles included A*01, A*02, A*11 and A*24 at A locus, B*35 and B*40 at B locus and DRB1*07 and DRB1*15 in all the four groups, although the frequency fluctuated in individual communities. HLA-DRB1*03 was significantly high (P < 0.05) in the Sindhi. Phylogenetic association using neighbour-joining tree, based on DA genetic distances for HLA-A and HLA-B alleles, indicated that the Sindhis cluster with North Indian and Pakistan Sindhi. The three locus haplotype analysis revealed that A*02-B*40-DRB1*15 and A*33-B*44-DRB1*07 were common haplotypes in all the groups. The three locus haplotypes found suggest an influence from Caucasian and Oriental populations. The data will be useful in developing an umbilical cord stem cell panel in India. The results will have clinical implications in unrelated umbilical cord stem cell for transplantation in India. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. [Pathogenesis of narcolepsy: from HLA association to hypocretin deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, G; Burghaus, L; Diederich, N

    2012-11-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare and chronic sleep disorder, characterised by excessive daytime sleepiness. Frequently associated signs are cataplexy, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations. Advances in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease have essentially been elucidated during the last fifteen years. The most significant finding has been the discovery of hypocretin-1 and -2 in 1998. Hypocretin-containing cells have widespread projections throughout the entire CNS and play a crucial role in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. They also contribute to olefaction and to the regulation of food intake. Animal models and human studies concordantly show that the disturbed hypocretin system is the probable cause of narcolepsy. However, it remains unclear why there is neuronal death of hypocretin-producing cells in the lateral hypothalamus. As the HLA-allele DQB1*0602 is associated with narcolepsy and hypocretin deficiency, an autoimmune reaction against hypocretin-producing neurons has been vigorously discussed. Newly discovered gene polymorphisms as well as previously unknown pathogenetic mechanisms, linking the sleep-wake cycle with the immune system, may also contribute to the pathogenetic cascade. Worthy of mention in this context is, e.g., the "insulin-like growth factor"-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), whose overexpression causes a down-regulation of the hypocretin production. Substitution of the deficient neuropeptides by hypocretin agonists may become the causal treatment strategy of the future, if an adequate administration route can be found. Presently, animal trials, including genetic therapy, cell transplantations or the administration of hypocretin receptor agonists, are underway. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. The STAR trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieser, F.S.; Crawford, H.J.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Greiner, L.C.; Judd, E.G.; Klein, S.R.; Meissner, F.; Minor, R.; Milosevich, Z.; Mutchler, G.; Nelson, J.M.; Schambach, J.; VanderMolen, A.S.; Ward, H.; Yepes, P.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the trigger system that we designed and implemented for the STAR detector at RHIC. This is a 10 MHz pipelined system based on fast detector output that controls the event selection for the much slower tracking detectors. Results from the first run are presented and new detectors for the 2001 run are discussed

  2. Asthma Triggers: Gain Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... harm people too. Try to use pest management methods that pose less of a risk. Keep counters, sinks, tables and floors clean and ... with pest challenges in your home and other environments. [EPA ... pests while reducing pesticide risks; roaches are often asthma triggers and shouldn’t ...

  3. Physics issues on triggering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detectors at the ILC are planned to run without hardware trigger. The ... as not coming from the interaction point and not matching to the silicon detectors ... electrons so that additional dE/dx cuts can help, making also here a factor 10 or.

  4. AIDS radio triggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, A M

    1991-07-01

    In April 1991, the Ethnic Communities' Council of NSW was granted funding under the Community AIDS Prevention and Education Program through the Department of Community Services and Health, to produce a series of 6x50 second AIDS radio triggers with a 10-second tag line for further information. The triggers are designed to disseminate culturally-sensitive information about HIV/AIDS in English, Italian, Greek, Spanish, Khmer, Turkish, Macedonian, Serbo-Croatian, Arabic, Cantonese, and Vietnamese, with the goal of increasing awareness and decreasing the degree of misinformation about HIV/AIDS among people of non-English-speaking backgrounds through radio and sound. The 6 triggers cover the denial that AIDS exists in the community, beliefs that words and feelings do not protect one from catching HIV, encouraging friends to be compassionate, compassion within the family, AIDS information for a young audience, and the provision of accurate and honest information on HIV/AIDS. The triggers are slated to be completed by the end of July 1991 and will be broadcast on all possible community, ethnic, and commercial radio networks across Australia. They will be available upon request in composite form with an information kit for use by health care professionals and community workers.

  5. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... one trigger that you shouldn't avoid because exercise is important for your health. Your doctor will want you to be active, so talk with him or her about what to do before playing ... or 15 minutes before you exercise or play sports. And, of course, you'll ...

  6. Trigger Finger (Stenosing Tenosynovitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Trigger Finger Email to a friend * required fields ...

  7. Contrasting roles of interallelic recombination at the HLA-A and HLA-B loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, A.L.; Hughes, M.K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)); Watkins, D.I. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-03-01

    A statistical study of DNA sequences of alleles at the highly polymorphic class I MHC loci of humans, HLA-A and HLA-B, showed evidence of both large-scale recombination events(involving recombination of exons 1-2 of one allele with exons 3-8 of another) and small scale recombination events (involving apparent exchange of short DNA segments). The latter events occurred disproportionately in the region of the gene encoding the antigen recognition site (ARS) of the class I molecule. Furthermore, they involved the ARS codons which are under the strongest selection favoring allelic diversity at the amino acid level. Thus, the frequency of recombinant alleles appears to have been increased by some form of balancing selection (such as overdominant selection) favoring heterozygosity in the ARS. These analyses also revealed a striking difference between the A and B loci. Recombination events appear to have occurred about twice as frequently at the B locus, and recombinants at the B locus were significantly more likely to affect polymorphic sites in the ARS. At the A locus, there are well-defined allelic lineages that have persisted since prior to the human-chimpanzee divergence; but at the B locus, there is no evidence for such long-lasting allelic lineages. Thus, relatively frequent interallelic recombination has apparently been a feature of the long-term evolution of the B locus but not of the A locus. 45 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Comparing HLA shared epitopes in French Caucasian patients with scleroderma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doua F Azzouz

    Full Text Available Although many studies have analyzed HLA allele frequencies in several ethnic groups in patients with scleroderma (SSc, none has been done in French Caucasian patients and none has evaluated which one of the common amino acid sequences, (67FLEDR(71, shared by HLA-DRB susceptibility alleles, or (71TRAELDT(77, shared by HLA-DQB1 susceptibility alleles in SSc, was the most important to develop the disease. HLA-DRB and DQB typing was performed for a total of 468 healthy controls and 282 patients with SSc allowing FLEDR and TRAELDT analyses. Results were stratified according to patient's clinical subtypes and autoantibody status. Moreover, standardized HLA-DRß1 and DRß5 reverse transcriptase Taqman PCR assays were developed to quantify ß1 and ß5 mRNA in 20 subjects with HLA-DRB1*15 and/or DRB1*11 haplotypes. FLEDR motif is highly associated with diffuse SSc (χ(2 = 28.4, p<10-6 and with anti-topoisomerase antibody (ATA production (χ(2 = 43.9, p<10-9 whereas TRAELDT association is weaker in both subgroups (χ(2 = 7.2, p = 0.027 and χ(2 = 14.6, p = 0.0007 respectively. Moreover, FLEDR motif- association among patients with diffuse SSc remains significant only in ATA subgroup. The risk to develop ATA positive SSc is higher with double dose FLEDR than single dose with respectively, adjusted standardised residuals of 5.1 and 2.6. The increase in FLEDR motif is mostly due to the higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*11 and DRB1*15 haplotypes. Furthermore, FLEDR is always carried by the most abundantly expressed ß chain: ß1 in HLA DRB1*11 haplotypes and ß5 in HLA-DRB1*15 haplotypes.In French Caucasian patients with SSc, FLEDR is the main presenting motif influencing ATA production in dcSSc. These results open a new field of potential therapeutic applications to interact with the FLEDR peptide binding groove and prevent ATA production, a hallmark of severity in SSc.

  9. HLA-B51 IN BEHÇET’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Davatchi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nThere is some data in the literature on the association of HLA-B5 and some manifestations of Behçet's disease (BD, especially ocular lesions. We studied 433 patients to see if there was any relationship between B51 and the manifestations of the disease. Clinical manifestations of BD were compared in patients having HLA-B51 (155 patients and those lacking HLA-B51 (278 patients. Oral aphthosis, genital aphthosis, skin manifestations, joint manifestations, gastrointestinal manifestations, phlebitis and neurological manifestations showed no significant difference in patients with and without HLA-B51. Ophthalmologic manifestations were seen in 52% of patients having B51 and in 42% of patients lacking it (χ2: 4.451, P = 0.035. Considering different lesions of ocular manifestations separately, no significant difference was found regarding the presence or absence of B51. Pathergy phenomenon was detected in 55% of B51 positive patients and in 45% of B51 negative patients (χ2: 4.111, P = 0.043. It seems that HLA-B51 may play a role in the pathogenesis of Behçet's disease, but cannot be used as predictive value for the occurrence of organ involvement, except for the eye.

  10. Clinical Relevance of HLA Gene Variants in HBV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Host gene variants may influence the natural history of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA system, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in humans, is one of the most important host factors that are correlated with the clinical course of HBV infection. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs near certain HLA gene loci are strongly associated with not only persistent HBV infection but also spontaneous HBV clearance and seroconversion, disease progression, and the development of liver cirrhosis and HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in chronic hepatitis B (CHB. These variations also influence the efficacy of interferon (IFN and nucleot(side analogue (NA treatment and response to HBV vaccines. Meanwhile, discrepant conclusions were reached with different patient cohorts. It is therefore essential to identify the associations of specific HLA allele variants with disease progression and viral clearance in chronic HBV infection among different ethnic populations. A better understanding of HLA polymorphism relevance in HBV infection outcome would enable us to elucidate the roles of HLA SNPs in the pathogenesis and clearance of HBV in different areas and ethnic groups, to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of chronic HBV infection.

  11. IDENTIFIKASI TIPE HLA KELAS II DENGAN TEKNIK PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervi Salwati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen contains a set of genes located together on the short arm of chromosome 6. These genes control immune responses, graft acceptance or rejection and tumor surveillance. These abilities have close relationship with genetic variation (occur in "many forms" or alleles that bind and present antigens to T lymphocytes. Using advanced technology and molecular biology approaches (PCR technique detection of genetic variation in the HLA region (or HLA typing has been performed based on DNA.. PCR is an in vitro technique to amplify the DNA sequence enzymatically. "Sequence Specific Primers" (SSP are designed for this PCR to obtain amplification of specific alleles or groups of alleles. The PCR products are visualized through agarose gel electrophoresis stained with ethidium bromide. The PCR technique requires small amount of whole blood (0.5 - 1 ml, gives rapid, accurate and complete result. This paper discuss identification of HLA class II typing using PCR-SSP technique and show the examples of the results.   Key words: HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen class II, PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction

  12. HLA in anthropology: the enigma of Easter Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Thorsby, Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we first present four significant cases where human leukocyte antigen (HLA) studies have been useful for the reconstruction of human peopling history on the worldwide scale; i.e., the spread of modern humans from East Africa, the colonization of East Asia along two geographic routes, the co-evolution of genes and languages in Africa, and the peopling of Europe through a main northward migration. These examples show that natural selection did not erase the genetic signatures of our past migrations in the HLA genetic diversity patterns observed today. In the second part, we summarize our studies on Easter Island. Using genomic HLA typing, we could trace an introduction of HLA alleles of native American (Amerindian) origin to Easter Island before the Peruvian slave trades; i.e., before the 1860s, and provide suggestive evidence that they may have already been introduced in prehistoric time. Our results give further support to an initial Polynesian population of the island, but also reveal an early contribution by Amerindians. Together, our data illustrate the usefulness of typing for HLA alleles to complement genetic analyses in anthropological investigations.

  13. Origin of Azeris (Iran) according to HLA genes | Arnaiz-Villena ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mediterranean, Central Asian and Caucasus extended HLA haplotypes were found, ... profile, and Gorgan (Turkmen) who have shown a closer Central Asia profile, ... Keywords: HLA, Pharmacogenomics, Disease, Transplantation, Iran, Irak, ...

  14. Intra HLA-D/DR region recombinant detected by primed lymphocyte typing (PLT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, B K; Kristensen, T; Lamm, L U

    1983-01-01

    lymphocyte typing (PLT) for HLA-D/DR region associated DP antigens. None of these studies gave evidence that the recombinations had occurred within the HLA region. Mixed leucocyte culture (MLC) tests within the families showed no detectable stimulation between the HLA identical siblings in two......The chromosome 6 markers, HLA-ABC, D, DR, MT, properdin factor Bf, and complement factors 2 (C2) and 5 (C4), were studied in three families, each of which included two HLA identical siblings, one or both of whom were known to be HLA-B: GLO recombinants. The families were also typed with primed...... to reactive reagents. One of these (GHx), reacted with a determinant which segregated within the GG family as if child G was a paternal recombinant between the HLA-D, DR, DP, and C4 loci, on the one hand, and on the other hand one or more loci governing other HLA-D/DR region controlled lymphocyte activating...

  15. The Impact of HLA Class I-Specific Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors on Antibody-Dependent Natural Killer Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Organ Allograft Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalingam, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play an important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during the developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self-HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation) or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation). NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR-binding self-HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  16. The impact of HLA class I-specific killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors on antibody-dependent natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity and organ allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Rajalingam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells of the innate immune system are cytotoxic lymphocytes that play important roles following transplantation of solid organs and hematopoietic stem cells. Recognition of self HLA class I molecules by inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR is involved in the calibration of NK cell effector capacities during a developmental stage, allowing the subsequent recognition and elimination of target cells with decreased expression of self HLA class I (due to virus infection or tumor transformation or HLA class I disparities (in the setting of allogeneic transplantation. NK cells expressing an inhibitory KIR binding self HLA can be activated when confronted with allografts lacking a ligand for the inhibitory receptor. Following the response of the adaptive immune system, NK cells can further destroy allograft endothelium by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC, triggered through cross-linking of the CD16 Fc receptor by donor-specific antibodies bound to allograft. Upon recognizing allogeneic target cells, NK cells also secrete cytokines and chemokines that drive maturation of dendritic cells to promote cellular and humoral adaptive immune responses against the allograft. The cumulative activating and inhibitory signals generated by ligation of the receptors regulates mature NK cell killing of target cells and their production of cytokines and chemokines. This review summarizes the role of NK cells in allograft rejection and proposes mechanistic concepts that indicate a prominent role for KIR-HLA interactions in facilitating NK cells for Fc receptor-mediated ADCC effector function involved in antibody-mediated rejection of solid organ transplants.

  17. Impact of HLA Diversity on Donor Selection in Organ and Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Tiercy Jean-Marie; Claas Frans

    2013-01-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex is a multigene system encoding polymorphic human leucocyte antigens (HLA) that present peptides derived from pathogens to the immune system. The high diversity of HLA alleles and haplotypes in the worldwide populations represents a major barrier to organ and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation because HLA incompatibilities are efficiently recognized by T and B lymphocytes. In organ transplantation pre transplant anti HLA antibodies nee...

  18. The ATLAS Tau Trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rados, Petar Kevin

    2013-06-01

    The tau lepton plays a crucial role in understanding particle physics at the Tera scale. One of the most promising probes of the Higgs boson coupling to fermions is with detector signatures involving taus. In addition, many theories beyond the Standard Model, such as supersymmetry and exotic particles (W' and Z'), predict new physics with large couplings to taus. The ability to trigger on hadronic tau decays is therefore critical to achieving the physics goals of the ATLAS experiment. The higher instantaneous luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in 2012 resulted in a larger probability of overlap (pile-up) between bunch crossings, and so it was critical for ATLAS to have an effective tau trigger strategy. The details of this strategy are summarized in this paper, and the results of the latest performance measurements are presented. (authors)

  19. The LPS trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benotto, F.; Costa, M.; Staiano, A.; Zampieri, A.; Bollito, M.; Isoardi, P.; Pernigotti, E.; Sacchi, R.; Trapani, P.P.; Larsen, H.; Massam, T.; Nemoz, C.

    1996-03-01

    The Leading Proton Spectrometer (LPS) has been equipped with microstrip silicon detectors specially designed to trigger events with high values of x L vertical stroke anti p' p vertical stroke / vertical stroke anti p p vertical stroke ≥0.95 where vertical stroke anti p' p vertical stroke and vertical stroke anti p p vertical stroke are respectively the momenta of outgoing and incoming protons. The LPS First Level Trigger can provide a clear tag for very high momentum protons in a kinematical region never explored before. In the following we discuss the physics motivation in tagging very forward protons and present a detailed description of the detector design, the front end electronics, the readout electronics, the Monte Carlo simulation and some preliminary results from 1995 data taking. (orig.)

  20. Minimum risk trigger indices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, F.H.

    1979-01-01

    A viable safeguards system includes among other things the development and use of indices which trigger various courses of action. The usual limit of error calculation provides such an index. The classical approach is one of constructing tests which, under certain assumptions, make the likelihood of a false alarm small. Of concern also is the test's failure to indicate a loss (diversion) when in fact one has occurred. Since false alarms are usually costly and losses both costly and of extreme strategic sinificance, there remains the task of balancing the probability of false alarm and its consequences against the probability of undetected loss and its consequences. The application of other than classical hypothesis testing procedures are considered in this paper. Using various consequence models, trigger indices are derived which have certain optimum properties. Application of the techniques would enhance the material control function

  1. Ankylosing Spondylitis Patients with HLA-B*2704 have More Uveitis than Patients with HLA-B*2705 in a North Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haibo; Li, Qiuxia; Ji, Chen; Gu, Jieruo

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the correlation between clinical features of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and different human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 subtypes. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 216 patients with AS. HLA-B27 and its subtypes were detected by polymerase chain reaction with sequence specific primer (PCR-SSP). Clinical features were compared between the different HLA-B27 subtypes. A meta-analysis on uveitis frequencies in AS patients with HLA-B*2705 vs 2704 was performed. The most prevalent subtypes of HLA-B27 were HLA-B*2704 (66.1%) and HLA-B*2705 (32.2%). There were 57 HLA-B27-positive AS patients with the history of uveitis; 45 were B*2704 and 12 were B*2705. Patients with B*2704 had more uveitis than B*2705 (p = 0.021). After meta-analysis, there was no significant difference in the presence of uveitis between HLA-B*2704 and HLA-B*2705. AS patients with B*2704 have a higher risk of uveitis than AS with B*2705 in a north Chinese people.

  2. Neural networks for triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denby, B.; Campbell, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Chriss, N.; Bowers, C.; Nesti, F.

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  3. The ARGUS vertex trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, N.; Kolander, M.; Kolanoski, H.; Siegmund, T.; Bergter, J.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K.R.; Waldi, R.; Imhof, M.; Ressing, D.; Weiss, U.; Weseler, S.

    1995-09-01

    A fast second level trigger has been developed for the ARGUS experiment which recognizes tracks originating from the interaction region. The processor compares the hits in the ARGUS Micro Vertex Drift Chamber to 245760 masks stored in random access memories. The masks which are fully defined in three dimensions are able to reject tracks originating in the wall of the narrow beampipe of 10.5 mm radius. (orig.)

  4. Implication of HLA-DMA Alleles in Corsican IDDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cucchi-Mouillot

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-DM molecule catalyses the CLIP/antigen peptide exchange in the classical class II peptide-binding groove. As such, DM is an antigen presentation regulator and may be linked to autoimmune diseases. Using PCR derived methods, a relationship was revealed between DM gene polymorphism and IDDM, in a Corsican population. The DMA*0101 allele was observed to confer a significant predisposition to this autoimmune disease while the DMA*0102 allele protected significantly. Experiments examining polymorphism of the HLA-DRB1 gene established that these relationships are not a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 alleles implicated in this pathology. The study of the DMA gene could therefore be an additional tool for early IDDM diagnosis in the Corsican population.

  5. HLA-G Expression on Blasts and Tolerogenic Cells in Patients Affected by Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Locafaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G contributes to cancer cell immune escape from host antitumor responses. The clinical relevance of HLA-G in several malignancies has been reported. However, the role of HLA-G expression and functions in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is still controversial. Our group identified a subset of tolerogenic dendritic cells, DC-10 that express HLA-G and secrete IL-10. DC-10 are present in the peripheral blood and are essential in promoting and maintaining tolerance via the induction of adaptive T regulatory (Treg cells. We investigated HLA-G expression on blasts and the presence of HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of AML patients at diagnosis. Moreover, we explored the possible influence of the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR of HLA-G, which has been associated with HLA-G expression, on AML susceptibility. Results showed that HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells are highly represented in AML patients with HLA-G positive blasts. None of the HLA-G variation sites evaluated was associated with AML susceptibility. This is the first report describing HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells in AML patients, suggesting that they may represent a strategy by which leukemic cells escape the host’s immune system. Further studies on larger populations are required to verify our findings.

  6. HLA-G, immunocompetent cells and pregnancy outcome : a case of modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmer, Peter Martin

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis we address the immunomodulatory role of human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G). The placental trophoblast cells express HLA-G as membrane bound and soluble form (due to alternative splicing) at the fetomaternal interface. HLA-G putatively interacts with the maternal endometrial (decidual)

  7. Peptide immunisation of HLA-DR-transgenic mice permits the identification of a novel HLA-DRbeta1*0101- and HLA-DRbeta1*0401-restricted epitope from p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, José Manuel; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Horton, Roger B V; Bell, Matthew; Mian, Shahid; Li, Geng; Ali, Selman A; Rees, Robert C

    2005-03-01

    Because of the central role of CD4(+) T cells in antitumour immunity, the identification of the MHC class II-restricted peptides to which CD4(+) T cells respond has become a priority of tumour immunologists. Here, we describe a strategy permitting us to rapidly determine the immunogenicity of candidate HLA-DR-restricted peptides using peptide immunisation of HLA-DR-transgenic mice, followed by assessment of the response in vitro. This strategy was successfully applied to the reported haemaglutinin influenza peptide HA(307-319), and then extended to three candidate HLA-DR-restricted p53 peptides predicted by the evidence-based algorithm SYFPEITHI to bind to HLA-DRbeta1*0101 (HLA-DR1) and HLA-DRbeta1*0401 (HLA-DR4) molecules. One of these peptides, p53(108-122), consistently induced responses in HLA-DR1- and in HLA-DR4-transgenic mice. Moreover, this peptide was naturally processed by dendritic cells (DCs), and induced specific proliferation in the splenocytes of mice immunised with p53 cDNA, demonstrating that immune responses could be naturally mounted to the peptide. Furthermore, p53(108-122) peptide was also immunogenic in HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR4 healthy donors. Thus, the use of this transgenic model permitted the identification of a novel HLA-DR-restricted epitope from p53 and constitutes an attractive approach for the rapid identification of novel immunogenic MHC class II-restricted peptides from tumour antigens, which can ultimately be incorporated in immunotherapeutic protocols.

  8. Identification of an HLA-A*0201 restricted Bcl2-derived epitope expressed on tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Johansen, Britta; Nissen, Mogens H

    2006-01-01

    A large number of human tumor-associated antigen-derived peptides have been identified that are recognized by CTLs in a MHC-I restricted fashion. The apoptosis inhibitory protein Bcl2 is overexpressed in many human cancers as part of their neoplastic phenotype. Since inhibition or loss of Bcl2...... from the amino acid sequence of the Bcl2 protein and its binding affinity for HLA-A*0201 was confirmed using a biochemical binding assay. We here demonstrate that the 9-mer peptide Bcl2(85-93) induces specific CTL reactivity in immunized C57-A2K(b) or -A2D(b) tg mice. These Bcl2(85-93) specific CTLs...... react with and lyse Bcl2-expressing human colon carcinoma CCL220 cells which have been transfected with a chimeric HLA-A*0201/H2-K(b) DNA construct similar to that expressed in the transgenic mice. Based on these observations, we suggest that Bcl2(85-93) may be a target for immune therapy....

  9. High resolution human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and class II allele typing in Mexican mestizo women with sporadic breast cancer: case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantú de León, David; Yu, Neng; Yunis, Edmond J; Granados, Julio; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Villavicencio, Verónica; Carranca, Alejandro García; Betancourt, Alejandro Mohar; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; López-Tello, Alberto; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Barquera, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    The development of breast cancer is multifactorial. Hormonal, environmental factors and genetic predisposition, among others, could interact in the presentation of breast carcinoma. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles play an important role in immunity (cellular immunity) and may be important genetic traits. HLAAllele-specific interaction has not been well established. Recently, several studies had been conducted in order to do so, but the results are controversial and in some instances contradictory. We designed a case-control study to quantify the association of HLA class I and II genes and breast cancer. HLA typing was performed by high resolution sequence-specific oligotyping after DNA amplification (PCR-SSOP) of 100 breast cancer Mexican mestizo patients and 99 matched healthy controls. HLA-A frequencies that we were able to observe that there was no difference between both groups from the statistical viewpoint. HLA-B*1501 was found three times more common in the case group (OR, 3.714; p = 0.031). HLA-Cw is not a marker neither for risk, nor protection for the disease, because we did not find significant statistical differences between the two groups. DRB1*1301, which is expressed in seven cases and in only one control, observing an risk increase of up to seven times and DRB1*1602, which behaves similarly in being present solely in the cases (OR, 16.701; 95% CI, 0.947 – 294.670). DQ*0301-allele expression, which is much more common in the control group and could be protective for the presentation of the disease (OR, 0.078; 95% CI, 0.027–0.223, p = 0.00001). Our results reveal the role of the MHC genes in the pathophysiology of breast cancer, suggesting that in the development of breast cancer exists a disorder of immune regulation. The triggering factor seems to be restricted to certain ethnic groups and certain geographical regions since the relevant MHC alleles are highly diverse. This is the first study in Mexican population where high resolutions HLA

  10. NetMHCIIpan-3.0, a common pan-specific MHC class II prediction method including all three human MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael; Blicher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) molecules play an important role in cell-mediated immunity. They present specific peptides derived from endosomal proteins for recognition by T helper cells. The identification of peptides that bind to MHCII molecules is therefore of great importa......MHCIIpan-3.0 method is the first pan-specific predictor covering all HLA class II molecules with known sequences including HLA-DR, HLA-DP, and HLA-DQ. The NetMHCpan-3.0 method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.0....

  11. HLA-DP antigens in HIV-infected individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Georgsen, J; Fugger, L

    1991-01-01

    We studied the distribution of HLA-DP antigens in 74 HIV-infected Danish homosexual men and 188 ethnically matched healthy individuals, using the primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) technique. Forty of the patients developed AIDS within 3 years after diagnosis, whereas the remaining 34 were healthy...... or had only minor symptoms for 3 years or more (median observation time was 42 months). HLA-DPwl seemed to be decreased (relative risk = 0.3) in AIDS patients (5.0 per cent) when compared to patients with minor symptoms (14.7 per cent) and healthy controls (14.9 per cent). These differences were, however...

  12. El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad humano: sistema HLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando García

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available

    El complejo mayor de histocompatibilidad humano, o sistema HLA, está localizado en el brazo corto del cromosoma 6. Sus genes codifican tres tipos de moléculas. Los antígenos clase I (HLA-A, B, C y E están formados por una cadena pesada unida no covalentemente a la β2-microglobulina y se expresan en la superficie de la mayoría de las células nucleadas del organismo. Estos antígenos actúan como elementos de restricción en la activación de los linfocitos T CD8+. Los antígenos clase II son dímeros compuestos por cadenas α y β y su distribución tisular está limitada sólo a algunos tipos de células. Estas moléculas actúan restringiendo la presentación de antígenos a los linfocitos CD4+. Los antígenos de clase III son proteínas plasmáticas del sistema del complemento. Los diferentes loci del sistema HLA son muy polimórficos y sus productos se heredan en bloques conocidos como haplotipos. Debido a que los diferentes grupos étnicos presentan variaciones en la frecuencia de ale ios y haplotipos, el HLA ha sido muy útil en los estudios antropogenéticos. Algunos antígenos HLA están presentes en pacientes con determinadas enfermedades con una frecuencia significativamente diferente a la encontrada en la población general. Estos hallazgos han sido de gran importancia para comprender la patogénesis y los mecanismos genéticos de resistencia o susceptibilidad a dichas enfermedades. En el campo de los transplantes de órganos, la compatibilidad HLA donante-receptor correlaciona con la sobrevida del injerto. El sistema HLA también parece tener mucha importancia en los fenómenos inmunológicos que ocurren durante el

  13. Distribution of HLA-G extended haplotypes and one HLA-E polymorphism in a large-scale study of mother-child dyads with and without severe preeclampsia and eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, L. L.; Djurisic, S; Andersen, A.-M. N.

    2016-01-01

    was not associated with severe preeclampsia. Furthermore, the polymorphism (rs1264457) defining the two nonsynonymous HLA-E alleles, HLA-E*01:01:xx:xx and HLA-E*01:03:xx:xx, were not associated with severe preeclampsia. Finally, no specific HLA-G haplotypes were significantly associated with increased risk...

  14. HLA typing in patients with multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borruat, F X; Herbort, C P; Spertini, F; Desarnaulds, A B

    1998-03-01

    Multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS) is an acquired chorioretinal disorder of unknown etiology. We investigated the possibility that MEWDS might be related to a specific HLA subtyping. Blood was obtained from nine patients affected by MEWDS. HLA-B51 was found in four of these nine patients with MEWDS. There was a 3.7-fold increased frequency of HLA-B51 in patients affected by MEWDS (relative risk 5.86). MEWDS might then be related to the presence of a specific HLA subtype, HLA-B51. However, due to the small sample size, our results need to be confirmed by further testing.

  15. Zinc triggers microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppinen, Tiina M; Higashi, Youichirou; Suh, Sang Won; Escartin, Carole; Nagasawa, Kazuki; Swanson, Raymond A

    2008-05-28

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS. When stimulated by infection, tissue injury, or other signals, microglia assume an activated, "ameboid" morphology and release matrix metalloproteinases, reactive oxygen species, and other proinflammatory factors. This innate immune response augments host defenses, but it can also contribute to neuronal death. Zinc is released by neurons under several conditions in which microglial activation occurs, and zinc chelators can reduce neuronal death in animal models of cerebral ischemia and neurodegenerative disorders. Here, we show that zinc directly triggers microglial activation. Microglia transfected with a nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) reporter gene showed a severalfold increase in NF-kappaB activity in response to 30 microm zinc. Cultured mouse microglia exposed to 15-30 microm zinc increased nitric oxide production, increased F4/80 expression, altered cytokine expression, and assumed the activated morphology. Zinc-induced microglial activation was blocked by inhibiting NADPH oxidase, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), or NF-kappaB activation. Zinc injected directly into mouse brain induced microglial activation in wild-type mice, but not in mice genetically lacking PARP-1 or NADPH oxidase activity. Endogenous zinc release, induced by cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, likewise induced a robust microglial reaction, and this reaction was suppressed by the zinc chelator CaEDTA. Together, these results suggest that extracellular zinc triggers microglial activation through the sequential activation of NADPH oxidase, PARP-1, and NF-kappaB. These findings identify a novel trigger for microglial activation and a previously unrecognized mechanism by which zinc may contribute to neurological disorders.

  16. HLA class Ia and Ib molecules and FOXP3+ TILs in relation to the prognosis of malignant melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melsted, Wenna Nascimento; Johansen, Lasse Lindholm; Lock-Andersen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    HLA class Ia (HLA-ABC) and HLA class Ib (HLA-E, -F and -G) molecules and FOXP3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are often reported as relevant factors of tumor immune regulation. We investigated their expression as prognostic factors in 200 patients with primary cutaneous melanoma (PCM...

  17. HLA-G Expression Pattern: Reliable Assessment for Pregnancy Outcome Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaferi, Elnaz; Majidi, Jafar; Mohammadian, Mojdeh; Babaloo, Zohreh; Monfaredan, Amir; Baradaran, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Because mothers and fathers are more or less dissimilar at multiple HLA loci, mother considers her fetus as a semi-allograft. Mother's immune system may recognize paternal HLA as foreign antigen and may develop anti-paternal HLA antibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. There are some mechanisms that modulate maternal immune responses during pregnancy, in order to make uterus an immune privileged site. This immunosuppression is believed to be mediated, at least partly, by HLA-G, non-classical class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule that is strongly expressed in cytotrophoblast and placenta. The major HLA-G function is its ability to inhibit T and B lymphocytes, NK cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC).Since HLA-G is expressed strongly at the maternofetal interface and has an essential role in immunosuppression, HLA-G polymorphism and altered expression of HLA-G seems to be associated with some complications of pregnancy, such as pre-eclampsia, recurrent misscariage and failure in IVF.This perspective discusses recent findings about HLA-G genetics, function, expression and polymorphism; and focus on HLA-G role in the etiology of recurrent miscarriage. PMID:24312875

  18. HLA-G Expression Pattern: Reliable Assessment for Pregnancy Outcome Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Mosaferi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Because mothers and fathers are more or less dissimilar at multiple HLA loci, mother considers her fetus as a semi-allograft. Mother's immune system may recognize paternal HLA as foreign antigen and may develop anti-paternal HLA antibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. There are some mechanisms that modulate maternal immune responses during pregnancy, in order to make uterus an immune privileged site. This immunosuppression is believed to be mediated, at least partly, by HLA-G, non-classical class I human leukocyte antigen (HLA molecule that is strongly expressed in cytotrophoblast and placenta. The major HLA-G function is its ability to inhibit T and B lymphocytes, NK cells and antigen-presenting cells (APC.Since HLA-G is expressed strongly at the maternofetal interface and has an essential role in immunosuppression, HLA-G polymorphism and altered expression of HLA-G seems to be associated with some complications of pregnancy, such as pre-eclampsia, recurrent misscariage and failure in IVF.This perspective discusses recent findings about HLA-G genetics, function, expression and polymorphism; and focus on HLA-G role in the etiology of recurrent miscarriage.

  19. Impact of HLA diversity on donor selection in organ and stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Claas, Frans

    2013-01-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex is a multigene system encoding polymorphic human leucocyte antigens (HLA) that present peptides derived from pathogens to the immune system. The high diversity of HLA alleles and haplotypes in the worldwide populations represents a major barrier to organ and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, because HLA incompatibilities are efficiently recognized by T and B lymphocytes. In organ transplantation, pre-transplant anti-HLA antibodies need to be taken into account for organ allocation. Although HLA-incompatible transplants can be performed thanks to immunosuppressive drugs, the de novo production of anti-HLA antibodies still represents a major cause of graft failure. The HLAMatchmaker computer algorithm determines the immunogenicity of HLA mismatches and allows to define HLA antigens that will not induce an antibody response. Because of the much higher stringency of HLA compatibility criteria in stem cell transplantation, the best donor is a HLA genotypically identical sibling. However, more than 50% of the transplants are now performed with hematopoietic stem cells from volunteer donors selected from the international registry. The development of European national registries covering populations with different HLA haplotype frequencies is essential for optimizing donor search algorithms and providing the best chance for European patients to find a fully compatible donor.

  20. Oligoclonal band phenotypes in MS differ in their HLA class II association, while specific KIR ligands at HLA class I show association to MS in general

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsen, Marte W; Viken, Marte K; Celius, Elisabeth G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated the associ......Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have been reported to have different HLA class II allele profiles depending on oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the cerebrospinal fluid, but HLA class I alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligands have not been studied. We investigated...

  1. The non-classical antigens of HLA-G and HLA-E as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and as therapeutic targets in transplantation and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seliger, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I antigen HLA-G represents a tolerogenic molecule and is involved in the inhibition of natural killer cell and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity. Under physiological conditions, HLA-G expression is mainly restricted to immune-privileged tissues, whereas it is overexpressed in tumors and transplants as well as in virus-infected cells. Due to its immunosuppressive features, HLA-G is important for pregnancy or organ transplantation and autoimmune diseases as well as cancer immune escape. This review focusses on the expression, regulation, and function of HLA-G in tumor cells andlor in transplants as well as therapeutic tools for enhancing (transplantation) or avoiding (tumor) tolerance. Thus, HLA-G or HLA-G-derived synthetic molecules might be used as therapeutic agents in combination with immunosuppressive drugs to enhance organ tolerance upon transplantation. In addition, HLA-G neoexpressing tumor cells could be targeted by HLA-G-specific microRNAs in order to enhance tumor immunogenicity.

  2. An SSP-PCR method for the rapid detection of disease-associated alleles HLA-A*29 and HLA-B*51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstutz, U; Schaerer, D; Andrey, G; Wirthmueller, U; Largiadèr, C R

    2018-05-15

    HLA-A*29 and HLA-B*51 are associated with birdshot uveitis and Behçet's disease, respectively, and are used as a diagnostic criterion in patients with suspected disease, requiring their detection in diagnostic laboratories. While commercial tests for individual HLA alleles are available for other disease-associated HLA variants, no similar allele-specific assays are available for HLA-A*29 and -B*51. Here, we report SSP-PCR methods for the detection of HLA-A*29 and -B*51 using a single PCR reaction per allele. The assays were tested in 30 and 32 previously HLA-typed samples, respectively, representing >97% of HLA-A alleles and >93% of HLA-B alleles in a European population. A concordance of 100% was observed with previous typing results, validating these methods for use in a diagnostic or research context. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. HLA-G in human reproduktion: aspects of genetics, function, and pregnancy complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, TVF

    2006-01-01

    -G polymorphism, the possible significance of this polymorphism in respect to HLA-G function and certain complications of pregnancy (such as pre-eclampsia and recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSA)) are discussed together with possible importance to IVF. Finally, aspects of a possible role of HLA-G in organ...... transplantation and in inflammatory or autoimmune disease, and of HLA-G in an evolutionary context, are also briefly examined......The non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib genes, HLA-E, -G and -F, are located on chromosome 6 in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA class Ib antigens resemble the HLA class Ia antigens in many ways, but several major differences have been described. This review...

  4. Novel HLA Class I Alleles Associated with Indian Leprosy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Shankarkumar

    2003-01-01

    A*0101, Cw*04011, and Cw*0602 leprosy patients was observed when compared to the controls. Further haplotype A*1102-B*4006-Cw*1502 was significantly increased among the lepromatous leprosy patients when compared to the controls. It seems that HLA class I alleles play vital roles in disease association/pathogenesis with leprosy among Indians.

  5. HLA-G levels in serum and plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rudstein-Svetlicky, N.; Loewenthal, R.; Hořejší, Václav; Gazit, E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 69, č. 1 (2007), s. 140-142 ISSN 0001-2815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : HLA-G * serum * plasma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.245, year: 2007

  6. HLA genes in Chimila Amerindians (Colombia), the Peopling of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    accepted origin of America peopling should be revised: Pacific (Asian and ... from Mongolia / North China as giving rise to the First Native American ... used 20,000 years ago in Spanish Solutrean culture (Holden 1999; Stanford and ...... link among Hani, Bulang and other Southeast Asian populations: evidence from HLA -.

  7. Non-HLA gene polymorphisms in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberdi-Saugstrup, M.; Enevold, C.; Zak, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To test the hypothesis that non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are risk factors for an unfavourable disease outcome at long-term follow-up. Methods: The Nordic JIA cohort is a prospective multicentre study cohort...

  8. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism and type 1 diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune multifactorial disease which has a great socio-economic impact. In Morocco, less is known about the contribution of Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles to type 1 diabetes susceptibility. Our study focused on evaluating the distribution of class II ...

  9. Association between HLA-DQA1 gene copy number polymorphisms ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-21

    Apr 21, 2014 ... 2007), type 1 diabetes (T1D) (Grayson et al. 2010), ... The aim of this study was to explore HLA-DQA1. CNVs that potentially .... McKinney C. and Merriman T. R. 2012 Meta-analysis confirms a ... Harrison A. A., Highton J. et al.

  10. Non HLA genetic markers association with type-1 diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The currently available data identified IDDM1 and IDDM2 as 2 susceptibility loci for type 1 diabetes (T1D). The major histocompatibility complex (MHC)/HLA region referred to as IDDM1 contains several 100 genes known to have a great influence on T1D risk. Within IDDM2, a minisatellite variable number of tandem repeats ...

  11. HLA-G polymorphisms in couples with recurrent spontaneous abortions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Hylenius, S; Hoegh, A M

    2002-01-01

    % of the RSA women carried the HLA-G*0106 allele compared to 2% of the control women. The 14 bp deletion polymorphism in exon 8 was investigated separately. There were a greater number of heterozygotes for the 14 bp polymorphism in the group of fertile control women than expected, according to Hardy-Weinberg...

  12. Class II HLA interactions modulate genetic risk for multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Jostins, Luke; Beecham, Ashley H

    2015-01-01

    Association studies have greatly refined the understanding of how variation within the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes influences risk of multiple sclerosis. However, the extent to which major effects are modulated by interactions is poorly characterized. We analyzed high-density SNP data on 17...

  13. HLA genes in Chimila Amerindians (Colombia), the Peopling of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Our aim is to study the HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1 and -DQB1 gene frequencies in the Chimila Amerindian (Colombia) ethnic group. Results are compared with other World populations in order to obtain information about Chimila and Amerindian Health promotion, Amerindian origins and America peopling. Written consent was ...

  14. HLA genes in Atlantic Celtic populations: are Celts Iberians? | Arnaiz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atlantic Europe populations were analyzed with HLA genes in order to establish their relationship among themselves and with other populations. Standard genetic and statistical software analyses were used. Celtic populations (British Isles and French Bretons) have genetically been found close together: Irish, Welsh, ...

  15. KIR : HLA association with clinical manifestations of HBV infection in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a serious health prob- lem in developing and ... superfamily and C-type lectin superfamily (McQueen and. Parham 2002). Among ... KIR : HLA genes in HBV patients from south India and found out that KIR ...

  16. ATLAS Tau Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Belanger-Champagne, C; Bosman, M; Brenner, R; Casado, MP; Czyczula, Z; Dam, M; Demers, S; Farrington, S; Igonkina, O; Kalinowski, A; Kanaya, N; Osuna, C; Pérez, E; Ptacek, E; Reinsch, A; Saavedra, A; Sopczak, A; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Tsuno, S; Vorwerk, V; Watson, A; Xella, S

    2008-01-01

    Moving to the high energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons will become a necessary and very powerful tool, allowing a discovery of physics beyond Standard Model. Many models, among them light SM Higgs and various SUSY models, predict an abundant production of taus with respect to other leptons. The reconstruction of hadronic tau decays, although a very challenging task in hadronic enviroments, allows to increase a signal efficiency by at least of factor 2, and provides an independent control sample to disantangle lepton tau decays from prompt electrons and muons. Thanks to the advanced calorimetry and tracking, the ATLAS experiment has developed tools to efficiently identify hadronic taus at the trigger level. In this presentation we will review the characteristics of taus and the methods to suppress low-multiplicity, low-energy jets contributions as well as we will address the tau trigger chain which provide a rejection rate of 10^5. We will further present plans for commissioning the ATLA...

  17. The D0 calorimeter trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guida, J.

    1992-12-01

    The D0 calorimeter trigger system consists of many levels to make physics motivated trigger decisions. The Level-1 trigger uses hardware techniques to reduce the trigger rate from ∼ 100kHz to 200Hz. It forms sums of electromagnetic and hadronic energy, globally and in towers, along with finding the missing transverse energy. A minimum energy is set on these energy sums to pass the event. The Level-2 trigger is a set of software filters, operating in a parallel-processing microvax farm which further reduces the trigger rate to a few Hertz. These filters will reject events which lack electron candidates, jet candidates, or missing transverse energy in the event. The performance of these triggers during the early running of the D0 detector will also be discussed

  18. Surgery for trigger finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Haroldo Junior; Tamaoki, Marcel Jun; Lenza, Mário; Gomes Dos Santos, Joao Baptista; Faloppa, Flávio; Belloti, Joao Carlos

    2018-02-20

    Trigger finger is a common clinical disorder, characterised by pain and catching as the patient flexes and extends digits because of disproportion between the diameter of flexor tendons and the A1 pulley. The treatment approach may include non-surgical or surgical treatments. Currently there is no consensus about the best surgical treatment approach (open, percutaneous or endoscopic approaches). To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different methods of surgical treatment for trigger finger (open, percutaneous or endoscopic approaches) in adults at any stage of the disease. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS up to August 2017. We included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials that assessed adults with trigger finger and compared any type of surgical treatment with each other or with any other non-surgical intervention. The major outcomes were the resolution of trigger finger, pain, hand function, participant-reported treatment success or satisfaction, recurrence of triggering, adverse events and neurovascular injury. Two review authors independently selected the trial reports, extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias. Measures of treatment effect for dichotomous outcomes calculated risk ratios (RRs), and mean differences (MDs) or standardised mean differences (SMD) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). When possible, the data were pooled into meta-analysis using the random-effects model. GRADE was used to assess the quality of evidence for each outcome. Fourteen trials were included, totalling 1260 participants, with 1361 trigger fingers. The age of participants included in the studies ranged from 16 to 88 years; and the majority of participants were women (approximately 70%). The average duration of symptoms ranged from three to 15 months, and the follow-up after the procedure ranged from eight weeks to 23 months.The studies reported nine types of comparisons: open surgery versus steroid injections (two

  19. The Protective Role of HLA-DRB1∗13 in Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Andreia; Carvalho, Cláudia; Leal, Bárbara; Brás, Sandra; Lopes, Dina; Martins da Silva, Ana; Santos, Ernestina; Torres, Tiago; Almeida, Isabel; Farinha, Fátima; Barbosa, Paulo; Marinho, António; Selores, Manuela; Correia, João; Vasconcelos, Carlos; Costa, Paulo P.; da Silva, Berta Martins

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are characterized by a multifactorial aetiology and a complex genetic background, with the MHC region playing a major role. We genotyped for HLA-DRB1 locus 1228 patients with AIDs-213 with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 166 with Psoriasis or Psoriatic Arthritis (Ps + PsA), 153 with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 67 with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc), 536 with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), and 93 with Myasthenia Gravis (MG) and 282 unrelated controls. We confirmed previously established associations of HLA-DRB1∗15 (OR = 2.17) and HLA-DRB1∗03 (OR = 1.81) alleles with MS, HLA-DRB1∗03 with SLE (OR = 2.49), HLA-DRB1∗01 (OR = 1.79) and HLA-DRB1∗04 (OR = 2.81) with RA, HLA-DRB1∗07 with Ps + PsA (OR = 1.79), HLA-DRB1∗01 (OR = 2.28) and HLA-DRB1∗08 (OR = 3.01) with SSc, and HLA-DRB1∗03 with MG (OR = 2.98). We further observed a consistent negative association of HLA-DRB1∗13 allele with SLE, Ps + PsA, RA, and SSc (18.3%, 19.3%, 16.3%, and 11.9%, resp., versus 29.8% in controls). HLA-DRB1∗13 frequency in the AIDs group was 20.0% (OR = 0.58). Although different alleles were associated with particular AIDs, the same allele, HLA-DRB1∗13, was underrepresented in all of the six diseases analysed. This observation suggests that this allele may confer protection for AIDs, particularly for systemic and rheumatic disease. The protective effect of HLA-DRB1∗13 could be explained by a more proficient antigen presentation by these molecules, favouring efficient clonal deletion during thymic selection. PMID:26605347

  20. HLA DNA sequence variation among human populations: molecular signatures of demographic and selective events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Buhler

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular differences between HLA alleles vary up to 57 nucleotides within the peptide binding coding region of human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes, but it is still unclear whether this variation results from a stochastic process or from selective constraints related to functional differences among HLA molecules. Although HLA alleles are generally treated as equidistant molecular units in population genetic studies, DNA sequence diversity among populations is also crucial to interpret the observed HLA polymorphism. In this study, we used a large dataset of 2,062 DNA sequences defined for the different HLA alleles to analyze nucleotide diversity of seven HLA genes in 23,500 individuals of about 200 populations spread worldwide. We first analyzed the HLA molecular structure and diversity of these populations in relation to geographic variation and we further investigated possible departures from selective neutrality through Tajima's tests and mismatch distributions. All results were compared to those obtained by classical approaches applied to HLA allele frequencies.Our study shows that the global patterns of HLA nucleotide diversity among populations are significantly correlated to geography, although in some specific cases the molecular information reveals unexpected genetic relationships. At all loci except HLA-DPB1, populations have accumulated a high proportion of very divergent alleles, suggesting an advantage of heterozygotes expressing molecularly distant HLA molecules (asymmetric overdominant selection model. However, both different intensities of selection and unequal levels of gene conversion may explain the heterogeneous mismatch distributions observed among the loci. Also, distinctive patterns of sequence divergence observed at the HLA-DPB1 locus suggest current neutrality but old selective pressures on this gene. We conclude that HLA DNA sequences advantageously complement HLA allele frequencies as a source of data used

  1. The Intergenic Recombinant HLA-B*46:01 Has a Distinctive Peptidome that Includes KIR2DL3 Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Hugo G.; McMurtrey, Curtis P.; Han, Alex S.

    2017-01-01

    HLA-B*46:01 was formed by an intergenic mini-conversion, between HLA-B*15:01 and HLA-C*01:02, in Southeast Asia during the last 50,000 years, and it has since become the most common HLA-B allele in the region. A functional effect of the mini-conversion was introduction of the C1 epitope into HLA-...

  2. HLA is not predictive of posttransplant diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Romero, L F; Santiago-Delpín, E A; de Echegaray, Sally; Solis, D R; Rodriguez-Trinidad, A T; Gonzalez-Caraballo, Z A; Morales-Otero, L A

    2006-04-01

    New-onset posttransplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) is a frequent complication of kidney transplantation. The goal of this study was to identify if the tendency to develop PTDM was associated to the HLA, as is seen in the general population. A retrospective study was made of 525 patients who underwent renal transplantation between 1997 and 2004. They were divided into three categories depending on the diabetic status before and after kidney transplantation. The HLA profile of each patient was identified for class 1 and class 2 antigens including HLA-A, HLA-B, and DR-R. Antigen frequencies were calculated and gene frequencies derived. These were compared among the three groups and with the published data for the Puerto Rico population. Other variables studied included weight, age, gender, and family history. Seventy-two of 526 (13.7%) were diabetic before transplantation; 92/453 (20.3%) developed PTDM after kidney transplantation. Pretransplant diabetics showed a higher incidence of A3 (0.1102 vs 0.0869 vs 0.0361), DR4 (0.3334 vs 0.1932 vs 0.2124), and DR-13 (0.1835 vs 0.1115 vs 0.1175) than nondiabetics and the normal Puerto Rican population. Posttransplant diabetics showed a higher A3 (0.1154) and a higher DR3 (0.0675 vs 0.0295 vs 0.0022) than nondiabetics and normal population. PTDM was not associated statistically with the HLA in this group of transplant recipients, although A3 and DR3 were higher. Patients with the phenotype that is related to diabetes in the normal population did not have a higher incidence of diabetes in this series.

  3. HLA genetic profile of Mapuche (Araucanian) Amerindians from Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Diego; Parga-Lozano, Carlos; Moscoso, Juan; Areces, Cristina; Enriquez-de-Salamanca, Mercedes; Fernández-Honrado, Mercedes; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, Sedeka; Alonso-Rubio, Javier; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    Amerindian Mapuche (Araucanians) are now living in Chile and Argentina at both sides of Andean Mountains. They are anthropologically and genetically different from southernmost South America Patagonian Amerindians. Most of the HLA alleles found in our Mapuche sample are frequent or very frequent in North and South America Amerindians: (1) Class I: A*02:01, A*03:01, A*68:01, B*39:09, B*51:01, (2) Class II: DRB1*03:01, DRB1*04:03, DRB1*07:01, DRB1*08:02, DRB1*14:02, DRB1*16:02. One of the nine most frequent extended haplotypes seems to be from European origin, suggesting the existence of a degree of admixture with Europeans in our Mapuche sample. It has been calculated of about 11 % admixture. Three of the extended haplotypes are also found in other Amerindians and five of them are newly found in Mapuche Amerindians: A*68:01-B*39:09-DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02; A*68:01-B*51:01-DRB1*04:03-DQB1*03:02; A*29:01-B*08:01-DRB1*03:01-DQB1*02:01; A*02:01-B*15:01-DRB1*04:03-DQB1*03:02; A*33:01-B*14:02-DRB1*07:01-DQB1*03:03. The medical importance of calculating HLA profile is discussed on the diagnostic (HLA and disease) and therapeutical bases of HLA pharmacogenomics and on the construction of a virtual transplantation HLA list profile. Also, anthropological conclusions are drawn.

  4. Triggering at high luminosity: fake triggers from pile-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.

    1983-01-01

    Triggers based on a cut in transverse momentum (p/sub t/) have proved to be useful in high energy physics both because they indicte that a hard constituent scattering has occurred and because they can be made quickly enough to gate electronics. These triggers will continue to be useful at high luminosities if overlapping events do not cause an excessive number of fake triggers. In this paper, I determine if this is indeed a problem at high luminosity machines

  5. Homozygous HLA-C1 is Associated with Reduced Risk of Relapse after HLA-Matched Transplantation in Patients with Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Nobuyoshi; Kanda, Junya; Tanaka, Junji; Yabe, Toshio; Morishima, Yasuo; Kim, Sung-Won; Najima, Yuho; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Eto, Tetsuya; Kanamori, Heiwa; Mori, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Naoki; Kondo, Tadakazu; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Uchida, Naoyuki; Inoue, Masami; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2018-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells assume graft-versus-leukemia alloreactivity after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) through their inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). KIR2D family members recognize HLA-C alleles with Asn80 (HLA-C1) or Lys80 (HLA-C2). The predominance of HLA-C1 over HLA-C2 and the frequent presence of KIR2DL1 are characteristic of Japanese people. We compared clinical outcomes among homozygous HLA-C1 (HLA-C1/C1) patients and heterozygous HLA-C1/C2 patients who underwent HLA-matched HSCT for hematologic malignancies by assessing the data of 10,638 patients from the Japanese national registry. HLA-C1/C1 recipients had a lower rate of relapse than HLA-C1/C2 recipients after transplantation for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) (hazard ratio [HR], .79; P = .006) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) (HR, .48; P = .025), but not for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (HR, 1.36), lymphoma (HR, .97), or low-grade myelodysplastic syndrome (HR, 1.40). We then grouped AML and CML patients together and divided them into several subgroups. Advantages of HLA-C1/C1 recipients over HLA-C1/C2 recipients regarding relapse were observed irrespective of donor relation (related: HR, .79, P = .069; unrelated: HR, .77, P = .022), preparative regimen (myeloablative: HR, .79, P = .014; reduced intensity: HR, .73, P = .084), and occurrence of acute graft-versus-host disease (yes: HR, .70, P = .122; no, HR .71, P = .026) or cytomegalovirus reactivation (reactivated: HR .67,P = .054; nonreactivated: HR .71, P = .033); however, these advantages were not observed in recipients with a delay in achieving complete chimerism (HR, 1.06). The advantage of decreasing relapse and extending relapse-free survival of C1/1 over C1/2 KIR-ligand status was most pronounced in T cell-depleted HSCT (HR, .27; P < .001 and HR, .30; P = .002, respectively) and in children age <15 years (HR, .29; P < .001 and HR .31; P

  6. Nostalgia: content, triggers, functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Arndt, Jamie; Routledge, Clay

    2006-11-01

    Seven methodologically diverse studies addressed 3 fundamental questions about nostalgia. Studies 1 and 2 examined the content of nostalgic experiences. Descriptions of nostalgic experiences typically featured the self as a protagonist in interactions with close others (e.g., friends) or in momentous events (e.g., weddings). Also, the descriptions contained more expressions of positive than negative affect and often depicted the redemption of negative life scenes by subsequent triumphs. Studies 3 and 4 examined triggers of nostalgia and revealed that nostalgia occurs in response to negative mood and the discrete affective state of loneliness. Studies 5, 6, and 7 investigated the functional utility of nostalgia and established that nostalgia bolsters social bonds, increases positive self-regard, and generates positive affect. These findings demarcate key landmarks in the hitherto uncharted research domain of nostalgia.

  7. Association of Human Leukocyte Antigen DRB1*15 and DRB1*15:01 Polymorphisms with Response to Immunosuppressive Therapy in Patients with Aplastic Anemia: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Li, Qing; Zhang, Ying; Li, Qiushuang; Ye, Baodong; Wu, Dijiong; Wu, Li; Lu, Hanti; Ji, Conghua

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to review and quantitatively analyze (1) the association of aplastic anemia (AA) with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*15 and HLA-DRB1*15:01 polymorphisms and (2) the association of HLA-DRB1*15 and HLA-DRB1*15:01 polymorphisms with response to immunosuppressive therapy (IST) in AA. Published studies have reported conflicting and heterogeneous results regarding the association of HLA-DRB1*15 and HLA-DRB1*15:01 polymorphisms with response to IST in AA. The PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese BioMedical Literature, Wangfang and Chinese Social Sciences Citation Index databases were searched. All relevant publications were searched through December 2015. Odds ratio (OR), risk ratio (RR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the comparison between case–control or cohort studies were evaluated. Finally, 24 articles were identified. For HLA-DRB1*15 and HLA-DRB1*15:01, the OR (95% CI) was 2.24(1.33–3.77), P 0.05). Sensitivity analyses revealed that the results were statistically robust. The meta-analysis suggested that HLA-DRB1*15 and HLA-DRB1*15:01 polymorphisms might be associated with increased AA risk in Asians. IST might be more effective in HLA-DRB1*15+ and HLA-DRB1*15:01+ Asian patients with AA than in HLA-DRB1*15− and HLA-DRB1*15:01− Asian patients with AA. Future studies with adequate methodological quality on gene–gene and gene–environment interactions and gene treatment may yield valid results. PMID:27611583

  8. The HLA-B*39 allele increases type 1 diabetes risk conferred by HLA-DRB1*04:04-DQB1*03:02 and HLA-DRB1*08-DQB1*04 class II haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikk, M-L; Kiviniemi, M; Laine, A-P; Härkönen, T; Veijola, R; Simell, O; Knip, M; Ilonen, J

    2014-01-01

    To further characterise the effect of the HLA-B*39 allele on type 1 diabetes risk we assessed its role in different HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes and genotypes using 1764 nuclear families with a diabetic child collected in the framework of the Finnish Paediatric Diabetes Register. HLA assays were based on sequence specific hybridization using lanthanide labelled oligonucleotide probes. Transmissions of major HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes with and without the HLA-B*39 allele to diabetic index cases were analysed by direct haplotype and allele counting. The HLA-B*39 allele significantly increased the disease risk conferred by DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 and (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotypes. The same effect was observed on genotype level as disease association for the HLA-B*39 allele was observed in multiple genotypes containing DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 or (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotypes. Finally we considered the two common subtypes of the HLA-B*39 allele, B*39:01 and B*39:06 and observed their unequal distribution when stratified for specific DR-DQ haplotypes. The risk for type 1 diabetes conferred by certain DR/DQ haplotypes is modified by the presence of the HLA-B*39 and this confirms the independent disease predisposing effect of the HLA-B*39 allele. The results can be applied in enhancing the sensitivity and specificity of DR/DQ based screening programs for subjects at disease risk. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of obesity was related to HLA-DQ in 2-4-year-old children at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Lernmark, Å; Uusitalo, U M; Lynch, K F; Veijola, R; Winkler, C; Larsson, H E; Rewers, M; She, J-X; Ziegler, A G; Simell, O G; Hagopian, W A; Akolkar, B; Krischer, J P; Vehik, K

    2014-12-01

    Body size is postulated to modulate type 1 diabetes as either a trigger of islet autoimmunity or an accelerator to clinical onset after seroconversion. As overweight and obesity continue to rise among children, the aim of this study was to determine whether human leukocyte antigen DQ (HLA-DQ) genotypes may be related to body size among children genetically at risk for type 1 diabetes. Repeated measures of weight and height were collected from 5969 children 2-4 years of age enrolled in The Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young prospective study. Overweight and obesity was determined by the International Obesity Task Force cutoff values that correspond to body mass index (BMI) of 25 and 30 kg m(-)(2) at age 18. The average BMI was comparable across specific HLA genotypes at every age point. The proportion of overweight was not different by HL A, but percent obesity varied by age with a decreasing trend among DQ2/8 carriers (P for trend=0.0315). A multivariable regression model suggested DQ2/2 was associated with higher obesity risk at age 4 (odds ratio, 2.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-4.80) after adjusting for the development of islet autoantibody and/or type 1 diabetes. The HLA-DQ2/2 genotype may predispose to obesity among 2-4-year-old children with genetic risk for type 1 diabetes.

  10. Contributions of vitamin D response elements and HLA promoters to multiple sclerosis risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, David; Castley, Alison; Tschochner, Monika; James, Ian; Qiu, Wei; Sayer, David; Christiansen, Frank T; Witt, Campbell; Mastaglia, Frank; Carroll, William; Kermode, Allan

    2012-08-07

    The identification of a vitamin D-responsive (VDRE) motif within the HLA-DRB1*15:01 promoter region provides an attractive explanation for the combined effects of HLA-DR inheritance and vitamin D exposure on multiple sclerosis (MS) risk. We therefore sought to incorporate HLA-DRB1 promoter variation, including the VDRE motif, in an assessment of HLA-DRB1-associated MS risk. We utilized 32 homozygous HLA cell lines (covering 17 DRB1 alleles) and 53 heterozygote MS samples (20 DRB1 alleles) for HLA-DRB1 promoter sequencing. The influence of HLA-DRB1 variation on MS risk was then assessed among 466 MS cases and 498 controls. The majority of HLA*DRB1 alleles (including HLA-DRB1*15:01) express the functional VDRE motif, apart from HLA-DRB1*04, *07, and *09 alleles that comprise the HLA-DR53 serologic group. Allele-specific variation within functional X-box and Y-box motifs was also associated with serologically defined HLA-DR haplotypes. Incorporating these results in an analysis of MS risk, we identified a strong protective effect of HLA-DRB1*04, *07, and *09 (DR53) alleles (p = 10(-12)) and elevated risk associated with DRB1*15 and *16 (DR51) and *08 (DR8) alleles (p < 10(-18)). HLA-DRB1 groups corresponding to serologic HLA-DR profiles as well as promoter polymorphism haplotypes effectively stratified MS risk over an 11-fold range, suggesting functional relationships between risk-modifying HLA-DRB1 alleles. An independent contribution of VDRE motif variation to increase MS risk was not discernible, although vitamin D-dependent regulation of HLA-DR expression may still play an important role given that HLA-DRB1*04/*07/*09 (DR53) alleles that express the "nonresponsive" VDRE motif were associated with significantly reduced risk of MS.

  11. Low Constitutive Cell Surface Expression of HLA-B Is Caused by a Posttranslational Mechanism Involving Glu180 and Arg239

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellgren, Christoffer; Ekwelum, Vanessa A. C.; Ormhøj, Maria

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I cell surface expression is crucial for normal immune responses, and variability in HLA expression may influence the course of infections. We have previously shown that classical HLA class I expression on many human cell types is biased with greatly reduced expression of HLA-B compared...... by affecting HLA processing in the Ag presentation pathway....

  12. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naive inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau trig...

  13. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Black, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    With the high luminosities of proton-proton collisions achieved at the LHC, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analysis. The naïve inclusive single tau lepton triggers now suffer from severe rate limitations. To allow for a large program of physics analyses with taus, the development of topological triggers that combine tau signatures with other measured quantities in the event is required. These combined triggers open many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model and to search for the Standard Model Higgs. We present the status and performance of the hadronic tau trigger in ATLAS. We demonstrate that the ATLAS tau trigger ran remarkably well over 2011, and how the lessons learned from 2011 led to numerous improvements in the preparation of the 2012 run. These improvements include the introduction of tau selection criteria that are robust against varying pileup scenarios, and the implementation of multivariate selection techniques in the tau tri...

  14. The molecule HLA-G: radiosensitivity indicator of a human melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelin, S.C.; Gallegos, C.E.; Dubner, D.L.; Baffa Trasci, S.; Favier, B.; Carosella, E.D.

    2010-01-01

    The physiological and pathological relevance of the HLA-G molecule (non-classical Human Leukocyte Antigen) has been motif of important research studies. Its distribution is restricted to only few tissues. HLA-G takes part in the implantation after in vitro fecundation, in graft tolerance, in auto-immune diseases, and in tumoral immune escape. Its expression has been demonstrated in more than 30% of tumors of 15 different histological types. Gamma radiation modulates HLA-G expression at the cell surface. However, its involvement in tumoral radiosensitivity has not been demonstrated yet. The objective of this work was to demonstrate if the HLA-G molecule intervenes in the radiosensibility of human melanoma cells cultured in vitro. For this purpose we used the human melanoma cell line M8, which was transfected with the plasmid containing the HLA-G gene (M8 HLA-G+) or with the plasmid alone, without the HLA-G gene (M8 pc DNA). Both cell lines were irradiated with 0, 2, 5 y 10 Gy and in all cases survival frequency was determined with the clonogenic assay. We observed a significant reduction in M8 HLA-G+ survival with respect to M8 pc DNA for all irradiation doses and was independent of doses. These results, if confirmed in other histological types, could postulate the HLA-G molecule as a tumoral radiosensitivity marker. The specific mechanism involved in the radiosensibility modification exerted by HLA-G has not been elucidated yet. (authors) [es

  15. HLA class Ib molecules and immune cells in pregnancy and preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezana eDjurisic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research, the highly prevalent pregnancy complication preeclampsia, ‘the disease of theories’, has remained an enigma. Indeed, the etiology of preeclampsia is largely unknown. A compiling amount of studies indicate that the pathological basis involves a complex array of genetic predisposition and immunological maladaptation, and that a contribution from the mother, the father and the fetus is likely to be important. The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA –G is an increasing focus of research in relation to preeclampsia. The HLA-G molecule is primarily expressed by the extravillous trophoblast cells lining the placenta together with the two other HLA class Ib molecules, HLA-E and HLA-F. Soluble isoforms of HLA-G have been detected in the early endometrium, the matured cumulus-oocyte complex, maternal blood of pregnant women, in umbilical cord blood, and lately, in seminal plasma. HLA-G is believed to be involved in modulating immune responses in the context of vascular remodeling during pregnancy as well as in dampening potential harmful immune attacks raised against the semi-allogeneic fetus. In addition, HLA-G genetic variants are associated with both membrane-bound and soluble forms of HLA-G, and, in some studies, with preeclampsia. In this review, a genetic contribution from the mother, the father and the fetus, together with the presence and function of various immune cells of relevance in pregnancy, are reviewed in relation to HLA-G and preeclampsia.

  16. AMBIGUITY OF LOCI DURING HLA-TYPING ON SSO TECHNOLOGY AND ATTEMPT TO RESOLVE THEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Loginova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sequence specific oligonucleotides typing was used to identify human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A, B, DRB1 alleles from 705 recruited volunteers with Volga Federal District for unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry and 155 of their number at locus HLA-C. 48 samples cannot be entered into the database because of ambiguities in the identification of allelic loci on HLA-class I – HLA-A, HLA-B. To resolution of ambiguity use reagents kits AlleleSEQR HLA Sequencing, which allowed to reveal the ambiguity of the locus HLA-A, 44% of cases, the loci HLA-B and HLA-C – 40% of cases. Application software HARPs Finder showed the possibility of resolution of all identified allelic ambiguities (with the exception of types of ambiguity – A*03/A*32 or A*74:13/A*32:04 and A*01/A*11 or A*36:04/A*11 with the addition of basic kits AlleleSEQR HLA Sequencing reagents kit Al- leleSEQR HARPs. 

  17. Charting improvements in US registry HLA typing ambiguity using a typing resolution score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunić, Vanja; Gragert, Loren; Schneider, Joel; Müller, Carlheinz; Maiers, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Unrelated stem cell registries have been collecting HLA typing of volunteer bone marrow donors for over 25years. Donor selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is based primarily on matching the alleles of donors and patients at five polymorphic HLA loci. As HLA typing technologies have continually advanced since the beginnings of stem cell transplantation, registries have accrued typings of varied HLA typing ambiguity. We present a new typing resolution score (TRS), based on the likelihood of self-match, that allows the systematic comparison of HLA typings across different methods, data sets and populations. We apply the TRS to chart improvement in HLA typing within the Be The Match Registry of the United States from the initiation of DNA-based HLA typing to the current state of high-resolution typing using next-generation sequencing technologies. In addition, we present a publicly available online tool for evaluation of any given HLA typing. This TRS objectively evaluates HLA typing methods and can help define standards for acceptable recruitment HLA typing. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. High-sensitivity HLA typing by Saturated Tiling Capture Sequencing (STC-Seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Li, Ran; Wu, Chao; Ding, Yibin; Liu, Yanning; Jia, Danmei; Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Xiang; Zhu, Jing; Zheng, Min; Jia, Junling

    2018-01-15

    Highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes are responsible for fine-tuning the adaptive immune system. High-resolution HLA typing is important for the treatment of autoimmune and infectious diseases. Additionally, it is routinely performed for identifying matched donors in transplantation medicine. Although many HLA typing approaches have been developed, the complexity, low-efficiency and high-cost of current HLA-typing assays limit their application in population-based high-throughput HLA typing for donors, which is required for creating large-scale databases for transplantation and precision medicine. Here, we present a cost-efficient Saturated Tiling Capture Sequencing (STC-Seq) approach to capturing 14 HLA class I and II genes. The highly efficient capture (an approximately 23,000-fold enrichment) of these genes allows for simplified allele calling. Tests on five genes (HLA-A/B/C/DRB1/DQB1) from 31 human samples and 351 datasets using STC-Seq showed results that were 98% consistent with the known two sets of digitals (field1 and field2) genotypes. Additionally, STC can capture genomic DNA fragments longer than 3 kb from HLA loci, making the library compatible with the third-generation sequencing. STC-Seq is a highly accurate and cost-efficient method for HLA typing which can be used to facilitate the establishment of population-based HLA databases for the precision and transplantation medicine.

  19. HLA-G in human reproduction: aspects of genetics, function and pregnancy complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2006-01-01

    The non-classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib genes, HLA-E, -G and -F, are located on chromosome 6 in the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC). HLA class Ib antigens resemble the HLA class Ia antigens in many ways, but several major differences have been described. This review will, in particular, discuss HLA-G and its role in human reproduction and in the human MHC. HLA-G seems to be important in the modulation of the maternal immune system during pregnancy and thereby the maternal acceptance of the semiallogenic fetus. Recent findings regarding aspects of HLA-G polymorphism, the possible significance of this polymorphism in respect to HLA-G function and certain complications of pregnancy (such as pre-eclampsia and recurrent spontaneous abortions (RSA)) are discussed together with possible importance to IVF. Finally, aspects of a possible role of HLA-G in organ transplantation and in inflammatory or autoimmune disease, and of HLA-G in an evolutionary context, are also briefly examined.

  20. HLA sharing among couples appears unrelated to idiopathic recurrent fetal loss in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghraby, J S; Tamim, H; Anacan, V; Al Khalaf, H; Moghraby, S A

    2010-08-01

    Recurrent fetal loss (RFL) is a prevalent problem affecting approximately 1% of all women of childbearing age. Many factors can lead to RFL; however, recent studies have indicated the important role of the maternal immune system in this process. The human leukocyte antigens (HLA), HLA-linked genes and regulatory factors play an important role in fetal loss and in fetal development. The current retrospective study was preformed to examine the HLA alleles shared between couples with RFL in Saudi Arabia, using a large cohort of women (having three or more RFL). Specific HLA alleles that could influence this condition, or the number of miscarriages experienced, were expected to be highlighted in this way. A total of 253 consecutive patients who visited the RFL clinic at the King AbdulAziz Medical City, National Guard Hospital in Riyadh were included in this study. They included 54 consanguineous couples, 132 non-consanguineous couples and another 67 couples shared only their tribal origin. Clinical examinations as well as laboratory investigations were carried out on each patient. Class I HLA, HLA-A, HLA-B and HLA-C, and Class II HLA, HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, were typed for each patient and their partner. No relationship was seen between sharing of HLA alleles and the number of RFL experienced by the couples, among neither consanguineous nor non-consanguineous couples. Although the results of this study suggest that HLA sharing is not an indicative factor in RFL, definitive conclusions on this topic must be based on large case-control studies.

  1. Gene Map of the HLA Region, Graves' Disease and Hashimoto Thyroiditis, and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasazuki, Takehiko; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Morishima, Satoko; Morishima, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genomic region spanning about 4 Mb is the most gene dense and the polymorphic stretches in the human genome. A total of the 269 loci were identified, including 145 protein coding genes mostly important for immunity and 50 noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Biological function of these ncRNAs remains unknown, becoming hot spot in the studies of HLA-associated diseases. The genomic diversity analysis in the HLA region facilitated by next-generation sequencing will pave the way to molecular understanding of linkage disequilibrium structure, population diversity, histocompatibility in transplantation, and associations with autoimmune diseases. The 4-digit DNA genotyping of HLA for six HLA loci, HLA-A through DP, in the patients with Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) identified six susceptible and three resistant HLA alleles. Their epistatic interactions in controlling the development of these diseases are shown. Four susceptible and one resistant HLA alleles are shared by GD and HT. Two HLA alleles associated with GD or HT control the titers of autoantibodies to thyroid antigens. All these observations led us to propose a new model for the development of GD and HT. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donor (UR-HSCT) provides a natural experiment to elucidate the role of allogenic HLA molecules in immune response. Large cohort studies using HLA allele and clinical outcome data have elucidated that (1) HLA locus, allele, and haplotype mismatches between donor and patient, (2) specific amino acid substitution at specific positions of HLA molecules, and (3) ethnic background are all responsible for the immunological events related to UR-HSCT including acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), chronic GVHD, graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, and graft failure. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PREDICTIVE SIGNIFICANCE OF ANTI-HLA AUTOANTIBODIES IN HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Shevchenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to define the role of preformed anti-HLA antibodies (anti-HLA in antibody-mediated rejection (AMR and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV after heart transplantation. Materials and Methods. 140 heart transplant recipients were followed after heart transplantation performed for 106 dilated and 34 – ischemic cardiomyopathy. Anti-HLA was determined before transplantation by ELISA. Results. Recipients were divided into 2 groups: anti-HLA positive (n = 45, 32,1% and anti-HLA negative (n = 95, 67,9%. The incidence of AMR in anti-HLA positive group was 12 (26,67% and 11 (11,58% in anti-HLA negative group. Risk of AMR was significantly higher in anti-HLA positive recipients (RR 2,3: 95% CI 1,02–4,81, р = 0,03. During first three years after transplantation CAV was diagnosed in 9 (20% of anti-HLA positive recipients and in 7 (6,8% of patients without anti-HLA. (RR 2,7: 95% CI 1,08–6,82, р = 0,03. Survival in freedom from CAV in anti-HLA negative recipients was much higher than in anti-HLA positive recipients (0,89 ± 0,07, 0,72 ± 0,06, resp. (p = 0,02.Conclusions. The presence of preformed anti-HLA antibodies in candidates for heart transplantation increase the risk of AMR and CAV post transplantation in 2,3 and 2,7 times, respectively. 

  3. The ATLAS hadronic tau trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Mansoora

    2012-01-01

    The extensive tau physics programs of the ATLAS experiment relies heavily on trigger to select hadronic decays of tau lepton. Such a trigger is implemented in ATLAS to efficiently collect signal events, while keeping the rate of multi-jet background within the allowed bandwidth. This contribution summarizes the performance of the ATLAS hadronic tau trigger system during 2011 data taking period and improvements implemented for the 2012 data collection.

  4. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATSUSHITA, Takashi; CMS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41 fb-1 with a peak luminosity of 1.5 × 1034 cm-2s-1 and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS Level-1 trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implementation of more algorithms at a time than previously possible, allowing CMS to be more flexible in how it handles the available trigger bandwidth. Algorithms for a trigger menu, including topological requirements on multi-objects, can be realised in the Global Trigger using the newly developed trigger menu specification grammar. Analysis-like trigger algorithms can be represented in an intuitive manner and the algorithms are translated to corresponding VHDL code blocks to build a firmware. The grammar can be extended in future as the needs arise. The experience of implementing trigger menus on the upgraded Global Trigger system will be presented.

  5. HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 as genetic markers for carbamazepine hypersensitivity in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstutz, Ursula; Ross, Colin J.D.; Castro-Pastrana, Lucila I.; Rieder, Michael J.; Shear, Neil H.; Hayden, Michael R.; Carleton, Bruce C.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of hypersensitivity reactions including rare but life-threatening Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (HSS) limits the use of the anticonvulsant carbamazepine (CBZ). HLA-B*15:02 and HLA-A*31:01 have been identified as predictive genetic markers for CBZ hypersensitivity in Asian and European patients. To replicate these genetic associations in pediatric patients from North America with a diverse ethnic background, we investigated HLA-A*31:01 and HLA-B*15:02 in 42 children with CBZ hypersensitivity, and 91 CBZ-tolerant children from across Canada. HLA-A*31:01 was significantly associated with CBZ-HSS (odds ratio (OR): 26.4, p=0.0025) and maculopapular exanthems (OR: 8.6, p=0.0037), but not with CBZ-SJS. Conversely, HLA-B*15:02 was associated with CBZ-SJS (OR: 38.6, p=0.002), but not HSS and maculopapular exanthems. This study is the first to demonstrate the association of HLA-A*31:01 with CBZ hypersensitivity in children, providing important replication of this association and highlighting the importance of HLA-A*31:01 as a predictive biomarker across various ancestries. PMID:23588310

  6. Comparison of allele frequency for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ between patients with ECC and caries-free children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagherian A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Early childhood caries (ECC is one of the most common diseases of childhood. The etiology of ECC is multifactorial and both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. Genetic variations in the hosts may contribute to changes in the risk for dental caries. Genetic factors such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA have recently been suggested as a predisposing factor. Aim: The aim of this study was to look for an association between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 with ECC for developing new strategies for the diagnosis as well as the prevention of the disease. Design: In this study, we extracted the genomic DNAs from whole blood samples of 44 patients with ECC and 35 caries-free children by the salting-out method. We amplified the genomic DNA by PCR-SSP and then HLA-typing was performed for all alleles. Results: The results revealed a significant increase in the frequency of HLA-DRB1FNx0104 in the patient group (P = 0.019. The odds ratio for this allele was detected to be 10. The frequency of HLA-DQB1 alleles was not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion: The above results suggest that HLA-DRB1FNx0104 is associated with the susceptibility to ECC. Thus HLA-DRB1FNx0104 detection as a molecular marker for early diagnosis of ECC may be recommended.

  7. Association of HLA-A*02:06 and HLA-DRB1*04:05 with clinical subtypes of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagimachi, Masakatsu; Miyamae, Takako; Naruto, Takuya; Hara, Takuma; Kikuchi, Masako; Hara, Ryoki; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Mori, Masaaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji; Goto, Hiroaki; Morita, Satoshi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Kimura, Akinori; Yokota, Shumpei

    2011-03-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common forms of pediatric chronic arthritis. JIA is a clinically heterogeneous disease. Therefore, the genetic background of JIA may also be heterogeneous. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and susceptibility to JIA and/or uveitis, which is one of the most devastating complications of JIA. A total of 106 Japanese articular JIA patients (67 with polyarthritis and 39 with oligoarthritis) and 678 healthy controls were genotyped for HLA-A, -B and -DRB1 by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe methodology. HLA-A(*)02:06 was the risk factor for JIA accompanied by uveitis after adjustment for clinical factors (corrected P-value < 0.001, odds ratio (OR) 11.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.2-43.0). On the other hand, HLA-DRB1(*)04:05 was associated with polyarticular JIA (corrected P-value < 0.001, OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7-4.8). We found an association of HLA-A(*)02:06 with susceptibility to JIA accompanied by uveitis, which might be considered a separate clinical JIA entity. We also found an association between HLA-DRB1(*)04:05 and polyarticular JIA. Thus, clinical subtypes of JIA can be classified by the presence of the specific HLA alleles, HLA-A(*)02:06 and DRB1(*)04:05.

  8. Association of HLA-A and HLA-B Alleles with Lamotrigine-Induced Cutaneous Adverse Drug Reactions in the Thai Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napatrupron Koomdee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lamotrigine (LTG is commonly used for treatment of epilepsy and bipolar disorder. It is one of the common cause of cutaneous adverse drug reactions (CADR. Clinical symptoms of LTG-induced CADR range from maculopapular exanthema (MPE to severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCAR. This study aimed to determine the association of the LTG-induced CADR with human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles in Thai patients.Methods: Fifteen patients with LTG-induced CADR [10 MPE; 4 Stevens–Johnson syndrome; and 1 drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms] and 50 LTG-tolerant controls were included in the study. HLA-A and HLA-B genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific oligonucleotides probes.Results: The proportion of HLA-A∗02:07 and HLA-B∗15:02 allele carriers were significantly higher in the LTG-induced CADR group than in the tolerant controls [odds ratio (OR: 7.83; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.60–38.25; P = 0.013, and OR: 4.89; 95% CI: 1.28–18.67; P = 0.014]. In addition, subjects with HLA-A∗33:03, HLA-B∗15:02, and HLA-B∗44:03 were significantly higher in the LTG-induced MPE group than in the tolerant controls (OR: 8.27; 95% CI: 1.83–37.41; P = 0.005, OR: 7.33; 95% CI: 1.63–33.02; P = 0.005; and OR: 10.29; 95% CI: 1.45–72.81; P = 0.029. In contrast to the LTG-induced MPE group, there were no significant differences between HLA alleles and LTG-induced SCAR group.Conclusion:HLA-A∗02:07 and HLA-B∗15:02 were associated with LTG-induced CADR in Thai patients. We also identified an association between HLA-A∗33:03, HLA-B∗15:02, and HLA-B∗44:03 and LTG-induced MPE in this population. These results suggest that these alleles could be useful screening markers for preventing CADR before LTG treatment in Thai patients, but further replication studies with larger sample sizes are needed.

  9. Strategies to work with HLA data in human populations for histocompatibility, clinical transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics: HLA-NET methodological recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Mazas, A; Vidan-Jeras, B; Nunes, J M; Fischer, G; Little, A-M; Bekmane, U; Buhler, S; Buus, S; Claas, F H J; Dormoy, A; Dubois, V; Eglite, E; Eliaou, J F; Gonzalez-Galarza, F; Grubic, Z; Ivanova, M; Lie, B; Ligeiro, D; Lokki, M L; da Silva, B Martins; Martorell, J; Mendonça, D; Middleton, D; Voniatis, D Papioannou; Papasteriades, C; Poli, F; Riccio, M E; Vlachou, M Spyropoulou; Sulcebe, G; Tonks, S; Nevessignsky, M Toungouz; Vangenot, C; van Walraven, A-M; Tiercy, J-M

    2012-12-01

    HLA-NET (a European COST Action) aims at networking researchers working in bone marrow transplantation, epidemiology and population genetics to improve the molecular characterization of the HLA genetic diversity of human populations, with an expected strong impact on both public health and fundamental research. Such improvements involve finding consensual strategies to characterize human populations and samples and report HLA molecular typings and ambiguities; proposing user-friendly access to databases and computer tools and defining minimal requirements related to ethical aspects. The overall outcome is the provision of population genetic characterizations and comparisons in a standard way by all interested laboratories. This article reports the recommendations of four working groups (WG1-4) of the HLA-NET network at the mid-term of its activities. WG1 (Population definitions and sampling strategies for population genetics' analyses) recommends avoiding outdated racial classifications and population names (e.g. 'Caucasian') and using instead geographic and/or cultural (e.g. linguistic) criteria to describe human populations (e.g. 'pan-European'). A standard 'HLA-NET POPULATION DATA QUESTIONNAIRE' has been finalized and is available for the whole HLA community. WG2 (HLA typing standards for population genetics analyses) recommends retaining maximal information when reporting HLA typing results. Rather than using the National Marrow Donor Program coding system, all ambiguities should be provided by listing all allele pairs required to explain each genotype, according to the formats proposed in 'HLA-NET GUIDELINES FOR REPORTING HLA TYPINGS'. The group also suggests taking into account a preliminary list of alleles defined by polymorphisms outside the peptide-binding sites that may affect population genetic statistics because of significant frequencies. WG3 (Bioinformatic strategies for HLA population data storage and analysis) recommends the use of programs capable

  10. GPER mediated estradiol reduces miR-148a to promote HLA-G expression in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Sifeng, E-mail: taosifeng@aliyun.com; He, Haifei; Chen, Qiang; Yue, Wenjie

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • E2 induces the level of miR-148a in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. • GPER mediates the E2-induced increase of miR-148a in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. • E2-GPER regulates the expression of HLA-G by miR-148a. - Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common malignant diseases in women. miR-148a plays an important role in regulation of cancer cell proliferation and cancer invasion and down-regulation of miR-148a has been reported in both estrogen receptor (ER) positive and triple-negative (TN) breast cancer. However, the regulation mechanism of miR-148a is unclear. The role of estrogen signaling, a signaling pathway is important in development and progression of breast cancer. Therefore, we speculated that E2 may regulate miR-148a through G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1 (GPER). To test our hypothesis, we checked the effects of E2 on miR-148a expression in ER positive breast cancer cell MCF-7 and TN cancer cell MDA-MB-231. Then we used GPER inhibitor G15 to investigate whether GPER is involved in regulation of E2 on miR-148a. Furthermore, we analyzed whether E2 affects the expression of HLA-G, which is a miR-148a target gene through GPER. The results showed that E2 induces the level of miR-148a in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, GPER mediates the E2-induced increase in miR-148a expression in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells and E2-GPER regulates the expression of HLA-G by miR-148a. In conclusion, our findings offer important new insights into the ability of estrogenic GPER signaling to trigger HLA-G expression through inhibiting miR-148a that supports immune evasion in breast cancer.

  11. Insights into Alpha-Hemolysin (Hla) Evolution and Expression among Staphylococcus aureus Clones with Hospital and Community Origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Ana; Nielsen, Jesper B; Boye, Kit

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alpha-hemolysin (Hla) is a major virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus infection, being active against a wide range of host cells. Although hla is ubiquitous in S. aureus, its genetic diversity and variation in expression in different genetic backgrounds...... and SCCmec typing. The internal regions of hla and the hla promoter were sequenced and gene expression was assessed by RT-PCR. RESULTS: Alpha-hemolysin encoding- and promoter sequences were diverse, with 12 and 23 different alleles, respectively. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we suggest that hla may have...... in the RNAIII binding site were not associated to hla expression. Although expression rates of hla were in general strain-specific, we observed CA clones showed significantly higher hla expression (p = 0.003) when compared with HA clones. CONCLUSION: We propose that the hla gene has evolved together...

  12. Adoptive T cell therapy targeting CD1 and MR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingxi eGuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has demonstrated clinically relevant efficacy in treating malignant and infectious diseases. However, much of these therapies have been focused on enhancing, or generating de novo, effector functions of conventional T cells recognizing HLA molecules. Given the heterogeneity of HLA alleles, mismatched patients are ineligible for current HLA-restricted adoptive T cell therapies. CD1 and MR1 are class I-like monomorphic molecules and their restricted T cells possess unique T cell receptor specificity against entirely different classes of antigens. CD1 and MR1 molecules present lipid and vitamin B metabolite antigens, respectively, and offer a new front of targets for T cell therapies. This review will cover the recent progress in the basic research of CD1, MR1, and their restricted T cells that possess translational potential.

  13. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition of HLA-A/B antigens introduced into EL4 cells by cell-liposome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, V H; Powers, G A; Moore, L C; Holterman, M J; Correa-Freire, M C

    1984-01-01

    HLA-A2 and -B7 antigens were introduced into EL4 (H-2b) cells by cell-liposome fusion and were used as targets or stimulators for cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated in C57B1/6 (H-2b) mice. It was found that such EL4-HLA cells were not recognized by CTL that had been raised against either a human cell line bearing these HLA antigens or the purified HLA-A2 and -B7 antigens reconstituted into liposomes. In addition, EL4-HLA cells were not capable of inducing CTL that could recognize a human cell line bearing HLA-A2 and -B7 antigens. Instead, EL4-HLA cells induced CTL that specifically lysed EL4-HLA cells and not human cells expressing HLA-A2 and -B7. CTL recognition required the presence of HLA antigens on the EL4 cell surface and was inhibited by antibodies against either H-2b or HLA-A/B. Monoclonal antibody binding studies showed that the expected polymorphic determinants of the HLA-A2 and -B7 antigens were still present on EL4-HLA cells. However, the specificity of CTL or their precursors that are capable of recognizing HLA-A2 or -B7 was altered after these antigens became associated with the EL4 surface. Possible explanations for these results are discussed.

  14. Trigger and data acquisition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Gaspar, C

    2001-01-01

    Past LEP experiments generate data at 0.5 MByte/s from particle detectors with over a quarter of a million readout channels. The process of reading out the electronic channels, treating them, and storing the date produced by each collision for further analysis by the physicists is called "Data Acquisition". Not all beam crossings produce interesting physics "events", picking the interesting ones is the task of the "Trigger" system. In order to make sure that the data is collected in good conditions the experiment's operation has to be constantly verified. In all, at LEP experiments over 100 000 parameters were monitored, controlled, and synchronized by the "Monotoring and control" system. In the future, LHC experiments will produce as much data in a single day as a LEP detector did in a full year's running with a raw data rate of 10 - 100 MBytes/s and will have to cope with some 800 million proton-proton collisions a second of these collisions only one in 100 million million is interesting for new particle se...

  15. An Evaluation of the High Level Architecture (HLA) as a Framework for NASA Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Michael R.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The High Level Architecture (HLA) is a current US Department of Defense and an industry (IEEE-1516) standard architecture for modeling and simulations. It provides a framework and set of functional rules and common interfaces for integrating separate and disparate simulators into a larger simulation. The goal of the HLA is to reduce software costs by facilitating the reuse of simulation components and by providing a runtime infrastructure to manage the simulations. In order to evaluate the applicability of the HLA as a technology for NASA space mission simulations, a Simulations Group at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) conducted a study of the HLA and developed a simple prototype HLA-compliant space mission simulator. This paper summarizes the prototyping effort and discusses the potential usefulness of the HLA in the design and planning of future NASA space missions with a focus on risk mitigation and cost reduction.

  16. HLA typing in acute optic neuritis. Relation to multiple sclerosis and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, J.L.; Madsen, H.O.; Ryder, L.P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients with ON refe......OBJECTIVE: To study the association of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and HLA findings to clarify the relationship between monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) and ON as part of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS). DESIGN: Population-based cohort of patients......: The frequency of HLA-DR15 was significantly increased in patients with ON + CDMS (52%) and ON (47%) compared with control subjects (31%). The frequency of HLA-DR17 was almost equal in the ON + CDMS (18%), ON (23%), and control (23%) groups. The frequencies of HLA-DQA-1B (55% in ON + CDMS, 58% in ON) and HLA...

  17. Molecular typing of HLA class II antigens in a São Paulo population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldberg A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we show data obtained from a normal population with a racially mixed profile typical of the city of São Paulo, State of São Paulo. Data were generated with polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP for HLA-DRB and polymerase chain reaction followed by hybridization with sequence specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSO for HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 loci. HLA-DRB, DQA1, DQB1 and haplotype frequencies as well as common linkage disequilibria were found. This population was also shown to be in genetic equilibrium according to the Hardy-Weinberg law. HLA-DR typing of a normal sample from the city of Porto Velho, State of Rondonia, highlighted the importance of different sets of HLA profiles found in other regions of the country. This database provides essential information for screening studies of disease associations, forensic analyses and transplants.

  18. Selective elution of HLA antigens and beta 2-microglobulin from human platelets by chloroquine diphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, K.J.

    1988-01-01

    To determine whether chloroquine can specifically elute HLA antigens and beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-M) from the platelet surface, quantitative immunofluorescence flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies were used to show that HLA antigens and beta 2-M were proportionally eluted from the platelet surface without affecting the membrane glycoproteins IIb and IIIa. Second, an autoradiogram of electrophoresed I-125-labeled platelets showed that only beta 2-M but not other I-125-labeled membrane proteins could be eluted. Although HLA antigens were poorly labeled by I-125 and could not be detected on the autoradiogram, the eluted HLA antigens could be detected by anti-HLA monoclonal antibody and immunoblotting techniques. No loss of plasma membrane integrity was observed by transmission electron microscopy after chloroquine treatment of platelets. The results indicate that chloroquine selectively elutes HLA antigens and their noncovalently associated beta 2-M without affecting other integral platelet membrane proteins

  19. Influence of HLA-D/DR antigen disparity in CTL generation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnsen, H.E.; Madsen, M.; Mossin, J.; Kristensen, T.

    1983-01-01

    This report describes the influence of HLA-D/-DR antigen disparity upon the level of cytotoxicity in allogeneic in vitro cultures. Allogeneic cultures, between unrelated HLA-D/-DR full house donors, tested in CML gave three different levels of cytotoxicity, termed weak, intermediate and strong cytotoxicity. HLA-D/-DR compatibility predicts weak cytotoxicity and two HLA-B antigen incompatibility predicts strong cytotoxicity. On the contrary, HLA-A antigens have no major influence upon the strength of cytotoxicity. Accepting that the MLC/CML reaction is an in vitro parallel to the in vivo transplantation of allogeneic tissue, the observations are in accordance with the results of HLA-D/-DR matching for graft survival in human renal transplantation. (author)

  20. Origin of Aymaras from Bolivia and their relationship with other Amerindians according to HLA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Siles, N; Moscoso, J; Zamora, J; Serrano-Vela, J I; Gomez-Casado, E; Castro, M J; Martinez-Laso, J

    2005-04-01

    Aymara Amerindians from the Titicaca Lake Andean highlands are studied for HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 gene frequencies. Genetic distances, neighbour-joining and correspondence analyses are performed by using other Amerindian and worldwide populations (15384 chromosomes are studied). The HLA genetic profile of Aymaras is different from neighbouring and language-related Quechuas (Incas). Both Quechuas and Aymaras seem to present an HLA-DRB1*0901 high frequency, which is present in a very low frequency or absent in Mesoamericans (Mazatecans, Mayans) and most studied Amerindians. Moreover, it is observed a closer relatedness of Aymaras with Amerindians from the Amazon Basin and Chaco lowlands, compared to Quechuans.

  1. Somatic HLA mutations expose the role of class I–mediated autoimmunity in aplastic anemia and its clonal complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Jamie L.; Xie, Hongbo M.; Stanley, Natasha; Atienza, Jamie; Perdigones, Nieves; Nicholas, Peter; Ferriola, Deborah; Li, Yimei; Huang, Hugh; Ye, Wenda; Morrissette, Jennifer J. D.; Kearns, Jane; Porter, David L.; Podsakoff, Gregory M.; Eisenlohr, Laurence C.; Biegel, Jaclyn A.; Chou, Stella T.; Monos, Dimitrios S.; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S.

    2017-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is an acquired deficiency of early hematopoietic cells, characterized by inadequate blood production, and a predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, aAA is thought to be driven by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)–restricted T cell immunity, with earlier studies favoring HLA class II-mediated pathways. Using whole-exome sequencing (WES), we recently identified 2 patients with aAA with somatic mutations in HLA class I genes. We hypothesized that HLA class I mutations are pathognomonic for autoimmunity in aAA, but were previously underappreciated because the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region is notoriously difficult to analyze by WES. Using a combination of targeted deep sequencing of HLA class I genes and single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) genotyping, we screened 66 patients with aAA for somatic HLA class I loss. We found somatic HLA loss in 11 patients (17%), with 13 loss-of-function mutations in HLA-A*33:03, HLA-A*68:01, HLA-B*14:02, and HLA-B*40:02 alleles. Three patients had more than 1 mutation targeting the same HLA allele. Interestingly, HLA-B*14:02 and HLA-B*40:02 were significantly overrepresented in patients with aAA compared with ethnicity-matched controls. Patients who inherited the targeted HLA alleles, regardless of HLA mutation status, had a more severe disease course with more frequent clonal complications as assessed by WES, SNP-A, and metaphase cytogenetics, and more frequent secondary MDS. The finding of recurrent HLA class I mutations provides compelling evidence for a predominant HLA class I-driven autoimmunity in aAA and establishes a novel link between immunogenetics and clonal evolution of patients with aAA. PMID:28971166

  2. Somatic HLA Mutations Expose the Role of Class I-Mediated Autoimmunity in Aplastic Anemia and its Clonal Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babushok, Daria V; Duke, Jamie L; Xie, Hongbo M; Stanley, Natasha; Atienza, Jamie; Perdigones, Nieves; Nicholas, Peter; Ferriola, Deborah; Li, Yimei; Huang, Hugh; Ye, Wenda; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Kearns, Jane; Porter, David L; Podsakoff, Gregory M; Eisenlohr, Laurence C; Biegel, Jaclyn A; Chou, Stella T; Monos, Dimitrios S; Bessler, Monica; Olson, Timothy S

    2017-10-10

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is an acquired deficiency of early hematopoietic cells, characterized by inadequate blood production, and a predisposition to myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and leukemia. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, aAA is thought to be driven by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-restricted T cell immunity, with earlier studies favoring HLA class II-mediated pathways. Using whole exome sequencing (WES), we recently identified two aAA patients with somatic mutations in HLA class I genes. We hypothesized that HLA class I mutations are pathognomonic for autoimmunity in aAA, but were previously underappreciated because the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) region is notoriously difficult to analyze by WES. Using a combination of targeted deep sequencing of HLA class I genes and single nucleotide polymorphism array (SNP-A) genotyping we screened 66 aAA patients for somatic HLA class I loss. We found somatic HLA loss in eleven patients (17%), with thirteen loss-of-function mutations in HLA-A *33:03, HLA-A *68:01, HLA-B *14:02 and HLA-B *40:02 alleles. Three patients had more than one mutation targeting the same HLA allele. Interestingly, HLA-B *14:02 and HLA-B *40:02 were significantly overrepresented in aAA patients, compared to ethnicity-matched controls. Patients who inherited the targeted HLA alleles, regardless of HLA mutation status, had a more severe disease course with more frequent clonal complications as assessed by WES, SNP-A, and metaphase cytogenetics, and more frequent secondary MDS. The finding of recurrent HLA class I mutations provides compelling evidence for a predominant HLA class I-driven autoimmunity in aAA, and establishes a novel link between aAA patients' immunogenetics and clonal evolution.

  3. Expression of a Chimeric Antigen Receptor Specific for Donor HLA Class I Enhances the Potency of Human Regulatory T Cells in Preventing Human Skin Transplant Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, D A; Philippeos, C; Fruhwirth, G O; Ibrahim, M A A; Hannen, R F; Cooper, D; Marelli-Berg, F M; Watt, F M; Lechler, R I; Maher, J; Smyth, L A; Lombardi, G

    2017-04-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy using recipient-derived Tregs expanded ex vivo is currently being investigated clinically by us and others as a means of reducing allograft rejection following organ transplantation. Data from animal models has demonstrated that adoptive transfer of allospecific Tregs offers greater protection from graft rejection compared to polyclonal Tregs. Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) are clinically translatable synthetic fusion proteins that can redirect the specificity of T cells toward designated antigens. We used CAR technology to redirect human polyclonal Tregs toward donor-MHC class I molecules, which are ubiquitously expressed in allografts. Two novel HLA-A2-specific CARs were engineered: one comprising a CD28-CD3ζ signaling domain (CAR) and one lacking an intracellular signaling domain (ΔCAR). CAR Tregs were specifically activated and significantly more suppressive than polyclonal or ΔCAR Tregs in the presence of HLA-A2, without eliciting cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, CAR and ΔCAR Tregs preferentially transmigrated across HLA-A2-expressing endothelial cell monolayers. In a human skin xenograft transplant model, adoptive transfer of CAR Tregs alleviated the alloimmune-mediated skin injury caused by transferring allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells more effectively than polyclonal Tregs. Our results demonstrated that the use of CAR technology is a clinically applicable refinement of Treg therapy for organ transplantation. © 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  4. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in alopecia areata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Frentz, G; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    fragment was increased to 65.0 per cent compared to 23.2 per cent in controls (RR = 6.1; p less than 10(-3)) suggesting that the previously reported associations between AA and both DR4 and DR5 is secondary to an association between AA and DQB1*0301, which codes for the beta-chain of the HLA-DQ molecule...

  5. The heterogeneous HLA genetic makeup of the Swiss population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhler, Stéphane; Nunes, José Manuel; Nicoloso, Grazia; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the HLA molecular variation across Switzerland in order to determine possible regional differences, which would be highly relevant to several purposes: optimizing donor recruitment strategies in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), providing reliable reference data in HLA and disease association studies, and understanding the population genetic background(s) of this culturally heterogeneous country. HLA molecular data of more than 20,000 HSCT donors from 9-13 recruitment centers of the whole country were analyzed. Allele and haplotype frequencies were estimated by using new computer tools adapted to the heterogeneity and ambiguity of the data. Non-parametric and resampling statistical tests were performed to assess Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, selective neutrality and linkage disequilibrium among different loci, both in each recruitment center and in the whole national registry. Genetic variation was explored through genetic distance and hierarchical analysis of variance taking into account both geographic and linguistic subdivisions in Switzerland. The results indicate a heterogeneous genetic makeup of the Swiss population: first, allele frequencies estimated on the whole national registry strongly deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, by contrast with the results obtained for individual centers; second, a pronounced differentiation is observed for Ticino, Graubünden, and, to a lesser extent, Wallis, suggesting that the Alps represent(ed) a barrier to gene flow; finally, although cultural (linguistic) boundaries do not represent a main genetic differentiation factor in Switzerland, the genetic relatedness between population from south-eastern Switzerland and Italy agrees with historical and linguistic data. Overall, this study justifies the maintenance of a decentralized donor recruitment structure in Switzerland allowing increasing the genetic diversity of the national--and hence global--donor registry. It also

  6. HLA DQβ restriction fragment length polymorphism and rheumatQid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two variants of the HLA-DR4-linked DQw3 allele, namely OQw7 and DQw8, were analysed in patients of mixed ancestry (Cape Coloureds) with rheumatoid arthritis and in healthy individuals from the same population group using a DQ-β specific cDNA probe. The DQw7 allele, identified by 3,4 kb Hind III or 3,7 kb and 6,9 ...

  7. National Marrow Donor Program. HLA Typing for Bone Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-30

    suggestion that low CFU doses were associated with delayed engraftment by day 28, but the effect disappeared by days 45 and 60 post transplant... chromosome 6, and non-HLA genetic factors may all influence the suitability and success of allogeneic stem cell transplants. The largest body of data...receptors (KIR) that specifically interact with MHC class I molecules. Genes encoding for these Ig-like ligands are found on chromosome 19. The

  8. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagliesi, M.G., E-mail: mg.bagliesi@pi.infn.i [University of Siena and INFN Pisa (Italy); Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N. [University of Siena and INFN Pisa (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5{mu}s. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  9. The TOTEM modular trigger system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagliesi, M.G.; Berretti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Greco, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Oliveri, E.; Pedreschi, E.; Scribano, A.; Spinella, F.; Turini, N.

    2010-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment will measure the total cross-section with the luminosity independent method and study elastic and diffractive scattering at the LHC. We are developing a modular trigger system, based on programmable logic, that will select meaningful events within 2.5μs. The trigger algorithm is based on a tree structure in order to obtain information compression. The trigger primitive is generated directly on the readout chip, VFAT, that has a specific fast output that gives low resolution hits information. In two of the TOTEM detectors, Roman Pots and T2, a coincidence chip will perform track recognition directly on the detector readout boards, while for T1 the hits are transferred from the VFATs to the trigger hardware. Starting from more than 2000 bits delivered by the detector electronics, we extract, in a first step, six trigger patterns of 32 LVDS signals each; we build, then, on a dedicated board, a 1-bit (L1) trigger signal for the TOTEM experiment and 16 trigger bits to the CMS experiment global trigger system for future common data taking.

  10. Upgrade trigger: Biannual performance update

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Couturier, Ben; Esen, Sevda; De Cian, Michel; De Vries, Jacco Andreas; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fontana, Marianna; Grillo, Lucia; Hasse, Christoph; Jones, Christopher Rob; Le Gac, Renaud; Matev, Rosen; Neufeld, Niko; Nikodem, Thomas; Polci, Francesco; Del Buono, Luigi; Quagliani, Renato; Schwemmer, Rainer; Seyfert, Paul; Stahl, Sascha; Szumlak, Tomasz; Vesterinen, Mika Anton; Wanczyk, Joanna; Williams, Mark Richard James; Yin, Hang; Zacharjasz, Emilia Anna

    2017-01-01

    This document presents the performance of the LHCb Upgrade trigger reconstruction sequence, incorporating changes to the underlying reconstruction algorithms and detector description since the Trigger and Online Upgrade TDR. An updated extrapolation is presented using the most recent example of an Event Filter Farm node.

  11. Minimum Bias Trigger in ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwee, Regina

    2010-01-01

    Since the restart of the LHC in November 2009, ATLAS has collected inelastic pp collisions to perform first measurements on charged particle densities. These measurements will help to constrain various models describing phenomenologically soft parton interactions. Understanding the trigger efficiencies for different event types are therefore crucial to minimize any possible bias in the event selection. ATLAS uses two main minimum bias triggers, featuring complementary detector components and trigger levels. While a hardware based first trigger level situated in the forward regions with 2.2 < |η| < 3.8 has been proven to select pp-collisions very efficiently, the Inner Detector based minimum bias trigger uses a random seed on filled bunches and central tracking detectors for the event selection. Both triggers were essential for the analysis of kinematic spectra of charged particles. Their performance and trigger efficiency measurements as well as studies on possible bias sources will be presented. We also highlight the advantage of these triggers for particle correlation analyses. (author)

  12. Epidemiologic and HLA Antigen Profile in Patients with Aplastic Anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taj, M.; Shamsi, T. S.; Ansari, S. H.; Farzana, T.; Nazi, A.; Nadeem, M.; Queresi, R. N.; Sheikh, K.; Kazmi, J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze patients suffering from aplastic anemia (AA, peripheral pancytopenia and hypocellular bone marrow in the absence of dysplasia, infiltration and fibrosis) for documenting patient's baseline characteristics and association with various human leucocyte antigens. Study Design: An observational, cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: The National Institute of Blood Disease (NIBD), Karachi, from March 2003 to August 2008. Methodology: All consecutive patients with confirmed diagnosis of AA were evaluated. Data included the baseline characteristics, complete blood counts (CBC), bone marrow biopsy findings, severity of disease, exposure to drugs or chemicals, viral serology and their HLA expression. The data was analyzed on SPSS programme and frequencies were documented. Results: Among 318 patients, there were 236 (74.21%) males and 82 (25.78%) females. Median age was 16 and 70% belonged to urban population. Drug exposure could be established in 23 (7.23%) of cases, while 4 (1.25%) were HBV surface antigen positive and 7 (2.2%) were HCV antibodies positive. In all, 73 (22.9%) had very severe AA, 195 (61.32%) had severe AA while 50 (15.7%) cases had non-severe AA. HLA B5 (52) showed high expression in 83 patients (26%) in comparison to 5.9% reported in healthy population. Conclusion: AA was found to affect young adult males living in urban areas. HLA B5 (52) showed higher expression in patients with aplastic anemia. (author)

  13. A glow of HLA typing in organ transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The transplant of organs and tissues is one of the greatest curative achievements of this century. In organ transplantation, the adaptive immunity is considered the main response exerted to the transplanted tissue, since the main goal of the immune response is the MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules expressed on the surface of donor cells. Cell surface molecules that induce an antigenic stimulus cause the rejection immune response to grafted tissue or organ. A wide variety of transplantation antigens have been described, including the major histocompatibility molecules, minor histocompatibility antigens, ABO blood group antigens and endothelial cell antigens. The sensitization to MHC antigens may be caused by transfusions, pregnancy, or failed previous grafts leading to development of anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies that are important factor responsible for graft rejection in solid organ transplantation and play a role in post-transfusion complication Anti-HLA Abs may be present in healthy individuals. Methods for HLA typing are described, including serological methods, molecular techniques of sequence-specific priming (SSP), sequence-specific oligonucleotide probing (SSOP), Sequence based typing (SBT) and reference strand-based conformation analysis (RSCA) method. Problems with organ transplantation are reservoir of organs and immune suppressive treatments that used to decrease rate of rejection with less side effect and complications. PMID:23432791

  14. Linkage disequilibrium in HLA cannot be explained by selective recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termijtelen, A; D'Amaro, J; van Rood, J J; Schreuder, G M

    1995-11-01

    Some combinations of HLA-A, -B and -DR antigens occur more frequently than would be expected from their gene frequencies in the population. This phenomenon, referred to as Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) has been the origin of many speculations. One hypothesis to explain LD is that some haplotypes are protected from recombination. A second hypothesis is that these HLA antigens preferentially recombine after cross-over to create an LD haplotype. We tested these 2 hypotheses: from a pool of over 10,000 families typed in our department, we analyzed 126 families in which HLA-A:B or B:DR recombinant offspring was documented. To overcome a possible bias in our material, we used the non-recombined haplotypes from the same 126 families as a control group. Our results show that the number of cross-overs through LD haplotypes is not significantly lower then would be expected if recombination occurred randomly. Also the number of LD haplotypes created upon recombination was not significantly increased.

  15. Role of HLA, KIR, MICA, and Cytokines Genes in Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarduli, Luciana Ribeiro; Sell, Ana Maria; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Ayo, Christiane Maria; Mazini, Priscila Saamara; Alves, Hugo Vicentin; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Many genes including HLA, KIR, and MICA genes, as well as polymorphisms in cytokines have been investigated for their role in infectious disease. HLA alleles may influence not only susceptibility or resistance to leprosy, but also the course of the disease. Some combinations of HLA and KIR may result in negative as well as positive interactions between NK cells and infected host cells with M. leprae, resulting in activation or inhibition of NK cells and, consequently, in death of bacillus. In addition, studies have demonstrated the influence of MICA genes in the pathogenesis of leprosy. Specifically, they may play a role in the interaction between NK cells and infected cells. Finally, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines have been influencing the clinical course of leprosy. Data from a wide variety of sources support the existence of genetic factors influencing the leprosy pathogenesis. These sources include twin studies, segregation analyses, family-based linkage and association studies, candidate gene association studies, and, most recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The purpose of this brief review was to highlight the importance of some immune response genes and their correlation with the clinical forms of leprosy, as well as their implications for disease resistance and susceptibility. PMID:23936864

  16. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis phagosome is a HLA-I processing competent organelle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff E Grotzke

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb resides in a long-lived phagosomal compartment that resists maturation. The manner by which Mtb antigens are processed and presented on MHC Class I molecules is poorly understood. Using human dendritic cells and IFN-gamma release by CD8(+ T cell clones, we examined the processing and presentation pathway for two Mtb-derived antigens, each presented by a distinct HLA-I allele (HLA-Ia versus HLA-Ib. Presentation of both antigens is blocked by the retrotranslocation inhibitor exotoxin A. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that, after reaching the cytosol, both antigens require proteasomal degradation and TAP transport, but differ in the requirement for ER-golgi egress and new protein synthesis. Specifically, presentation by HLA-B8 but not HLA-E requires newly synthesized HLA-I and transport through the ER-golgi. Phenotypic analysis of the Mtb phagosome by flow organellometry revealed the presence of Class I and loading accessory molecules, including TAP and PDI. Furthermore, loaded HLA-I:peptide complexes are present within the Mtb phagosome, with a pronounced bias towards HLA-E:peptide complexes. In addition, protein analysis also reveals that HLA-E is enriched within the Mtb phagosome compared to HLA-A2. Together, these data suggest that the phagosome, through acquisition of ER-localized machinery and as a site of HLA-I loading, plays a vital role in the presentation of Mtb-derived antigens, similar to that described for presentation of latex bead-associated antigens. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of this presentation pathway for an intracellular pathogen. Moreover, these data suggest that HLA-E may play a unique role in the presentation of phagosomal antigens.

  17. Deciphering allogeneic antibody response against native and denatured HLA epitopes in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visentin, Jonathan; Guidicelli, Gwendaline; Moreau, Jean-François; Lee, Jar-How; Taupin, Jean-Luc

    2015-07-01

    Anti-HLA donor-specific antibodies are deleterious for organ transplant survival. Class I HLA donor-specific antibodies are identified by using the Luminex single antigen beads (LSAB) assay, which also detects anti-denatured HLA antibodies (anti-dHLAs). Anti-dHLAs are thought to be unable to recognize native HLA (nHLA) on the cell surface and therefore to be clinically irrelevant. Acid denaturation of nHLA on LSAB allows anti-dHLAs to be discriminated from anti-nHLAs. We previously defined a threshold for the ratio between mean fluorescence intensity against acid-treated (D for denaturation) and nontreated (N) LSAB, D ≥ 1.2 N identifying the anti-dHLAs. However, some anti-dHLAs remained able to bind nHLA on lymphocytes in flow cytometry crossmatches, and some anti-nHLAs conserved significant reactivity toward acid-treated LSAB. After depleting serum anti-nHLA reactivity with HLA-typed cells, we analyzed the residual LSAB reactivity toward nontreated and acid-treated LSABs, and then evaluated the ability of antibodies to recognize nHLA alleles individually. We observed that sera can contain mixtures of anti-nHLAs and anti-dHLAs, or anti-nHLAs recognizing acid-resistant epitopes, all possibly targeting the same allele(s). Therefore, the anti-HLA antibody response can be highly complex and subtle, as is the accurate identification of pathogenic anti-HLA antibodies in human serum. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Frecuencia de alelos HLA de clase I y II en una cohorte de pacientes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Patricia Velásquez

    2012-03-01

    Conclusión. Los alelos HLA-B27, HLA-DRB4*01 y HLA-DQB1*0501 fueron frecuentes en los diferentes subtipos de espondiloartritis y en las manifestaciones clínicas axiales, periféricas y extraarticulares específicas, además de la sacroiliítis radiológica.   DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7705/biomedica.v32i1.569

  19. Donor-Recipient Matching for KIR Genotypes Reduces Chronic GVHD and Missing Inhibitory KIR Ligands Protect against Relapse after Myeloablative, HLA Matched Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehan Mujeeb Faridi

    Full Text Available Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT can be curative for many hematologic diseases. However, complications such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD and relapse of primary malignancy remain significant and are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Effects of killer Ig-like receptors (KIR-influenced NK cells on HCT outcomes have been extensively pursued over the last decade. However, the relevance of the reported algorithms on HLA matched myeloablative HCT with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG is used for GVHD prophylaxis remains elusive. Here we examined the role of KIR and KIR-ligands of donor-recipient pairs in modifying the outcomes of ATG conditioned HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT.The study cohort consisted of 281 HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor-recipient pairs of first allogeneic marrow or blood stem cell transplantation allocated into 'discovery' (135 pairs and 'validation' (146 pairs cohorts. High resolution HLA typing was obtained from the medical charts and KIR gene repertoires were obtained by a Luminex® based SSO method. All surviving patients were followed-up for a minimum of two years. KIR and HLA class I distributions of HCT pairs were stratified as per applicable definitions and were tested for their association with cause specific outcomes [acute GVHD grade II-IV (aGVHD, chronic GVHD needing systemic therapy (cGVHD and relapse] using a multivariate competing risks regression model as well as with survival outcomes [relapse-free survival (RFS, cGVHD & relapse free survival (cGRFS and overall survival (OS] by multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. A significant association between KIR genotype mismatching (KIR-B/x donor into KIR-AA recipient or vice versa and cGVHD was found in both discovery (p = 0.001; SHR = 2.78; 95%CI: 1.50-5.17 and validation cohorts (p = 0.005; SHR = 2.61; 95%CI: 1.33-5.11. High incidence of cGVHD associated with KIR genotype mismatching was

  20. Donor-Recipient Matching for KIR Genotypes Reduces Chronic GVHD and Missing Inhibitory KIR Ligands Protect against Relapse after Myeloablative, HLA Matched Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faridi, Rehan Mujeeb; Kemp, Taylor J; Dharmani-Khan, Poonam; Lewis, Victor; Tripathi, Gaurav; Rajalingam, Raja; Daly, Andrew; Berka, Noureddine; Storek, Jan; Masood Khan, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can be curative for many hematologic diseases. However, complications such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and relapse of primary malignancy remain significant and are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Effects of killer Ig-like receptors (KIR)-influenced NK cells on HCT outcomes have been extensively pursued over the last decade. However, the relevance of the reported algorithms on HLA matched myeloablative HCT with rabbit antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is used for GVHD prophylaxis remains elusive. Here we examined the role of KIR and KIR-ligands of donor-recipient pairs in modifying the outcomes of ATG conditioned HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor HCT. The study cohort consisted of 281 HLA matched sibling and unrelated donor-recipient pairs of first allogeneic marrow or blood stem cell transplantation allocated into 'discovery' (135 pairs) and 'validation' (146 pairs) cohorts. High resolution HLA typing was obtained from the medical charts and KIR gene repertoires were obtained by a Luminex® based SSO method. All surviving patients were followed-up for a minimum of two years. KIR and HLA class I distributions of HCT pairs were stratified as per applicable definitions and were tested for their association with cause specific outcomes [acute GVHD grade II-IV (aGVHD), chronic GVHD needing systemic therapy (cGVHD) and relapse] using a multivariate competing risks regression model as well as with survival outcomes [relapse-free survival (RFS), cGVHD & relapse free survival (cGRFS) and overall survival (OS)] by multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. A significant association between KIR genotype mismatching (KIR-B/x donor into KIR-AA recipient or vice versa) and cGVHD was found in both discovery (p = 0.001; SHR = 2.78; 95%CI: 1.50-5.17) and validation cohorts (p = 0.005; SHR = 2.61; 95%CI: 1.33-5.11). High incidence of cGVHD associated with KIR genotype mismatching was applicable

  1. HIV subtype influences HLA-B*07:02-associated HIV disease outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik N; Adland, Emily; Koyanagi, Madoka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms within the MHC encoding region have the strongest impact on HIV disease progression of any in the human genome and provide important clues to the mechanisms of HIV immune control. Few analyses have been undertaken of HLA alleles associated with rapid disease progression. HLA......% versus 43% in HLA-B*07:02-negative subjects). These data support earlier studies suggesting that increased breadth of the Gag-specific CD8(+) T cell response may contribute to improved HIV immune control irrespective of the particular HLA molecules expressed....

  2. Chimerism representing both paternal alleles detected by HLA typing before kidney transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mette; Petersen, Mikkel Steen; Møller, Bjarne Kuno

    2014-01-01

    trisomy 6p or by chimerism. Flow cytometric analysis, employing antibodies specific for the two paternal HLA-A alleles, clearly showed two distinct populations of cells: 83% expressing HLA-A11 and 12% expressing HLA-A2, suggesting a paternal chimerism. We are studying these cell populations to possibly...... identify the mechanism behind this rather unusual paternally derived chimerism. This exceptional case illustrates that careful scrutiny of HLA-typing results may produce atypical conclusions. Clinically, the father is considered the best donor based on immunogenetics....

  3. Characterization of the fine specificity of peptide antibodies to HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, J S; Atar, D; Karlsen, Alan E

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to produce epitope specific antisera which could distinguish two closely associated HLA-DQ beta-chain alleles, we immunized 20 rabbits with synthetic peptides representing sequences from the first domain of the HLA-DQw8 and -DQw7 beta-chain molecules, differing only by one amino acid...... in position 57. Several of the antisera in immunoblotting specifically recognized either the HLA-DQw7 or the HLA-DQw8 beta-chain allele as previously reported. The fine specificity of the antisera was tested in ELISA using synthetic peptides of varying length as solid phase antigen. Two out of the 20 antisera...

  4. DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes in primary biliary cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Dalhoff, K; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism of the major histocompatibility complex class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, -DPB, the serologically defined HLA-A, B, C, DR antigens, and the primed lymphocyte typing defined HLA-DP antigens in 23 Danish patients with primary...... than 0.05, 'corrected' P greater than 0.05). No DNA fragments specific for DRB1*0301 (DR3) could be identified. The frequencies in PBC of other genetic markers including DRw8, DRB1*08, HLA-DP antigens, DPA, and DPB genes did not differ significantly from those in controls. The associations between PBC...

  5. Mapping of HLA- DQ haplotypes in a group of Danish patients with celiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Flemming; Hermansen, Mette N; Pedersen, Merete F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A cost-effective identification of HLA- DQ risk haplotypes using the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) technique has recently been applied in the diagnosis of celiac disease (CD) in four European populations. The objective of the study was to map risk HLA- DQ haplotypes in a group...... of Danish CD patients using the SNP technique. METHODS: Cohort A: Among 65 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms we compared the HLA- DQ2 and HLA- DQ8 risk haplotypes obtained by the SNP technique (method 1) with results based on a sequence specific primer amplification technique (method 2...

  6. Infectious mononucleosis-linked HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Naghmeh; Broer, Linda; Hoppenbrouwers, Ilse A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2010-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a presumed autoimmune disease associated with genetic and environmental risk factors such as infectious mononucleosis. Recent research has shown infectious mononucleosis to be associated with a specific HLA class I polymorphism. Our aim was to test if the infectious mononucleosis-linked HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6457110) is also associated with multiple sclerosis. Genotyping of the HLA-A single nucleotide polymorphism rs6457110 using TaqMan was performed in 591 multiple sclerosis cases and 600 controls. The association of multiple sclerosis with the HLA-A single nucleotide polymorphism was tested using logistic regression adjusted for age, sex and HLA-DRB1*1501. HLA-A minor allele (A) is associated with multiple sclerosis (OR = 0.68; p = 4.08 × 10( -5)). After stratification for HLA-DRB1*1501 risk allele (T) carrier we showed a significant OR of 0.70 (p = 0.003) for HLA-A. HLA class I single nucleotide polymorphism rs6457110 is associated with infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis, independent of the major class II allele, supporting the hypothesis that shared genetics may contribute to the association between infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis.

  7. The HLA-G genotype is associated with IL-10 levels in activated PBMCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzo, Roberta; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F; Stignani, Marina

    2005-01-01

    ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated peripheral blood mononuclear lymphocytes (PBMCs) in relation to the HLA-G 14 bp genotype. No HLA-G5/sHLA-G1 could be detected in the non-activated control PBMC culture media, and there were no significant differences among the three HLA-G 14 bp genotypes regarding IL-10...... concentrations. In LPS-activated PBMC cultures, no significant differences among the three HLA-G 14 bp genotypes regarding HLA-G5/sHLA-G1 concentrations were observed. However, this was in contrast to the IL-10 levels (P=0.0004, Kruskal-Wallis test). The +14/+14 bp PBMC samples expressed higher levels of IL-10...... when compared to the -14/+14 bp genotype and the -14/-14 bp genotype. Interestingly, the IL-10 G/G polymorphism at position -1082 was more frequent in the +14/+14 bp genotype (P=0.024, chi2 test). These results support an autocrine loop between HLA-G5/sHLA-G1 and IL-10 expression in activated PBMCs...

  8. HLA-E regulatory and coding region variability and haplotypes in a Brazilian population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Jaqueline; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C; Donadi, Eduardo A; Mendes-Junior, Celso T; Castelli, Erick C

    2017-11-01

    The HLA-E gene is characterized by low but wide expression on different tissues. HLA-E is considered a conserved gene, being one of the least polymorphic class I HLA genes. The HLA-E molecule interacts with Natural Killer cell receptors and T lymphocytes receptors, and might activate or inhibit immune responses depending on the peptide associated with HLA-E and with which receptors HLA-E interacts to. Variable sites within the HLA-E regulatory and coding segments may influence the gene function by modifying its expression pattern or encoded molecule, thus, influencing its interaction with receptors and the peptide. Here we propose an approach to evaluate the gene structure, haplotype pattern and the complete HLA-E variability, including regulatory (promoter and 3'UTR) and coding segments (with introns), by using massively parallel sequencing. We investigated the variability of 420 samples from a very admixed population such as Brazilians by using this approach. Considering a segment of about 7kb, 63 variable sites were detected, arranged into 75 extended haplotypes. We detected 37 different promoter sequences (but few frequent ones), 27 different coding sequences (15 representing new HLA-E alleles) and 12 haplotypes at the 3'UTR segment, two of them presenting a summed frequency of 90%. Despite the number of coding alleles, they encode mainly two different full-length molecules, known as E*01:01 and E*01:03, which corresponds to about 90% of all. In addition, differently from what has been previously observed for other non classical HLA genes, the relationship among the HLA-E promoter, coding and 3'UTR haplotypes is not straightforward because the same promoter and 3'UTR haplotypes were many times associated with different HLA-E coding haplotypes. This data reinforces the presence of only two main full-length HLA-E molecules encoded by the many HLA-E alleles detected in our population sample. In addition, this data does indicate that the distal HLA-E promoter is by

  9. Evaluation of 278 hla-b27 positive patients suspected of seronegative spondyloarthropathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eman, S.J.; Badri, S.; Khosravi, A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine HLA-B27 prevalence in patients suspected of Seronegative spondyloarthropathy referred to the Transplantation Department of Blood Transfusion Organization, and to evaluate clinical findings among HLA-B27 positive patients. One thousand six hundred ten patients having clinical manifestation of seronegative SpAs were screened for HLA typing by serological methods from January 1997 to June 2002 at Transplantation Department of Blood Transfusion Organization, Ahwaz, Iran. Serologic-based HLA typing using Antigen-specific sera to determine a person's HLA type was performed. Among these patients, individuals found HLA-B27 positive were investigated regarding clinical findings, age, and sex distribution. In this study the frequency of HLA-B27 antigen was 17.26% (278 cases). The minimum age in males was 10 years and the maximum age in female was 70 years. Median age with seronegative SpAs findings (34.2% including 28.42% females, 71.57% males) was 20-30 years. Based on our results, the most frequent clinical manifestation, was peripheral joints arthritis (58.7%; 34.35% females, 65.65 % males). There were no association between any of the major clinical manifestations and age or sex distribution. These findings confirm the strong association of the HLA B27 allele with various types of spondyloarthritis and suggests that HLA typing would help in the diagnosis of seronagative SpAs, specially ankylosing spondylitis with indeterminate clinical presentation and also in identifying at risk family members. (author)

  10. A common minimal motif for the ligands of HLA-B*27 class I molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Alejandro; Lorente, Elena; Johnstone, Carolina; Mir, Carmen; del Val, Margarita; López, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    CD8(+) T cells identify and kill infected cells through the specific recognition of short viral antigens bound to human major histocompatibility complex (HLA) class I molecules. The colossal number of polymorphisms in HLA molecules makes it essential to characterize the antigen-presenting properties common to large HLA families or supertypes. In this context, the HLA-B*27 family comprising at least 100 different alleles, some of them widely distributed in the human population, is involved in the cellular immune response against pathogens and also associated to autoimmune spondyloarthritis being thus a relevant target of study. To this end, HLA binding assays performed using nine HLA-B*2705-restricted ligands endogenously processed and presented in virus-infected cells revealed a common minimal peptide motif for efficient binding to the HLA-B*27 family. The motif was independently confirmed using four unrelated peptides. This experimental approach, which could be easily transferred to other HLA class I families and supertypes, has implications for the validation of new bioinformatics tools in the functional clustering of HLA molecules, for the identification of antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, and for future vaccine development.

  11. A common minimal motif for the ligands of HLA-B*27 class I molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Barriga

    Full Text Available CD8(+ T cells identify and kill infected cells through the specific recognition of short viral antigens bound to human major histocompatibility complex (HLA class I molecules. The colossal number of polymorphisms in HLA molecules makes it essential to characterize the antigen-presenting properties common to large HLA families or supertypes. In this context, the HLA-B*27 family comprising at least 100 different alleles, some of them widely distributed in the human population, is involved in the cellular immune response against pathogens and also associated to autoimmune spondyloarthritis being thus a relevant target of study. To this end, HLA binding assays performed using nine HLA-B*2705-restricted ligands endogenously processed and presented in virus-infected cells revealed a common minimal peptide motif for efficient binding to the HLA-B*27 family. The motif was independently confirmed using four unrelated peptides. This experimental approach, which could be easily transferred to other HLA class I families and supertypes, has implications for the validation of new bioinformatics tools in the functional clustering of HLA molecules, for the identification of antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, and for future vaccine development.

  12. Association between HLA-DR antigens and rheumatoid arthritis in Arabs.

    OpenAIRE

    Sattar, M A; al-Saffar, M; Guindi, R T; Sugathan, T N; Behbehani, K

    1990-01-01

    Eighty five Arab patients with classical and definite rheumatoid arthritis were typed to determine the prevalence of HLA A, B, C, and DR antigens. A significant increase in the prevalence of HLA-A10, B8, B21, and DR3 was found in comparison with a control population matched for age and sex. HLA-DR5 was significantly decreased in the patient group. The classical association of HLA-DR4 with rheumatoid arthritis could not be confirmed in the Arab patients resident in Kuwait, supporting reported ...

  13. HLA Class Ib Molecules and Immune Cells in Pregnancy and Preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurisic, Snezana; Hviid, Thomas Vauvert F

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the highly prevalent pregnancy complication preeclampsia, "the disease of theories," has remained an enigma. Indeed, the etiology of preeclampsia is largely unknown. A compiling amount of studies indicates that the pathological basis involves a complex array of geneti...... of HLA-G, and, in some studies, with preeclampsia. In this review, a genetic contribution from the mother, the father, and the fetus, together with the presence and function of various immune cells of relevance in pregnancy are reviewed in relation to HLA-G and preeclampsia....... predisposition and immunological maladaptation, and that a contribution from the mother, the father, and the fetus is likely to be important. The Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-G is an increasing focus of research in relation to preeclampsia. The HLA-G molecule is primarily expressed by the extravillous...... trophoblast cells lining the placenta together with the two other HLA class Ib molecules, HLA-E and HLA-F. Soluble isoforms of HLA-G have been detected in the early endometrium, the matured cumulus-oocyte complex, maternal blood of pregnant women, in umbilical cord blood, and lately, in seminal plasma. HLA...

  14. DUMAND data acquisition with triggering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, A.E.; Theriot, D.; March, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    A data acquisition scheme for the standard DUMAND array that includes a simple triggering scheme as a fundamental part of the system is presented. Although there are a number of not yet fully understood parameters, it is assumed that thresholds can be set in such a manner as to give rise to a triggered signal that is not so dominated by randoms that it gives a substantial decrease in the data acquisition rate over that which would be required by a nontriggered system. It is also assumed that the triggering logic is relatively simple and does not need major computational capabilities for a trigger logic decision. With these assumptions, it is possible to generate the trigger at the array and restrict the data transfer to shore. However, with a not unreasonable delay of 200 microseconds, it is even possible to transmit the information for the trigger to shore and perform all that logic on the shore. The critical point is to send the minimum amount of information necessary to construct the trigger such that one need not send all the possible information in all detectors of the array continuously to shore. 1 figure

  15. Assembly and architecture of the EBV B cell entry triggering complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Sathiyamoorthy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV is an enveloped double-stranded DNA virus of the gammaherpesvirinae sub-family that predominantly infects humans through epithelial cells and B cells. Three EBV glycoproteins, gH, gL and gp42, form a complex that targets EBV infection of B cells. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class II molecules expressed on B cells serve as the receptor for gp42, triggering membrane fusion and virus entry. The mechanistic role of gHgL in herpesvirus entry has been largely unresolved, but it is thought to regulate the activation of the virally-encoded gB protein, which acts as the primary fusogen. Here we study the assembly and function of the reconstituted B cell entry complex comprised of gHgL, gp42 and HLA class II. The structure from negative-stain electron microscopy provides a detailed snapshot of an intermediate state in EBV entry and highlights the potential for the triggering complex to bring the two membrane bilayers into proximity. Furthermore, gHgL interacts with a previously identified, functionally important hydrophobic pocket on gp42, defining the overall architecture of the complex and playing a critical role in membrane fusion activation. We propose a macroscopic model of the initiating events in EBV B cell fusion centered on the formation of the triggering complex in the context of both viral and host membranes. This model suggests how the triggering complex may bridge the two membrane bilayers, orienting critical regions of the N- and C- terminal ends of gHgL to promote the activation of gB and efficient membrane fusion.

  16. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  17. The production and crystallization of the human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 complexed with deamidated gliadin peptides implicated in coeliac disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, Kate N.; Reid, Hugh H.; Borg, Natalie A.; Broughton, Sophie E.; Huyton, Trevor [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Anderson, Robert P. [Autoimmunity and Transplantation Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, 1G Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Grattan Street, Parkville, Victoria 3050 (Australia); McCluskey, James [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Rossjohn, Jamie, E-mail: jamie.rossjohn@med.monash.edu.au [The Protein Crystallography Unit, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Biomedical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2007-12-01

    The production and crystallization of human leukocyte antigen class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with deamidated gliadin peptides is reported. Crystals of HLA-DQ2{sup PQPELPYPQ} diffracted to 3.9 Å, while the HLA-DQ8{sup EGSFQPSQE} crystals diffracted to 2.1 Å, allowing structure determination by molecular replacement. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 are key risk factors in coeliac disease, as they bind deamidated gluten peptides that are subsequently recognized by CD4{sup +} T cells. Here, the production and crystallization of both HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 in complex with the deamidated gliadin peptides DQ2 α-I (PQPELPYPQ) and DQ8 α-I (EGSFQPSQE), respectively, are reported.

  18. Novel multi-peptide vaccination in Hla-A2+ hormone sensitive patients with biochemical relapse of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, Susan; Stevanovic, Stefan; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Wernet, Dorothee; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Bedke, Jens; Dietz, Klaus; Pascolo, Steve; Kuczyk, Markus; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2009-06-15

    A phase I/II trial was conducted to assess feasibility and tolerability of tumor associated antigen peptide vaccination in hormone sensitive prostate carcinoma (PC) patients with biochemical recurrence after primary surgical treatment. Nineteen HLA-A2 positive patients with rising PSA without detectable metastatic disease or local recurrence received 11 HLA-A*0201-restricted and two HLA class II synthetic peptides derived from PC tumor antigens subcutaneously for 18 months or until PSA progression. The vaccine was emulgated in montanide ISA51 and combined with imiquimod, GM-CSF, mucin-1-mRNA/protamine complex, local hyperthermia or no adjuvant. PSA was assessed, geometric mean doubling times (DT) calculated and clinical performance monitored. PSA DT of 4 out of 19 patients (21%) increased from 4.9 to 25.8 months during vaccination. Out of these, two patients (11%) exhibited PSA stability for 28 and 31 months which were still continuing at data cut-off. One patient showed no change of PSA DT during vaccination but decline after the therapy. Three patients had an interim PSA decline or DT increase followed by DT decrease compared to baseline PSA DT. Three of the responding patients received imiquimod and one the mucin-1-mRNA/protamine complex as adjuvant; both are Toll-like receptor-7 agonists. Eleven (58%) patients had progressive PSA values. The vaccine was well tolerated, and no grade III or IV toxicity occurred. Multi-peptide vaccination stabilized or slowed down PSA progress in four of 19 cases. The vaccination approach is promising with moderate adverse events. Long-term stability delayed androgen deprivation up to 31 months. TLR-7 co-activation seems to be beneficial.

  19. The HLA Dictionary 2001: A Summary of HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1/3/4/5, -DQB1 Alleles and Their Association with Serologically Defined HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR and -DQ Antigens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schreuder, G

    2001-01-01

    ...) the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) and individual laboratories. In addition a listing is provided of alleles which are expressed as antigens with serologic reaction patterns that differ from the well-established HLA specificities...

  20. MHC class II super-enhancer increases surface expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and affects cytokine production in autoimmune vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalli, Giulio; Hayashi, Masahiro; Jin, Ying; Yorgov, Daniel; Santorico, Stephanie A.; Holcomb, Cherie; Rastrou, Melinda; Erlich, Henry; Tengesdal, Isak W.; Dagna, Lorenzo; Neff, C. Preston; Palmer, Brent E.; Spritz, Richard A.; Dinarello, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a classic autoimmune disease genetically associated with SNPs in the MHC class II region. To date, the impact of HLA molecules on autoimmunity has focused on structural diversity of antigen presentation. Here, we describe the properties of a 47-nucleotide high-risk haplotype of three SNPs within an intergenic “super-enhancer” located between the HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1 genes, localized by a genome-wide association study of 2,853 subjects with vitiligo. Monocytes from healthy subject...

  1. Co-dominant expression of the HLA-G gene and various forms of alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA in human first trimester trophoblast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, T V; Møller, C; Sørensen, S

    1998-01-01

    imprinting of the HLA-G locus could have implications for the interaction in the feto-maternal relationship. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), allele-specific amplification and Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP) analysis followed by DNA sequencing were performed on Reverse...... Transcription (RT) Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) products of HLA-G mRNA to examine the expression of maternal and paternal alleles. Our results demonstrate that HLA-G is co-dominantly expressed in first trimester trophoblast cells. A "new" non-synonymous base substitution in exon 4 was detected. We also...

  2. Identification of an elaborate NK-specific system regulating HLA-C expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchuan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-C gene appears to have evolved in higher primates to serve as a dominant source of ligands for the KIR2D family of inhibitory MHC class I receptors. The expression of NK cell-intrinsic MHC class I has been shown to regulate the murine Ly49 family of MHC class I receptors due to the interaction of these receptors with NK cell MHC in cis. However, cis interactions have not been demonstrated for the human KIR and HLA proteins. We report the discovery of an elaborate NK cell-specific system regulating HLA-C expression, indicating an important role for HLA-C in the development and function of NK cells. A large array of alternative transcripts with differences in intron/exon content are generated from an upstream NK-specific HLA-C promoter, and exon content varies between HLA-C alleles due to SNPs in splice donor/acceptor sites. Skipping of the first coding exon of HLA-C generates a subset of untranslatable mRNAs, and the proportion of untranslatable HLA-C mRNA decreases as NK cells mature, correlating with increased protein expression by mature NK cells. Polymorphism in a key Ets-binding site of the NK promoter has generated HLA-C alleles that lack significant promoter activity, resulting in reduced HLA-C expression and increased functional activity. The NK-intrinsic regulation of HLA-C thus represents a novel mechanism controlling the lytic activity of NK cells during development.

  3. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Feng, E-mail: jiangfeng1161@163.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Zhao, Hongxi [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang, Li [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Guo, Xinyu [Assisted Reproductive Center, General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Hu, Yunsheng [Department of Orthopedics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Li, Yi [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Yao, Yuanqing, E-mail: yuanqingyaoxa@163.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  4. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Feng; Zhao, Hongxi; Wang, Li; Guo, Xinyu; Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu; Hu, Yunsheng; Li, Yi; Yao, Yuanqing

    2015-01-01

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions

  5. pH-triggered block copolymer micelles based on a pH-responsive PDPA (poly[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate]) inner core and a PEO (poly(ethylene oxide)) outer shell as a potential tool for the cancer therapy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giacomelli, F. C.; Štěpánek, Petr; Giacomelli, C.; Schmidt, V.; Jäger, Eliezer; Jäger, Alessandro; Ulbrich, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 19 (2011), s. 9316-9325 ISSN 1744-683X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1600 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : copolymer micelles * light scattering * cancer therapy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2011

  6. Association of selected human leukocyte antigen alleles (HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA–DQB1*0301 with Helicobacter pylori infection among dyspeptic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyumali Sandareka Arachchi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori has been identified as a group I carcinogenic bacteria that infect the gastric mucosa leading to gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, lymphoma and gastric cancer. Pathogenesis of H. pylori depends on the virulence of the strain, host immune response and modulating factors like smoking and diet. Objective: This study aimed to assess the association of selected HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen alleles; HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301, with the presence of H. pylori infection and disease severity among dyspeptic patients. Methods: Gastric tissue samples from 100 dyspeptic patients, who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at a tertiary care hospital, were collected. Presence of HLA alleles was confirmed using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. H. pylori infection was determined using PCR and Histology. The histological interpretation was done according to the ‘Sydney classification’. Statistical analysis was done with the Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS (version 22; SPSS, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, USA. Results: Respective percentages of HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 were 39%, 31% and 20%. Of the 25 samples positive for H. pylori infection respectively 56% (14/25, 36% (9/25 and 12% (3/25 were positive for HLA-DQA1*0102, HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 alleles. Considering the association with H. pylori infection, only HLA-DQA1*0102 showed significant association (p=0.044. No significant association was found between the HLA alleles and the histological severity among the H. pylori infected patients. Conclusion: In conclusion, HLA-DQA1*0102 allele has a significant association with H. pylori infection while HLA-DQA1*0103 and HLA-DQB1*0301 shows no significant association in a Sri Lankan dyspeptic patient population.

  7. Fine Mapping Seronegative and Seropositive Rheumatoid Arthritis to Shared and Distinct HLA Alleles by Adjusting for the Effects of Heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Buhm; Diogo, Dorothee; Eyre, Steve; Kallberg, Henrik; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Padyukov, Leonid; Okada, Yukinori; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress in defining human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles for anti-citrullinated-protein-autoantibody-positive (ACPA(+)) rheumatoid arthritis (RA), identifying HLA alleles for ACPA-negative (ACPA(-)) RA has been challenging because of clinical heterogeneity within clinical cohorts. We

  8. The CDF level-3 trigger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devlin, T.

    1993-01-01

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) has been operating at the Tevatron and collecting data on proton-antiproton interactions with collision rates above 250,000 Hz. Three levels of filtering select events for data logging at a rate of about 4 Hz. The Level 3 trigger provides most of the capabilities of the offline production programs for event reconstruction and physics analysis. The type of physics triggers, application of cuts, and combinations of logical requirements for event selection are controlled at run time by a trigger table using a syntax fully integrated with the Level 1 and Level 2 hardware triggers. The level 3 software operates in 48 RISC/UNIX processors (over 1000 mips) served by four 20-MByte/sec data buses for input, output and control. The system architecture, debugging, code validation, error reporting, analysis capabilities and performance will be described

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of HLA-B*5801 testing in preventing allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN in Thai population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surasak Saokaew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN, caused by allopurinol therapy, are strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA, HLA-B*5801. Identification of HLA-B*5801 genotype before prescribing allopurinol offers the possibility of avoiding allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN. As there is a paucity of evidence about economic value of such testing, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of HLA-B*5801 testing compared with usual care (no genetic testing before allopurinol administration in Thailand. METHODS AND FINDING: A decision analytical and Markov model was used to estimate life time costs and outcomes represented as quality adjusted life years (QALYs gained. The model was populated with relevant information of the association between gene and allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN, test characteristics, costs, and epidemiologic data for Thailand from a societal perspective. Input data were obtained from the literature and a retrospective database analysis. The results were expressed as incremental cost per QALY gained. A base-case analysis was performed for patients at age 30. A series of sensitivity analyses including scenario, one-way, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were constructed to explore the robustness of the findings. Based on a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 patients, the incremental total cost was 923,919 THB (USD 29,804 and incremental QALY was 5.89 with an ICER of 156,937.04 THB (USD 5,062 per QALY gained. The cost of gout management, incidence of SJS/TEN, case fatality rate of SJS/TEN, and cost of genetic testing are considered very influential parameters on the cost-effectiveness value of HLA-B*5801 testing. CONCLUSIONS: The genetic testing for HLA-B*5801 before allopurinol administration is considered a highly potential cost-effective intervention in Thailand. The findings are sensitive to a number of factors. In addition to cost-effectiveness findings, consideration of other

  10. HLA-typing, clinical, and immunological characterization of youth with type 2 diabetes mellitus phenotype from the German/Austrian DPV database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awa, Wendy L; Boehm, Bernard O; Rosinger, Silke; Achenbach, Peter; Ziegler, Anette G; Krause, Stephanie; Meissner, Thomas; Wiegand, Susanne; Reinehr, Thomas; Kapellen, Thomas; Karges, Beate; Eiermann, Thomas; Schober, Edith; Holl, Reinhard W

    2013-12-01

    To characterize the clinical and immunological features of HLA-typed youth with pediatric onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). One hundred and seven patients with clinically diagnosed T2DM (aged ≤20 yr at diagnosis) were examined. DNA and serum, obtained after a median diabetes duration of 2.2 (Q1-Q3: 0.8-4.6) yr, were used for centralized HLA-typing and autoantibody (GADA, IA-2A, ZnT8A) measurements. 64.6% of patients were female and median age at diagnosis was 13.8 (Q1-Q3: 11.6-15.4) yr. Patients were obese [median body mass index-standard deviation score (BMI-SDS): 2.6 (2.0-3.1)], 88.0% had a family history of diabetes and 40.2% a migration background. Islet autoantibodies were detected in 16 (15.0%), among which 7 (6.5%) had multiple islet autoantibodies. Autoantibody positive patients had poorer metabolic control than autoantibody negative patients [glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): 8.1 (6.9-10.1) % vs. 6.6 (5.9-8.0) %; p = 0.033], while patients with HLA-DR genetic risk had higher BMI-SDS than those with HLA-DRXX [2.6 (2.4-3.7) vs. 2.4 (1.7-2.9); p = 0.007]. Metabolic syndrome (61.7%), microalbuminuria (13.4%), and retinopathy (3.9%) were diagnosed. Therapies used were lifestyle only (35.5%), oral anti-diabetics (OAD) only (43.3 %), insulin +  OAD (15.9%) and insulin only (5.6%). Patients with β-cell autoimmunity or HLA-DR genetic risk more frequently used insulin than confirmed T2DM patients (50.0 vs. 22.0%; p = 0.037) and less often had diabetic relatives (61.1 vs. 86.0%; p = 0.030). T2DM was confirmed in about 90% of patients while about 10% with β-cell autoimmunity or HLA-DR genetic risk likely had either T1.5DM or 'double diabetes' or an unknown diabetes type. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. HLA-DP and bonemarrow transplantation: DP-incompatibility and severe acute graft versus host disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Platz, P; Jakobsen, B K

    1987-01-01

    The presence of activated T cells as judged from the reaction with monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against (a) a late stage T cell activation antigen (VLA-1), (b) the interleukin 2 (IL2) receptor (CD25), and (c) four different HLA class II molecules (HLA-DR, DRw52, DQ, and DP) was studied in 15...

  12. HLA-DR and -DQ phenotypes in inflammatory bowel disease: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkers, P. C.; Reitsma, P. H.; Tytgat, G. N.; van Deventer, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is partially genetically determined and the HLA class II genes are candidates for a role in genetic susceptibility to IBD, because their products play a central role in the immune response. Multiple studies have reported associations between HLA-DR

  13. Identification of immunogenic HLA-B7 "Achilles' heel" epitopes within highly conserved regions of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Groot, Anne S; Rivera, Daniel S; McMurry, Julie A

    2008-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in class I human leukocyte antigen molecules (HLA) have been shown to determine susceptibility to HIV infection as well as the rate of progression to AIDS. In particular, the HLA-B7 supertype has been shown to be associated with high viral loads and rapid progression to dise...

  14. Significant Association of HLA-DQ5 with Autoimmune Hepatitis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lok-Beng Koay

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic predisposition is known to be an important etiopathogenic factor of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH. HLA antigens associated with AIH have been well studied in Western countries and Japan, but there is no HLA typing data of AIH patients in Taiwan. We therefore investigated HLA phenotypes and their association with AIH patients and compared the results with those of normal subjects and patients with chronic liver disease. Group 1 consisted of 22 AIH patients. All were born in Taiwan with no history of blood transfusion. Group 2 consisted of 19 chronic liver disease patients. Group 3 consisted of 81 unrelated healthy subjects who were normal blood donors. All three groups were tested for HLA phenotypes (HLAA, B, C, DR, DQ using the polymerase chain reaction—sequence specific probe method. The statistical method used was Fisher's exact test. We found that HLA-DQ5 was significantly more frequent in the AIH group compared to the control group (RR, 2.03; p = 0.034. Low frequency of A1 (n = 2/22, B8 (n = 1/22 and DR3 (n = 0/22 were noted compared to results from the West; only HLA-DR4 showed a higher rate in our AIH patients (n = 8/22. This is a preliminary report of our study of HLA antigens in AIH patients. Further investigation to characterize AIH patients into HLA allelic subgroups is being done.

  15. A molecular basis for the presentation of phosphorylated peptides by HLA-B antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alpízar, Adán; Marino, Fabio; Ramos-Fernández, Antonio; Lombardía, Manuel; Jeko, Anita; Pazos, Florencio; Paradela, Alberto; Santiago, César; Heck, Albert J R; Marcilla, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    As aberrant protein phosphorylation is a hallmark of tumor cells, the display of tumor-specific phosphopeptides by Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I molecules can be exploited in the treatment of cancer by T-cell-based immunotherapy. Yet, the characterization and prediction of HLA-I

  16. Genetic HLA Associations in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome With and Without Dystonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, D.E.; Roelen, D.L.; Verduijn, W.; Haasnoot, G.W.; Huygen, F.J.P.M.; Perez, R.S.G.M.; Claas, F.H.J.; Marinus, J.; van Hilten, J.J.; van den Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed evidence for a genetic association of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) with dystonia. Involvement of the HLA system suggests that CRPS has a genetic component with perturbed regulation of inflammation and neuroplasticity as

  17. Identification of non-HLA antibodies in ventricular assist device recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy von Salisch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims Recipients of ventricular assist devices (VADR have a higher incidence to develop antibodies (Abs against human leukocyte antigens (HLA. Non-HLA antibodies like major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA and autoantibodies against angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R and endothelin receptor A (ETAR are also implicated in the pathogenesis of acute rejection and allograft vasculopathy. We monitored non-HLA- and HLA-Abs in VADR up to one year after implantation. Materials and methods Sera of 56 VADR (54.1±12.8 years old, 50 men were analyzed for Abs against HLA-, MICA-, AT1R- and ETAR several times over one year after implantation using ELISA and Luminex xMAP technology. Blood transfusions, gender and age were reviewed. Results Sera of 56 VADR (54.1±12.8 years old, 50 men were analyzed for Abs against HLA-, MICA-, AT1R- and ETAR several times over one year after implantation using ELISA and Luminex xMAP technology. Blood transfusions, gender and age were reviewed. Conclusion Beside HLA- and MICA-Abs, VADR showed high titres of Abs against AT1R or ETAR, which underlines the necessity for monitoring non-HLA antibodies in VADR prior heart transplantation.

  18. A polymorphism in HLA-G modifies statin benefit in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naidoo, D; Wu, A C; Brilliant, M H

    2015-01-01

    Several reports have shown that statin treatment benefits patients with asthma; however, inconsistent effects have been observed. The mir-152 family (148a, 148b and 152) has been implicated in asthma. These microRNAs suppress HLA-G expression, and rs1063320, a common SNP in the HLA-G 3'UTR that i...

  19. Structural and regulatory diversity shape HLA-C protein expression levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, Gurman; Gras, Stephanie; Mobbs, Jesse I

    2017-01-01

    expression of HLA-C allomorphs at the cell surface by influencing the structure of the peptide-binding cleft and the diversity of peptides bound by the HLA-C molecules. Together with a phylogenetic analysis, these results highlight the diversity and long-term balancing selection of regulatory factors...

  20. HLA-class II alleles in patients with drug-resistant pulmonary tuberculosis in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranov, A B; Kozhamkulov, U A; Vavilov, M N; Belova, E S; Bismilda, V L; Alenova, A H; Ismailov, S S; Momynaliev, K T

    2014-02-01

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system has a major role in the regulation of the immune response as it is involved in the defense against pathogens. Some studies have reported that HLA class II genes play a strong role in severe cases of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in several populations. Thus the aim of the study was to compare the HLA-class II alleles of patients with drug resistant tuberculosis with those of healthy controls from the same ethnic group in Kazakhstan. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the correlation of HLA-class II alleles by patients with drug resistant tuberculosis and the healthy controls of the same ethnic group in Kazakhstan. The HLA-class II alleles of 76 patients with tuberculosis (TB) and 157 healthy volunteers were investigated using sequence-based typing (SBT)-method. HLA-DQA1*03:02 HLA-DRB1*08:01 and DRB1*08:03 occurred more frequently (P = 0.05) in patients with drug resistant tuberculosis than in controls. We observed a possible association between certain HLA alleles and TB that are specific for the Kazakh population. Further studies are needed to confirm our findings using a larger number of patients with drug resistant tuberculosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Susceptibility and HLA-B27 in post-dysenteric arthropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bohemen, C. G.; Lionarons, R. J.; van Bodegom, P.; Dinant, H. J.; Landheer, J. E.; Nabbe, A. J.; Grumet, F. C.; Zanen, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    A recent outbreak of bacillary dysentery in The Netherlands revealed that, despite the close association of HLA-B27 with post-dysenteric or reactive arthritis (ReA), not even in one family did all HLA-B27 positive patients infected by an arthritogenic bacterium, develop ReA. This dissociation shows

  2. HLA-DP antigens are involved in the susceptibility to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Hyldig-Nielsen, J J; Morling, N

    1988-01-01

    Forty-five unrelated patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) from Sweden and 166 Danish controls were typed for HLA-DP using Primed Lymphocyte Typing. Thirty-nine MS-patients and 63 controls were also DNA-typed with the Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) technique for HLA-DP and -DR ge...... susceptibility to MS....

  3. HLA-E-expressing pluripotent stem cells escape allogeneic responses and lysis by NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornalusse, Germán G; Hirata, Roli K; Funk, Sarah E; Riolobos, Laura; Lopes, Vanda S; Manske, Gabriel; Prunkard, Donna; Colunga, Aric G; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Clegg, Dennis O; Turtle, Cameron; Russell, David W

    2017-08-01

    Polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes can cause the rejection of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived products in allogeneic recipients. Disruption of the Beta-2 Microglobulin (B2M) gene eliminates surface expression of all class I molecules, but leaves the cells vulnerable to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Here we show that this 'missing-self' response can be prevented by forced expression of minimally polymorphic HLA-E molecules. We use adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene editing to knock in HLA-E genes at the B2M locus in human PSCs in a manner that confers inducible, regulated, surface expression of HLA-E single-chain dimers (fused to B2M) or trimers (fused to B2M and a peptide antigen), without surface expression of HLA-A, B or C. These HLA-engineered PSCs and their differentiated derivatives are not recognized as allogeneic by CD8 + T cells, do not bind anti-HLA antibodies and are resistant to NK-mediated lysis. Our approach provides a potential source of universal donor cells for applications where the differentiated derivatives lack HLA class II expression.

  4. HLA-E-expressing pluripotent stem cells escape allogeneic responses and lysis by NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornalusse, Germán G.; Hirata, Roli K.; Funk, Sarah; Riolobos, Laura; Lopes, Vanda S.; Manske, Gabriel; Prunkard, Donna; Colunga, Aric G.; Hanafi, Laïla-Aïcha; Clegg, Dennis O.; Turtle, Cameron; Russell, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I genes can cause the rejection of pluripotent stem cell (PSC)-derived products in allogeneic recipients. Disruption of the Beta-2 Microglobulin (B2M) gene eliminates surface expression of all class I molecules, but leaves the cells vulnerable to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Here we show that this ‘missing self’ response can be prevented by forced expression of minimally polymorphic HLA-E molecules. We use adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene editing to knock in HLA-E genes at the B2M locus in human PSCs in a manner that confers inducible, regulated, surface expression of HLA-E single-chain dimers (fused to B2M) or trimers (fused to B2M and a peptide antigen), without surface expression of HLA-A, B or C. These HLA-engineered PSCs and their differentiated derivatives are not recognized as allogeneic by CD8+ T cells, do not bind anti-HLA antibodies, and are resistant to NK-mediated lysis. Our approach provides a potential source of universal donor cells for applications where the differentiated derivatives lack HLA class II expression. PMID:28504668

  5. Is there an indication for HLA-DR typing for individual patients with rheumatoid arthritis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Jaarsveld, C. H.; Otten, H. G.; Jacobs, J. W.; Kruize, A. A.; Brus, H. L.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    The clinical expression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) varies considerably among individual patients. Genetic variations in human leucocyte antigen (HLA) may influence susceptibility to RA and the severity of the disease. The literature concerning the association of HLA-DR with the susceptibility to

  6. Natural HLA-B*2705 Protein Ligands with Glutamine as Anchor Motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infantes, Susana; Lorente, Elena; Barnea, Eilon; Beer, Ilan; Barriga, Alejandro; Lasala, Fátima; Jiménez, Mercedes; Admon, Arie; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The presentation of short viral peptide antigens by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on cell surfaces is a key step in the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which mediate the killing of pathogen-infected cells or initiate autoimmune tissue damage. HLA-B27 is a well known class I molecule that is used to study both facets of the cellular immune response. Using mass spectrometry analysis of complex HLA-bound peptide pools isolated from large amounts of HLA-B*2705+ cells, we identified 200 naturally processed HLA-B*2705 ligands. Our analyses revealed that a change in the position (P) 2 anchor motif was detected in the 3% of HLA-B*2705 ligands identified. B*2705 class I molecules were able to bind these six GlnP2 peptides, which showed significant homology to pathogenic bacterial sequences, with a broad range of affinities. One of these ligands was able to bind with distinct conformations to HLA-B27 subtypes differentially associated with ankylosing spondylitis. These conformational differences could be sufficient to initiate autoimmune damage in patients with ankylosing spondylitis-associated subtypes. Therefore, these kinds of peptides (short, with GlnP2, and similar low affinity to all HLA-B27 subtypes tested but with unlike conformations in differentially ankylosing spondylitis-associated subtypes) must not be excluded from future researches involving potential arthritogenic peptides. PMID:23430249

  7. A major non-HLA locus in celiac disease maps to chromosome 19.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belzen, van MJ; Meijer, JW; Sandkuijl, L.A.; Bardoel, A.F.; Mulder, C.J.J.; Pearson, PL; Houwen, RH; Wijmenga, C.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The pathogenesis of celiac disease is still unknown despite its well-known association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQ2 and DQ8. It is clear that non-HLA genes contribute to celiac disease development as well, but none of the previous genome-wide screens in celiac disease

  8. HLA-DQA1 typing in Danes by two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowland, J B; Madsen, H O; Morling, N

    1995-01-01

    (ASA) method, which together recognise eight alleles. In 146 unrelated Danish individuals, the HLA-DQA1 alleles were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. For identity testing, the power of discrimination (PD) of HLA-DQA1 was 0.932 with the RDB method and 0.942 with the PCR-RFLP/ASA method. For paternity...

  9. Non-HLA antibodies post-transplantation: clinical relevance and treatment in solid organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragun, Duska; Hegner, Bjorn

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies and B cells are increasingly recognized as major modulators of allograft function and survival. Improved immunohistochemical and serologic diagnostic procedures have been developed to monitor antibody responses against HLA antigens during the last decade. Acute and chronic allograft rejection can occur in HLA-identical sibling transplants implicating the importance of immune response against non-HLA targets. Non-HLA anti-bodies may occur as alloantiboides, yet they seem to be predominantly autoantibodies. Antigenic targets of non-HLA antibodies described thus far include various minor histocompatibility antigens, vascular receptors, adhesion molecules, and intermediate filaments. Non-HLA antibodies may function as complement- and non-complement-fixing antibodies and they may induce a wide variety of allograft injuries, reflecting the complexity of their acute and chronic actions. Refined approaches considering the subtle mechanistic differences in the individual antibody responses directed against non-HLA antigens may help to define patients at particular risk for irreversible acute or chronic allograft injuries and improve over-all outcomes. We attempted to summarize the current state of research, development in diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, and to address some emerging problems in the area of humoral response against non-HLA antigens beyond ABO blood group and MHC class I chain-related gene A and B (MICA and MICB) antigens in solid organ transplantation. Copyright (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Increased frequency of HLA-DPw2 in pauciarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Friis, J

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six unrelated Danish patients with pauciarticular Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (PJCA) and 120 controls were typed for HLA-DPw1-w6 and the local specificity CDPHEI with bulk-expanded Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells. The frequency of HLA-DPw2 was 52.8% in PJCA patients and 16.7% in controls...

  11. Increased frequency of HLA-DPw2 in pauciarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødum, Niels; Morling, Niels; Friis, J

    1986-01-01

    Thirty-six unrelated Danish patients with pauciarticular Juvenile Chronic Arthritis (PJCA) and 120 controls were typed for HLA-DPw1-w6 and the local specificity CDPHEI with bulk-expanded Primed Lymphocyte Typing (PLT) cells. The frequency of HLA-DPw2 was 52.8% in PJCA patients and 16.7% in contro...

  12. Epigenetic priming restores the HLA class-I antigen processing machinery expression in Merkel cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Cathrin; Fan, Kaiji; Paschen, Annette

    2017-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and aggressive, yet highly immunogenic skin cancer. The latter is due to its viral or UV-associated carcinogenesis. For tumor progression MCC has to escape the host's immuno-surveillance, e.g. by loss of HLA class-I expression. Indeed, a reduced HLA class...

  13. Living unrelated donors in kidney transplants: better long-term results than with non-HLA-identical living related donors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humar, A; Durand, B; Gillingham, K; Payne, W D; Sutherland, D E; Matas, A J

    2000-05-15

    Given the severe organ shortage and the documented superior results obtained with living (vs. cadaver) donor kidney transplants, we have adopted a very aggressive policy for the use of living donors. Currently, we make thorough attempts to locate a living related donor (LRD) or a living unrelated donor (LURD) before proceeding with a cadaver transplant. We compared the results of our LURD versus LRD transplants to determine any significant difference in outcome. Between 1/1/84 and 6/30/98, we performed 711 adult kidney transplants with non-HLA-identical living donors. Of these, 595 procedures used LRDs and 116 used LURDs. Immunosuppression for both groups was cyclosporine-based, although LURD recipients received 5-7 days of induction therapy (antilymphocyte globulin or antithymocyte globulin), whereas LRD recipients did not. LURD recipients tended to be older, to have inferior HLA matching, and to have older donors than did the LRD recipients (all factors potentially associated with decreased graft survival). Short-term results, including initial graft function and incidence of acute rejection, were similar in the two groups. LURD recipients had a slightly higher incidence of cytomegalovirus disease (P=NS). We found no difference in patient and graft survival rates. However, the incidence of biopsy-proven chronic rejection was significantly lower among LURD recipients (16.7% for LRD recipients and 10.0% for LURD recipients at 5 years posttransplant; P=0.05). LRD recipients also had a greater incidence of late (>6 months posttransplant) acute rejection episodes than did the LURD recipients (8.6% vs. 2.6%, P=0.04). The exact reason for these findings is unknown. Although LURD recipients have poorer HLA matching and older donors, their patient and graft survival rates are equivalent to those of non-HLA-identical LRD recipients. The incidence of biopsy-proven chronic rejection is lower in LURD transplants. Given this finding and the superior results of living donor (vs

  14. HLA-DR alleles among Pakistani patients of coeliac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.; Ali, S.; Iqbal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether certain DR alleles might also contribute to the genetic susceptibility among Coeliac disease patients in Pakistan. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from October 2011 to January 2012, and analysed 25 children diagnosed to have coeliac disease as per the criteria set by the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, which included histopathological alterations in duodenal biopsies, clinical response to gluten withdrawal, and presence of anti-endomyseal antibodies. Patients were compared with a group of 150 healthy subjects. Dioxyribonucleic acid was extracted from peripheral blood collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid.K3. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01 - DRB1*16) using sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among the patient group and the control group was calculated by direct counting, and significance of their association was determined by Fisher Exact Test. Results: A total of 11 (44%) female paediatric coeliac patients in age range 1-9 (mean 7.2+-4.8 years) and 14 (56%) male paediatric patients in the age range 6-14 (mean 8.6+-5.1 years) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant positive association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*03 (n=23; 92% versus n=31; 21% in controls, p <0.01) was observed. Conclusion: HLA-DRB1*03 is associated with increased risk of developing coeliac disease. (author)

  15. The peopling of Madeira Archipelago (Portugal) according to HLA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Reguera, R; Ferri, A; Barbolla, L; Abd-El-Fatah-Khalil, S; Bakhtiyarova, N; Millan, P; Moscoso, J; Mafalda, A; Serrano-Vela, J I

    2009-02-01

    The Madeira-Porto Santo Archipelago was officially colonized in 1420 by Portuguese settlers. Its importance in Columbus' information for the American discovery and for slave traffic across the Atlantic is unquestionable. Thus, a complex peopling may have given rise to a present-day high admixture of ethnicities according to HLA genes. A sample of 173 healthy unrelated Madeirans was analysed and compared with 6986 HLA chromosomes from other worldwide populations. Genetic distances, neighbour-joining dendrograms and correspondence analyses were used for comparisons. Southern European, North African (including Canary Islands), Jewish and Mediterranean typical HLA alleles were found and genetic distances from Madeirans to these populations were the closest ones. In addition A*24-B*65-DRB1*0102-DQB1*0501 and A*68-B*08-DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 haplotypes were newly found in Madeira and not found in any other population. Jewish-Armenian-Middle East haplotype (A*33-B*65-DRB1*0102-DQB1*0501) is one of the most common haplotypes; this haplotype is also present in Spaniards and North Africans. Quantitatively, Portuguese, North Africans (Algerians), Spaniards and Canary Islanders (in this order) are the most important parental populations to Madeirans. Results are discussed on the basis of the recorded historical peopling which does not show a noticeable African gene input in present-day Madeiran population according to our data; one of the closest related populations found is the Canary Islanders, suggesting that Guanche (Canary Islands first inhabitants) slaves gene flow is still noticed at present, both in Madeira and in Canary Islands populations.

  16. HLA-B7-restricted islet epitopes are differentially recognized in type 1 diabetic children and adults and form weak peptide-HLA complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scotto, Matthieu; Afonso, Georgia; Østerbye, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The cartography of β-cell epitopes targeted by CD8(+) T cells in type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients remains largely confined to the common HLA-A2 restriction. We aimed to identify β-cell epitopes restricted by the HLA-B7 (B*07:02) molecule, which is associated with mild T1D protection. Using DNA immu......1D children and adults, and are recognized by IFN-γ(+)TGF-β(+)CD8(+) T cells. These features may explain the T1D-protective effect of HLA-B7. The novel epitopes identified should find valuable applications for immune staging of HLA-B7(+) individuals....

  17. Allelic imbalance modulates surface expression of the tolerance-inducing HLA-G molecule on primary trophoblast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djurisic, S; Teiblum, S; Tolstrup, C K

    2015-01-01

    The HLA-G molecule is expressed on trophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface, where it interacts with local immune cells, and upholds tolerance against the semi-allogeneic fetus. Aberrant HLA-G expression in the placenta and reduced soluble HLA-G levels are observed in pregnancy complicati...

  18. Characterization of a Proteasome and TAP-independent Presentation of Intracellular Epitopes by HLA-B27 Molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Magnacca, A.; Persiconi, I.; Nurzia, E.; Caristi, S.; Meloni, F.; Barnaba, V.; Paladini, F.; Raimondo, D.; Fiorillo, M. T.; Sorrentino, R.

    2012-01-01

    -presentation by the HLA-B27 molecules was proteasome and TAP-independent and not restricted to Antigen-Presenting Cells (APC). Here, using these chimeric proteins as epitope suppliers, we compared with each other and with the HLA-A2 molecules, the two HLA-B*2705 and B

  19. Expression and differential regulation of HLA-G isoforms in the retinal pigment epithelial cell line, ARPE-19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Signe Goul; Udsen, Maja Søberg; Daouya, Marina

    2017-01-01

    by digital droplet PCR, measuring the gene expression of HLA-G in total RNA. The protein expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry and by immunofluorescence followed by confocal microscopy and the expression of the HLA-G isoforms was explored by fragment analysis. In the current study, we show that HLA...

  20. Present and future of allogeneic natural killer cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okjae eLim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate lymphocytes that are capable of eliminating tumor cells and are therefore used for cancer therapy. Although many early investigators used autologous NK cells, including lymphokine-activated killer cells, the clinical efficacies were not satisfactory. Meanwhile, human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation revealed the anti-tumor effect of allogeneic NK cells, and HLA-haploidentical, killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR ligand-mismatched allogeneic NK cells are currently used for many protocols requiring NK cells. Moreover, allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors have been recently used in cancer therapy. The use of allogeneic NK cells from non-HLA-related healthy donors allows the selection of donor NK cells with higher flexibility and to prepare expanded, cryopreserved NK cells for instant administration without delay for ex vivo expansion. In cancer therapy with allogeneic NK cells, optimal matching of donors and recipients is important to maximize the efficacy of the therapy. In this review, we summarize the present state of allogeneic NK cell therapy and its future directions.

  1. Predicting HLA class I non-permissive amino acid residues substitutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Andrew Binkowski

    Full Text Available Prediction of peptide binding to human leukocyte antigen (HLA molecules is essential to a wide range of clinical entities from vaccine design to stem cell transplant compatibility. Here we present a new structure-based methodology that applies robust computational tools to model peptide-HLA (p-HLA binding interactions. The method leverages the structural conservation observed in p-HLA complexes to significantly reduce the search space and calculate the system's binding free energy. This approach is benchmarked against existing p-HLA complexes and the prediction performance is measured against a library of experimentally validated peptides. The effect on binding activity across a large set of high-affinity peptides is used to investigate amino acid mismatches reported as high-risk factors in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  2. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S; Richards, Constance Shamuyarira; Richman, Douglas D; Rodes, Berta; Rodriguez, Milagros; Rose, Richard C; Rosenberg, Eric S; Rosenthal, Daniel; Ross, Polly E; Rubin, David S; Rumbaugh, Elease; Saenz, Luis; Salvaggio, Michelle R; Sanchez, William C; Sanjana, Veeraf M; Santiago, Steven; Schmidt, Wolfgang; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sestak, Philip M; Shalit, Peter; Shay, William; Shirvani, Vivian N; Silebi, Vanessa I; Sizemore, James M; Skolnik, Paul R; Sokol-Anderson, Marcia; Sosman, James M; Stabile, Paul; Stapleton, Jack T; Starrett, Sheree; Stein, Francine; Stellbrink, Hans-Jurgen; Sterman, F Lisa; Stone, Valerie E; Stone, David R; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Taplitz, Randy A; Tedaldi, Ellen M; Telenti, Amalio; Theisen, William; Torres, Richard; Tosiello, Lorraine; Tremblay, Cecile; Tribble, Marc A; Trinh, Phuong D; Tsao, Alice; Ueda, Peggy; Vaccaro, Anthony; Valadas, Emilia; Vanig, Thanes J; Vecino, Isabel; Vega, Vilma M; Veikley, Wenoah; Wade, Barbara H; Walworth, Charles; Wanidworanun, Chingchai; Ward, Douglas J; Warner, Daniel A; Weber, Robert D; Webster, Duncan; Weis, Steve; Wheeler, David A; White, David J; Wilkins, Ed; Winston, Alan; Wlodaver, Clifford G; van't Wout, Angelique; Wright, David P; Yang, Otto O; Yurdin, David L; Zabukovic, Brandon W; Zachary, Kimon C; Zeeman, Beth; Zhao, Meng

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

  3. Genetic studies of the HLA-D region by the primed lymphocyte test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWolf, W.C.; Carroll, P.G.; Yunis, E.J.

    1978-01-01

    The control and influence of the stimulating DRw antigens on primed lymphocyte typing (PLT) response was studied by using a discriminatory PLT assay with a low responder: stimulator ratio. Positive restimulation was established at 90.3% RR, based on a statistical evaluation of a composite or %RR values from 13 separate intrafamily PLTs performed in this laboratory. Two intrafamily PLT cells were then made against specificities HLA-DRwl and HLA-DRw3 and restimulated with a panel of unrelated individuals. The results show a very high correlation (p < 0.001) between the HLA-DRw antigen specificity of those unrelated panel cells that stimulated in PLT and the HLA-DRw target specificity, which shows that PLT reactivity is strongly influenced by HLA-DRw

  4. HLA alleles and haplotypes in Burmese (Myanmarese) and Karen in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongmaroeng, C; Romphruk, A; Puapairoj, C; Leelayuwat, C; Kulski, J K; Inoko, H; Dunn, D S; Romphruk, A V

    2015-09-01

    This is the first report on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele and haplotype frequencies at three class I loci and two class II loci in unrelated healthy individuals from two ethnic groups, 170 Burmese and 200 Karen, originally from Burma (Myanmar), but sampled while residing in Thailand. Overall, the HLA allele and haplotype frequencies detected by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) at five loci (A, B, C, DRB1 and DRQB1) at low resolution showed distinct differences between the Burmese and Karen. In Burmese, five HLA-B*15 haplotypes with different HLA-A and HLA-DR/DQ combinations were detected with three of these not previously reported in other Asian populations. The data are important in the fields of anthropology, transplantation and disease-association studies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Immunogenicity of HLA Class I and II Double Restricted Influenza A-Derived Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara Ram; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Buus, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify influenza A-derived peptides which bind to both HLA class I and -II molecules and by immunization lead to both HLA class I and class II restricted immune responses. Eight influenza A-derived 9-11mer peptides with simultaneous binding to both HLA-A*02...... four of the double binding peptides did result in HLA-A*02:01 restricted responses only. According to their cytokine profile, the CD4 T cell responses were of the Th2 type. In influenza infected mice, we were unable to detect natural processing in vivo of the double restricted peptides and in line...... with this, peptide vaccination did not decrease virus titres in the lungs of intranasally influenza challenged mice. Our data show that HLA class I and class II double binding peptides can be identified by bioinformatics and biochemical technology. By immunization, double binding peptides can give rise...

  6. Structure of HLA-A*0301 in complex with a peptide of proteolipid protein: insights into the role of HLA-A alleles in susceptibility to multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, Róisín M.; Friis, Lone; Siebold, Christian; Friese, Manuel A.; Fugger, Lars; Jones, E. Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. The structure of the human major histocompatability (MHC) class I molecule HLA-A*0301 (HLA-A3) in complex with a nonameric peptide (KLIETYFSK) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 2.7 Å resolution. HLA-A3 is a predisposing allele for multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. The KLIETYFSK peptide is a naturally processed epitope of proteolipid protein, a myelin protein and candidate target for immune-mediated myelin destruction in MS. Comparison of the structure of HLA-A3 with that of HLA-A2, an MHC class I molecule which is protective against MS, indicates that both MHC class I molecules present very similar faces for T-cell receptor recognition whilst differing in the specificity of their peptide-binding grooves. These characteristics may underlie the opposing (predisposing versus protective) associations that they exhibit both in humans and in mouse models of MS-like disease. Furthermore, subtle alterations within the peptide-binding groove of HLA-A3 and other A3-like MHC class I molecules, members of the so-called A3 superfamily, may be sufficient to alter their presentation of autoantigen peptides such as KLIETYFSK. This in turn may modulate their contribution to the associated risk of autoimmune disease

  7. MHC class II super-enhancer increases surface expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and affects cytokine production in autoimmune vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Giulio; Hayashi, Masahiro; Jin, Ying; Yorgov, Daniel; Santorico, Stephanie A; Holcomb, Cherie; Rastrou, Melinda; Erlich, Henry; Tengesdal, Isak W; Dagna, Lorenzo; Neff, C Preston; Palmer, Brent E; Spritz, Richard A; Dinarello, Charles A

    2016-02-02

    Genetic risk for autoimmunity in HLA genes is most often attributed to structural specificity resulting in presentation of self-antigens. Autoimmune vitiligo is strongly associated with the MHC class II region. Here, we fine-map vitiligo MHC class II genetic risk to three SNPs only 47 bp apart, located within a predicted super-enhancer in an intergenic region between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1, localized by a genome-wide association study of 2,853 Caucasian vitiligo patients. The super-enhancer corresponds to an expression quantitative trait locus for expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ RNA; we observed elevated surface expression of HLA-DR (P = 0.008) and HLA-DQ (P = 0.02) on monocytes from healthy subjects homozygous for the high-risk SNP haplotype. Unexpectedly, pathogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects homozygous for the high-risk super-enhancer haplotype exhibited greater increase in production of IFN-γ and IL-1β than cells from subjects homozygous for the low-risk haplotype. Specifically, production of IFN-γ on stimulation of dectin-1, mannose, and Toll-like receptors with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 2.5- and 2.9-fold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects, respectively (P = 0.007 and P = 0.01). Similarly, production of IL-1β was fivefold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects (P = 0.02). Increased production of immunostimulatory cytokines in subjects carrying the high-risk haplotype may act as an "adjuvant" during the presentation of autoantigens, tying together genetic variation in the MHC with the development of autoimmunity. This study demonstrates that for risk of autoimmune vitiligo, expression level of HLA class II molecules is as or more important than antigen specificity.

  8. Comparison of allele frequency for HLA-DR and HLA-DQ between patients with ECC and caries-free children

    OpenAIRE

    Bagherian A; Nematollahi H; Afshari J; Moheghi N

    2008-01-01

    Background: Early childhood caries (ECC) is one of the most common diseases of childhood. The etiology of ECC is multifactorial and both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in the pathogenesis of the disease. Genetic variations in the hosts may contribute to changes in the risk for dental caries. Genetic factors such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) have recently been suggested as a predisposing factor. Aim: The aim of this study was to look for an association between HLA-D...

  9. Flexible trigger menu implementation on the Global Trigger for the CMS Level-1 trigger upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has continued to explore physics at the high-energy frontier in 2016. The integrated luminosity delivered by the LHC in 2016 was 41~fb$^{-1}$ with a peak luminosity of 1.5 $\\times$ 10$^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ and peak mean pile-up of about 50, all exceeding the initial estimations for 2016. The CMS experiment has upgraded its hardware-based Level-1 trigger system to maintain its performance for new physics searches and precision measurements at high luminosities. The Global Trigger is the final step of the CMS \\mbox{Level-1} trigger and implements a trigger menu, a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects from calorimeter and muon triggers, for reducing the 40 MHz collision rate to 100 kHz. The Global Trigger has been upgraded with state-of-the-art FPGA processors on Advanced Mezzanine Cards with optical links running at 10 GHz in a MicroTCA crate. The powerful processing resources of the upgraded system enable implemen...

  10. Distribution of HLA-G extended haplotypes and one HLA-E polymorphism in a large-scale study of mother-child dyads with and without severe preeclampsia and eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, L L; Djurisic, S; Andersen, A-M N; Melbye, M; Bjerre, D; Ferrero-Miliani, L; Hackmon, R; Geraghty, D E; Hviid, T V F

    2016-10-01

    The etiological pathways and pathogenesis of preeclampsia have rendered difficult to disentangle. Accumulating evidence points toward a maladapted maternal immune system, which may involve aberrant placental expression of immunomodulatory human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class Ib molecules during pregnancy. Several studies have shown aberrant or reduced expression of HLA-G in the placenta and in maternal blood in cases of preeclampsia compared with controls. Unlike classical HLA class Ia loci, the nonclassical HLA-G has limited polymorphic variants. Most nucleotide variations are clustered in the 5'-upstream regulatory region (5'URR) and 3'-untranslated regulatory region (3'UTR) of HLA-G and reflect a stringent expressional control. Based on genotyping and full gene sequencing of HLA-G in a large number of cases and controls (n > 900), the present study, which to our knowledge is the largest and most comprehensive performed, investigated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del (rs66554220) and HLA-E polymorphisms in mother and newborn dyads from pregnancies complicated by severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and from uncomplicated pregnancies. Furthermore, results from extended HLA-G haplotyping in the newborns are presented in order to assess whether a combined contribution of nucleotide variations spanning the 5'URR, coding region, and 3'UTR of HLA-G describes the genetic association with severe preeclampsia more closely. In contrast to earlier findings, the HLA-G 14-bp ins/del polymorphism was not associated with severe preeclampsia. Furthermore, the polymorphism (rs1264457) defining the two nonsynonymous HLA-E alleles, HLA-E*01:01:xx:xx and HLA-E*01:03:xx:xx, were not associated with severe preeclampsia. Finally, no specific HLA-G haplotypes were significantly associated with increased risk of developing severe preeclampsia/eclampsia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. A polymorphism in the HLA-DPB1 gene is associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Field

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We conducted an association study across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA complex to identify loci associated with multiple sclerosis (MS. Comparing 1927 SNPs in 1618 MS cases and 3413 controls of European ancestry, we identified seven SNPs that were independently associated with MS conditional on the others (each P ≤ 4 x 10(-6. All associations were significant in an independent replication cohort of 2212 cases and 2251 controls (P ≤ 0.001 and were highly significant in the combined dataset (P ≤ 6 x 10(-8. The associated SNPs included proxies for HLA-DRB1*15:01 and HLA-DRB1*03:01, and SNPs in moderate linkage disequilibrium (LD with HLA-A*02:01, HLA-DRB1*04:01 and HLA-DRB1*13:03. We also found a strong association with rs9277535 in the class II gene HLA-DPB1 (discovery set P = 9 x 10(-9, replication set P = 7 x 10(-4, combined P = 2 x 10(-10. HLA-DPB1 is located centromeric of the more commonly typed class II genes HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1. It is separated from these genes by a recombination hotspot, and the association is not affected by conditioning on genotypes at DRB1, DQA1 and DQB1. Hence rs9277535 represents an independent MS-susceptibility locus of genome-wide significance. It is correlated with the HLA-DPB1*03:01 allele, which has been implicated previously in MS in smaller studies. Further genotyping in large datasets is required to confirm and resolve this association.

  12. HLA AND CROSS·REACTIVE ANTIGEN GROUP MATCHING FOR CADAVER KIDNEY ALLOCATION1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Eliasziw, Michael; Gjertson, David; Terasaki, Paul I.; Fung, John J.; Trucco, Massimo; Martell, Joan; McMichael, John; Scantlebury, Velma; Shapiro, Ron; Donner, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Background Allocation of cadaver kidneys by graded human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility scoring arguably has had little effect on overall survival while prejudicing the transplant candidacy of African-American and other hard to match populations. Consequently, matching has been proposed of deduced amino acid residues of the individual HLA molecules shared by cross-reactive antigen groups (CREGs). We have examined the circumstances under which compatibility with either method impacted graft survival. Methods Using Cox proportional hazards regression modeling, we studied the relationship between levels of conventional HLA mismatch and other donor and recipient factors on primary cadaver kidney survival between 1981 and 1995 at the University of Pittsburgh (n=1,780) and in the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) Scientific Registry during 1991–1995 (n=31,291). The results were compared with those obtained by the matching of amino acid residues that identified CREG-compatible cases with as many as four (but not five and six) HLA mismatches. Results With more than one HLA mismatch (>85% of patients in both series), most of the survival advantage of a zero mismatch was lost. None of the HLA loci were “weak.” In the UNOS (but not Pittsburgh) category of one-HLA mismatch (n=1334), a subgroup of CREG-matched recipients (35.3%) had better graft survival than the remaining 64.7%, who were CREG-mismatched. There was no advantage of a CREG match in the two- to four-HLA incompatibility tiers. Better graft survival with tacrolimus was observed in both the Pittsburgh and UNOS series. Conclusions Obligatory national sharing of cadaver kidneys is justifiable only for zero-HLA-mismatched kidneys. The potential value of CREG matching observed in the one-HLA-mismatched recipients of the UNOS (but not the Pittsburgh) experience deserves further study. PMID:9381546

  13. Distinct HLA associations of LGI1 and CASPR2-antibody diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Sophie; Varley, James; Lee, Wanseon; Makuch, Mateusz; Elliott, Katherine; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Jacob, Saiju; Leite, M Isabel; Maddison, Paul; Chen, Mian; Geschwind, Michael D; Grant, Eleanor; Sen, Arjune; Waters, Patrick; McCormack, Mark; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Barnardo, Martin; Knight, Julian C; Irani, Sarosh R

    2018-05-18

    The recent biochemical distinction between antibodies against leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated-1 (LGI1), contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2) and intracellular epitopes of voltage-gated potassium-channels (VGKCs) demands aetiological explanations. Given established associations between human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and adverse drug reactions, and our clinical observation of frequent adverse drugs reactions in patients with LGI1 antibodies, we compared HLA alleles between healthy controls (n = 5553) and 111 Caucasian patients with VGKC-complex autoantibodies. In patients with LGI1 antibodies (n = 68), HLA-DRB1*07:01 was strongly represented [odds ratio = 27.6 (95% confidence interval 12.9-72.2), P = 4.1 × 10-26]. In contrast, patients with CASPR2 antibodies (n = 31) showed over-representation of HLA-DRB1*11:01 [odds ratio = 9.4 (95% confidence interval 4.6-19.3), P = 5.7 × 10-6]. Other allelic associations for patients with LGI1 antibodies reflected linkage, and significant haplotypic associations included HLA-DRB1*07:01-DQA1*02:01-DQB1*02:02, by comparison to DRB1*11:01-DQA1*05:01-DQB1*03:01 in CASPR2-antibody patients. Conditional analysis in LGI1-antibody patients resolved further independent class I and II associations. By comparison, patients with both LGI1 and CASPR2 antibodies (n = 3) carried yet another complement of HLA variants, and patients with intracellular VGKC antibodies (n = 9) lacked significant HLA associations. Within LGI1- or CASPR2-antibody patients, HLA associations did not correlate with clinical features. In silico predictions identified unique CASPR2- and LGI1-derived peptides potentially presented by the respective over-represented HLA molecules. These highly significant HLA associations dichotomize the underlying immunology in patients with LGI1 or CASPR2 antibodies, and inform T cell specificities and cellular interactions at disease initiation.

  14. Immunogenicity of Anti-HLA Antibodies in Pancreas and Islet Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaigne, Benjamin; Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Bédat, Benoît; Ahmed, Mohamed Alibashe; Hönger, Gideon; De Seigneux, Sophie; Demuylder-Mischler, Sandrine; Berney, Thierry; Spierings, Eric; Ferrari-Lacraz, Sylvie; Villard, Jean

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize the anti-HLA antibodies before and after pancreatic islet or pancreas transplantation. We assessed the risk of anti-donor-specific antibody (DSA) sensitization in a single-center, retrospective clinical study at Geneva University Hospital. Data regarding clinical characteristics, graft outcome, HLA mismatch, donor HLA immunogenicity, and anti-HLA antibody characteristics were collected. Between January 2008 and July 2014, 18 patients received islet transplants, and 26 patients received a pancreas transplant. Eleven out of 18 patients (61.1%) in the islet group and 12 out of 26 patients (46.2%) in the pancreas group had anti-HLA antibodies. Six patients (33.3%) developed DSAs against HLA of the islets, and 10 patients (38.4%) developed DSAs against HLA of the pancreas. Most of the DSAs were at a low level. Several parameters such as gender, number of times cells were transplanted, HLA mismatch, eplet mismatch and PIRCHE-II numbers, rejection, and infection were analyzed. Only the number of PIRCHE-II was associated with the development of anti-HLA class II de novo DSAs. Overall, the development of de novo DSAs did not influence graft survival as estimated by insulin independence. Our results indicated that pretransplant DSAs at low levels do not restrict islet or pancreas transplantation [especially islet transplantation (27.8% vs. 15.4.%)]. De novo DSAs do occur at a similar rate in both pancreas and islet transplant recipients (mainly of class II), and the immunogenicity of donor HLA is a parameter that should be taken into consideration. When combined with an immunosuppressive regimen and close follow-up, development of low levels of DSAs was not found to result in reduced graft survival or graft function in the current study.

  15. Relevance of MICA and other non-HLA antibodies in clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumitran-Holgersson, Suchitra

    2008-10-01

    The clinical importance of HLA-specific antibodies for organ allograft outcome is well established. In the past few years, there has been an increasing interest in non-HLA antigens as targets of injury in organ transplant recipients. This increased interest has been spurred by the fact that HLA-identical kidney transplants also undergo immunological rejections. Polymorphisms within non-HLA genes associated with evoking an immune response to alloantigens are currently being studied for their association with transplant outcome. Non-HLA antigens, such as the polymorphic MHC class I-related chain A (MICA), expressed on endothelial cells have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hyperacute, acute and chronic organ allograft rejections. Use of endothelial cells as targets may clarify the specificities of other clinically relevant non-HLA antibodies in graft rejections. This review summarizes past and current knowledge of the clinical importance and specificities of non-HLA antibodies, and mechanisms by which these antibodies may contribute to graft destruction in clinical transplantation. The aims of current research into the role of non-HLA antigens and their genetics in predicting outcome are to develop an improved insight into the basic science of transplantation and to develop a risk or prognostic index for use in the clinical setting. Non-HLA antibody responses are receiving increasing interest in acute and chronic rejection and specificity, affinity, and pathogenicity need to be investigated to estimate their contribution. Undoubtedly, this will continue to be an area of interest in terms of fully understanding the role of non-HLA antigens as targets of immune-mediated injury and the potential for clinical intervention.

  16. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zilian

    Full Text Available Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA class I (HLA I antibodies (Abs play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs. The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]. Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation.

  17. Upregulation of Soluble HLA-G5 and HLA-G6 Isoforms in the Milder Histopathological Stages of Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Role for Subverting Immune Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, D M B Oliveira; Genre, J; Silva, T G Alves; Soares, C P; Rocha, K Borges Ferreira; Oliveira, C Nunes; Jatobá, C A Nunes; Andrade, J Marco de Leon; Moreau, P; Medeiros, A da Cunha; Donadi, E A; Crispim, J C de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The subversion mechanisms employed by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to escape from immune surveillance and to establish persistent infection are poorly understood. Growing evidence indicates that expression of HLA-G, a non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule, negatively regulates immune responses in pathological conditions, including infectious diseases. In this context, we aimed to evaluate HLA-G expression in the gastric microenvironment of individuals harbouring H. pylori and to correlate it with histological variables. Fifty-four gastric specimens from patients harbouring H. pylori infection were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using anti-HLA-G monoclonal antibody. As a result, HLA-G expression was detected in 43 of 54 specimens harbouring H. pylori. The presence of HLA-G was significantly associated with milder colonization by H. pylori (P role of HLA-G during H. pylori infection is beneficial or hazardous for patients remains to be defined. © 2015 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  18. Trigger processing using reconfigurable logic in the CMS calorimeter trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooke, J J; Cussans, D G; Heath, G P; Maddox, A J; Newbold, D M; Rabbetts, P D

    2001-04-01

    We present the design of the Global Calorimeter Trigger processor for the CMS detector at LHC. This is a fully pipelined processor system which collects data from all the CMS calorimeters and produces summary information used in forming the Level-1 trigger decision for each event. The design in based on the use of state-of-the-art reconfigurable logic devices (FPGAs) and fast data links. We present the results of device testing using a low-latency pipelined sort algorithm, which demonstrate that an FPGA can be used to perform processing previously foreseen to require custom ASICs. Our design approach results in a powerful, flexible and compact processor system.

  19. HLA antibodies and soluble CD30 are associated with poor renal graft outcome: updated results of a single-center cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Leanne L; D'Orsogna, Lloyd; Park, Lawrence P; Hughes, Tiffany L; Irish, Ashley; Luxton, Grant; Witt, Campbell S; Christiansen, Frank T

    2006-01-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that HLA class II antibodies and a high soluble CD30 (sCD30) measured at least 1 year post-transplant predict subsequent graft failure. We have now updated the results of this same cohort of 208 patients 15 months later. HLA-specific antibodies (class I and class II) were detected by ELISA LAT-M and Luminex LabScreen assays. Data on graft outcome was collected with a median follow-up of 4.7 years. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, class II antibody was again associated with a poorer outcome, with an estimated 6-year graft survival of 67% and 71% when detected by ELISA and Luminex, respectively, compared with 92% for those without class II antibody (p soluble CD30 level of > or = 100 U/ml was also associated with a poorer estimated 6-year graft survival (p = 0.02). HLA antibodies and high sCD30 (> or = 100 U/ml) had an additive effect such that those with both high sCD30 and class II antibodies had a hazard ratio for subsequent graft failure of 18.1 (p = 0.0008) and 8.6 (p = 0.007) when detected by ELISA and Luminex, respectively. These data show that detection of HLA class II antibodies and serum sCD30 measured at least 1 year post-transplant continues to predict a subsequent outcome up to 6 years after the initial measurement; they also show that such measures provide important information that may allow for modification of ongoing therapy.

  20. PD-L1 Is a Therapeutic Target of the Bromodomain Inhibitor JQ1 and, Combined with HLA Class I, a Promising Prognostic Biomarker in Neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaiu, Ombretta; Mina, Marco; Chierici, Marco; Boldrini, Renata; Jurman, Giuseppe; Romania, Paolo; D'Alicandro, Valerio; Benedetti, Maria C; Castellano, Aurora; Liu, Tao; Furlanello, Cesare; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2017-08-01

    Purpose: This study sought to evaluate the expression of programmed cell death-ligand-1 (PD-L1) and HLA class I on neuroblastoma cells and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG3) on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes to better define patient risk stratification and understand whether this tumor may benefit from therapies targeting immune checkpoint molecules. Experimental Design: In situ IHC staining for PD-L1, HLA class I, PD-1, and LAG3 was assessed in 77 neuroblastoma specimens, previously characterized for tumor-infiltrating T-cell density and correlated with clinical outcome. Surface expression of PD-L1 was evaluated by flow cytometry and IHC in neuroblastoma cell lines and tumors genetically and/or pharmacologically inhibited for MYC and MYCN. A dataset of 477 human primary neuroblastomas from GEO and ArrayExpress databases was explored for PD-L1, MYC, and MYCN correlation. Results: Multivariate Cox regression analysis demonstrated that the combination of PD-L1 and HLA class I tumor cell density is a prognostic biomarker for predicting overall survival in neuroblastoma patients ( P = 0.0448). MYC and MYCN control the expression of PD-L1 in neuroblastoma cells both in vitro and in vivo Consistently, abundance of PD-L1 transcript correlates with MYC expression in primary neuroblastoma. Conclusions: The combination of PD-L1 and HLA class I represents a novel prognostic biomarker for neuroblastoma. Pharmacologic inhibition of MYCN and MYC may be exploited to target PD-L1 and restore an efficient antitumor immunity in high-risk neuroblastoma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(15); 4462-72. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.