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Sample records for therapy research network

  1. The Marriage and Family Therapy Practice Research Network (MFT-PRN): Creating a More Perfect Union Between Practice and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lee N; Miller, Richard B; Bradford, Angela B; Anderson, Shayne R

    2017-10-01

    This article describes the Marriage and Family Therapy Practice Research Network (MFT-PRN). The MFT-PRN is designed to build a professional community based on practice-informed research and research-informed practice, increase the diversity of participants in MFT research, and unify researchers and clinicians. Clinics choose measures from a list that best represent their clinic needs. Clients' outcomes are assessed regularly, and therapists receive immediate graphical feedback on how clients are progressing or digressing. Data are pooled to create a large and diverse database, while improving client outcomes. We will discuss advantages of the MFT-PRN for researchers, therapists, clients, and agencies, and provide one model that we hope will inform other collaborative clinical-research models in the field of marriage and family therapy. Video Abstract is found in the online version of the article. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  2. The network researchers' network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C.; Jiang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987). In thi...

  3. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  4. Lymphatic Education & Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymphatic Education & Research Network Donate Now Become a Supporting Member X Living with LYMPHEDEMA AND Lymphatic Disease FAQs About ... December 8, 2017 11.08.2017 The Lymphatic Education & Research Network… Read More > ASRM LE&RN Combined ...

  5. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. International Occupational Therapy Research Priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Lynette; Coppola, Susan; Alvarez, Liliana; Cibule, Lolita; Maltsev, Sergey; Loh, Siew Yim; Mlambo, Tecla; Ikiugu, Moses N; Pihlar, Zdenka; Sriphetcharawut, Sarinya; Baptiste, Sue; Ledgerd, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Occupational therapy is a global profession represented by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT). International research priorities are needed for strategic guidance on global occupational therapy practice. The objective of this study was to develop international research priorities to reflect global occupational therapy practice. A Delphi study using three rounds of electronic surveys, distributed to WFOT member organizations and WFOT accredited universities, was conducted. Data were analyzed after each round, and priorities were presented for rating and ranking in order of importance. Forty-six (53%) out of 87 WFOT member countries participated in the Delphi process. Eight research priorities were confirmed by the final electronic survey round. Differences were observed in rankings given by member organizations and university respondents. Despite attrition at Round 3, the final research priorities will help to focus research efforts in occupational therapy globally. Follow-up research is needed to determine how the research priorities are being adopted internationally.

  7. Mixed methods research in music therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Burns, Debra S; Creswell, John W

    2013-01-01

    Music therapists have an ethical and professional responsibility to provide the highest quality care possible to their patients. Much of the time, high quality care is guided by evidence-based practice standards that integrate the most current, available research in making decisions. Accordingly, music therapists need research that integrates multiple ways of knowing and forms of evidence. Mixed methods research holds great promise for facilitating such integration. At this time, there have not been any methodological articles published on mixed methods research in music therapy. The purpose of this article is to introduce mixed methods research as an approach to address research questions relevant to music therapy practice. This article describes the core characteristics of mixed methods research, considers paradigmatic issues related to this research approach, articulates major challenges in conducting mixed methods research, illustrates four basic designs, and provides criteria for evaluating the quality of mixed methods articles using examples of mixed methods research from the music therapy literature. Mixed methods research offers unique opportunities for strengthening the evidence base in music therapy. Recommendations are provided to ensure rigorous implementation of this research approach.

  8. Interferon-free therapy for genotype 1 hepatitis C in liver transplant recipients: Real-world experience from the hepatitis C therapeutic registry and research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert S; O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Reddy, K Rajender; Kuo, Alexander; Morelli, Giuseppe J; Burton, James R; Stravitz, R Todd; Durand, Christine; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M; Kwo, Paul; Frenette, Catherine T; Stewart, Thomas G; Nelson, David R; Fried, Michael W; Terrault, Norah A

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) after liver transplantation (LT) is associated with decreased graft and patient survival. Achieving sustained virological response (SVR) with antiviral therapy improves survival. Because interferon (IFN)-based therapy has limited efficacy and is poorly tolerated, there has been rapid transition to IFN-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens. This article describes the experience with DAAs in the treatment of posttransplant genotype (GT) 1 HCV from a consortium of community and academic centers (Hepatitis C Therapeutic Registry and Research Network [HCV-TARGET]). Twenty-one of the 54 centers contributing to the HCV-TARGET consortium participated in this study. Enrollment criteria included positive posttransplant HCV RNA before treatment, HCV GT 1, and documentation of use of a simeprevir (SMV)/sofosbuvir (SOF) containing DAA regimen. Safety and efficacy were assessed. SVR was defined as undetectable HCV RNA 64 days or later after cessation of treatment. A total of 162 patients enrolled in HCV-TARGET started treatment with SMV+SOF with or without ribavirin (RBV) following LT. The study population included 151 patients treated with these regimens for whom outcomes and safety data were available. The majority of the 151 patients were treated with SOF and SMV alone (n = 119; 79%) or with RBV (n = 32; 21%), The duration of therapy was 12 weeks for most patients, although 15 patients received 24 weeks of treatment. Of all patients receiving SOF/SMV with or without RBV, 133/151 (88%) achieved sustained virological response at 12 weeks after therapy and 11 relapsed (7%). One patient had virological breakthrough (n = 1), and 6 patients were lost to posttreatment follow-up. Serious adverse events occurred in 11.9%; 3 patients (all cirrhotic) died due to aspiration pneumonia, suicide, and multiorgan failure. One experienced LT rejection. IFN-free DAA treatment represents a major improvement over prior IFN

  9. International research networks in pharmaceuticals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, Uwe; Rake, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    of scientific publications related to pharmaceutical research and applying social network analysis, we find that both the number of countries and their connectivity increase in almost all disease group specific networks. The cores of the networks consist of high income OECD countries and remain rather stable......Knowledge production and scientific research have become increasingly more collaborative and international, particularly in pharmaceuticals. We analyze this tendency in general and tie formation in international research networks on the country level in particular. Based on a unique dataset...... over time. Using network regression techniques to analyze the network dynamics our results indicate that accumulative advantages based on connectedness and multi-connectivity are positively related to changes in the countries' collaboration intensity whereas various indicators on similarity between...

  10. The Social Phobia Psychotherapy Research Network

    OpenAIRE

    Leichsenring, Falk; Hoyer, Jürgen; Beutel, Manfred; Herpertz, Sabine; Hiller, Wolfgang; Irle, Eva; Joraschky, Peter; König, Hans-Helmut; de Liz, Therese Marie; Nolting, Björn; Pöhlmann, Karin; Salzer, Simone; Schauenburg, Henning; Stangier, Ulrich; Strauss, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the Social Phobia Psychotherapy Research Network. The research program encompasses a coordinated group of studies adopting a standard protocol and an agreed-on set of standardized measures for the assessment and treatment of social phobia (SP). In the central project (study A), a multicenter randomized controlled trial, refined models of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy and manualized short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy are compared in the treatment of SP. A samp...

  11. Research, Boundaries, and Policy in Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book presents cutting-edge, peer reviewed research on networked learning organized by three themes: policy in networked learning, researching networked learning, and boundaries in networked learning. The "policy in networked learning" section explores networked learning in relation to policy...... networks, spaces of algorithmic governance and more. The "boundaries in networked learning" section investigates frameworks of students' digital literacy practices, among other important frameworks in digital learning. Lastly, the "research in networked learning" section delves into new research methods...

  12. Social networks and research output

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ductor, L.; Fafchamps, M.; Goyal, S.; van der Leij, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We study how knowledge about the social network of an individual researcher - as embodied in his coauthor relations - helps us in developing a more accurate prediction of his future productivity. We find that incorporating information about coauthor networks leads to a modest improvement in the

  13. Research Award: Informaon and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Corey Piccioni

    2013-08-07

    Aug 7, 2013 ... What are the limitaons of openness models in reducing poverty or achieving networked sociees? • What role do collaborave technologies (e.g., social media) play in social innovaon and change? • Which policies and regulaons are needed to sustain inclusive and innovave network sociees? The Research ...

  14. Translational research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Belardelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  15. Translational research on advanced therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardelli, Filippo; Rizza, Paola; Moretti, Franca; Carella, Cintia; Galli, Maria Cristina; Migliaccio, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues) is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  16. Research Award: Networked Economies

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Office 2004 Test Drive User

    2015-08-06

    Aug 6, 2015 ... have completed a master's or doctoral degree at a recognized university. These awards may be part of an academic requirement. • Your proposed research must focus on a developing country. The research awardee should have the following qualifications: • Master's degree in social sciences, media ...

  17. Research nodes and networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Schwarz, Annette Winkel; Find, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the spatial distribution and connectivity of scientific research, using linkages between academic units (institutions and business)to assess the relative weight of the worlds metropolitan regions. The findings support Richard Floridas assertion that the world is "spiky" rather than fl...

  18. The MUSE network: research outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Toll, D. G.; Gallipoli, Domenico; Augarde, C. E.; Gennaro, V. de; Mancuso, C.; Tarantino, A; Vaunat, Jean; Wheeler, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    TheMUSEproject ("Mechanics of Unsaturated Soils for Engineering") was a Research Training Network funded by the European Commission from 2004 until 2008. The network produced a unique data set of laboratory test results on a wide range of unsaturated soil types. Work on constitutive modelling involved re-evaluated existing constitutive models and indicated that even the latest coupled models failed to capture some aspects of observed behaviour. This led to new models being developed to att...

  19. Network Penetration Testing and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brandon F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will focus the on research and testing done on penetrating a network for security purposes. This research will provide the IT security office new methods of attacks across and against a company's network as well as introduce them to new platforms and software that can be used to better assist with protecting against such attacks. Throughout this paper testing and research has been done on two different Linux based operating systems, for attacking and compromising a Windows based host computer. Backtrack 5 and BlackBuntu (Linux based penetration testing operating systems) are two different "attacker'' computers that will attempt to plant viruses and or NASA USRP - Internship Final Report exploits on a host Windows 7 operating system, as well as try to retrieve information from the host. On each Linux OS (Backtrack 5 and BlackBuntu) there is penetration testing software which provides the necessary tools to create exploits that can compromise a windows system as well as other operating systems. This paper will focus on two main methods of deploying exploits 1 onto a host computer in order to retrieve information from a compromised system. One method of deployment for an exploit that was tested is known as a "social engineering" exploit. This type of method requires interaction from unsuspecting user. With this user interaction, a deployed exploit may allow a malicious user to gain access to the unsuspecting user's computer as well as the network that such computer is connected to. Due to more advance security setting and antivirus protection and detection, this method is easily identified and defended against. The second method of exploit deployment is the method mainly focused upon within this paper. This method required extensive research on the best way to compromise a security enabled protected network. Once a network has been compromised, then any and all devices connected to such network has the potential to be compromised as well. With a compromised

  20. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  1. Social networks user: current research

    OpenAIRE

    Agadullina E.R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review current research studies focusing on the users of Facebook and their behaviors in social networks. This review is organized into two sections: 1) social-demographic characteristics (Age, Gender, Nationality); 2) personality characteristics (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness-to-Experience, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Narcissism, Self-esteem). The results showed that the information in the personal profile and online behavior are strongly connect...

  2. Social networks user: current research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agadullina E.R.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to review current research studies focusing on the users of Facebook and their behaviors in social networks. This review is organized into two sections: 1 social-demographic characteristics (Age, Gender, Nationality; 2 personality characteristics (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness-to-Experience, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Narcissism, Self-esteem. The results showed that the information in the personal profile and online behavior are strongly connected with socio-demographic and personality characteristics

  3. Historical Research in Music Therapy. Third Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Alan L., Ed.; Davis, William B., Ed.; Heller, George N., Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This bibliography, produced by the American Music Therapy Association, represents a collection of research articles and publications over the past 50 years of music therapy's history. It is organized by author.

  4. Modeling management of research and education networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    Computer networks and their services have become an essential part of research and education. Nowadays every modern R&E institution must have a computer network and provide network services to its students and staff. In addition to its internal computer network, every R&E institution must have a

  5. Oversight and Management of a Cell Therapy Clinical Trial Network: Experience and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Moyé, Lemuel A.; Sayre, Shelly L.; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C.; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A.; Skarlatos, Sonia I.

    2011-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This arti...

  6. Rescuing policy in tourism network research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dredge, Dianne

    2018-01-01

    Networks provide a powerful lens to understand complex relational entanglements that are transforming social, economic and political life. Through a discussion of the various streams of network research in tourism, this paper argues that policy matters run across and throughout these strands....... Rather than arguing for increased interest in tourism policy network research as a separate subfield, the paper argues for deeper theoretical engagement with the policy dimension in tourism network research. Researchers adopting a network ontology could gain considerable insights and open up new lines...

  7. Grounded theory in music therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare

    2012-01-01

    Grounded theory is one of the most common methodologies used in constructivist (qualitative) music therapy research. Researchers use the term "grounded theory" when denoting varying research designs and theoretical outcomes. This may be challenging for novice researchers when considering whether grounded theory is appropriate for their research phenomena. This paper examines grounded theory within music therapy research. Grounded theory is briefly described, including some of its "contested" ideas. A literature search was conducted using the descriptor "music therapy and grounded theory" in Pubmed, CINAHL PsychlNFO, SCOPUS, ERIC (CSA), Web of Science databases, and a music therapy monograph series. A descriptive analysis was performed on the uncovered studies to examine researched phenomena, grounded theory methods used, and how findings were presented, Thirty music therapy research projects were found in refereed journals and monographs from 1993 to "in press." The Strauss and Corbin approach to grounded theory dominates the field. Descriptors to signify grounded theory components in the studies greatly varied. Researchers have used partial or complete grounded theory methods to examine clients', family members', staff, music therapy "overhearers," music therapists', and students' experiences, as well as music therapy creative products and professional views, issues, and literature. Seven grounded theories were offered. It is suggested that grounded theory researchers clarify what and who inspired their design, why partial grounded theory methods were used (when relevant), and their ontology. By elucidating assumptions underpinning the data collection, analysis, and findings' contribution, researchers will continue to improve music therapy research using grounded theory methods.

  8. Research on the model of home networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Xiang; Feng, Xiancheng

    2007-11-01

    It is the research hotspot of current broadband network to combine voice service, data service and broadband audio-video service by IP protocol to transport various real time and mutual services to terminal users (home). Home Networking is a new kind of network and application technology which can provide various services. Home networking is called as Digital Home Network. It means that PC, home entertainment equipment, home appliances, Home wirings, security, illumination system were communicated with each other by some composing network technology, constitute a networking internal home, and connect with WAN by home gateway. It is a new network technology and application technology, and can provide many kinds of services inside home or between homes. Currently, home networking can be divided into three kinds: Information equipment, Home appliances, Communication equipment. Equipment inside home networking can exchange information with outer networking by home gateway, this information communication is bidirectional, user can get information and service which provided by public networking by using home networking internal equipment through home gateway connecting public network, meantime, also can get information and resource to control the internal equipment which provided by home networking internal equipment. Based on the general network model of home networking, there are four functional entities inside home networking: HA, HB, HC, and HD. (1) HA (Home Access) - home networking connects function entity; (2) HB (Home Bridge) Home networking bridge connects function entity; (3) HC (Home Client) - Home networking client function entity; (4) HD (Home Device) - decoder function entity. There are many physical ways to implement four function entities. Based on theses four functional entities, there are reference model of physical layer, reference model of link layer, reference model of IP layer and application reference model of high layer. In the future home network

  9. Using Social Network Research in HRM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaše, Robert; King, Zella; Minbaeva, Dana

    2013-01-01

    ; the impact of social networking sites on perceptions of relationships; and ethical issues in organizational network analysis, we propose specific suggestions to bring social network perspectives closer to HRM researchers and practitioners and rebalance our attention to people and to their relationships....

  10. Action Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    and interventions come to exist. Thus, interventions and roles can be seen as network effects—they are enacted and supported by the network. Accordingly, roles and interventions are neither simply static and fixed nor fluid and flexible; rather, these are products of past and present attachments. I demonstrate how...

  11. Research of ad hoc network based on SINCGARS network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hao; Cai, Xiaoxia; Chen, Hong; Chen, Jian; Weng, Pengfei

    2016-03-01

    In today's world, science and technology make a spurt of progress, so society has entered the era of information technology, network. Only the comprehensive use of electronic warfare and network warfare means can we maximize their access to information and maintain the information superiority. Combined with the specific combat mission and operational requirements, the research design and construction in accordance with the actual military which are Suitable for the future of information technology needs of the tactical Adhoc network, tactical internet, will greatly improve the operational efficiency of the command of the army. Through the study of the network of the U.S. military SINCGARS network, it can explore the routing protocol and mobile model, to provide a reference for the research of our army network.

  12. Using Network Science to Support Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parraguez Ruiz, Pedro; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    and societal impact. This chapter contributes to the use of network science in empirical studies of design organisations. It focuses on introducing a network-based perspective on the design process and in particular on making use of network science to support design research and practice. The main contribution......A network-based perspective on designing permits research on the complexity of product, process, and people interactions. Strengthened by the latest advances in information technologies and accessibility of data, a network-based perspective and use of appropriate network analysis metrics, theories......, and tools allow us to explore new data-driven research approaches in design. These approaches allow us to move from counting to connecting, meaning to explicitly link disconnected pieces of data, information, and knowledge, and thus to answer far-reaching research questions with strong industrial...

  13. Action Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus-Rødje, Nina

    2012-01-01

    and interventions come to exist. Thus, interventions and roles can be seen as network effects—they are enacted and supported by the network. Accordingly, roles and interventions are neither simply static and fixed nor fluid and flexible; rather, these are products of past and present attachments. I demonstrate how...... the different attachments existing in the network at different points in time enable the configuration of particular actors with capacities to enact different roles and interventions in a diversity of contexts and settings. Finally, I illustrate what happens when these attachments are missing and how...

  14. Video micro analysis in music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla; Oldfield, Amelia; Plahl, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Three music therapy researchers from three different countries who have recently completed their PhD theses will each briefly discuss the role of video analysis in their investigations. All three of these research projects have involved music therapy work with children, some of whom were...... and qualitative approaches to data collection. In addition, participants will be encouraged to reflect on what types of knowledge can be gained from video analyses and to explore the general relevance of video analysis in music therapy research....

  15. Proton Therapy Research and Treatment Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodnight, J.E. Jr. (University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center); Alonso, J.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This Grant proposal outlines the steps that will be undertaken to bring the UC Davis Proton Therapy Research and Treatment, known locally as the Proton Therapy Facility (PTF), through its design and construction phases. This application concentrates on the design phase of the PTF project.

  16. Collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macleod, Christopher Kit

    2015-04-01

    There is a need to improve the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge of catchment systems through networks of researchers, policy makers and practitioners. This requires greater levels of systems based integrative research. In parallel to the growing realization that greater levels of collaborative knowledge in scientific research networks are required, a digital revolution has been taking place. This has been driven primarily by the emergence of distributed networks of computers and standards-based interoperability. The objective of this paper is to present the status and research needs for greater levels of systems based integrative research for the production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. To enable increased levels of integrative research depends on development and application of digital technologies to improve collection, use and sharing of data and devise new knowledge infrastructures. This paper focuses on the requirements for catchment observatories that integrate existing and novel physical, social and digital networks of knowledge infrastructures. To support this focus, I present three leading international examples of collaborative networks of catchment researchers and their development of catchment observatories. In particular, the digital infrastructures they have developed to support collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks. These examples are from North America (NSF funded CUAHSI HIS) and from Europe (UK NERC funded EVOp and the German Helmholtz Association Centers funded TERENO/TEODOOR). These exemplars all supported advancing collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks through the development of catchment observatories. I will conclude by discussing the future research directions required for greater levels of production, sharing and use of collaborative knowledge in catchment research networks based on catchment systems science.

  17. Targeting molecular networks for drug research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of molecular networks has recently moved into the limelight of biomedical research. While it has certainly provided us with plenty of new insights into cellular mechanisms, the challenge now is how to modify or even restructure these networks. This is especially true for human diseases, which can be regarded as manifestations of distorted states of molecular networks. Of the possible interventions for altering networks, the use of drugs is presently the most feasible. In this mini-review, we present and discuss some exemplary approaches of how analysis of molecular interaction networks can contribute to pharmacology (e.g., by identifying new drug targets or prediction of drug side effects, as well as listing pointers to relevant resources and software to guide future research. We also outline recent progress in the use of drugs for in vitro reprogramming of cells, which constitutes an example par excellence for altering molecular interaction networks with drugs.

  18. Heroin assisted treatment and research networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houborg, Esben; Munksgaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to map research communities related to heroin-assisted treatment (HAT) and the scientific network they are part of to determine their structure and content. Design/methodology/approach – Co-authorship as the basis for conducting social network analysis...

  19. Evolution of the Research Libraries Information Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David; Lerche, Carol

    1989-01-01

    Discusses current RLIN (Research Libraries Information Network) communications technology and motivations for change. Goals, topology, hardware, software, and protocol, terminal wiring, and deployment are considered. Sidebars provide a diagram of the current RLIN communications technology and describe the integrated RLIN network. (one reference)…

  20. Action research in inter-organisational networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager; Jørgensen, Jacob Høj

    2007-01-01

    -organisational network, this article discusses potential pitfalls in the legitimiser role. Lack of clarity in defining the researcher role and project ownership in relation to the funding organisation and the rest of the network can jeopardise the project and potentially the credibility of the researchers. The article......Traditionally, the literature on action research has been aimed at intra-organisational issues. These studies have distinguished between two researcher roles: The problem-solver and the observer. This article addresses the distinct challenges of action research in inter-organisational projects...

  1. African Transitional Justice Research Network | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... the creation and sustainable expansion of an electronically-based research network on options and lessons learned pertaining to transitional justice. A second objective is to build the capacity of 75 African human rights researchers to produce locally based research and carry out evidence-based human rights advocacy.

  2. Interventionist Research as a Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boulus, Nina

    2010-01-01

    as a response to growing concerns with making STS ‘useful’ and politically relevant. The fundamental characteristic of interventionist and action-oriented research, is that the researcher is deliberately and explicitly engaged in a process of change through collaboration with a community partner. However...... epistemological stance, I trace the trajectory of the research collaboration and the different roles and positions I occupied or acquired in a diversity of contexts and settings. To better understand the complex nature of collaboration found within interventionist research projects, I draw upon insights from......In the past three decades, we have been witnessing a development in social studies which has been described by STS scholars as the ‘participatory turn.’ This refers to a move toward various types of interventionist and action-oriented research. This turn to participation and action emerged...

  3. Research progess on treatment of cancer with targeted radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Jiawen; Zhang Caixia

    2008-01-01

    The new development and situation of targeted radionuclide therapy in oncology is described, which include radioimmunotherapy, peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, gene therapy and radionuclide labled chemotherapeutics therapy. The application research on labled carrier of those therapy is emphasized. Meanwhile, the research progess of indomethacin and its combined with targeted radionuclide therapy is also described. (authors)

  4. A proposed international watershed research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterkamp, W.R.; Gray, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    An “International Watershed Research Network” is to be an initial project of the Sino-U. S. Centers for Soil and Water Conservation and Environmental Protection. The Network will provide a fundamental database for research personnel of the Centers, as well as of the global research community, and is viewed as an important resource for their successful operation. Efforts are under way to (a) identify and select candidate watersheds, (b) develop standards and protocols for data collection and dissemination, and (c) specify other data sources on erosion, sediment transport, hydrology, and ancillary information of probable interest and use to participants of the Centers. The initial focus of the Network will be on water-deficient areas. Candidate watersheds for the Network are yet to be determined although likely selections include the Ansai Research Station, northern China, and the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed, Arizona, USA. The Network is to be patterned after the Vigil Network, an open-ended group of global sites and small drainage basins for which Internet-accessible geomorphic, hydrologic, and biological data are periodically collected or updated. Some types of data, using similar instruments and observation methods, will be collected at all watersheds selected for the Network. Other data from the watersheds that may reflect individual watershed characteristics and research objectives will be collected as well.

  5. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF); Boden, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowley, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Dattoria, Vince [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Desai, Narayan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foster, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Goldstone, Robin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gregurick, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological Systems Science Division; Houghton, John [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; Izaurralde, Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Joseph, Renu [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Pritchard, Matt [British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), Oxon (United Kingdom); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Strand, Gary [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Stuart, Cory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tatusova, Tatiana [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Thomas, Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zurawski, Jason [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  6. The smart grid research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troi, Anders; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard; Larsen, Emil Mahler

    2013-01-01

    Grid Network’s recommendations’, which relate to strengthening and marketing the research infrastructure that will position Denmark as the global hub for Smart Grid development; strengthening basic research into the complex relationships in electric systems with large quantities of independent parties...... for Smart Grid research, development and demonstration It is recommended that the electricity sector invite the Ministry to participate in the creation of a road map to ensure that solutions are implemented and coordinated with related policy areas. The sector should also establish a fast-acting working...... group with representatives from universities, distribution companies and the electric industry, in order to produce a mutual, binding schedule for the RDD of the Smart Grid in Denmark. Time prioritisation of part-recommendation: 2011-2012 Responsibility for implementation of part...

  7. Creatiing a Collaborative Research Network for Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, W.

    2012-12-01

    This abstract proposes a discussion of how professional science communication and scientific cooperation can become more efficient through the use of modern social network technology, using the example of Mendeley. Mendeley is a research workflow and collaboration tool which crowdsources real-time research trend information and semantic annotations of research papers in a central data store, thereby creating a "social research network" that is emergent from the research data added to the platform. We describe how Mendeley's model can overcome barriers for collaboration by turning research papers into social objects, making academic data publicly available via an open API, and promoting more efficient collaboration. Central to the success of Mendeley has been the creation of a tool that works for the researcher without the requirement of being part of an explicit social network. Mendeley automatically extracts metadata from research papers, and allows a researcher to annotate, tag and organize their research collection. The tool integrates with the paper writing workflow and provides advanced collaboration options, thus significantly improving researchers' productivity. By anonymously aggregating usage data, Mendeley enables the emergence of social metrics and real-time usage stats on top of the articles' abstract metadata. In this way a social network of collaborators, and people genuinely interested in content, emerges. By building this research network around the article as the social object, a social layer of direct relevance to academia emerges. As science, particularly Earth sciences with their large shared resources, become more and more global, the management and coordination of research is more and more dependent on technology to support these distributed collaborations.

  8. Research Award: Information and Networks

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    mentorship allow award holders to pursue their research goals and work in one of IDRC's dynamic program or ... governance, education, entrepreneurship, as well as collaborative models for participation and organization. ... What role do collaborative technologies (e.g., social media) play in social innovation and change?

  9. Mapping the network | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Together, the Poverty Research Network scholars possess a dozen different affiliations. They come from nine universities, two major national research organizations – the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences – and the National Bureau of Statistics.

  10. Consolidating African Research and Education Networking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Consolidating African Research and Education Networking (CORENA) - Phase I. African universities and research institutions possess significant human capacity, but their contribution to national human development as well as their intellectual property output is still very limited. A major cause of this is lack of easy and ...

  11. The future of network governance research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewis, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The popularity and scope of network governance research and practice continues to expand from its divergent foundations, assumptions and ethodological positions. This paper introduces a symposium of papers on this substantial sub-field by first summarizing the sprawling research endeavour...

  12. The network evolves | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-07-08

    Jul 8, 2011 ... “The labour economists' group is one of the fruits of the Poverty Research Network, so it has really been very helpful,” Lu Ming says. “The network is a bridge, and it could be expanded to more people.” Indeed, the young economists and their mentors have helped lay the groundwork for a possible next ...

  13. Sustaining Research Networks: the Twenty-Year Experience of the HMO Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, John F; Paolino, Andrea R; Thompson, Ella E; Larson, Eric B

    2014-01-01

    As multi-institutional research networks assume a central role in clinical research, they must address the challenge of sustainability. Despite its importance, the concept of network sustainability has received little attention in the literature, and the sustainability strategies of durable scientific networks have not been described. The Health Maintenance Organization Research Network (HMORN) is a consortium of 18 research departments in integrated health care delivery systems with over 15 million members in the United States and Israel. The HMORN has coordinated federally funded scientific networks and studies since 1994. This case study describes the HMORN approach to sustainability, proposes an operational definition of network sustainability, and identifies 10 essential elements that can enhance sustainability. The sustainability framework proposed here is drawn from prior publications on organizational issues by HMORN investigators and from the experience of recent HMORN leaders and senior staff. Network sustainability can be defined as (1) the development and enhancement of shared research assets to facilitate a sequence of research studies in a specific content area or multiple areas, and (2) a community of researchers and other stakeholders who reuse and develop those assets. Essential elements needed to develop the shared assets of a network include: network governance; trustworthy data and processes for sharing data; shared knowledge about research tools; administrative efficiency; physical infrastructure; and infrastructure funding. The community of researchers within a network is enhanced by: a clearly defined mission, vision and values; protection of human subjects; a culture of collaboration; and strong relationships with host organizations. While the importance of these elements varies based on the membership and goals of a network, this framework for sustainability can enhance strategic planning within the network and can guide relationships with

  14. The clinical applicability of music therapy research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    practitioners in all three areas (and beyond) can demonstrate, through previous and current research, that the music therapy service and interventions they provide are relevant and effective (Ansdell, Pavicevic & Proctor, 2004; Gold, Voracek and Wigram, 2004; Vink, 2003; Wigram 2002). Documentation of research......Research serves the functions of informing the clinical field, guiding future research, establishing new knowledge and theory, and meeting criteria for evidence based practice. Given the demands of health, education and social services today and there is an increasing expectation that clinical...... in lengthy and complex theses is seldom accessible to the practitioner working ‘at the coal-face’; and sometimes lacks clear direction on how the results are applicable in everyday therapy. For results to be implemented in clinical practice and disseminated to colleagues in related fields as well as senior...

  15. A child abuse research network: Now what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Daniel M; Scribano, Philip V

    2017-08-01

    As foundational work in preparation for a sustainable, multi-center network devoted to child abuse medical research, we recently used a combination of survey and modified Delphi methodologies to determine research priorities for future multi-center studies. Avoiding missed diagnoses, and improving selected/indicated prevention were the topics rated most highly in terms of research priority. Several constructive commentaries in this issue identify the key challenges which must be overcome to ensure a successful network. Indeed, as with the clinical work of child abuse pediatrics, a scientific network will also require constant collaboration within and outside the community of child abuse pediatricians, the wider medical community, and even non-medical professions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. SARNET: Severe accident research network of excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albiol, T.; Van Dorsselaere, J. P.; Chaumont, B.; Haste, T.; Journeau, Ch.; Meyer, L.; Sehgal, Bal Raj; Schwinges, Bernd; Beraha, D.; Annunziato, A.; Zeyen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Fifty-one organisations network in SARNET (Severe Accident Research Network of Excellence) their research capacities in order to resolve the most important pending issues for enhancing, with regard to Severe Accidents (SA), the safety of existing and future Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). This project. co-funded by the European Commission (EC) under the 6. Framework Programme, has been defined in order to optimise the use of the available means and to constitute sustainable research groups in the European Union. SARNET tackles the fragmentation that may exist between the different national R and D programmes, in defining common research programmes and developing common computer tools and methodologies for safety assessment. SARNET comprises most of the organisations involved in SA research in Europe, plus Canada. To reach these objectives, all the organisations networked in SARNET contributed to a joint Programme of Activities, which consisted of: Implementation of an advanced communication tool for accessing all project information, fostering exchange of information, and managing documents; Harmonization and re-orientation of the research programmes, and definition of new ones; Analysis of the experimental results provided by research programmes in order to elaborate a common understanding of relevant phenomena; Development of the ASTEC code (integral computer code used to predict the NPP behaviour during a postulated SA), which capitalizes in terms of physical models the knowledge produced within SARNET; Development of Scientific Databases in which all the results of research programmes are stored in a common format (DATANET); Development of a common methodology for Probabilistic Safety Assessment of NPPs; Development of short courses and writing a textbook on Severe Accidents for students and researchers; Promotion of personnel mobility amongst various European organisations. This paper presents the major achievements after four and a half years of operation of the

  18. Networks (2005) | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... From its launch in 1970, IDRC adopted a new approach to providing international development assistance. IDRC's philosophy was to work with the people who hoped to benefit from the aid, and to set research agendas in collaboration with local partners. Networks have been at the core of this cooperative ...

  19. Differential network analysis in human cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Ryan; Datta, Somnath; Datta, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    A complex disease like cancer is hardly caused by one gene or one protein singly. It is usually caused by the perturbation of the network formed by several genes or proteins. In the last decade several research teams have attempted to construct interaction maps of genes and proteins either experimentally or reverse engineer interaction maps using computational techniques. These networks were usually created under a certain condition such as an environmental condition, a particular disease, or a specific tissue type. Lately, however, there has been greater emphasis on finding the differential structure of the existing network topology under a novel condition or disease status to elucidate the perturbation in a biological system. In this review/tutorial article we briefly mention some of the research done in this area; we mainly illustrate the computational/statistical methods developed by our team in recent years for differential network analysis using publicly available gene expression data collected from a well known cancer study. This data includes a group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a group with acute myeloid leukemia. In particular, we describe the statistical tests to detect the change in the network topology based on connectivity scores which measure the association or interaction between pairs of genes. The tests under various scores are applied to this data set to perform a differential network analysis on gene expression for human leukemia. We believe that, in the future, differential network analysis will be a standard way to view the changes in gene expression and protein expression data globally and these types of tests could be useful in analyzing the complex differential signatures.

  20. Navigating cancer network attractors for tumor-specific therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin; Erler, Janine Terra

    2012-01-01

    Cells employ highly dynamic signaling networks to drive biological decision processes. Perturbations to these signaling networks may attract cells to new malignant signaling and phenotypic states, termed cancer network attractors, that result in cancer development. As different cancer cells reach...... these malignant states by accumulating different molecular alterations, uncovering these mechanisms represents a grand challenge in cancer biology. Addressing this challenge will require new systems-based strategies that capture the intrinsic properties of cancer signaling networks and provide deeper...... understanding of the processes by which genetic lesions perturb these networks and lead to disease phenotypes. Network biology will help circumvent fundamental obstacles in cancer treatment, such as drug resistance and metastasis, empowering personalized and tumor-specific cancer therapies....

  1. Conceptualizing and Advancing Research Networking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHLEYER, TITUS; BUTLER, BRIAN S.; SONG, MEI; SPALLEK, HEIKO

    2013-01-01

    Science in general, and biomedical research in particular, is becoming more collaborative. As a result, collaboration with the right individuals, teams, and institutions is increasingly crucial for scientific progress. We propose Research Networking Systems (RNS) as a new type of system designed to help scientists identify and choose collaborators, and suggest a corresponding research agenda. The research agenda covers four areas: foundations, presentation, architecture, and evaluation. Foundations includes project-, institution- and discipline-specific motivational factors; the role of social networks; and impression formation based on information beyond expertise and interests. Presentation addresses representing expertise in a comprehensive and up-to-date manner; the role of controlled vocabularies and folksonomies; the tension between seekers’ need for comprehensive information and potential collaborators’ desire to control how they are seen by others; and the need to support serendipitous discovery of collaborative opportunities. Architecture considers aggregation and synthesis of information from multiple sources, social system interoperability, and integration with the user’s primary work context. Lastly, evaluation focuses on assessment of collaboration decisions, measurement of user-specific costs and benefits, and how the large-scale impact of RNS could be evaluated with longitudinal and naturalistic methods. We hope that this article stimulates the human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, and related communities to pursue a broad and comprehensive agenda for developing research networking systems. PMID:24376309

  2. Changes in dynamic resting state network connectivity following aphasia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, E Susan; Small, Steven L

    2017-10-24

    Resting state magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) permits observation of intrinsic neural networks produced by task-independent correlations in low frequency brain activity. Various resting state networks have been described, with each thought to reflect common engagement in some shared function. There has been limited investigation of the plasticity in these network relationships after stroke or induced by therapy. Twelve individuals with language disorders after stroke (aphasia) were imaged at multiple time points before (baseline) and after an imitation-based aphasia therapy. Language assessment using a narrative production task was performed at the same time points. Group independent component analysis (ICA) was performed on the rsfMRI data to identify resting state networks. A sliding window approach was then applied to assess the dynamic nature of the correlations among these networks. Network correlations during each 30-second window were used to cluster the data into ten states for each window at each time point for each subject. Correlation was performed between changes in time spent in each state and therapeutic gains on the narrative task. The amount of time spent in a single one of the (ten overall) dynamic states was positively associated with behavioral improvement on the narrative task at the 6-week post-therapy maintenance interval, when compared with either baseline or assessment immediately following therapy. This particular state was characterized by minimal correlation among the task-independent resting state networks. Increased functional independence and segregation of resting state networks underlies improvement on a narrative production task following imitation-based aphasia treatment. This has important clinical implications for the targeting of noninvasive brain stimulation in post-stroke remediation.

  3. ENTERVISION: Research Training in 3D Digital Imaging for Cancer Radiation Therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosanjh, M

    2013-01-01

    ENTERVISION, is a Marie Curie Initial Training Network project providing training for 12 Early - Stage Researchers and 4 Experienced Researchers in the field of online medical imaging for hadron therapy. It was established in response to the critical need for reinforcing research in online imaging and for training of highly skilled professionals, with the aim of early detection and more precise treatment of tumours.

  4. Computer network for experimental research using ISDN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, Katsumi; Nakanishi, Hideya

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the development of a computer network that uses the Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN) for real-time analysis of experimental plasma physics and nuclear fusion research. Communication speed, 64/128kbps (INS64) or 1.5Mbps (INS1500) per connection, is independent of how busy the network is. When INS-1500 is used, the communication speed, which is proportional to the public telephone connection fee, can be dynamically varied from 64kbps to 1472kbps (depending on how much data are being transferred using the Bandwidth-on-Demand (BOD) function in the ISDN Router. On-demand dial-up and time-out disconnection reduce the public telephone connection fee by 10%-97%. (author)

  5. The Importance of Research in Educating About Music Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara L. Wheeler

    2014-01-01

    In this "Essay" article, the author explores some ways in which music therapy research is important in educating people—music therapists and those outside of music therapy—about music therapy. There are different levels and types of research, and different levels are appropriate at different points in the development of music therapy in a country. However, some type of music therapy research is important for the development of music therapy in all cases and in all situations and all countries...

  6. Clustering, cooperation, and research in social networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vega-Redondo, F.; Slanina, František; Marsili, M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 3, 2-3 (2005), s. 628-638 ISSN 1542-4766 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P04OCP10.001 Grant - others:MEC(ES) SEJ2004-02170; EU(XE) HPRN-CT-2002-00319 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : sociophysics * random graphs * networks Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  7. 3: Computer network in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rekonen, A.; Valve, J.; Toivanen, J.

    1987-01-01

    A computer network linking two accelerators (Saturne Therac 20, CGR and Dynaray CH-4, BBC), dose planning system, simulator (Ximatron CX, Varian) and radiation field analyzer is described. Patient anatomical data are fed off-line from the CT-scanner. In addition the system insists a treatment control (verification) system developed in the hospital. The treatment parameters from the dose planning are transferred to the PDP-11/23+ computer via a serial line using the KERMIT data transfer protocol. The verification computer is further connected with the accelerators and the simulator. The radiation treatment is possible only when accelerator settings agree with the treatment parameters transmitted from the dose planning. Verification is also applied to the simulation process. When simulation study requires changes in fields and/or field settings the changes are fed back on line to the dose planning. 5 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table

  8. Alternative approaches to research in physical therapy: positivism and phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, K F; Jensen, G M; Schmoll, B J; Hack, L M; Gwyer, J

    1993-02-01

    This article presents philosophical approaches to research in physical therapy. A comparison is made to demonstrate how the research purpose, research design, research methods, and research data differ when one approaches research from the philosophical perspective of positivism (predominantly quantitative) as compared with the philosophical perspective of phenomenology (predominantly qualitative). Differences between the two approaches are highlighted by examples from research articles published in Physical Therapy. The authors urge physical therapy researchers to become familiar with the tenets, rigor, and knowledge gained from the use of both approaches in order to increase their options in conducting research relevant to the practice of physical therapy.

  9. A research on the application of software defined networking in satellite network architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huan; Chen, Jinqiang; Cao, Suzhi; Cui, Dandan; Li, Tong; Su, Yuxing

    2017-10-01

    Software defined network is a new type of network architecture, which decouples control plane and data plane of traditional network, has the feature of flexible configurations and is a direction of the next generation terrestrial Internet development. Satellite network is an important part of the space-ground integrated information network, while the traditional satellite network has the disadvantages of difficult network topology maintenance and slow configuration. The application of SDN technology in satellite network can solve these problems that traditional satellite network faces. At present, the research on the application of SDN technology in satellite network is still in the stage of preliminary study. In this paper, we start with introducing the SDN technology and satellite network architecture. Then we mainly introduce software defined satellite network architecture, as well as the comparison of different software defined satellite network architecture and satellite network virtualization. Finally, the present research status and development trend of SDN technology in satellite network are analyzed.

  10. Research on 6R Military Logistics Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Wan; Wen, Wang

    The building of military logistics network is an important issue for the construction of new forces. This paper has thrown out a concept model of 6R military logistics network model based on JIT. Then we conceive of axis spoke y logistics centers network, flexible 6R organizational network, lean 6R military information network based grid. And then the strategy and proposal for the construction of the three sub networks of 6Rmilitary logistics network are given.

  11. Research on Evolutionary Mechanism of Agile Supply Chain Network via Complex Network Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Ru Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper establishes the evolutionary mechanism model of agile supply chain network by means of complex network theory which can be used to describe the growth process of the agile supply chain network and analyze the complexity of the agile supply chain network. After introducing the process and the suitability of taking complex network theory into supply chain network research, the paper applies complex network theory into the agile supply chain network research, analyzes the complexity of agile supply chain network, presents the evolutionary mechanism of agile supply chain network based on complex network theory, and uses Matlab to simulate degree distribution, average path length, clustering coefficient, and node betweenness. Simulation results show that the evolution result displays the scale-free property. It lays the foundations of further research on agile supply chain network based on complex network theory.

  12. Establishing a Research Agenda for Art Therapy: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Donna; Deaver, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Art therapy in the United States is a young profession that would benefit from an identified research agenda to marshal resources more effectively to address gaps in the knowledge base. This article describes a Delphi study of U.S. art therapy researchers who were surveyed on research priorities for the profession. The research panelists were…

  13. Phenylketonuria: translating research into novel therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Gladys

    2014-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an inborn error of metabolism of the amino acid phenylalanine. It is an autosomal recessive disorder with a rate of incidence of 1 in 10,000 in Caucasian populations. Mutations in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene are the major cause of PKU, due to the loss of the catalytic activity of the enzyme product PAH. Newborn screening for PKU allows early intervention, avoiding irreparable neurological damage and intellectual disability that would arise from untreated PKU. The current primary treatment of PKU is the limitation of dietary protein intake, which in the long term may be associated with poor compliance in some cases and other health problems due to malnutrition. The only alternative therapy currently approved is the supplementation of BH4, the requisite co-factor of PAH, in the orally-available form of sapropterin dihydrochloride. This treatment is not universally available, and is only effective for a proportion (estimated 30%) of PKU patients. Research into novel therapies for PKU has taken many different approaches to address the lack of PAH activity at the core of this disorder: enzyme replacement via virus-mediated gene transfer, transplantation of donor liver and recombinant PAH protein, enzyme substitution using phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) to provide an alternative pathway for the metabolism of phenylalanine, and restoration of native PAH activity using chemical chaperones and nonsense read-through agents. It is hoped that continuing efforts into these studies will translate into a significant improvement in the physical outcome, as well as quality of life, for patients with PKU. PMID:26835324

  14. The network researchers' network: A social network analysis of the IMP Group 1985-2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, Stephan C. M.; Ziang, Zhizhong; Naudé, Peter

    ). In this paper, based upon the papers presented at the 22 conferences held to date, we undertake a Social Network Analysis in order to examine the degree of co-publishing that has taken place between this group of researchers. We identify the different components in this database, and examine the large main......The Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) Group is a network of academic researchers working in the area of business-to-business marketing. The group meets every year to discuss and exchange ideas, with a conference having been held every year since 1984 (there was no meeting in 1987...

  15. Modern International Research Groups: Networks and Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katehi, Linda

    2009-05-01

    In a globalized economy, education and research are becoming increasing international in content and context. Academic and research institutions worldwide try to internationalize their programs by setting formal or informal collaborations. An education that is enhanced by international experiences leads to mobility of the science and technology workforce. Existing academic cultures and research structures are at odds with efforts to internationalize education. For the past 20-30 years, the US has recognized the need to improve the abroad experience of our scientists and technologists: however progress has been slow. Despite a number of both federally and privately supported programs, efforts to scale up the numbers of participants have not been satisfactory. The exchange is imbalanced as more foreign scientists and researchers move to the US than the other way around. There are a number of issues that contribute to this imbalance but we could consider the US academic career system, as defined by its policies and practices, as a barrier to internationalizing the early career faculty experience. Strict curricula, pre-tenure policies and financial commitments discourage students, post doctoral fellows and pre-tenure faculty from taking international leaves to participate in research abroad experiences. Specifically, achieving an international experience requires funding that is not provided by the universities. Furthermore, intellectual property requirements and constraints in pre-tenure probationary periods may discourage students and faculty from collaborations with peers across the Atlantic or Pacific or across the American continent. Environments that support early career networking are not available. This presentation will discuss the increasing need for international collaborations and will explore the need for additional programs, more integration, better conditions and improved infrastructures that can encourage and support mobility of scientists. In addition

  16. Recent Themes in Social Networking Service Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Liu

    Full Text Available The body of literature addressing the phenomenon related to social networking services (SNSs has grown rather fast recently. Through a systematic and quantitative approach, this study identifies the recent SNS research themes, which are the issues discussed by a coherent and growing subset of this literature. A set of academic articles retrieved from the Web of Science database is used as the basis for uncovering the recent themes. We begin the analysis by constructing a citation network which is further separated into groups after applying a widely used clustering method. The resulting clusters all consist of articles coherent in citation relationships. This study suggests eight fast growing recent themes. They span widely encompassing politics, romantic relationships, public relations, journalism, and health. Among them, four focus their issues largely on Twitter, three on Facebook, and one generally on both. While discussions on traditional issues in SNSs such as personality, motivations, self-disclosure, narcissism, etc. continue to lead the pack, the proliferation of the highlighted recent themes in the near future is very likely to happen.

  17. Recent Themes in Social Networking Service Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, John S; Ho, Mei Hsiu-Ching; Lu, Louis Y Y

    2017-01-01

    The body of literature addressing the phenomenon related to social networking services (SNSs) has grown rather fast recently. Through a systematic and quantitative approach, this study identifies the recent SNS research themes, which are the issues discussed by a coherent and growing subset of this literature. A set of academic articles retrieved from the Web of Science database is used as the basis for uncovering the recent themes. We begin the analysis by constructing a citation network which is further separated into groups after applying a widely used clustering method. The resulting clusters all consist of articles coherent in citation relationships. This study suggests eight fast growing recent themes. They span widely encompassing politics, romantic relationships, public relations, journalism, and health. Among them, four focus their issues largely on Twitter, three on Facebook, and one generally on both. While discussions on traditional issues in SNSs such as personality, motivations, self-disclosure, narcissism, etc. continue to lead the pack, the proliferation of the highlighted recent themes in the near future is very likely to happen.

  18. Privacy Issues of a National Research and Education Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, James E.; Graveman, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the right to privacy of communications focuses on privacy expectations within a National Research and Education Network (NREN). Highlights include privacy needs in scientific and education communications; academic and research networks; network security and privacy concerns; protection strategies; and consequences of privacy…

  19. Research of Innovation Diffusion on Industrial Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongtai Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The real value of innovation consists in its diffusion on industrial network. The factors which affect the diffusion of innovation on industrial network are the topology of industrial network and rules of diffusion. Industrial network is a complex network which has scale-free and small-world characters; its structure has some affection on threshold, length of path, enterprise’s status, and information share of innovation diffusion. Based on the cost and attitude to risk of technical innovation, we present the “avalanche” diffusing model of technical innovation on industrial network.

  20. Yoga Therapy Research: A Whole-Systems Perspective on Comparative Effectiveness and Patient-Centered Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Jennifer G

    2015-01-01

    For the yoga research community to capitalize on its current momentum, it is critical to consider certain developments in research theory and innovative methodologies. The concept of model validity must be incorporated in yoga therapy research so that explanatory constructs employed and outcome measures chosen reflect the principles of traditional yogic science. Focusing on effectiveness research will ensure maximum generalizability of study results and reflect real-world therapy delivery settings, thereby increasing the relevance of outcomes. Whole systems of healing require research methodologies that address complex relationships between multi-target therapies with multiple potential treatment results. Complex, dynamic systems theory provides the theoretical and methodological innovations necessary to design studies, choose outcomes, and analyze data in a way that can account for charting complex, cyclical, therapeutic trajectories across time. Emphasizing patient-centered outcomes is aligned with the patent-oriented and tailored natured of yoga therapy delivery. Increasing the quality and quantity of comparative effectiveness research to analyze the harms and benefits of contrasting therapies can provide an infrastructure for designing studies that can have significant practical impact. The creation of practice-based research networks within the yoga research community will incentivize links between mainstream clinical researchers and yoga therapy delivery settings, ultimately developing collaborative networks. Yoga therapy centers can facilitate patient recruitment for studies and inform standards for yoga researchers. Collaborative efforts between the yoga and ayurvedic research communities will streamline efforts, solidify expertise, cross-pollinate theoretical and methodological innovation, and consolidate efforts to secure research funding and increase publication and dissemination of study findings.

  1. Networking: a catalyst in science and technological research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research focuses on the network of networks access, usage, and productivity by the research scientists of Federal Institute of Industrial Research, Oshodi Lagos. Data was gathered through the use of questionnaire randomly administered to 100 research scientists in two phases. The phases were before and after the ...

  2. Advances in European drought research efforts and related research networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallaksen, Lena; van Lanen, Henny

    2010-05-01

    Drought is a complex phenomenon with wide-ranging socio-economic and environmental impacts; still drought research and operational applications like drought monitoring and forecasting, have been lagging behind the development in flood-related research. However, recently several drought research projects and networks have emerged in Europe, partly in response to the occurrence of a series of dry and hot summers in the 21st century, notable the record breaking 2003 event covering large part of central Europe. These events were a strong reminder of Europe's vulnerability to drought and neither were forecasted. Meteorological drought is caused by regional or meso- (synoptic) scale spatial and temporal anomalies in the climatic system, which control the natural short- and long term variability in drought occurrence. However, climate forcing by synoptic scale conditions is not the only cause of drought, also various regional land-surface feedbacks through soil moisture and vegetation, concur to amplify dry weather and high summer temperatures. A deficit in the climatic water balance may affect all components of the hydrological cycle through a reduction in soil moisture, groundwater and surface water and subsequently, reduced water availability. Understanding how a climate water deficiency propagates through the hydrological system and its feedbacks to the atmosphere is crucial to develop drought mitigation and adaptation plans. Moreover, it is the basis for early warning and forecasting of hydrological drought (groundwater and surface water). A review of drought studies from the 20th century suggests that drought in Europe has occurred more frequently in the latter part of the century, partly enhanced by higher temperatures. However, the scientific understanding of the driving forces behind large-scale droughts is incomplete and further complicated by insufficient knowledge about long-term (decadal and millennial) natural variability. Moreover, the role of the physical

  3. Art Therapy, Research and Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Gilroy, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Art Therapy around the world is under increasing pressure to become more "evidence-based". As a result, practitioners now need to get to grips with what constitutes "evidence", how to apply research in appropriate ways and also how to contribute to the body of evidence through their own research and other related activities.\\ud \\ud Written specifically for art therapy practitioners and students, Art Therapy, Research & Evidence Based Practice traces the background to EBP, critically reviews t...

  4. Connecting the Dots: Understanding the Flow of Research Knowledge within a Research Brokering Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodway, Joelle

    2015-01-01

    Networks are frequently cited as an important knowledge mobilization strategy; however, there is little empirical research that considers how they connect research and practice. Taking a social network perspective, I explore how central office personnel find, understand and share research knowledge within a research brokering network. This mixed…

  5. Steps in Researching the Music in Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2007-01-01

    The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy.......The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy....

  6. Collaboration networks and research productivity at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Carlos Anisio; Barroso, Antonio Carlos de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the IPEN's scientific collaboration network. Based on publications registered in IPEN's technical and scientific database was extracted a set of authors that developed technical and scientific work on the 2001 to 2010 period, using coauthorship to define the relationship between authors. From the data collected, we used degree centrality indicator in conjunction with two approaches to assess the relationship between collaboration and productivity: normal count, where for each publication that the author appears is added one for the author’s productivity indicator, and fractional count which is added a fractional value according to the total number of publication's authors. We concluded that collaboration for the development of a technical and scientific work has a positive correlation with the researchers productivity, that is, the greater the collaboration greater the productivity. We presented, also, a statistical summary to reveal the total number of publications and the number of IPEN's authors by publication, the average number of IPEN's authors per publication and the average number of publications by IPEN's author, the number of IPEN's authors that not published with no other author of the IPEN and, finally, the number of active and inactive (ex. retirees) researchers of the IPEN, as well as, the number of authors who do not have employment contract with the IPEN. (author)

  7. Federal Plan for Advanced Networking Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — In the four decades since Federal research first enabled computers to send and receive data over networks, U.S. government research and development R and D in...

  8. Local Governance and ICT Research Network for Africa | Page 2 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Local Governance and ICT Research Network for Africa (LOG-IN Africa) is an emergent pan-African network of researchers and research institutions from nine countries. LOG-IN Africa will assess the current state and outcome of electronic local governance initiatives in Africa, focusing on how information and ...

  9. The Security Research of Digital Library Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Song, Ding-Li; Yan, Shu

    Digital library is a self-development needs for the modern library to meet the development requirements of the times, changing the way services and so on. digital library from the hardware, technology, management and other aspects to objective analysis of the factors of threats to digital library network security. We should face up the problems of digital library network security: digital library network hardware are "not hard", the technology of digital library is relatively lag, digital library management system is imperfect and other problems; the government should take active measures to ensure that the library funding, to enhance the level of network hardware, to upgrade LAN and prevention technology, to improve network control technology, network monitoring technology; to strengthen safety management concepts, to prefect the safety management system; and to improve the level of security management modernization for digital library.

  10. Helicobacter Pylori eradication therapy: getting research into practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter Pylori (H. Pylori) is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer (DU). Guidelines recommend that all patients with DU be considered for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy (HPET). However, the proportion of patients with DU on long term anti-ulcer medication receiving HPET is small. This study examined the effectiveness of the continuing medical education (CME) network of the Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP) in promoting best practice in DU treatment among GPs in an eastern region of Ireland. Ninty eight GPs recruited from the CME network of the ICGP were randomised in two cohorts. Cohort 1 received an (early) intervention; GPs were asked to identify their patients with DU receiving long term anti-ulcer medication and prescribe HPET according to defined criteria. Cohort 2 received the intervention later. Prescribing of HPET was monitored using routine prescribing data. Twenty per cent (286\\/1,422) of patients in cohort 1 and 19.2% (127\\/661) in cohort 2 had a DU. After exclusions, 53% (152\\/286) in cohort 1 and 30.7% (39\\/127) in cohort 2, were eligible for HPET. A significantly higher proportion of patients in cohort 1 received HPET compared with cohort 2 during the early intervention period (13.8% vs 0.0%, p<0.05). Reasons for not prescribing HPET included concurrent illness in patients, failure to comply with treatment. Best practice guidelines on HPET treatment of DU can be successfully applied using CME networks. This model could be repeated in another therapeutic area where established research is not yet current practice.

  11. Communicating in context: a priority for gene therapy researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Julie M

    2015-03-01

    History shows that public opinion of emerging biotechnologies has the potential to impact the research process through mechanisms such as funding and advocacy. It is critical, therefore, to consider public attitudes towards modern biotechnology such as gene therapy and more specifically towards the ethics of gene therapy, alongside advances in basic and clinical research. Research conducted through social media recently assessed how online users view the ethics of gene therapy and showed that while acceptability is high, significant ethical concerns remain. To address these concerns, the development of effective and evidence-based communication strategies that engage a wide range of stakeholders should be a priority for researchers.

  12. Building Research Collaboration Networks--An Interpersonal Perspective for Research Capacity Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun Song

    2014-01-01

    While collaboration is increasingly recognized to be important for research, researchers' collaboration networks are still not adequately recognized as a form of research capacity in the literature. Research is a knowledge creation activity and interpersonal research collaboration networks are important for knowledge cross-fertilization and…

  13. Voicework in Music Therapy : Research and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Felicity; Uhlig, S.

    2011-01-01

    ‘Baker and Uhlig’s new book gives many salient examples of innovative vocal techniques and methods that can be used with different populations. This much needed and timely new book will add to the literature base of vocal music therapy as well as making a valuable contribution to our field by

  14. Computer Network Equipment for Intrusion Detection Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ye, Nong

    2000-01-01

    .... To test the process model, the system-level intrusion detection techniques and the working prototype of the intrusion detection system, a set of computer and network equipment has been purchased...

  15. Europe agrees to boost Internet networks used by researchers

    CERN Multimedia

    Butler, D

    2000-01-01

    The member states of the EU have approved an 80 million Euro upgrade of Europe's research Internet networks. The move will ensure the necessary infrastructure for work to begin on the concept of an advanced research computing 'grid' (1 page).

  16. New Visions for Large Scale Networks: Research and Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — This paper documents the findings of the March 12-14, 2001 Workshop on New Visions for Large-Scale Networks: Research and Applications. The workshops objectives were...

  17. How Might Better Network Theories Support School Leadership Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Mark; Jopling, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how recent research in education has applied different aspects of "network" theory to the study of school leadership. Constructs from different network theories are often used because of their perceived potential to clarify two perennial issues in leadership research. The first is the relative importance of formal and…

  18. West and Central African Research and Education Networking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will allow the Research and Education Networking Unit of the Association of African Universities (AAU) to take the necessary steps to establish a research and education network for West and Central Africa (WACREN). This will include undertaking feasibility studies, developing a strategic plan, adopting a legal ...

  19. Supporting Scientific Research with the Energy Sciences Network

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Monga, Inder

    2016-01-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is a high-performance, unclassified national network built to support scientific research. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science (SC) and managed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, ESnet provides services to more than 40 DOE research sites, including the entire National Laboratory system, its supercomputing facilities, and its major scientific instruments. ESnet also connects to 140 research and commercial networks, permitting DOE-funded scientists to productively collaborate with partners around the world. ESnet Division Director (Interim) Inder Monga and ESnet Networking Engineer David Mitchell will present current ESnet projects and research activities which help support the HEP community. ESnet  helps support the CERN community by providing 100Gbps trans-Atlantic network transport for the LHCONE and LHCOPN services. ESnet is also actively engaged in researching connectivity to cloud computing resources for HEP workflows a...

  20. Research on centrality of urban transport network nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Fu, Xiufen

    2017-05-01

    Based on the actual data of urban transport in Guangzhou, 19,150 bus stations in Guangzhou (as of 2014) are selected as nodes. Based on the theory of complex network, the network model of Guangzhou urban transport is constructed. By analyzing the degree centrality index, betweenness centrality index and closeness centrality index of nodes in the network, the level of centrality of each node in the network is studied. From a different point of view to determine the hub node of Guangzhou urban transport network, corresponding to the city's key sites and major transfer sites. The reliability of the network is determined by the stability of some key nodes (transport hub station). The research of network node centralization can provide a theoretical basis for the rational allocation of urban transport network sites and public transport system planning.

  1. Spectromicroscopy in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Redondo, Jose; Andres, Roger; Suda, Takashi; Neumann, Michael; Steen, Steffi; Gabel, Detlef; Mercanti, Delio; Ciotti, Teresa; Perfetti, Paolo; Margaritondo, Giorgio; de Stasio, Gelsomina

    1998-03-01

    The MEPHISTO synchrotron imaging spectromicroscope can analyse ashed cells or tissue sections to reveal the microdistribution of trace elements. MEPHISTO performs core level x-ray absorption spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, and uses an electron optics system to provide magnified photoelectron images. An application of the MEPHISTO spectromicroscope is in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). BNCT is a binary cancer therapy that will selectively destroy cancer cells provided that compounds containing a boron isotope are selectively accumulated in tumor tissue. Important factors for the success of BNCT include the ability to target every cancer cell, and the distribution of boron inside the cell. To investigate the boron distribution in tissue, sections of human glioblastoma containing a BNCT compound, and stained with nickel against a protein found in the nuclei of proliferating (cancer) cells, were studied with MEPHISTO.

  2. Mining and Visualizing Research Networks using the Artefact-Actor-Network Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Wilke, Adrian; Moi, Matthias; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Wilke, A., Moi, M., Drachsler, H., & Sloep, P. B. (2012). Mining and Visualizing Research Networks using the Artefact-Actor-Network Approach. In A. Abraham (Ed.), Computational Social Networks. Mining and Visualization (pp. 233-268). Springer. Also available at

  3. Information Phage Therapy Research Should Report

    OpenAIRE

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages, or phages, are viruses which infect bacteria. A large subset of phages infect bactericidally and, consequently, for nearly one hundred years have been employed as antibacterial agents both within and outside of medicine. Clinically these applications are described as phage or bacteriophage therapy. Alternatively, and especially in the treatment of environments, this practice instead may be described as a phage-mediated biocontrol of bacteria. Though the history of phage therap...

  4. Cognitive radio wireless sensor networks: applications, challenges and research trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Gyanendra Prasad; Nam, Seung Yeob; Kim, Sung Won

    2013-08-22

    A cognitive radio wireless sensor network is one of the candidate areas where cognitive techniques can be used for opportunistic spectrum access. Research in this area is still in its infancy, but it is progressing rapidly. The aim of this study is to classify the existing literature of this fast emerging application area of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, highlight the key research that has already been undertaken, and indicate open problems. This paper describes the advantages of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, the difference between ad hoc cognitive radio networks, wireless sensor networks, and cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, potential application areas of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, challenges and research trend in cognitive radio wireless sensor networks. The sensing schemes suited for cognitive radio wireless sensor networks scenarios are discussed with an emphasis on cooperation and spectrum access methods that ensure the availability of the required QoS. Finally, this paper lists several open research challenges aimed at drawing the attention of the readers toward the important issues that need to be addressed before the vision of completely autonomous cognitive radio wireless sensor networks can be realized.

  5. Cognitive Radio Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Challenges and Research Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyanendra Prasad Joshi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A cognitive radio wireless sensor network is one of the candidate areas where cognitive techniques can be used for opportunistic spectrum access. Research in this area is still in its infancy, but it is progressing rapidly. The aim of this study is to classify the existing literature of this fast emerging application area of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, highlight the key research that has already been undertaken, and indicate open problems. This paper describes the advantages of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, the difference between ad hoc cognitive radio networks, wireless sensor networks, and cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, potential application areas of cognitive radio wireless sensor networks, challenges and research trend in cognitive radio wireless sensor networks. The sensing schemes suited for cognitive radio wireless sensor networks scenarios are discussed with an emphasis on cooperation and spectrum access methods that ensure the availability of the required QoS. Finally, this paper lists several open research challenges aimed at drawing the attention of the readers toward the important issues that need to be addressed before the vision of completely autonomous cognitive radio wireless sensor networks can be realized.

  6. The quantitative imaging network: the role of quantitative imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Pushpa; Nordstrom, Robert J.; Clark, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    The potential value of modern medical imaging methods has created a need for mechanisms to develop, translate and disseminate emerging imaging technologies and, ideally, to quantitatively correlate those with other related laboratory methods, such as the genomics and proteomics analyses required to support clinical decisions. One strategy to meet these needs efficiently and cost effectively is to develop an international network to share and reach consensus on best practices, imaging protocols, common databases, and open science strategies, and to collaboratively seek opportunities to leverage resources wherever possible. One such network is the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN) started by the National Cancer Institute, USA. The mission of the QIN is to improve the role of quantitative imaging for clinical decision making in oncology by the development and validation of data acquisition, analysis methods, and other quantitative imaging tools to predict or monitor the response to drug or radiation therapy. The network currently has 24 teams (two from Canada and 22 from the USA) and several associate members, including one from Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. Each QIN team collects data from ongoing clinical trials and develops software tools for quantitation and validation to create standards for imaging research, and for use in developing models for therapy response prediction and measurement and tools for clinical decision making. The members of QIN are addressing a wide variety of cancer problems (Head and Neck cancer, Prostrate, Breast, Brain, Lung, Liver, Colon) using multiple imaging modalities (PET, CT, MRI, FMISO PET, DW-MRI, PET-CT). (author)

  7. Ocean Research - Perspectives from an international Ocean Research Coordination Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearlman, Jay; Williams, Albert, III

    2013-04-01

    The need for improved coordination in ocean observations is more urgent now given the issues of climate change, sustainable food sources and increased need for energy. Ocean researchers must work across disciplines to provide policy makers with clear and understandable assessments of the state of the ocean. With advances in technology, not only in observation, but also communication and computer science, we are in a new era where we can answer questions asked over the last 100 years at the time and space scales that are relevant. Programs like GLOBEC moved us forward but we are still challenged by the disciplinary divide. Interdisciplinary problem solving must be addressed not only by the exchange of data between the many sides, but through levels where questions require day-to-day collaboration. A National Science Foundation-funded Research Coordination Network (RCN) is addressing approaches for improving interdisciplinary research capabilities in the ocean sciences. During the last year, the RCN had a working group for Open Data led by John Orcutt, Peter Pissierssens and Albert Williams III. The teams has focused on three areas: 1. Data and Information formats and standards; 2. Data access models (including IPR, business models for open data, data policies,...); 3. Data publishing, data citation. There has been a significant trend toward free and open access to data in the last few years. In 2007, the US announced that Landsat data would be available at no charge. Float data from the US (NDBC), JCOMM and OceanSites offer web-based access. The IODE is developing its Ocean Data Portal giving immediate and free access to ocean data. However, from the aspect of long-term collaborations across communities, this global trend is less robust than might appear at the surface. While there are many standard data formats for data exchange, there is not yet widespread uniformity in their adoption. Use of standard data formats can be encouraged in several ways: sponsors of

  8. Using mixed methods in music therapy health care research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2015-01-01

    »Mixed methods« (or »multiple methods») is a fairly new concept in music therapy research. It is inspired by recent methodological developments in social science, covering the interaction of quantitative and qualitative methods in one and the same research study. Mixed methods are not the same...... as the diversity or pluralism of methods advocated by many scholars who are critical towards the principles of evidence-based medicine. This article presents a concrete example of mixed methods in music therapy research: a psycho-social study of music therapy with female cancer survivors. Problems related...

  9. [Co-authorship research networks in public health in Santander].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo-Estupiñán, Néstor F; Mora, Query J; Jaimes-Vega, Diana; Idrovo, Álvaro J

    2014-01-01

    Although a good deal of research in public health has been performed, large inequalities still exist in health. It is necessary to know how knowledge is generated and disseminated to the public in order for research to reach decision-makers. To characterize public health research networks in Santander, Colombia. Analysis of social networks based on co-authorship of scientific publications by researchers living in Santander in 2012. Researchers were identified using a "snowball" technique. The publications search was conducted using national and international databases. The density and average geodesic distance of networks were calculated, as was the size, pairs, brokers and homophily of egocentric networks. There were 531 researchers. Most worked in epidemiology (77.59%), and in more than one thematic field. The network density was 0.0058 and the average geodesic distance was 4.418. Several indicators suggested that the most cohesive egocentric networks were those in which researches investigated more than in one knowledge area or in epidemiology. Homophily was lower for health systems, biostatistics and social and behavioral sciences, as well as private hospitals and the public university. The network structure suggests a growth phase in research and a predominance of epidemiology. Other public health areas need strengthening so as to better address the health needs of the state.

  10. The prevention research centers' managing epilepsy well network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiIorio, Colleen K; Bamps, Yvan A; Edwards, Ariele L; Escoffery, Cam; Thompson, Nancy J; Begley, Charles E; Shegog, Ross; Clark, Noreen M; Selwa, Linda; Stoll, Shelley C; Fraser, Robert T; Ciechanowski, Paul; Johnson, Erica K; Kobau, Rosemarie; Price, Patricia H

    2010-11-01

    The Managing Epilepsy Well (MEW) Network was created in 2007 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Prevention Research Centers and Epilepsy Program to promote epilepsy self-management research and to improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. MEW Network membership comprises four collaborating centers (Emory University, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, University of Michigan, and University of Washington), representatives from CDC, affiliate members, and community stakeholders. This article describes the MEW Network's background, mission statement, research agenda, and structure. Exploratory and intervention studies conducted by individual collaborating centers are described, as are Network collaborative projects, including a multisite depression prevention intervention and the development of a standard measure of epilepsy self-management. Communication strategies and examples of research translation programs are discussed. The conclusion outlines the Network's role in the future development and dissemination of evidence-based epilepsy self-management programs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exchanging and using research evidence in health policy networks: a statistical network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jessica C; Dion, Michelle; Lavis, John N

    2014-10-30

    Evidence-informed health policymaking is a goal of equitable and effective health systems but occurs infrequently in reality. Past research points to the facilitating role of interpersonal relationships between policy-makers and researchers, imploring the adoption of a social network lens. This study aims to identify network-level factors associated with the exchange and use of research evidence in policymaking. Data on social networks and research use were collected from seventy policy actors across three health policy cases in Burkina Faso (child health, malaria, and HIV). Networks were graphed for actors' interactions, their provision of, and request for research evidence. Exponential random graph models estimated the probability of evidence provision and request between actors, controlling for network- and individual-level covariates. Logistic regression models estimated actors' use of research evidence to inform policy. Network structure explained more than half of the evidence exchanges (ties) observed in these networks. Across all cases, a pair of actors was more likely to form a provision tie if they already had a request tie between them and visa versa (θ=6.16, presearch evidence was positively associated with their centrality (i.e., connectedness). The exchange and use of research evidence in policymaking can be partly explained by the structure of actors' networks of relationships. Efforts to support knowledge translation and evidence-informed policymaking should consider network factors.

  12. Community-centred Networks and Networking among Companies, Educational and Cultural Institutions and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Ulla; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    2010-01-01

    and research as formulated in the Triple Helix Model (Etzkowitz 2008). The article draws on a case study of NoEL, a network on e-learning among business, educational and cultural institutions and research, all in all 21 partners from all around Denmark. Focus is how networks and networking change character......This article presents visions for community-centred networks and networking among companies, educational and cultural institutions and research based on blended on- and off-line collaboration and communication. Our point of departure is the general vision of networking between government, industry....... Finally, we argue for our vision and plans for the future NoEL; e.g. the importance of stronger online activities. We believe that design must be based on collaborative thinking, which consists of open and collaborative sharing of resources among participants from companies, institutions and research...

  13. Research progress in physical therapy for dry eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Ma

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dry eye is a common ocular surface disease, which seriously affects the work and quality of life of the patients. In recent years, physical therapies for dry eye have developed rapidly. This paper summarizes the traditional physical therapies such as fumigation, atomization, eye massage, hot compress, moisture chamber glasses and so on, and bandage contact lenses and scleral contact lenses, intense pulsed light treatment, Blephasteam wet chamber warming device, LipiFlow heat pulse therapy and other advanced physical treatment methods widely used in recent years. We review the recent research progress about physical therapies for dry eye to provide reference for clinical treatment.

  14. PCs and networking for oceanographic research vessels

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, R.G.P.; Desa, E.; Vithayathil, G.

    on IBM PC compatibles. The computers are located in different laboratories and are dedicated to data collection from one or more instruments. They are integratEd. by a local area network for real time sharing and integration of data. The special...

  15. Research award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-09-06

    Sep 6, 2017 ... Deadline: September 6, 2017 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the ... For example, big data analytics can offer solutions to a number of health and social problems, but they also pose privacy and security concerns for governments in the developing world. Networked ...

  16. Research Award: Networked Economies | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Deadline: September 7, 2016 Please note that all applications must be submitted online. IDRC is one of the world's ... For example, open data has great potential for driving innovation. Similarly, big data analytics can offer solutions to a number of health and social problems. Networked Economies also ...

  17. A joint research protocol for music therapy in dementia care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner; Stige, Brynjulf

    2011-01-01

    Agitation is a major challenge within institutions of care for the elderly. The effect of music therapy on agitation and quality of live is investigated in a practice-relevant research combined with a Randomized Controlled Trial and multicentre research. The research protocol is developed...... in dialogue with practicing music therapists....

  18. Research Universities as Knowledge Networks: The Role of Institutional Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikov, Igor

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the elaboration of institutional research practice, which is an important element of any research university. The study addresses three questions. First, how did institutional research arise, and what is its raison d'etre in a research university? Second, how can institutional research contribute to the improvement of the…

  19. Multipath Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks: Survey and Research Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marjan; Dezfouli, Behnam; Bakar, Kamalrulnizam Abu; Lee, Malrey

    2012-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is a large collection of sensor nodes with limited power supply and constrained computational capability. Due to the restricted communication range and high density of sensor nodes, packet forwarding in sensor networks is usually performed through multi-hop data transmission. Therefore, routing in wireless sensor networks has been considered an important field of research over the past decade. Nowadays, multipath routing approach is widely used in wireless sensor networks to improve network performance through efficient utilization of available network resources. Accordingly, the main aim of this survey is to present the concept of the multipath routing approach and its fundamental challenges, as well as the basic motivations for utilizing this technique in wireless sensor networks. In addition, we present a comprehensive taxonomy on the existing multipath routing protocols, which are especially designed for wireless sensor networks. We highlight the primary motivation behind the development of each protocol category and explain the operation of different protocols in detail, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this paper compares and summarizes the state-of-the-art multipath routing techniques from the network application point of view. Finally, we identify open issues for further research in the development of multipath routing protocols for wireless sensor networks. PMID:22368490

  20. Multipath routing in wireless sensor networks: survey and research challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marjan; Dezfouli, Behnam; Abu Bakar, Kamalrulnizam; Lee, Malrey

    2012-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is a large collection of sensor nodes with limited power supply and constrained computational capability. Due to the restricted communication range and high density of sensor nodes, packet forwarding in sensor networks is usually performed through multi-hop data transmission. Therefore, routing in wireless sensor networks has been considered an important field of research over the past decade. Nowadays, multipath routing approach is widely used in wireless sensor networks to improve network performance through efficient utilization of available network resources. Accordingly, the main aim of this survey is to present the concept of the multipath routing approach and its fundamental challenges, as well as the basic motivations for utilizing this technique in wireless sensor networks. In addition, we present a comprehensive taxonomy on the existing multipath routing protocols, which are especially designed for wireless sensor networks. We highlight the primary motivation behind the development of each protocol category and explain the operation of different protocols in detail, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this paper compares and summarizes the state-of-the-art multipath routing techniques from the network application point of view. Finally, we identify open issues for further research in the development of multipath routing protocols for wireless sensor networks.

  1. Taxonomy for the Network and Service Management Research Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raniery Paula dos Santos, Carlos; Famaey, Jeroen; Schönwälder, Jürgen; Zambenedetti Granville, Lisandro; Pras, Aiko; De Turck, Filip

    Network and service management has established itself as a research field in the general area of computer networks. However, up to now, no appropriate organization of the field has been carried out in terms of a comprehensive list of terms and topics. In this paper, we introduce a taxonomy for

  2. Learning Networks--Enabling Change through Community Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleach, Josephine

    2016-01-01

    Learning networks are a critical element of ethos of the community action research approach taken by the Early Learning Initiative at the National College of Ireland, a community-based educational initiative in the Dublin Docklands. Key criteria for networking, whether at local, national or international level, are the individual's and…

  3. Online communities: Challenges and opportunities for social network research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.; Moser, C.; Brass, D.; Labianca, G.; Mehra, A.; Halgin, D; Borgatti, S

    2014-01-01

    Online communities form a challenging and still-evolving field for social network research. We highlight two themes that are at the core of social network literature: formative processes and structures, and discuss how these might be relevant in the context of online communities. Processes of tie

  4. Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This grant will assist the Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa (ERNWACA) by providing funding for succession planning, recruiting a regional coordinator (to be based in Mali) and strengthening the Network's capacity to mobilize resources with a view to long-term sustainability.

  5. Researching the psychological therapies in prison: considerations and future recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Joanna; Bertrand-Godfrey, Betty

    2014-01-01

    The psychological therapies are widely considered within the forensic literature as holding a useful role in the prison system, however, despite this, very little research into the psychological therapies has taken place. Further, where research is carried out, it is often associated with the need for evidence-based practice (EBP), involving quantification and randomization. The paper aims to discuss these issues. This paper will initially introduce the importance of research into the psychological therapies in prison, followed by a consideration of EBP which can be thought of as the current movement governing research in the psychological therapies in the UK. However, in providing a focused critique of EBP, particularly within prisons, this paper will attempt to pave the way for a consideration of alternative research methodologies and resultant methods in researching the psychological therapies in prisons in the UK. Through this it is argued that research within the prison setting should act not to promote interventions and create an evidence-based as such, but to provide an accessible body of knowledge for the psychological therapists working in prisons in the UK.

  6. Enhancing the Impact of Research: Experimenting with Network Leadership Strategies to Grow a Vibrant Nature-Based Learning Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Jordan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Research can fall short of having societal impact due to traditions of the research enterprise as well as the perceptions of researchers about their appropriate role. What if researchers saw their work as part of a social movement to make change, and the research enterprise was designed to encourage that view and to facilitate relevance, rigor, activation of research, and a collaborative approach to address research questions aligned with a common goal? What would such a research enterprise look like? In this article, we describe the application of “network leadership strategies” to develop a “generative, social-impact network” to support the efforts of a nature-based learning research network to advance knowledge of the natural environment's impact on children's learning and educational outcomes. The activities and achievements of the nature-based learning research network are examined through the lens of network-building approaches aiming to create social impact. Though inspired by and grounded in these approaches, the reality is that certain constraints influenced our ability to function collaboratively as a generative, social-impact network and to fully realize the potential of this approach. We describe these challenges and offer recommendations for other researchers interested in enhancing the social impact of research.

  7. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted

  8. Research needs for neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Key issues and questions addressed by the workshop related to optimization of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT), in general, and to the possibility of success of the present BNCT trials at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in particular. Both trials use nuclear fission reactors as neutron sources for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme (BNL) and of deep seated melanoma (MIT). Presentations and discussions focussed on optimal boron-labeled compounds, mainly for brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme, and the best mode of compound delivery to the tumor. Also, optimizing neutron irradiation with dose delivery to the tumor cells and the issues of dosimetry of BNCT especially in the brain were discussed. Planning of treatment and of follow-up of patients, coordination of BNCT at various treatment sites, and the potential of delivering BNCT to various types of cancer with an appropriately tailored protocol were additional issues. The need for multicentric interdisciplinary cooperation among the different medical specialties was highlighted.

  9. Music therapy in cardiac health care: current issues in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, Suzanne B

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is a service that has become more prevalent as an adjunct to medical practice-as its evidence base expands and music therapists begin to join the cardiology team in every phase of care, from the most serious cases to those maintaining good heart health. Although applications of music medicine, primarily listening to short segments of music, are capable of stabilizing vital signs and managing symptoms in the short-term, music therapy interventions by a qualified practitioner are showing promise in establishing deeper and more lasting impact. On the basis of mind-body approaches, stress/coping models, the neuromatrix theory of pain, and entrainment, music therapy capitalizes on the ability of music to affect the autonomic nervous system. Although only a limited number of randomized controlled trials pinpoint the efficacy of specific music therapy interventions, qualitative research reveals some profound outcomes in certain individuals. A depth of understanding related to the experience of living with a cardiovascular disease can be gained through music therapy approaches such as nonverbal music psychotherapy and guided imagery and music. The multifaceted nature of musical responsiveness contributes to strong individual variability and must be taken into account in the development of research protocols for future music therapy and music medicine interventions. The extant research provides a foundation for exploring the many potential psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual outcomes of a music therapy service for cardiology patients.

  10. Research Ethics: Institutional Review Board Oversight of Art Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2011-01-01

    By having their research proposals reviewed and approved by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), art therapists meet important ethical principles regarding responsibility to research participants. This article provides an overview of the history of human subjects protections in the United States; underlying ethical principles and their application…

  11. The Relationships Between Policy, Boundaries and Research in Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Sinclair, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The biennial Networked Learning Conference is an established locus for work on practice, research and epistemology in the field of networked learning. That work continues between the conferences through the researchers’ own networks, ‘hot seat’ debates, and through publications, especially...... for the Networked Learning Conference are all peer-reviewed, and as they have turned into chapters for this book, each has been re-reviewed by the editors and other authors. The result is a genuinely collegial distillation of themes from a stimulating conference; a snapshot of a time when national and international...

  12. Innovative research of AD HOC network mobility model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin

    2017-08-01

    It is difficult for researchers of AD HOC network to conduct actual deployment during experimental stage as the network topology is changeable and location of nodes is unfixed. Thus simulation still remains the main research method of the network. Mobility model is an important component of AD HOC network simulation. It is used to describe the movement pattern of nodes in AD HOC network (including location and velocity, etc.) and decides the movement trail of nodes, playing as the abstraction of the movement modes of nodes. Therefore, mobility model which simulates node movement is an important foundation for simulation research. In AD HOC network research, mobility model shall reflect the movement law of nodes as truly as possible. In this paper, node generally refers to the wireless equipment people carry. The main research contents include how nodes avoid obstacles during movement process and the impacts of obstacles on the mutual relation among nodes, based on which a Node Self Avoiding Obstacle, i.e. NASO model is established in AD HOC network.

  13. Research on key technology of space laser communication network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chengwu; Huang, Huiming; Liu, Hongyang; Gao, Shenghua; Cheng, Liyu

    2016-10-01

    Since the 21st century, Spatial laser communication has made a breakthrough development. Europe, the United States, Japan and other space powers have carried out the test of spatial laser communication technology on-orbit, and put forward a series of plans. In 2011, China made the first technology demonstration of satellite-ground laser communication carried by HY-2 satellite. Nowadays, in order to improve the transmission rate of spatial network, the topic of spatial laser communication network is becoming a research hotspot at home and abroad. This thesis, from the basic problem of spatial laser communication network to solve, analyzes the main difference between spatial network and ground network, which draws forth the key technology of spatial laser communication backbone network, and systematically introduces our research on aggregation, addressing, architecture of spatial network. From the perspective of technology development status and trends, the thesis proposes the development route of spatial laser communication network in stages. So as to provide reference about the development of spatial laser communication network in China.

  14. West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The West Indian Ocean Deltas Exchange and Research Network (WIoDER) aims to support research, training, and pilot interventions in up to four Western Indian Ocean river deltas under pressure from human activity. Research will examine in particular the links between population mobility, agriculture, climate change, ...

  15. African Transitional Justice Research Network - Phase II | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The African Transitional Justice Research Network (ATJRN) aims to strengthen the capacity of African researchers and civil society institutions to conduct effective human rights advocacy through the production of high-quality, locally based and targeted empirical research. Phase I of the project (102862) focused on creating ...

  16. West and Central African Research and Education Networking ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    West and Central African Research and Education Networking (WACREN). For universities and research centres around the world, the Internet has become an important resource for teaching, learning and research. But, African universities have always faced important challenges to accessing cheap and reliable bandwidth ...

  17. Researching Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodgson, Vivien; de Laat, Maarten; McConnell, David

    2014-01-01

    and final section draws attention to a growing topic of interest within networked learning: that of networked learning in informal practices. In addition, we provide a reflection on the theories, methods and settings featured in the networked learning research of the chapters. We conclude the introduction...... by discussing four main themes that have emerged from our reading of the chapters and which we believe are important in taking forward the theory of networked learning. They are as follows: practice as epistemology; the coupling of learning contexts (the relationship and connection of learning contexts......In the introductory chapter, we explore how networked learning has developed in recent years by summarising and discussing the research presented in the chapters of the book. The chapters are structured in three sections, each highlighting a particular aspect of practice. The first section focuses...

  18. Content-centric networks an overview, applications and research challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Syed Hassan; Kim, Dongkyun

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces Content-Centric Networking (CCN), a networking paradigm that provides a simple and effective solution to the challenging demands of future wired and wireless communications. It provides an overview of the recent developments in the area of future internet technologies, bringing together the advancements that have been made in Information-Centric Networking (ICN) in general, with a focus on CCN. It begins with an introduction to the basics of CCN is followed by an overview of the current internet paradigm and its challenges. Next, an application perspective has been included, where the authors encompass the selected applications for CCN with recent refereed research and developments. These applications include Internet of Things (IoT), Smart Grid, Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs), and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs). The book is a useful reference source for practising researchers, and can be used as supporting material for undergraduate and graduate level courses in computer science and...

  19. Research of future network with multi-layer IP address

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoling; Long, Zhaohua; Wei, Ziqiang

    2018-04-01

    The shortage of IP addresses and the scalability of routing systems [1] are challenges for the Internet. The idea of dividing existing IP addresses between identities and locations is one of the important research directions. This paper proposed a new decimal network architecture based on IPv9 [11], and decimal network IP address from E.164 principle of traditional telecommunication network, the IP address level, which helps to achieve separation and identification and location of IP address, IP address form a multilayer network structure, routing scalability problem in remission at the same time, to solve the problem of IPv4 address depletion. On the basis of IPv9, a new decimal network architecture is proposed, and the IP address of the decimal network draws on the E.164 principle of the traditional telecommunication network, and the IP addresses are hierarchically divided, which helps to realize the identification and location separation of IP addresses, the formation of multi-layer IP address network structure, while easing the scalability of the routing system to find a way out of IPv4 address exhausted. In addition to modifying DNS [10] simply and adding the function of digital domain, a DDNS [12] is formed. At the same time, a gateway device is added, that is, IPV9 gateway. The original backbone network and user network are unchanged.

  20. Global Development Network: Supporting Global Research Capacity

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    GDN's capacity-building objective is being strengthened through their Global Research Capacity Building program, which provides up to six years of direct support for collaborative and cross-disciplinary research through regional competitions. This increased focus on capacity building enhances the commonalities with ...

  1. Tobacco Control Research, Dissemination and Networking in ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Tobacco Control Research Group (TCRG), University of Beirut (AUB), is a multidisciplinary team of professionals from the health sciences, medicine, chemistry and engineering departments. The Group was established in 1999 with IDRC support and has since produced some remarkable research on waterpipe ...

  2. SOCIAL KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT, RESEARCH AND INNOVATION NETWORKS FOR INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ace vedo Zapata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to describe the social management of knowledge through research and innovation networks to promote social inclusion. The reflection of the exploratory stage is presented within the doctoral thesis analyzing the challenges of the universities in the achievement of social inclusion with networks of research and innovation. A descriptive work was done, with documentary tracking, systematization and analysis. The findings show that it is necessary to articulate efforts in interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary networks with different actors: state, company, education, scientists, technologists and vulnerable, excluded populations, to build policies and strategies for social inclusion.

  3. Psychological therapies for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in adults: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompoli, Alessandro; Furukawa, Toshi A; Imai, Hissei; Tajika, Aran; Efthimiou, Orestis; Salanti, Georgia

    2016-04-13

    present and we strongly suspected publication bias. Finally, we found almost half of the included studies to be at high risk of researcher allegiance bias.Overall the networks appeared to be well connected, but were generally underpowered to detect any important disagreement between direct and indirect evidence. The results showed the superiority of psychological therapies over the WL condition, although this finding was amplified by evident small study effects (SSE). The NMAs for ST-remission, ST-response and ST-improvement on a continuous scale showed well-replicated evidence in favour of CBT, as well as some sparse but relevant evidence in favour of PD and SP, over other therapies. In terms of ST-dropouts, PD and 3W showed better tolerability over other psychological therapies in the short term. In the long term, CBT and PD showed the highest level of remission/response, suggesting that the effects of these two treatments may be more stable with respect to other psychological therapies. However, all the mentioned differences among active treatments must be interpreted while taking into account that in most cases the effect sizes were small and/or results were imprecise. There is no high-quality, unequivocal evidence to support one psychological therapy over the others for the treatment of panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in adults. However, the results show that CBT - the most extensively studied among the included psychological therapies - was often superior to other therapies, although the effect size was small and the level of precision was often insufficient or clinically irrelevant. In the only two studies available that explored PD, this treatment showed promising results, although further research is needed in order to better explore the relative efficacy of PD with respect to CBT. Furthermore, PD appeared to be the best tolerated (in terms of ST-dropouts) among psychological treatments. Unexpectedly, we found some evidence in support of the possible

  4. Direct2Experts: a pilot national network to demonstrate interoperability among research-networking platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William; Conlon, Mike; Eichmann, David; Kibbe, Warren; Falk-Krzesinski, Holly; Halaas, Michael; Johnson, Layne; Meeks, Eric; Mitchell, Donald; Schleyer, Titus; Stallings, Sarah; Warden, Michael; Kahlon, Maninder

    2011-01-01

    Research-networking tools use data-mining and social networking to enable expertise discovery, matchmaking and collaboration, which are important facets of team science and translational research. Several commercial and academic platforms have been built, and many institutions have deployed these products to help their investigators find local collaborators. Recent studies, though, have shown the growing importance of multiuniversity teams in science. Unfortunately, the lack of a standard data-exchange model and resistance of universities to share information about their faculty have presented barriers to forming an institutionally supported national network. This case report describes an initiative, which, in only 6 months, achieved interoperability among seven major research-networking products at 28 universities by taking an approach that focused on addressing institutional concerns and encouraging their participation. With this necessary groundwork in place, the second phase of this effort can begin, which will expand the network's functionality and focus on the end users. PMID:22037890

  5. Detecting and analyzing research communities in longitudinal scientific networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Leone Sciabolazza

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence shows that collaborative teams and communities tend to produce the highest-impact scientific work. This paper proposes a new method to (1 Identify collaborative communities in longitudinal scientific networks, and (2 Evaluate the impact of specific research institutes, services or policies on the interdisciplinary collaboration between these communities. First, we apply community-detection algorithms to cross-sectional scientific collaboration networks and analyze different types of co-membership in the resulting subgroups over time. This analysis summarizes large amounts of longitudinal network data to extract sets of research communities whose members have consistently collaborated or shared collaborators over time. Second, we construct networks of cross-community interactions and estimate Exponential Random Graph Models to predict the formation of interdisciplinary collaborations between different communities. The method is applied to longitudinal data on publication and grant collaborations at the University of Florida. Results show that similar institutional affiliation, spatial proximity, transitivity effects, and use of the same research services predict higher degree of interdisciplinary collaboration between research communities. Our application also illustrates how the identification of research communities in longitudinal data and the analysis of cross-community network formation can be used to measure the growth of interdisciplinary team science at a research university, and to evaluate its association with research policies, services or institutes.

  6. Dyadic research in marriage and family therapy: methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenborn, Andrea K; Dolbin-MacNab, Megan L; Keiley, Margaret K

    2013-01-01

    With training that emphasizes relationship systems, marriage and family therapists are uniquely attuned to interpersonal dynamics, interdependence, and the influence of relationships on individuals' perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes. While recent statistical advances have contributed to a proliferation of resources designed to introduce researchers to dyadic data analysis, guidelines related to the methodological aspects of dyadic research design have received less attention. Given the potential advantages of dyadic designs for examining couple and family relational and therapeutic processes, the purpose of this article is to introduce marriage and family therapy researchers to dyadic research methodology. Using examples from our own research, we discuss methodological considerations and lessons learned related to sampling, measurement, data collection, and ethics. Recommendations for future dyadic research are provided. © 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  7. [Training of institutional research networks as a strategy of improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván-Plata, María Eugenia; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio Abdel

    2017-01-01

    The Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) through the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud (Health Research Council) has promoted a strong link between the generation of scientific knowledge and the clinical care through the program Redes Institucionales de Investigación (Institutional Research Network Program), whose main aim is to promote and generate collaborative research between clinical, basic, epidemiologic, educational, economic and health services researchers, seeking direct benefits for patients, as well as to generate a positive impact on institutional processes. All of these research lines have focused on high-priority health issues in Mexico. The IMSS internal structure, as well as the sufficient health services coverage, allows the integration of researchers at the three levels of health care into these networks. A few years after their creation, these networks have already generated significant results, and these are currently applied in the institutional regulations in diseases that represent a high burden to health care. Two examples are the National Health Care Program for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction "Código Infarto", and the Early Detection Program on Chronic Kidney Disease; another result is the generation of multiple scientific publications, and the promotion of training of human resources in research from the same members of our Research Networks. There is no doubt that the Coordinación de Investigación en Salud advances steadily implementing the translational research, which will keep being fruitful to the benefit of our patients, and of our own institution.

  8. Southern African Development Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Members of the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) are struggling to craft policies for fruitful integration into the global economy and inclusive growth. While some donor initiatives have been successful in meeting short-term policy needs, they are not sustainable solutions to a weak research and policy ...

  9. Research, Supervision, and the Network Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, Carmel

    2009-01-01

    Much has been written about the use of information and communication technology (ICT) in distance learning environments. A quick Google search turns up as many as 178,000 links to the term. ICT has been less used and discussed as a means of communication between research student and supervisor--particularly where this is the major means of student…

  10. Research into the Development of Voice Assessment in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Sanne

    This study was a research into the development of a voice assessment profile (VOIAS). Already a preliminary literature search showed that no such profile within music therapy existed, and only very sparse research within music therapy focusing on and involving the human voice. The development...... of VOIAS is based on vocal parameters extracted from the literature review and my clinical approach “Psychodynamic Voice Therapy”. The parameters’ relevance is based on clinical practice and the focus of population in this study, clients suffering from depression....

  11. Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL) Telemetry Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    providing efficient and responsive services to millions of simultaneous users. Seeing as their business model is largely dependent on maintaining its users...all of the most popular programming languages currently in use, including Java , Python, and C#. Work is underway to provide Python bindings to the...client library. NSRL researchers plan to develop Python and Java wrappers for this library. Sensors must obtain an experiment session token in

  12. Embedding HIV Mentoring Programs in HIV Research Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M Isabel; Wheeler, Darrell P; Alfonso, Sarah V

    2016-09-01

    Responding to the demands of the HIV/AIDS epidemic necessitates a diverse scientific and clinical workforce trained in applying interdisciplinary research approaches to address the epidemic domestically and internationally. Ensuring diversity in our workforce requires concerted efforts. Yet, the majority of graduate and post-graduate programs are ill-equipped to provide this type of training. Research networks, the HPTN, HVTN, CFAR and ATN, are uniquely positioned to implement interdisciplinary mentoring programs and all four have done so. We describe these programs, the nuts and bolts of program implementation and efforts to recruit and retain diversity scholars. We outline some inherent challenges such as competing demands for network resources or tension in aligning scholars' research agenda with that of the networks. We argue that the benefits to be gained from continuing these programs far outweigh their costs and that these programs are an essential component of a comprehensive strategy for developing the future HIV research workforce.

  13. Fostering Research Engagement in Partnership Schools: Networking and Value Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Frank; McLellan, Ros W.; Schofield, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The call for teachers and schools to become more research-engaged is resonating stronger than ever with government efforts to improve research impact and educational quality in the United Kingdom (UK) and many other countries. In these endeavors strengthening the social network structure and collegial relationships that enable collaborative…

  14. Networks of Practice in Science Education Research: A Global Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sonya N.; Siry, Christina

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we employ cultural sociology and Braj Kachru's model of World Englishes as theoretical and analytical tools for considering English as a form of capital necessary for widely disseminating research findings from local networks of practice to the greater science education research community. We present a brief analysis of recent…

  15. Research Award: Information and Networks (I&N) Deadline ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    arashid

    2011-09-12

    Sep 12, 2011 ... What role do collaborative technologies (e.g. social media) play in social innovation and change? Which policies and regulations are needed to sustain inclusive and innovative network societies? The research awardee is expected to be able to present his or her research plan and progress during the year ...

  16. Research Award: Information and Networks (I&N) Deadline: 12 ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Jean-Claude Dumais

    2012-09-12

    Sep 12, 2012 ... What role do collaborative technologies (e.g., social media) play in social innovation and change? • Which policies and regulations are needed to sustain inclusive and innovative network societies? The research awardee is expected to be able to present his/her research plan and progress during the year ...

  17. Local Governance and ICT Research Network for Africa | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... promote principles of good governance, and encourage public participation and consultation. The African Training and Research Centre in Administration for Development (CAFRAD) will coordinate the network, ensuring effective implementation, a pan-African outlook and high-level dissemination of research results.

  18. The Mind Research Network - Mental Illness Neuroscience Discovery Grant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, J. [The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Calhoun, V. [The Mind Research Network, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-17

    The scientific and technological programs of the Mind Research Network (MRN), reflect DOE missions in basic science and associated instrumentation, computational modeling, and experimental techniques. MRN's technical goals over the course of this project have been to develop and apply integrated, multi-modality functional imaging techniques derived from a decade of DOE-support research and technology development.

  19. Music therapy research and applications in pediatric oncology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, J M; Hanser, S B

    1995-01-01

    Music therapy is a profession which meets multiple physical, social, and psychological needs. Music therapists can facilitate health objectives by reducing the intensity or duration of pain, alleviating anxiety, and decreasing the amount of analgesic medication needed. Rehabilitative objectives can include activities which incorporate exercise, range of motion therapy, or gait training. Reduction of fear, anxiety, stress, or grief are common psychological objectives. Music therapy is particularly effective in promoting social objectives such as increased interaction, verbalization, independence, and cooperation; enhanced relationships with health care personnel and family members; and increased stimulation during long-term hospitalization or isolation. Counseling techniques are often paired with music to achieve emotional objectives such as expression, adjustment, stability, or locus of control. The purpose of this article is to synthesize the extant music/medical research literature and clarify how music therapy can provide a quintessential combination of physical, social, and psychological benefits to enhance the health care of pediatric oncology patients.

  20. Ethical issues in stem cell research and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Nancy Mp; Perrin, Jacob

    2014-07-07

    Rapid progress in biotechnology has introduced a host of pressing ethical and policy issues pertaining to stem cell research. In this review, we provide an overview of the most significant issues with which the stem cell research community should be familiar. We draw on a sample of the bioethics and scientific literatures to address issues that are specific to stem cell research and therapy, as well as issues that are important for stem cell research and therapy but also for translational research in related fields, and issues that apply to all clinical research and therapy. Although debate about the moral status of the embryo in human embryonic stem cell research continues to have relevance, the discovery of other highly multipotent stem cell types and alternative methods of isolating and creating highly multipotent stem cells has raised new questions and concerns. Induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise, but care is needed to ensure their safety in translational clinical trials, despite the temptation to move quickly from bench to bedside. A variety of highly multipotent stem cells - such as mesenchymal stem/stromal cells and stem cells derived from amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood, adipose tissue, or urine - present the opportunity for widespread biobanking and increased access. With these increased opportunities, however, come pressing policy issues of consent, control, and justice. The imperatives to minimize risks of harm, obtain informed consent, reduce the likelihood of the therapeutic misconception, and facilitate sound translation from bench to bedside are not unique to stem cell research; their application to stem cell research and therapy nonetheless merits particular attention. Because stem cell research is both scientifically promising and ethically challenging, both the application of existing ethical frameworks and careful consideration of new ethical implications are necessary as this broad and diverse field moves forward.

  1. Networks as integrated in research methodologies in PER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    In recent years a number of researchers within the PER community have started using network analysis as a new methodology to extend our understanding of teaching and learning physics by viewing these as complex systems. In this paper, I give examples of social, cognitive, and action mapping...... of using networks to create insightful maps of learning discussions. To conclude, I argue that conceptual blending is a powerful framework for constructing "mixed methods" methodologies that may integrate diverse theories and other methodologies with network methodologies....

  2. Analyzing Earth Science Research Networking through Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasnain, S.; Stephan, R.; Narock, T.

    2017-12-01

    Using D3.js we visualize collaboration amongst several geophysical science organizations, such as the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP). We look at historical trends in Earth Science research topics, cross-domain collaboration, and topics of interest to the general population. The visualization techniques used provide an effective way for non-experts to easily explore distributed and heterogeneous Big Data. Analysis of these visualizations provides stakeholders with insights into optimizing meetings, performing impact evaluation, structuring outreach efforts, and identifying new opportunities for collaboration.

  3. Preclinical animal research on therapy dosimetry with dual isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnenberg, Mark W; de Jong, Marion

    2011-05-01

    Preclinical research into radionuclide therapies based on radiation dosimetry will enable the use of any LET-equivalent radionuclide. Radiation dose and dose rate have significant influence on dose effects in the tumour depending on its radiation sensitivity, possibilities for repair of sublethal damage, and repopulation during or after the therapy. Models for radiation response of preclinical tumour models after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy based on the linear quadratic model are presented. The accuracy of the radiation dose is very important for observation of dose-effects. Uncertainties in the radiation dose estimation arise from incomplete assay of the kinetics, low accuracy in volume measurements and absorbed dose S-values for stylized models instead of the actual animal geometry. Normal dose uncertainties in the order of 20% might easily make the difference between seeing a dose-effect or missing it altogether. This is true for the theoretical case of a homogeneous tumour type behaving in vivo in the same way as its cells do in vitro. Heterogeneity of tumours induces variations in clonogenic cell density, radiation sensitivity, repopulation capacity and repair kinetics. The influence of these aspects are analysed within the linear quadratic model for tumour response to radionuclide therapy. Preclinical tumour models tend to be less heterogenic than the clinical conditions they should represent. The results of various preclinical radionuclide therapy experiments for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy are compared to the outcome of theoretical models and the influence of increased heterogeneity is analysed when the results of preclinical research is transferred to the clinic. When the radiation dose and radiobiology of the tumour response is known well enough it may be possible to leave the current phenomenological approach in preclinical radionuclide therapy and start basing these experiments on radiation dose. Then the use of a gamma ray

  4. Preclinical animal research on therapy dosimetry with dual isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konijnenberg, Mark W.; Jong, Marion de

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical research into radionuclide therapies based on radiation dosimetry will enable the use of any LET-equivalent radionuclide. Radiation dose and dose rate have significant influence on dose effects in the tumour depending on its radiation sensitivity, possibilities for repair of sublethal damage, and repopulation during or after the therapy. Models for radiation response of preclinical tumour models after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy based on the linear quadratic model are presented. The accuracy of the radiation dose is very important for observation of dose-effects. Uncertainties in the radiation dose estimation arise from incomplete assay of the kinetics, low accuracy in volume measurements and absorbed dose S-values for stylized models instead of the actual animal geometry. Normal dose uncertainties in the order of 20% might easily make the difference between seeing a dose-effect or missing it altogether. This is true for the theoretical case of a homogeneous tumour type behaving in vivo in the same way as its cells do in vitro. Heterogeneity of tumours induces variations in clonogenic cell density, radiation sensitivity, repopulation capacity and repair kinetics. The influence of these aspects are analysed within the linear quadratic model for tumour response to radionuclide therapy. Preclinical tumour models tend to be less heterogenic than the clinical conditions they should represent. The results of various preclinical radionuclide therapy experiments for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy are compared to the outcome of theoretical models and the influence of increased heterogeneity is analysed when the results of preclinical research is transferred to the clinic. When the radiation dose and radiobiology of the tumour response is known well enough it may be possible to leave the current phenomenological approach in preclinical radionuclide therapy and start basing these experiments on radiation dose. Then the use of a gamma ray

  5. Photodynamic therapy: Progress toward a scientific and clinical network in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzá, Hilde H; da Silva, Ana Paula; Vollet Filho, José Dirceu; Ramirez, Dora Patricia; Trujillo, José Roberto; Inada, Natalia M; Moriyama, Lilian T; Kurachi, Cristina; Bagnato, Vanderlei S

    2016-03-01

    Cancer is one of the major challenges for Latin America health services, since the skin cancer is the most frequent lesion. This manuscript addresses an initiative for the treatment of basal cell carcinomas (BCC) by photodynamic therapy (PDT) based on a government-funded national program in Brazil. The program provides clinical training and facilitates access to drugs/equipment and significantly reduces PDT costs. It also lays foundations for the establishment of a Latin American research network to improve prevention, early detection and treatment of diseases. Centers have been established by direct contact (conferences, visits to healthcare facilities and official departments). A local training was divided into complementary theoretical and practical parts. This is an ongoing project that has involved 10 countries: Brazil, Bolivia Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela, The initial results are encouraging and have provided assessment of Latin America patients relating, for example, the most common skin phototypes with incidence of BCC in such countries. The network is expected to produce relevant scientific information for PDT introduction in many countries. The experience acquired by local teams shall enable them to innovate PDT protocols and increase the number of skilled contributors/researchers to broaden knowledge on the ever-crescent PDT field in Latin America. The establishment of a collaboration network and introduction of other projects and experience exchange shall become an easier process with time. This PDT clinical research network is a start for the strengthening of Science in South Hemisphere countries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Profile of the Brazilian Researcher in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Any Carolina Cardoso Guimarães Vasconcelos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to analyze the profile of Brazilian PhD researchers in occupational therapy based on data obtained from the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development - CNPq. Two hundred forty curricula of occupational therapists were individually analyzed, 102 of them from PhD researchers. The curricula were analyzed with respect to gender; completion time of undergraduate studies; institution; time spent for obtaining the doctorate; professional activities; geographical distribution, scientific, and editorial composition; and guidance of undergraduate research, specialization, and master, doctorate and post-doctorate courses. The data showed that 94% of the researchers were women. With regard to professional practice, 73% of the doctors were affiliated to public universities and 84% were located in the southeast region. A total of 1361 papers were produced, at an average of 13.3 articles per researcher, with 25% on the theme of functional health (cognitive, neuromotor, musculoskeletal occupational performance and assistive technology. The PhD researchers in occupational therapy also published 90 books and 488 book chapters. Additionally, 59% of the researchers collaborated as reviewers for scientific periodicals. The results of the analysis will allow the academic community to gain a perspective of the occupational therapy scenario in Brazil, assisting in the establishment of future priorities for improving knowledge and professional practice.

  7. Collaborative research networks in health: a pragmatic scoping study for the development of an imaging network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tracy Elizabeth; Rankin, Nicole; Janssen, Anna; Mcgregor, Deborah; Grieve, Stuart; Shaw, Timothy

    2015-12-09

    Collaborative research networks are often touted as a solution for enhancing the translation of knowledge, but questions remain about how to evaluate their impact on health service delivery. This pragmatic scoping study explored the enabling factors for developing and supporting a collaborative imaging network in a metropolitan university in Australia. An advisory group was established to provide governance and to identify key informants and participants. Focus group discussions (n = 2) and semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were facilitated with representatives from a broad range of disciplines. In addition, a survey, a review of relevant websites (n = 15) and a broad review of the literature were undertaken to elicit information on collaborative research networks and perceived needs and factors that would support their involvement in a multi-disciplinary collaborative research network. Findings were de-identified and broad themes were identified. Participants identified human factors as having priority for developing and sustaining a collaborative research network. In particular, leadership, a shared vision and a communication plan that includes social media were identified as crucial for sustaining an imaging network in health research. It is important to develop metrics that map relationships between network members and the role that communication tools can contribute to this process. This study confirms that human factors remain significant across a range of collaborative endeavours. The use of focus group discussions, interviews, and literature and website reviews means we can now strongly recommend the primacy of human factors. More work is needed to identify how the network operates and what specific indicators or metrics help build the capacity of clinicians and scientists to participate in translational research.

  8. Aesthetic Forms of Data Representation in Qualitative Family Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piercy, Fred P.; Benson, Kristen

    2005-01-01

    In this article we provide a rationale for using alternative, aesthetic methods of qualitative representation (e.g., creative writing, art, music, performance, poetry) in qualitative family therapy research. We also provide illustrative examples of methods that bring findings to life, and involve the audience in reflecting on their meaning. One…

  9. Preclinical animal research on therapy dosimetry with dual isotopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Konijnenberg (Mark); M. de Jong (Marion)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPreclinical research into radionuclide therapies based on radiation dosimetry will enable the use of any LET-equivalent radionuclide. Radiation dose and dose rate have significant influence on dose effects in the tumour depending on its radiation sensitivity, possibilities for repair of

  10. Review of the Research: Are Therapy Dogs in Classrooms Beneficial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, Jerri J.; Shupp, Mikaela M.

    2017-01-01

    Research findings on the presence of a therapy dog in the classroom are summarized. The authors reviewed 30 articles, book chapters, and other sources on the topic of the various uses of dogs in classrooms, published between 2001 and 2017. Ages studied ranged from 3 years to adolescence (high school). In our analysis, three categories of…

  11. The systematic review as a research process in music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson-Abromeit, Deanna; Sena Moore, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Music therapists are challenged to present evidence on the efficacy of music therapy treatment and incorporate the best available research evidence to make informed healthcare and treatment decisions. Higher standards of evidence can come from a variety of sources including systematic reviews. To define and describe a range of research review methods using examples from music therapy and related literature, with emphasis on the systematic review. In addition, the authors provide a detailed overview of methodological processes for conducting and reporting systematic reviews in music therapy. The systematic review process is described in five steps. Step 1 identifies the research plan and operationalized research question(s). Step 2 illustrates the identification and organization of the existing literature related to the question(s). Step 3 details coding of data extracted from the literature. Step 4 explains the synthesis of coded findings and analysis to answer the research question(s). Step 5 describes the strength of evidence evaluation and results presentation for practice recommendations. Music therapists are encouraged to develop and conduct systematic reviews. This methodology contributes to review outcome credibility and can determine how information is interpreted and used by clinicians, clients or patients, and policy makers. A systematic review is a methodologically rigorous research method used to organize and evaluate extant literature related to a clinical problem. Systematic reviews can assist music therapists in managing the ever-increasing literature, making well-informed evidence based practice and research decisions, and translating existing music-based and nonmusic based literature to clinical practice and research development. © the American Music Therapy Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. [Drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: a network Meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Q Y; Yu, R B; Shi, R H

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and the risk of adverse effect of drug susceptibility test guided therapy and novel empirical quadruple therapy for Helicobacter ( H .) pylori infection. Methods: Literature retrieval was conducted by using major databases. Related papers published up to June 2015 were considered eligible if they were randomized control trials comparing different pharmacological formulations for H. pylori infection and used in a network Meta-analysis and a single rate Meta-analysis to evaluate the relative and absolute rates of H. pylori eradication and the risk of adverse effect. The Jadad score was used to evaluate the methodological quality. Funnel plot was constructed to evaluate the risk of publication bias. Begg's rank correlation test or Egger's regression intercept test was done for the asymmetry of funnel plot. Results: Twenty randomized control trials for the treatment of 6 753 initial treated patients with H. pylori infection were included. Drug susceptibility test guided therapy was significantly superior to concomitant therapy, hybrid therapy, sequential therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy. The culture-based therapy had the highest likelihood of improving clinical efficacy, with lowest risk of adverse effect. Concomitant therapy had the highest probability of causing adverse effect despite its effectiveness. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy were associated with lower risk of adverse effect and higher effectiveness. Conclusion: Drug susceptibility test guided therapy showed superiority to other 4 interventions for H. pylori eradication mentioned above. Hybrid therapy and bismuth quadruple therapy might be applied in the settings where the culture-based strategy is not available.

  13. Establishment and preliminary outcomes of a palliative care research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter; Street, Annette; Graham, Suzanne; Aranda, Sanchia; O'Connor, Margaret; Thomas, Kristina; Jackson, Kate; Spruyt, Odette; Ugalde, Anna; Philip, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The difficulties in conducting palliative care research have been widely acknowledged. In order to generate the evidence needed to underpin palliative care provision, collaborative research is considered essential. Prior to formalizing the development of a research network for the state of Victoria, Australia, a preliminary study was undertaken to ascertain interest and recommendations for the design of such a collaboration. Three data-collection strategies were used: a cross-sectional questionnaire, interviews, and workshops. The questionnaire was completed by multidisciplinary palliative care specialists from across the state (n = 61); interviews were conducted with senior clinicians and academics (n = 21) followed by two stakeholder workshops (n = 29). The questionnaire was constructed specifically for this study, measuring involvement of and perceptions of palliative care research. Both the interview and the questionnaire data demonstrated strong support for a palliative care research network and aided in establishing a research agenda. The stakeholder workshops assisted with strategies for the formation of the Palliative Care Research Network Victoria (PCRNV) and guided the development of the mission and strategic plan. The research and efforts to date to establish the PCRNV are encouraging and provide optimism for the evolution of palliative care research in Australia. The international implications are highlighted.

  14. EARLINET: potential operationality of a research network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicard, M.; D'Amico, G.; Comerón, A.; Mona, L.; Alados-Arboledas, L.; Amodeo, A.; Baars, H.; Belegante, L.; Binietoglou, I.; Bravo-Aranda, J. A.; Fernández, A. J.; Fréville, P.; García-Vizcaíno, D.; Giunta, A.; Granados-Muñoz, M. J.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Hadjimitsis, D.; Haefele, A.; Hervo, M.; Iarlori, M.; Kokkalis, P.; Lange, D.; Mamouri, R. E.; Mattis, I.; Molero, F.; Montoux, N.; Muñoz, A.; Muñoz Porcar, C.; Navas-Guzmán, F.; Nicolae, D.; Nisantzi, A.; Papagiannopoulos, N.; Papayannis, A.; Pereira, S.; Preißler, J.; Pujadas, M.; Rizi, V.; Rocadenbosch, F.; Sellegri, K.; Simeonov, V.; Tsaknakis, G.; Wagner, F.; Pappalardo, G.

    2015-07-01

    In the framework of ACTRIS summer 2012 measurement campaign (8 June-17 July 2012), EARLINET organized and performed a controlled exercise of feasibility to demonstrate its potential to perform operational, coordinated measurements and deliver products in near-real time. Eleven lidar stations participated to the exercise which started on 9 July 2012 at 06:00 UT and ended 72 h later on 12 July at 06:00 UT. For the first time the Single-Calculus Chain (SCC), the common calculus chain developed within EARLINET for the automatic evaluation of lidar data from raw signals up to the final products, was used. All stations sent in real time measurements of 1 h of duration to the SCC server in a predefined netcdf file format. The pre-processing of the data was performed in real time by the SCC while the optical processing was performed in near-real time after the exercise ended. 98 and 84 % of the files sent to SCC were successfully pre-processed and processed, respectively. Those percentages are quite large taking into account that no cloud screening was performed on lidar data. The paper shows time series of continuous and homogeneously obtained products retrieved at different levels of the SCC: range-square corrected signals (pre-processing) and daytime backscatter and nighttime extinction coefficient profiles (optical processing), as well as combined plots of all direct and derived optical products. The derived products include backscatter- and extinction-related Ångström exponents, lidar ratios and color ratios. The combined plots reveal extremely valuable for aerosol classification. The efforts made to define the measurements protocol and to configure properly the SCC pave the way for applying this protocol for specific applications such as the monitoring of special events, atmospheric modelling, climate research and calibration/validation activities of spaceborne observations.

  15. Building capability through networking with investors and researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Daojuan; Schøtt, Thomas

    A startup requires financing, typically, and the startup is based on innovation, often. Capabilities for innovation and financing may be built simultaneously and created jointly at inception. Co-creation of capabilities for financing and innovation is accounted for in this study. Co-creation is e......A startup requires financing, typically, and the startup is based on innovation, often. Capabilities for innovation and financing may be built simultaneously and created jointly at inception. Co-creation of capabilities for financing and innovation is accounted for in this study. Co......-creation is embedded in the network around the starting entrepreneur, we expect. Co-creation benefits from networking with potential investors and with researchers and inventors, we hypothesize, and especially by networking with both investors and researchers concurrently. Co-creation is analyzed in a sample...... of startups at inception, by 9,161 entrepreneurs, surveyed in Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 49 countries. Co-creation is found to be reduced by the entrepreneur’s networking in the private sphere of family and friends, but to be benefiting from networking in the public sphere, especially by networking...

  16. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  17. Research on the complex network of the UNSPSC ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yingying; Zou, Shengrong; Gu, Aihua; Wei, Li; Zhou, Ta

    The UNSPSC ontology mainly applies to the classification system of the e-business and governments buying the worldwide products and services, and supports the logic structure of classification of the products and services. In this paper, the related technologies of the complex network were applied to analyzing the structure of the ontology. The concept of the ontology was corresponding to the node of the complex network, and the relationship of the ontology concept was corresponding to the edge of the complex network. With existing methods of analysis and performance indicators in the complex network, analyzing the degree distribution and community of the ontology, and the research will help evaluate the concept of the ontology, classify the concept of the ontology and improve the efficiency of semantic matching.

  18. Research Note: Networking Among Small and Medium-sized Enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Hans Jørgen; Grøn, Sisse; Flensborg Jensen, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Researchers and regulatory bodies lack an in-depth understanding of how small and mediumsized enterprises (SMEs) make decisions about workplace health and safety improvements and the role played by business networks in these decisions. To improve regulation and support there is a need to understand...... SMEs better and, to create the means to empower them to work systematically with occupational health and safety. The present study suggests that networks of SMEs might be a suitable target for interventions. Realistic evaluation and social capital theory based on data obtained via qualitative...... interviews, document analysis and observations were used to analyse two networks of small enterprises (in dairy and brewery) in Denmark that launched similar occupational health projects but had different outcomes. Whilst both Dairy (D) and Brewery (B) networks had active external funding, the following...

  19. NIHR Clinical Research Networks: what they do and how they help paediatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lythgoe, Hanna; Price, Victoria; Poustie, Vanessa; Attar, Sabah; Hawcutt, Daniel; Preston, Jennifer; Beresford, Michael W

    2017-08-01

    This review provides paediatricians with an update on the new structure of the National Institute for Health Research's (NIHR) Clinical Research Network (CRN): Children and its role within the wider NIHR infrastructure. The network supports delivery of high-quality research within the NHS in England and supports researchers, through provision of staff and resources, with feasibility, site set-up, patient recruitment and study management. Since 2013, over 80% of commercial contract studies running within the UK sat within the UKCRN Portfolio. Of the diverse, increasing portfolio of studies supported by the network, many studies are interventional, with 33% being randomised controlled studies. Recruitment to studies supported by the network through the Children's Portfolio has consistently improved. Over 200 000 participants have been recruited to the Children's Portfolio studies to date, and there are currently approximately 500 studies open to recruitment. The CRN: Children has successfully involved patients and the public in all aspects of study design and delivery, including through the work of Generation R. Challenges remain in conducting paediatric research and the network is committed to supporting Children's research and further building on its achievements to date. Education and engagement of paediatricians within the network and research is important to further improving quality and delivery of paediatric research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. 75 FR 57521 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-21

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD...) for Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD). ACTION: Notice, request.... SUMMARY: With this notice, the National Coordination Office for Networking and Information Technology...

  1. The human face of biobank networks for translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Karen; Gaffney, Eoin F; Simeon-Dubach, Daniel; Ravid, Rivka; Watson, Peter H; Schacter, Brent; Morente And The Marble Arch International Working Group On Biobanking, Manuel M

    2011-09-01

    The biobanking literature frequently addresses donor and societal issues surrounding biobanking, but the biobanker's perspective is rarely highlighted. While not comprehensive, this article offers an overview of the human aspects of biobanking from the viewpoint of biobank personnel-from biobank formation, through the process, and in addressing post-biobanking issues. As every biobank and biobank network may differ, such factors may vary. Before biobanking can commence, the purpose of the biobank network must be defined, and buy-in achieved from many stakeholders. An attitude of trust and sharing is essential, as is good communication. Developing a biobank is time consuming and laborious. Forming a network requires significantly more time due to the need for cross-institutional harmonization of policies, procedures, information technology considerations, and ethics. Circumstances may dictate whether development occurs top-down and/or bottom-up, as well as whether network management may be independent or by personnel from participating biobanks. Funding tends to be a prominent issue for biobanks and networks alike. In particular, networks function optimally with some level of government support, particularly for personnel. Quality biospecimen collection involves meticulously documented coordination with a network of medical and nursing staff. Examining and sampling operative specimens requires timely collaboration between the surgical and pathology teams. "Catch rates" for samples may be difficult to predict and may occur at a frequency less than anticipated due to factors related to the institution, staff, or specimen. These factors may affect specimen quality, and have a downstream effect on competition for specimens for research. Thus, release of samples requires a fair, carefully constructed sample access policy, usually incorporating an incentive for researchers, and an encouragement to form collaborations. Finally, the public and patient groups should aim to

  2. The use and significance of a research networking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Maninder; Yuan, Leslie; Daigre, John; Meeks, Eric; Nelson, Katie; Piontkowski, Cynthia; Reuter, Katja; Sak, Rachael; Turner, Brian; Weber, Griffin M; Chatterjee, Anirvan

    2014-02-07

    Universities have begun deploying public Internet systems that allow for easy search of their experts, expertise, and intellectual networks. Deployed first in biomedical schools but now being implemented more broadly, the initial motivator of these research networking systems was to enable easier identification of collaborators and enable the development of teams for research. The intent of the study was to provide the first description of the usage of an institutional research "social networking" system or research networking system (RNS). Number of visits, visitor location and type, referral source, depth of visit, search terms, and click paths were derived from 2.5 years of Web analytics data. Feedback from a pop-up survey presented to users over 15 months was summarized. RNSs automatically generate and display profiles and networks of researchers. Within 2.5 years, the RNS at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) achieved one-seventh of the monthly visit rate of the main longstanding university website, with an increasing trend. Visitors came from diverse locations beyond the institution. Close to 75% (74.78%, 208,304/278,570) came via a public search engine and 84.0% (210 out of a sample of 250) of these queried an individual's name that took them directly to the relevant profile page. In addition, 20.90% (214 of 1024) visits went beyond the page related to a person of interest to explore related researchers and topics through the novel and networked information provided by the tool. At the end of the period analyzed, more than 2000 visits per month traversed 5 or more links into related people and topics. One-third of visits came from returning visitors who were significantly more likely to continue to explore networked people and topics (P<.001). Responses to an online survey suggest a broad range of benefits of using the RNS in supporting the research and clinical mission. Returning visitors in an ever-increasing pool of visitors to an RNS are

  3. An integrative review of Reiki touch therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Reiki touch therapy is a complementary biofield energy therapy that involves the use of hands to help strengthen the body's ability to heal. There is growing interest among nurses to use Reiki in patient care and as a self-care treatment, however, with little supportive empirical research and evidence to substantiate these practices. The purpose of this integrative review is to begin the systematic process of evaluating the findings of published Reiki research. Selected investigations using Reiki for effects on stress, relaxation, depression, pain, and wound healing management, among others is reviewed and summarized. A summary of Reiki studies table illustrates the study descriptions and Reiki treatment protocols specified in the investigations. Synthesis of findings for clinical practice and implications for future research are explored.

  4. Advanced Scientific Computing Research Network Requirements: ASCR Network Requirements Review Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacon, Charles [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, Greg [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Canon, Shane [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dart, Eli [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dattoria, Vince [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Goodwin, Dave [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Lee, Jason [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hicks, Susan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holohan, Ed [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Klasky, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lauzon, Carolyn [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR); Rogers, Jim [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shipman, Galen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skinner, David [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tierney, Brian [ESnet, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-03-08

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In October 2012, ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the ASCR program office. The requirements identified at the review are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  5. The Earth Science Research Network as Seen Through Network Analysis of the AGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narock, T.; Hasnain, S.; Stephan, R.

    2017-12-01

    Scientometrics is the science of science. Scientometric research includes measurements of impact, mapping of scientific fields, and the production of indicators for use in policy and management. We have leveraged network analysis in a scientometric study of the American Geophysical Union (AGU). Data from the AGU's Linked Data Abstract Browser was used to create a visualization and analytics tools to explore the Earth science's research network. Our application applies network theory to look at network structure within the various AGU sections, identify key individuals and communities related to Earth science topics, and examine multi-disciplinary collaboration across sections. Opportunities to optimize Earth science output, as well as policy and outreach applications, are discussed.

  6. Linking behavior in the physics education research coauthorship network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Katharine A.; Crespi, Matthew; Sayre, Eleanor C.

    2017-06-01

    There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real time. In this paper, we use thirty years of data from an emerging scientific community to look at that crucial early stage in the development of a social network. We show that when the field was very young, islands of individual researchers labored in relative isolation, and the coauthorship network was disconnected. Thirty years later, rather than a cluster of individuals, we find a true collaborative community, bound together by a robust collaboration network. However, this change did not take place gradually—the network remained a loose assortment of isolated individuals until the mid 2000s, when those smaller parts suddenly knit themselves together into a single whole. In the rest of this paper, we consider the role of three factors in these observed structural changes: growth, changes in social norms, and the introduction of institutions such as field-specific conferences and journals. We have data from the very earliest years of the field, a period which includes the introduction of two different institutions: the first field-specific conference, and the first field-specific journals. We also identify two relevant behavioral shifts: a discrete increase in coauthorship coincident with the first conference, and a shift among established authors away from collaborating with outsiders, towards collaborating with each other. The interaction of these factors gives us insight into the formation of collaboration networks more broadly.

  7. Measuring Networking as an Outcome Variable in Undergraduate Research Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I; Hatfull, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose, present, and validate a simple survey instrument to measure student conversational networking. The tool consists of five items that cover personal and professional social networks, and its basic principle is the self-reporting of degrees of conversation, with a range of specific discussion partners. The networking instrument was validated in three studies. The basic psychometric characteristics of the scales were established by conducting a factor analysis and evaluating internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha. The second study used a known-groups comparison and involved comparing outcomes for networking scales between two different undergraduate laboratory courses (one involving a specific effort to enhance networking). The final study looked at potential relationships between specific networking items and the established psychosocial variable of project ownership through a series of binary logistic regressions. Overall, the data from the three studies indicate that the networking scales have high internal consistency (α = 0.88), consist of a unitary dimension, can significantly differentiate between research experiences with low and high networking designs, and are related to project ownership scales. The ramifications of the networking instrument for student retention, the enhancement of public scientific literacy, and the differentiation of laboratory courses are discussed. © 2015 D. I. Hanauer and G. Hatfull. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Linking behavior in the physics education research coauthorship network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine A. Anderson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable long-term interest in understanding the dynamics of collaboration networks, and how these networks form and evolve over time. Most of the work done on the dynamics of social networks focuses on well-established communities. Work examining emerging social networks is rarer, simply because data are difficult to obtain in real time. In this paper, we use thirty years of data from an emerging scientific community to look at that crucial early stage in the development of a social network. We show that when the field was very young, islands of individual researchers labored in relative isolation, and the coauthorship network was disconnected. Thirty years later, rather than a cluster of individuals, we find a true collaborative community, bound together by a robust collaboration network. However, this change did not take place gradually—the network remained a loose assortment of isolated individuals until the mid 2000s, when those smaller parts suddenly knit themselves together into a single whole. In the rest of this paper, we consider the role of three factors in these observed structural changes: growth, changes in social norms, and the introduction of institutions such as field-specific conferences and journals. We have data from the very earliest years of the field, a period which includes the introduction of two different institutions: the first field-specific conference, and the first field-specific journals. We also identify two relevant behavioral shifts: a discrete increase in coauthorship coincident with the first conference, and a shift among established authors away from collaborating with outsiders, towards collaborating with each other. The interaction of these factors gives us insight into the formation of collaboration networks more broadly.

  9. Applying a Network-Lens to Hospitality Business Research: A New Research Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian AUBKE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hospitality businesses are first and foremost places of social interaction. This paper argues for an inclusion of network methodology into the tool kit of hospitality researchers. This methodology focuses on the interaction of people rather than applying an actor-focused view, which currently seems dominant in hospitality research. Outside the field, a solid research basis has been formed, upon which hospitality researchers can build. The paper introduces the foundations of network theory and its applicability to the study of organizations. A brief methodological introduction is provided and potential applications and research topics relevant to the hospitality field are suggested.

  10. The importance of project networking for the replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitbourn, G.

    2003-01-01

    When the HIFAR research reactor was commissioned in 1958 it was both constructed and regulated by the then Australian Atomic Energy Commission. The situation now is much more complicated, with an independent regulator, The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and oversight by national security agencies and the Australian Safeguards and Non proliferation Organisation (ASNO). In July 2000 ANSTO contracted INVAP SE a suitably qualified and experienced nuclear organisation based in Argentina to provide the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR). INVAP subcontracted an Australian entity, a joint venture between John Holland and Evans Deakin Industries (JHEDI) to provide resources in Australia. There is an international network of over 100 subcontractors providing services, products and materials to INVAP and JHEDI and a significant number of contractors providing project support services to ANSTO. The interaction of all these entities to provide the RRR is a significant networking challenge, involving a complex network of legal, contractual and functional relationships and communication processes

  11. Networking of theories as a research practice in mathematics education

    CERN Document Server

    Bikner-Ahsbahs, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    How can we deal with the diversity of theories in mathematics education This was the main question that led the authors of this book to found the Networking Theories Group. Starting from the shared assumption that the existence of different theories is a resource for mathematics education research, the authors have explored the possibilities of interactions between theories, such as contrasting, coordinating, and locally integrating them. The book explains and illustrates what it means to network theories; it presents networking as a challenging but fruitful research practice and shows how the Group dealt with this challenge considering five theoretical approaches, namely the approach of Action, Production, and Communication (APC), the Theory of Didactical Situations (TDS), the Anthropological Theory of the Didactic (ATD), the approach of Abstraction in Context (AiC), and the Theory of Interest-Dense Situations (IDS). A synthetic presentation of each theory and their connections shows how the activity of netw...

  12. Evidence-based therapy relationships: research conclusions and clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcross, John C; Wampold, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    In this closing article of the special issue, we present the conclusions and recommendations of the interdivisional task force on evidence-based therapy relationships. The work was based on a series of meta-analyses conducted on the effectiveness of various relationship elements and methods of treatment adaptation. A panel of experts concluded that several relationship elements were demonstrably effective (alliance in individual psychotherapy, alliance in youth psychotherapy, alliance in family therapy, cohesion in group therapy, empathy, collecting client feedback) while others were probably effective (goal consensus, collaboration, positive regard). Three other relationship elements (congruence/genuineness, repairing alliance ruptures, and managing countertransference) were deemed promising but had insufficient evidence to conclude that they were effective. Multiple recommendations for practice, training, research, and policy are advanced. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Accelerating drug development for neuroblastoma - New Drug Development Strategy: an Innovative Therapies for Children with Cancer, European Network for Cancer Research in Children and Adolescents and International Society of Paediatric Oncology Europe Neuroblastoma project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Lucas; Caron, Hubert; Geoerger, Birgit; Eggert, Angelika; Schleiermacher, Gudrun; Brock, Penelope; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Chesler, Louis; Schulte, Johannes H; De Preter, Katleen; Molenaar, Jan; Schramm, Alexander; Eilers, Martin; Van Maerken, Tom; Johnsen, John Inge; Garrett, Michelle; George, Sally L; Tweddle, Deborah A; Kogner, Per; Berthold, Frank; Koster, Jan; Barone, Giuseppe; Tucker, Elizabeth R; Marshall, Lynley; Herold, Ralf; Sterba, Jaroslav; Norga, Koen; Vassal, Gilles; Pearson, Andrew Dj

    2017-08-01

    Neuroblastoma, the commonest paediatric extra-cranial tumour, remains a leading cause of death from cancer in children. There is an urgent need to develop new drugs to improve cure rates and reduce long-term toxicity and to incorporate molecularly targeted therapies into treatment. Many potential drugs are becoming available, but have to be prioritised for clinical trials due to the relatively small numbers of patients. Areas covered: The current drug development model has been slow, associated with significant attrition, and few new drugs have been developed for neuroblastoma. The Neuroblastoma New Drug Development Strategy (NDDS) has: 1) established a group with expertise in drug development; 2) prioritised targets and drugs according to tumour biology (target expression, dependency, pre-clinical data; potential combinations; biomarkers), identifying as priority targets ALK, MEK, CDK4/6, MDM2, MYCN (druggable by BET bromodomain, aurora kinase, mTORC1/2) BIRC5 and checkpoint kinase 1; 3) promoted clinical trials with target-prioritised drugs. Drugs showing activity can be rapidly transitioned via parallel randomised trials into front-line studies. Expert opinion: The Neuroblastoma NDDS is based on the premise that optimal drug development is reliant on knowledge of tumour biology and prioritisation. This approach will accelerate neuroblastoma drug development and other poor prognosis childhood malignancies.

  14. Stories in Networks and Networks in Stories: A Tri-Modal Model for Mixed-Methods Social Network Research on Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Doyle, Kira J.

    2015-01-01

    Social network research on teachers and schools has risen exponentially in recent years as an innovative method to reveal the role of social networks in education. However, scholars are still exploring ways to incorporate traditional quantitative methods of Social Network Analysis (SNA) with qualitative approaches to social network research. This…

  15. Principles and Policies for International Coordination of Research Data Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M. A.; Mokrane, M.; Sorvari, S.; Treloar, A.; Smith, C.

    2017-12-01

    International data networks enable the sharing of data within and between scientific disciplines and countries and thus provide the foundation for Open Science. Developing effective and sustainable international research data networks is critical for progress in many areas of research and for science to address complex global societal challenges. However, the development and maintenance of effective networks is not always easy, particularly in a context where public resources for science are limited and international cooperation is not a priority for many countries. The global landscape for data sharing in science is complex; many international data networks already exist and have highly variable structures. Some are linked to large intergovernmental research infrastructures, have highly developed centralized services and deal mainly with the data needs of single disciplines. Some are highly distributed, have much less rigid governance structures and provide access to data from many different domains. Most are somewhere between these two extremes and they cover different geographic regions, from regional to global. All provide a mix of data and associated data services which meets the needs of the research community to various extents and this provision depends on a mix of hardware, software, standards and protocols and human skills. These come together, working across national boundaries, in technical and social networks. In all of this, what makes a network function effectively or not is unclear. This means that there is also no simple answer to what can usefully be done at the policy level to promote the development of effective and sustainable data networks. Hence the rational for the present project - to study a variety of currently successful networks, explore the challenges that they are facing and the lessons that can be learned from confronting these challenges, and, where applicable, to translate this analysis into potential policy actions. Detailed

  16. Eleven years of net network research activity - inr contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaconu, V.; Ionita, I.; Meleg, T.; Deaconu, M.; Truta, C.; Oncioiu, G.

    2013-01-01

    The European Network on Neutron Techniques Standardization for Structural Integrity (NeT) was established in 2002, grouping institutions from industry, research and academic media. Coordinated by the European Commission.s Joint Research Centre, the main mission of this network is to develop experimental and numerical techniques and standards for the reliable characterisation of residual stresses in structural welds. Each problem is tackled by creating a dedicated Task Group which manages measurement and modelling round robin studies and undertakes a thorough analysis and interpretation of the results. Over forty institutions are active NeT partners, their specific involvement and contributions being summarised in this paper. The Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR) is one of NeT founders and its contribution is related to numerical modelling, specimen analysis, material characterisation, data analysis or SANS support. This is also emphasised throughout this paper, together with the specific NeT research topics presentation. (authors)

  17. Digital networks to aid research and education in Africa

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Around 120 participants were assembled over two days at CERN to discuss ways to bridge the digital divide with Africa. As part of efforts to implement the outcome of the first World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS), held in Geneva in 2003, CERN held the international workshop on Research and Education Networks in Africa, from 25 to 27 September. Organized by the United Nations University (UNU) in collaboration with the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) and CERN, this meeting was designed to promote scientific cooperation with and within Africa, through the development of networking infrastructure. Faster, reliable and more affordable Internet access is widely recognized as one of the key factors for enhancing research and education efforts in African academic and research institutions. For the first time, this workshop brought together representatives of all the key stakeholders: African academic and research institutions, international coordinators, funding agencies, grass-roots imple...

  18. Using Action Research to Investigate Social Networking Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Lisa; Harris, Katy

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines the first cycle of an Action Research (AR) investigation into why professional learners are not using the Social Networking Technologies (SNTs) of their bespoke website. It presents the rationale of how this study came about, the ontological and epistemological stance of the authors and how this led to the particular choice…

  19. Higher Education Change and Social Networks: A Review of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews literature on the potential for understanding higher education change processes through social network analysis (SNA). In this article, the main tenets of SNA are reviewed and, in conjunction with organizational theory, are applied to higher education change to develop a set of hypotheses that can be tested in future research.

  20. Understanding the meaning of awareness in Research Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Sloep, Peter; Drachsler, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Mletzko, C., Sloep, P. B., & Drachsler, H. (2012). Understanding the meaning of awareness in Research Networks. In A. Moore, V. Pammer, L. Pannese, M. Prilla, K. Rajagopal, W. Reinhardt, Th. D. Ullman, & Ch. Voigt (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in

  1. Asia-Pacific Research and Training Network on Trade (ARTNET ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    During the first phase of support (102568), the Network produced a number of high quality trade policy studies, disseminated the results to policymakers and increased the capacity of research institutions - notably those in the least developed countries - to conduct trade policy ... Agent(e) responsable du CRDI. Due, Evan ...

  2. Decomposing social and semantic networks in emerging "big data" research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, H.W.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the structural patterns of networks of internationally co-authored SCI papers in the domain of research driven by big data and provides an empirical analysis of semantic patterns of paper titles. The results based on data collected from the DVD version of the 2011 SCI database

  3. Interdependent networks - Topological percolation research and application in finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Di

    This dissertation covers the two major parts of my Ph.D. research: i) developing a theoretical framework of complex networks and applying simulation and numerical methods to study the robustness of the network system, and ii) applying statistical physics concepts and methods to quantitatively analyze complex systems and applying the theoretical framework to study real-world systems. In part I, we focus on developing theories of interdependent networks as well as building computer simulation models, which includes three parts: 1) We report on the effects of topology on failure propagation for a model system consisting of two interdependent networks. We find that the internal node correlations in each of the networks significantly changes the critical density of failures, which can trigger the total disruption of the two-network system. Specifically, we find that the assortativity within a single network decreases the robustness of the entire system. 2) We study the percolation behavior of two interdependent scale-free (SF) networks under random failure of 1-p fraction of nodes. We find that as the coupling strength q between the two networks reduces from 1 (fully coupled) to 0 (no coupling), there exist two critical coupling strengths q1 and q2 , which separate the behaviors of the giant component as a function of p into three different regions, and for q2 stock market indices and foreign exchange daily returns for 60 countries over the period of 1999-2012. We build a multi-layer network model based on different correlation measures, and introduce a dynamic network model to simulate and analyze the initializing and spreading of financial crisis. Using different computational approaches and econometric tests, we find atypical behavior of the cross correlations and community formations in the financial networks that we study during the financial crisis of 2008. For example, the overall correlation of stock market increases during crisis while the correlation between

  4. What clinicians want: findings from a psychotherapy practice research network survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Sylvestre, John; Balfour, Louise; Chyurlia, Livia; Evans, Jane; Fortin-Langelier, Benjamin; Francis, Kylie; Gandhi, Jasmine; Huehn, Linda; Hunsley, John; Joyce, Anthony S; Kinley, Jackie; Koszycki, Diana; Leszcz, Molyn; Lybanon-Daigle, Vanessa; Mercer, Deanna; Ogrodniczuk, John S; Presniak, Michelle; Ravitz, Paula; Ritchie, Kerri; Talbot, Jeanne; Wilson, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Practice research networks may be one way of advancing knowledge translation and exchange (KTE) in psychotherapy. In this study, we document this process by first asking clinicians what they want from psychotherapy research. Eighty-two psychotherapists in 10 focus groups identified and discussed psychotherapy research topics relevant to their practices. An analysis of these discussions led to the development of 41 survey items. In an online survey, 1,019 participants, mostly practicing clinicians, rated the importance to their clinical work of these 41 psychotherapy research topics. Ratings were reduced using a principal components analysis in which 9 psychotherapy research themes emerged, accounting for 60.66% of the variance. Two postsurvey focus groups of clinicians (N = 22) aided in interpreting the findings. The ranking of research themes from most to least important were-Therapeutic Relationship/Mechanisms of Change, Therapist Factors, Training and Professional Development, Client Factors, Barriers and Stigma, Technology and Adjunctive Interventions, Progress Monitoring, Matching Clients to Therapist or Therapy, and Treatment Manuals. Few differences were noted in rankings based on participant age or primary therapeutic orientation. Postsurvey focus group participants were not surprised by the top-rated items, as they were considered most proximal and relevant to therapists and their work with clients during therapy sessions. Lower ranked items may be perceived as externally imposed agendas on the therapist and therapy. We discuss practice research networks as a means of creating new collaborations consistent with KTE goals. Findings of this study can help to direct practitioner-researcher collaborations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Graduate students navigating social-ecological research: insights from the Long-Term Ecological Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydne Record; Paige F. B. Ferguson; Elise Benveniste; Rose A. Graves; Vera W. Pfeiffer; Michele Romolini; Christie E. Yorke; Ben Beardmore

    2016-01-01

    Interdisciplinary, collaborative research capable of capturing the feedbacks between biophysical and social systems can improve the capacity for sustainable environmental decision making. Networks of researchers provide unique opportunities to foster social-ecological inquiry. Although insights into interdisciplinary research have been discussed elsewhere,...

  6. Promoting Cognitive Health: A Formative Research Collaboration of the Healthy Aging Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laditka, James N.; Beard, Renee L.; Bryant, Lucinda L.; Fetterman, David; Hunter, Rebecca; Ivey, Susan; Logsdon, Rebecca G.; Sharkey, Joseph R.; Wu, Bei

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests that healthy lifestyles may help maintain cognitive health. The Prevention Research Centers Healthy Aging Research Network, 9 universities collaborating with their communities and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is conducting a multiyear research project, begun in 2005, to understand how to translate this…

  7. A community of practice: librarians in a biomedical research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager-Loftus, Danielle P; Midyette, J David; Harvey, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Providing library and reference services within a biomedical research community presents special challenges for librarians, especially those in historically lower-funded states. These challenges can include understanding needs, defining and communicating the library's role, building relationships, and developing and maintaining general and subject specific knowledge. This article describes a biomedical research network and the work of health sciences librarians at the lead intensive research institution with librarians from primarily undergraduate institutions and tribal colleges. Applying the concept of a community of practice to a collaborative effort suggests how librarians can work together to provide effective reference services to researchers in biomedicine.

  8. Pharmacy practice-based research networks: do pharmacists need them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshy, Samuel

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight the need for the development of pharmacy practice-based research networks (PBRNs). Large multicenter research projects that provide evidence for the provision of patient care services by pharmacists are required, which can be facilitated by pharmacy PBRNs. There is a growing need for pharmacy PBRNs, and the time is appropriate for pharmacists around the world to engage in the development of pharmacy PBRNs. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Social working memory: neurocognitive networks and directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Meghan L; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2012-01-01

    Navigating the social world requires the ability to maintain and manipulate information about people's beliefs, traits, and mental states. We characterize this capacity as social working memory (SWM). To date, very little research has explored this phenomenon, in part because of the assumption that general working memory systems would support working memory for social information. Various lines of research, however, suggest that social cognitive processing relies on a neurocognitive network (i.e., the "mentalizing network") that is functionally distinct from, and considered antagonistic with, the canonical working memory network. Here, we review evidence suggesting that demanding social cognition requires SWM and that both the mentalizing and canonical working memory neurocognitive networks support SWM. The neural data run counter to the common finding of parametric decreases in mentalizing regions as a function of working memory demand and suggest that the mentalizing network can support demanding cognition, when it is demanding social cognition. Implications for individual differences in social cognition and pathologies of social cognition are discussed.

  10. Assessing citation networks for dissemination and implementation research frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Lehmann, Todd; Tabak, Rachel G; Harris, Jenine; Lecy, Jesse; Sales, Anne E

    2017-07-28

    A recent review of frameworks used in dissemination and implementation (D&I) science described 61 judged to be related either to dissemination, implementation, or both. The current use of these frameworks and their contributions to D&I science more broadly has yet to be reviewed. For these reasons, our objective was to determine the role of these frameworks in the development of D&I science. We used the Web of Science™ Core Collection and Google Scholar™ to conduct a citation network analysis for the key frameworks described in a recent systematic review of D&I frameworks (Am J Prev Med 43(3):337-350, 2012). From January to August 2016, we collected framework data including title, reference, publication year, and citations per year and conducted descriptive and main path network analyses to identify those most important in holding the current citation network for D&I frameworks together. The source article contained 119 cited references, with 50 published articles and 11 documents identified as a primary framework reference. The average citations per year for the 61 frameworks reviewed ranged from 0.7 to 103.3 among articles published from 1985 to 2012. Citation rates from all frameworks are reported with citation network analyses for the framework review article and ten highly cited framework seed articles. The main path for the D&I framework citation network is presented. We examined citation rates and the main paths through the citation network to delineate the current landscape of D&I framework research, and opportunities for advancing framework development and use. Dissemination and implementation researchers and practitioners may consider frequency of framework citation and our network findings when planning implementation efforts to build upon this foundation and promote systematic advances in D&I science.

  11. Impact of the Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribisl, Kurt M.; Fernandez, Maria E.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Hannon, Peggy; Leeman, Jennifer; Moore, Alexis; Olson, Lindsay; Ory, Marcia; Risendal, Betsy; Sheble, Laura; Taylor, Vicky; Williams, Rebecca; Weiner, Bryan J.

    2018-01-01

    The Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN) is a thematic network dedicated to accelerating the adoption of evidence-based cancer prevention and control practices in communities by advancing dissemination and implementation science. Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Cancer Institute, CPCRN has operated at two levels: Each participating Network Center conducts research projects with primarily local partners as well as multicenter collaborative research projects with state and national partners. Through multicenter collaboration, thematic networks leverage the expertise, resources, and partnerships of participating centers to conduct research projects collectively that might not be feasible individually. Although multicenter collaboration often is advocated, it is challenging to promote and assess. Using bibliometric network analysis and other graphical methods, this paper describes CPCRN’s multicenter publication progression from 2004 to 2014. Searching PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science in 2014 identified 249 peer-reviewed CPCRN publications involving two or more centers out of 6,534 total. The research and public health impact of these multicenter collaborative projects initiated by CPCRN during that 10-year period were then examined. CPCRN established numerous workgroups around topics such as: 2-1-1, training and technical assistance, colorectal cancer control, federally qualified health centers, cancer survivorship, and human papillomavirus. The paper discusses the challenges that arise in promoting multicenter collaboration and the strategies that CPCRN uses to address those challenges. The lessons learned should broadly interest those seeking to promote multisite collaboration to address public health problems, such as cancer prevention and control. PMID:28215371

  12. Current electroconvulsive therapy practice and research in the geriatric population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Nancy; Prudic, Joan

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is utilized worldwide for various severe and treatment-resistant psychiatric disorders. Research studies have shown that ECT is the most effective and rapid treatment available for elderly patients with depression, bipolar disorder and psychosis. For patients who suffer from intractable catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome, ECT can be life saving. For elderly patients who cannot tolerate or respond poorly to medications and who are at a high risk for drug-induced toxicity or toxic drug interactions, ECT is the safest treatment option. Organic causes are frequently associated with late-life onset of neuropsychiatric conditions, such as parkinsonism, dementia and stroke. ECT has proven to be efficacious even when these conditions are present. During the next decade, research studies should focus on the use of ECT as a synergistic therapy, to enhance other biological and psychological treatments, and prevent symptom relapse and recurrence. PMID:24778709

  13. Enabling research in care homes: an evaluation of a national network of research ready care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sue L; Goodman, Claire; Manthorpe, Jill; Smith, Adam; Carrick, Natasha; Iliffe, Steve

    2014-04-05

    In the UK care homes are one of the main providers of long term care for older people with dementia. Despite the recent increase in care home research, residents with dementia are often excluded from studies. Care home research networks have been recommended by the Ministerial Advisory Group on Dementia Research (MAGDR) as a way of increasing research opportunities for residents with dementia. This paper reports on an evaluation of the feasibility and early impact of an initiative to increase care home participation in research. A two phase, mixed methods approach was used; phase 1 established a baseline of current and recent studies including the National Institute for Health Research portfolio. To explore the experiences of recruiting care homes and research participation, interviews were conducted with researchers working for the Dementia and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network (DeNDRoN) and care home managers. In phase 2, four DeNDRoN area offices recruited care homes to a care home network for their region. The care home networks were separate from the DeNDRoN research network. Diaries were used to document and cost recruitment; DeNDRoN staff were interviewed to understand the barriers, facilitators and impact of the care home networks. Thirty three current or recent studies were identified as involving care homes as care home specific studies or those which included residents. Further details of care home recruitment were obtained on 20 studies by contacting study teams. Care home managers were keen to be involved in research that provided staff support, benefits for residents and with minimal disruption. In phase 2, 141 care homes were recruited to the care home research networks, through corporate engagement and individual invitation. Pre-existing relationships with care homes facilitated recruitment. Sites with minimal experience of working with care homes identified the need for care home training for researchers. Phase 1 review revealed a small

  14. Turning Failure into Success: Trials of the Heart Failure Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emer; Givertz, Michael M

    2016-12-01

    The Heart Failure Clinical Research Network (HFN) was established in 2008 on behalf of the NIH National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, with the primary goal of improving outcomes in heart failure (HF) by designing and conducting high-quality concurrent clinical trials testing interventions across the spectrum of HF. Completed HFN trials have answered several important and relevant clinical questions concerning the safety and efficacy of different decongestive and adjunctive vasodilator therapies in hospitalized acute HF, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibition and nitrate therapies in HF with preserved ejection fraction, and the role of xanthine oxidase inhibition in hyperuricemic HF. These successes, independent of the "positive" or "negative" result of each individual trial, have helped to shape the current clinical care of HF patients and serve as a platform to inform future research directions and trial designs.

  15. Wireless networks and security issues, challenges and research trends

    CERN Document Server

    Pathan, Al-Sakib

    2013-01-01

     “Wireless Networks and Security” provides a broad coverage of wireless security issues including cryptographic coprocessors, encryption, authentication, key management, attacks and countermeasures, secure routing, secure medium access control, intrusion detection, epidemics, security performance analysis, security issues in applications. The contributions identify various vulnerabilities in the physical layer, MAC layer, network layer, transport layer, and application layer, and focus on ways of strengthening security mechanisms and services throughout the layers. This carefully edited monograph is targeting  for researchers, post-graduate students in universities, academics, and industry practitioners or professionals.  

  16. Effects of Actor-Network Theory in Accounting Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Lise Nederland; Mouritsen, Jan

    2011-01-01

    of a critical literature review and discussion. Findings – Since the early 1990s, actor-network theory, particularly the work of Bruno Latour, has inspired accounting researchers and led to a number of innovative studies of accounting phenomena. In particular, Latour's book, Science in Action, has been...... number of accounting papers that apply actor-network theory. A different sample might have given a somewhat different picture. Furthermore, it focuses on the influence of Latour's work and refrains from discussing how the writings of Michel Callon, John Law or other thinkers within the actor...

  17. Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology (NERIES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eck, T.; Giardini, D.; Bossu, R.; Wiemer, S.

    2008-12-01

    NERIES (Network of Research Infrastructures for European Seismology) is an Integrated Infrastructure Initiative (I3) project within the Sixth Framework Programme of the European Commission (EC). The project consortium consists of 25 participants from 13 different European countries. It is currently the largest earth science project ever funded by the EC. The goal of NERIES is to integrate European seismological observatories and research institutes into one integrated cyber-infrastructure for seismological data serving the research community, civil protection authorities and the general public. The EC provides funds for the networking and research. The participants provide the necessary hardware investments, mostly through national resources. NERIES consists of 13 subprojects (networking and research activities) and 5 facilities providing access through grants (Transnational Access). The project is coordinated by ORFEUS in close cooperation with the EMSC. The individual subprojects address different issues such as: extension of the Virtual European Broadband Seismic Network (VEBSN) from 140 to about 500 stations, implementing the core European Integrated Waveform Data Archive (EIDA) consisting of ODC-KNMI, GFZ, INGV and IPGP and a distributed archive of historical Data. Providing access to data gathered by acceleration networks within Europe and its surroundings and deploys Ocean Bottom Seismometers in coordination with relevant Ocean bottom projects like ESONET. Tot facilitate access to this diverse and distributed data NERIES invests a significant portion of its resources to implementing a portal for which a beta release is planned to be release in the autumn of 2008. The research project main goal is to produce products and tools facilitating data interpretation and analysis. These tools include a European reference (velocity) model, real-time hazard tools, shakemaps and lossmaps, site response determination software and tools, and automatic tools to manage and

  18. European network for research in global change (ENRICH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, A. [European Commission, Bruxelles (Belgium). DG XII/JRC

    1995-12-31

    While approaching the beginning of the twenty first century, the scientific community is faced with the formidable tasks of monitoring and detecting, understanding and predicting changes in the Earth System and its interactions with human beings. A crucial challenge is to make scientific research results accessible and usable for those involved in the decision making process related to the concept of Sustainable Development. Major international scientific programmes under the umbrella of ICSU, such as the IGBP and WCRP, are dealing with these issues. Although there exist many well developed global change research programmes in several European countries and effective collaboration networks between research institutes, there is an urgent need for overall communication with a view to promoting wider international links ensuring complementarity, synergy and coherence. Recognizing the importance of promoting coherence in research and utilising research results for various European Union (EU) policies, the European Commissioner responsible for Science, Research and Development wrote in March 1992 to all the EU Research Ministers to propose an initiative in this domain. In a rapid response, a group of Senior Experts from the EU Member States was set up in April 1992. This Group established a Task Force to develop the concept of the European Network for Research In Global CHange (ENRICH) which was approved in July 1993

  19. Efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapies in Korea: A systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon Suk; Park, Chan Hyuk; Park, Jung Ho; Nam, Eunwoo; Lee, Hang Lak

    2017-08-01

    The efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens may depend on the country where the studies were performed because of the difference in antibiotic resistance. We aimed to analyze the efficacy of H. pylori eradication regimens in Korea where clarithromycin resistance rate is high. We searched for all relevant randomized controlled trials published until November 2016 that investigated the efficacy of H. pylori eradication therapies in Korea. A network meta-analysis was performed to calculate the direct and indirect estimates of efficacy among the eradication regimens. Forty-three studies were identified through a systematic review, of which 34 studies, published since 2005, were included in the meta-analysis. Among 21 included regimens, quinolone-containing sequential therapy for 14 days (ST-Q-14) showed the highest eradication rate (91.4% [95% confidence interval [CI], 86.9%-94.4%] in the intention-to-treat [ITT] analysis). The eradication rate of the conventional triple therapy for 7 days, standard sequential therapy for 10 days, hybrid therapy for 10-14 days, and concomitant therapy for 10-14 days was 71.1% (95% CI, 68.3%-73.7%), 76.2% (95% CI, 72.8%-79.3%), 79.4% (95% CI, 75.5%-82.8%), and 78.3% (95% CI, 75.3%-80.9%), respectively, in the ITT analysis. In the network meta-analysis, ST-Q-14 showed a better comparative efficacy than the conventional triple therapy, standard sequential therapy, hybrid therapy, and concomitant therapy. In addition, tolerability of ST-Q-14 was comparable to those regimens. In Korea, ST-Q-14 showed the highest efficacy in terms of eradication and a comparable tolerability, compared to the results reported for the conventional triple therapy, standard sequential therapy, hybrid therapy, and concomitant therapy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Analyzing Enterprise Networks Needs: Action Research from the Mechatronics Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnazzo, Luca; Taticchi, Paolo; Bidini, Gianni; Baglieri, Enzo

    New business models and theories are developing nowadays towards collaborative environments direction, and many new tools in sustaining companies involved in these organizations are emerging. Among them, a plethora of methodologies to analyze their needs are already developed for single companies. Few academic works are available about Enterprise Networks (ENs) need analysis. This paper presents the learning from an action research (AR) in the mechatronics sector: AR has been used in order to experience the issue of evaluating network needs and therefore define, develop, and test a complete framework for network evaluation. Reflection on the story in the light of the experience and the theory is presented, as well as extrapolation to a broader context and articulation of usable knowledge.

  1. Challenges, limits and possibilities of the telejournalism researchers network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Antônio Camargo Porcello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a theoretical reflection on the challenges, limits and possibilities of network research, with emphasis on the case of the Telejournalism Researchers Network of the Brazilian Association of Journalism Researchers (SBPJor. In addition to a brief historical account of the network´s years of existence, we will deal here with the publications already accomplished, the evolution of the empirical research works, the courses adopted and also the future plans for the amplification, in quantity and quality, of the commitments undertaken. The interaction between theory and practice has always been a basic milestone in the advancement of the group, composed of professors who have had professional activity in television broadcasting stations. TV enters into people´s lives and cannot be seen as a mere support for electronic communication. Telejournalism is an interdisciplinary field which should be studied in its discursive and enunciative aspects. This article will offer some theoretical contributions from authors such as Castells, Bauman, Chauraudeau, Thompson, Gomes and Mattos, among others, to help in shedding light on this path and stimulate the amplification of the theoretical debate proposed.

  2. Social working memory: Neurocognitive networks and directions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L Meyer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Navigating the social world requires the ability to maintain and manipulate information about people’s beliefs, traits, and mental states. We characterize this capacity as social working memory. To date, very little research has explored this phenomenon, in part because of the assumption that general working memory systems would support working memory for social information. Various lines of research, however, suggest that social cognitive processing relies on a neurocognitive network (i.e., the ‘mentalizing network’ that is functionally distinct from, and considered antagonistic with, the canonical working memory network. Here, we review evidence suggesting that demanding social cognition requires social working memory and that both the mentalizing and canonical working memory neurocognitive networks support social working memory. The neural data run counter to the common finding of parametric decreases in mentalizing regions as a function of working memory demand and suggest that the mentalizing network can support demanding cognition, when it is demanding social cognition. Implications for individual differences in social cognition and pathologies of social cognition are discussed.

  3. 75 FR 55360 - Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program: Draft NITRD 2010...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD... Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD). ACTION: Notice, request for public comment. FOR..., the National Coordination Office for Networking and Information Technology Research and Development...

  4. Delegation of research governance to networks: research councils as multiple goal boundary organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerkx, L.W.A.; Leeuwis, C.

    2009-01-01

    The delegation of research governance to networks is increasingly seen as a potential way to resolve the paradox in research fundingi, because it would reduce the direct influence of the state on funding policies, respect the independence of scientific institutions, foster `vigorous¿ scientific

  5. Consumer involvement in cancer research: example from a Cancer Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Mubashir; Pyne, Sarah; Thornton, Nigel; Palmer, Susan; Sharma, Ricky A

    2015-10-01

    The involvement of consumers and the general public in improving cancer services is an important component of health services. However, consumer involvement in cancer research is relatively unexplored. The objective of this study was to explore different ways of involving consumers in cancer research in one regional network. Thames Valley Cancer Network Consumer Research Partnership (CRP) group was formed in 2009. The group consists of consumers and professionals to help in promoting consumer involvement in Cancer Research in the Thames Valley. This study evaluated the project of consumer involvement in cancer research in the Thames Valley from March 2010 to March 2011. We used different indices to judge the level of consumer involvement: number of projects involving consumers through the group, types of projects, level of involvement (ranged from consultation on research documents to collaborating in preparing grant applications) and the methods of involving consumers in cancer research. Fifteen projects were submitted to the CRP group during the 12-month period studied. Of these, eight projects were clinical trials, three were qualitative research projects, two were patients' surveys and two were non-randomized interventional studies. Seven projects requested consumer involvement on patient information sheets for clinical trials. Of these seven applications, three also requested consumers' help in designing research questionnaires and another three requested that consumers should be involved in their project management group. In addition, four projects involved consumers in the proposal development phase and another four projects asked for advice on how to increase trial recruitment, conduct patient interviews or help with grant applications. The creation of the CRP and this audit of its activity have documented consumer involvement in cancer research in the Thames Valley. We have clearly shown that consumers can be involved in designing and managing cancer

  6. European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centre (ENBREC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henry, Chantal; Andreassen, Ole A; Barbato, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    of a critical mass of expertise and multicentre collaborative projects. Within the framework of the European FP7 programme, we developed a European Network of Bipolar Research Expert Centres (ENBREC) designed specifically to facilitate EU-wide studies. ENBREC provides an integrated support structure...... clinical decision-making as well as being applicable to research. Reliable, established measures have been prioritised, and instruments have been translated and validated when necessary. An electronic healthcare record and monitoring system (e-ENBREC©) has been developed to collate the data. Protocols...... to conduct multicentre clinical observational studies and joint studies on cognitive function, biomarkers, genetics, and neuroimaging are in progress; a pilot study has been completed on strategies for routine implementation of psycho-education. The network demonstrates 'proof of principle' that expert...

  7. Development of dosimetry tools for proton therapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Dogyun

    2010-01-01

    Dosimetry tools for proton therapy research have been developed to measure the properties of a therapeutic proton beam. A CCD camera-scintillation screen system, which can verify the 2D dose distribution of a scanning beam and can be used for proton radiography, was developed. Also developed were a large area parallel-plate ionization chamber and a multi-layer Faraday cup to monitor the beam current and to measure the beam energy, respectively. To investigate the feasibility of locating the distal dose falloff in real time during patient treatment, a prompt gamma measuring system composed of multi-layer shielding structures was then devised. The system worked well for a pristine proton beam. However, correlation between the distal dose falloff and the prompt gamma distribution was blurred by neutron background for a therapy beam formed by scattering method. We have also worked on the design of a Compton camera to image the 2D distribution of prompt gamma rays.

  8. Vitamin Therapy and Children with Down's Syndrome: A Review of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruess, James B.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Following a brief outline of vitamin therapy's effects on schizophrenia and learning disabilities, research is reviewed on vitamin therapy for children with Down's Syndrome, concluding with a discussion of critical responses to research endorsing vitamin therapy. It is concluded that vitamin therapy contributes nothing to the development of…

  9. Social network analysis of international scientific collaboration on psychiatry research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Duan, Zhiguang

    2015-01-01

    Mental disorder is harmful to human health, effects social life seriously and still brings a heavy burden for countries all over the world. Scientific collaboration has become the indispensable choice for progress in the field of biomedicine. However, there have been few scientific publications on scientific collaboration in psychiatry research so far. The aim of this study was to measure the activities of scientific collaboration in psychiatry research at the level of authors, institutions and countries. We retrieved 36557 papers about psychiatry from Science Ciation Index Expanded (SCI-Expanded) in web of science. Additionally, some methods such as social network analysis (SNA), K-plex analysis and Core-Periphery were used in this study. Collaboration has been increasing at the level of authors, institutions and countries in psychiatry in the last ten years. We selected the top 100 prolific authors, institutions and 30 countries to construct collaborative map respectively. Freedman, R and Seidman, LJ were the central authors, Harvard university was the central institution and the USA was the central country of the whole network. Notably, the rate of economic development of countries affected collaborative behavior. The results show that we should encourage multiple collaboration types in psychiatry research as they not only help researchers to master the current research hotspots but also provide scientific basis for clinical research on psychiatry and suggest policies to promote the development of this area.

  10. 75 FR 80853 - Designing a Digital Future: Federally Funded Research and Development in Networking and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... in Networking and Information Technology AGENCY: National Coordination Office (NCO) for the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program, National Science Foundation... Development in Networking and Information Technology''. ACTION: Request for Information (RFI). SUMMARY...

  11. The Mid-South clinical Data Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, S Trent; Harris, Paul; Pulley, Jill; Basford, Melissa; Grant, Jason; DuBuisson, Allison; Rothman, Russell L

    2014-01-01

    The Mid-South Clinical Data Research Network (CDRN) encompasses three large health systems: (1) Vanderbilt Health System (VU) with electronic medical records for over 2 million patients, (2) the Vanderbilt Healthcare Affiliated Network (VHAN) which currently includes over 40 hospitals, hundreds of ambulatory practices, and over 3 million patients in the Mid-South, and (3) Greenway Medical Technologies, with access to 24 million patients nationally. Initial goals of the Mid-South CDRN include: (1) expansion of our VU data network to include the VHAN and Greenway systems, (2) developing data integration/interoperability across the three systems, (3) improving our current tools for extracting clinical data, (4) optimization of tools for collection of patient-reported data, and (5) expansion of clinical decision support. By 18 months, we anticipate our CDRN will robustly support projects in comparative effectiveness research, pragmatic clinical trials, and other key research areas and have the capacity to share data and health information technology tools nationally. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. MedAustron - Ion-Beam Therapy and Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, Thomas; Seemann, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    MedAustron is a synchrotron-based light-ion beam therapy center for cancer treatment as well as for clinical and non-clinical research, currently in the commissioning phase in Wiener Neustadt, Austria. Recently, the first proton beam was transported successfully to one of the four irradiation rooms. Whilst the choice of basic machine parameters was driven by medical requirements, i.e. 60 MeV protons and 120 MeV/A to 400 MeV/A carbon ions, the accelerator complex design was also optimized to offer flexibility for research operation. The potential of the synchrotron is being exploited to increase the maximum proton energy far beyond the medical needs to up to 800 MeV, for experimental physics applications, mainly in the areas of proton scattering and detector research. The accelerator layout allows for the installation of up to four ion source-spectrometer units, to provide various ion types besides the clinical used protons and carbon ions. Besides experimental physics, the two main non-clinical research disciplines are medical radiation physics and radiation biology. To decouple research and medical operation, a dedicated irradiation room for non-clinical research was included providing the installation of different experiments. In addition, several labs have been equipped with appropriate devices for preparing and analyzing radio-biological samples. This presentation gives a status overview over the whole project and highlights the non-clinical research opportunities at MedAustron. (Author)

  13. China's landscape in oncology drug research: perspectives from research collaboration networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Han; Ni, Jingyun; Barber, Michael; Scherngell, Thomas; Hu, Yuanjia

    2015-04-01

    Better understanding of China's landscape in oncology drug research is of great significance for discovering anti-cancer drugs in future. This article differs from previous studies by focusing on Chinese oncology drug research communities in co-publication networks at the institutional level. Moreover, this research aims to explore structures and behaviors of relevant research units by thematic community analysis and to address policy recommendations. This research used social network analysis to define an institutions network and to identify a community network which is characterized by thematic content. A total of 675 sample articles from 2008 through 2012 were retrieved from the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE) database of Web of Science, and top institutions and institutional pairs are highlighted for further discussion. Meanwhile, this study revealed that institutions based in the Chinese mainland are located in a relatively central position, Taiwan's institutions are closely assembled on the side, and Hong Kong's units located in the middle of the Chinese mainland's and Taiwan's. Spatial division and institutional hierarchy are still critical barriers to research collaboration in the field of anti-cancer drugs in China. In addition, the communities focusing on hot research areas show the higher nodal degree, whereas communities giving more attention to rare research subjects are relatively marginalized to the periphery of network. This paper offers policy recommendations to accelerate cross-regional cooperation, such as through developing information technology and increasing investment. The brokers should focus more on outreach to other institutions. Finally, participation in topics of common interest is conducive to improved efficiency in research and development (R&D) resource allocation.

  14. Evaluating UK research in speech and language therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewison, Grant; Carding, Paul

    2003-01-01

    There has been a steady growth in recent years in British higher-degree training in speech and language therapy. But what is the standing of UK research in the subject and its component areas which should underpin and inform such training? How can such research be evaluated? The intention was to compare UK publications relevant to speech and language therapy with those of other countries, both quantitatively and qualitatively. We sought then to examine the UK papers in more detail to analyse their sources of funding, their geographical distribution and the ways in which they could appropriately be evaluated. Papers were selectively retrieved from the Science Citation Index and the Social Sciences Citation Index for 1991-2000 by means of a filter based on journal names and paper title words. They were subsequently checked to remove many false positives. The papers were classified into one of seven subject areas and by their research level (from clinical to basic). Their importance was estimated through their potential impact on other researchers, as determined by the citation score of their journals, by the numbers of citations they actually received and by the subjective esteem in which the various journals were held by UK speech and language researchers. World output of speech and language therapy papers has averaged 1000 papers per year during the 1990s, and has grown by half over the period. UK output has been about 12% of the total, compared with 10% in biomedicine, and is published in high impact journals relative to the norm for the field, which is quite a low rate compared with biomedicine overall. Almost half the UK papers had no funding acknowledgements, with the private-non-profit and industrial sectors playing less of a role than in other biomedical areas. Papers in seven subject areas showed substantial differences in their performance on the four criteria selected. The state of British speech and language research appears to be satisfactory, with an

  15. WORKING TOGETHER: EDUCATION, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR 5G NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Ivanova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the new world of globalization of ideas and mobility difficulties in knowledge diffusion still remains. The effectiveexchange of experiences and skills in new generation networks is not guaranteed by the enormous potentialsofinternetworking systems and devices. Conceptual model for performance modeling and evaluation of multiservicenetworks has been major interest for mobile networks providers. It is essential to assess the performance ofmobile system architectures in order to identify where potential bottlenecks and data packet blocking probabilityare possible to occur. Educational platforms, new simulations opportunities represent a good opportunity to reducethe digital divide and to ensure faster and higher communication trends. Several universities and companies arecurrently involved in using educational platforms to provide better results. Conceptual model for teletrafficengineering in educational platform and applications focuses on some important aspects: tutorials, exercise,simulations, and expectation values of parameters, testing and estimation of students work. In the same time thesame model is very appropriate for simulation of network management for the new generation networks. Thiseducational platform for academics, students and researchers, puts together some of the critical aspects ofdistributed systems and their characteristics, parameters and probability of blocking.

  16. METHODOLOGY OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT OF REGIONAL NETWORK ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Botkin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Information practically of all the Russian regions economy branches and development by managing subjects is information − communicative the Internet technologies render huge influence on economic attitudes development in the environment of regional business: there are new forms of interaction of managing subjects and change is information − organizational structures of regional business management. Integrated image of the set forth above innovations is the regional network economy representing the interactive environment in which on high speed and with minimal transaction (R.H.Coase’s costs are performed social economic and commodity monetary attitudes between managing subjects of region with use of Internet global network interactive opportunities. The urgency of the regional network economy phenomenon research, first of all, is caused by necessity of a substantiation of regional network economy methodology development and management mechanisms development by its infrastructure with the purpose of regional business efficiency increase. In our opinion, the decision of these problems will be the defining factor of effective economic development maintenance and russian regions economy growth in the near future.

  17. Psychological Therapies for Auditory Hallucinations (Voices): Current Status and Key Directions for Future Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, N.; Hayward, M.; Peters, E; van der Gaag, M.; Bentall, R.P.; Jenner, J.; Strauss, C.; Sommer, I.E.; Johns, L.C.; Varese, F.; Gracia-Montes, J.M.; Waters, F.; Dodgson, G.; McCarthy-Jones, S.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the International Consortium on Hallucinations Research considers the current status and future directions in research on psychological therapies targeting auditory hallucinations (hearing voices). Therapy approaches have evolved from behavioral and coping-focused interventions,

  18. [Cognitive therapy: foundations, conceptual models, applications and research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Paulo; Beck, Aaron T

    2008-10-01

    There is growing interest in the cognitive model of psychotherapy stimulated by an extensive body of research findings demonstrating its effectiveness for a varied set of psychiatric disorders and medical conditions. This review article aims to give an overview of the historical and philosophical background to contemporary cognitive and cognitive-behavioral approaches to psychotherapy, pointing out similarities across and differences between them. A presentation of the cognitive model as designed by Aaron Beck, and some of the cognitive and behavioral techniques used in emotional disorders will be discussed. Outcome studies and meta-analyses contemplating the efficacy of cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapies in various psychological and medical conditions will be briefly depicted. Through review of articles and textbooks, especially the works of Aaron Beck from which this review article has heavily borrowed, the origins and foundations of the cognitive-behavioral approaches to the treatment of psychiatric and medical conditions are described. Through Medline, the search of randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses has pointed out the evidence-based efficacy of this psychotherapeutic approach. Cognitive-behavioral therapies in general and Beckian cognitive therapy in particular hold a theoretical foundation and a varied set of techniques, whose evidence-based efficacy was demonstrated for the treatment of diverse mental and physical conditions.

  19. Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy: Theoretical Background, Empirical Research, and Dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roddy, McKenzie K; Nowlan, Kathryn M; Doss, Brian D; Christensen, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (IBCT), developed by Drs. Andrew Christensen and Neil Jacobson, builds off the tradition of behavioral couple therapy by including acceptance strategies as key components of treatment. Results from a large randomized clinical trial of IBCT indicate that it yields large and significant gains in relationship satisfaction. Furthermore, these benefits have been shown to persist for at least 5 years after treatment for the average couple. Not only does IBCT positively impact relationship constructs such as satisfaction and communication, but the benefits of therapy extend to individual, co-parenting, and child functioning. Moreover, IBCT has been shown to operate through the putative mechanisms of improvements in emotional acceptance, behavior change, and communication. IBCT was chosen for nationwide training and dissemination through the Veteran Affairs Medical Centers. Furthermore, the principles of IBCT have been translated into a web-based intervention for distressed couples, OurRelationship.com. IBCT is continuing to evolve and grow as research and technologies allow for continued evaluation and dissemination of this well-supported theoretical model. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  20. Enhancing research capacity of African institutions through social networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Castellanos, Ana; Ramirez-Robles, Maximo; Shousha, Amany; Bagayoko, Cheick Oumar; Perrin, Caroline; Zolfo, Maria; Cuzin, Asa; Roland, Alima; Aryeetey, Richmond; Maojo, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, participation of African researchers in top Biomedical Informatics (BMI) scientific journals and conferences has been scarce. Looking beyond these numbers, an educational goal should be to improve overall research and, therefore, to increase the number of scientists/authors able to produce and publish high quality research. In such scenario, we are carrying out various efforts to expand the capacities of various institutions located at four African countries - Egypt, Ghana, Cameroon and Mali - in the framework of a European Commission-funded project, AFRICA BUILD. This project is currently carrying out activities such as e-learning, collaborative development of informatics tools, mobility of researchers, various pilot projects, and others. Our main objective is to create a self-sustained South-South network of BMI developers.

  1. How Researchers Use Social Media to Promote their Research and Network with Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Päivi Jaring

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Social media is now an essential information and interaction channel. Companies advertise and sell their products and services through social media, but this channel has not been so commonly applied to the task of selling knowledge and research work. This article studies the use of social media by researchers to promote their research and network with product developers in industry, and it presents a model of the use of social media by researchers. The data for this research was obtained by interviewing individual researchers of a research organization and surveying product developers from industry. The findings show that social media is seen as a good source of new information and contacts, and it is suitable for promoting awareness of research services and results. The results show that the speed and intensity of social media present challenges for researchers, but by being active in posting content and participating in discussions, researchers can derive benefits and enhance their personal reputations.

  2. Dynamics of Research Team Formation in Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Caihong; Wan, Yuzi; Chen, Yu

    Most organizations encourage the formation of teams to accomplish complicated tasks, and vice verse, effective teams could bring lots benefits and profits for organizations. Network structure plays an important role in forming teams. In this paper, we specifically study the dynamics of team formation in large research communities in which knowledge of individuals plays an important role on team performance and individual utility. An agent-based model is proposed, in which heterogeneous agents from research communities are described and empirically tested. Each agent has a knowledge endowment and a preference for both income and leisure. Agents provide a variable input (‘effort’) and their knowledge endowments to production. They could learn from others in their team and those who are not in their team but have private connections in community to adjust their own knowledge endowment. They are allowed to join other teams or work alone when it is welfare maximizing to do so. Various simulation experiments are conducted to examine the impacts of network topology, knowledge diffusion among community network, and team output sharing mechanisms on the dynamics of team formation.

  3. The DREME Network: Research and Interventions in Early Childhood Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-Hess, Crystal; Clements, Douglas H

    2017-01-01

    The DREME Network was created to advance the field of early mathematics research and improves the opportunities to develop math competencies offered to children birth through age 8 years, with an emphasis on the preschool years. All four main Network projects will have implications for interventions. Section 1 introduces the Network and its four projects. The remainder of the chapter focuses on one of these four projects, Making More of Math (MMM), in depth. MMM is directly developing an intervention for children, based on selecting high-quality instructional activities culled from the burgeoning curriculum resources. We first report a review of 457 activities from 6 research-based curricula, which describes the number of activities by content focus, type (nature), and setting of each activity. Given the interest in higher-order thinking skills and self-regulation, we then identified activities that had the potential to, develop both mathematics and executive function (EF) proficiencies. We rated these, selecting the top 10 for extensive coding by mathematics content and EF processes addressed. We find a wide divergence across curricula in all these categories and provide comprehensive reports for those interested in selecting, using, or developing early mathematics curricula. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. European network infrastructures of observatories for terrestrial Global Change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, H.; Bogena, H.; Lehning, M.

    2009-04-01

    The earth's climate is significantly changing (e.g. IPCC, 2007) and thus directly affecting the terrestrial systems. The number and intensity hydrological extremes, such as floods and droughts, are continually increasing, resulting in major economical and social impacts. Furthermore, the land cover in Europe has been modified fundamentally by conversions for agriculture, forest and for other purposes such as industrialisation and urbanisation. Additionally, water resources are more than ever used for human development, especially as a key resource for agricultural and industrial activities. As a special case, the mountains of the world are of significant importance in terms of water resources supply, biodiversity, economy, agriculture, traffic and recreation but particularly vulnerable to environmental change. The Alps are unique because of the pronounced small scale variability they contain, the high population density they support and their central position in Europe. The Alps build a single coherent physical and natural environment, artificially cut by national borders. The scientific community and governmental bodies have responded to these environmental changes by performing dedicated experiments and by establishing environmental research networks to monitor, analyse and predict the impact of Global Change on different terrestrial systems of the Earths' environment. Several European network infrastructures for terrestrial Global Change research are presently immerging or upgrading, such as ICOS, ANAEE, LifeWatch or LTER-Europe. However, the strongest existing networks are still operating on a regional or national level and the historical growth of such networks resulted in a very heterogeneous landscape of observation networks. We propose therefore the establishment of two complementary networks: The NetwOrk of Hydrological observAtories, NOHA. NOHA aims to promote the sustainable management of water resources in Europe, to support the prediction of

  5. [German Competence Network on Atrial Fibrillation (AFNET). A nationwide cooperation for better research and patient care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leute, Angelika; Kirchhof, Paulus; Breithardt, Günter; Goette, Andreas; Lewalter, Thorsten; Meinertz, Thomas; Oeff, Michael; Ravens, Ursula; Steinbeck, Gerhard; Weiss, Thomas

    2006-08-15

    The Atrial Fibrillation Competence Network is an interdisciplinary national research network funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). The aim of the network--founded in 2003--is to improve the treatment of atrial fibrillation, the most common clinically important arrhythmia of the heart. A decentralized patient registry has been established. This registry, which comprises the manifestation, diagnostics and therapy of atrial fibrillation in Germany, is being used as a data basis for epidemiologic clinical studies. Epidemiologic projects are being conducted to study, e.g., the prevalence of atrial fibrillation as well as the occurrence of complications. Four multicenter clinical trials have been started to optimize pharmacological treatments (ANTIPAF trial, Flec-SL trial), preventive pacing (BACE-PACE trial) and catheter-based ablation (GAP-AF trial). Other clinical projects are being conducted to study the risk of neurologic complications and to develop new diagnostic imaging techniques. Experimental basic research projects are focusing on different aspects of atrial remodeling in order to find out in which way the molecular mechanisms can be manipulated by new methods of treatment. First results are presented.

  6. Passive and Active Monitoring on a High Performance Research Network.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Warren

    2001-05-01

    The bold network challenges described in ''Internet End-to-end Performance Monitoring for the High Energy and Nuclear Physics Community'' presented at PAM 2000 have been tackled by the intrepid administrators and engineers providing the network services. After less than a year, the BaBar collaboration has collected almost 100 million particle collision events in a database approaching 165TB (Tera=10{sup 12}). Around 20TB has been exported via the Internet to the BaBar regional center at IN2P3 in Lyon, France, for processing and around 40 TB of simulated events have been imported to SLAC from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An unforseen challenge has arisen due to recent events and highlighted security concerns at DoE funded labs. New rules and regulations suggest it is only a matter of time before many active performance measurements may not be possible between many sites. Yet, at the same time, the importance of understanding every aspect of the network and eradicating packet loss for high throughput data transfers has become apparent. Work at SLAC to employ passive monitoring using netflow and OC3MON is underway and techniques to supplement and possibly replace the active measurements are being considered. This paper will detail the special needs and traffic characterization of a remarkable research project, and how the networking hurdles have been resolved (or not!) to achieve the required high data throughput. Results from active and passive measurements will be compared, and methods for achieving high throughput and the effect on the network will be assessed along with tools that directly measure throughput and applications used to actually transfer data.

  7. Recruitment of Underrepresented Minority Researchers into HIV Prevention Research: The HIV Prevention Trials Network Scholars Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Erica L.; Griffith, Sam B.; Jennings, Larissa; Dyer, Typhanye V.; Mayer, Kenneth; Wheeler, Darrell

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Most U.S. investigators in the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) have been of majority race/ethnicity and sexual orientation. Research participants, in contrast, have been disproportionately from racial/ethnic minorities and men who have sex with men (MSM), reflecting the U.S. epidemic. We initiated and subsequently evaluated the HPTN Scholars Program that mentors early career investigators from underrepresented minority groups. Scholars were affiliated with the HPTN for 12–18 months, mentored by a senior researcher to analyze HPTN study data. Participation in scientific committees, trainings, protocol teams, and advisory groups was facilitated, followed by evaluative exit surveys. Twenty-six trainees have produced 17 peer-reviewed articles to date. Research topics typically explored health disparities and HIV prevention among black and Hispanic MSM and at-risk black women. Most scholars (81% in the first five cohorts) continued HIV research after program completion. Alumni reported program-related career benefits and subsequent funding successes. Their feedback also suggested that we must improve the scholars' abilities to engage new research protocols that are developed within the network. Mentored engagement can nurture the professional development of young researchers from racial/ethnic and sexual minority communities. Minority scientists can benefit from training and mentoring within research consortia, whereas the network research benefits from perspectives of underrepresented minority scientists. PMID:29145745

  8. THE NEED OF DASHBOARD IN SOCIAL RESEARCH NETWORK SITES FOR RESEARCHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hawa Apandi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, dashboard has been widely used by organizations to display information based on their objectives such as monitoring business performance or checking the current trend in the niche market. There is a need to investigate whether the researchers also need the dashboard in assisting their research works. There are some issues facing by researchers while using Social Research Network Sites (SRNS since they could not noticed with information related to research field that they might be interested in because they are huge amounts of information in the SRNS. The inclusion of dashboard in the SRNS has to be explored to understand its relevancy in supporting the researchers work. We review previous works regarding dashboard usage to find the purposes of having dashboard and find researcher needs by reviewing researchers use scenario in the social networking sites. Then, we analyze whether the dashboard purposes can satisfy the researcher needs. From the analysis, we found out that the dashboard is a significant tool in assisting the researchers on: measuring their own research performance, monitoring research trends and alerting them with upcoming events.

  9. National High Frequency Radar Network (hfrnet) and Pacific Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, L.; Terrill, E. J.; Cook, T.; de Paolo, T.; Otero, M. P.; Rogowski, P.; Schramek, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. High Frequency Radar Network (HFRNet) has been in operation for over ten years with representation from 31 organizations spanning academic institutions, state and local government agencies, and private organizations. HFRNet currently holds a collection from over 130 radar installations totaling over 10 million records of surface ocean velocity measurements. HFRNet is a primary example of inter-agency and inter-institutional partnerships for improving oceanographic research and operations. HF radar derived surface currents have been used in several societal applications including coastal search and rescue, oil spill response, water quality monitoring and marine navigation. Central to the operational success of the large scale network is an efficient data management, storage, access, and delivery system. The networking of surface current mapping systems is characterized by a tiered structure that extends from the individual field installations to local regional operations maintaining multiple sites and on to centralized locations aggregating data from all regions. The data system development effort focuses on building robust data communications from remote field locations (sites) for ingestion into the data system via data on-ramps (Portals or Site Aggregators) to centralized data repositories (Nodes). Centralized surface current data enables the aggregation of national surface current grids and allows for ingestion into displays, management tools, and models. The Coastal Observing Research and Development Center has been involved in international relationships and research in the Philippines, Palau, and Vietnam. CORDC extends this IT architecture of surface current mapping data systems leveraging existing developments and furthering standardization of data services for seamless integration of higher level applications. Collaborations include the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), The Coral Reef Research

  10. Multisystemic Therapy(®) : Clinical Overview, Outcomes, and Implementation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henggeler, Scott W; Schaeffer, Cindy M

    2016-09-01

    Multisystemic therapy (MST) is an evidence-based treatment originally developed for youth with serious antisocial behavior who are at high risk for out-of-home placement and their families; and subsequently adapted to address other challenging clinical problems experience by youths and their families. The social-ecological theoretical framework of MST is presented as well as its home-based model of treatment delivery, defining clinical intervention strategies, and ongoing quality assurance/quality improvement system. With more than 100 peer-reviewed outcome and implementation journal articles published as of January 2016, the majority by independent investigators, MST is one of the most extensively evaluated family based treatments. Outcome research has yielded almost uniformly favorable results for youths and families, and implementation research has demonstrated the importance of treatment and program fidelity in achieving such outcomes. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  11. Research on electroconvulsive therapy in India: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangadhar, Bangalore N.; Phutane, Vivek H.; Thirthalli, Jagadisha

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of researchers from India in the field of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been substantial. Over 250 papers have been published by authors from India in the past five decades on this issue; about half of these have appeared in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. This article summarizes the papers on ECT research that have appeared in the Journal. A bulk of these articles has focused on establishing the efficacy in different disorders. Considerable numbers of papers describe refinement in the ECT procedure, including anesthetic modification, ECT machine and EEG monitoring. Papers on neurobiology of ECT and long-term follow-up of ECT-treated patients form a minority. Despite the decline in the use of ECT across the globe, papers on ECT have only increased in the recent decades in the Journal. PMID:21836706

  12. Mathematical Modeling and Evaluation of Human Motions in Physical Therapy Using Mixture Density Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakanski, A; Ferguson, J M; Lee, S

    2016-12-01

    The objective of the proposed research is to develop a methodology for modeling and evaluation of human motions, which will potentially benefit patients undertaking a physical rehabilitation therapy (e.g., following a stroke or due to other medical conditions). The ultimate aim is to allow patients to perform home-based rehabilitation exercises using a sensory system for capturing the motions, where an algorithm will retrieve the trajectories of a patient's exercises, will perform data analysis by comparing the performed motions to a reference model of prescribed motions, and will send the analysis results to the patient's physician with recommendations for improvement. The modeling approach employs an artificial neural network, consisting of layers of recurrent neuron units and layers of neuron units for estimating a mixture density function over the spatio-temporal dependencies within the human motion sequences. Input data are sequences of motions related to a prescribed exercise by a physiotherapist to a patient, and recorded with a motion capture system. An autoencoder subnet is employed for reducing the dimensionality of captured sequences of human motions, complemented with a mixture density subnet for probabilistic modeling of the motion data using a mixture of Gaussian distributions. The proposed neural network architecture produced a model for sets of human motions represented with a mixture of Gaussian density functions. The mean log-likelihood of observed sequences was employed as a performance metric in evaluating the consistency of a subject's performance relative to the reference dataset of motions. A publically available dataset of human motions captured with Microsoft Kinect was used for validation of the proposed method. The article presents a novel approach for modeling and evaluation of human motions with a potential application in home-based physical therapy and rehabilitation. The described approach employs the recent progress in the field of

  13. Mathematical Modeling and Evaluation of Human Motions in Physical Therapy Using Mixture Density Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakanski, A; Ferguson, JM; Lee, S

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of the proposed research is to develop a methodology for modeling and evaluation of human motions, which will potentially benefit patients undertaking a physical rehabilitation therapy (e.g., following a stroke or due to other medical conditions). The ultimate aim is to allow patients to perform home-based rehabilitation exercises using a sensory system for capturing the motions, where an algorithm will retrieve the trajectories of a patient’s exercises, will perform data analysis by comparing the performed motions to a reference model of prescribed motions, and will send the analysis results to the patient’s physician with recommendations for improvement. Methods The modeling approach employs an artificial neural network, consisting of layers of recurrent neuron units and layers of neuron units for estimating a mixture density function over the spatio-temporal dependencies within the human motion sequences. Input data are sequences of motions related to a prescribed exercise by a physiotherapist to a patient, and recorded with a motion capture system. An autoencoder subnet is employed for reducing the dimensionality of captured sequences of human motions, complemented with a mixture density subnet for probabilistic modeling of the motion data using a mixture of Gaussian distributions. Results The proposed neural network architecture produced a model for sets of human motions represented with a mixture of Gaussian density functions. The mean log-likelihood of observed sequences was employed as a performance metric in evaluating the consistency of a subject’s performance relative to the reference dataset of motions. A publically available dataset of human motions captured with Microsoft Kinect was used for validation of the proposed method. Conclusion The article presents a novel approach for modeling and evaluation of human motions with a potential application in home-based physical therapy and rehabilitation. The described approach

  14. Economic perspectives of the research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose María Pamo Larrauri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since a new advanced therapy medicinal product is discovered until finally allowed its sale in the domestic market, it has to overcome a series of stages. Biomedical research is the first phase, currently its situation is encouraging to the increase in the number of clinical trials in Spain and in the rest of the world, despite the economic situation and the various difficulties that have faced the pharmaceutical laboratories. The next phase consists in obtaining the authorization of marketing of the European Medicines Agency. After authorization, will attempt to set a fair and moderate price for inclusion in the list of health provision of Social Security. A price for a drug that provides added value to health and society, a price that is generated profits for the pharmaceutical companies that hope to make up for the years of work and investment. Commitment to advanced therapy must be clear and forceful, to fund ongoing research projects and encouraging their creation with economic aid

  15. Making health policy: networks in research and policy after 1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    Science and policy in health and medicine have interacted in new ways in Britain since 1945. The relationship between research and policy has a history. The changing role of social medicine, the rise of health services research and "customer contractor" policies in government have been important. The relationship between research and policy has been analysed by different schools of thought. This chapter categorises them as several groups: "evidence-based", "journalism", "sociology of scientific knowledge" and "science policy studies". The chapters in the book illuminate aspects of these changing relationships. The role of chronic disease epidemiology, of new networks in public health, of media-focussed activism, and of health technology and its advocates have been more important than political interest.

  16. Trends in intensity modulated radiation therapy use for locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network centers

    OpenAIRE

    Marsha Reyngold, MD, PhD; Joyce Niland, PhD; Anna ter Veer, MS; Tanios Bekaii-Saab, MD; Lily Lai, MD; Joshua E. Meyer, MD; Steven J. Nurkin, MD, MS; Deborah Schrag, MD, MPH; John M. Skibber, MD, FACS; Al B. Benson, MD; Martin R. Weiser, MD; Christopher H. Crane, MD; Karyn A. Goodman, MD, MS

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been rapidly incorporated into clinical practice because of its technological advantages over 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT). We characterized trends in IMRT utilization in trimodality treatment of locally advanced rectal cancer at National Comprehensive Cancer Network cancer centers between 2005 and 2011. Methods and materials: Using the prospective National Comprehensive Cancer Network Colorectal Cancer Database, ...

  17. Knowledge brokers in a knowledge network: the case of Seniors Health Research Transfer Network knowledge brokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to describe and reflect on the role of knowledge brokers (KBs) in the Seniors Health Research Transfer Network (SHRTN). The paper reviews the relevant literature on knowledge brokering, and then describes the evolving role of knowledge brokering in this knowledge network. Methods The description of knowledge brokering provided here is based on a developmental evaluation program and on the experiences of the authors. Data were gathered through qualitative and quantitative methods, analyzed by the evaluators, and interpreted by network members who participated in sensemaking forums. The results were fed back to the network each year in the form of formal written reports that were widely distributed to network members, as well as through presentations to the network’s members. Results The SHRTN evaluation and our experiences as evaluators and KBs suggest that a SHRTN KB facilitates processes of learning whereby people are connected with tacit or explicit knowledge sources that will help them to resolve work-related challenges. To make this happen, KBs engage in a set of relational, technical, and analytical activities that help communities of practice (CoPs) to develop and operate, facilitate exchanges among people with similar concerns and interests, and help groups and individuals to create, explore, and apply knowledge in their practice. We also suggest that the role is difficult to define, emergent, abstract, episodic, and not fully understood. Conclusions The KB role within this knowledge network has developed and matured over time. The KB adapts to the social and technical affordances of each situation, and fashions a unique and relevant process to create relationships and promote learning and change. The ability to work with teams and to develop relevant models and feasible approaches are critical KB skills. The KB is a leader who wields influence rather than power, and who is prepared to adopt whatever roles and

  18. Differential Regulatory Analysis Based on Coexpression Network in Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapid development of high-throughput techniques and accumulation of big transcriptomic data, plenty of computational methods and algorithms such as differential analysis and network analysis have been proposed to explore genome-wide gene expression characteristics. These efforts are aiming to transform underlying genomic information into valuable knowledges in biological and medical research fields. Recently, tremendous integrative research methods are dedicated to interpret the development and progress of neoplastic diseases, whereas differential regulatory analysis (DRA based on gene coexpression network (GCN increasingly plays a robust complement to regular differential expression analysis in revealing regulatory functions of cancer related genes such as evading growth suppressors and resisting cell death. Differential regulatory analysis based on GCN is prospective and shows its essential role in discovering the system properties of carcinogenesis features. Here we briefly review the paradigm of differential regulatory analysis based on GCN. We also focus on the applications of differential regulatory analysis based on GCN in cancer research and point out that DRA is necessary and extraordinary to reveal underlying molecular mechanism in large-scale carcinogenesis studies.

  19. Study of co-authorship network of papers in the Journal of Research in Medical Sciences using social network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoozeh Zare-Farashbandi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Co-authorship is one of the most tangible forms of research collaboration. A co-authorship network is a social network in which the authors through participation in one or more publication through an indirect path have linked to each other. The present research using the social network analysis studied co-authorship network of 681 articles published in Journal of Research in Medical Sciences (JRMS during 2008-2012. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out with the scientometrics approach and using co-authorship network analysis of authors. The topology of the co-authorship network of 681 published articles in JRMS between 2008 and 2012 was analyzed using macro-level metrics indicators of network analysis such as density, clustering coefficient, components and mean distance. In addition, in order to evaluate the performance of each authors and countries in the network, the micro-level indicators such as degree centrality, closeness centrality and betweenness centrality as well as productivity index were used. The UCINET and NetDraw softwares were used to draw and analyze the co-authorship network of the papers. Results: The assessment of the authors productivity in this journal showed that the first ranks were belonged to only five authors, respectively. Furthermore, analysis of the co-authorship of the authors in the network demonstrated that in the betweenness centrality index, three authors of them had the good position in the network. They can be considered as the network leaders able to control the flow of information in the network compared with the other members based on the shortest paths. On the other hand, the key role of the network according to the productivity and centrality indexes was belonged to Iran, Malaysia and United States of America. Conclusion: Co-authorship network of JRMS has the characteristics of a small world network. In addition, the theory of 6° separation is valid in this network was also true.

  20. Caries treatment in a dental practice-based research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V; Funkhouser, Ellen M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide a venue to foster evidence-based care. We tested the hypothesis that a higher level of participation in a dental PBRN is associated with greater stated change toward evidence-based practice. METHODS: A total of 565 dental PBRN...... practitioner-investigators completed a baseline questionnaire entitled 'Assessment of Caries Diagnosis and Treatment'; 405 of these also completed a follow-up questionnaire about treatment of caries and existing restorations. Certain questions (six treatment scenarios) were repeated at follow-up a mean (SD...

  1. The role of social networking sites in medical genetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reaves, Allison Cook; Bianchi, Diana W

    2013-05-01

    Social networking sites (SNS) have potential value in the field of medical genetics as a means of research subject recruitment and source of data. This article examines the current role of SNS in medical genetics research and potential applications for these sites in future studies. Facebook is the primary SNS considered, given the prevalence of its use in the United States and role in a small but growing number of studies. To date, utilization of SNS in medical genetics research has been primarily limited to three studies that recruited subjects from populations of Facebook users [McGuire et al. (2009); Am J Bioeth 9: 3-10; Janvier et al. (2012); Pediatrics 130: 293-298; Leighton et al. (2012); Public Health Genomics 15: 11-21]. These studies and a number of other medical and public health studies that have used Facebook as a context for recruiting research subjects are discussed. Approaches for Facebook-based subject recruitment are identified, including paid Facebook advertising, snowball sampling, targeted searching and posting. The use of these methods in medical genetics research has the potential to facilitate cost-effective research on both large, heterogeneous populations and small, hard-to-access sub-populations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Practice-based research networks: the laboratories of primary care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbloom, Erik J; Ewigman, Bernard G; Hickner, John M

    2004-04-01

    Medical research has traditionally been based in academic centers, and the findings are frequently not applicable in community primary care settings. The result is a large gap between the possible and the practical in delivering high-quality primary medical care in the United States. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs), laboratories for primary care clinical research, are the appropriate vehicles for uniting the worlds of community primary care practice and clinical research. Although they have received little attention in the mainstream of clinical and health services research, PBRNs have already reported a variety of findings useful for primary care providers, and these networks have helped to identify key issues in healthcare delivery that affect important outcomes. In this report, we outline the rationale for and history of PBRNs. We describe the organization and work of several productive PBRNs, giving examples of their studies that have changed the standards of modern primary care practice. Finally, we describe a developing electronic process for identifying research questions obtained directly from primary care providers that can be used to focus the national primary care research agenda on questions of clinical relevance and importance. As electronic technologies are fully developed and tested, they will facilitate communication between clinicians and researchers, thereby improving the effectiveness and efficiency of practice-based research.

  3. International research partnerships in occupational therapy: a Canadian-Zambian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njelesani, Janet; Stevens, Marianne; Cleaver, Shaun; Mwambwa, Lombe; Nixon, Stephanie

    2013-06-01

    The country of Zambia's Sixth National Development Plan includes many objectives related to participation and health that align with values underlying occupational therapy. Given this link, occupational therapy research has the potential to advance the Sixth National Development Plan and thereby enhance the participation and health of Zambians. However, there is neither a school of occupational therapy nor many occupational therapists working in Zambia. Using an example of a global research partnership between Canadian occupational therapy researchers and Zambian researchers, this paper examines the partnership using four criteria for global health research in order to derive lessons for future occupational therapy research partnerships. Implications for future occupational therapy research partnerships include the need for partners to combine their complementary skills and knowledge so that they may collaborate in mutually beneficial ways to address global health challenges and expand the reach of occupational therapy perspectives. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Manufacturing/Cell Therapy Specialist | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the Leidos Biomedical Research Inc.’s Clinical Research Directorate, the Clinical Monitoring Research Program (CMRP) provides high-quality comprehensive and strategic operational support to the high-profile domestic and international clinical research initiatives of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Clinical Center (CC), National Institute of Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH). Since its inception in 2001, CMRP’s ability to provide rapid responses, high-quality solutions, and to recruit and retain experts with a variety of backgrounds to meet the growing research portfolios of NCI, NIAID, CC, NHLBI, NIAMS, NCATS, NINDS, and NIMH has led to the considerable expansion of the program and its repertoire of support services. CMRP’s support services are strategically aligned with the program’s mission to provide comprehensive, dedicated support to assist National Institutes of Health researchers in providing the highest quality of clinical research in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines, maintaining data integrity, and protecting human subjects. For the scientific advancement of clinical research, CMRP services include comprehensive clinical trials, regulatory, pharmacovigilance, protocol navigation and development, and programmatic and project management support for facilitating the conduct of 400+ Phase I, II, and III domestic and international trials on a yearly basis. These trials investigate the prevention, diagnosis, treatment of, and therapies for cancer, influenza, HIV, and other infectious diseases and viruses such as hepatitis C, tuberculosis, malaria, and Ebola virus; heart, lung, and blood diseases and

  5. [Effect of forest therapy on the human psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2011-09-01

    Traditional thinking considered the nervous system, endocrine system and immune system to be independent of each other. However, it is now widely accepted that these systems interact through the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network. The nervous system affects the endocrine and immune systems by releasing neurotransmitters through the hypothalamus in the hypothalamic-pituitary portal circulation. The endocrine system affects the nervous and immune systems by secreting hormones and the immune system feeds back to the nervous and endocrine systems via cytokines. Forest therapy reduces sympathetic nervous activity, increases parasympathetic nervous activity, and regulates the balance of autonomic nerves. As a result, forest therapy decreases blood pressure and heart rate and has a relaxing effect. Forest therapy affects psychological responses via the brain and nervous system thereby decreasing the scores for anxiety, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion, and increasing the score for vigor in the POMS test. Forest therapy acts on the endocrine system to reduce stress hormone levels such as urinary adrenaline, urinary noradrenaline, salivary cortisol, and blood cortisol levels and shows a relaxing effect. Forest therapy also acts directly and indirectly on the immune system to promote NK activity by increasing the number of NK cells and intracellular levels of anticancer proteins such as perforin, granulysin and granzymes. Taken together, forest therapy brings various effects on human health via the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network.

  6. The research of computer network security and protection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian

    2017-05-01

    With the widespread popularity of computer network applications, its security is also received a high degree of attention. Factors affecting the safety of network is complex, for to do a good job of network security is a systematic work, has the high challenge. For safety and reliability problems of computer network system, this paper combined with practical work experience, from the threat of network security, security technology, network some Suggestions and measures for the system design principle, in order to make the masses of users in computer networks to enhance safety awareness and master certain network security technology.

  7. Global network on engineering education research and expertise in PBL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig; Kolmos, Anette; Moesby, Egon

    2006-01-01

    The UCPBL Centre for Problem Based Learning is based at Aalborg University, Denmark, known world-wide for its successful educational approach based on problem oriented project work. Due to more than 30 years of experience in utilizing PBL-learning principles in Engineering Education, an increasin....... This involves considerations concerning what is engineering education research – and how do we promote research based staff and educational development........ UCPBL Centre for Problem Based Learning is currently involved in a number of projects world wide focusing on institutional change toward a more student centred, project organized, and problem based approach to learning. The Centre is also establishing a UCPBL Global Network on Problem Based Learning...

  8. The Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research: a network of community and hospital pharmacies in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Ellen S; Blom, Lyda; Philbert, Daphne; Rump, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L

    2014-08-01

    Practice-based networks can serve as effective mechanisms for the development of the profession of pharmacists, on the one hand by supporting student internships and on the other hand by collection of research data and implementation of research outcomes among public health practice settings. This paper presents the characteristics and benefits of the Utrecht Pharmacy Practice network for Education and Research, a practice based research network affiliated with the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Utrecht University. Yearly, this network is used to realize approximately 600 student internships (in hospital and community pharmacies) and 20 research projects. To date, most research has been performed in community pharmacy and research questions frequently concerned prescribing behavior or adherence and subjects related to uptake of regulations in the pharmacy setting. Researchers gain access to different types of data from daily practice, pharmacists receive feedback on the functioning of their own pharmacy and students get in depth insight into pharmacy practice.

  9. Research and Collaboration Overview of Institut Pasteur International Network: A Bibliometric Approach toward Research Funding Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Mostafavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Institut Pasteur International Network (IPIN, which includes 32 research institutes around the world, is a network of research and expertise to fight against infectious diseases. A scientometric approach was applied to describe research and collaboration activities of IPIN. Methods Publications were identified using a manual search of IPIN member addresses in Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE between 2006 and 2011. Total publications were then subcategorized by geographic regions. Several scientometric indicators and the H-index were employed to estimate the scientific production of each IPIN member. Subject and geographical overlay maps were also applied to visualize the network activities of the IPIN members. Results A total number of 12667 publications originated from IPIN members. Each author produced an average number of 2.18 papers and each publication received an average of 13.40 citations. European Pasteur Institutes had the largest amount of publications, authored papers, and H-index values. Biochemistry and molecular biology, microbiology, immunology and infectious diseases were the most important research topics, respectively. Geographic mapping of IPIN publications showed wide international collaboration among IPIN members around the world. Conclusion IPIN has strong ties with national and international authorities and organizations to investigate the current and future health issues. It is recommended to use scientometric and collaboration indicators as measures of research performance in IPIN future policies and investment decisions.

  10. Research Network of Tehran Defined Population: Methodology and Establishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali-Asghar Kolahi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We need a defined population for determining prevalence and incidence of diseases, as well as conducting interventional, cohort and longitudinal studies, calculating correct and timely public health indicators, assessing actual health needs of community, performing educational programs and interventions to promote healthy lifestyle, and enhancing quality of primary health services.The objective of this project was to determine a defined population which is representative of Tehran, the Capital of Iran. This article reports the methodology and establishment of the research network of Tehran defined population.Methods: This project started by selecting two urban health centers from each of the five district health centers affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Inside each selected urban health center, one defined population research station was established. Two new centers have been added during 2013 and 2014. For the time being, the number of the covered population of the network has reached 40000 individuals. The most important criterion for the defined population has been to be representative of the population of Tehran. For this, we selected two urban health centers from 12 of 22 municipality districts and from each of the five different socioeconomic of Greater Tehran. Merely 80000 individuals in neighborhoods of each defined population research station were considered as control group of the project.Findings: Totally we selected 12 defined population research stations and their under-covered population developed a defined population which is representative of Tehran population.Conclusion: a population lab is ready now in metropolitan of Tehran.

  11. Implementation of Motivational Interviewing in Substance Use Disorder Treatment: Research Network Participation and Organizational Compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, Traci R; Abraham, Amanda J; Bride, Brian E

    Despite considerable empirical evidence that psychosocial interventions improve addiction treatment outcomes across populations, implementation remains problematic. A small body of research points to the importance of research network participation as a facilitator of implementation; however, studies examined limited numbers of evidence-based practices. To address this gap, the present study examined factors impacting implementation of motivational interviewing (MI). This study used data from a national sample of privately funded treatment programs (n = 345) and programs participating in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) (n = 156). Data were collected via face-to-face interviews with program administrators and clinical directors (2007-2009). Analysis included bivariate t tests and chi-square tests to compare private and CTN programs, and multivariable logistic regression of MI implementation. A majority (68.0%) of treatment programs reported use of MI. Treatment programs participating in the CTN (88.9%) were significantly more likely to report use of MI compared with non-CTN programs (58.5%; P Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers as compared with private programs (56.1%; P < 0.05). Multivariable logistic regression models reveal that CTN-affiliated programs and programs with a psychiatrist on staff were more likely to use MI. Programs that used the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale assessment tool were more likely to use MI, whereas programs placing greater emphasis on confrontational group therapy were less likely to use MI. Findings suggest the critical role of research network participation, access to psychiatrists, and organizational compatibility in adoption and sustained use of MI.

  12. Research on Network Scanning Strategy Based on Information Granularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Futong; Shi, Pengfei; Du, Jing; Cheng, Ruosi; Zhou, Yunyan

    2017-10-01

    As the basic mean to obtain the information of the targets network, network scanning is often used to discover the security risks and vulnerabilities existing on the network. However, with the development of network technology, the scale of network is more and more large, and the network scanning efficiency put forward higher requirements. In this paper, the concept of network scanning information granularity is proposed, and the design method of network scanning strategy based on information granularity is proposed. Based on single information granularity and hybrid information granularity, four network scanning strategies were designed and verified experimentally. Experiments show that the network scanning strategies based on hybrid information granularity can improve the efficiency of network scanning.

  13. Testosterone replacement therapy among HIV-infected men in the CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ramona; Murphy, Adam B; Raper, James L; Chamie, Gabriel; Kitahata, Mari M; Drozd, Daniel R; Mayer, Kenneth; Napravnik, Sonia; Moore, Richard; Achenbach, Chad

    2015-01-02

    The objectives of this study were to determine the rate of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) initiation, TRT predictors and associated monitoring in HIV-infected men. A multisite cohort study. We examined TRT initiation rates and monitoring among adult HIV-infected men in routine care at seven sites in the Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR) Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS) from 1996 to 2011. We determined TRT predictors using Cox regression modelling. Of 14 454 men meeting inclusion criteria, TRT was initiated in 1482 (10%) with an initiation rate of 19.7/1000 person-years [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 18.7-20.7]. In the multivariable model, TRT was significantly associated with age at least 35 years, white race, diagnosis of AIDS wasting, hepatitis C coinfection, protease inhibitor based antiretroviral therapy and nadir CD4 cell count of 200 cells/μl or less. Overall, 1886 out of 14 454 (13%) had testosterone deficiency. Among those initiating TRT, 992 out of 1482 (67%) had a pre-TRT serum total testosterone measured, and deficiency [<300 ng/dl (10.4 nmol/l)] was found in 360 out of 1482 (24%). Post-TRT serum total testosterone was measured within 6 months of TRT initiation in 377 out of 1482 (25%) men. TRT was common in HIV-infected men, though evidence for pre-TRT testosterone deficiency was lacking in 76%. Endocrine guidelines for post-TRT monitoring were uncommonly followed. Given cardiovascular and other risks associated with TRT, efforts should focus on understanding factors driving these TRT practices in HIV-infected men.

  14. Research on optical access network remote management technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wayne; Zou, Chen; Luo, Wenyi

    2008-11-01

    This paper goal is to provide a framework for the remote configuration and management of services for PON (Passive Optical Network) access and fiber access. Also it defines how Auto-Configuration Servers (ACS) in the network can remotely configure, troubleshoot and manage a Passive Optical Network (PON) optical network termination (ONT) with layer 3 capabilities using the CPE WAN management protocol, TR-069.

  15. Systematic review with network meta-analysis: dual therapy for high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Keda; Shen, Zeren; Zhu, Guiqi; Meng, Fansheng; Gu, Mengli; Ji, Feng

    2017-04-19

    Adding a second endoscopic therapy to epinephrine injection might improve hemostatic efficacy in patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers but the optimum modality remains unknown. We aimed to estimate the comparative efficacy of different dual endoscopic therapies for the management of bleeding peptic ulcers through random-effects Bayesian network meta-analysis. Different databases were searched for controlled trials comparing dual therapy versus epinephrine monotherapy or epinephrine combined with another second modality until September, 30 2016. We estimated the ORs for rebleeding, surgery and mortality among different treatments. Adverse events were also evaluated. Seventeen eligible articles were included in the network meta-analysis. The addition of mechanical therapy (OR 0.19, 95% CrI 0.07-0.52 and OR 0.10, 95% CrI 0.01-0.50, respectively) after epinephrine injection significantly reduced the probability of rebleeding and surgery. Similarly, patients who received epinephrine plus thermal therapy showed a significantly decreased rebleeding rate (OR 0.30, 95% CrI 0.10-0.91), as well as a non-significant reduction in surgery (OR 0.47, 95% CrI 0.16-1.20). Although differing, epinephrine plus mechanical therapy did not provide a significant reduction in rebleeding (OR 0.62, 95% CrI 0.19-2.22) and surgery (OR 0.21, 95% CrI 0.03-1.73) compared to epinephrine plus thermal therapy. Sclerosant failed to confer further benefits and was ranked highest among the 5 treatments in relation to adverse events. Mechanical therapy was the most appropriate modality to add to epinephrine injection. Epinephrine plus thermal coagulation was effective for controlling high risk bleeding ulcers. There was no further benefit with sclerosants with regard to rebleeding or surgery, and sclerosants were also associated with more adverse events than any other modality.

  16. The Health and Occupation Research Network: An Evolving Surveillance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Carder

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Vital to the prevention of work-related ill-health (WRIH is the availability of good quality data regarding WRIH burden and risks. Physician-based surveillance systems such as The Health and Occupation Research (THOR network in the UK are often established in response to limitations of statutory, compensation-based systems for addressing certain epidemiological aspects of disease surveillance. However, to fulfil their purpose, THOR and others need to have methodologic rigor in capturing and ascertaining cases. This article describes how data collected by THOR and analogous systems can inform WRIH incidence, trends, and other determinants. An overview of the different strands of THOR research is provided, including methodologic advancements facilitated by increased data quantity/quality over time and the value of the research outputs for informing Government and other policy makers. In doing so, the utility of data collected by systems such as THOR to address a wide range of research questions, both in relation to WRIH and to wider issues of public and social health, is demonstrated.

  17. The Health and Occupation Research Network: An Evolving Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Melanie; Hussey, Louise; Money, Annemarie; Gittins, Matthew; McNamee, Roseanne; Stocks, Susan Jill; Sen, Dil; Agius, Raymond M

    2017-09-01

    Vital to the prevention of work-related ill-health (WRIH) is the availability of good quality data regarding WRIH burden and risks. Physician-based surveillance systems such as The Health and Occupation Research (THOR) network in the UK are often established in response to limitations of statutory, compensation-based systems for addressing certain epidemiological aspects of disease surveillance. However, to fulfil their purpose, THOR and others need to have methodologic rigor in capturing and ascertaining cases. This article describes how data collected by THOR and analogous systems can inform WRIH incidence, trends, and other determinants. An overview of the different strands of THOR research is provided, including methodologic advancements facilitated by increased data quantity/quality over time and the value of the research outputs for informing Government and other policy makers. In doing so, the utility of data collected by systems such as THOR to address a wide range of research questions, both in relation to WRIH and to wider issues of public and social health, is demonstrated.

  18. An Overview of Computer Network security and Research Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Rathore, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development in the field of computer networks and systems brings both convenience and security threats for users. Security threats include network security and data security. Network security refers to the reliability, confidentiality, integrity and availability of the information in the system. The main objective of network security is to maintain the authenticity, integrity, confidentiality, availability of the network. This paper introduces the details of the technologies used in...

  19. Networking among young global health researchers through an intensive training approach: a mixed methods exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenters, Lindsey M; Cole, Donald C; Godoy-Ruiz, Paula

    2014-01-25

    Networks are increasingly regarded as essential in health research aimed at influencing practice and policies. Less research has focused on the role networking can play in researchers' careers and its broader impacts on capacity strengthening in health research. We used the Canadian Coalition for Global Health Research (CCGHR) annual Summer Institute for New Global Health Researchers (SIs) as an opportunity to explore networking among new global health researchers. A mixed-methods exploratory study was conducted among SI alumni and facilitators who had participated in at least one SI between 2004 and 2010. Alumni and facilitators completed an online short questionnaire, and a subset participated in an in-depth interview. Thematic analysis of the qualitative data was triangulated with quantitative results and CCGHR reports on SIs. Synthesis occurred through the development of a process model relevant to networking through the SIs. Through networking at the SIs, participants experienced decreased isolation and strengthened working relationships. Participants accessed new knowledge, opportunities, and resources through networking during the SI. Post-SI, participants reported ongoing contact and collaboration, although most participants desired more opportunities for interaction. They made suggestions for structural supports to networking among new global health researchers. Networking at the SI contributed positively to opportunities for individuals, and contributed to the formation of a network of global health researchers. Intentional inclusion of networking in health research capacity strengthening initiatives, with supportive resources and infrastructure could create dynamic, sustainable networks accessible to global health researchers around the world.

  20. The 1st symposium of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy on fundamental development of the charged particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soga, Fuminori

    2002-06-01

    This issue is the collection of the paper presented at the 1st Symposium of Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy on fundamental development of the charged particle therapy. The 31 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Building a Community of Practice for Researchers: The International Network for Simulation-Based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Auerbach, Marc; Calhoun, Aaron; Mackinnon, Ralph; Chang, Todd P; Nadkarni, Vinay; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Peiris, Nicola; Kessler, David

    2017-11-08

    The scope and breadth of simulation-based research is growing rapidly; however, few mechanisms exist for conducting multicenter, collaborative research. Failure to foster collaborative research efforts is a critical gap that lies in the path of advancing healthcare simulation. The 2017 Research Summit hosted by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare highlighted how simulation-based research networks can produce studies that positively impact the delivery of healthcare. In 2011, the International Network for Simulation-based Pediatric Innovation, Research and Education (INSPIRE) was formed to facilitate multicenter, collaborative simulation-based research with the aim of developing a community of practice for simulation researchers. Since its formation, the network has successfully completed and published numerous collaborative research projects. In this article, we describe INSPIRE's history, structure, and internal processes with the goal of highlighting the community of practice model for other groups seeking to form a simulation-based research network.

  2. The Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network Data Repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keator, David B; van Erp, Theo G M; Turner, Jessica A; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A; Liu, Thomas T; Voyvodic, James T; Rasmussen, Jerod; Calhoun, Vince D; Lee, Hyo Jong; Toga, Arthur W; McEwen, Sarah; Ford, Judith M; Mathalon, Daniel H; Diaz, Michele; O'Leary, Daniel S; Jeremy Bockholt, H; Gadde, Syam; Preda, Adrian; Wible, Cynthia G; Stern, Hal S; Belger, Aysenil; McCarthy, Gregory; Ozyurt, Burak; Potkin, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    The Function Biomedical Informatics Research Network (FBIRN) developed methods and tools for conducting multi-scanner functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Method and tool development were based on two major goals: 1) to assess the major sources of variation in fMRI studies conducted across scanners, including instrumentation, acquisition protocols, challenge tasks, and analysis methods, and 2) to provide a distributed network infrastructure and an associated federated database to host and query large, multi-site, fMRI and clinical data sets. In the process of achieving these goals the FBIRN test bed generated several multi-scanner brain imaging data sets to be shared with the wider scientific community via the BIRN Data Repository (BDR). The FBIRN Phase 1 data set consists of a traveling subject study of 5 healthy subjects, each scanned on 10 different 1.5 to 4 T scanners. The FBIRN Phase 2 and Phase 3 data sets consist of subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder along with healthy comparison subjects scanned at multiple sites. In this paper, we provide concise descriptions of FBIRN's multi-scanner brain imaging data sets and details about the BIRN Data Repository instance of the Human Imaging Database (HID) used to publicly share the data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. COST network genderSTE: Networking Gender Equality in Research and Innovation in Europe and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Sánchez de Madariaga

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gender is one of five priorities of the European Research Area, as stated in the Communication adopted in July 2012 entitled A Reinforced European Research Area Partnership for Excellence and Growth (EC 2012c. Following this Communication, the EC has fully integrated gender dimensions in its proposal for a regulation on the new research framework program Horizon 2020¸ which includes in article 15 a provision for gender mainstreaming (EC 2011b. One final upcoming policy instrument announced by the EC is the Recommendation on Gender, Science and Innovation that will address member states and be adopted in the next months. Against this European policy background , the international COST network genderSTE (Gender, Science, Technology and Environment aims at enhancing a better integration of gender dimensions in science and technology at three main levels: i promoting women’s careers in science and technology through structural change of institutions (as recommended by EC by disseminating existing research and practice; ii promoting a better integration of gender in the content of science, research and technology, by dissemination existing research on the topic, ie the UE-US Gendered Innovations Project; iii identifying gender dimensions relevant to environment-related Horizon2020 Grand Challenges and other urban EC initiatives.  

  4. Research Networking Systems: The State of Adoption at Institutions Aiming to Augment Translational Research Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Jihad S; Johnson, Layne M; Stallings, Sarah; Eichmann, David

    2015-01-01

    Fostering collaborations across multiple disciplines within and across institutional boundaries is becoming increasingly important with the growing emphasis on translational research. As a result, Research Networking Systems that facilitate discovery of potential collaborators have received significant attention by institutions aiming to augment their research infrastructure. We have conducted a survey to assess the state of adoption of these new tools at the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) funded institutions. Survey results demonstrate that most CTSA funded institutions have either already adopted or were planning to adopt one of several available research networking systems. Moreover a good number of these institutions have exposed or plan to expose the data on research expertise using linked open data, an established approach to semantic web services. Preliminary exploration of these publically-available data shows promising utility in assessing cross-institutional collaborations. Further adoption of these technologies and analysis of the data are needed, however, before their impact on cross-institutional collaboration in research can be appreciated and measured. PMID:26491707

  5. From Network to Research – Ten Years of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Søren R.; Grund, Cynthia M.; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly chronicles the history of the Nordic Network of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics (NNIMIPA) and its roots in previous research networks and milieus. It explains how a cross-disciplinary network works and gives rise to research projects that bridge the gap between...

  6. 76 FR 46359 - Announcing the Nineteenth Public Meeting of the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA... members of the Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network. CIREN is a collaborative effort to conduct... computer network. The current CIREN model utilizes two types of centers, medical and engineering. Medical...

  7. The structure of mental health research: networks of influence among psychiatry and clinical psychology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, N; Lusher, D

    2011-12-01

    Psychiatry and clinical psychology are the two dominant disciplines in mental health research, but the structure of scientific influence and information flow within and between them has never been mapped. Citations among 96 of the highest impact psychiatry and clinical psychology journals were examined, based on 10 052 articles published in 2008. Network analysis explored patterns of influence between journal clusters. Psychiatry journals tended to have greater influence than clinical psychology journals, and their influence was asymmetrical: clinical psychology journals cited psychiatry journals at a much higher rate than the reverse. Eight journal clusters were found, most dominated by a single discipline. Their citation network revealed an influential central cluster of 'core psychiatry' journals that had close affinities with a 'psychopharmacology' cluster. A group of 'core clinical psychology' journals was linked to a 'behavior therapy' cluster but both were subordinate to psychiatry journals. Clinical psychology journals were less integrated than psychiatry journals, and 'health psychology/behavioral medicine' and 'neuropsychology' clusters were relatively peripheral to the network. Scientific publication in the mental health field is largely organized along disciplinary lines, and is to some degree hierarchical, with clinical psychology journals tending to be structurally subordinate to psychiatry journals.

  8. Social networks and social functioning level among occupational therapy workshops and community-based support centers users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronowski, Paweł; Sawicka, Maryla; Rowicka, Magda; Bronowska, Marta

    2017-02-26

    Community-Based Support Centers (CSC) and Occupational Therapy Workshops (OTW) have been functioning for over 20 years in Poland. However, the effectiveness of their rehabilitation programs as well as the users profile has not been examined yet. The aim of the study was to determine social functioning level and support network effectiveness of CSC and OTW users. Research tools: GAS (Global Assessment Scale), social network and social support assessment, Social Functioning Scale, Sociodemographic Questionnaire. Results show that investigated groups (except for participants' age) show no significant differences in sociodemographic variables and illness profile. Significant differences were found in the aspect of number and quality of support networks and the functioning level. Analyzed support institutions have different aims and offer different support programs which show differences in support networks and social functioning level. It can result from that the goal of OTW is to activate its users and assist them with their reintegration into the labor market, whereas CSCs are oriented on users' current issues and hospitalization prevention. It is important to have knowledge of these specifics during referring a person to such service.

  9. The Geropathology Research Network: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Integrating Pathology Into Research on Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, Yuji; Niedernhofer, Laura; McIndoe, Richard A.; Ciol, Marcia A.; Ritchey, Jerry; Liggitt, Denny

    2016-01-01

    Geropathology is the study of aging and age-related lesions and diseases in the form of whole necropsies/autopsies, surgical biopsies, histology, and molecular biomarkers. It encompasses multiple subspecialties of geriatrics, anatomic pathology, molecular pathology, clinical pathology, and gerontology. In order to increase the consistency and scope of communication in the histologic and molecular pathology assessment of tissues from preclinical and clinical aging studies, a Geropathology Research Network has been established consisting of pathologists and scientists with expertise in the comparative pathology of aging, the design of aging research studies, biostatistical methods for analysis of aging data, and bioinformatics for compiling and annotating large sets of data generated from aging studies. The network provides an environment to promote learning and exchange of scientific information and ideas for the aging research community through a series of symposia, the development of uniform ways of integrating pathology into aging studies, and the statistical analysis of pathology data. The efforts of the network are ultimately expected to lead to a refined set of sentinel biomarkers of molecular and anatomic pathology that could be incorporated into preclinical and clinical aging intervention studies to increase the relevance and productivity of these types of investigations. PMID:26243216

  10. The Geropathology Research Network: An Interdisciplinary Approach for Integrating Pathology Into Research on Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladiges, Warren; Ikeno, Yuji; Niedernhofer, Laura; McIndoe, Richard A; Ciol, Marcia A; Ritchey, Jerry; Liggitt, Denny

    2016-04-01

    Geropathology is the study of aging and age-related lesions and diseases in the form of whole necropsies/autopsies, surgical biopsies, histology, and molecular biomarkers. It encompasses multiple subspecialties of geriatrics, anatomic pathology, molecular pathology, clinical pathology, and gerontology. In order to increase the consistency and scope of communication in the histologic and molecular pathology assessment of tissues from preclinical and clinical aging studies, a Geropathology Research Network has been established consisting of pathologists and scientists with expertise in the comparative pathology of aging, the design of aging research studies, biostatistical methods for analysis of aging data, and bioinformatics for compiling and annotating large sets of data generated from aging studies. The network provides an environment to promote learning and exchange of scientific information and ideas for the aging research community through a series of symposia, the development of uniform ways of integrating pathology into aging studies, and the statistical analysis of pathology data. The efforts of the network are ultimately expected to lead to a refined set of sentinel biomarkers of molecular and anatomic pathology that could be incorporated into preclinical and clinical aging intervention studies to increase the relevance and productivity of these types of investigations. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. International Children's Advisory Network: A Multifaceted Approach to Patient Engagement in Pediatric Clinical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwara, Meghan; Smith, Sharon; Woods, Christine; Sheeren, Elizabeth; Woods, Hampton

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric youth advisory groups were created to provide insight and guidance to the clinical research community. Such efforts have become a priority and parallel the demand for patient-centered health care. While steps are being made to integrate the patient voice into research, there remains a lack of pediatric-specific engagement in the development of pharmaceuticals and in clinical research. For example, a significant number of children are still treated with medications that are not approved for use in this age group, due to a lack of clinical trials involving younger children and neonates. The American Academy of Pediatrics noted that physicians are faced with an ethical dilemma, as they must frequently either not treat children with potentially beneficial medications or treat them with medications based on adult studies or anecdotal empirical experience in children. By improving the approach to pediatric study design, indications for pediatric-specific therapies can be developed. We describe a structured organization with empowered youth and parents who are beginning to play a key role in the research process that suggests ways to improve pediatric research and for innovative medical products to be more "child friendly" and usable. We will also describe how investigators can engage the International Children's Advisory Network to obtain valuable youth perspectives on many aspects of clinical research and health care advocacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for Systemic Therapy of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The SCAN pancreatic cancer workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines for systemic therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in Singapore. The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. Five international guidelines were evaluated- those developed by the National Cancer Comprehensive Network (2014), the European Society of Medical Oncology (2012), Cancer Care Ontario (2013), the Japan Pancreas Society (2013) and the British Society of Gastroenterology, Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Association of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (2005). Recommendations on the management of resected, borderline resectable, locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were developed. These adapted guidelines form the SCAN Guidelines for systemic therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in Singapore.

  13. The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development NITRD Program 2012 Strategic Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — Information technology IT computers, wired and wireless digital networks, electronic data and information, IT devices and systems, and software applications?today...

  14. Research on network information security model and system construction

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Haijun

    2016-01-01

    It briefly describes the impact of large data era on China’s network policy, but also brings more opportunities and challenges to the network information security. This paper reviews for the internationally accepted basic model and characteristics of network information security, and analyses the characteristics of network information security and their relationship. On the basis of the NIST security model, this paper describes three security control schemes in safety management model and the...

  15. A Space Operations Network Alternative: Using Globally Connected Research and Education Networks for Space-Based Science Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Robert N.

    2006-01-01

    Earth based networking in support of various space agency projects has been based on leased service/circuits which has a high associated cost. This cost is almost always taken from the science side resulting in less science. This is a proposal to use Research and Education Networks (RENs) worldwide to support space flight operations in general and space-based science operations in particular. The RENs were developed to support scientific and educational endeavors. They do not provide support for general Internet traffic. The connectivity and performance of the research and education networks is superb. The connectivity at Layer 3 (IP) virtually encompasses the globe. Most third world countries and all developed countries have their own research and education networks, which are connected globally. Performance of the RENs especially in the developed countries is exceptional. Bandwidth capacity currently exists and future expansion promises that this capacity will continue. REN performance statistics has always exceeded minimum requirements for spaceflight support. Research and Education networks are more loosely managed than a corporate network but are highly managed when compared to the commodity Internet. Management of RENs on an international level is accomplished by the International Network Operations Center at Indiana University at Indianapolis. With few exceptions, each regional and national REN has its own network ops center. The acceptable use policies (AUP), although differing by country, allows any scientific program or project the use of their networks. Once in compliance with the first RENs AUP, all others will accept that specific traffic including regional and transoceanic networks. RENs can support spaceflight related scientific programs and projects. Getting the science to the researcher is obviously key to any scientific project. RENs provide a pathway to virtually any college or university in the world, as well as many governmental institutes and

  16. New Research Findings on Emotionally Focused Therapy: Introduction to Special Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Susan M.; Wittenborn, Andrea K.

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces the special section "New Research Findings on Emotionally Focused Therapy." Emotionally focused couple therapy researchers have a strong tradition of outcome and process research and this special section presents new findings from three recent studies. The first study furthers the goal of determining the kinds of clients…

  17. Touch-Based Interaction Approach for Network Science Research and Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    wireless networks . The primary emulation tools used by ARL are the Extendable Mobile Ad hoc Network Emulator (EMANE)1 and the Common Open Research...Extendable Mobile Ad - hoc Network Emulator (EMANE), http://www.nrl.navy.mil/itd/ncs/products/emane 2. Common Open Research Emulator (CORE), http...or falsification of theoretical models, and characterization of protocols and algorithms for mobile wireless networks . It is used for a range of

  18. Research in high speed fiber optics local area networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobagi, F. A.

    1986-01-01

    The design of high speed local area networks (HSLAN) for communication among distributed devices requires solving problems in three areas: the network medium and its topology, the medium access control, and the network interface. Considerable progress was already made in the first two areas. Accomplishments are divided into two groups according to their theoretical or experimental nature. A brief summary is given.

  19. Five years of mental health research in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Sharon A; Raphael-Greenfield, Emily I

    2014-01-01

    In the past 5 years, the number of research articles on occupational therapy in mental health published in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy has steadily declined. This article identifies the strengths and limitations of this body of research and provides directions for practitioners and researchers to enhance the profession's role as a valued mental health service provider. Copyright © 2014 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  20. [Progress of researches on the mechanism of cupping therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuai; Cui, Jin

    2012-12-01

    Cupping therapy of Chinese medicine is able to relieve a variety of diseases or clinical conditions, which results from the comprehensive effects of multiple types of stimulation exerted onto the regional acupoint areas. Among the stimuli, the negative pressure from cupping is one of the main factors inducing therapeutic effects. In the present paper, the authors review development of researches on the underlying mechanism of therapeutic effects of cupping-negative pressure from 1) the factor of intra-cup negative pressure; 2) influence of intra-cup negative pressure on cup-blackspot formation; 3) influence of cupping on regional blood vessels and blood flow; 4) effect of cupping on regional ultrastructure of the capillary in the raw-surface tissue; 5) effect of cupping-negative pressure on regional endothelial cells; and 6) biological effects of negative pressure drainage. Generally, cupping induced negative pressure can dilate local blood vessels to improve microcirculation, promote capillary endothelial cells repair, accelerate granulation and angiogenesis, etc., in the regional tissues, normalizing the patients' functional state at last.

  1. [Current research status of drug therapy for apnea of prematurity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Shu, Xian-Xiao; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Shi, Jing; Tang, Jun; Mu, De-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the current status of studies on drug therapy for apnea of prematurity (AOP) in the past decade in China and abroad, and to describe the research trends in the field. CNKI and MEDLINE were searched with the key words "apnea of prematurity" and "treatment" for articles published in the past decade (January 2006 to December 2015). The articles were screened and the key words were extracted to establish the co-occurrence matrix. Ucinet 6.2 was used to plot the knowledge map. A total of 26 Chinese key words and 20 English key words were included. Those in the center of the co-existent knowledge map of Chinses keywords were "preterm infants", "apnea", "primary apnea", "naloxone" and "aminophylline"; while "apnea", "preterm infants" and "caffeine" located in the central place of the co-existent knowledge map of English keywords. Methylxanthines are still the major drugs for AOP; however, aminophylline is mainly used in China, while caffeine is mainly used in foreign countries. Other drugs such as naltrexone are also used in the clinical treatment of AOP.

  2. Community pharmacist participation in a practice-based research network: a report from the Medication Safety Research Network of Indiana (Rx-SafeNet).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Puja; Hemmeger, Heather; Kozak, Mary Ann; Gernant, Stephanie A; Snyder, Margie E

    2015-01-01

    To describe the experiences and opinions of pharmacists serving as site coordinators for the Medication Safety Research Network of Indiana (Rx-SafeNet). Retail chain, independent, and hospital/health system outpatient community pharmacies throughout Indiana, with a total of 127 pharmacy members represented by 26 site coordinators. Rx-SafeNet, a statewide practice-based research network (PBRN) formed in 2010 and administered by the Purdue University College of Pharmacy. Barriers and facilitators to participation in available research studies, confidence participating in research, and satisfaction with overall network communication. 22 of 26 site coordinators participated, resulting in an 85% response rate. Most (72.2%) of the respondents had received a doctor of pharmacy degree, and 13.6% had postgraduate year (PGY)1 residency training. The highest reported benefits of PBRN membership were an enhanced relationship with the Purdue University College of Pharmacy (81% agreed or strongly agreed) and enhanced professional development (80% agreed or strongly agreed). Time constraints were identified as the greatest potential barrier to network participation, reported by 62% of respondents. In addition, the majority (59%) of survey respondents identified no prior research experience. Last, respondents' confidence in performing research appeared to increase substantially after becoming network members, with 43% reporting a lack of confidence in engaging in research before joining the network compared with 90% reporting confidence after joining the network. In general, Rx-SafeNet site coordinators appeared to experience increased confidence in research engagement after joining the network. While respondents identified a number of benefits associated with network participation, concerns about potential time constraints remained a key barrier to participation. These findings will assist network leadership in identifying opportunities to positively increase member participation

  3. Research Coordination Networks: a phylogeny for kingdom Fungi (Deep Hypha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Meredith; Hibbett, David S; Taylor, John W; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2006-01-01

    Research in fungal phylogenetics and systematics progressed rapidly in the past decade due to advances in DNA sequencing technologies and analytical methods. A newfound wealth of sequence data acquired through community-wide initiatives has advanced the process of acquiring a stable phylogenetic classification of many fungal taxa. Financial support from the National Science Foundation Research Coordination Networks: a phylogeny for kingdom Fungi (Deep Hypha) for 5 y enabled more than 100 fungal systematists to assess the taxon sampling, molecular markers and analytical methods necessary to facilitate such a project. Later a second NSF program provided financial support for the Assembling the Fungal Tree of Life (AFTOL) project to accomplish much of the research. Deep Hypha may be viewed as an involved parent of AFTOL with a continuing role as coordinator of likeminded workers. Many questions posed at the beginning of the Deep Hypha project have been addressed, at least in part, although some details remain to be clarified. Many of the main branches of the fungal tree are stable and well supported, often as a result of multigene analyses that involved collaboration of many laboratories. More work is necessary, however, to resolve certain branching events near the base of the tree, as well as to reconstruct relationships in some terminal groups. The phylogenetic classification in this issue of Mycologia is a product of the AFTOL project and many other independent research initiatives, and it is an initial synthesis of a working classification designed to be used for all major publications that require a phylogenetic classification of fungi.

  4. Bioluminescence Tomography–Guided Radiation Therapy for Preclinical Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin, E-mail: kwang27@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yu, Jingjing [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); School of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Shaanxi (China); Eslami, Sohrab; Iordachita, Iulian [Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Reyes, Juvenal; Malek, Reem [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Oncology and Urology, Brady Urological Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Patterson, Michael S. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Wong, John W. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: In preclinical radiation research, it is challenging to localize soft tissue targets based on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) guidance. As a more effective method to localize soft tissue targets, we developed an online bioluminescence tomography (BLT) system for small-animal radiation research platform (SARRP). We demonstrated BLT-guided radiation therapy and validated targeting accuracy based on a newly developed reconstruction algorithm. Methods and Materials: The BLT system was designed to dock with the SARRP for image acquisition and to be detached before radiation delivery. A 3-mirror system was devised to reflect the bioluminescence emitted from the subject to a stationary charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Multispectral BLT and the incomplete variables truncated conjugate gradient method with a permissible region shrinking strategy were used as the optimization scheme to reconstruct bioluminescent source distributions. To validate BLT targeting accuracy, a small cylindrical light source with high CBCT contrast was placed in a phantom and also in the abdomen of a mouse carcass. The center of mass (CoM) of the source was recovered from BLT and used to guide radiation delivery. The accuracy of the BLT-guided targeting was validated with films and compared with the CBCT-guided delivery. In vivo experiments were conducted to demonstrate BLT localization capability for various source geometries. Results: Online BLT was able to recover the CoM of the embedded light source with an average accuracy of 1 mm compared to that with CBCT localization. Differences between BLT- and CBCT-guided irradiation shown on the films were consistent with the source localization revealed in the BLT and CBCT images. In vivo results demonstrated that our BLT system could potentially be applied for multiple targets and tumors. Conclusions: The online BLT/CBCT/SARRP system provides an effective solution for soft tissue targeting, particularly for small, nonpalpable, or

  5. Research priorities for administrative challenges of integrated networks of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilgrim, Randy; Hilton, Joshua A; Carrier, Emily; Pines, Jesse M; Hufstetler, Greg; Thorby, Suzette; Milling, T J; Cesta, Beth; Hsia, Renee Y

    2010-12-01

    In 2006, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) advanced the concept of "coordinated, regionalized, and accountable emergency care systems" to address significant problems with the delivery of emergency medical care in the United States. Achieving this vision requires the thoughtful implementation of well-aligned, system-level structures and processes that enhance access to emergency care and improve patient outcomes at a sustainable cost. Currently, the delivery of emergency medical care is supported by numerous administrative systems, including economic; reimbursement; legal and regulatory structures; licensure, credentialing, and accreditation processes; medicolegal systems; and quality reporting mechanisms. In addition, many regionalized systems may not optimize patient outcomes because of current administrative barriers that make it difficult for providers to deliver the best care. However, certain administrative barriers may also threaten the sustainability of integration efforts or prevent them altogether. This article identifies significant administrative challenges to integrating networks of emergency care in four specific areas: reimbursement, medical-legal, quality reporting mechanisms, and regulatory aspects. The authors propose a research agenda for indentifying optimal approaches that support consistent access to quality emergency care with improved outcomes for patients, at a sustainable cost. Researching administrative challenges will involve careful examination of the numerous natural experiments in the recent past and will be crucial to understand the impact as we embark on a new era of health reform. 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  6. GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas-Perea, V.; Balzter, H.

    2012-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. GIONET is a partnership of leading Universities, research institutes and private companies from across Europe aiming to cultivate a community of early stage researchers in the areas of optical and radar remote sensing skilled for the emerging GMES land monitoring services during the GMES Initial Operations period (2011-2013) and beyond. GIONET is expected to satisfy the demand for highly skilled researchers and provide personnel for operational phase of the GMES and monitoring and emergency services. It will achieve this by: -Providing postgraduate training in Earth Observation Science that exposes students to different research disciplines and complementary skills, providing work experiences in the private and academic sectors, and leading to a recognized qualification (Doctorate). -Enabling access to first class training in both fundamental and applied research skills to early-stage researchers at world-class academic centers and market leaders in the private sector. -Building on the experience from previous GMES research and development projects in the land monitoring and emergency information services. The training program through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics (each carried out by an Early Stage Researchers based in one of the partner organization) divided in 5 main areas: Forest monitoring: Global biomass information systems Forest Monitoring of the Congo Basin using Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR) Multi-concept Earth Observation Capabilities for Biomass Mapping and Change Detection: Synergy of Multi-temporal and Multi-frequency Interferometric Radar and Optical Satellite Data Land cover and change: Multi-scale Remote Sensing Synergy for Land Process Studies: from field Spectrometry to Airborne Hyperspectral and

  7. Research progress of interventional therapy in primary hepatic carcinoma companied with portal vein tumor thrombus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Guoqin; Luo Pengfei; Chen Yuqiang

    2011-01-01

    Portal vein tumor thrombus is an important factor on the prognosis of hepatic carcinoma. Interventional therapy is one of the effective therapies and plays an important role in the clinical treatment because of the advantage of minimally invasive and repeatable. The research and progress of interventional therapy on portal vein tumor thrombus was reviewed in this article. (authors)

  8. GIONET (GMES Initial Operations Network for Earth Observation Research Training)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, V.; Balzter, H.

    2013-12-01

    GMES Initial Operations - Network for Earth Observation Research Training (GIONET) is a Marie Curie funded project that aims to establish the first of a kind European Centre of Excellence for Earth Observation Research Training. Copernicus (previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security) is a joint undertaking of the European Space Agency and the European Commission. It develops fully operational Earth Observation monitoring services for a community of end users from the public and private sector. The first services that are considered fully operational are the land monitoring and emergency monitoring core services. In GIONET, 14 early stage researchers are being trained at PhD level in understanding the complex physical processes that determine how electromagnetic radiation interacts with the atmosphere and the land surface ultimately form the signal received by a satellite. In order to achieve this, the researchers are based in industry and universities across Europe, as well as receiving the best technical training and scientific education. The training programme through supervised research focuses on 14 research topics. Each topic is carried out by an Early Stage Researcher based in one of the partner organisations and is expected to lead to a PhD degree. The 14 topics are grouped in 5 research themes: Forest monitoring Land cover and change Coastal zone and freshwater monitoring Geohazards and emergency response Climate adaptation and emergency response The methods developed and used in GIONET are as diverse as its research topics. GIONET has already held two summer schools; one at Friedrich Schiller University in Jena (Germany), on 'New operational radar satellite applications: Introduction to SAR, Interferometry and Polarimetry for Land Surface Mapping'. The 2nd summer school took place last September at the University of Leicester (UK )on 'Remote sensing of land cover and forest in GMES'. The next Summer School in September 2013

  9. [Clinical research activity of the French cancer cooperative network: Overview and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Claire; Morin, Franck; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Langlais, Alexandra; Seitz, Jean-François; Girault, Cécile; Salles, Gilles; Haioun, Corinne; Deschaseaux, Pascal; Casassus, Philippe; Mathiot, Claire; Pujade-Lauraine, Éric; Votan, Bénédicte; Louvet, Christophe; Delpeut, Christine; Bardet, Étienne; Vintonenko, Nadejda; Hoang Xuan, Khê; Vo, Maryline; Michon, Jean; Milleron, Bernard

    The French Cancer Plan 2014-2019 stresses the importance of strengthening collaboration between all stakeholders involved in the fight against cancer, including cancer cooperative groups and intergroups. This survey aimed to describe the basics characteristics and clinical research activity among the Cancer Cooperative Groups (Groupes coopérateurs en oncologie). The second objective was to identify facilitators and barriers to their research activity. A questionnaire was sent to all the clinicians involved in 2014 as investigators in a clinical trial sponsored by one of the ten members of the Cancer Cooperative Groups network. The questions were related to their profile, research activity and the infrastructure existing within their healthcare center to support clinical research and related compliance activities. In total, 366 investigators responded to our survey. The academic clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Cooperative Groups represented an important part of the research activity of the investigators in France in 2014. These academic groups contributed to the opening of many research sites throughout all regions in France. Factors associated with a higher participation of investigators (more than 10 patients enrolled in a trial over a year) include the existing support of healthcare professionals (more than 2 clinical research associate (CRA) OR=11.16 [3.82-32.6] compared to none) and the practice of their research activity in a University Hospital Center (CHU) rather than a Hospital Center (CH) (OR=2.15 [1.20-3.83]). This study highlighted factors that can strengthen investigator clinical research activities and subsequently improve patient access to evidence-based new cancer therapies in France. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Delegation of authority in research funding to networks: experiences with a multiple goal boundary organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerkx, L.W.A.; Leeuwis, C.

    2008-01-01

    The delegation of authority in research funding to multi-actor networks that include users is seen as a way to make research more responsive to users' needs. This paper analyzes multi-actor networks for the planning and execution of agricultural research in The Netherlands. It shows that delegation

  11. [AFNET. A translational research network develops into an academic research organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Goette, Andreas; Näbauer, Michael; Schotten, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    "The whole is greater than the sum of its parts" (Aristotle).Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and affects 1-2 % of the population in developed countries, especially the elderly. We expect that the prevalence of AF will double in the next few decades. The last decades have seen important improvements in the management of atrial fibrillation, but many questions remain regarding the optimal diagnosis and management of the condition. The German Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET) was one of three cardiovascular competence networks in medicine funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research between 2003-2014. AFNET has contributed to the understanding of atrial fibrillation, and AFNET-led studies have led to improved clinical practices and practice guidelines in Germany and in Europe. This work has been expanded and is continuing in the AFNET association (AFNET e. V.). The AFNET association, founded in 2010 and continuing to this day, has developed into a small but fully formed academic research organisation that conducts investigator-initiated clinical trials as the responsible sponsor in Germany, Europe, and beyond. The AFNET association currently cooperates with EHRA (The European Heart Rhythm Association), ESC (The European Society of Cardiology) and DZHK (The German Centre for Cardiovascular Research) and receives funding from the European Union to generate evidence that can in the future lead to better prevention and management of AF.

  12. The research of "blind" spot in the LVQ network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhanjie; Nan, Shupo; Wang, Xiaoli

    2017-04-01

    Nowadays competitive neural network has been widely used in the pattern recognition, classification and other aspects, and show the great advantages compared with the traditional clustering methods. But the competitive neural networks still has inadequate in many aspects, and it needs to be further improved. Based on the learning Vector Quantization Network proposed by Learning Kohonen [1], this paper resolve the issue of the large training error, when there are "blind" spots in a network through the introduction of threshold value learning rules and finally programs the realization with Matlab.

  13. Boolean network model for cancer pathways: predicting carcinogenesis and targeted therapy outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman F Fumiã

    Full Text Available A Boolean dynamical system integrating the main signaling pathways involved in cancer is constructed based on the currently known protein-protein interaction network. This system exhibits stationary protein activation patterns--attractors--dependent on the cell's microenvironment. These dynamical attractors were determined through simulations and their stabilities against mutations were tested. In a higher hierarchical level, it was possible to group the network attractors into distinct cell phenotypes and determine driver mutations that promote phenotypic transitions. We find that driver nodes are not necessarily central in the network topology, but at least they are direct regulators of central components towards which converge or through which crosstalk distinct cancer signaling pathways. The predicted drivers are in agreement with those pointed out by diverse census of cancer genes recently performed for several human cancers. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that cell phenotypes can evolve towards full malignancy through distinct sequences of accumulated mutations. In particular, the network model supports routes of carcinogenesis known for some tumor types. Finally, the Boolean network model is employed to evaluate the outcome of molecularly targeted cancer therapies. The major find is that monotherapies were additive in their effects and that the association of targeted drugs is necessary for cancer eradication.

  14. An Analysis for the Use of Research and Education Networks and Commercial Network Vendors in Support of Space Based Mission Critical and Non-Critical Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Robert N.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, and in the past, dedicated communication circuits and "network services" with very stringent performance requirements are being used to support manned and unmanned mission critical ground operations at GSFC, JSC, MSFC, KSC and other NASA facilities. Because of the evolution of network technology, it is time to investigate using other approaches to providing mission services for space ground operations. The current NASA approach is not in keeping with the evolution of network technologies. In the past decade various research and education networks dedicated to scientific and educational endeavors have emerged, as well as commercial networking providers, that employ advanced networking technologies. These technologies have significantly changed networking in recent years. Significant advances in network routing techniques, various topologies and equipment have made commercial networks very stable and virtually error free. Advances in Dense Wave Division Multiplexing will provide tremendous amounts of bandwidth for the future. The question is: Do these networks, which are controlled and managed centrally, provide a level of service that equals the stringent NASA performance requirements. If they do, what are the implication(s) of using them for critical space based ground operations as they are, without adding high cost contractual performance requirements? A second question is the feasibility of applying the emerging grid technology in space operations. Is it feasible to develop a Space Operations Grid and/or a Space Science Grid? Since these network's connectivity is substantial, both nationally and internationally, development of these sorts of grids may be feasible. The concept of research and education networks has evolved to the international community as well. Currently there are international RENs connecting the US in Chicago to and from Europe, South America, Asia and the Pacific rim, Russia and Canada. And most countries in these areas have their

  15. Research infrastructure, networks of science and regional development - the case of Oskarshamn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folke Valfrid Snickars

    2017-10-01

    Our results indicate that research infrastructures as the ones in Oskarshamn are powerful creators of international research networks. It is possible although somewhat difficult in view of scattered systems for data provision to assess their academic and societal impacts. Engineering research has its own networks of university-industry and industry-university interaction where value is cogenerated dynamically. In the study we have come some way towards empirically analyzing the networks of research cooperation between industry and university using methods of infrastructure theory and network analysis.

  16. Prostate Cancer Clinical Consortium Clinical Research Site: Targeted Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    relevance to targeted therapies. Our overarching goal is to more effectively bring novel agents and new biomarker driven trials directly to patients...direct relevance to targeted therapies. Our overarching goal is to more effectively bring novel agents and new biomarker driven trials directly to...al: Functional characterization of circulating tumor cells with a prostate-cancer-specific microfluidic device . PLoS One 7:e35976, 2012 21

  17. Mapping the Field of Educational Administration Research: A Journal Citation Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinying; Bowers, Alex J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to uncover how knowledge is exchanged and disseminated in the educational administration research literature through the journal citation network. Design/ Methodology/Approach: Drawing upon social network theory and citation network studies in other disciplines, the authors constructed an educational…

  18. Defining dimensions of research readiness: a conceptual model for primary care research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Helen; de Lusignan, Simon; Liyanage, Harshana; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Terry, Amanda; Rafi, Imran

    2014-11-26

    Recruitment to research studies in primary care is challenging despite widespread implementation of electronic patient record (EPR) systems which potentially make it easier to identify eligible cases. Literature review and applying the learning from a European research readiness assessment tool, the TRANSFoRm International Research Readiness instrument (TIRRE), to the context of the English NHS in order to develop a model to assess a practice's research readiness. Seven dimensions of research readiness were identified: (1) Data readiness: Is there good data quality in EPR systems; (2) Record readiness: Are EPR data able to identify eligible cases and other study data; (3) Organisational readiness: Are the health system and socio-cultural environment supportive; (4) Governance readiness: Does the study meet legal and local health system regulatory compliance; (5) Study-specific readiness; (6) Business process readiness: Are business processes tilted in favour of participation: including capacity and capability to take on extra work, financial incentives as well as intangibles such as social and intellectual capital; (7) Patient readiness: Are systems in place to recruit patients and obtain informed consent? The model might enable the development of interventions to increase participation in primary care-based research and become a tool to measure the progress of practice networks towards the most advanced state of readiness.

  19. Default mode network coherence in treatment-resistant major depressive disorder during electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, Peter C R; van Eijndhoven, Philip F P; Pluijmen, Joris; Schene, Aart H; Tendolkar, Indira; Beckmann, Christian F

    2016-11-15

    Functional connectivity in the "default mode network" (DMN) is changed in depression, and evidence suggests depression also affects the DMN's spatial topography and might cause a dissociation between its anterior and posterior regions. As antidepressive treatment affects anterior and posterior regions of the network differently, how depression and treatment change DMN-organization is crucial for understanding their mechanisms. We present a novel way of assessing the coherence of a network's regions to the network as a whole, and apply this to investigate treatment-resistant depression and the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Resting-state functional MRI was collected from 16 patients with treatment-resistant depression before and after ECT and 16 healthy controls matched for age and sex. For each subject, the mean time series of the DMN was used as a regressor for each voxel within the DMN, creating a map of "network coherence" (NC). The obtained maps were compared across groups using permutation testing. NC was significantly decreased in depressed subjects in the precuneus and the angular gyrus. With ECT the NC normalized in responders (n=8), but not in non-responders (n=8). We present a novel method of investigating within-network coherence and apply this to show that in depression, a large area of the DMN shows a decrease in coherence to the network as a whole. Although tentative due to the small sample size, we find that this effect is not present after ECT in those improving clinically, but persists in patients not responding to ECT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a process…

  1. Hierarchical Network Models for Education Research: Hierarchical Latent Space Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Tracy M.; Thomas, Andrew C.; Junker, Brian W.

    2013-01-01

    Intervention studies in school systems are sometimes aimed not at changing curriculum or classroom technique, but rather at changing the way that teachers, teaching coaches, and administrators in schools work with one another--in short, changing the professional social networks of educators. Current methods of social network analysis are…

  2. Positive Art Therapy: Linking Positive Psychology to Art Therapy Theory, Practice, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rebecca A.; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    As a growing movement in the larger field of mental health, positive psychology has much to offer the art therapy profession, which in turn is uniquely poised to contribute to the study of optimal functioning. This article discusses the relationship of positive psychology to art therapy and its capacity to mobilize client strengths, to induce…

  3. The relationship of membership in research networks to compliance with treatment guidelines for early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laliberte, Linda; Fennell, Mary L; Papandonatos, George

    2005-05-01

    Research has shown that older women with breast cancer are less likely than younger women to receive treatment in accordance with accepted guidelines. Cancer-related research networks (eg, Comprehensive Cancer Centers) have been funded by the National Cancer Institute to increase the dissemination of new treatment strategies, but little is known about their relationship to cancer treatment patterns. We used a 3-level hierarchical regression model to examine the relationship of treating facilities' memberships in cancer research networks to compliance with guidelines for primary treatment of early stage breast cancer, controlling for patient and facility factors. We analyzed data from a database linking SEER registry data and Medicare claims in patients aged 65 years of age or older with early-stage breast cancer to data on the treating facility, including variables that indicate membership(s) in cancer research networks. A total of 16,600 women with stage I or stage II breast cancer, diagnosed between 1990 and 1994, and who received treatment in one of 423 facilities were studied. The key independent variable in this analysis was membership in NCI-funded cancer research networks. The outcome measure is a 3-category variable defined as (1) mastectomy (MAST), (2) breast-conserving surgery plus radiation therapy (BCS+RT), or (3) BCS alone. Patients treated at facilities that were members of 2 or more cancer research networks were more likely to receive guideline-concordant treatment (ie, MAST or BCS+RT) than similar patients treated at non-member facilities. Organizational factors may influence compliance with treatment guidelines and be useful in improving the quality of care.

  4. Reflections on...a disability methodology for the client-centred practice of occupational therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammell, Karen Whalley

    2007-12-01

    Occupational therapists' stated commitments to client-centred practice and to enabling participation in the occupations of daily life are not universally reflected in either the practice or the occupation of occupational therapy research. Nor have the profession's researchers generally engaged with those critiques of their endeavours that have been articulated by disability theorists. Because no guidelines exist for the client-centred practice of occupational therapy research this paper draws from the work of disability theorists to sketch a disability methodology: a specific philosophical, political and ethical approach to developing knowledge that is fundamentally concerned with realigning power within the research relationship and throughout the research process. The proposed disability methodology attempts to align the practice of occupational therapy research with the client-centred philosophy underpinning occupational therapy practice and aspires to enable clients' meaningful participation in the occupation of research.

  5. Research progress in targeted therapy for liver cancer stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAO Ping

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is a malignant tumor. The current operation or chemoradiotherapy cannot achieve a satisfactory effect, and relapse and metastasis are always big problems in the treatment of liver cancer. According to the recent theory of liver cancer stem cells, the genesis, development, relapse, metastasis, and prognosis of liver cancer are all related to liver cancer stem cells. If the liver cancer stem cells are treated by targeted therapy, which would reduce the number of or destroy the stem cells, the relapse, metastasis, and drug resistance after tumor resection may be reduced or eliminated. The progress in targeted therapy for liver cancer stem cells is reviewed here. Although there are many types of targeted therapies for liver cancer stem cells, it is still a key problem that the targeting is not strong enough, which needs to be solved urgently. Whether the dual- or multi-targeting would solve this problem still needs to be confirmed by further experimental studies.

  6. Visually Augmented Analysis of Socio-Technical Networks in Engineering Systems Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storga, M.; Stankovic, T.; Cash, Philip

    2013-01-01

    /service-system (PSS) life cycle) may be applied in engineering design research. Network thinking of the kind described in this paper could be fundamental for developing new and effective techniques for solving the problems in the engineering design research related to the interpretation of the huge amount of data...... captured during experiments and observations that are more and more used as a main research method. Case studies that are presented illustrate also the significance of the network based research approach in providing insight into ways of improving the design process for complex engineering systems......., but only fairly recently has the study of networks in general become a major topic of research in complex engineering systems. The research reported in this paper is discussing how the visually augmented analysis of complex socio-networks (networks of people and technology engaged in a product...

  7. Automatic generation of investigator bibliographies for institutional research networking systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Stephen B; Bales, Michael E; Dine, Daniel; Bakken, Suzanne; Albert, Paul J; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-10-01

    Publications are a key data source for investigator profiles and research networking systems. We developed ReCiter, an algorithm that automatically extracts bibliographies from PubMed using institutional information about the target investigators. ReCiter executes a broad query against PubMed, groups the results into clusters that appear to constitute distinct author identities and selects the cluster that best matches the target investigator. Using information about investigators from one of our institutions, we compared ReCiter results to queries based on author name and institution and to citations extracted manually from the Scopus database. Five judges created a gold standard using citations of a random sample of 200 investigators. About half of the 10,471 potential investigators had no matching citations in PubMed, and about 45% had fewer than 70 citations. Interrater agreement (Fleiss' kappa) for the gold standard was 0.81. Scopus achieved the best recall (sensitivity) of 0.81, while name-based queries had 0.78 and ReCiter had 0.69. ReCiter attained the best precision (positive predictive value) of 0.93 while Scopus had 0.85 and name-based queries had 0.31. ReCiter accesses the most current citation data, uses limited computational resources and minimizes manual entry by investigators. Generation of bibliographies using named-based queries will not yield high accuracy. Proprietary databases can perform well but requite manual effort. Automated generation with higher recall is possible but requires additional knowledge about investigators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cellular Therapies Clinical Research Roadmap: lessons learned on how to move a cellular therapy into a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, Stacy; Tappitake, Darah; Armant, Myriam; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Derecho, Ivy; Draxler, Rebecca; Wood, Deborah; Centanni, John M

    2015-04-01

    A clinical research roadmap has been developed as a resource for researchers to identify critical areas and potential pitfalls when transitioning a cellular therapy product from the research laboratory, by means of an Investigational New Drug (IND) application, into early-phase clinical trials. The roadmap describes four key areas: basic and preclinical research, resource development, translational research and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and IND assembly and submission. Basic and preclinical research identifies a new therapeutic concept and demonstrates its potential value with the use of a model of the relevant disease. During resource development, the appropriate specialists and the required expertise to bring this product into the clinic are identified (eg, researchers, regulatory specialists, GMP manufacturing staff, clinicians and clinical trials staff, etc). Additionally, the funds required to achieve this goal (or a plan to procure them) are identified. In the next phase, the plan to translate the research product into a clinical-grade therapeutic is developed. Finally regulatory approval to start the trial must be obtained. In the United States, this is done by filing an IND application with the Food and Drug Administration. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-funded Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies program has facilitated the transition of a variety of cellular therapy products from the laboratory into Phase1/2 trials. The five Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies facilities have assisted investigators by performing translational studies and GMP manufacturing to ensure that cellular products met release specifications and were manufactured safely, reproducibly and at the appropriate scale. The roadmap resulting from this experience is the focus of this article. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Review of the Research in Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Stephanie A; Johnson, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    Emotionally Focused Therapy for Couples (EFT) is a brief evidence-based couple therapy based in attachment theory. Since the development of EFT, efficacy and effectiveness research has accumulated to address a range of couple concerns. EFT meets or exceeds the guidelines for classification as an evidence-based couple therapy outlined for couple and family research. Furthermore, EFT researchers have examined the process of change and predictors of outcome in EFT. Future research in EFT will continue to examine the process of change in EFT and test the efficacy and effectiveness of EFT in new applications and for couples of diverse backgrounds and concerns. © 2016 Family Process Institute.

  10. From Network to Research – Ten Years of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Søren; Grund, Cynthia M.; Jensen, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    This article briefly chronicles the history of the Nordic Network of Music Informatics, Performance and Aesthetics (NNIMIPA) and its roots in previous research networks and milieus. It explains how a cross-disciplinary network works and gives rise to research projects that bridge the gap between...... the disciplines involved. As examples, three thematically linked projects within NNIMIPA are presented. These projects all have performance interaction (between musicians and between musician and audience) as their nexus....

  11. Implications of technology in music therapy practice and research for music therapy education: a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Barbara J; Rio, Robin

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the use of technology in music therapy practice and research for the purpose of providing music therapy educators and clinicians with specific and accurate accounts of the types and benefits of technology being used in various settings. Additionally, this knowledge will help universities comply with National Association of Schools of Music requirements and help to standardize the education and training of music therapists in this rapidly changing area. Information was gathered through a literature review of music therapy and related professional journals and a wide variety of books and personal communications. More data were gathered in a survey requesting information on current use of technology in education and practice. This solicitation was sent to all American Music Therapy Association approved universities and clinical training directors. Technology applications in music therapy are organized according to the following categories: (a) adapted musical instruments, (b) recording technology, (c) electric/electronic musical instruments, (d) computer applications, (e) medical technology, (f) assistive technology for the disabled, and (g) technology-based music/sound healing practices. The literature reviewed covers 177 books and articles from a span of almost 40 years. Recommendations are made for incorporating technology into music therapy course work and for review and revision of AMTA competencies. The need for an all-encompassing clinical survey of the use of technology in current music therapy practice is also identified.

  12. Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve Palsy After Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter AOSpine Clinical Research Network Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokaslan, Ziya L; Bydon, Mohamad; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Smith, Zachary A; Hsu, Wellington K; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Baird, Evan O; Mroz, Thomas E; Fehlings, Michael; Arnold, Paul M; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective study. To investigate the risk of symptomatic recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy (RLNP) following cervical spine surgery, to examine risk factors for its development, and to report its treatment and outcomes. A multicenter study from 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was performed. Each center screened for rare complications following cervical spine surgery, including RLNP. Patients were included if they underwent cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2011. Data were analyzed with regard to complication treatment and outcome. Cases were compared to a control group from the AOSpine CSM and CSM-I studies. Three centers reported 19 cases of RLNP from a cohort of 1345 patients. The reported incidence of RLNP ranged from 0.6% to 2.9% between these 3 centers. Fifteen patients (79%) in the RLNP group were approached from the left side. Ten patients (52.6%) required treatment for RLNP-6 required medical therapy (steroids), 1 interventional treatment (injection laryngoplasty), and 3 conservative therapy (speech therapy). When examining outcomes, 73.7% (14/19) of cases resolved completely, 15.8% (3/19) resolved with residual effects, and in 10.5% (2/19) of cases this could not be determined. In this multicenter study examining rare complications following cervical spine surgery, the risk of RLNP after cervical spine surgery ranged from 0.6% to 2.9% between centers. Though rare, it was found that 16% of patients may experience partial resolution with residual effects, and 74% resolve completely.

  13. Research on optimization method of deep neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Zhao, Huaici; Cao, Feidao

    2017-11-01

    Image recognition technology has been widely applied and played an important role in various fields nowadays. Because of multi-layer structure of deep network can use a more concise way to express complex functions, deep neural network (DNN) will be applied to the image recognition to improve the accuracy of image classification. Analysis the existing problems of deep neural network. Then put forward new approaches to solve the gradient vanishing and over-fitting problems. The experimental results which verified on the MNIST, show that our proposed approaches can improve the classification accuracy greatly and accelerate the convergence speed. Compared to support vector machine (SVM), the optimized model of the neural network is not only effective, but also converged quickly.

  14. Positive train control interoperability and networking research : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    This document describes the initial development of an ITC PTC Shared Network (IPSN), a hosted : environment to support the distribution, configuration management, and IT governance of Interoperable : Train Control (ITC) Positive Train Control (PTC) s...

  15. Manifesto for a European Anxiety Disorders Research Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, David S.; Allgulander, Christer; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo; Angst, Jules; Bandelow, Borwin; den Boer, Johan; Boyer, Patrice; Davies, Simon; dell'Osso, Bernardo; Eriksson, Elias; Fineberg, Naomi; Fredrikson, Mats; Herran, Andres; Maron, Eduard; Metspalu, Andres; Nutt, David; van der Wee, Nic; Luis Vazquez-Barquero, Jose; Zohar, Joseph

    Despite the size, burden and costs of anxiety disorders, many patients remain unrecognised, and the effectiveness of evidence-based interventions in routine clinical practice can be disappointing. The European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) has established the ECNP Network Initiative

  16. A Bayesian network meta-analysis on second-line systemic therapy in advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaofu; Ko, Yoo-Joung; Berry, Scott; Shah, Keya; Lee, Esther; Chan, Kelvin

    2017-07-01

    It is unclear which regimen is the most efficacious among the available therapies for advanced gastric cancer in the second-line setting. We performed a network meta-analysis to determine their relative benefits. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) through the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases and American Society of Clinical Oncology abstracts up to June 2014 to identify phase III RCTs on advanced gastric cancer in the second-line setting. Overall survival (OS) data were the primary outcome of interest. Hazard ratios (HRs) were extracted from the publications on the basis of reported values or were extracted from survival curves by established methods. A Bayesian network meta-analysis was performed with WinBUGS to compare all regimens simultaneously. Eight RCTs (2439 patients) were identified and contained extractable data for quantitative analysis. Network meta-analysis showed that paclitaxel plus ramucirumab was superior to single-agent ramucirumab [OS HR 0.51, 95 % credible region (CR) 0.30-0.86], paclitaxel (OS HR 0.81, 95 % CR 0.68-0.96), docetaxel (OS HR 0.56, 95 % CR 0.33-0.94), and irinotecan (OS HR 0.71, 95 % CR 0.52-0.99). Paclitaxel plus ramucirumab also had an 89 % probability of being the best regimen among all these regimens. Single-agent ramucirumab, paclitaxel, docetaxel, and irinotecan were comparable to each other with respect to OS and were superior to best supportive care. This is the first network meta-analysis to compare all second-line regimens reported in phase III gastric cancer trials. The results suggest the paclitaxel plus ramucirumab combination is the most effective therapy and should be the reference regimen for future comparative trials.

  17. Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: Description, Research and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swales, Michaela A.

    2009-01-01

    Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) is a cognitive behavioural treatment initially developed for adult women with a diagnosis of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and a history of chronic suicidal behaviour (Linehan, 1993a; 1993b). DBT was the first treatment for BPD to demonstrate its efficacy in a randomised controlled trial (Linehan ,…

  18. Human Nature and Research Paradigms: Theory Meets Physical Therapy Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plack, Margaret M.

    2005-01-01

    Human nature is a very complex phenomenon. In physical therapy this complexity is enhanced by the need to understand the intersection between the art and science of human behavior and patient care. A paradigm is a set of basic beliefs that represent a worldview, defines the nature of the world and the individual's place in it, and helps to…

  19. Research on Network Defense Strategy Based on Honey Pot Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jianchao; Hua, Ying

    2018-03-01

    As a new network security technology of active defense, The honeypot technology has become a very effective and practical method of decoy attackers. The thesis discusses the theory, structure, characteristic, design and implementation of Honeypot in detail. Aiming at the development of means of attack, put forward a kind of network defense technology based on honeypot technology, constructing a virtual Honeypot demonstrate the honeypot’s functions.

  20. Research on Influence of Cloud Environment on Traditional Network Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xiaobo; Guo, Jinhua

    2018-02-01

    Cloud computing is a symbol of the progress of modern information network, cloud computing provides a lot of convenience to the Internet users, but it also brings a lot of risk to the Internet users. Second, one of the main reasons for Internet users to choose cloud computing is that the network security performance is great, it also is the cornerstone of cloud computing applications. This paper briefly explores the impact on cloud environment on traditional cybersecurity, and puts forward corresponding solutions.

  1. Speech Quality Monitoring in Czech National Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Voznak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with techniques of measuring and assessment of the voice transmitted in IP networks and describes design of quality measurement, which can be used for Cisco Gateways. Cisco gateways send Calculated Planning Impairment Factor in every CDR (Call Detail Record. Our design is based on collection of CDR's, their storing into SQL database and their visualization through web page. This design was implemented and successfully tested in CESNET network.

  2. A practice-based research network on the survival of ceramic inlay/onlay restorations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collares, K.; Correa, M.B.; Laske, M.; Kramer, E.; Reiss, B.; Moraes, R.R.; Huysmans, M.C.; Opdam, N.J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate prospectively the longevity of ceramic inlay/onlay restorations placed in a web-based practice-based research network and to investigate risk factors associated with restoration failures. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data were collected by a practice-based research network called

  3. Action research in inter-organisational networks : - impartial studies or the Trojan horse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager; Jørgensen, Jacob Høj

    2007-01-01

    -organisational network, this article discusses potential pitfalls in the legitimiser role. Lack of clarity in defining the researcher role and project ownership in relation to the funding organisation and the rest of the network can jeopardise the project and potentially the credibility of the researchers. The article...

  4. Action Research in Inter-organisational Networks - Impartial studies or the Trojan Horse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goduscheit, René Chester; Bergenholtz, Carsten; Jørgensen, Jacob Høj

    2008-01-01

    -organisational network, this article discusses potential pitfalls in the legitimiser role. Lack of clarity in defining the researcher role and project ownership in relation to the funding organisation and the rest of the network can jeopardise the project and, potentially, the credibility of the researchers. The article...

  5. Qwest provides high-speed network for major research institutions in Illinois eight campuses interconnected to foster collaborative, virtual research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Qwest Communications International Inc. today announced that Argonne National Laboratory has deployed Qwest's broadband fiber optic network for the Illinois Wired/Wireless Infrastructure for Research and Education (I-WIRE) project (1 page).

  6. Default-Mode Network Functional Connectivity in Aphasia: Therapy-Induced Neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Karine; Perlbarg, Vincent; Marrelec, Guillaume; Benali, Habib; Ansaldo, Ana Ines

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on participants with aphasia has mainly been based on standard functional neuroimaging analysis. Recent studies have shown that functional connectivity analysis can detect compensatory activity, not revealed by standard analysis. Little is known, however, about the default-mode network in aphasia. In the current study, we studied…

  7. Research on Evaluation on Agility of Agile Supply Chain Network Based on Complex Network Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Ru Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper tries to add the network structure factors of agile supply chain network into agility evaluation. The paper firstly presents three concepts including node strength centrality, betweenness centrality, and network centrality. They are used to calculate the weight of node enterprises in the agile supply chain network. And then, a series of agility indicators are designed to evaluate agility of agile supply chain network. AHP is used to calculate the weight of the indicators. Next, these indicators are used to get initial agility evaluation matrix by means of Delphi method, Data Mining, and so forth. Then FCE is used to calculate the membership degree on agility of node enterprises by combining the evaluation matrix with the weight of indicators. Last, the evaluation result of comprehensive agility of agile supply chain network is calculated on the basis of considering the weight of node enterprises. This method can reflect the effect which the network structure of supply chain network makes on the agility of the supply chain network. It is a complement to the current evaluation methods of agility.

  8. Research network on capital markets and financial integration in Europe : results and experience after two years

    OpenAIRE

    European Central Bank ; Center for Financial Studies (CFS)

    2008-01-01

    In April 2002 the European Central Bank (ECB) and the Center for Financial Studies (CFS) launched the ECB-CFS Research Network to promote research on “Capital Markets and Financial Integration in Europe”. The ECB-CFS research network aims at stimulating top-level and policy-relevant research, significantly contributing to the understanding of the current and future structure and integration of the financial system in Europe and its international linkages with the United States and Japan. This...

  9. [The network organization of medical research in the US Armed Forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golota, A S; Zubenko, A I; Ivchenko, E V; Krassiĭ, A B; Shalakhin, R A

    2014-03-01

    The current article is dedicated to the network mode of medical scientific research organization in the US Armed Forces exploring the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine as an example. The following features of the institute are examined: the structure, definition of scientific research goals and tasks, financing, management, areas of research, the next generation of the institute. In conclusion some characteristic features of network scientific research establishment and required legal conditions are determined.

  10. Providing access to research data, publications and current research information at Data Archiving and Networked Services - DANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, E.M.S.; Doorn, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) promotes sustained access to digital research data in the Netherlands. Researchers can deposit their data through the online archiving system EASY. Via the portal NARCIS the research data are shown in context, namely in relation to publications, and other

  11. CollaborationViz: interactive visual exploration of biomedical research collaboration networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Bian

    Full Text Available Social network analysis (SNA helps us understand patterns of interaction between social entities. A number of SNA studies have shed light on the characteristics of research collaboration networks (RCNs. Especially, in the Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA community, SNA provides us a set of effective tools to quantitatively assess research collaborations and the impact of CTSA. However, descriptive network statistics are difficult for non-experts to understand. In this article, we present our experiences of building meaningful network visualizations to facilitate a series of visual analysis tasks. The basis of our design is multidimensional, visual aggregation of network dynamics. The resulting visualizations can help uncover hidden structures in the networks, elicit new observations of the network dynamics, compare different investigators and investigator groups, determine critical factors to the network evolution, and help direct further analyses. We applied our visualization techniques to explore the biomedical RCNs at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences--a CTSA institution. And, we created CollaborationViz, an open-source visual analytical tool to help network researchers and administration apprehend the network dynamics of research collaborations through interactive visualization.

  12. A Federated Network for Translational Cancer Research Using Clinical Data and Biospecimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Rebecca S; Becich, Michael J; Bollag, Roni J; Chavan, Girish; Corrigan, Julia; Dhir, Rajiv; Feldman, Michael D; Gaudioso, Carmelo; Legowski, Elizabeth; Maihle, Nita J; Mitchell, Kevin; Murphy, Monica; Sakthivel, Mayurapriyan; Tseytlin, Eugene; Weaver, JoEllen

    2015-12-15

    Advances in cancer research and personalized medicine will require significant new bridging infrastructures, including more robust biorepositories that link human tissue to clinical phenotypes and outcomes. In order to meet that challenge, four cancer centers formed the Text Information Extraction System (TIES) Cancer Research Network, a federated network that facilitates data and biospecimen sharing among member institutions. Member sites can access pathology data that are de-identified and processed with the TIES natural language processing system, which creates a repository of rich phenotype data linked to clinical biospecimens. TIES incorporates multiple security and privacy best practices that, combined with legal agreements, network policies, and procedures, enable regulatory compliance. The TIES Cancer Research Network now provides integrated access to investigators at all member institutions, where multiple investigator-driven pilot projects are underway. Examples of federated search across the network illustrate the potential impact on translational research, particularly for studies involving rare cancers, rare phenotypes, and specific biologic behaviors. The network satisfies several key desiderata including local control of data and credentialing, inclusion of rich phenotype information, and applicability to diverse research objectives. The TIES Cancer Research Network presents a model for a national data and biospecimen network. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Facilitative Components of Collaborative Learning: A Review of Nine Health Research Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Lisa; Rittner, Jessica Levin; Johnson, Karin E; Gerteis, Jessie; Miller, Therese

    2017-02-01

    Collaborative research networks are increasingly used as an effective mechanism for accelerating knowledge transfer into policy and practice. This paper explored the characteristics and collaborative learning approaches of nine health research networks. Semi-structured interviews with representatives from eight diverse US health services research networks conducted between November 2012 and January 2013 and program evaluation data from a ninth. The qualitative analysis assessed each network's purpose, duration, funding sources, governance structure, methods used to foster collaboration, and barriers and facilitators to collaborative learning. The authors reviewed detailed notes from the interviews to distill salient themes. Face-to-face meetings, intentional facilitation and communication, shared vision, trust among members and willingness to work together were key facilitators of collaborative learning. Competing priorities for members, limited funding and lack of long-term support and geographic dispersion were the main barriers to coordination and collaboration across research network members. The findings illustrate the importance of collaborative learning in research networks and the challenges to evaluating the success of research network functionality. Conducting readiness assessments and developing process and outcome evaluation metrics will advance the design and show the impact of collaborative research networks. Copyright © 2017 Longwoods Publishing.

  14. Melodic Intonation Therapy: Back to Basics for Future Research

    OpenAIRE

    Zumbansen, Anna; Peretz, Isabelle; Hébert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    We present a critical review of the literature on melodic intonation therapy (MIT), one of the most formalized treatments used by speech-language therapist in Broca’s aphasia. We suggest basic clarifications to enhance the scientific support of this promising treatment. First, therapeutic protocols using singing as a speech facilitation technique are not necessarily MIT. The goal of MIT is to restore propositional speech. The rationale is that patients can learn a new way to speak through sin...

  15. AVAILABILITY RESEARCH OF REMOTE DEVICES FOR WIRELESS NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Bazhayev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We consider the wireless network under attack, aimed at "broadcast storm" initiation, in order to determine the availability of stand-alone units and the ability to carry out their functional tasks under information exposure. We determine a set of conditions for such type of attacks on the part of potential information interloper. The functional analysis of the systems based on wireless technology is made. We examine the remote device of a self-organizing wireless network as a queuing system M/M/1/n. Model dependencies are shown for normal system performance and at information exposure on the part of potential information interloper. Analytical simulation of wireless network functioning is carried out in the normal mode and under the attack aimed at "broadcast storm" initiation. An experiment is described which provides statistical information on operation of network remote devices. We present experiment results on carrying out attack at typical system transferring data by broabcast net scanning package at different noise intensities on the part of information interloper. The proposed model can be used to determine the technical characteristics of wireless ad-hoc network, develop recommendations for node configuration, aimed at countering "broadcast storm".

  16. Cyber Security Research Frameworks For Coevolutionary Network Defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, George D. [Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States); Tauritz, Daniel Remy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-03

    Several architectures have been created for developing and testing systems used in network security, but most are meant to provide a platform for running cyber security experiments as opposed to automating experiment processes. In the first paper, we propose a framework termed Distributed Cyber Security Automation Framework for Experiments (DCAFE) that enables experiment automation and control in a distributed environment. Predictive analysis of adversaries is another thorny issue in cyber security. Game theory can be used to mathematically analyze adversary models, but its scalability limitations restrict its use. Computational game theory allows us to scale classical game theory to larger, more complex systems. In the second paper, we propose a framework termed Coevolutionary Agent-based Network Defense Lightweight Event System (CANDLES) that can coevolve attacker and defender agent strategies and capabilities and evaluate potential solutions with a custom network defense simulation. The third paper is a continuation of the CANDLES project in which we rewrote key parts of the framework. Attackers and defenders have been redesigned to evolve pure strategy, and a new network security simulation is devised which specifies network architecture and adds a temporal aspect. We also add a hill climber algorithm to evaluate the search space and justify the use of a coevolutionary algorithm.

  17. Research on HFC network broadband access using WLAN technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuguang; Liu, Deming; Zhang, Shu; Wu, Guangsheng

    2007-11-01

    Current broadband access system such as ADSL can not satisfy the network applications as the development of network services. In this paper, we proposed to use WLAN technology on the HFC network as a terminal broadband access plan. First of all, theoretical analysis is given to support the feasibility of using WLAN technology on the HFC network. Then, transmission experiments and results of the proposed plan are described in this paper. The key point of the plan is to use a WLAN access point device as a modem to modulate the baseband Ethernet signal into 2.4GHz WLAN signal which then be transmitted via coaxial cable(COAX). The experimental results show that the average traffic throughput of the system could reach to approximate 20Mbps which is the theoretical throughput of 802.11g WLAN transmission. And the transmission throughput has no remarkable change no matter there is CATV signal in the system or not. Finally, conclusions are drawn out: The proposed system can work properly. WLAN signal is quite suitable to be transmitted in the coaxial cable. CATV signal and WLAN signal are not interfering with each other in the system. Using WLAN on the existing coaxial cable which has already accessed to thousands of people's home could be a cost-effective plan for broadband access on the HFC network.

  18. Clinical research evidence of cupping therapy in China: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Huijuan; Han, Mei; Li, Xun; Dong, Shangjuan; Shang, Yongmei; Wang, Qian; Xu, Shu; Liu, Jianping

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Though cupping therapy has been used in China for thousands of years, there has been no systematic summary of clinical research on it. This review is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of cupping therapy using evidence-based approach based on all available clinical studies. Methods We included all clinical studies on cupping therapy for all kinds of diseases. We searched six electronic databases, all searches ended in December 2008. We extracted data on the type of cupping...

  19. Research needed for improving heavy-ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G; Kraft, S D

    2009-01-01

    The large interest in heavy-ion therapy is stimulated from its excellent clinical results. The bases of this success are the radiobiological and physical advantages of heavy-ion beams and the active beam delivery used for an intensity-modulated particle radiotherapy (IMPT). Although heavy-ion therapy has reached a high degree of perfection for clinical use there is still large progress possible to improve this novel technique: in order to extend IMPT to more tumor entities and to tailor the planning more individually for each patient in an adaptive way, radiobiological work is required both experimentally and theoretically. It is also not clear whether the neighboring ions to carbon could have a clinical application as well. For this extension basic biological studies as well as physics experiments have to be performed. On the technical side, many improvements of the equipment used seem to be possible. Two major topics are the extension of IMPT to moving organs and the transition to more compact and therefore cheaper particle accelerators. In the present paper, these topics are treated to some extent in order to give an outline of the great future potential of ion-beam therapy.

  20. Research advances in proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAI Shuyang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, one of the most common malignancies with high prevalence and mortality rate, usually results in poor prognosis and limited survival. A comprehensive analysis on the number and location of tumors, Child-Pugh grade, and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage will help the development of suitable treatment programs and improve prediction of prognosis. A majority of patients are complicated by cirrhosis, enlarged tumor, multiple lesions, vascular invasion, and even cancer embolus in the portal vein. With the growth of knowledge about the radiation tolerance of normal tissue and the advances in radiotherapy techniques, radiotherapy has become an important tool for step-down therapy and adjuvant therapy for liver cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT is emerging as a novel radiotherapy for the management of HCC, which, benefiting from the effect of Bragg Peak from PBT, effectively decreases the toxicity of traditional radiotherapies to the liver and does little harm to the uninvolved liver tissue or the surrounding structures while intensifying the destruction in targeted malignant lesions. Furthermore, several previous studies on the treatment of HCC with PBT revealed excellent local control. The distinctive biophysical attributes of PBT in the treatment of HCC, as well as the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using PBT for HCC, are reviewed. Current evidence provides limited indications for PBT, which suggests that further study on the relationship between liver function and PBT is required to gain further insight into its indication and standardization.

  1. The Swiss Education and Research Network - SWITCH - Upgrades Optical Network to Transport 10 Gbps Using Sorrento Networks DWDM Platform

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Sorrento Networks, a supplier of optical transport networking equipment for carriers and enterprises worldwide, today announced that SWITCH successfully completed 10 Gbps BER tests on the 220 km Zurich to Manno and 360 km Zurich to Geneva links in September and November 2003, using Sorrento's GigaMux DWDM system" (1/2 page).

  2. Research on three-phase unbalanced distribution network reconfiguration strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuang; Li, Ke-Jun; Xu, Yanshun; Liu, Zhijie; Guo, Jing; Wang, Zhuodi

    2017-01-01

    With the development of social economy, the loads installed in the distribution network become more and more complex which may cause the three-phase unbalance problems. This paper proposes an optimal reconfiguration approach based on mixed integer quadric programming (MIQP) method to address the three-phase unbalance problem. It aims to minimize the total network losses of the system. By using several square constraints to substitute the circular constraint, the original optimization problem is linearized and converted into a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model. Then this MILP problem is solved in general algebraic model system (GAMS) software using CPLEX solver. The additional losses caused by three-phase unbalanced are also considered. An IEEE 34 nodes test system is used to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the losses and the voltage violation mitigation in the network can be reduced significantly.

  3. Research into alternative network approaches for space operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmanoff, Antone L.; Barton, Timothy J.

    1990-01-01

    The main goal is to resolve the interoperability problem of applications employing DOD TCP/IP (Department of Defence Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol) family of protocols on a CCITT/ISO based network. The objective is to allow them to communicate over the CCITT/ISO protocol GPLAN (General Purpose Local Area Network) network without modification to the user's application programs. There were two primary assumptions associated with the solution that was actually realized. The first is that the solution had to allow for future movement to the exclusive use of the CCITT/ISO standards. The second is that the solution had to be software transparent to the currently installed TCP/IP and CCITT/ISO user application programs.

  4. Vehicular ad hoc networks standards, solutions, and research

    CERN Document Server

    Molinaro, Antonella; Scopigno, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    This book presents vehicular ad-hoc networks (VANETs) from the their onset, gradually going into technical details, providing a clear understanding of both theoretical foundations and more practical investigation. The editors gathered top-ranking authors to provide comprehensiveness and timely content; the invited authors were carefully selected from a list of who’s who in the respective field of interest: there are as many from Academia as from Standardization and Industry sectors from around the world. The covered topics are organized around five Parts starting from an historical overview of vehicular communications and standardization/harmonization activities (Part I), then progressing to the theoretical foundations of VANETs and a description of the day-one standard-compliant solutions (Part II), hence going into details of vehicular networking and security (Part III) and to the tools to study VANETs, from mobility and channel models, to network simulators and field trial methodologies (Part IV), and fi...

  5. Research on networked manufacturing system for reciprocating pump industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yangdong; Qi, Guoning; Xie, Qingsheng; Lu, Yujun

    2005-12-01

    Networked manufacturing is a trend of reciprocating pump industry. According to the enterprises' requirement, the architecture of networked manufacturing system for reciprocating pump industry was proposed, which composed of infrastructure layer, system management layer, application service layer and user layer. Its main functions included product data management, ASP service, business management, and customer relationship management, its physics framework was a multi-tier internet-based model; the concept of ASP service integration was put forward and its process model was also established. As a result, a networked manufacturing system aimed at the characteristics of reciprocating pump industry was built. By implementing this system, reciprocating pump industry can obtain a new way to fully utilize their own resources and enhance the capabilities to respond to the global market quickly.

  6. Research on Community Structure in Bus Transport Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xuhua; Wang Bo; Sun Youxian

    2009-01-01

    We abstract the bus transport networks (BTNs) to two kinds of complex networks with space L and space P methods respectively. Using improved community detecting algorithm (PKM agglomerative algorithm), we analyze the community property of two kinds of BTNs graphs. The results show that the BTNs graph described with space L method have obvious community property, but the other kind of BTNs graph described with space P method have not. The reason is that the BTNs graph described with space P method have the intense overlapping community property and general community division algorithms can not identify this kind of community structure. To overcome this problem, we propose a novel community structure called N-depth community and present a corresponding community detecting algorithm, which can detect overlapping community. Applying the novel community structure and detecting algorithm to a BTN evolution model described with space P, whose network property agrees well with real BTNs', we get obvious community property. (general)

  7. NET.EXCEL thematic network: networking for research on radioactive waste geological disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svemar, Christer [Svensk Karnbranslemantering AB, SKB, Aspo Hard Rock Laboratory, PL 300, S-57295 Figeholm (Sweden); Vira, Juhani [Posiva Oy, FIN-27160 Olkiluoto (Finland); Astudillo, Julio [Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA, ENRESA, Emilio Vargas 7, E-Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    2004-07-01

    The NET.EXCEL project concerns the forming of a network of European end users for analysing the present status and future needs in Research, Technical development and Demonstration (RTD) for the disposal of highly radioactive waste in the three classical rock media: salt, clay/clay sediments and crystalline rock. The aim is to generate value additional to that gained by the individual participants: Svensk Kaernbraenslehantering AB (Sweden), Posiva Oy (Finland), Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos SA (Spain), Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (Germany), Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs (France), Nationale Genossenschaft fuer die Lagerung radioaktiver Abfaelle (Switzerland), Organisme National des Dechets Radioactifs et des Matieres Fissiles Enrichies (Belgium) and United Kingdom Nirex Limited (UK). The work performed in various research institutes as well as in large-scale underground rock laboratories in European countries to develop techniques for the safe handling and disposal of highly radioactive waste has led to a substantial build-up of experience. The experience covers both the practical areas of repository design and construction, waste encapsulation/conditioning (as over-packing) and disposal, as well as the theoretical evaluation of long term safety. In general, there are differences in the type of high level and long lived radioactive waste (for instance, either spent fuel or vitrified waste if the reprocessing option is considered by utilities) that the participating organisations have responsibilities for, and the time-schedules for their work. The national regulatory framework may also induce some differences. One of the initial issues in the project is to shed light on the rationale for these observed differences. In contrast, the practical way to carry out the needed RTD-activities and the principles behind the process to establish priorities for the necessary RTD-work is quite similar. Common ground

  8. The use of Theory in Family Therapy Research: Content Analysis and Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruoxi; Hughes, Alexandria C; Austin, Jason P

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated 275 empirical studies from Journal of Marital and Family Therapy and Family Process from 2010 to 2015 on their use of theory, and compared our findings to those of a similar previous analysis (Hawley & Geske, 2000). Overall, theory seems to have become much better incorporated in empirical family therapy research, with only 16.4% of the articles not using theory in either their introductory or discussion sections. Theory appeared better incorporated in the introductory sections than in the discussion sections. Systems theory remained the most commonly used conceptual framework, followed by attachment theory. We discuss areas for improving theory incorporation in family therapy research, and offer suggestions for both family therapy researchers and educators. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  9. A new approach to mentoring for research careers: the National Research Mentoring Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkness, Christine A; Pfund, Christine; Ofili, Elizabeth O; Okuyemi, Kolawole S; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Zavala, Maria Elena; Pesavento, Theresa; Fernandez, Mary; Tissera, Anthony; Deveci, Alp; Javier, Damaris; Short, Alexis; Cooper, Paige; Jones, Harlan; Manson, Spero; Buchwald, Dedra; Eide, Kristin; Gouldy, Andrea; Kelly, Erin; Langford, Nicole; McGee, Richard; Steer, Clifford; Unold, Thad; Weber-Main, Anne Marie; Báez, Adriana; Stiles, Jonathan; Pemu, Priscilla; Thompson, Winston; Gwathmey, Judith; Lawson, Kimberly; Johnson, Japera; Hall, Meldra; Paulsen, Douglas; Fouad, Mona; Smith, Ann; Luna, Rafael; Wilson, Donald; Adelsberger, Greg; Simenson, Drew; Cook, Abby; Feliu-Mojer, Monica; Harwood, Eileen; Jones, Amy; Branchaw, Janet; Thomas, Stephen; Butz, Amanda; Byars-Winston, Angela; House, Stephanie; McDaniels, Melissa; Quinn, Sandra; Rogers, Jenna; Spencer, Kim; Utzerath, Emily; Duplicate Of Weber-Main; Womack, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Effective mentorship is critical to the success of early stage investigators, and has been linked to enhanced mentee productivity, self-efficacy, and career satisfaction. The mission of the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) is to provide all trainees across the biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social sciences with evidence-based mentorship and professional development programming that emphasizes the benefits and challenges of diversity, inclusivity, and culture within mentoring relationships, and more broadly the research workforce. The purpose of this paper is to describe the structure and activities of NRMN. NRMN serves as a national training hub for mentors and mentees striving to improve their relationships by better aligning expectations, promoting professional development, maintaining effective communication, addressing equity and inclusion, assessing understanding, fostering independence, and cultivating ethical behavior. Training is offered in-person at institutions, regional training, or national meetings, as well as via synchronous and asynchronous platforms; the growing training demand is being met by a cadre of NRMN Master Facilitators. NRMN offers career stage-focused coaching models for grant writing, and other professional development programs. NRMN partners with diverse stakeholders from the NIH-sponsored Diversity Program Consortium (DPC), as well as organizations outside the DPC to work synergistically towards common diversity goals. NRMN offers a virtual portal to the Network and all NRMN program offerings for mentees and mentors across career development stages. NRMNet provides access to a wide array of mentoring experiences and resources including MyNRMN, Guided Virtual Mentorship Program, news, training calendar, videos, and workshops. National scale and sustainability are being addressed by NRMN "Coaches-in-Training" offerings for more senior researchers to implement coaching models across the nation. "Shark Tanks" provide

  10. The feasibility of a clinical trial of pain related to temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders: the results of a survey from the Collaboration on Networked Dental and Oral Research dental practice-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velly, Ana M; Schiffman, Eric L; Rindal, D Brad; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Gilbert, Gregg H; Lehmann, Maryann; Horowitz, Allan; Fricton, James

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted a survey to characterize the strategies used by general dentists to manage pain related to temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJDs) and to assess the feasibility of conducting a randomized controlled trial (RCT) to determine the effectiveness of these strategies. Dentists from three dental practice-based research networks (PBRNs) (The Dental Practice-Based Research Network, Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning Network and Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry) agreed to participate in this survey. Of 862 dentists surveyed, 654 were general dentists who treated TMJDs; among these, 80.3 percent stated they would participate in a future RCT. Dentists treated an average of three patients with TMJD-related pain per month. Splints or mouthguards (97.6 percent), self-care (85.9 percent) and over-the-counter or prescribed medications (84.6 percent) were the treatments most frequently used. The treatments dentists preferred to compare in an RCT were splint or mouthguard therapy (35.8 percent), self-care (27.4 percent) and medication (17.0 percent). Most general dentists treat TMJD-related pain, and initial reversible care typically is provided. It is feasible to conduct an RCT in a dental PBRN to assess the effectiveness of splint or mouthguard therapy, self-care or medication for the initial management of painful TMJD. There is an opportunity to do an RCT in a dental PBRN, which could lead to the development of evidence-based treatment guidelines for the initial treatment of TMJD-related pain by primary care dentists.

  11. Research and application of knowledge resources network for product innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Li, Wen-qiang; Li, Yan; Na, Hui-zhen; Shi, Qian

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the capabilities of knowledge service in product innovation design service platform, a method of acquiring knowledge resources supporting for product innovation from the Internet and providing knowledge active push is proposed. Through knowledge modeling for product innovation based on ontology, the integrated architecture of knowledge resources network is put forward. The technology for the acquisition of network knowledge resources based on focused crawler and web services is studied. Knowledge active push is provided for users by user behavior analysis and knowledge evaluation in order to improve users' enthusiasm for participation in platform. Finally, an application example is illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  12. Research and Application of Knowledge Resources Network for Product Innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to enhance the capabilities of knowledge service in product innovation design service platform, a method of acquiring knowledge resources supporting for product innovation from the Internet and providing knowledge active push is proposed. Through knowledge modeling for product innovation based on ontology, the integrated architecture of knowledge resources network is put forward. The technology for the acquisition of network knowledge resources based on focused crawler and web services is studied. Knowledge active push is provided for users by user behavior analysis and knowledge evaluation in order to improve users’ enthusiasm for participation in platform. Finally, an application example is illustrated to prove the effectiveness of the method.

  13. Architecture of the Multi-Modal Organizational Research and Production Heterogeneous Network (MORPHnet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, R.J.; Carlson, R.A.; Foster, I.T. [and others

    1997-01-01

    The research and education (R&E) community requires persistent and scaleable network infrastructure to concurrently support production and research applications as well as network research. In the past, the R&E community has relied on supporting parallel network and end-node infrastructures, which can be very expensive and inefficient for network service managers and application programmers. The grand challenge in networking is to provide support for multiple, concurrent, multi-layer views of the network for the applications and the network researchers, and to satisfy the sometimes conflicting requirements of both while ensuring one type of traffic does not adversely affect the other. Internet and telecommunications service providers will also benefit from a multi-modal infrastructure, which can provide smoother transitions to new technologies and allow for testing of these technologies with real user traffic while they are still in the pre-production mode. The authors proposed approach requires the use of as much of the same network and end system infrastructure as possible to reduce the costs needed to support both classes of activities (i.e., production and research). Breaking the infrastructure into segments and objects (e.g., routers, switches, multiplexors, circuits, paths, etc.) gives the capability to dynamically construct and configure the virtual active networks to address these requirements. These capabilities must be supported at the campus, regional, and wide-area network levels to allow for collaboration by geographically dispersed groups. The Multi-Modal Organizational Research and Production Heterogeneous Network (MORPHnet) described in this report is an initial architecture and framework designed to identify and support the capabilities needed for the proposed combined infrastructure and to address related research issues.

  14. Transnational Research Networks in Chinese Scientific Production. An Investigation on Health-Industry Related Sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, Lauretta; Pollio, Chiara; Di Tommaso, Marco R

    2017-08-29

    Transnational research networks (TRN) are becoming increasingly complex. Such complexity may have both positive and negative effects on the quality of research. Our work studies the evolution over time of Chinese TRN and the role of complexity on the quality of Chinese research, given the leading role this country has recently acquired in international science. We focus on the fields of geriatrics and gerontology. We build an original dataset of all scientific publications of China in these areas in 2009, 2012 and 2015, starting from the ISI Web of Knowledge (ISI WoK) database. Using Social Network Analysis (SNA), we analyze the change in scientific network structure across time. Second, we design indices to control for the different aspects of networks complexity (number of authors, country heterogeneity and institutional heterogeneity) and we perform negative binomial regressions to identify the main determinants of research quality. Our analysis shows that research networks in the field of geriatrics and gerontology have gradually become wider in terms of countries and have become more balanced. Furthermore, our results identify that different forms of complexity have different impacts on quality, including a reciprocal moderating effect. In particular, according to our analysis, research quality benefits from complex research networks both in terms of countries and of types of institutions involved, but that such networks should be "compact" in terms of number of authors. Eventually, we suggest that complexity should be carefully taken into account when designing policies aimed at enhancing the quality of research.

  15. Supporting novel biomedical research via multilayer collaboration networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzmin, Konstantin; Lu, Xiaoyan; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi; Zhuang, Juntao; Gaiteri, Chris; Szymanski, Boleslaw K

    2016-01-01

    The value of research containing novel combinations of molecules can be seen in many innovative and award-winning research programs. Despite calls to use innovative approaches to address common diseases, an increasing majority of research funding goes toward "safe" incremental research. Counteracting this trend by nurturing novel and potentially transformative scientific research is challenging, it must be supported in competition with established research programs. Therefore, we propose a to...

  16. Searching for Music's Potential: A Critical Examination of Research on Music Therapy with Individuals with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accordino, Robert; Comer, Ronald; Heller, Wendy B.

    2007-01-01

    The authors conducted a literature review on music therapy for individuals with autism because of the frequent use of music therapy for those with autism and recent research on the musical abilities of this population. To accomplish this narrative review, articles were searched from relevant databases, reference lists from articles, and book…

  17. Commonalities among the Creative Arts Therapies as a Basis for Research Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Charles

    1992-01-01

    Argues that poetry therapy is similar to the other creative arts therapies in its use of creative processes and products, and in its intrinsic positiveness, gentle indirectness, and breadth of appeal and application. Suggests that collaborative research efforts among creative arts therapists can lead to new understandings of the processes and…

  18. Beyond Erasure: The Ethics of Art Therapy Research with Trans and Gender-Independent People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Asha

    2017-01-01

    Trans and gender-independent clients, who often experience unnecessary pathologization when accessing mental health care, can benefit from art therapy because it offers practitioners and clients the unique potential to disrupt social hierarchies. Art therapy research, however, has often replicated social structures that oppress people from diverse…

  19. Research priorities for a multi-center child abuse pediatrics network - CAPNET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Daniel M; Wood, Joanne N; Campbell, Kristine A; Scribano, Philip V; Laskey, Antoinette; Leventhal, John M; Pierce, Mary Clyde; Runyan, Desmond K

    2017-03-01

    Although child maltreatment medical research has benefited from several multi-center studies, the new specialty of child abuse pediatrics has not had a sustainable network capable of pursuing multiple, prospective, clinically-oriented studies. The Child Abuse Pediatrics Network (CAPNET) is a new multi-center research network dedicated to child maltreatment medical research. In order to establish a relevant, practical research agenda, we conducted a modified Delphi process to determine the topic areas with highest priority for such a network. Research questions were solicited from members of the Ray E. Helfer Society and study authors and were sorted into topic areas. These topic areas were rated for priority using iterative rounds of ratings and in-person meetings. The topics rated with the highest priority were missed diagnosis and selected/indicated prevention. This agenda can be used to target future multi-center child maltreatment medical research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Research Priorities for a Multi-Center Child Abuse Pediatrics Network - CAPNET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Joanne N.; Campbell, Kristine A.; Scribano, Philip V.; Laskey, Antoinette; Leventhal, John M.; Pierce, Mary Clyde; Runyan, Desmond K.

    2018-01-01

    Although child maltreatment medical research has benefited from several multi-center studies, the new specialty of child abuse pediatrics has not had a sustainable network capable of pursuing multiple, prospective, clinically-oriented studies. The Child Abuse Pediatrics Network (CAPNET) is a new multi-center research network dedicated to child maltreatment medical research. In order to establish a relevant, practical research agenda, we conducted a modified Delphi process to determine the topic areas with highest priority for such a network. Research questions were solicited from members of the Ray E. Helfer Society and study authors and were sorted into topic areas. These topic areas were rated for priority using iterative rounds of ratings and in-person meetings. The topics rated with the highest priority were missed diagnosis and selected/indicated prevention. This agenda can be used to target future multi-center child maltreatment medical research. PMID:28161656

  1. Is a practice-based rural research network feasible in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemenc-Ketis, Zalika; Kurpas, Donata; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Petrazzuoli, Ferdinando; Jacquet, Jean-Pierre; Buono, Nicola; Lopez-Abuin, Jose; Lionis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Research in family medicine is a well-established entity nationally and internationally, covering all aspects of primary care including remote and isolated practices. However, due to limited capacity and resources in rural family medicine, its potential is not fully exploited yet. An idea to foster European rural primary care research by establishing a practice-based research network has been recently put forward by several members of the European Rural and Isolated Practitioners Association (EURIPA) and the European General Practice Research Network (EGPRN). Two workshops on why, and how to design a practice-based research network among rural family practices in Europe were conducted at two international meetings. This paper revisits the definition of practice-based research in family medicine, reflects on the current situation in Europe regarding the research in rural family practice, and discusses a rationale for practice-based research in rural family medicine. A SWOT analysis was used as the main tool to analyse the current situation in Europe regarding the research in rural family practice at both meetings. The key messages gained from these meetings may be employed by the Wonca Working Party on research, the International Federation of Primary Care Research Network and the EGPRN that seek to introduce a practice-based research approach. The cooperation and collaboration between EURIPA and EGPRN creates a fertile ground to discuss further the prospect of a European practice-based rural family medicine research network, and to draw on the joint experience.

  2. Teacher Agency in Educational Reform: Lessons from Social Networks Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datnow, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a context for understanding how social networks among teachers support or constrain school improvement in terms of instructional practice, professional development, and educational reform. It comments on the articles in this special issue, summarizing their contributions to the field. This analysis reveals several important…

  3. Low-stress bicycling and network connectivity : [research brief].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    In one sense, a citys or regions bicycling network includes all of its roads and paths on which bicycling is permitted. However, some streets provide such a poor level of safety and comfort for bicycling that the majority of the population cons...

  4. Genome network medicine: innovation to overcome huge challenges in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukos, Dimitrios H

    2014-01-01

    The post-ENCODE era shapes now a new biomedical research direction for understanding transcriptional and signaling networks driving gene expression and core cellular processes such as cell fate, survival, and apoptosis. Over the past half century, the Francis Crick 'central dogma' of single n gene/protein-phenotype (trait/disease) has defined biology, human physiology, disease, diagnostics, and drugs discovery. However, the ENCODE project and several other genomic studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, computational strategies, and imaging techniques to visualize regulatory networks, provide evidence that transcriptional process and gene expression are regulated by highly complex dynamic molecular and signaling networks. This Focus article describes the linear experimentation-based limitations of diagnostics and therapeutics to cure advanced cancer and the need to move on from reductionist to network-based approaches. With evident a wide genomic heterogeneity, the power and challenges of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to identify a patient's personal mutational landscape for tailoring the best target drugs in the individual patient are discussed. However, the available drugs are not capable of targeting aberrant signaling networks and research on functional transcriptional heterogeneity and functional genome organization is poorly understood. Therefore, the future clinical genome network medicine aiming at overcoming multiple problems in the new fields of regulatory DNA mapping, noncoding RNA, enhancer RNAs, and dynamic complexity of transcriptional circuitry are also discussed expecting in new innovation technology and strong appreciation of clinical data and evidence-based medicine. The problematic and potential solutions in the discovery of next-generation, molecular, and signaling circuitry-based biomarkers and drugs are explored. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Psychosocial therapies for the adjunctive treatment of bipolar disorder in adults: network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterton, Mary Lou; Stockings, Emily; Berk, Michael; Barendregt, Jan J; Carter, Rob; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine

    2017-05-01

    Background Few trials have compared psychosocial therapies for people with bipolar affective disorder, and conventional meta-analyses provided limited comparisons between therapies. Aims To combine evidence for the efficacy of psychosocial interventions used as adjunctive treatment of bipolar disorder in adults, using network meta-analysis (NMA). Method Systematic review identified studies and NMA was used to pool data on relapse to mania or depression, medication adherence, and symptom scales for mania, depression and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). Results Carer-focused interventions significantly reduced the risk of depressive or manic relapse. Psychoeducation alone and in combination with cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) significantly reduced medication non-adherence. Psychoeducation plus CBT significantly reduced manic symptoms and increased GAF. No intervention was associated with a significant reduction in depression symptom scale scores. Conclusions Only interventions for family members affected relapse rates. Psychoeducation plus CBT reduced medication non-adherence, improved mania symptoms and GAF. Novel methods for addressing depressive symptoms are required. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  6. Variation in Definitive Therapy for Localized Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Among National Comprehensive Cancer Network Institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Luca F. [Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire (United States); Jagsi, Reshma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bobiak, Sarah N.; Zornosa, Carrie [National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Fort Washington, Pennsylvania (United States); D' Amico, Thomas A. [Department of Surgery, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Pisters, Katherine M. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dexter, Elisabeth U. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Niland, Joyce C. [Department of Information Sciences, City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kapadia, Nirav S., E-mail: Nirav.S.Kapadia@hitchcock.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: This study determined practice patterns in the staging and treatment of patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) member institutions. Secondary aims were to determine trends in the use of definitive therapy, predictors of treatment type, and acute adverse events associated with primary modalities of treatment. Methods and Materials: Data from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Oncology Outcomes Database from 2007 to 2011 for US patients with stage I NSCLC were used. Main outcome measures included patterns of care, predictors of treatment, acute morbidity, and acute mortality. Results: Seventy-nine percent of patients received surgery, 16% received definitive radiation therapy (RT), and 3% were not treated. Seventy-four percent of the RT patients received stereotactic body RT (SBRT), and the remainder received nonstereotactic RT (NSRT). Among participating NCCN member institutions, the number of surgeries-to-RT course ratios varied between 1.6 and 34.7 (P<.01), and the SBRT-to-NSRT ratio varied between 0 and 13 (P=.01). Significant variations were also observed in staging practices, with brain imaging 0.33 (0.25-0.43) times as likely and mediastinoscopy 31.26 (21.84-44.76) times more likely for surgical patients than for RT patients. Toxicity rates for surgical and for SBRT patients were similar, although the rates were double for NSRT patients. Conclusions: The variations in treatment observed among NCCN institutions reflects the lack of level I evidence directing the use of surgery or SBRT for stage I NSCLC. In this setting, research of patient and physician preferences may help to guide future decision making.

  7. Sharing the agenda: pondering the politics and practices of occupational therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammell, Karen R W; Miller, William C; Forwell, Susan J; Forman, Bert E; Jacobsen, Brad A

    2012-05-01

    Occupational therapists espouse a client-centred philosophy of practice, yet little attention has been given to pondering the politics or client-centred practices of occupational therapy research. The aim of this paper is thus to foster reflection on occupational therapy's commitment to client-centredness in the practice of occupational therapy research. Occupational therapy research is not consistently undertaken in a collaborative manner. Power resides in control of the research agenda and participants' priorities can be supplanted by those of researchers. However, examples from the literature and from the authors' research suggest that study participants may wish to influence the research agenda such that their needs and priorities are addressed. Client-centred principles appear to require occupational therapists to undertake collaborative research and to ensure that research agendas are informed by clients' priorities. Commitment to client-centred principles demands concerted efforts to identify and address potential barriers to meaningful client participation in the occupation of research. However, it is argued that if researchers and disabled people collaborate, and pool their knowledge and expertise, they may achieve research that is more philosophically compatible with espoused professional values; and that collaborative research may also inform more relevant and useful client-centred clinical practices.

  8. Mekong Economic Research Network (MERN) | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The project will enable researchers to produce high-quality policy oriented research on critical economic issues of national and regional concern. It will do so by strengthening the analytical and technical skills of young economists through applied research and mentoring, and by promoting cooperation between researchers ...

  9. Applying nuclear techniques for environmental protection: A global research network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson Wiltschegg, T.

    1993-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of the IAEA's Research Contract Programme, designed to stimulate advances in scientific knowledge; to assist where possible developing countries to increase their participation in nuclear research; and to coordinate research between the IAEA and national centres. The relationship between Coordinated Research Programs and Technical Cooperation Projects is also described

  10. Psychological therapies for auditory hallucinations (voices): current status and key directions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Hayward, Mark; Peters, Emmanuelle; van der Gaag, Mark; Bentall, Richard P; Jenner, Jack; Strauss, Clara; Sommer, Iris E; Johns, Louise C; Varese, Filippo; García-Montes, José Manuel; Waters, Flavie; Dodgson, Guy; McCarthy-Jones, Simon

    2014-07-01

    This report from the International Consortium on Hallucinations Research considers the current status and future directions in research on psychological therapies targeting auditory hallucinations (hearing voices). Therapy approaches have evolved from behavioral and coping-focused interventions, through formulation-driven interventions using methods from cognitive therapy, to a number of contemporary developments. Recent developments include the application of acceptance- and mindfulness-based approaches, and consolidation of methods for working with connections between voices and views of self, others, relationships and personal history. In this article, we discuss the development of therapies for voices and review the empirical findings. This review shows that psychological therapies are broadly effective for people with positive symptoms, but that more research is required to understand the specific application of therapies to voices. Six key research directions are identified: (1) moving beyond the focus on overall efficacy to understand specific therapeutic processes targeting voices, (2) better targeting psychological processes associated with voices such as trauma, cognitive mechanisms, and personal recovery, (3) more focused measurement of the intended outcomes of therapy, (4) understanding individual differences among voice hearers, (5) extending beyond a focus on voices and schizophrenia into other populations and sensory modalities, and (6) shaping interventions for service implementation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  11. Researches on the Security of Cluster-based Communication Protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhong Sun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Along with the in-depth application of sensor networks, the security issues have gradually become the bottleneck of wireless sensor applications. To provide a solution for security scheme is a common concern not only of researchers but also of providers, integrators and users of wireless sensor networks. Based on this demand, this paper focuses on the research of strengthening the security of cluster-based wireless sensor networks. Based on the systematic analysis of the clustering protocol and its security enhancement scheme, the paper introduces the broadcast authentication scheme, and proposes an SA-LEACH network security enhancement protocol. The performance analysis and simulation experiments prove that the protocol consumes less energy with the same security requirements, and when the base station is comparatively far from the network deployment area, it is more advantageous in terms of energy consumption and t more suitable for wireless sensor networks.

  12. Research progress on criteria for discontinuation of EGFR inhibitor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang HQ

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hong-qing Zhuang, Zhi-yong Yuan, Jun Wang, Ping Wang, Lu-jun Zhao, Bai-lin ZhangDepartment of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: The clinical success of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI as therapeutic agents has prompted great interest in their further development and clinical testing for a wide variety of malignancies. However, most studies have focused on the efficacy of TKI, and few studies have been done on the criteria for their discontinuation. The current standard for drug discontinuation is “until progression”, based on change in tumor size. However, tumor size is not related to the gene expression which determines the efficacy of TKI in the final analysis, and it is also difficult to make a thorough and correct prediction based on tumor size when the TKI is discontinued. Nevertheless, clinical evaluation of the criteria for TKI discontinuation is still in its early days. Some promising findings have started to emerge. With the improving knowledge of EGFR and its inhibitors, it is expected that the criteria for discontinuation of EGFR inhibitor therapy will become clearer.Keywords: epidermal growth factor receptor, drug discontinuation, acquired drug-resistance

  13. Neutron capture therapy beams at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.R.; Clement, S.D.; Harling, O.K.; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    Several neutron beams that could be used for neutron capture therapy at MITR-II are dosimetrically characterized and their suitability for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and other types of tumors are described. The types of neutron beams studied are: (1) those filtered by various thicknesses of cadmium, D2O, 6Li, and bismuth; and (2) epithermal beams achieved by filtration with aluminum, sulfur, cadmium, 6Li, and bismuth. Measured dose vs. depth data are presented in polyethylene phantom with references to what can be expected in brain. The results indicate that both types of neutron beams are useful for neutron capture therapy. The first type of neutron beams have good therapeutic advantage depths (approximately 5 cm) and excellent in-phantom ratios of therapeutic dose to background dose. Such beams would be useful for treating tumors located at relatively shallow depths in the brain. On the other hand, the second type of neutron beams have superior therapeutic advantage depths (greater than 6 cm) and good in-phantom therapeutic advantage ratios. Such beams, when used along with bilateral irradiation schemes, would be able to treat tumors at any depth in the brain. Numerical examples of what could be achieved with these beams, using RBEs, fractionated-dose delivery, unilateral, and bilateral irradiation are presented in the paper. Finally, additional plans for further neutron beam development at MITR-II are discussed

  14. Evaluating research and impact: a bibliometric analysis of research by the NIH/NIAID HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R Rosas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluative bibliometrics uses advanced techniques to assess the impact of scholarly work in the context of other scientific work and usually compares the relative scientific contributions of research groups or institutions. Using publications from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID HIV/AIDS extramural clinical trials networks, we assessed the presence, performance, and impact of papers published in 2006-2008. Through this approach, we sought to expand traditional bibliometric analyses beyond citation counts to include normative comparisons across journals and fields, visualization of co-authorship across the networks, and assess the inclusion of publications in reviews and syntheses. Specifically, we examined the research output of the networks in terms of the a presence of papers in the scientific journal hierarchy ranked on the basis of journal influence measures, b performance of publications on traditional bibliometric measures, and c impact of publications in comparisons with similar publications worldwide, adjusted for journals and fields. We also examined collaboration and interdisciplinarity across the initiative, through network analysis and modeling of co-authorship patterns. Finally, we explored the uptake of network produced publications in research reviews and syntheses. Overall, the results suggest the networks are producing highly recognized work, engaging in extensive interdisciplinary collaborations, and having an impact across several areas of HIV-related science. The strengths and limitations of the approach for evaluation and monitoring research initiatives are discussed.

  15. Dengue research networks: building evidence for policy and planning in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula Fonseca E Fonseca, Bruna; Zicker, Fabio

    2016-11-08

    The analysis of scientific networks has been applied in health research to map and measure relationships between researchers and institutions, describing collaboration structures, individual roles, and research outputs, and helping the identification of knowledge gaps and cooperation opportunities. Driven by dengue continued expansion in Brazil, we explore the contribution, dynamics and consolidation of dengue scientific networks that could ultimately inform the prioritisation of research, financial investments and health policy. Social network analysis (SNA) was used to produce a 20-year (1995-2014) retrospective longitudinal evaluation of dengue research networks within Brazil and with its partners abroad, with special interest in describing institutional collaboration and their research outputs. The analysis of institutional co-authorship showed a significant expansion of collaboration over the years, increased international involvement, and ensured a shift from public health research toward vector control and basic biomedical research, probably as a reflection of the expansion of transmission, high burden and increasing research funds from the Brazilian government. The analysis identified leading national organisations that maintained the research network connectivity, facilitated knowledge exchange and reduced network vulnerability. SNA proved to be a valuable tool that, along with other indicators, can strengthen a knowledge platform to inform future policy, planning and funding decisions. The paper provides relevant information to policy and planning for dengue research as it reveals: (1) the effectiveness of the research network in knowledge generation, sharing and diffusion; (2) the near-absence of collaboration with the private sector; and (3) the key central organisations that can support strategic decisions on investments, development and implementation of innovations. In addition, the increase in research activities and collaboration has not yet

  16. CERN launches new cancer therapy initiative

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    "The first meeting of a new European network for research in cancer therapy was held at CERN, in February 2002. ENLIGHT, the European Network for Research in Light Ion Therapy aims to coordinate the development of a variety of projects at European facilities for "light ion therapy" - a form of radiation therapy that uses beams of the nuclei of lightweight atoms" (1/2 page).

  17. New disposition for pain therapy in Italy, center for headache should be integrated in the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensini, Gian Franco

    2011-05-01

    On March 15th 2010, Italy adopted the Law no. 38 "Disposizioni per garantire l'accesso alle cure palliative e alla terapia del dolore" (Provisions aimed at ensuring access to palliative care and pain therapy). The aim of pain therapy is to enable patients with chronic diseases to achieve pain control. Palliative care, as defined by the World Health Organization, aims at "improving the quality of life of patients and families, who face the problems associated with incurable diseases, through prevention and relief from suffering, achieved through an early identification and treatment of pain by pharmacological medication and other physical, psychosocial and spiritual techniques". The main issues addressed by the law concern the monitoring of pain (the doctors will have to record on the clinical report form every level of pain intensity suffered by the patient, the appropriate therapy administered, and the pain relief achieved. This report must be kept accurately in all settings: hospital, day hospital and in outpatients). The law also suggests the establishment of two kinds of regional networks. One network (including Hospices) ensures the administration of palliative care to terminally ill patients; the other, including clinics and centers of pain therapy, provides assistance to patients with chronic pain. These networks involve general practitioners, hospital specialists and pain therapy specialists in order to ensure the best patient care. Simplification of the prescription of opiate drugs is also included in the law. In the prescription of opiates, the National Health Service medical staff can use the normal prescription form, and opiates will reimbursed by the NHS, like all other drugs. In addition, the technical papers provide precise indications of the appropriate modality of administration. The law allocates (art. 12, paragraph 2) 100 million euros per year and € 2,450,000 in the biennium 2010-2011 to implement experimental regional projects: "hospital

  18. Researchers in Music Education/Therapy: Analysis of Publications, Citations, and Retrievability of Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittin, Ruth V.; Standley, Jayne

    1997-01-01

    Summarizes several citation analyses of articles appearing in the "Journal of Research in Music Education,""Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education," and "The Journal of Music Therapy." Identifies the most productive scholars, researchers, and universities. Investigates retrievability of related work by specialists outside the…

  19. Data-Intensive Cloud Service Provision for Research Institutes: the Network Connectivity Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Cass, Tony; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2016-01-01

    Much effort (and money) has been invested in recent years to ensure that academic and research sites are well interconnected with high-capacity networks that, in most cases, span national and continental boundaries. However, these dedicated research and education networks, whether national (NRENs) or trans-continental (RENs), frequently have Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) that restrict their use by commercial entities, notably Cloud Service Providers (CSPs). After a brief summary of the issues involved, we describe three approaches to removing the network connectivity barrier that threatens to limit the ability of academic and research institutions to profit effectively from services offered by CSPs.

  20. Cognitive behavioral therapy increases amygdala connectivity with the cognitive control network in both MDD and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Haochang; Yang, Zhen; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Cook, Philip A; Bruce, Steven E; Shinohara, Russell T; Rosenberg, Benjamin; Sheline, Yvette I

    2017-01-01

    Both major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are characterized by alterations in intrinsic functional connectivity. Here we investigated changes in intrinsic functional connectivity across these disorders as a function of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), an effective treatment in both disorders. 53 unmedicated right-handed participants were included in a longitudinal study. Patients were diagnosed with PTSD ( n  = 18) and MDD ( n  = 17) with a structured diagnostic interview and treated with 12 sessions of manualized CBT over a 12-week period. Patients received an MRI scan (Siemens 3 T Trio) before and after treatment. Longitudinal functional principal components analysis (LFPCA) was performed on functional connectivity of the bilateral amygdala with the fronto-parietal network. A matched healthy control group ( n  = 18) was also scanned twice for comparison. LFPCA identified four eigenimages or principal components (PCs) that contributed significantly to the longitudinal change in connectivity. The second PC differentiated CBT-treated patients from controls in having significantly increased connectivity of the amygdala with the fronto-parietal network following CBT. Analysis of CBT-induced amygdala connectivity changes was restricted to the a priori determined fronto-parietal network. Future studies are needed to determine the generalizability of these findings, given the small and predominantly female sample. We found evidence for the hypothesis that CBT treatment is associated with changes in connectivity between the amygdala and the fronto-parietal network. CBT may work by strengthening connections between the amygdala and brain regions that are involved in cognitive control, potentially providing enhanced top-down control of affective processes that are dysregulated in both MDD and PTSD.

  1. Use of peers to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy: a global network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanters, Steve; Park, Jay Jh; Chan, Keith; Ford, Nathan; Forrest, Jamie; Thorlund, Kristian; Nachega, Jean B; Mills, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether using peers can improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). To construct the World Health Organization's global guidance on adherence interventions, we conducted a systematic review and network meta-analysis to determine the effectiveness of using peers for achieving adequate adherence and viral suppression. We searched for randomized clinical trials of peer-based interventions to promote adherence to ART in HIV populations. We searched six electronic databases from inception to July 2015 and major conference abstracts within the last three years. We examined the outcomes of adherence and viral suppression among trials done worldwide and those specific to low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) using pairwise and network meta-analyses. Twenty-two trials met the inclusion criteria. We found similar results between pairwise and network meta-analyses, and between the global and LMIC settings. Peer supporter+Telephone was superior in improving adherence than standard-of-care in both the global network (odds-ratio [OR]=4.79, 95% credible intervals [CrI]: 1.02, 23.57) and the LMIC settings (OR=4.83, 95% CrI: 1.88, 13.55). Peer support alone, however, did not lead to improvement in ART adherence in both settings. For viral suppression, we found no difference of effects among interventions due to limited trials. Our analysis showed that peer support leads to modest improvement in adherence. These modest effects may be due to the fact that in many settings, particularly in LMICs, programmes already include peer supporters, adherence clubs and family disclosures for treatment support. Rather than introducing new interventions, a focus on improving the quality in the delivery of existing services may be a more practical and effective way to improve adherence to ART.

  2. History of the Rare Cancer Network and past research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René-Olivier Mirimanoff

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Approximately, twenty years ago, the Rare Cancer Network (RCN was formed in Lausanne, Switzerland, to support the study of rare malignancies. The RCN has grown over the years and now includes 130 investigators from twenty-four nations on six continents. The network held its first international symposium in Nice, France, on March 21-22, 2014. The proceedings of that meeting are presented in two companion papers. This manuscript reviews the history of the growth of the RCN and contains the abstracts of fourteen oral presentations made at the meeting of prior RCN studies. From 1993 to 2014, 74 RCN studies have been initiated, of which 54 were completed, 10 are in progress or under analysis, and 9 were stopped due to poor accrual. Forty-four peer reviewed publications have been written on behalf of the RCN.

  3. Research on artificial neural network applications for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Soon-Heung; Cheon, Se-Woo

    1992-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are an emerging computational technology which can significantly enhance a number of applications. These consist of many interconnected processing elements that exhibit human-like performance, i.e., learning, pattern recognition and associative memory skills. Several application studies on ANNs devoted to nuclear power plants have been carried out at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology since 1989. These studies include the feasibility of using ANNs for the following tasks: (1) thermal power prediction, (2) transient identification, (3) multiple alarm processing and diagnosis, (4) core thermal margin prediction, and (5) prediction of core parameters for fuel reloading. This paper introduces the back-propagation network (BPN) model which is the most commonly used algorithm, and summarizes each of the studies briefly. (author)

  4. Research on a Queue Scheduling Algorithm in Wireless Communications Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenchuan; Hu, Yuanmei; Zhou, Qiancai

    This paper proposes a protocol QS-CT, Queue Scheduling Mechanism based on Multiple Access in Ad hoc net work, which adds queue scheduling mechanism to RTS-CTS-DATA using multiple access protocol. By endowing different queues different scheduling mechanisms, it makes networks access to the channel much more fairly and effectively, and greatly enhances the performance. In order to observe the final performance of the network with QS-CT protocol, we simulate it and compare it with MACA/C-T without QS-CT protocol. Contrast to MACA/C-T, the simulation result shows that QS-CT has greatly improved the throughput, delay, rate of packets' loss and other key indicators.

  5. Research on Transformer Fault Based on Probabilistic Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yingshun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of computer science and technology, and increasingly intelligent industrial production, the application of big data in industry also advances rapidly, and the development of artificial intelligence in the aspect of fault diagnosis is particularly prominent. On the basis of MATLAB platform, this paper constructs a fault diagnosis expert system of artificial intelligence machine based on the probabilistic neural network, and it also carries out a simulation of production process by the use of bionic algorithm. This paper makes a diagnosis of transformer fault by the use of an expert system developed by this paper, and verifies that the probabilistic neural network has a good convergence, fault-tolerant ability and big data handling capability in the fault diagnosis. It is suitable for industrial production, which can provide a reliable mathematical model for the construction of fault diagnosis expert system in the industrial production.

  6. Research on chronicles correlation based network intrusion detection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Zhengping; Jin Yan; Chen Taiwei; Xu Rongsheng

    2007-01-01

    According to some problems existed in network intrusion detection technique, such as alerts overwhelming, false-positives and lack of alert description, this paper introduces chronicle correlation method to alert events analysis by some correlative examples. With designed chronicle recognition language, portscan's alerts can be reduced, false-positives in buffer overflow's alerts can be detected, and NetBios DCERPC attack's alerts semantics can be improved. (authors)

  7. Global research collaboration: Networks and partners in South East Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Woolley, Richard; Robinson-Garcia, Nicolas; Costas, Rodrigo

    2017-01-01

    This is an empirical paper that addresses the role of bilateral and multilateral international co-authorships in the six leading science systems among the ASEAN group of countries (ASEAN6). The paper highlights the different ways that bilateral and multilateral co-authorships structure global networks and the collaborations of the ASEAN6. The paper looks at the influence of the collaboration styles of major collaborating countries of the ASEAN6, particularly the USA and Japan. It also highlig...

  8. Online social networks for patient involvement and recruitment in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Gemma Sinead

    2013-01-01

    To review current literature and discuss the potential of online social networking to engage patients and the public and recruit and retain participants in clinical research. Online social networking is becoming a large influence on people's daily lives. Clinical research faces several challenges, with an increasing need to engage with patients and the public and for studies to recruit and retain increasing numbers of participants, particularly in under-served, under-represented and hard to reach groups and communities. Searches were conducted using EMBASE, BNI, ERIC, CINAHL, PSYCHinfo online databases and Google Scholar to identify any grey or unpublished literature that may be available. Review methods This is a methodology paper. Online social networking is a successful, cost-effective and efficient method by which to target and recruit a wide range of communities, adolescents, young people and underserved populations into quantitative and qualitative research. Retention of participants in longitudinal studies could be improved using social networks such as Facebook. Evidence indicates that a mixed approach to recruitment using social networking and traditional methods is most effective. Further research is required to strengthen the evidence available, especially in dissemination of research through online social networks. Researchers should consider using online social networking as a method of engaging the public, and also for the recruitment and follow up of participants.

  9. Undergraduate students' development of social, cultural, and human capital in a networked research experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer Jo; Conaway, Evan; Dolan, Erin L.

    2016-12-01

    Recent calls for reform in undergraduate biology education have emphasized integrating research experiences into the learning experiences of all undergraduates. Contemporary science research increasingly demands collaboration across disciplines and institutions to investigate complex research questions, providing new contexts and models for involving undergraduates in research. In this study, we examined the experiences of undergraduates participating in a multi-institution and interdisciplinary biology research network. Unlike the traditional apprenticeship model of research, in which a student participates in research under the guidance of a single faculty member, students participating in networked research have the opportunity to develop relationships with additional faculty and students working in other areas of the project, at their own and at other institutions. We examined how students in this network develop social ties and to what extent a networked research experience affords opportunities for students to develop social, cultural, and human capital. Most studies of undergraduate involvement in science research have focused on documenting student outcomes rather than elucidating how students gain access to research experiences or how elements of research participation lead to desired student outcomes. By taking a qualitative approach framed by capital theories, we have identified ways that undergraduates utilize and further develop various forms of capital important for success in science research. In our study of the first 16 months of a biology research network, we found that undergraduates drew upon a combination of human, cultural, and social capital to gain access to the network. Within their immediate research groups, students built multidimensional social ties with faculty, peers, and others, yielding social capital that can be drawn upon for information, resources, and support. They reported developing cultural capital in the form of learning to

  10. Psychological Therapies for Auditory Hallucinations (Voices): Current Status and Key Directions for Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Hayward, Mark; Peters, Emmanuelle; van der Gaag, Mark; Bentall, Richard P.; Jenner, Jack; Strauss, Clara; Sommer, Iris E.; Johns, Louise C.; Varese, Filippo; García-Montes, José Manuel; Waters, Flavie; Dodgson, Guy; McCarthy-Jones, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This report from the International Consortium on Hallucinations Research considers the current status and future directions in research on psychological therapies targeting auditory hallucinations (hearing voices). Therapy approaches have evolved from behavioral and coping-focused interventions, through formulation-driven interventions using methods from cognitive therapy, to a number of contemporary developments. Recent developments include the application of acceptance- and mindfulness-based approaches, and consolidation of methods for working with connections between voices and views of self, others, relationships and personal history. In this article, we discuss the development of therapies for voices and review the empirical findings. This review shows that psychological therapies are broadly effective for people with positive symptoms, but that more research is required to understand the specific application of therapies to voices. Six key research directions are identified: (1) moving beyond the focus on overall efficacy to understand specific therapeutic processes targeting voices, (2) better targeting psychological processes associated with voices such as trauma, cognitive mechanisms, and personal recovery, (3) more focused measurement of the intended outcomes of therapy, (4) understanding individual differences among voice hearers, (5) extending beyond a focus on voices and schizophrenia into other populations and sensory modalities, and (6) shaping interventions for service implementation. PMID:24936081

  11. Community-Based Research Networks: Development and Lessons Learned in an Emerging Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Randy; Ambler, Susan H.; Cutforth, Nick; Donohue, Patrick; Dougherty, Dan; Marullo, Sam; Nelson, Kris S.; Stutts, Nancy B.

    2003-01-01

    Compares seven multi-institutional community-based research networks in Appalachia; Colorado; District of Columbia; Minneapolis-St. Paul; Philadelphia; Richmond, Virginia; and Trenton, New Jersey. After reviewing the histories of the networks, conducts a comparative SWOT analysis, showing their common and unique strengths, weaknesses,…

  12. MUPBED: A Pan-European Prototype for Multi-Domain Research Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaeth, Jan; Cavazzoni, Carlo; Foisel, Hans-Martin

    2009-01-01

    Integration and full interoperability are challenging areas of research in wide-area networks today. A European project, MUPBED, has recently concluded and achieved the main result of integrating and demonstrating technologies and network solutions that enable the operation of future European res...

  13. Research of negotiation in network trade system based on multi-agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Wang, Guozheng; Wu, Haiyan

    2009-07-01

    A construction and implementation technology of network trade based on multi-agent is described in this paper. First, we researched the technology of multi-agent, then we discussed the consumer's behaviors and the negotiation between purchaser and bargainer which emerges in the traditional business mode and analysed the key technology to implement the network trade system. Finally, we implement the system.

  14. Energy Research and Development Administration Ad Hoc Computer Networking Group: experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, I.

    1975-03-19

    The Ad Hoc Computer Networking Group was established to investigate the potential advantages and costs of newer forms of remote resource sharing and computer networking. The areas of research and investigation that are within the scope of the ERDA CNG are described. (GHT)

  15. The Role of Action Research in the Development of Learning Networks for Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Valerie; Mullally, Martina; O'Gorman, Bill; Fuller-Love, Nerys

    2012-01-01

    Developing sustainable learning networks for entrepreneurs is the core objective of the Sustainable Learning Networks in Ireland and Wales (SLNIW) project. One research team drawn from the Centre for Enterprise Development and Regional Economy at Waterford Institute of Technology and the School of Management and Business from Aberystwyth…

  16. DOE Network 2025: Network Research Problems and Challenges for DOE Scientists. Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-02-01

    The growing investments in large science instruments and supercomputers by the US Department of Energy (DOE) hold enormous promise for accelerating the scientific discovery process. They facilitate unprecedented collaborations of geographically dispersed teams of scientists that use these resources. These collaborations critically depend on the production, sharing, moving, and management of, as well as interactive access to, large, complex data sets at sites dispersed across the country and around the globe. In particular, they call for significant enhancements in network capacities to sustain large data volumes and, equally important, the capabilities to collaboratively access the data across computing, storage, and instrument facilities by science users and automated scripts and systems. Improvements in network backbone capacities of several orders of magnitude are essential to meet these challenges, in particular, to support exascale initiatives. Yet, raw network speed represents only a part of the solution. Indeed, the speed must be matched by network and transport layer protocols and higher layer tools that scale in ways that aggregate, compose, and integrate the disparate subsystems into a complete science ecosystem. Just as important, agile monitoring and management services need to be developed to operate the network at peak performance levels. Finally, these solutions must be made an integral part of the production facilities by using sound approaches to develop, deploy, diagnose, operate, and maintain them over the science infrastructure.

  17. Announced document collection of the 3rd information exchange meeting on radioactive waste disposal research network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-03-01

    The 3rd meeting on 'Radioactive Waste Disposal Research Network' was held at the Ricotti techno community square of JAEA on September 3 and 4, 2007. The 'Radioactive Waste Disposal Research Network' was established in Interorganization Atomic Energy Research Program under academic collaborative agreement between Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the University of Tokyo. The objective is to bring both research infrastructures and human expertise in Japan to an adequate performance level, thereby contributing to the development of the fundamental research area in the field of radioactive waste disposal. This lecture material is a collection of presentations and discussions during the information exchange meeting. (author)

  18. Experimental research of radiogenic therapy on human melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min Fengling; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong; Li Wenjiang; Liu Bing; Zhou Qingming; Duan Xin; Zhou Guangming; Gao Qingxiang

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the effect of low dose irradiation on gene transfer efficiency and the effect of adenoviral-mediated exogenous P53 overexpression on radiosensitivity of radioresistant human melanoma cell line A375 with wild type p53, control vector, a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector containing a CMV promoter and green fluorescent protein (AdCMV-GFP), was used to transfect the A375 cells preirradiated with or without 1 Gy X-ray radiation. The transduction efficiency of GFP gene was determined with fluorescence microscope directly. A375 cells radiated by 1 Gy X-ray were transfected with a replication deficient recombinant adenoviral vector carrying human wild p53 were detected using flow cytometry (FCM) at different time after transfection. The radiosensitivity of A375 cells after p53 transduction was assayed by clonoy formation. The authors found that 1 Gy exposure increased the gene transfer efficiency of A375 cells. The expression of exogenous P53 was found to be 60% to 80% of transfected cells during the first three days after transduction and then declined continuously down to the control level on the day 10. The G1 cell cycle arrest was also observed after p53 gene transfer. A375 cells that were transfected with p53 showed higher sensitivity of X-ray-induced cell killing than those cells that either were transfected with the viral vector carrying a green fluorescent protein gene or were not transfected at all. Low dose ionizing radiation can improve gene transfer efficiency of A375 cells mediated by adenovirus vector. Althrough the overexpresion of exogenous P53 may not inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis of melanoma cell line A375 in vitro, it made the tumor cells much sensitive to death by irradiation. the data suggested that p53 gene might be a potential gene for melanoma therapy and provide the experimental evidences to clinically using the combination of radiation with gene therapy on melanoma. Namely, there may be a reduction of

  19. Research on key technology of planning and design for AC/DC hybrid distribution network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Wu, Guilian; Zheng, Huan; Deng, Junpeng; Shi, Pengjia

    2018-04-01

    With the increasing demand of DC generation and DC load, the development of DC technology, AC and DC distribution network integrating will become an important form of future distribution network. In this paper, the key technology of planning and design for AC/DC hybrid distribution network is proposed, including the selection of AC and DC voltage series, the design of typical grid structure and the comprehensive evaluation method of planning scheme. The research results provide some ideas and directions for the future development of AC/DC hybrid distribution network.

  20. We need to talk about epistemology: orientations, meaning, and interpretation within music therapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jane

    2012-01-01

    Epistemology is a term used explicitly in social science research to refer to theory of knowledge, or ways of knowing. Describing the epistemological stance underpinning research studies in music therapy that use social science methods such as grounded theory, phenomenology, and ethnography will increase understanding of the outcomes presented. To promote an understanding of epistemology and its applications for music therapy research. The researcher describes her own views and experiences in developing knowledge of epistemology with reference to the social sciences and music therapy research literature published in English. She first focuses on terminology, then presents a discussion of epistemology. Further clarification is needed to improve understanding of the role of epistemology in advancing understanding of the foundations of the methods from the social sciences used in research in music therapy. In order to improve some aspects of research studies the following recommendations are made to authors. At minimum, a research report should, (a) define and describe the specific methodology such as grounded theory, phenomenology, ethnography, or other, (b) present the epistemological foundations of the method chosen, (c) include a statement on the personal standpoint of the researcher including motivations to undertake the study, (d) include the process of data analysis with justification from the epistemological stance as to why the process is credible, (e) provide outcomes of the analysis of the research in detail and in summary, and (f) refer to processes of reflexivity.

  1. Stem cell research: cloning, therapy and scientific fraud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusnak, A J; Chudley, A E

    2006-10-01

    Stem cell research has generated intense excitement, awareness, and debate. Events in the 2005-2006 saw the rise and fall of a South Korean scientist who had claimed to be the first to clone a human embryonic stem cell line. From celebration of the potential use of stem cells in the treatment of human disease to disciplinary action taken against the disgraced scientists, the drama has unfolded throughout the world media. Prompted by an image of therapeutic cloning presented on a South Korean stamp, a brief review of stem cell research and the events of the Woo-suk Hwang scandal are discussed.

  2. Social networks and informal learning processes: a research study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Besana

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Scopo del presente contributo di ricerca è di presentare i SNS come spazi maturi per l’erogazione di esperienze formative e la gestione dei flussi informativi, nonché dei processi di apprendimento. È pertanto presentato il secondo step di una ricerca che prende le mosse da un’analisi pilota condotta nel 2009 e che ha coinvolto - nel 2010 e nei primi mesi del 2011 - 926 soggetti nel tentativo di definire aspetti positivi, negativi, abitudini d’uso, rappresentazioni più o meno consapevoli e ipotesi d’impiego circa il possibile utilizzo dei Social Network nella didattica.

  3. Melodic Intonation Therapy: Back to Basics for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eZumbansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a critical review of the literature on Melodic intonation therapy (MIT, one of the most formalized treatments used by speech-language therapist in Broca’s aphasia. We suggest basic clarifications to enhance the scientific support of this promising treatment. First, MIT is a program, not a single speech facilitation technique. The goal of MIT is to restore propositional speech. The rational is that patients can learn a new way to speak through singing by using language-capable regions of the right cerebral hemisphere. We argue that many treatment programs covered in systematic reviews on MIT’s efficacy do not match MIT’s therapeutic goal and rationale. Second, we distinguish between the immediate effect of MIT’s main speech facilitation technique (i.e., intoned-speech and the effect of the entire program on language recovery. Many results in the MIT literature can be explained by this duration factor. Finally, we propose that MIT can be viewed as a treatment of apraxia of speech more than aphasia. This issue should be explored in future experimental studies.

  4. Melodic intonation therapy: back to basics for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumbansen, Anna; Peretz, Isabelle; Hébert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    We present a critical review of the literature on melodic intonation therapy (MIT), one of the most formalized treatments used by speech-language therapist in Broca's aphasia. We suggest basic clarifications to enhance the scientific support of this promising treatment. First, therapeutic protocols using singing as a speech facilitation technique are not necessarily MIT. The goal of MIT is to restore propositional speech. The rationale is that patients can learn a new way to speak through singing by using language-capable regions of the right cerebral hemisphere. Eventually, patients are supposed to use this way of speaking permanently but not to sing overtly. We argue that many treatment programs covered in systematic reviews on MIT's efficacy do not match MIT's therapeutic goal and rationale. Critically, we identified two main variations of MIT: the French thérapie mélodique et rythmée (TMR) that trains patients to use singing overtly as a facilitation technique in case of speech struggle and palliative versions of MIT that help patients with the most severe expressive deficits produce a limited set of useful, readymade phrases. Second, we distinguish between the immediate effect of singing on speech production and the long-term effect of the entire program on language recovery. Many results in the MIT literature can be explained by this temporal perspective. Finally, we propose that MIT can be viewed as a treatment of apraxia of speech more than aphasia. This issue should be explored in future experimental studies.

  5. Grand Challenges: Science, Engineering, and Societal Advances, Requiring Networking and Information Technology Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — ...the U.S. Government makes critical decisions about appropriate investments in IT R and D to help society forward both socially and economically. To inform that...

  6. Introduction to Future Wireless Networks research group's projects/activities (St. Petersburg)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lysko, Albert A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The presentation about the CSIR Meraka's Future Wireless Networks research group's projects and activities was delivered to Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg, Russia, during May 2017...

  7. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care: data from general practice research and registration networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Laar, van de F.A.; Waal, de M.W.M.; Okkes, I.M.; Akker, van den M.; Veen, van der W.J.; Schellevis, F.G.; Staveren, van W.A.; Binsbergen, van J.J.; Weel, van C.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. Methods: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care

  8. Nutritional deficiency in Dutch primary care : data from general practice research and registration networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wayenburg, CAM; van de Laar, FA; de Waal, MWM; Okkes, IM; van den Akker, M; van der Veen, WJ; Schellevis, FG; van Staveren, WA; van Binsbergen, JJ; van Weel, C

    Objective: To explore incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency in adults in general practice. Methods: Six Dutch general practice research and registration networks supplied incidence and prevalence rates of nutritional deficiency by the International Classification of Primary Care

  9. Restoration of noncarious tooth defects by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons....

  10. Embedded, everywhere: a research agenda for networked systems of embedded computers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Networked Systems of Embedded Computers; National Research Council Staff; Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences; Computer Science and Telecommunications Board; National Academy of Sciences

    2001-01-01

    .... Embedded, Everywhere explores the potential of networked systems of embedded computers and the research challenges arising from embedding computation and communications technology into a wide variety of applicationsâ...

  11. A survey of research and practices of network-on-chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Tobias; Mahadevan, Shankar

    2006-01-01

    . This survey presents a perspective on existing NoC research. We define the following abstractions: system, network adapter, network, and link to explain and structure the fundamental concepts. First, research relating to the actual network design is reviewed. Then system level design and modeling......The scaling of microchip technologies has enabled large scale systems-on-chip (SoC). Network-on-chip (NoC) research addresses global communication in SoC, involving (i) a move from computation-centric to communication-centric design and (ii) the implementation of scalable communication structures...... are discussed. We also evaluate performance analysis techniques. The research shows that NoC constitutes a unification of current trends of intrachip communication rather than an explicit new alternative....

  12. NICHD Research Networks Help Piece Together the Puzzle of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... research networks help piece together the puzzle of polycystic ovary syndrome Many people think that scientific progress is ... Consider, for example the puzzling disorder known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) . Women with this condition produce high ...

  13. Socio-semantic Networks of Research Publications in the Learning Analytics Community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazeli, Soude; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fazeli, S., Drachsler, H., & Sloep, P. B. (2013, April). Socio-semantic Networks of Research Publications in the Learning Analytics Community. Presentation at the Learning Analystic and Knowelege (LAK13), Leuven, Belgium.

  14. AWESOME: A widget-based dashboard for awareness-support in Research Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinhardt, Wolfgang; Mletzko, Christian; Drachsler, Hendrik; Sloep, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Reinhardt, W., Mletzko, C., Drachsler, H., & Sloep, P. B. (2011). AWESOME: A widget-based dashboard for awareness-support in Research Networks. In Proceedings of The PLE Conference 2011. July, 11-13, 2011, Southampton, UK.

  15. Training and development through the IAEA's global research network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, T.

    1988-01-01

    The Agency's research contract programme stimulates and co-ordinates the undertaking of research, in selected nuclear fields of interest, by scientists in IAEA Member States. Benefits of the research contract programme can be direct or indirect. Direct benefits include increased scientific knowledge in a specific field and case-by-case application of this knowledge. Indirect benefits include the training effects - what participants in the programme learn via work carried out under the contract or at regularly held RCMs. The educational effect of CRPs is substantial as many institutes, guided by Agency scientific staff, learn how to conduct research without assistance. Unanticipated spin-off benefits can also result from a CRP through information exchanges at RCMs that stimulate ideas for other research programmes or methods of research

  16. Advancing Massage Therapy Research Competencies: Dimensions for Thought and Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M.

    Two major developments in the therapeutic massage and bodywork profession have recently brought to the forefront the issue of research competencies. The profession has been called to a potentially heightened level of credibility. One challenge to the profession's development is that of coordinating the various curricular, instructional,…

  17. The AFR. An approved network of research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, Gabriele [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Betriebs- und Sicherheitsfragen an Forschungsreaktoren (AFR)

    2012-10-15

    AFR (Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Betriebs- und Sicherheitsfragen an Forschungsreaktoren) is the German acronym for 'Association for Research Reactor Operation and Safety Issues' which was founded in 1959. Reactor managers of European research reactors mainly from the German linguistic area meet regularly for their mutual benefit to exchange experience and knowledge in all areas of operating, managing and utilization of research reactors. In the last 2 years joint meetings were held together with the French association of research reactors CER (Club d'Exploitants des Reacteurs). In this contribution the AFR, its members, work and aims as well as the French partner CER are presented. (orig.)

  18. The state of gene therapy research in Africa, its significance and implications for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuthnot, P; Maepa, M B; Ely, A; Pepper, M S

    2017-09-01

    Gene therapy has made impressive recent progress and has potential for treating a wide range of diseases, many of which are important to Africa. However, as a result of lack of direct public funding and skilled personnel, direct research on gene therapy in Africa is currently limited and resources to support the endeavor are modest. A strength of the technology is that it is based on principles of rational design, and the tools of gene therapy are now highly versatile. For example gene silencing and gene editing may be used to disable viral genes for therapeutic purposes. Gene therapy may thus lead to cure from infections with HIV-1, hepatitis B virus and Ebola virus, which are of significant public health importance in Africa. Although enthusiasm for gene therapy is justified, significant challenges to implementing the technology remain. These include ensuring efficient delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids to target cells, limiting unintended effects, cost and complexity of treatment regimens. In addition, implementation of effective legislation that will govern gene therapy research will be a challenge. Nevertheless, it is an exciting prospect that gene therapy should soon reach the mainstream of medical management. Participation of African researchers in the exciting developments is currently limited, but their involvement is important to address health problems, develop capacity and enhance economic progress of the continent.

  19. Leveraging the Methodological Affordances of Facebook: Social Networking Strategies in Longitudinal Writing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Jenna Pack; Kimme Hea, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    While composition studies researchers have examined the ways social media are impacting our lives inside and outside of the classroom, less attention has been given to the ways in which social media--specifically Social Network Sites (SNSs)--may enhance our own research methods and methodologies by helping to combat research participant attrition…

  20. Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) promotes sustained access to digital research data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berchum, M.; Kraaikamp, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    Data Archiving and Networked Services (DANS) promotes sustained access to digital research data. For this purpose, DANS encourages researchers to archive and reuse data in a sustained form. In the online archiving system EASY research data is stored in a permanent and sustainable manner, according

  1. Restoration of noncarious tooth defects by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons.......The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons....

  2. A Research of the Impact of the Network Sports Information on College Students’ Sports Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Haixin Yao; Yinbo Wu; Xinyu Wu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have a research of the impact of the network sports information on college students’ sports cognition. The college students’ network access behaviors, content preferences, sports values and behaviors, the factors affecting the contemporary college students’ sports cognition can be deduced. Our research could be divided into four parts. Firstly, caring for the major sports events at home and abroad and enhance their confidence. The majority of the contemporary college student...

  3. Integrated environmental research and networking of economy and information in rural areas of Finland

    OpenAIRE

    M. LUOSTARINEN

    2008-01-01

    This article uses material from many extensive research projects starting from the construction of the electric power supply network and its water supply systems in northern Finland in 1973-1986, to the Agropolis agricultural strategy and networking for the Loimijoki project. A list of the material and references of the publications is available in Agronet on the Internet. All these projects applied integrated environmental research covering biology, the natural sciences, social sciences, and...

  4. The German CFD-network in nuclear safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuerer, M.

    2004-01-01

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of nuclear reactors is becoming of increasing interest. This interest arises from the importance of three-dimensional effects in the containment and primary system of light water reactors which cannot be predicted well by the established one-dimensional system codes. Although CFD codes are well established in non-nuclear fields, there is a need for the assessment and extension of numerical and physical models for nuclear reactor safety applications, in particular for two-phase flow simulations. The German CFD-network was established to address the needs for development in the areas of two-phase flow modelling, numerical schemes, minimisation of user effects, code assessment and evaluation of uncertainties. As part of the CFD-network, a three-dimensional CFD code is developed and maintained, which can efficiently and accurately simulate the flow, heat and mass transfer phenomena in nuclear reactors. (orig.)

  5. Research on Artificial Spider Web Model for Farmland Wireless Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Through systematic analysis of the structural characteristics and invulnerability of spider web, this paper explores the possibility of combining the advantages of spider web such as network robustness and invulnerability with farmland wireless sensor network. A universally applicable definition and mathematical model of artificial spider web structure are established. The comparison between artificial spider web and traditional networks is discussed in detail. The simulation result shows that the networking structure of artificial spider web is better than that of traditional networks in terms of improving the overall reliability and invulnerability of communication system. A comprehensive study on the advantage characteristics of spider web has important theoretical and practical significance for promoting the invulnerability research of farmland wireless sensor network.

  6. Understanding Classrooms through Social Network Analysis: A Primer for Social Network Analysis in Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunspan, Daniel Z.; Wiggins, Benjamin L.; Goodreau, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions between students are a major and underexplored part of undergraduate education. Understanding how learning relationships form in undergraduate classrooms, as well as the impacts these relationships have on learning outcomes, can inform educators in unique ways and improve educational reform. Social network analysis (SNA)…

  7. Assessing Collaboration Networks in Educational Research: A Co-Authorship-Based Social Network Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, David Andres; Queupil, Juan Pablo; Fraser, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze collaboration networks and their patterns among higher education institutions (HEIs) in Chile and the Latin American region. This will provide evidence to educational managements in order to properly allocate their efforts to improve collaboration. Design/methodology/approach: This quantitative…

  8. Clinical trial network for the promotion of clinical research for rare diseases in Japan: muscular dystrophy clinical trial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Reiko; Ogata, Katsuhisa; Tamaura, Akemi; Kimura, En; Ohata, Maki; Takeshita, Eri; Nakamura, Harumasa; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Komaki, Hirofumi

    2016-07-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most commonly inherited neuromuscular disease. Therapeutic agents for the treatment of rare disease, namely "orphan drugs", have recently drawn the attention of researchers and pharmaceutical companies. To ensure the successful conduction of clinical trials to evaluate novel treatments for patients with rare diseases, an appropriate infrastructure is needed. One of the effective solutions for the lack of infrastructure is to establish a network of rare diseases. To accomplish the conduction of clinical trials in Japan, the Muscular dystrophy clinical trial network (MDCTN) was established by the clinical research group for muscular dystrophy, including the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, as well as national and university hospitals, all which have a long-standing history of research cooperation. Thirty-one medical institutions (17 national hospital organizations, 10 university hospitals, 1 national center, 2 public hospitals, and 1 private hospital) belong to this network and collaborate to facilitate clinical trials. The Care and Treatment Site Registry (CTSR) calculates and reports the proportion of patients with neuromuscular diseases in the cooperating sites. In total, there are 5,589 patients with neuromuscular diseases in Japan and the proportion of patients with each disease is as follows: DMD, 29 %; myotonic dystrophy type 1, 23 %; limb girdle muscular dystrophy, 11 %; Becker muscular dystrophy, 10 %. We work jointly to share updated health care information and standardized evaluations of clinical outcomes as well. The collaboration with the patient registry (CTSR), allows the MDCTN to recruit DMD participants with specific mutations and conditions, in a remarkably short period of time. Counting with a network that operates at a national level is important to address the corresponding national issues. Thus, our network will be able to contribute with international research activity, which can lead to

  9. The Evolution of Research and Education Networks and their Essential Role in Modern Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, W.; Chaniotakis, E.; Dart, E.; Guok, C.; Metzger, J.; Tierney, B.

    2009-06-15

    ESnet - the Energy Sciences Network - has the mission of enabling the aspects of the US Department of Energy's Office of Science programs and facilities that depend on large collaborations and large-scale data sharing to accomplish their science. The Office of Science supports a large fraction of all U.S. physical science research and operates many large science instruments and supercomputers that are used by both DOE and University researchers. The network requirements of this community have been explored in some detail by ESnet and a long-term plan has been developed in order to ensure adequate networking to support the science. In this paper we describe the planning process (which has been in place for several years and was the basis of a new network that is just now being completed and a new set of network services) and examine the effectiveness and adequacy of the planning process in the light of evolving science requirements.

  10. pbdd's global project and the educational research network of west

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    It is also PBDD's mandate to strengthen the resource mobilization capacity of IDRC's research partners. Currently, it does this through a global project that envisions a research for development community capable of accessing a diversity of funding and other resources to maintain financial sustain- ability and to establish ...

  11. Mapping the networks of cancer research in Portugal: first results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bras, O.R.; Cointet, J.P.; Nunes, J.A.; David, L.; Cambrosio, A.

    2016-07-01

    Social studies of cancer research at the international level have contributed to a better understanding of the developmental dynamics – both organizational and epistemic – of this field (Keating & Cambrosio, 2012). In contrast, despite its robust development, oncology research in Portugal has been the subject of only few studies. Most of them have a strong focus on the first half of the 20th century (Raposo, 2004; Costa, 2010, 2012a; 2012b), while a few focus on more contemporary events (Nunes, 2001). Consequently, we do not have a clear picture of recent trends in oncology research in Portugal, and how it integrates into the international landscape. This hinders public accountability of oncology research while also limiting the analysis of how this research relates to health care delivery, health outcomes, and health policy formulations. This paper presents the first results of an ongoing research project on the organizational and epistemic development of oncology research in Portugal, covering the period from the end of the 20th century to 2015. Among other issues, we intend to explore the extent to which oncology research in Portugal mirrors the international dynamics at a smaller scale, and the extent to which it presents features of its own. The study draws upon computer-based analysis of publications using the platform CorText (http://www.cortext.net/) of IFRIS (Institut Francilien Recherche, Innovation, Société), along with interviews with Portuguese oncologists and related practitioners. (Author)

  12. Dearfield Dream Project: Developing an Interdisciplinary Historical/Cultural Research Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Brunswig

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Dearfield Dream Project is a collaborative research initiative to conduct historical, cultural, archaeological, and environmental studies on the early 20th Century African-American colony site of Dearfield, Colorado, USA. Because the breadth and significance of the Dearfield Project requires an interdisciplinary research team, a network of research collaborators has been assembled. This research network seeks to discover, preserve, and disseminate knowledge of the site and its surrounding farmsteads’ economic, social, political, and environmental history for better understanding and interpretation of its contributions to Colorado and U.S. history. Herein, we detail progress that has been made on this important historical/cultural research project. Further, we outline the future of the Dearfield research network along with our current and anticipated subjects of inquiry.

  13. Research progress in nanographene oxide with tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOU Peihong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanographene oxide,one of graphene oxide derivatives and a novel two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial,has become a popular research topic in nanomedicine due to its unique properties such as ultra-high surface-to-volume ratio and great photo-thermal effect.It contains a large amount of reactive chemical groups,including carboxy group,carbonyl group,hydroxyl group and epoxy group,which enable its easy biological and chemical functionalization and excellent biocompatibility.Therefore,it has potential applications in biomedical field.This paper briefly describes the preparation and functionalization of nanographeme oxide,and then mainly focuses on its application studies in the biomedical field,including in vitro and in vivo toxicity tests and advanced research progress of tumor imaging and treatment.

  14. Development and implementation of a performance measure tool in an academic pediatric research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Rachel; Lillis, Kathleen A; Zuspan, Sally Jo; Lichenstein, Richard; Ruddy, Richard M; Gerardi, Michael J; Dean, J Michael

    2010-09-01

    The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) is a federally funded multi-center research network. To promote high quality research within the network, it is important to establish evaluation tools to measure performance of the research sites. To describe the collaborative development of a site performance measure tool "report card" in an academic pediatric research network. To display report card template information and discuss the successes and challenges of the report cards. DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NETWORK PERFORMANCE MEASURE TOOL: The PECARN Quality Assurance Subcommittee and the PECARN data center were responsible for the development and implementation of the report cards. Using a Balanced Scorecard format, four key metrics were identified to align with PECARN's research goals. Performance indicators were defined for each of these metrics. After two years of development, the final report cards have been implemented annually since 2005. Protocol submission time to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) improved between 2005 and 2007. Mean overall report card scores for site report cards increased during this period with less variance between highest and lowest performing sites indicating overall improvement. Report cards have helped PECARN sites and investigators focus on performance improvement and may have contributed to improved operations and efficiencies within the network. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bibliographical analysis of research on smoking cessation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, J. R.; Liguori, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the growth of research on treatments for smoking with that for similar medical/behavioural disorders. DESIGN: We surveyed Medline for 1967-1994 for articles on smoking, alcohol, anxiety, and obesity disorders. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Number of articles published in two-year intervals. RESULTS: The number of articles per year on smoking/nicotine in humans increased fivefold from 1967 to 1994 compared with twofold for Medline as a whole. The rate of growth of empirical...

  16. The intellectual property management for data sharing in a German liver cancer research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Ganzinger, Matthias; Knaup, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Sharing data in biomedical research networks has great potential benefits including efficient use of resources, avoiding duplicate experiments and promoting collaboration. However, concerns from data producers about difficulties of getting proper acknowledgement for their contributions are becoming obstacles for efficient and network wide data sharing in reality. Effective and convenient ways of intellectual property management and acknowledging contributions to the data producers are required. This paper analyzed the system requirements for intellectual property management in a German liver cancer research network and proposed solutions for facilitating acknowledgement of data contributors using informatics tools instead of pure policy level strategies.

  17. Restorative outcomes for endodontically treated teeth in the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Howard; Schaffer, Scott B; Cohen, Mitchell G; Wu, Hongyu; Vena, Donald A; Collie, Damon; Curro, Frederick A; Thompson, Van P; Craig, Ronald G

    2012-07-01

    The authors aimed to determine the outcome of and factors associated with success and failure of restorations in endodontically treated teeth in patients in practices participating in the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network. Practitioner-investigators (P-Is) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking care at participating practices who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years earlier. P-Is classified endodontically reated teeth as restorative failures if the restoration was replaced, the restoration needed replacement or the tooth was cracked or fractured. P-Is from 64 practices enrolled in the study 1,298 eligible patients who had endodontically treated teeth that had been restored. The mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up was 3.9 (0.6) years. Of the 1,298 enrolled teeth, P-Is classified 181 (13.9 percent; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 12.1-15.8 percent) as restorative failures: 44 (3.4 percent) due to cracks or fractures, 57 (4.4 percent) due to replacement of the original restoration for reasons other than fracture and 80 (6.2 percent) due to need for a new restoration. When analyzing the results by means of multivariate logistic regression, the authors found a greater risk of restorative failure to be associated with canines or incisors and premolars (P = .04), intracoronal restorations (P < .01), lack of preoperative proximal contacts (P < .01), presence of periodontal connective-tissue attachment loss (P < .01), younger age (P = .01), Hispanic/Latino ethnicity (P = .04) and endodontic therapy not having been performed by a specialist (P = .04). These results suggest that molars (as opposed to other types of teeth), full-coverage restorations, preoperative proximal contacts, good periodontal health, non-Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, endodontic therapy performed by a specialist and older patient age are associated with restorative success for

  18. Restorative outcomes for endodontically treated teeth in the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Howard; Schaffer, Scott B.; Cohen, Mitchell G.; Wu, Hongyu; Vena, Donald A.; Collie, Damon; Curro, Frederick A.; Thompson, Van P.; Craig, Ronald G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The authors aimed to determine the outcome of and factors associated with success and failure of restorations in endodontically treated teeth in patients in practices participating in the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network. Methods Practitioner-investigators (P-Is) invited the enrollment of all patients seeking care at participating practices who had undergone primary endodontic therapy and restoration in a permanent tooth three to five years earlier. P-Is classified endodontically reated teeth as restorative failures if the restoration was replaced, the restoration needed replacement or the tooth was cracked or fractured. Results P-Is from 64 practices enrolled in the study 1,298 eligible patients who had endodontically treated teeth that had been restored. The mean (standard deviation) time to follow-up was 3.9 (0.6) years. Of the 1,298 enrolled teeth, P-Is classified 181 (13.9 percent; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 12.1–15.8 percent) as restorative failures: 44 (3.4 percent) due to cracks or fractures, 57 (4.4 percent) due to replacement of the original restoration for reasons other than fracture and 80 (6.2 percent) due to need for a new restoration. When analyzing the results by means of multivariate logistic regression, the authors found a greater risk of restorative failure to be associated with canines or incisors and premolars (P = .04), intracoronal restorations (P < .01), lack of preoperative proximal contacts (P < .01), presence of periodontal connective-tissue attachment loss (P < .01), younger age (P = .01), Hispanic/Latino ethnicity (P = .04) and endodontic therapy not having been performed by a specialist (P = .04). Conclusions These results suggest that molars (as opposed to other types of teeth), full-coverage restorations, preoperative proximal contacts, good periodontal health, non-Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, endodontic therapy performed by a specialist and older patient age are associated

  19. Getting Ready for Ion-Beam Therapy Research in Austria - Building-up Research in Parallel with a Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georg, Dietmar; Knaeusl; Kuess, Peter; Fuchs, Hermann; Poetter, Richard; Schreiner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    With participation in ion-beam projects funded nationally or by the European Commission (EC), ion-beam research activities were started at the Medical University of Vienna in parallel with the design and construction of the ion-beam center MedAustron in Wiener Neustadt, 50 km from the Austrian capital. The current medical radiation physics research activities that will be presented comprise: (1) Dose calculation and optimization: ion-beam centers focus mostly on proton and carbon-ion therapy. However, there are other ion species with great potential for clinical applications. Helium ions are currently under investigation from a theoretical physics and biology perspective. (2) Image guided and adaptive ion-beam therapy: organ motion and anatomic changes have a severe influence in ion-beam therapy since variations in heterogeneity along the beam path have a significant impact on the particle range. Ongoing research focuses on possibilities to account for temporal variations of the anatomy during radiotherapy. Both during and between fractions also considering temporal variations in tumor biology. Furthermore, research focuses on particle therapy positron emission tomography (PT-PET) verification and the detection of prompt gammas for on-line verification of ion-beam delivery. (3) Basic and applied dosimetry: an end-to-end procedure was designed and successfully tested in both scanned proton and carbon-ion beams, which may also serve as a dosimetric credentialing procedure for clinical trials in the future. (Author)

  20. The many facets of integrating data and metadata for research networks: experience from the AmeriFlux Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorello, G.; Poindexter, C.; van Ingen, C.; Papale, D.; Agarwal, D.

    2014-12-01

    Grassroots research networks, such as AmeriFlux, require data and metadata integration from multiple, independently managed field sites, scales, and science domains. The goal of these networks is production of consistent datasets enabling investigation of broad science questions at regional and global scales. These datasets combine data from a large number of data providers, who often utilize different data collection protocols and data processing approaches. In this scenario, data integration and curation quickly become large-scale efforts. This presentation reports on our experience with integration efforts for the AmeriFlux network. In AmeriFlux we are attempting to integrate flux, meteorological, biological, soil, chemistry, and disturbance data and metadata. Our data management activities range from acquisition/publication mechanisms, quality control, processing and product generation, data and software synchronized versioning and archiving, and interaction mechanisms and tools for data providers and data users. To enable consistent data processing and network-level data quality, combinations of automated and visual data quality assessment procedures were built, extending on checks already done at site levels. The implementation of community developed and trusted algorithms to operate in production mode proved to be a key aspect of data product generation, with extensive testing and validation being one of the main concerns. Clear definitions for data processing levels help with easily tracking different data products and data quality levels. For metadata and ancillary information, formatting standards are even more relevant, since variables collected are considerably more heterogeneous. Documentation and training on the standards were crucial in this case, with instruction sessions having proved to be an effective approach, given that documentation cannot cover all different scenarios at different sites. This work is being developed in close coordination with

  1. Artificial neural network for research reactor safety status monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varde, P.V.

    2001-01-01

    During reactor upset/abnormal conditions, emphasis is placed on plant operator's ability to quickly identify the problem and perform diagnosis and initiate recovery action to ensure safety of the plant. However, the reliability of human action is adversely affected at the time of crisis, due to the time stress and psychological factors. Availability of operational aids capable of monitoring the status of the plant and quickly identifying the deviation from normal operation is expected to significantly improve the operator reliability. Artificial Neural Network (based on Back Propagation Algorithm) has been developed and applied for reactor safety status monitoring, as part of an Operator Support System. ANN has been trained for 14 different plant states using 42 input symptom patterns. Recall tests performed on the ANN show that the system was able to identify the plant state with reasonable accuracy. (author)

  2. Research on Web-Based Networked Virtual Instrument System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, B P; Xu, C; He, Q Y; Lu, D

    2006-01-01

    The web-based networked virtual instrument (NVI) system is designed by using the object oriented methodology (OOM). The architecture of the NVI system consists of two major parts: client-web server interaction and instrument server-virtual instrument (VI) communication. The web server communicates with the instrument server and the clients connected to it over the Internet, and it handles identifying the user's name, managing the connection between the user and the instrument server, adding, removing and configuring VI's information. The instrument server handles setting the parameters of VI, confirming the condition of VI and saving the VI's condition information into the database. The NVI system is required to be a general-purpose measurement system that is easy to maintain, adapt and extend. Virtual instruments are connected to the instrument server and clients can remotely configure and operate these virtual instruments. An application of The NVI system is given in the end of the paper

  3. Ten years of the Immune Tolerance Network: an integrated clinical research organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Krensky, Alan M; Turka, Laurence A; Rotrosen, Daniel; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2010-02-17

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health Roadmap and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Critical Path Initiative have endorsed the establishment of large academic clinical research networks as part of the solution to the growing divide between increased R&D spending and the lagging number of new drugs making it to market. Clearly, the role of these networks as translational science incubators that complement industry-sponsored programs is laudable and much-needed. However, the path to success for such organizations is less clear. Here, drawing on the experiences of the Immune Tolerance Network, a multidisciplinary clinical research network founded in 1999, we discuss some of the barriers inherent in developing such consortia and offer firsthand insight into the planning, resources, and organizational infrastructure required for a successful research program.

  4. Anticipated Ethics and Regulatory Challenges in PCORnet: The National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Joseph; Califf, Robert; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network, seeks to establish a robust national health data network for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. This article reports the results of a PCORnet survey designed to identify the ethics and regulatory challenges anticipated in network implementation. A 12-item online survey was developed by leadership of the PCORnet Ethics and Regulatory Task Force; responses were collected from the 29 PCORnet networks. The most pressing ethics issues identified related to informed consent, patient engagement, privacy and confidentiality, and data sharing. High priority regulatory issues included IRB coordination, privacy and confidentiality, informed consent, and data sharing. Over 150 IRBs and five different approaches to managing multisite IRB review were identified within PCORnet. Further empirical and scholarly work, as well as practical and policy guidance, is essential if important initiatives that rely on comparative effectiveness research are to move forward.

  5. Solar-Terrestrial and Astronomical Research Network (STAR-Network) - A Meaningful Practice of New Cyberinfrastructure on Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Zou, Z.

    2017-12-01

    For the next decades, comprehensive big data application environment is the dominant direction of cyberinfrastructure development on space science. To make the concept of such BIG cyberinfrastructure (e.g. Digital Space) a reality, these aspects of capability should be focused on and integrated, which includes science data system, digital space engine, big data application (tools and models) and the IT infrastructure. In the past few years, CAS Chinese Space Science Data Center (CSSDC) has made a helpful attempt in this direction. A cloud-enabled virtual research platform on space science, called Solar-Terrestrial and Astronomical Research Network (STAR-Network), has been developed to serve the full lifecycle of space science missions and research activities. It integrated a wide range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary resources, to provide science-problem-oriented data retrieval and query service, collaborative mission demonstration service, mission operation supporting service, space weather computing and Analysis service and other self-help service. This platform is supported by persistent infrastructure, including cloud storage, cloud computing, supercomputing and so on. Different variety of resource are interconnected: the science data can be displayed on the browser by visualization tools, the data analysis tools and physical models can be drived by the applicable science data, the computing results can be saved on the cloud, for example. So far, STAR-Network has served a series of space science mission in China, involving Strategic Pioneer Program on Space Science (this program has invested some space science satellite as DAMPE, HXMT, QUESS, and more satellite will be launched around 2020) and Meridian Space Weather Monitor Project. Scientists have obtained some new findings by using the science data from these missions with STAR-Network's contribution. We are confident that STAR-Network is an exciting practice of new cyberinfrastructure architecture on

  6. A Delphi study on research priorities in radiation therapy: The Norwegian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egestad, H.; Halkett, G.K.B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Although radiation therapists (RTs) need to engage more in research to establish an evidence base for their daily practice the majority conduct little research themselves. This project is the second stage of a Delphi process aimed at determining research priorities in radiation therapy in Norway. The aim of this article is to prioritize the research areas radiation therapists in Norway think are most important in their own profession. Methods: A questionnaire was administered using responses to a previous questionnaire, which identified the research interests of Norwegian RTs. The survey was sent to all Norwegian departments of radiation oncology, and RTs were asked to form interest groups to discuss and prioritize the research areas. Results: There was a 70% response rate, seven of 10 departments participated. The highest ranked research categories were imaging in radiation therapy and radiation therapist education. Seven of the top ten ranked research areas were in these categories. Conclusion: Prioritization of research areas and categories provides a useful list of future research for Norwegian RTs, which will enable them to decide whether their research ideas are a high priority, and spend less time deciding on a relevant research topic that needs investigation in their own workplaces. - Highlights: • Norwegian RTs prioritize research about performing their professional practice. • Main points of research interests are about new techniques and competence. • The top ten are about treatment plan, doses, safety and relationship with patients. • Prioritization of research areas provides a useful list of future research.

  7. Integrated environmental research and networking of economy and information in rural areas of Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. LUOSTARINEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This article uses material from many extensive research projects starting from the construction of the electric power supply network and its water supply systems in northern Finland in 1973-1986, to the Agropolis agricultural strategy and networking for the Loimijoki project. A list of the material and references of the publications is available in Agronet on the Internet. All these projects applied integrated environmental research covering biology, the natural sciences, social sciences, and planning methodology. To be able to promote sustainable agriculture and rural development there is a pressing need to improve research methodology and applications for integrated environmental research. This article reviews the philosophy and development of the theory behind integrated environmental re-search and the theory of network economy.

  8. Social Network Analysis of Iranian Researchers on Medical Parasitology: A 41 Year Co-Authorship Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Valinejadi, Ali; Shirazi, Mansoureh Serati; Khademi, Rouhallah

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the Iranian Parasitology researchers' performance, and analyse and visualize the scientific outputs of their co-authorship network. This study was conducted using scientometric method and social network analysis (SNA). The data extracted from the Web of Science (WoS) databases in July 10th 2014. Totally, 1048 documents of all types in research area of Parasitology during 1972-2013 by Iranian researches retrieved. The co-authorship map was drawn utilizing NETDRAW, Coauthor.exe, and UCINET softwares and was analysed based on SNA measures. The researchers' co-authorship network consisted of 78 authors and its density degree is 0.57. "Mohebali" ranked top in all of centrality measures. The most of the publications were related to 2012, "Mohebali" with about 9% of all documents was the Iranian most prolific author in Parasitology field. The Iranian researches have published mostly (266 documents) in "Iranian Journal of Parasitology", and the most of the documents belong to "Tropical Medicine" subject field. The most of Iranian researchers' scientific cooperation was performed with England and United States. Bringing forth density degree (is 0.57) showed that this network has an almost medium density. Indeed, the authors have had relations in moderate level with each other in the network. The findings of this study can be identified aspects of scientific collaboration, and help policy makers of Parasitology field research.

  9. Canada's neglected tropical disease research network: who's in the core-who's on the periphery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye Phillips

    Full Text Available This study designed and applied accessible yet systematic methods to generate baseline information about the patterns and structure of Canada's neglected tropical disease (NTD research network; a network that, until recently, was formed and functioned on the periphery of strategic Canadian research funding.MULTIPLE METHODS WERE USED TO CONDUCT THIS STUDY, INCLUDING: (1 a systematic bibliometric procedure to capture archival NTD publications and co-authorship data; (2 a country-level "core-periphery" network analysis to measure and map the structure of Canada's NTD co-authorship network including its size, density, cliques, and centralization; and (3 a statistical analysis to test the correlation between the position of countries in Canada's NTD network ("k-core measure" and the quantity and quality of research produced.Over the past sixty years (1950-2010, Canadian researchers have contributed to 1,079 NTD publications, specializing in Leishmania, African sleeping sickness, and leprosy. Of this work, 70% of all first authors and co-authors (n = 4,145 have been Canadian. Since the 1990s, however, a network of international co-authorship activity has been emerging, with representation of researchers from 62 different countries; largely researchers from OECD countries (e.g. United States and United Kingdom and some non-OECD countries (e.g. Brazil and Iran. Canada has a core-periphery NTD international research structure, with a densely connected group of OECD countries and some African nations, such as Uganda and Kenya. Sitting predominantly on the periphery of this research network is a cluster of 16 non-OECD nations that fall within the lowest GDP percentile of the network.The publication specialties, composition, and position of NTD researchers within Canada's NTD country network provide evidence that while Canadian researchers currently remain the overall gatekeepers of the NTD research they generate; there is opportunity to leverage

  10. Understanding Gaps in Research Networks: Using "Spatial Reasoning" as a Window into the Importance of Networked Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Catherine D.; Davis, Brent; Sinclair, Nathalie; McGarvey, Lynn; Hallowell, David; Drefs, Michelle; Francis, Krista; Hawes, Zachary; Moss, Joan; Mulligan, Joanne; Okamoto, Yukari; Whiteley, Walter; Woolcott, Geoff

    2017-01-01

    This paper finds its origins in a multidisciplinary research group's efforts to assemble a review of research in order to better appreciate how "spatial reasoning" is understood and investigated across academic disciplines. We first collaborated to create a historical map of the development of spatial reasoning across key disciplines…

  11. Building a national research network for clinical investigations in otology and neurotology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Debara L; Schulz, Kristine; Witsell, David L

    2010-02-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) are the preferred research setting for descriptive/epidemiologic studies and studies that explore the effectiveness of treatments for disease that are managed in community settings, away from the rubric of the academic medical center. A PBRN in otology/neurotology, established upon a sustainable research infrastructure, addresses the challenges of performing community-based research through enhanced support for data collection and facilitated research regulatory adherence. A strategic alignment of a PBRN with an established research infrastructure allows for successful implementation of a variety of study methodologies and a framework for successful competition for research funding in hearing and balance disorders. Our goal is to develop a centralized, high-quality research infrastructure that supports a dynamic research alliance between regional centers for research excellence, community physicians, allied health professionals, and patients. We describe herein current plans and progress toward the goal of developing a network of academic- and community-based research sites to facilitate the conduct of clinical research in hearing and balance disorders. We have formed a PBRN that we call the CHEER Network: Creating Healthcare Excellence through Education and Research. Creating healthcare excellence through education and research was proposed in response to a request for applications from the National Institute for Deafness and other Communication Disorders to further develop clinical research in otolaryngology, specifically focusing on disorders in hearing and balance. Our expectation is that a network organized and focused around regional research alliances between academic institutions and community practitioners will have broad appeal to community-based health care professionals and patients, resulting in enhanced communications, interoperability, and success in the conduct of high-quality multicenter clinical research in

  12. Characteristics and lessons learned from practice-based research networks (PBRNs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Melinda M Davis,1,2 Sara Keller,1 Jennifer E DeVoe,1,3 Deborah J Cohen11Department of Family Medicine, 2Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA; 3OCHIN Practice-based Research Network, Portland, OR, USAAbstract: Practice-based research networks (PBRNs are organizations that involve practicing clinicians in asking and answering clinically relevant research questions. This review explores the origins, characteristics, funding, and lessons learned through practice-based research in the United States. Primary care PBRNs emerged in the USA in the 1970s. Early studies explored the etiology of common problems encountered in primary care practices (eg, headache, miscarriage, demonstrating the gap between research conducted in controlled specialty settings and real-world practices. Over time, national initiatives and an evolving funding climate have shaped PBRN development, contributing to larger networks, a push for shared electronic health records, and the use of a broad range of research methodologies (eg, observational studies, pragmatic randomized controlled trials, continuous quality improvement, participatory methods. Today, there are over 160 active networks registered with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's PBRN Resource Center that engage primary care clinicians, pharmacists, dentists, and other health care professionals in research and quality-improvement initiatives. PBRNs provide an important laboratory for encouraging collaborative research partnerships between academicians and practices or communities to improve population health, conduct comparative effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes research, and study health policy reform. PBRNs continue to face critical challenges that include: (1 adapting to a changing landscape; (2 recruiting and retaining membership; (3 securing infrastructure support; (4 straddling two worlds (academia and community and managing

  13. Neural Network Assisted Experimental Designs for Food Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.S. Ramaswamy

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of artificial neural networks (ANN in predicting full factorial data from the fractional data corresponding to some of the commonly used experimental designs is explored in this paper. Factorial and fractional factorial designs such as L8, L9, L18, and Box and Behnken schemes were considered both in their original form and with some variations (L8+6, L15 and L9+1. Full factorial (3 factors x 5 levels and fractional data were generated employing sixteen different mathematical equations (four in each category: linear, with and without interactions, and non-linear, with and without interactions. Different ANN models were trained and the best model was chosen for each equation based on their ability to predict the fractional data. The best experimental design was then chosen based on their ability to simulate the full- factorial data for each equation. In several cases, the mean relative errors with the L18 design (which had more input data than other models were even higher than with other smaller fractional design. In general, the ANN assisted Lm, Box and Behnken, L15 and L18 designs were found to predict the full factorial data reasonably well with errors less than 5 %. The L8+6 model performed well with several experimental datasets reported in the literature.

  14. The Air Force Academy’s Falcon Telescope Network: An Educational and Research Network for K-12 and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Francis; Tippets, Roger; Della-Rose, Devin J.; Polsgrove, Daniel; Gresham, Kimberlee; Barnaby, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The Falcon Telescope Network (FTN) is a global network of small aperture telescopes developed by the Center for Space Situational Awareness Research in the Department of Physics at the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA). Consisting of commercially available equipment, the FTN is a collaborative effort between USAFA and other educational institutions ranging from two- and four-year colleges to major research universities. USAFA provides the equipment (e.g. telescope, mount, camera, filter wheel, dome, weather station, computers and storage devices) while the educational partners provide the building and infrastructure to support an observatory. The user base includes USAFA along with K-12 and higher education faculty and students. The diversity of the users implies a wide variety of observing interests, and thus the FTN collects images on diverse objects, including satellites, galactic and extragalactic objects, and objects popular for education and public outreach. The raw imagery, all in the public domain, will be accessible to FTN partners and will be archived at USAFA. USAFA cadets use the FTN to continue a tradition of satellite characterization and astronomical research; this tradition is the model used for designing the network to serve undergraduate research needs. Additionally, cadets have led the development of the FTN by investigating observation priority schemes and conducting a 'day-in-the-life' study of the FTN in regards to satellite observations. With respect to K-12 outreach, cadets have provided feedback to K-12 students and teachers through evaluation of first-light proposals. In this paper, we present the current status of the network and results from student participation in the project.

  15. First Outcomes of WP2 Research Carried Out Within the Framework of the IRNet Project - International Research Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Smyrnova-Trybulska, Eugenia; Morze, Natalia; Noskova, Tatyana; Pavlova, Tatyana; Yakovleva, Olga; Turcani, M.; Drlik, M.; Kapusta, J.; Svec, P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper, prepared by an international team of authors including specialists from different scientific areas, connected with ICT, e-learning, pedagogy, and other related disciplines, focuses on the objectives of the international project IRNet - International Research Network for the study and

  16. The IRIS network of excellence : Integrating research in interactive storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavazza, Marc; Donikian, Stéphane; Christie, Marc; Spierling, Ulrike; Szilas, Nicolas; Vorderer, Peter; Hartmann, Tilo; Klimmt, Christoph; André, Elisabeth; Champagnat, Ronan; Petta, Paolo; Olivier, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Interactive Storytelling is a major endeavour to develop new media which could offer a radically new user experience, with a potential to revolutionise digital entertainment. European research in Interactive Storytelling has played a leading role in the development of the field, and this creates a

  17. Mother and Child Health International Research Network | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    child.org/) is a demand-driven, participatory and non-proprietary online space for maternal-child health researchers to engage in online collaboration activities - often facilitated by "Web 2.0" technologies. Web 2.0 is a term that encompasses ...

  18. Using Social Network Analysis to Evaluate Research Productivity and Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D.; Akers, Kathryn S.; Lybarger, Melanie A.; Zakrajsek, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Research productivity and collaborations are essential aspects of advancing academia. Publishing is a critical mechanism in higher education to allow faculty members to share new information in all disciplinary fields. Due to its importance, scholarly work is often heavily considered for promotion, tenure, compensation, and other merit decisions.…

  19. Family practices registration networks contributed to primary care research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, C. van; Grauw, W.J.C. de

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Family physicians (FP) play a key role in the diagnosis and treatment of health problems in the community and for evidence-based guidance clinical research must be based on primary care data. This paper analyses the state-of-the-art approaches to collection of data and the

  20. Building a National Research Network for Clinical Investigations in Otology & Neurotology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucci, Debara L.; Schulz, Kristine; Witsell, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) are the preferred research setting for descriptive/epidemiologic studies and studies that explore the effectiveness of treatments for disease that are managed in community settings, away from the rubric of the academic medical center. A PBRN in Otology/Neurotology, established upon a sustainable research infrastructure, addresses the challenges of performing community-based research through enhanced support for data collection and facilitated research regulatory adherence. A strategic alignment of a PBRN with an established research infrastructure allows for successful implementation of a variety of study methodologies and a framework for successful competition for research funding in hearing and balance disorders. Our goal is to develop a centralized, high quality research infrastructure that supports a dynamic research alliance between regional centers for research excellence, community physicians, allied health professionals, and patients. Objective We describe herein current plans and progress toward the goal of developing a network of academic and community based research sites to facilitate the conduct of clinical research in hearing and balance disorders. We have formed a PBRN that we call the CHEER Network: Creating Healthcare Excellence through Education and Research. CHEER was proposed in response to a request for applications from the National Institute for Deafness and other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) to further develop clinical research in Otolaryngology, specifically focusing on disorders in hearing and balance. Conclusion Our expectation is that a network organized and focused around regional research alliances between academic institutions and community practitioners will have broad appeal to community-based health care professionals and patients, resulting in enhanced communications, interoperability, and success in the conduct of high quality multi-center clinical research in hearing and

  1. Description of research design of articles published in four Brazilian physical therapy journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragiotto, Bruno T; Costa, Lucíola C M; Oliveira, Ronaldo F; Lopes, Alexandre D; Moseley, Anne M; Costa, Leonardo O P

    2014-01-01

    While the research design of articles published in medical journals and in some physical therapy journals has already been evaluated, this has not been investigated in Brazilian physical therapy journals. Objective : To describe the research design used in all articles published in Brazilian scientific journals that are freely available, have high Qualis rankings, and are relevant to physical therapy over a 7-year period. We extracted the bibliometric data, research design, research type (human or animal), and clinical area for all articles published. The articles were grouped into their level of evidence, and descriptive analyses were performed. We calculated the frequency, proportions of articles, and 95% confidence interval of these proportions with each research design in each journal. We cross-tabulated the clinical areas with research designs (expressed as number and percentages). A total of 1,458 articles from four Brazilian journals were found: Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia, Revista Fisioterapia em Movimento, Revista Fisioterapia e Pesquisa, and Revista Acta Fisiátrica. The majority of articles were classified as level II of evidence (60%), followed by level III (29%) and level I (10%). The most prevalent research designs were cross-sectional studies (38%), single-case or case-series studies, and narrative reviews. Most articles reported human research and were in the musculoskeletal, neurologic, and cardiothoracic areas. Most of the research published in Brazilian physical therapy journals used levels II and III of evidence. Increasing the publication rate of systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials would provide more high-quality evidence to guide evidence-based physical therapy practice.

  2. A local area network for medical research; planning, realization and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schosser, R; Weiss, C; Messmer, K

    1991-01-01

    This report focuses on the planning and realization of an interdisciplinary local area network (LAN) for medical research at the University of Heidelberg. After a detailed requirements analysis, several networks were evaluated by means of a test installation, and a cost-performance analysis was carried out. At present, the LAN connects 45 (IBM-compatible) PCs, several heterogeneous mainframes (IBM, DEC and Siemens) and provides access to the public X.25 network and to wide-area networks for research (EARN, BITNET). The network supports application software that is frequently needed in medical research (word processing, statistics, graphics, literature databases and services, etc.). Compliance with existing "official" (e.g., IEEE 802.3) and "de facto" standards (e.g., PostScript) was considered to be extremely important for the selection of both hardware and software. Customized programs were developed to improve access control, user interface and on-line help. Wide acceptance of the LAN was achieved through extensive education and maintenance facilities, e.g., teaching courses, customized manuals and a hotline service. Since requirements of clinical routine differ substantially from medical research needs, two separate networks (with a gateway in between) are proposed as a solution to optimally satisfy the users' demands.

  3. Manualization of occupational therapy interventions: illustrations from the pressure ulcer prevention research program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Toward the latter end, intervention manuals are essential for ensuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this article, we review the literature on the process of intervention manualization. We then illustrate the prescribed steps through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center's collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project. In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce the incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in adults with spinal cord injury.

  4. Manualization of Occupational Therapy Interventions: Illustrations from the Pressure Ulcer Prevention Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, Erna Imperatore; Fogelberg, Donald; Diaz, Jesus; Carlson, Mike; Clark, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The manualization of a complex occupational therapy intervention is a crucial step in ensuring treatment fidelity for both clinical application and research purposes. Towards this latter end, intervention manuals are essential for assuring trustworthiness and replicability of randomized controlled trials (RCT’s) that aim to provide evidence of the effectiveness of occupational therapy. In this paper, literature on the process of intervention manualization is reviewed. The prescribed steps are then illustrated through our experience in implementing the University of Southern California/Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center’s collaborative Pressure Ulcer Prevention Project (PUPP). In this research program, qualitative research provided the initial foundation for manualization of a multifaceted occupational therapy intervention designed to reduce incidence of medically serious pressure ulcers in people with SCI. PMID:22214116

  5. The Research of Wireless Sensor Network Channel Propagation Model in the Wild Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Yueshuns

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The survey shows that for the layout environment of wireless network, channel propagation model of wireless network still needs to be improved, especially low altitude propagation channel. In order to effectively study and design any random layout of wireless sensor node on the wild environment, several classic application scenes of wireless network are tested and improved in this paper. Since sample data are fitted by linear regression algorithm based on the method of least square, some meaningful conclusions about low-altitude path loss model are obtained. When antenna height is fully close to surface, thus the loss model of single broken line can be adopted. When antenna height is higher and LOS exists, the double broken line model can be adopted. At the same time other channel parameters related with network design are also measured. Those data provide an important scientific basis for the research of wireless sensor network.

  6. Sixty-five years of Physical Therapy: bibliometric analysis of research publications from 1945 through 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Louise; Matricciani, Lisa; Williams, Marie; Olds, Timothy

    2012-04-01

    The generation of research can be likened to the production of consumer goods, with a producer (the study authors and funders), a product (the study and publications arising from it), and consumers (those who read and cite the published study). The aim of this study was to use bibliometric indexes to track changes in the producers, products, and consumers of the journal Physical Therapy from 1945 through 2010. An analysis of published manuscripts (excluding letters, editorials, corrections, commentaries, and book reviews) in Physical Therapy was performed using a reliable bibliometric audit tool. Articles were sampled every 3 months and at 5-year intervals over a 65-year period. Information relating to authorship, the research methods used, and citation patterns was collected. Data were analyzed descriptively. There have been substantial shifts in the nature of research published over the last 65 years in Physical Therapy. In 1945, the typical paper was anecdotal and authored by 1.4 American authors (working in hospitals), and consisted of 4 pages and 4 references. In 2010, the typical paper used a cross-sectional survey or randomized controlled trial design, with 4.6 multinational authors (working in universities), and consisted of 12 pages and 49 references. Findings are specific to the articles published in Physical Therapy that were sampled in this bibliometric analysis. The changes seen in the research published in Physical Therapy mirror the shifts that have occurred in other industries: increasing quantification, standardization, collaboration, and internationalization. These trends are likely to continue in the future.

  7. Building Networks for Global Clinical Research: The Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David W; Volberding, Paul A; Schemitsch, Emil H; Cook, Gillian E; Slobogean, Gerard P; Morshed, Saam

    2015-12-01

    Over the last several decades, interest in global health across all fields of medicine, including orthopaedic surgery, has grown markedly. Cross-national collaborations are an effective means of conducting high-quality clinical research and offer many advantages over single-center investigations. Successful collaboration requires a well-designed research protocol, development of an effective team structure, and the funding to ensure the project is sustained to completion. Equally important, investigators must consider the social, linguistic, and cultural context in which the study is being undertaken. Although randomized clinical trials are the highest level of evidence, study designs may have to be adapted to accommodate available resources, expertise, and local contextual factors. With appropriate planning, these collaborative endeavors can generate changes in clinical practice and positively impact health policy.

  8. Barrett's Esophagus Translational Research Network (BETRNet) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of BETRNet is to reduce the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of esophageal adenocarcinoma by answering key questions related to the progression of the disease, especially in the premalignant stage. In partnership with NCI’s Division of Cancer Biology, multidisciplinary translational research centers collaborate to better understand the biology of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma to improve risk stratification and develop prevention strategies. | Multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaboration to enhance understanding of Barrett's esophagus and to prevent esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  9. Neurophysiological Research Supporting the Investigation of Adaptive Network Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    cat submandibular salivary gland . Nature 5845, 147-149, (1982). 3. Hedlund, B., Grynfarb, M., and Bartfai, T. Two ligands may bind simultaneously to... Cancer Society Natitbnal Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda Swedish Board for Planning Research Letters of recommendation could be obtained from...J., and Bartfali T. Chronic atropine treatment induces supersensitivity of VIP receptors and muscarinic receptors in the rat salivary gland , Science

  10. The smart grid research network: Road map for Smart Grid research, development and demonstration up to 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troi, A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Electrical Engineering, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Noerregaard Joergensen, B. [Syddansk Univ. (SDU), Odense (Denmark); Mahler Larsen, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Electrical Engineering, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)] [and others

    2013-01-15

    This road map is a result of part-recommendation no. 25 in 'MAIN REPORT - The Smart Grid Network's recommendations', written by the Smart Grid Network for the Danish Ministry of Climate, Energy and Building in October 2011. This part-recommendation states: ''Part-recommendation 25 - A road map for Smart Grid research, development and demonstration It is recommended that the electricity sector invite the Ministry to participate in the creation of a road map to ensure that solutions are implemented and coordinated with related policy areas. The sector should also establish a fast-acting working group with representatives from universities, distribution companies and the electric industry, in order to produce a mutual, binding schedule for the RDD of the Smart Grid in Denmark. Time prioritisation of part-recommendation: 2011-2012 Responsibility for implementation of part-recommendation: Universities, along with relevant electric-industry actors, should establish a working group for the completion of a consolidated road map by the end of 2012.'' In its work on this report, the Smart Grid Research Network has focused particularly on part-recommendations 26, 27 and 28 in 'MAIN REPORT - The Smart Grid Network's recommendations', which relate to strengthening and marketing the research infrastructure that will position Denmark as the global hub for Smart Grid development; strengthening basic research into the complex relationships in electric systems with large quantities of independent parties; and improved understanding of consumer behaviour and social economics. Naturally the work has spread to related areas along the way. The work has been conducted by the Smart Grid Research Network. (Author)

  11. The establishment of an attachment research network in Latin America: goals, accomplishments, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causadias, José M; Sroufe, L Alan; Herreros, Francisca

    2011-03-01

    In the face of a pressing need for expanded attachment research programs and attachment informed interventions in Latin America, a research network was established: Red Iberoamericana de Apego: RIA (Iberian-American Attachment Network). The purpose of RIA is to promote human development and well being, informed by attachment theory, centering on research, and with implications for public policies, education, and intervention. We report the proceedings of the second meeting of RIA held in Panama City, Panama, in February 2010. As part of this meeting, RIA sponsored the first Latin-American attachment conference. Proceedings of the conference are described, as are future goals of this new organization.

  12. Research Activity in Computational Physics utilizing High Performance Computing: Co-authorship Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sul-Ah; Jung, Youngim

    2016-10-01

    The research activities of the computational physicists utilizing high performance computing are analyzed by bibliometirc approaches. This study aims at providing the computational physicists utilizing high-performance computing and policy planners with useful bibliometric results for an assessment of research activities. In order to achieve this purpose, we carried out a co-authorship network analysis of journal articles to assess the research activities of researchers for high-performance computational physics as a case study. For this study, we used journal articles of the Scopus database from Elsevier covering the time period of 2004-2013. We extracted the author rank in the physics field utilizing high-performance computing by the number of papers published during ten years from 2004. Finally, we drew the co-authorship network for 45 top-authors and their coauthors, and described some features of the co-authorship network in relation to the author rank. Suggestions for further studies are discussed.

  13. Interest in Collaborative, Practice-Based Research Networks in Pediatric Refugee Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sural; Yun, Katherine

    2018-02-01

    Over the last decade, approximately 200,000 refugee children have resettled across the United States. This population is dispersed, resulting in limited data. Collaborative research networks, where clinicians across distinct practice sites work together to answer research questions, can improve the evidence base regarding clinical care. We distributed a web-based survey to pediatric refugee providers around North America to assess priorities, perceived barriers and benefits to collaborative research. We recruited 57 participants. Of respondents, 89 % were interested in collaborative research, prioritizing: (1) access to health care (33 %), (2) mental health (24 %) and (3) nutrition/growth (24 %). Perceived benefits were "improving clinical practice" (98 %) and "raising awareness about the needs of pediatric refugees" (94 %). Perceived barriers were "too many other priorities" (89 %) and "lack of funding for data entry" (78 %). There is widespread interest in collaborative networks around pediatric refugee healthcare. A successful network will address barriers and emphasize priorities.

  14. Networks of Neuroscientists: Professional Interactions within an Interdisciplinary Brain Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godley, Jenny; Sharkey, Keith A.; Weiss, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    This paper uses social network analysis to evaluate how the formation of an interdisciplinary brain research institute affected interaction and collaboration among neuroscientists at one Canadian university. The research institute, formed in 2004, has about 100 members representing ten different departments across the university campus. We…

  15. Social network utilization and the impact of academic research in marketing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenzweig, Stav; Grinstein, A.; Ofek, Elie

    2016-01-01

    The forces that drive the impact of academic research articles in the marketing discipline are of great interests to authors, editors, and the discipline's policy makers. A key understudied driver is social network utilization by academic researchers. In this paper, we examine how activating one's

  16. Implementing Mconf web conferencing at the South African National Research and Education Network

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Isaac, K

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available by the Brazilian National Research and Education Network (NREN), Rede Nacional de Ensino e Pesquisa (RNP). Mconf is a research collaboration tool that is web based and that can also be set up as a room based video conferencing system. It can be used for distance...

  17. The E-Business Research Network: summary of the results of the Dutch pilot survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van der Wiele (Ton); A.R.T. Williams (Roger); J.D. van Iwaarden (Jos); M. Wilson (Melanie); B.G. Dale (Barry)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractA project has been started with the intention to develop an E-Business Research Network on E-business related research in business and management. The initiative has been taken in co-operation between Erasmus University and UMIST to develop a project in which the first stage concerns the

  18. Understanding the Validity of Data: A Knowledge-Based Network Underlying Research Expertise in Scientific Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ros

    2016-01-01

    This article considers what might be taught to meet a widely held curriculum aim of students being able to understand research in a discipline. Expertise, which may appear as a "chain of practice," is widely held to be underpinned by networks of understanding. Scientific research expertise is considered from this perspective. Within…

  19. Qualitative Network Analysis Tools for the Configurative Articulation of Cultural Value and Impact from Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oancea, Alis; Florez Petour, Teresa; Atkinson, Jeanette

    2017-01-01

    This article introduces a methodological approach for articulating and communicating the impact and value of research: qualitative network analysis using collaborative configuration tracing and visualization. The approach was proposed initially in Oancea ("Interpretations and Practices of Research Impact across the Range of Disciplines…

  20. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...